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Sample records for cag repeat length

  1. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty;

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original resu...

  2. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty; Dumoulin, Christine; Ramos-Arroyo, Maria; Biunno, Ida; Bauer, Peter; Kline, Margaret; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original results from 121 laboratories across 15 countries. We report on 1326 duplicate results; a discrepancy in reporting the upper allele occurred in 51% of cases, this reduced to 13.3% and 9.7% when we applied acceptable measurement errors proposed by the American College of Medical Genetics and the Draft European Best Practice Guidelines, respectively. Duplicate results were available for 1250 lower alleles; discrepancies occurred in 40% of cases. Clinically significant discrepancies occurred in 4.0% of cases with a potential unexplained misdiagnosis rate of 0.3%. There was considerable variation in the discrepancy rate among 10 of the countries participating in this study. Out of 1326 samples, 348 were re-analysed by an accredited diagnostic laboratory, based in Germany, with concordance rates of 93% and 94% for the upper and lower alleles, respectively. This became 100% if the acceptable measurement errors were applied. The central laboratory correctly reported allele sizes for six standard reference samples, blind to the known result. Our study differs from external quality assessment (EQA) schemes in that these are duplicate results obtained from a large sample of patients across the whole diagnostic range. We strongly recommend that laboratories state an error rate for their measurement on the report, participate in EQA schemes and use reference materials regularly to adjust their own internal standards. PMID:21811303

  3. Size matters: Associations between the androgen receptor CAG repeat length and the intrafollicular hormone milieu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbo, T; Macek, M; Chrudimska, J;

    2015-01-01

    Granulosa cell (GC) expressed androgen receptors (AR) and intrafollicular androgens are central to fertility. The transactivating domain of the AR contains a polymorphic CAG repeat sequence, which is linked to the transcriptional activity of AR and may influence the GC function. This study aims to...... expression compared to medium CAG repeat lengths (P = 0.03). In conclusion, long CAG repeat lengths in the AR were associated to significant attenuated levels of androgens and an increased conversion of testosterone into oestradiol, in human small antral follicles....

  4. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length Is Associated With Body Fat and Serum SHBG in Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar;

    2013-01-01

    to evaluate associations between the AR (CAG)n polymorphism and development of pubic hair, levels of androgens, and body fat content in healthy boys. Methods: A longitudinal study of 78 healthy boys (age 6.2-12.4 years at inclusion) from the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study was conducted with clinical...... examinations and blood samples drawn every 6 months. The AR (CAG)n length was established by direct DNA sequencing and reproductive hormones were measured in serum by standardized analyses. Results: Median AR (CAG)n length was 22 (range, 17-30). Before puberty (at 10 years of age), boys with long CAG repeats...... (CAG ≥24) had lower levels of SHBG (88 vs 125 nmol/L) (P <.05) and a nonsignificant trend toward higher median skinfold thickness (41 vs 31 mm) (P = .06) compared with boys with an average number of CAG repeats (CAG 21-23). In contrast, the inverse association was observed at puberty (at 12 years of...

  5. Positive association of the androgen receptor CAG repeat length polymorphism with the risk of prostate cancer.

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    Paz-Y-Miño, César; Robles, Paulo; Salazar, Carolina; Leone, Paola E; García-Cárdenas, Jennyfer M; Naranjo, Manuel; López-Cortés, Andrés

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in Ecuador (15.6%). The androgen receptor gene codes for a protein that has an androgen‑binding domain, DNA‑binding domain and N‑terminal domain, which contains two polymorphic trinucleotide repeats (CAG and GGC). The aim of the present study was to determine whether variations in the number of repetitions of CAG and GGC are associated with the pathological features and the risk of developing PC. The polymorphic CAG and GGC repeat lengths in 108 mestizo patients with PC, 148 healthy mestizo individuals, and 78 healthy indigenous individuals were examined via a retrospective case‑control study. Genotypes were determined by genomic sequencing. The results demonstrated that patients with ≤21 CAG repeats have an increased risk of developing PC [odds ratio (OR)=2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.79‑5.01; P<0.001]. The presence of ≤21 CAG repeats was also associated with a tumor stage ≥T2c (OR=4.75; 95% CI=1.77‑12.72; P<0.005) and a Gleason score ≥7 (OR=2.9; 95% CI=1.1‑7.66; P=0.03). In addition, the combination of ≤21 CAG and ≥17 GGC repeats was associated with the risk of developing PC (OR=2.42; 95% CI=1.38‑4.25; P=0.002) and with tumor stage ≥T2c (OR=2.77; 95% CI=1.13‑6.79; P=0.02). In conclusion, the histopathological characteristics and PC risk in Ecuadorian indigenous and mestizo populations differs in association with the CAG repeats, and the combination of CAG and GGC repeats. PMID:27357524

  6. Genetic Association Between Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Length Polymorphism and Male Infertility: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bihui; Li, Rui; Chen, Yao; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Liping; Lu, Chuncheng; Pan, Feng; Ding, Hongjuan; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2016-03-01

    The association between polymorphism of androgen receptor gene CAG (AR-CAG) and male infertility in several studies was controversial. Based on studies on association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in recent years, an updated meta-analysis is needed. We aimed to evaluate the association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in advantage of the data in all published reports.We searched for reports published before August 2015 using PubMed, CNKI, VIP, and WanFang. Data on sample size, mean, and standard deviation (SD) of AR-CAG repeat length were extracted independently by 3 investigators.Forty-four reports were selected based on criteria. The overall infertile patients and azoospermic patients were found to have longer AR-CAG repeat length (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.28, P < 0.01; SMD = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.10-0.61, P < 0.01). AR-CAG repeat length was longer in infertile men in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races (SMD = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.08-0.43, P <0.01; SMD = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.02-0.25, P <0.05; SMD = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.15-0.63, P <0.01). The overall study shows that increased AR-CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility. The subgroup study on races shows that increased AR-CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races. Increased AR-CAG repeat length was also associated with azoospermia.This meta-analysis supports that increased androgen receptor CAG length is capable of causing male infertility susceptibility. PMID:26962784

  7. Androgen receptor CAG repeats length polymorphism and the risk of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS.

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    Singh Rajender

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS refers to an inheritable androgen excess disorder characterized by multiple small follicles located at the ovarian periphery. Hyperandrogenism in PCOS, and inverse correlation between androgen receptor (AR CAG numbers and AR function, led us to hypothesize that CAG length variations may affect PCOS risk. METHODS: CAG repeat region of 169 patients recruited following strictly defined Rotterdam (2003 inclusion criteria and that of 175 ethnically similar control samples, were analyzed. We also conducted a meta-analysis on the data taken from published studies, to generate a pooled estimate on 2194 cases and 2242 controls. RESULTS: CAG bi-allelic mean length was between 8.5 and 24.5 (mean = 17.43, SD = 2.43 repeats in the controls and between 11 and 24 (mean = 17.39, SD = 2.29 repeats in the cases, without any significant difference between the two groups. Further, comparison of bi-allelic mean and its frequency distribution in three categories (short, moderate and long alleles did not show any significant difference between controls and various case subgroups. Frequency distribution of bi-allelic mean in two categories (extreme and moderate alleles showed over-representation of extreme sized alleles in the cases with marginally significant value (50.3% vs. 61.5%, χ(2 = 4.41; P = 0.036, which turned insignificant upon applying Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. X-chromosome inactivation analysis showed no significant difference in the inactivation pattern of CAG alleles or in the comparison of weighed bi-allelic mean between cases and controls. Meta-analysis also showed no significant correlation between CAG length and PCOS risk, except a minor over-representation of short CAG alleles in the cases. CONCLUSION: CAG bi-allelic mean length did not differ between controls and cases/case sub-groups nor did the allele distribution. Over-representation of short

  8. Relationships among androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in Han adult men from China:a cross-sectional study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanMin Ma; DaLin He; KaiJie Wu; Liang Ning; Jin Zeng; Bo Kou; HongJun Xie; ZhenKun Ma; XinYang Wang; YongGuang Gong

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlations among androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in healthy Chinese young adult men. Two hundred and iffty-three healthy men (aged 22.8 ± 3.1 years) were enrolled. The individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAGS) if they harbored repeat length of≤20 or as CAG long (CAGL) if their CAG repeat length was>20. Body height/weight, penile length and other parameters were examined and recorded by the speciifed physicians;CAG repeat polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method;and the serum levels of the sex hormones were detected by radioimmunoassay. Student’s t-test or linear regression analysis was used to assess the associations among AR CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length. This investigation showed that the serum total testosterone (T) level was positively associated with the AR CAG repeat length (P= 0.01); whereas, no signiifcant correlation of T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism with the penile length was found (P= 0.593). Interestingly, an inverse association was observed between serum prolactin (PRL) levels and penile length by linear regression analyses (b=-0.024, P= 0.039, 95%conifdence interval (CI):-0.047, 0). Collectively, this study provides the ifrst evidence that serum PRL, but not T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism, is correlated with penile length in the Han adult population from northwestern China.

  9. Undermasculinized genitalia in a boy with an abnormally expanded CAG repeat length in the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, T; Muroya, K; Ishii, T; Suzuki, Y; Nakada, T; Sasagawa, I

    2001-06-01

    We report an 11-year-old boy with undermasculinized genitalia and an abnormally expanded CAG repeat length at exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. He had microphallus and scrotal hypospadias with chordee, and underwent urethroplasty at 4 years of age. At 11 years of age, a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) test yielded a relatively high leutinizing hormone (LH) response (0.7-->20.4 IU/l) and a relatively low follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) response (1.7-->4.8 IU/l), and an human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test showed sufficient responses of testosterone (0.7-->23.0 nmol/l) and dihydrotestosterone (0.38-->2.95 nmol/l). The CAG repeat length was 44 for the boy and ranged from 12 to 32 for 100 control males. The DNA sequences of the AR gene were normal for the exons 1-8 and for the splice donor, splice acceptor and branch sites. The markedly expanded CAG repeat length appears to be relevant to the undermasculinized genitalia of this boy, because such an expandsion, which has previously been reported only in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is known to reduce AR function. PMID:11422120

  10. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

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    Saeid Reza Khatami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The androgen receptor (AR gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (NTAD. We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12 of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdeletions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12 patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26 and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25 in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%, while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%. Conclusion: Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran.

  11. Non-linear association between androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeat lengths and reproductive parameters in fertile European and Inuit men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokken, L J S; Rylander, L; Jönsson, B A;

    2013-01-01

    Recently the dogma that there is an inverse linear association between androgen receptor (AR) CAG and GGN polymorphisms and receptor activity has been challenged. We analysed the pattern of association between 21 male reproductive phenotypes and AR CAG/GGN repeat lengths in 557 proven-fertile men...

  12. ATXN2 with intermediate-length CAG/CAA repeats does not seem to be a risk factor in hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Svenstrup, Kirsten; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben;

    2012-01-01

    degeneration with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), since TDP-43 positive inclusions have recently been found in an HSP subtype, and TDP-43 are found in abundance in pathological inclusions of both ALS and FTD-MND. Furthermore, ataxin-2 (encoded by the gene ATXN2), a polyglutamine containing protein elongated in...... spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, has been shown to be a modulator of TDP-43 induced toxicity in ALS animal and cell models. Finally, it has been shown that ATXN2 with non-pathogenic intermediate-length CAG/CAA repeat elongations (encoding the polyglutamine tract) is a genetic risk factor of ALS. Considering the...

  13. Intermediate CAG repeat lengths (53,54) for MJD/SCA3 are associated with an abnormal phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alfen, N; Sinke, R J; Zwarts, M J; Gabreëls-Festen, A; Praamstra, P; Kremer, B P; Horstink, M W

    2001-01-01

    We report on a Dutch family in which 4 members in 2 generations have intermediate repeat lengths (53 and 54) for Machado-Joseph Disease/Spinocerebellar Ataxia (MJD/SCA3). All but the youngest have a restless legs syndrome with fasciculations and a sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Central neurolog

  14. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, J-M; Ramos, E M; Lee, J-H; Gillis, T; Mysore, J S; Hayden, M R; Warby, S C; Morrison, P; Nance, M; Ross, C A; Margolis, R L; Squitieri, F; Orobello, S; Di Donato, S; Gomez-Tortosa, E; Ayuso, C; Suchowersky, O; Trent, R J A; McCusker, E; Novelletto, A; Frontali, M; Jones, R; Ashizawa, T; Frank, S; Saint-Hilaire, M H; Hersch, S M; Rosas, H D; Lucente, D; Harrison, M B; Zanko, A; Abramson, R K; Marder, K; Sequeiros, J; Paulsen, J S; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Myers, R H; MacDonald, M E; Gusella, J F; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich; Nørremølle, Anne; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik

    2012-01-01

    Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound...

  15. Androgen receptor polymorphism (CAG repeats) and androgenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, D; Caglieresi, C; Moschini, C; Liberati, C D; Macchia, E; Pinchera, A; Martino, E

    2005-09-01

    Objective Polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) has been related to various pathophysiological conditions, such as osteoporosis and infertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of distribution in a normal Italian population and to assess CAG repeats (CAGr) in other conditions, such as hypoandrogenism, potentially influenced by AR polymorphism. Patients and measurements CAGr polymorphism was determined in a group of 91 healthy normoandrogenized subjects, 29 hypoandrogenized patients (hypoplasia of prostate and seminal vesicles, reduced beard or body hair, etc.) and 29 infertile patients by direct sequencing. Results The mean (+/- SD) number of CAG repeats [(CAGr)n] was 21.5 (+/- 1.7) in the control group, 21.4 (+/- 2.0) in the infertile patients and 24.0 (+/- 2.9) in the hypoandrogenic males. The difference was statistically significant between this last group and the other two (P CAGr repeats was 38% among hypoandrogenized patients, 7% among infertile patients and 5% among the control group. In hypoandrogenized subjects (CAGr)n correlated slightly with testis and prostate volume. The number of CAG repeats was not associated with any of the hormonal parameters, including testosterone, evaluated in the three groups. Conclusions Our normal population, representing subjects from Central Italy, is superimposable on other European populations with regard to (CAGr)n distribution. Hypoandrogenic males have a shift in the frequency distribution towards longer (CAGr)n. Infertile patients are not statistically different from the control group. These findings suggest that, given the same amount of circulating testosterone, as in our hypoandrogenized and control group, the final net androgenic phenotypical effect is due to AR polymorphism. PMID:16117826

  16. A pathogenic mechanism in Huntington's disease involves small CAG-repeated RNAs with neurotoxic activity.

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    Mónica Bañez-Coronel

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT gene. The abnormally extended polyglutamine in the HTT protein encoded by the CAG repeats has toxic effects. Here, we provide evidence to support that the mutant HTT CAG repeats interfere with cell viability at the RNA level. In human neuronal cells, expanded HTT exon-1 mRNA with CAG repeat lengths above the threshold for complete penetrance (40 or greater induced cell death and increased levels of small CAG-repeated RNAs (sCAGs, of ≈21 nucleotides in a Dicer-dependent manner. The severity of the toxic effect of HTT mRNA and sCAG generation correlated with CAG expansion length. Small RNAs obtained from cells expressing mutant HTT and from HD human brains significantly decreased neuronal viability, in an Ago2-dependent mechanism. In both cases, the use of anti-miRs specific for sCAGs efficiently blocked the toxic effect, supporting a key role of sCAGs in HTT-mediated toxicity. Luciferase-reporter assays showed that expanded HTT silences the expression of CTG-containing genes that are down-regulated in HD. These results suggest a possible link between HD and sCAG expression with an aberrant activation of the siRNA/miRNA gene silencing machinery, which may trigger a detrimental response. The identification of the specific cellular processes affected by sCAGs may provide insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HD, offering opportunities to develop new therapeutic approaches.

  17. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

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    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1. PMID:27382061

  18. Unusual structures are present in DNA fragments containing super-long Huntingtin CAG repeats.

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    Daniel Duzdevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD, expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat length beyond about 300 repeats induces a novel phenotype associated with a reduction in transcription of the transgene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the structure of polymerase chain reaction (PCR-generated DNA containing up to 585 CAG repeats using atomic force microscopy (AFM. As the number of CAG repeats increased, an increasing proportion of the DNA molecules exhibited unusual structural features, including convolutions and multiple protrusions. At least some of these features are hairpin loops, as judged by cross-sectional analysis and sensitivity to cleavage by mung bean nuclease. Single-molecule force measurements showed that the convoluted DNA was very resistant to untangling. In vitro replication by PCR was markedly reduced, and TseI restriction enzyme digestion was also hindered by the abnormal DNA structures. However, significantly, the DNA gained sensitivity to cleavage by the Type III restriction-modification enzyme, EcoP15I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: "Super-long" CAG repeats are found in a number of neurological diseases and may also appear through CAG repeat instability. We suggest that unusual DNA structures associated with super-long CAG repeats decrease transcriptional efficiency in vitro. We also raise the possibility that if these structures occur in vivo, they may play a role in the aetiology of CAG repeat diseases such as HD.

  19. In Vitro Expansion of CAG, CAA, and Mixed CAG/CAA Repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Figura; Edyta Koscianska; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington’s disease and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias, are caused by expanded CAG repeats that are located in translated sequences of individual, functionally-unrelated genes. Only mutant proteins containing polyglutamine expansions have long been thought to be pathogenic, but recent evidence has implicated mutant transcripts containing long CAG repeats in pathogenic processes. The presence of two pathogenic factors prompted us to attempt to distinguis...

  20. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective...

  1. How strong is the association between CAG and GGN repeat length polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene and prostate cancer risk?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Nieder, A.M.; Ostrer, H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although narrative reviews have suggested an association between (CAG)n and (GGN)n polymorphisms in the AR gene and prostate cancer, it has never been quantified systematically. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to provide relative and absolute quantitative summary estimates with suff

  2. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-M.; Ramos, E.M.; Lee, J.-H.; Gillis, T.; Mysore, J.S.; Hayden, M.R.; Warby, S.C.; Morrison, P.; Nance, M.; Ross, C.A.; Margolis, R.L.; Squitieri, F.; Orobello, S.; Di Donato, S.; Gomez-Tortosa, E.; Ayuso, C.; Suchowersky, O.; Trent, R.J.A.; McCusker, E.; Novelletto, A.; Frontali, M.; Jones, R.; Ashizawa, T.; Frank, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M.H.; Hersch, S.M.; Rosas, H.D.; Lucente, D.; Harrison, M.B.; Zanko, A.; Abramson, R.K.; Marder, K.; Sequeiros, J.; Paulsen, J.S.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Myers, R.H.; MacDonald, M.E.; Durr, Alexandra; Rosenblatt, Adam; Frati, Luigi; Perlman, Susan; Conneally, Patrick M.; Klimek, Mary Lou; Diggin, Melissa; Hadzi, Tiffany; Duckett, Ayana; Ahmed, Anwar; Allen, Paul; Ames, David; Anderson, Christine; Anderson, Karla; Anderson, Karen; Andrews, Thomasin; Ashburner, John; Axelson, Eric; Aylward, Elizabeth; Barker, Roger A.; Barth, Katrin; Barton, Stacey; Baynes, Kathleen; Bea, Alexandra; Beall, Erik; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Biglan, Kevin; Bjork, Kristine; Blanchard, Steve; Bockholt, Jeremy; Bommu, Sudharshan Reddy; Brossman, Bradley; Burrows, Maggie; Calhoun, Vince; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chesire, Amy; Chiu, Edmond; Chua, Phyllis; Connell, R.J.; Connor, Carmela; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Craufurd, David; Cross, Stephen; Cysique, Lucette; Santos, Rachelle Dar; Davis, Jennifer; Decolongon, Joji; DiPietro, Anna; Doucette, Nicholas; Downing, Nancy; Dudler, Ann; Dunn, Steve; Ecker, Daniel; Epping, Eric A.; Erickson, Diane; Erwin, Cheryl; Evans, Ken; Factor, Stewart A.; Farias, Sarah; Fatas, Marta; Fiedorowicz, Jess; Fullam, Ruth; Furtado, Sarah; Garde, Monica Bascunana; Gehl, Carissa; Geschwind, Michael D.; Goh, Anita; Gooblar, Jon; Goodman, Anna; Griffith, Jane; Groves, Mark; Guttman, Mark; Hamilton, Joanne; Harrington, Deborah; Harris, Greg; Heaton, Robert K.; Helmer, Karl; Henneberry, Machelle; Hershey, Tamara; Herwig, Kelly; Howard, Elizabeth; Hunter, Christine; Jankovic, Joseph; Johnson, Hans; Johnson, Arik; Jones, Kathy; Juhl, Andrew; Kim, Eun Young; Kimble, Mycah; King, Pamela; Klimek, Mary Lou; Klöppel, Stefan; Koenig, Katherine; Komiti, Angela; Kumar, Rajeev; Langbehn, Douglas; Leavitt, Blair; Leserman, Anne; Lim, Kelvin; Lipe, Hillary; Lowe, Mark; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Mallonee, William M.; Mans, Nicole; Marietta, Jacquie; Marshall, Frederick; Martin, Wayne; Mason, Sarah; Matheson, Kirsty; Matson, Wayne; Mazzoni, Pietro; McDowell, William; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Miller, Michael; Mills, James; Miracle, Dawn; Montross, Kelsey; Moore, David; Mori, Sasumu; Moser, David J.; Moskowitz, Carol; Newman, Emily; Nopoulos, Peg; Novak, Marianne; O'Rourke, Justin; Oakes, David; Ondo, William; Orth, Michael; Panegyres, Peter; Pease, Karen; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Peterson, Asa; Phillips, Michael; Pierson, Ron; Potkin, Steve; Preston, Joy; Quaid, Kimberly; Radtke, Dawn; Rae, Daniela; Rao, Stephen; Raymond, Lynn; Reading, Sarah; Ready, Rebecca; Reece, Christine; Reilmann, Ralf; Reynolds, Norm; Richardson, Kylie; Rickards, Hugh; Ro, Eunyoe; Robinson, Robert; Rodnitzky, Robert; Rogers, Ben; Rosenblatt, Adam; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Price, Kathy; Price, Kathy; Ryan, Pat; Salmon, David; Samii, Ali; Schumacher, Jamy; Schumacher, Jessica; Sendon, Jose Luis Lópenz; Shear, Paula; Sheinberg, Alanna; Shpritz, Barnett; Siedlecki, Karen; Simpson, Sheila A.; Singer, Adam; Smith, Jim; Smith, Megan; Smith, Glenn; Snyder, Pete; Song, Allen; Sran, Satwinder; Stephan, Klaas; Stober, Janice; Sü?muth, Sigurd; Suter, Greg; Tabrizi, Sarah; Tempkin, Terry; Testa, Claudia; Thompson, Sean; Thomsen, Teri; Thumma, Kelli; Toga, Arthur; Trautmann, Sonja; Tremont, Geoff; Turner, Jessica; Uc, Ergun; Vaccarino, Anthony; van Duijn, Eric; Van Walsem, Marleen; Vik, Stacie; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Vuletich, Elizabeth; Warner, Tom; Wasserman, Paula; Wassink, Thomas; Waterman, Elijah; Weaver, Kurt; Weir, David; Welsh, Claire; Werling-Witkoske, Chris; Wesson, Melissa; Westervelt, Holly; Weydt, Patrick; Wheelock, Vicki; Williams, Kent; Williams, Janet; Wodarski, Mary; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Wood, Jessica; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Wu, Shuhua; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Zhao, Yong Qiang; Zimbelman, Janice; Zschiegner, Roland; Aaserud, Olaf; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Andrews, Thomasin; Andrich, Jurgin; Antczak, Jakub; Arran, Natalie; Artiga, Maria J. Saiz; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Banaszkiewicz, Krysztof; di Poggio, Monica Bandettini; Bandmann, Oliver; Barbera, Miguel A.; Barker, Roger A.; Barrero, Francisco; Barth, Katrin; Bas, Jordi; Beister, Antoine; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Bertini, Elisabetta; Biunno, Ida; Bjørgo, Kathrine; Bjørnevoll, Inga

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. Methods: We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. Results: An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Conclusions: Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors. Neurology® 2012;78:690–695 PMID:22323755

  3. Nuclear speckles are detention centers for transcripts containing expanded CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Jazurek, Magdalena; Switonski, Pawel M; Figura, Grzegorz; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-09-01

    The human genetic disorders caused by CAG repeat expansions in the translated sequences of various genes are called polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases because of the cellular "toxicity" of the mutant proteins. The contribution of mutant transcripts to the pathogenesis of these diseases is supported by several observations obtained from cellular models of these disorders. Here, we show that the common feature of cell lines modeling polyQ diseases is the formation of nuclear CAG RNA foci. We performed qualitative and quantitative analyses of these foci in numerous cellular models endogenously and exogenously expressing mutant transcripts by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We compared the CAG RNA foci of polyQ diseases with the CUG foci of myotonic dystrophy type 1 and found substantial differences in their number and morphology. Smaller differences within the polyQ disease group were also revealed and included a positive correlation between the foci number and the CAG repeat length. We show that expanded CAA repeats, also encoding glutamine, did not trigger RNA foci formation and foci formation is independent of the presence of mutant polyglutamine protein. Using FISH combined with immunofluorescence, we demonstrated partial co-localization of CAG repeat foci with MBNL1 alternative splicing factor, which explains the mild deregulation of MBNL1-dependent genes. We also showed that foci reside within nuclear speckles in diverse cell types: fibroblasts, lymphoblasts, iPS cells and neuronal progenitors and remain dependent on integrity of these nuclear structures. PMID:27239700

  4. Anthropometry in Klinefelter syndrome - multifactorial influences due to CAG length, testosterone treatment and possibly intrauterine hypogonadism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Simon; Skakkebæk, Anne; Trolle, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    .47)(p<0.02 for all), as well as total fat mass (0.74), abdominal fat mass (0.67) and total body fat percentage (0.84) was increased in KS males (p<0.001 for all), while bitesticular volume was reduced (4.6). AR CAG repeat length was comparable in KS and controls, and among KS CAG correlated to arm...... body composition in KS and relate findings to biochemistry and X-chromosome related genetic markers. Design, setting and participants: 73 KS males referred to our clinic and 73 age-matched controls underwent comprehensive measurements of anthropometry and body composition in a cross-sectional, case......-controlled study. Furthermore, genetic analysis for parental origin of the supernumerary X-chromosome, skewed X-chromosome inactivation and androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat length was done. Main outcome measure: Anthropometry and body composition in KS and the effect of genotype hereon. Results: KS males were...

  5. Single cell analysis reveals gametic and tissue-specific instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, S.S.; McCall, A.E.; Cota, J. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p22-23. We performed a comparative analysis of the SCA1 CAG repeat from blood and sperm of an affected male. Genomic amplification revealed a broader smear of the SCA1 allele product from sperm compared to that from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). To resolve this observed difference, we analyzed single sperm directly and demonstrate that the SCA1 allele in PBL is also heterogeneous, although the range of variability in allele sizes is much less than that observed in sperm. Limited genome analysis was also performed on PBL DNA from an unaffected individual with an upper normal allele of 36 repeats in parallel with an affected individual with an expanded allele of 40 repeats. The 36 repeat normal allele, which contains a CAT interruption, was completely stable compared to the uninterrupted repeat of the SCA1 allele, demonstrating a direct correlation between absence of a CAT interruption and somatic instability of the repeat. We also analyzed the size of the CAG repeat in tissues derived from various brain regions from a patient with juvenile-onset disease to determine if the size of the expansion correlated with the site of neuropathology. The results clearly show tissue-specific differences in mosaicism of repeat length. More importantly, the pattern of tissue-specific differences in repeat-length mosaicism in SCA1 within the brain parallels those seen in Huntington disease. In both disorders the expanded alleles are smaller in cerebellar tissue. These results suggest that the observed tissue-specific differences in instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat, either within the brain or between blood and sperm, are a function of the intracellular milieu or the intrinsic replicative potential of the various celltypes.

  6. Association analysis of a highly polymorphic CAG Repeat in the human potassium channel gene KCNN3 and migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovcaric Mick

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a polygenic multifactorial disease, possessing environmental and genetic causative factors with multiple involved genes. Mutations in various ion channel genes are responsible for a number of neurological disorders. KCNN3 is a neuronal small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel gene that contains two polyglutamine tracts, encoded by polymorphic CAG repeats in the gene. This gene plays a critical role in determining the firing pattern of neurons and acts to regulate intracellular calcium channels. Methods The present association study tested whether length variations in the second (more 3' polymorphic CAG repeat in exon 1 of the KCNN3 gene, are involved in susceptibility to migraine with and without aura (MA and MO. In total 423 DNA samples from unrelated individuals, of which 202 consisted of migraine patients and 221 non-migraine controls, were genotyped and analysed using a fluorescence labelled primer set on an ABI310 Genetic Analyzer. Allele frequencies were calculated from observed genotype counts for the KCNN3 polymorphism. Analysis was performed using standard contingency table analysis, incorporating the chi-squared test of independence and CLUMP analysis. Results Overall, there was no convincing evidence that KCNN3 CAG lengths differ between Caucasian migraineurs and controls, with no significant difference in the allelic length distribution of CAG repeats between the population groups (P = 0.090. Also the MA and MO subtypes did not differ significantly between control allelic distributions (P > 0.05. The prevalence of the long CAG repeat (>19 repeats did not reach statistical significance in migraineurs (P = 0.15, nor was there a significant difference between the MA and MO subgroups observed compared to controls (P = 0.46 and P = 0.09, respectively, or between MA vs MO (P = 0.40. Conclusion This association study provides no evidence that length variations of the second polyglutamine array in

  7. CAG repeats determine brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia 17: a VBM study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Reetz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal repeat length has been associated with an earlier age of onset and more severe disease progression in the rare neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether specific structural brain degeneration and rate of disease progression in SCA17 might be associated with the CAG repeat size, observer-independent voxel-based morphometry was applied to high-resolution magnetic resonance images of 16 patients with SCA17 and 16 age-matched healthy controls. The main finding contrasting SCA17 patients with healthy controls demonstrated atrophy in the cerebellum bilaterally. Multiple regression analyses with available genetic data and also post-hoc correlations revealed an inverse relationship again with cerebellar atrophy. Moreover, we found an inverse relationship between the CAG repeat length and rate of disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: Our results highlight the fundamental role of the cerebellum in this neurodegenerative disease and support the genotype-phenotype relationship in SCA17 patients. Genetic factors may determine individual susceptibility to neurodegeneration and rate of disease progression.

  8. Problems and solutions for the analysis of somatic CAG repeat expansion and their relationship to Huntington's disease toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budworth, Helen; McMurray, Cynthia T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Huntington's Disease is caused by inheritance of a single disease-length allele harboring an expanded CAG repeat, which continues to expand in somatic tissues with age. Whether somatic expansion contributed to toxicity was unknown. From extensive work from multiple laboratories, it has been made clear that toxicity depended on length of the inherited allele, but whether preventing or delaying somatic repeat expansion in vivo would be beneficial was unknown, since the inherited disease allele was still expressed. In Budworth et al., we provided definitive evidence that suppressing the somatic expansion in mice substantially delays disease onset in littermates that inherit the same disease-length allele. This key discovery opens the door for therapeutic approaches targeted at stopping or shortening the CAG tract during life. The analysis was difficult and, at times, non-standard. Here, we take the opportunity to discuss the challenges, the analytical solutions, and to address some controversial issues with respect to expansion biology.

  9. The DRPLA CAG repeats in an Italian population sample: evaluation of the polymorphism for forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelotti, S; Mantovani, V; Esposti, P D; D'Apote, L; Bragliani, M; Maiolini, E; Abbondanza, A; Pappalardo, G

    1998-03-01

    The DRPLA CAG repeats polymorphism has been studied in an Italian population sample. PCR amplification, manual PAGE and silver staining were employed. A total of 16 different alleles, spanning the range from 5 to 21 CAG triplettes, was observed. The heterozygosity was 0.81 and no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was found 81 meioses from parentage testing were also analyzed and a Mendelian pattern of inheritance was observed in all cases. In addition, we could successfully type DRPLA locus in some forensic specimens, 1 ng of DNA allowing clear definition of alleles. The authors conclude that the DRPLA CAG repeats analysis may be useful for forensic applications. PMID:9544554

  10. The impact of the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene on muscle and adipose tissues in 20-29-year-old Danish men: Odense Androgen Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2010-01-01

    The number of CAG repeats (CAG(n)) within the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene correlates inversely with the transactivation of the receptor.......The number of CAG repeats (CAG(n)) within the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene correlates inversely with the transactivation of the receptor....

  11. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Tomé

    Full Text Available Expansions of trinucleotide CAG/CTG repeats in somatic tissues are thought to contribute to ongoing disease progression through an affected individual's life with Huntington's disease or myotonic dystrophy. Broad ranges of repeat instability arise between individuals with expanded repeats, suggesting the existence of modifiers of repeat instability. Mice with expanded CAG/CTG repeats show variable levels of instability depending upon mouse strain. However, to date the genetic modifiers underlying these differences have not been identified. We show that in liver and striatum the R6/1 Huntington's disease (HD (CAG∼100 transgene, when present in a congenic C57BL/6J (B6 background, incurred expansion-biased repeat mutations, whereas the repeat was stable in a congenic BALB/cByJ (CBy background. Reciprocal congenic mice revealed the Msh3 gene as the determinant for the differences in repeat instability. Expansion bias was observed in congenic mice homozygous for the B6 Msh3 gene on a CBy background, while the CAG tract was stabilized in congenics homozygous for the CBy Msh3 gene on a B6 background. The CAG stabilization was as dramatic as genetic deficiency of Msh2. The B6 and CBy Msh3 genes had identical promoters but differed in coding regions and showed strikingly different protein levels. B6 MSH3 variant protein is highly expressed and associated with CAG expansions, while the CBy MSH3 variant protein is expressed at barely detectable levels, associating with CAG stability. The DHFR protein, which is divergently transcribed from a promoter shared by the Msh3 gene, did not show varied levels between mouse strains. Thus, naturally occurring MSH3 protein polymorphisms are modifiers of CAG repeat instability, likely through variable MSH3 protein stability. Since evidence supports that somatic CAG instability is a modifier and predictor of disease, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that variable levels of CAG instability associated with

  12. Searching for association of the CAG repeat polymorphism in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma gene (POLG) with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkowska, Katarzyna; Jawień, Arkadiusz; Marszałek, Andrzej; Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) is the only DNA polymerase involved in maintaining the mitochondrial genome. Recent studies demonstrated an association of CAG repeat polymorphism in the second exon of POLG gene with the risk of cancer. We investigated the CAG repeat variability in the POLG gene in tumor and non-tumor tissues from colorectal cancer patients and in DNA samples isolated from blood obtained from age-matched healthy persons. Somatically occuring CAG-repeat alterations in cancer tissues have been observed in 10% of patients, but no association has been found between the CAG repeat variants in the POLG gene and colorectal cancer risk. PMID:26317126

  13. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Polymorphism and Epigenetic Influence among the South Indian Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpi Dasgupta; Pisapati V S Sirisha; Kudugunti Neelaveni; Kathragadda Anuradha; Alla G Reddy; Kumarasamy Thangaraj; B Mohan Reddy

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the role of androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism and X chromosome inactivation (XCI) pattern among Indian PCOS women and controls which has not been hitherto explored and also to test the hypothesis that shorter CAG alleles would be preferentially activated in PCOS. CAG repeat polymorphism and X chromosome methylation patterns were compared between PCOS and non-PCOS women. 250 PCOS women and 299 controls were included for this study. Androgen r...

  14. Counting CAG repeats in the Huntington’s disease gene by restriction endonuclease EcoP15I cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Moencke-Buchner, E.; Reich, S.; Muecke, M.; M. Reuter; Messer, W; Wanker, E E; Krueger, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance. The disease is caused by a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion located in the first exon of the HD gene. The CAG repeat is highly polymorphic and varies from 6 to 37 repeats on chromosomes of unaffected individuals and from more than 30 to 180 repeats on chromosomes of HD patients. In this study, we show that the number of CAG repeats in the HD gene can be determined by restriction of the...

  15. Meta-analysis of relationship between androgen receptor CAG repeats length polymorphism and the polycystic ovary syndrome%雄激素受体(CAG)n基因多态性与多囊卵巢综合征相关性的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余瑞梅; 邱娜璇; 陈春敏

    2015-01-01

    目的 评价雄激素受体(androgen receptor,AR) (CAG)n基因多态性与多囊卵巢综合征(polycystic ovary syndrome,PCOS)易感性的相关性.方法 检索Pubmed、Embase、CNKI、VIP、万方数据库,英文检索词为androgen receptor,polycystic ovarian syndrome,中文检索词为雄激素受体和多囊卵巢综合征,收集有关AR (CAG)n基因多态性与PCOS易感性的病例对照研究,进行Meta分析.结果 共纳入12篇文献,PCOS组1 697例,对照组(健康女性)1 984例.Meta分析结果显示,PCOS组与对照组间AR (CAG)n重复序列长度比较,差异无统计学意义[标准化均数差(SMD)=-0.05,95%CI:-0.19~0.08,P=0.440].PCOS患者中,高雄激素血症(hyperandrogenism,HA)患者与非HA患者间AR (CAG)n重复序列长度比较,差异无统计学意义(SMD=0.56,95%CI:-0.13~1.25,P=0.110).结论 AR (CAG)n基因多态性可能与P-COS及其并发的高雄激素血症的发生无关联.

  16. Continuous and periodic expansion of CAG repeats in Huntington's disease R6/1 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Møllersen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats in a coding gene. Somatic CAG expansion rates in HD vary between organs, and the greatest instability is observed in the brain, correlating with neuropathology. The fundamental mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability are poorly understood, but locally formed secondary DNA structures generated during replication and/or repair are believed to underlie triplet repeat expansion. Recent studies in HD mice have demonstrated that mismatch repair (MMR and base excision repair (BER proteins are expansion inducing components in brain tissues. This study was designed to simultaneously investigate the rates and modes of expansion in different tissues of HD R6/1 mice in order to further understand the expansion mechanisms in vivo. We demonstrate continuous small expansions in most somatic tissues (exemplified by tail, which bear the signature of many short, probably single-repeat expansions and contractions occurring over time. In contrast, striatum and cortex display a dramatic--and apparently irreversible--periodic expansion. Expansion profiles displaying this kind of periodicity in the expansion process have not previously been reported. These in vivo findings imply that mechanistically distinct expansion processes occur in different tissues.

  17. Novel BAC mouse model of Huntington’s disease with 225 CAG repeats exhibits an early widespread and stable degenerative phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Bichell, Terry Jo; Soares, Barbara D.; Loth, Meredith K.; McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Alikhan, Fatima S.; Hua, Kegang; Coughlin, Jennifer M.; Holt, Hunter K.; Jetter, Christopher S.; Mori, Susumu; Pomper, Martin G.; Osmand, Alexander P.; Guilarte, Tomás R.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unusually large CAG repeat expansions (>60) in exon one of Huntingtin (HTT) are invariably associated with a juvenile-onset form of Huntington’s disease (HD), characterized by a more extensive and rapidly progressing neuropathology than the more prevalent adult-onset form. However, existing mouse models of HD that express the full-length Htt gene with CAG repeat lengths associated with juvenile HD (ranging between ~75 to ~150 repeats in published models) exhibit selective neurodegenerative phenotypes more consistent with adult-onset HD. OBJECTIVE To determine if a very large CAG repeat (>200) in full-length Htt elicits neurodegenerative phenotypes consistent with juvenile HD. METHODS Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated mice expressing full-length mouse Htt with ~225 CAG repeats under control of the mouse Htt promoter. Mice were characterized using behavioral, neuropathological, biochemical and brain imaging methods. RESULTS BAC-225Q mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with a subset of features seen in juvenile-onset HD: very early motor behavior abnormalities, reduced body weight, widespread and progressive increase in Htt aggregates, gliosis, and neurodegeneration. Early striatal pathology was observed, including reactive gliosis and loss of dopamine receptors, prior to detectable volume loss. HD-related blood markers of impaired energy metabolism and systemic inflammation were also increased. Aside from an age-dependent progression of diffuse nuclear aggregates at 6 months of age to abundant neuropil aggregates at 12 months of age, other pathological and motor phenotypes showed little to no progression. CONCLUSIONS The HD phenotypes present in animals 3 to 12 months of age make the BAC-225Q mice a unique and stable model of full-length mutant Htt associated phenotypes, including body weight loss, behavioral impairment and HD-like neurodegenerative phenotypes characteristic of juvenile-onset HD and/or late-stage adult

  18. Replication Stalling and Heteroduplex Formation within CAG/CTG Trinucleotide Repeats by Mismatch Repair

    KAUST Repository

    Viterbo, David

    2016-03-16

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded.

  19. No effects of androgen receptor gene CAG and GGC repeat polymorphisms on digit ratio (2D:4D): Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Voracek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A series of meta-analyses assessed whether differentially efficacious variants (CAG and GGC repeat-length polymorphisms) of the human androgen receptor gene are associated with digit ratio (2D:4D), a widely investigated putative pointer to prenatal androgen action. Methods: Extensive literature search strategies identified a maximum of 16 samples (total N = 2157) eligible for meta-analysis. Results: In contrast to a small-sample (N = 50) initial report, widely cited affirmatively ...

  20. Unstable expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat in MAB21L1: report of a second pedigree and effect on protein expression

    OpenAIRE

    Margolis, R.; Stine, O; Ward, C.; Franz, M.; Rosenblatt, A; Callahan, C; Sherr, M.; Ross, C; Potter, N.

    1999-01-01

    MAB21L1, originally termed CAGR1, is the human homologue of the C elegans cell fate determining gene mab21. MAB21L1, mapped to 13q13, contains a highly polymorphic 5' untranslated CAG repeat that normally ranges from six to 31 triplets in length. A pedigree has been previously reported in which the repeat length is expanded to 45-50 triplets and is transmitted unstably between generations; the expansion did not correlate to a clinical phenotype but did exhibit somatic mosaicism. We now report...

  1. The androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism and modification of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene exon 1 CAG repeat polymorphism encodes a string of 9–32 glutamines. Women with germline BRCA1 mutations who carry at least one AR allele with 28 or more repeats have been reported to have an earlier age at onset of breast cancer. A total of 604 living female Australian and British BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers from 376 families were genotyped for the AR CAG repeat polymorphism. The association between AR genotype and disease risk was assessed using Cox regression. AR genotype was analyzed as a dichotomous covariate using cut-points previously reported to be associated with increased risk among BRCA1 mutation carriers, and as a continuous variable considering smaller allele, larger allele and average allele size. There was no evidence that the AR CAG repeat polymorphism modified disease risk in the 376 BRCA1 or 219 BRCA2 mutation carriers screened successfully. The rate ratio associated with possession of at least one allele with 28 or more CAG repeats was 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.42–1.29; P = 0.3) for BRCA1 carriers, and 1.12 (95% confidence interval 0.55–2.25; P = 0.8) for BRCA2 carriers. The AR exon 1 CAG repeat polymorphism does not appear to have an effect on breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

  2. Huntington CAG repeat size does not modify onset age in familial Parkinson’s disease: The GenePD Study

    OpenAIRE

    McNicoll, Christopher F.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Lew, Mark F.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klein, Christine; Golbe, Lawrence I; Mark, Margery H; Growdon, John H.; Wooten, G. Frederick; Watts, Ray L.; Guttman, Mark; Racette, Brad A.; Perlmutter, Joel. S.; Ahmed, Anwar

    2008-01-01

    The ATP/ADP ratio reflects mitochondrial function and has been reported to be influenced by the size of the Huntington disease gene (HD) repeat. Impaired mitochondrial function has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and therefore, we evaluated the relationship of the HD CAG repeat size to PD onset age in a large sample of familial PD cases. PD affected siblings (n=495) with known onset ages from 248 families, were genotyped for the HD CAG repeat. Genotyping f...

  3. No CAG repeat expansion of polymerase gamma is associated with male infertility in Tamil Nadu, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Poongothai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria contains a single deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA polymerase, polymerase gamma (POLG mapped to long arm of chromosome 15 (15q25, responsible for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA. Exon 1 of the human POLG contains CAG trinucleotide repeat, which codes for polyglutamate. Ten copies of CAG repeat were found to be uniformly high (0.88 in different ethnic groups and considered as the common allele, whereas the mutant alleles (not -10/not -10 CAG repeats were found to be associated with oligospermia/oligoasthenospermia in male infertility. Recent data suggested the implication of POLG CAG repeat expansion in infertility, but are debated. The aim of our study was to explore whether the not -10/not -10 variant is associated with spermato g enic failure. As few study on Indian population have been conducted so far to support this view, we investigated the distribution of the POLG CAG repeats in 61 infertile men and 60 normozoospermic control Indian men of Tamil Nadu, from the same ethnic background. This analysis interestingly revealed that the homozygous wild type genotype (10/-10 was common in infertile men (77% - 47/61 and in normozoospermic control men (71.7% - 43/60. Our study failed to confirm any influence of the POLG gene polymorphism on the efficiency of the spermatogenesis.

  4. Huntington CAG repeat size does not modify onset age in familial Parkinson’s disease: The GenePD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicoll, Christopher F.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Lew, Mark F.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klein, Christine; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Mark, Margery H.; Growdon, John H.; Wooten, G. Frederick; Watts, Ray L.; Guttman, Mark; Racette, Brad A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Ahmed, Anwar; Shill, Holly A.; Singer, Carlos; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Massood, Tiffany; Huskey, Karen W.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Baker, Kenneth B.; Itin, Ilia; Litvan, Irene; Nicholson, Garth; Corbett, Alastair; Nance, Martha; Drasby, Edward; Isaacson, Stuart; Burn, David J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Al-hinti, Jomana; Moller, Anette T.; Ostergaard, Karen; Sherman, Scott J.; Roxburgh, Richard; Snow, Barry; Slevin, John T.; Cambi, Franca; Gusella, James F.; Myers, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    The ATP/ADP ratio reflects mitochondrial function and has been reported to be influenced by the size of the Huntington disease gene (HD) repeat. Impaired mitochondrial function has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and therefore, we evaluated the relationship of the HD CAG repeat size to PD onset age in a large sample of familial PD cases. PD affected siblings (n=495) with known onset ages from 248 families, were genotyped for the HD CAG repeat. Genotyping failed in 11 cases leaving 484 for analysis, including 35 LRRK2 carriers. All cases had HD CAG repeats (range 15 to 34) below the clinical range for HD, although 5.2 percent of the sample (n=25) had repeats in the intermediate range (the intermediate range lower limit=27; upper limit=35 repeats), suggesting that the prevalence of intermediate allele carriers in the general population is significant. No relation between the HD CAG repeat size and the age at onset for PD was found in this sample of familial PD. PMID:18649400

  5. Contributions of sex, testosterone, and androgen receptor CAG repeat number to virtual Morris water maze performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Nicole T; Diamond, Michael P; Land, Susan J; Moffat, Scott D

    2014-03-01

    The possibility that androgens contribute to the male advantage typically found on measures of spatial cognition has been investigated using a variety of approaches. To date, evidence to support the notion that androgens affect spatial cognition in healthy young adults is somewhat equivocal. The present study sought to clarify the association between testosterone (T) and spatial performance by extending measurements of androgenicity to include both measures of circulating T as well as an androgen receptor-specific genetic marker. The aims of this study were to assess the contributions of sex, T, and androgen receptor CAG repeat number (CAGr) on virtual Morris water task (vMWT) performance in a group of healthy young men and women. The hypothesis that men would outperform women on vMWT outcomes was supported. Results indicate that CAGr may interact with T to impact navigation performance and suggest that consideration of androgen receptor sensitivity is an important consideration in evaluating hormone-behavior relationships. PMID:24495604

  6. Androgen receptor CAG polymorphism and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei Biolchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a very frequent age-related proliferative abnormality in men. Polymorphic CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR can alter transactivation of androgen-responsive genes and potentially influence BPH risk. We investigated the association between CAG repeat length and risk of BPH in a case-control study of a Brazilian population. We evaluated 214 patients; 126 with BPH and 88 healthy controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral leucocytes and the AR gene was analyzed using fragment analysis. Hazard ratio (HR and 95% confidence interval were estimated using logistic regression models. Mean CAG length was not different between patients with BPH and controls. The CAG repeat length was examined as a categorical variable (CAG 21 and CAG 22 and did not differ between the control vs. the BPH group. We found no evidence for an association between AR CAG repeat length in BPH risk in a population-based sample of Brazilians.

  7. Mutant CAG repeats of Huntingtin transcript fold into hairpins, form nuclear foci and are targets for RNA interference

    OpenAIRE

    de Mezer, Mateusz; Wojciechowska, Marzena; Napierala, Marek; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2011-01-01

    The CAG repeat expansions that occur in translated regions of specific genes can cause human genetic disorders known as polyglutamine (poly-Q)-triggered diseases. Huntington’s disease and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) are examples of these diseases in which underlying mutations are localized near other trinucleotide repeats in the huntingtin (HTT) and androgen receptor (AR) genes, respectively. Mutant proteins that contain expanded polyglutamine tracts are well-known triggers of pathoge...

  8. Effects of Anthocyanins on CAG Repeat Instability and Behaviour in Huntington’s Disease R6/1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllersen, Linda; Moldestad, Olve; Rowe, Alexander D.; Bjølgerud, Anja; Holm, Ingunn; Tveterås, Linda; Klungland, Arne; Retterstøl, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background: Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by CAG repeat expansions in the HTT gene. Somatic repeat expansion in the R6/1 mouse model of HD depends on mismatch repair and is worsened by base excision repair initiated by the 7,8-dihydroxy-8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (Ogg1) or Nei-like 1 (Neil1). Ogg1 and Neil1 repairs common oxidative lesions. Methods: We investigated whether anthocyanin antioxidants added daily to the drinking water could affect CAG repeat instability in several organs and behaviour in R6/1 HD mice. In addition, anthocyanin-treated and untreated R6/1 HD mice at 22 weeks of age were tested in the open field test and on the rotarod. Results: Anthocyanin-treated R6/1 HD mice showed reduced instability index in the ears and in the cortex compared to untreated R6/1 mice, and no difference in liver and kidney. There were no significant differences in any of the parameters tested in the behavioural tests among anthocyanin-treated and untreated R6/1 HD mice. Conclusions: Our results indicate that continuous anthocyanin-treatment may have modest effects on CAG repeat instability in the ears and the cortex of R6/1 mice. More studies are required to investigate if anthocyanin-treatment could affect behaviour earlier in the disease course. PMID:27540492

  9. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Jacquet

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  10. Androgen Receptor Repeat Length Polymorphism Associated with Male-to-Female Transsexualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Lauren; Bernard, Pascal; Sánchez, Francisco J.; Baird, Paul N.; Vilain, Eric; Kennedy, Trudy; Harley, Vincent R.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a likely genetic component to transsexualism, and genes involved in sex steroidogenesis are good candidates. We explored the specific hypothesis that male-to-female transsexualism is associated with gene variants responsible for undermasculinization and/or feminization. Specifically, we assessed the role of disease-associated repeat length polymorphisms in the androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and aromatase (CYP19) genes. Methods Subject-control analysis included 112 male-to-female transsexuals and 258 non-transsexual males. Associations and interactions were investigated between CAG repeat length in the AR gene, CA repeat length in the ERβ gene, and TTTA repeat length in the CYP19 gene and male-to-female transsexualism. Results A significant association was identified between transsexualism and the AR allele, with transsexuals having longer AR repeat lengths than non-transsexual male control subjects (p = .04). No associations for transsexualism were evident in repeat lengths for CYP19 or ERβ genes. Individuals were then classified as short or long for each gene polymorphism on the basis of control median polymorphism lengths in order to further elucidate possible combined effects. No interaction associations between the three genes and transsexualism were identified. Conclusions This study provides evidence that male gender identity might be partly mediated through the androgen receptor. PMID:18962445

  11. Distinct repeat motifs at the C-terminal region of CagA of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from diseased patients and asymptomatic individuals in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Santanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains that express CagA is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The biological function of CagA depends on tyrosine phosphorylation by a cellular kinase. The phosphate acceptor tyrosine moiety is present within the EPIYA motif at the C-terminal region of the protein. This region is highly polymorphic due to variations in the number of EPIYA motifs and the polymorphism found in spacer regions among EPIYA motifs. The aim of this study was to analyze the polymorphism at the C-terminal end of CagA and to evaluate its association with the clinical status of the host in West Bengal, India. Results Seventy-seven H. pylori strains isolated from patients with various clinical statuses were used to characterize the C-ternimal polymorphic region of CagA. Our analysis showed that there is no correlation between the previously described CagA types and various disease outcomes in Indian context. Further analyses of different CagA structures revealed that the repeat units in the spacer sequences within the EPIYA motifs are actually more discrete than the previously proposed models of CagA variants. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that EPIYA motifs as well as the spacer sequence units are present as distinct insertions and deletions, which possibly have arisen from extensive recombination events. Moreover, we have identified several new CagA types, which could not be typed by the existing systems and therefore, we have proposed a new typing system. We hypothesize that a cagA gene encoding higher number EPIYA motifs may perhaps have arisen from cagA genes that encode lesser EPIYA motifs by acquisition of DNA segments through recombination events.

  12. Association of the polymorphism of the CAG repeat in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma gene (POLG) with testicular germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, M; Leffers, H; Petersen, J H;

    2008-01-01

    of the common 10-CAG-long POLG allele with testicular cancer as well as previously reported in some European populations' association with male subfertility, which is a condition carrying an increased risk of TGCT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The number of CAG repeats in both POLG alleles was established in 243...... patients with TGCT and in 869 controls by the analysis of the genomic DNA fragment. RESULTS: A significantly higher proportion of men homozygous allele of other than the common 10 CAG repeats was found among the patients with TGCT in comparison to the controls (4.9% versus 1.3%, respectively, P = 0.......001). The vast majority of the homozygous patients had a seminoma (11 of 12; 97%), despite that only about half (55%) of the studied patients had this tumour type. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that the POLG polymorphism may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of TGCT particularly in seminoma...

  13. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorain Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  14. Presence of terminal EPIYA phosphorylation motifs in Helicobacter pylori CagA contributes to IL-8 secretion, irrespective of the number of repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos S Papadakos

    Full Text Available CagA protein contributes to pro-inflammatory responses during H. pylori infection, following its intracellular delivery to gastric epithelial cells. Here, we report for the first time in an isogenic background, on the subtle role of CagA phosphorylation on terminal EPIYA-C motifs in the transcriptional activation and expression of IL-8. We utilized isogenic H. pylori mutants of P12 reference strain, expressing CagA with varying number of EPIYA-C motifs and the corresponding phosphorylation defective EPIFA-C motifs while preserving intact the CM multimerization motifs. These mutants had been previously closely scrutinized in terms of type IV secretion system functionality, CagA translocation and its subsequent phosphorylation. Following infection of gastric epithelial cell lines, transcriptional activation of IL-8 gene and secreted IL-8 levels were found to be strictly dependent upon the functionality of the EPIYA-C phosphorylation motifs, as EPIFA-C phosphorylation-deficient CagA expression failed to induce full IL-8 transcriptional activity. Interestingly, levels of IL-8 gene activation and of secreted IL-8 were the same, irrespective of the number of EPIYA-C terminal repeats. We monitored IkBα phosphorylation and confirmed CagA involvement in NF-kB activation. Furthermore, we observed that presence of EPIYA-C functional phosphorylation motifs contributed to NF-kB activation. NF-kB upstream signaling events, such as early ERK1/2 and AKT activation were confirmed to be independent of EPIYA-C phosphorylation. On the contrary, use of TAK1 specific inhibitor 5Z-7-Oxozeaenol resulted in complete arrest of IL-8 secretion, in a dose-dependent manner, irrespective of CagA status. H. pylori-infected TAK1(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs failed to induce NF-kB activity, unlike the respective control MEFs. CagA and TAK1 were found to immunoprecipitate together, irrespective of CagA EPIYA-C status, thus confirming earlier reports of TAK1 and Cag

  15. Random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RRACE) allows for cloning of multiple novel human cDNA fragments containing (CAG)n repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J P; McKnight, C; VanEpps, S; Kelley, M R

    1995-04-01

    We describe a new technique for isolating cDNA fragments in which (i) either a partial sequence of the cDNA is known or (ii) a repeat sequence is utilized. We have used this technique, termed random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (random RACE), to isolate a number of trinucleotide repeat (CAG)n-containing genes. Using the random RACE (RRACE) technique, we have isolated over a hundred (CAG)n-containing genes. The results of our initial analysis of ten clones indicate that three are identical to previously cloned (CAG)n-containing genes. Three of our clones matched with expressed sequence tags, one of which contained a CA repeat. The remaining four clones did not match with any sequence in GenBank. These results indicate that this approach provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating trinucleotide repeat-containing cDNA fragments. Finally, this technique may be used for purposes other than cloning repeat-containing cDNA fragments. If only a partial sequence of a gene is known, our system, described here, provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating a fragment of the gene of interest. PMID:7536696

  16. Triplet repeat length bias and variation in the human transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Molla, Michael; Delcher, Arthur; Sunyaev, Shamil; Cantor, Charles; Kasif, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Length variation in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an important family of DNA polymorphisms with numerous applications in genetics, medicine, forensics, and evolutionary analysis. Several major diseases have been associated with length variation of trinucleotide (triplet) repeats including Huntington's disease, hereditary ataxias and spinobulbar muscular atrophy. Using the reference human genome, we have catalogued all triplet repeats in genic regions. This data revealed a bias in noncoding D...

  17. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine the...... CAG-repeat number in relation to body fat mass and circulating androgens, and to identify the best hormonal marker of low muscle size amongst total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based study of 783 Danish men aged 20......-repeat number correlated inversely with thigh and axial muscle area and with lower and upper extremity lean body mass. Except for upper extremity lean body mass, these findings remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for circulating androgens, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake...

  18. Ataxin-2 repeat-length variation and neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Owen A.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Adamson, Jennifer; Li, Ma; Volkening, Kathryn; Finger, Elizabeth; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Woodruff, Bryan K.; Knopman, David S.; White, Charles L.; Van Gerpen, Jay A.; Meschia, James F.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Boylan, Kevin; Boeve, Bradley F.; Miller, Bruce L.; Strong, Michael J.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Younkin, Steven G.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Expanded glutamine repeats of the ataxin-2 (ATXN2) protein cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), a rare neurodegenerative disorder. More recent studies have suggested that expanded ATXN2 repeats are a genetic risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) via an RNA-dependent interaction with TDP-43. Given the phenotypic diversity observed in SCA2 patients, we set out to determine the polymorphic nature of the ATXN2 repeat length across a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we genotyped the ATXN2 repeat in 3919 neurodegenerative disease patients and 4877 healthy controls and performed logistic regression analysis to determine the association of repeat length with the risk of disease. We confirmed the presence of a significantly higher number of expanded ATXN2 repeat carriers in ALS patients compared with healthy controls (OR = 5.57; P= 0.001; repeat length >30 units). Furthermore, we observed significant association of expanded ATXN2 repeats with the development of progressive supranuclear palsy (OR = 5.83; P= 0.004; repeat length >30 units). Although expanded repeat carriers were also identified in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease patients, these were not significantly more frequent than in controls. Of note, our study identified a number of healthy control individuals who harbor expanded repeat alleles (31–33 units), which suggests caution should be taken when attributing specific disease phenotypes to these repeat lengths. In conclusion, our findings confirm the role of ATXN2 as an important risk factor for ALS and support the hypothesis that expanded ATXN2 repeats may predispose to other neurodegenerative diseases, including progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:21610160

  19. Ataxin-2 repeat-length variation and neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Owen A.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Adamson, Jennifer; Li, Ma; Volkening, Kathryn; Finger, Elizabeth; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H

    2011-01-01

    Expanded glutamine repeats of the ataxin-2 (ATXN2) protein cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), a rare neurodegenerative disorder. More recent studies have suggested that expanded ATXN2 repeats are a genetic risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) via an RNA-dependent interaction with TDP-43. Given the phenotypic diversity observed in SCA2 patients, we set out to determine the polymorphic nature of the ATXN2 repeat length across a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. In...

  20. Multiple repeats of Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites predict risk of gastric ulcer in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand-Jahromy, Sahar; Siavoshi, Farideh; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sattari, Taher Nejad; Latifi-Navid, Saeid

    2015-12-01

    Biological activity of Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA is determined by a diversity in the tyrosine phosphorylation motif sites. In the present study, the diversity and the type of the H. pylori CagA EPIYA motifs and their association with gastric ulcer (GU) and duodenal ulcer (DU) in Iranian dyspeptic patients were assessed. PCR amplification, sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis were performed to determine the pattern of CagA EPIYA motifs. Of 168 H. pylori cagA(+) strains, the frequency of ABC was 93.50%, ABCCC 5.40%, ABC + ABCCC 0.6% and ABCC 0.6%. There was no EPIYA-D segment. The ABCCC pattern of EPIYA motif was more frequent in the H. pylori isolates from GU (8/50, 16%) than in those from chronic gastritis (CG) (0/81, 0%) (P = 0). In contrast, The ABC pattern of EPIYA motif was less frequent in the H. pylori isolates from GU (41/50, 82%) than in those from CG (80/81, 98.80%) (Age-sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.020, 95% CI = 0.002-0.259; P = 0.003). The distribution of the ABC motif was almost the same in H. pylori isolates from CG (98.80%) and DU diseases (97.30%). There was no significant association between the number of CagA EPIYA-C segment and DU (P > 0.05). We have proposed that CagA from Iranian H. pylori strains were Western type and all strains had active phosphorylation sites. The three EPIYA-C motifs of CagA were more frequently observed in the H. pylori strains from GU; thus it might be an important biomarker for predicting the GU risk in Iran. PMID:26408373

  1. Marked phenotypic heterogeneity associated with expansion of a CAG repeat sequence at the spinocerebellar ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph disease locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancel, G.; Abbas, N.; Stevanin, G. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropathological findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Sequence analysis of the CCG polymorphic region adjacent to the CAG triplet repeat of the HD gene in normal and HD chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Pêcheux, C; Mouret, J F; Dürr, A.; Agid, Y; Feingold, J; Brice, A; Dodé, C; Kaplan, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The CAG expansion responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) is followed by an adjacent polymorphic CCG repeat region which may interfere with a PCR based diagnosis. We have sequenced this region in 52 unrelated HD patients, from both normal and HD chromosomes. Fifty percent of the normal alleles were (CCG)7(CCT)2, 48% (CCG)10(CCT)2, and 2% (CCG)7(CCT)3. In contrast (CCG)7(CCT)2 was found in 85% of the HD alleles which represents significant linkage disequilibrium with the HD mutation.

  3. Glacier area and length changes in Norway from repeat inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsvold, S. H.; Andreassen, L. M.; Kienholz, C.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we assess glacier area and length changes in mainland Norway from repeat Landsat TM/ETM+-derived inventories and digitized topographic maps. The multi-temporal glacier inventory consists of glacier outlines from three time ranges: 1947 to 1985 (GIn50), 1988 to 1997 (GI1990), and 1999 to 2006 (GI2000). For the northernmost regions, we include an additional inventory (GI1900) based on historic maps surveyed between 1895 and 1907. Area and length changes are assessed per glacier unit, 36 subregions, and for three main parts of Norway: southern, central, and northern. The results show a decrease in the glacierized area from 2994 km2 in GIn50 to 2668 km2 in GI2000 (total 2722 glacier units), corresponding to an area reduction of -326 km2, or -11% of the initial GIn50 area. The average length change for the full epoch (within GIn50 and GI2000) is -240 m. Overall, the comparison reveals both area and length reductions as general patterns, even though some glaciers have advanced. The three northernmost subregions show the highest retreat rates, whereas the central part of Norway shows the lowest change rates. Glacier area and length changes indicate that glaciers in maritime areas in southern Norway have retreated more than glaciers in the interior, and glaciers in the north have retreated more than southern glaciers. These observed spatial trends in glacier change are related to a combination of several factors such as glacier geometry, elevation, and continentality, especially in southern Norway.

  4. Modelling studies on neurodegenerative disease-causing triplet repeat sequences d(GGC/GCC)n and d(CAG/CTG)n

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shibasish Chowdhury; Manju Bansal

    2001-12-01

    Model building and molecular mechanics studies have been carried out to examine the potential structures for d(GGC/GCC)5 and d(CAG/CTG)5 that might relate to their biological function and association with triplet repeat expansion diseases. Model building studies suggested that hairpin and quadruplex structures could be formed with these repeat sequences. Molecular mechanics studies have demonstrated that the hairpin and hairpin dimer structures of triplet repeat sequences formed by looping out of the two strands are as favourable as the corresponding B-DNA type hetero duplex structures. Further, at high salt condition, Greek key type quadruplex structures are energetically comparable with hairpin dimer and B-DNA type duplex structures. All tetrads in the quadruplex structures are well stacked and provide favourable stacking energy values. Interestingly, in the energy minimized hairpin dimer and Greek key type quadruplex structures, all the bases even in the non-G tetrads are cyclically hydrogen bonded, even though the A, C and T-tetrads were not hydrogen bonded in the starting structures.

  5. Simple sequence repeat length polymorphisms mapped to rat chromosome 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Y; Remmers, E F; Goldmuntz, E A; Zha, H; Mathern, P; Crofford, L J; Wilder, R L

    1994-01-01

    Two genes and two anonymous DNA loci were mapped to rat chromosome 11 using F2 intercross progeny of Fischer (F344/N) and Lewis (LEW/N) inbred rats. These four loci formed a single linkage group covering 21.5 cM with the following map order: somatostatin (SST)-D11N161-D11N18-cell surface protein (MOX2). These four loci were typed by PCR-based simple sequence repeat (SSR) length polymorphism detection. For each marker four to seven different alleles were detected using a panel of 13 inbred rat strains (F344/N, LEW/N, BN/SsN, BUF/N, LER/N, MR/N, MNR/N, LOU/MN, ACI/N, WBB1/N, WBB2/N, SHR/N, WKY/N). Comparative gene mapping analysis suggests syntenic conservation between rat chromosome 11 and mouse Chromosome 16. PMID:8222758

  6. Neil1 is a genetic modifier of somatic and germline CAG trinucleotide repeat instability in R6/1 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Møllersen, Linda; Rowe, Alexander D; Illuzzi, Jennifer L.; Hildrestrand, Gunn A; Gerhold, Katharina J.; Tveterås, Linda; Bjølgerud, Anja; Wilson, David M.; Bjørås, Magnar; Klungland, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions. We show here that somatic TNR expansions are significantly reduced in several organs of R6/1 mice lacking exon 2 of Nei-like 1 (Neil1) (R6/1/Neil1 −/−), when compared with R6/1/Neil1 +/+ mice. Somatic TNR expansion is measured by two different methods, namely mean repeat change and instability index. Reduced somatic expansions are more pronounced in male R6/1/Neil1 −/− mice, ...

  7. Presence of terminal EPIYA phosphorylation motifs in Helicobacter pylori CagA contributes to IL-8 secretion, irrespective of the number of repeats.

    OpenAIRE

    Papadakos, Konstantinos S.; Sougleri, Ioanna S; Mentis, Andreas F; Efstathios Hatziloukas; Sgouras, Dionyssios N.

    2013-01-01

    CagA protein contributes to pro-inflammatory responses during H. pylori infection, following its intracellular delivery to gastric epithelial cells. Here, we report for the first time in an isogenic background, on the subtle role of CagA phosphorylation on terminal EPIYA-C motifs in the transcriptional activation and expression of IL-8. We utilized isogenic H. pylori mutants of P12 reference strain, expressing CagA with varying number of EPIYA-C motifs and the corresponding phosphorylation de...

  8. Oxidized dNTPs and the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases combine to induce CAG/CTG repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, Piera; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Meccia, Ettore; Martire, Alberto; Wilson, Samuel H; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2016-06-20

    DNA trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underlies several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease (HD). Accumulation of oxidized DNA bases and their inefficient processing by base excision repair (BER) are among the factors suggested to contribute to TNR expansion. In this study, we have examined whether oxidation of the purine dNTPs in the dNTP pool provides a source of DNA damage that promotes TNR expansion. We demonstrate that during BER of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) in TNR sequences, DNA polymerase β (POL β) can incorporate 8-oxodGMP with the formation of 8-oxodG:C and 8-oxodG:A mispairs. Their processing by the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases generates closely spaced incisions on opposite DNA strands that are permissive for TNR expansion. Evidence in HD model R6/2 mice indicates that these DNA glycosylases are present in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration. Consistent with prevailing oxidative stress, the same brain areas contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and expression of the p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model where an oxidized dNTPs pool together with aberrant BER processing contribute to TNR expansion in non-replicating cells. PMID:26980281

  9. Low-Normal FMR1 CGG Repeat Length: Phenotypic Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha eMailick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This population-based study investigates genotype-phenotype correlations of low-normal CGG repeats in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene. FMR1 plays an important role in brain development and function, and encodes FMRP (fragile X mental retardation protein, an RNA-binding protein that regulates protein synthesis impacting activity-dependent synaptic development and plasticity. Most past research has focused on CGG premutation expansions (41 to 200 CGG repeats and on fragile X syndrome (200+ CGG repeats, with considerably less attention on the other end of the spectrum of CGG repeats. Using existing data, older adults with 23 or fewer CGG repeats (2 SDs below the mean were compared with age-peers who have normal numbers of CGGs (24-40 with respect to cognition, mental health, cancer, and having children with disabilities. Men (n = 341 with an allele in the low-normal range and women (n = 46 with two low-normal alleles had significantly more difficulty with their memory and ability to solve day to day problems. Women with both FMR1 alleles in the low-normal category had significantly elevated odds of feeling that they need to drink more to get the same effect as in the past. These women also had two and one-half times the odds of having had breast cancer and four times the odds of uterine cancer. Men and women with low-normal CGGs had higher odds of having a child with a disability, either a developmental disability or a mental health condition. These findings are in line with the hypothesis that there is a need for tight neuronal homeostatic control mechanisms for optimal cognitive and behavioral functioning, and more generally that low numbers as well as high numbers of CGG repeats may be problematic for health.

  10. Severe and rapidly progressing cognitive phenotype in a SCA17-family with only marginally expanded CAG/CAA repeats in the TATA-box binding protein gene: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Troels

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs confine a group of rare and heterogeneous disorders, which present with progressive ataxia and numerous other features e.g. peripheral neuropathy, macular degeneration and cognitive impairment, and a subset of these disorders is caused by CAG-repeat expansions in their respective genes. The diagnosing of the SCAs is often difficult due to the phenotypic overlap among several of the subtypes and with other neurodegenerative disorders e.g. Huntington’s disease. Case presentation We report a family in which the proband had rapidly progressing cognitive decline and only subtle cerebellar symptoms from age 42. Sequencing of the TATA-box binding protein gene revealed a modest elongation of the CAG/CAA-repeat of only two repeats above the non-pathogenic threshold of 41, confirming a diagnosis of SCA17. Normally, repeats within this range show reduced penetrance and result in a milder disease course with slower progression and later age of onset. Thus, this case presented with an unusual phenotype. Conclusions The current case highlights the diagnostic challenge of neurodegenerative disorders and the need for a thorough clinical and paraclinical examination of patients presenting with rapid cognitive decline to make a precise diagnosis on which further genetic counseling and initiation of treatment modalities can be based.

  11. Short QTc Interval in Males with Klinefelter Syndrome-Influence of CAG Repeat Length, Body Composition, and Testosterone Replacement Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Inger Norlyk; Skakkebaek, Anne; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Pedersen, Lisbeth Nørum; Hougaard, David Michael; Bojesen, Anders; Trolle, Christian; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundKlinefelter syndrome (KS) is a sex chromosomal aneuploidy (47,XXY) affecting 1/660 males. Based on findings in Turner syndrome, we hypothesized that electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities would be present in males with KS. ObjectiveTo investigate ECGs in males with KS and compare with co...

  12. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat length as modifier of the association between Persistent Organohalogen Pollutant exposure markers and semen characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Aleksander; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants was suggested to impair male reproductive function. A gene-environment interaction has been proposed. No genes modifying the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutants on reproductive organs have yet been identified. We aimed to inves...

  13. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: do trinucleotide repeats in androgen receptor gene have any role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Singh Rajender; Nalini J. Gupta; Baidyanath Chakravarty; Lalji Singh; Kumarasamy Thangaraj

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of CAG and GGN repeats as genetic background affecting androgen insensitivity syn- drome (AIS) phenotype. Methods: We analyzed lengths of androgen receptor (AR)-CAG and GGN repeats in 69 AIS cases, along with 136 unrelated normal male individuals. The lengths of repeats were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by allelic genotyping to determine allele length. Results: Our study revealed significantly shorter mean lengths of CAG repeats in patients (mean 18.25 repeats, range 14-26 repeats) in comparison to the controls (mean 22.57 repeats, range 12-39 repeats) (two-tailed P < 0.0001). GGN repeats, however, did not differ significantly between patients (mean 21.48 repeats) and controls (mean 21.21 repeats) (two- tailed P = 0.474). Among patients' groups, the mean number of CAG repeats in partial androgen insensitivity cases (mean 15.83 repeats) was significantly less than in complete androgen insensitivity cases (mean 19.46 repeats) (two- tailed P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The findings suggest that shorter lengths of repeats in the AR gene might act as low penetrance genetic background in varying manifestation of androgen insensitivity. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 616-624)

  14. The impact of the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene on muscle and adipose tissues in 20-29-year-old Danish men: Odense Androgen Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2010-01-01

    .108), and relative LBMtotal (r=–0.082), and positively with relative SATthigh (r=0.137), relative SATlower trunk (r=0.188), relative FMlower extremity (r=0.107), and relative FMtotal (r=0.082). These relationships remained significant, controlling for physical activity, smoking, chronic disease, and age. CAGn did...... not correlate with any circulating androgen. Conclusions: The CAG repeat polymorphism affects body composition in young men: absolute musclethigh and absolute musclelower trunk increase as CAGn decreases. Expressed relatively, muscle areas and LBM increase, while SAT and FM decrease as CAGn decreases...

  15. Progress study on the mechanism of CAG repeats dynamic mutation in polyQ disease%多聚谷氨酰胺病CAG重复序列动态突变机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春荣; 江泓

    2012-01-01

    多聚谷氨酰胺病是一类中枢神经系统退行性疾病.由致病基因外显子内胞嘧啶-腺嘌呤-鸟嘌呤(CAG)三核苷酸重复序列拷贝数异常扩增导致其编码的多聚谷氨酰胺链异常延长,引起多聚谷氨酰胺扩展突变蛋白积聚而致病.迄今为止,共发现9种因多聚谷氨酰胺扩展突变型蛋白积聚引起的遗传性神经退行性疾病.CAG重复序列在代间传递过程中发生动态突变(拷贝数不断扩增),进而导致发病年龄提前和疾病严重程度增加.%Polyglutamine (polyQ) disease is a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by abnormal expansion of CAG repeats within coding regions of certain causative genes, which are translated into a series of abnormally expanded polyQ tracts causing cytotoxicity. So far, nine diseases caused by expanded polyQ tracts have been demonstrated including Huntington's disease (HD), spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) and several spinocerebellar ataxias subtypes (SCA). In human, long CAG repeats tend to expand during transmissions from parent to offspring, named as dynamic mutation, leading to an earlier age of disease onset and more severe symptoms in subsequent generations. The review presents some novel mechanisms based on dynamic mutation.

  16. Length of normal alleles of C9ORF72 GGGGCC repeat do not influence disease phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Nicola J.; Heckman, Michael G.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Baker, Matt C.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Stewart, Heather; Finger, Elizabeth; Volkening, Kathryn; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Knopman, David S.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Neumann, Manuela; Caselli, Richard J.; White, Charles L.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Strong, Michael J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Boylan, Kevin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Expansions of the non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene were recently identified as the long sought-after cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on chromosome 9p. In this study we aimed to determine whether the length of the normal - unexpanded - allele of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 plays a role in the presentation of disease or affects age at onset in C9ORF72 mutation carriers. We also studied whether the GGGGCC repeat length confers risk or affects age at onset in FTD and ALS patients without C9ORF72 repeat expansions. C9ORF72 genotyping was performed in 580 FTD, 995 ALS and 160 FTD-ALS patients and 1444 controls, leading to the identification of 211 patients with pathogenic C9ORF72 repeat expansions and an accurate quantification of the length of the normal alleles in all patients and controls. No meaningful association between the repeat length of the normal alleles of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 and disease phenotype or age at onset was observed in C9ORF72 mutation carriers or non-mutation carriers. PMID:22840558

  17. Clinical characteristics of Huntington disease in two pedigrees and analysis of expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat%2个Huntington病家系临床特征及CAG重复性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹广娜; 包新华; 卢红梅; 张晶晶; 马一楠; 顾卫红; 熊晖; 秦炯; 吴希如

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨Huntington病(Huntington disease,HD)的临床和遗传特征.方法:对收集的2个中国汉族HD家系患者的临床资料进行综合分析,应用聚合酶链式反应及基因扫描方法对其中9例家系成员的IT15基因的三核苷酸重复序列进行分析.结果:在两个家系中确诊了6例患者(男女均有发病),患者IT15基因的基因型均为杂合子,致病CAG重复拷贝数介于40~78次.两个家系中子代较父代发病年龄提前,家系2中可见发病年龄与CAG重复拷贝数呈负相关.6例患者中有1例为少年型HD,其临床表现明显不同于成人型,以肌张力障碍为主要表现.结论:HD是一种由CAG重复序列异常扩增所致的神经变性病,存在遗传早现现象;少年型HD的临床表现不同于成人型,CAG重复拷贝数与发病年龄及疾病严重程度有关.%Objective: To understand the clinical and genetic features of Huntington disease ( HD) . Methods: The clinical data of HD cases from 2 Chinese families were analyzed and trinucleotide repeat in the IT15 gene were investigated in 9 of the two families by polymerase chain reaction and GeneScan. Results : Among the two pedigrees, 6 cases were ascertained as HD by genetic test. Genotypes of IT15 were heterozygous in these HD patients. CAG repeat of the patients in the HD chromosome were 40 -78. In the two pedigrees, the onset age was earlier in the subsequent generations than that of their fathers. In pedigree 2, the onset age was inversely correlated with CAG repeat number. One out of the 6 cases was juvenile-onset type of Huntington disease, whose clinical symptoms were different from those of the adultonset cases, especially the hypertonic manifestation. Conclusion: HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder with genetic anticipation caused by enlargement of CAG repeat in IT15 gene. The clinical manifestation is different between the juvenile-onset and the adult-onset. The number of CAG repeat is inversely

  18. The relationship between trinucleotide (GAA) repeat length and clinical features in Friedreich ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filla, A.; De Michele, G.; Cavalcanti, F. [Federico II Univ., Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FA) is associated with the expansion of a GAA trinucleotide repeat in the first intron of the X25 gene. We found both alleles expanded in 67 FA patients from 48 Italian families. Five patients from three families were compound heterozygotes with expansion on one allele and an isoleucine{r_arrow}phenylalanine change at position 154 on the other one. We found neither expansions nor point mutations in three patients. The length of FA alleles ranged from 201 to 1,186 repeat units, with no overlap with the normal range, and showed a negatively skewed distribution with a peak between 800 and 1,000 repeats. The FA repeat showed meiotic instability with a median variation of 150 repeats. The lengths of both larger and smaller alleles in each patient inversely correlated with age at onset of the disorder. Smaller alleles showed the best correlation, accounting for {approximately}50% of the variation of age at onset. Mean allele length was significantly higher in patients with diabetes and in those with cardiomyopathy. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Read length and repeat resolution: Exploring prokaryote genomes using next-generation sequencing technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Cahill, Matt J.

    2010-07-12

    Background: There are a growing number of next-generation sequencing technologies. At present, the most cost-effective options also produce the shortest reads. However, even for prokaryotes, there is uncertainty concerning the utility of these technologies for the de novo assembly of complete genomes. This reflects an expectation that short reads will be unable to resolve small, but presumably abundant, repeats. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using a simple model of repeat assembly, we develop and test a technique that, for any read length, can estimate the occurrence of unresolvable repeats in a genome, and thus predict the number of gaps that would need to be closed to produce a complete sequence. We apply this technique to 818 prokaryote genome sequences. This provides a quantitative assessment of the relative performance of various lengths. Notably, unpaired reads of only 150nt can reconstruct approximately 50% of the analysed genomes with fewer than 96 repeat-induced gaps. Nonetheless, there is considerable variation amongst prokaryotes. Some genomes can be assembled to near contiguity using very short reads while others require much longer reads. Conclusions: Given the diversity of prokaryote genomes, a sequencing strategy should be tailored to the organism under study. Our results will provide researchers with a practical resource to guide the selection of the appropriate read length. 2010 Cahill et al.

  20. Read length and repeat resolution: exploring prokaryote genomes using next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Cahill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are a growing number of next-generation sequencing technologies. At present, the most cost-effective options also produce the shortest reads. However, even for prokaryotes, there is uncertainty concerning the utility of these technologies for the de novo assembly of complete genomes. This reflects an expectation that short reads will be unable to resolve small, but presumably abundant, repeats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a simple model of repeat assembly, we develop and test a technique that, for any read length, can estimate the occurrence of unresolvable repeats in a genome, and thus predict the number of gaps that would need to be closed to produce a complete sequence. We apply this technique to 818 prokaryote genome sequences. This provides a quantitative assessment of the relative performance of various lengths. Notably, unpaired reads of only 150nt can reconstruct approximately 50% of the analysed genomes with fewer than 96 repeat-induced gaps. Nonetheless, there is considerable variation amongst prokaryotes. Some genomes can be assembled to near contiguity using very short reads while others require much longer reads. CONCLUSIONS: Given the diversity of prokaryote genomes, a sequencing strategy should be tailored to the organism under study. Our results will provide researchers with a practical resource to guide the selection of the appropriate read length.

  1. Length of normal alleles of C9ORF72 GGGGCC repeat do not influence disease phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Rutherford, Nicola J.; Heckman, Michael G.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Baker, Matt C.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Stewart, Heather; Finger, Elizabeth; Volkening, Kathryn; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H; Lippa, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Expansions of the non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene were recently identified as the long sought-after cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on chromosome 9p. In this study we aimed to determine whether the length of the normal - unexpanded - allele of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 plays a role in the presentation of disease or affects age at onset in C9ORF72 mutation carriers. We also studie...

  2. Structural basis for triplet repeat disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    1999-01-01

    ? Results: Using several different computational models of DNA structure, we show that the triplets involved in the pathological repeats generally fall into extreme classes. Thus, CAG/CTG repeats are particularly flexible, whereas GCC, CGG and GAA repeats appear to display both flexible and rigid (but...... curved) characteristics depending on the method of analysis. The fact that (1) trinucleotide repents often become increasingly unstable when they exceed a length of approximately 50 repeats, and (2) repented 12-mers display a similar increase in instability above 13 repeats, together suggest that......, which we predict to have very high flexibility, may play a role in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorder multiple system atrophy (MSA)....

  3. Repeat Measurement of Cervical Length in Women with Threatened Preterm Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, P.; Sonek, J.; Heidemeyer, M.; Schmid, M.; Abele, H.; Hoopmann, M.; Kagan, K. O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the value of a repeat measurement some days after the first cervical length measurement done at the time of preterm contractions. Study Design: Retrospective study involving women with singleton pregnancies who presented with preterm contractions at 24 to 33 + 6 weeks of gestation. The cervical length was measured at the time of presentation and some days afterwards. Results: The study population consisted of 17 cases with a preterm delivery within 14 days and 288 uneventful pregnancies. Univariate logistic regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between delivery within 14 days and both, the first and second cervical length measurements as well as the difference between the two measurements. Up to a false positive rate of 20 %, ROC curve analysis showed an improved detection rate for preterm delivery by inluding both measurements. At a false positive rate of 10 % – which corresponds to a first and second cervical length of 10 and 9 mm – the detection rate was 17.6 % with the first cervical length measurement, 47.0 % with the second and 52.9 % if the difference between both measurements was added. Conclusion: Our results indicate that in women with symptoms of preterm labor it is worth to repeat the measurement some days later and to take into account the difference between both measurements.

  4. Biological activity of the virulence factor cagA of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱永良; 郑树; 钱可大; 方平楚

    2004-01-01

    Background China is one of the countries with the highest incidence of H. Pylori and more than 9090 isolates possessed the cagA gene. This study was to evaluate the biological activity of the H.pylori virulence factor cagA isolated from Chinese patients. Methods cagA DNA fragments were amplified from the genomic DNA and subsequently cloned into the mammalian expression vector for cell transfection and DNA sequencing. cagA protein, phosphorylated-tyrosine cagA and the complex of cagA precipitated with SHP-2 were identified respectively by western blot in the crude cell lysate from conditionally immortalized gastric epithelial cells at 48 hours after transfection with cagA DNA. In addition, the ability of induction of scattering phenotype was examined after transient expression of cagA in AGS cells. Results The C-terminal half of cagA contained only one repeated sequence and three tandem five-amino-acid motifs glutamic acid-proline-isoleucine-tyrosine-alanine (EPIYA). Moreover, the amino acid sequence of D2 region in repeated sequence was aspartic acid-phenylanaline-aspartic acid (D-F-D) which was significantly distinguished from the three repeated sequences and aspartic acid-aspartic adid-leucine (D-D-L) in the western standard strain NCTC11637. Western blot revealed that cagA became phosphorylated in tyrosine site and bound with SHP-2 after transient expression of cagA DNA in gastric epithelial cells. Transient expression of cagA in AGS cells showed that cagA was able to induce the elongation phenotype although to a lesser extent than western strains. Conclusions cagA perturbs cell signaling pathways by binding with SHP-2. However, significant difference exists in amino acid sequence and biological function of cagA in Chinese compared with those of western countries.

  5. RUNX2 tandem repeats and the evolution of facial length in placental mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pointer Marie A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When simple sequence repeats are integrated into functional genes, they can potentially act as evolutionary ‘tuning knobs’, supplying abundant genetic variation with minimal risk of pleiotropic deleterious effects. The genetic basis of variation in facial shape and length represents a possible example of this phenomenon. Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2, which is involved in osteoblast differentiation, contains a functionally-important tandem repeat of glutamine and alanine amino acids. The ratio of glutamines to alanines (the QA ratio in this protein seemingly influences the regulation of bone development. Notably, in domestic breeds of dog, and in carnivorans in general, the ratio of glutamines to alanines is strongly correlated with facial length. Results In this study we examine whether this correlation holds true across placental mammals, particularly those mammals for which facial length is highly variable and related to adaptive behavior and lifestyle (e.g., primates, afrotherians, xenarthrans. We obtained relative facial length measurements and RUNX2 sequences for 41 mammalian species representing 12 orders. Using both a phylogenetic generalized least squares model and a recently-developed Bayesian comparative method, we tested for a correlation between genetic and morphometric data while controlling for phylogeny, evolutionary rates, and divergence times. Non-carnivoran taxa generally had substantially lower glutamine-alanine ratios than carnivorans (primates and xenarthrans with means of 1.34 and 1.25, respectively, compared to a mean of 3.1 for carnivorans, and we found no correlation between RUNX2 sequence and face length across placental mammals. Conclusions Results of our diverse comparative phylogenetic analyses indicate that QA ratio does not consistently correlate with face length across the 41 mammalian taxa considered. Thus, although RUNX2 might function as a ‘tuning knob’ modifying face

  6. (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families: abundance and selective patterns of distribution according to function and gene length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creation of human gene families was facilitated significantly by gene duplication and diversification. The (TG/CAn repeats exhibit length variability, display genome-wide distribution, and are abundant in the human genome. Accumulation of evidences for their multiple functional roles including regulation of transcription and stimulation of recombination and splicing elect them as functional elements. Here, we report analysis of the distribution of (TG/CAn repeats in human gene families. Results The 1,317 human gene families were classified into six functional classes. Distribution of (TG/CAn repeats were analyzed both from a global perspective and from a stratified perspective based on their biological properties. The number of genes with repeats decreased with increasing repeat length and several genes (53% had repeats of multiple types in various combinations. Repeats were positively associated with the class of Signaling and communication whereas, they were negatively associated with the classes of Immune and related functions and of Information. The proportion of genes with (TG/CAn repeats in each class was proportional to the corresponding average gene length. The repeat distribution pattern in large gene families generally mirrored the global distribution pattern but differed particularly for Collagen gene family, which was rich in repeats. The position and flanking sequences of the repeats of Collagen genes showed high conservation in the Chimpanzee genome. However the majority of these repeats displayed length polymorphism. Conclusion Positive association of repeats with genes of Signaling and communication points to their role in modulation of transcription. Negative association of repeats in genes of Information relates to the smaller gene length, higher expression and fundamental role in cellular physiology. In genes of Immune and related functions negative association of repeats perhaps relates to the smaller gene

  7. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Moseley, A.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Belmont, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. The authors have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 pb away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27[beta] probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, the authors examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Efficacy Improvement of PCR Amplification of CAG Trinucleotide Repeats in the Coding Sequence of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type II Gene%提高SCA2编码区CAG三核苷酸重复的PCR扩增效率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤熙翔; 夏家辉

    2000-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of PCR amplification of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the coding sequence of spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene(69.2% G+C), hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR, and the addition of enhancers(1%~12.5% DMSO , 1%~25% glycerol ,1%~12.5% formamide) were performed and compared with normal PCR . The results showed that hot-start PCR, base-replacement PCR and the addition of enhancers(1%~10% DMSO , 5%~20% glycerol , 1%~10% formamide) improved the amplification efficacy of the GC rich region. Gene diagnosis in 70 SCA pedgrees and 60 spontaneous SCA patients were also conducted.%以遗传性脊髓小脑共济失调II型基因(spinocerebellar ataxia type II gene SCA2)编码区内的CAG三核苷酸重复为研究对象(G+C含量为69.2%),比较了热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR、添加增效剂(1%~12.5%二甲亚砜、1%~25%甘油、1%~12.5%甲酰胺)与常规PCR的扩增效率,发现热启动PCR、碱基替代PCR及添加增效剂(1%~10%二甲亚砜、5%~20%甘油、1%~10%甲酰胺)能提高该GC富集区的扩增效率,并对70个SCA家系及60个散发SCA患者进行了SCA2的基因诊断。

  9. 直接检测IT15基因(CAG)n重复对亨廷顿氏病进行基因诊断%Direct Detection of the Expanded CAG Repeat in IT15 Gene for Molecular Diagnosis of Huntington's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛跃华; 周刚; 陈美珏; 任兆瑞; 曾溢滔; 王秀英; 许志大

    1995-01-01

    应用巢式PCR和变性聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳放射自显影鉴定IT15基因(CAG)n串联重复序列拷贝数的技术,对40名正常中国人以及徐州和浙江两大亨廷顿氏病(HD病)家系46名家庭成员进行了分析.结果表明,正常中国人IT15基因(CAG)n拷贝数为16左右,而HD患者的突变基因(CAG)n拷贝数均大于40,两者之间不重叠.对38名HD病高风险者进行症状前分子诊断,揭示11名家庭成员为HD基因的携带者,与家系调查和临床分析的结果相吻合.本文结果不仅证明IT15基因的动态突变也是导致中国人HD病的遗传学基础,而且为HD病的基因诊断、遗传咨询和遗传保健提供了科学资料.

  10. Psychiatric symptoms and CAG expansion in Huntington`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.W.; Schmid, W.; Spiegel, R. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-02-16

    The mutation responsible for Huntington`s disease (HD) is an elongated CAG repeat in the coding region of the IT15 gene. A PCR-based test with high sensitivity and accuracy is now available to identify asymptomatic gene carriers and patients. An inverse correlation between CAG copy number and age at disease onset has been found in a large number of affected individuals. The influence of the CAG repeat expansion on other phenotypic manifestations, especially specific psychiatric symptoms has not been studied intensively. In order to elucidate this situation we investigated the relation between CAG copy number and distinct psychiatric phenotypes found in 79 HD-patients. None of the four differentiated categories (personality change, psychosis, depression, and nonspecific alterations) showed significant differences in respect to size of the CAG expansion. In addition, no influence of individual sex on psychiatric presentation could be found. On the other hand in patients with personality changes maternal transmission was significantly more frequent compared with all other groups. Therefore we suggest that clinical severity of psychiatric features in HD is not directly dependent on the size of the dynamic mutation involved. The complex pathogenetic mechanisms leading to psychiatric alterations are still unknown and thus genotyping does not provide information about expected psychiatric symptoms in HD gene carriers. 40 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Distinct diversity of vacA, cagA, and cagE genes of Helicobacter pylori associated with peptic ulcer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shiho; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2005-08-01

    Colonization of the stomach mucosa by Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of acute and chronic gastric pathologies in humans. Several H. pylori virulence genes that may play a role in its pathogenicity have been identified. The most important determinants are vacA and cagA in the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) genes. In the present study, to consider the association of molecular genetics between vacA and the cagPAI regarding clinical outcome, we selected H. pylori strains with various genotypes of vacA in Japan and sequenced full-length vacA, cagA, and cagE genes. Sequencing of vacA and cagA genes revealed variable size, whereas the cagE gene was well conserved among strains. Each of the phylogenetic trees based on the deduced amino acid sequences of VacA, CagA, and CagE indicated that all three proteins were divided into two major groups, a Western group and an East Asian group, and the distributions of isolates exhibited similar patterns among the three proteins. The strains with s2 and s1a/m1a vacA genotypes and the Western-type 3' region cagA genotype were classified into the Western group, and the strains with the s1c/m1b vacA genotype and the East Asian-type 3' cagA genotype were included in the East Asian group. In addition, the prevalence of infection with the Western group strain was significantly higher in patients with peptic ulcer (90.0%, 9/10) than in patients with chronic gastritis (22.7%, 5/22) (chi2 = 12.64, P = 0.00057). These data suggest that the molecular genetics of vacA and cagPAI are associated and that the Western group with vacA and cagPAI genes is associated with peptic ulcer disease. PMID:16081930

  12. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Osamu; Oyake, Mutsuo; Takano, Hiroki [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these poly-serine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Characterization of CagA variable region of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Liang Zhu; Shu Zheng; Qin Du; Ke-Da Qian; Ping-Chu Fang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the CagA variable region of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Chinese patients.METHODS: DNA fragments in CagA variable region were amplified and sequenced respectively from genomic DNA of 19 isolates from patients with gastric cancer and 20isolates from patients with chronic gastritis. The tendency of phosphorylation in tyrosine(s) of CagA proteins was evaluated subsequently by phosphorylation assay in vivo and in vitro respectively.RESULTS: About 97.44% (38/39) H pylori isolates possessed CagA gene. CagA+ strains contained 2-4tandem five-amino-acid motifs EPIYA but only one EPIYA had repeated sequence in CagA variable region in different isolates. There was no significant difference between the number of EPIYA motifs in H pylori from patients with different diseases. However, only tyrosine site in EPIYA within repeated sequence could be phosphorylated by AGS cells in vivo although all tyrosine sites in EPIYA could be phosphorylated in vitro.CONCLUSION: CagA in Chinese has no functional difference in perturbing cellular signal pathway among different H pylori isolates.

  14. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum

    OpenAIRE

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with th...

  15. Murine protein H is comprised of 20 repeating units, 61 amino acids in length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten; Tack, B F

    1986-01-01

    with this cDNA probe. Ten positives were colony-purified, and the largest plasmid cDNA insert, MH8 (4.4 kb), was sequenced by the dideoxy chain termination method. MH8 contained the complete coding sequence for the precursor of murine complement protein factor H (3702 bp), 100 bp of 5'-untranslated sequence......A cDNA library constructed from size-selected (greater than 28 S) poly(A)+ RNA isolated from the livers of C57B10. WR mice was screened by using a 249-base-pair (bp) cDNA fragment encoding 83 amino acid residues of human protein H as a probe. Of 120,000 transformants screened, 30 hybridized......, 448 bp of 3'-untranslated sequence, and a polyadenylylated tail of undetermined length. Murine pre-protein H was deduced to consist of an 18-amino acid signal peptide and 1216 residues of H-protein sequence. Murine H was composed of 20 repetitive units, each about 61 amino acid residues in length...

  16. Topological diversity of chromatin fibers: Interplay between nucleosome repeat length, DNA linking number and the level of transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Norouzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of nucleosomes in 30-nm fibers remains unknown in detail. To tackle this problem, we analyzed all stereochemically possible configurations of two-start chromatin fibers with DNA linkers L = 10-70 bp (nucleosome repeat length NRL = 157-217 bp. In our model, the energy of a fiber is a sum of the elastic energy of the linker DNA, steric repulsion, electrostatics, and the H4 tail-acidic patch interaction between two stacked nucleosomes. We found two families of energetically feasible conformations of the fibers—one observed earlier, and the other novel. The fibers from the two families are characterized by different DNA linking numbers—that is, they are topologically different. Remarkably, the optimal geometry of a fiber and its topology depend on the linker length: the fibers with linkers L = 10n and 10n + 5 bp have DNA linking numbers per nucleosome DLk >>-1.5 and -1.0, respectively. In other words, the level of DNA supercoiling is directly related to the length of the inter-nucleosome linker in the chromatin fiber (and therefore, to NRL. We hypothesize that this topological polymorphism of chromatin fibers may play a role in the process of transcription, which is known to generate different levels of DNA supercoiling upstream and downstream from RNA polymerase. A genome-wide analysis of the NRL distribution in active and silent yeast genes yielded results consistent with this assumption.

  17. A Statistical Approach Designed for Finding Mathematically Defined Repeats in Shotgun Data and Determining the Length Distribution of Clone—Inserts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanZhong; KunlinZhang; XiangangHuang; PeixiangNi; YujunHan; KaiWang; JunWang; SonggangLi

    2003-01-01

    The large amount of repeats,especially high copy repeats,in the genomes of higher animals and plants makes whole genome assembly(WGA)quite difficult.In order to solve this problem,we tried to identify repeats and mask them prior to assembly even at the stage of genome survey.It is known that repeats of different copy number have different probabilities of appearance in shotgun data,so based on this principle,we constructed a statistical model and inferred criteria for mathematically defined repeats(MDRs)at different shotgun coverages.According to these criteria,we developed software MDRmasker to identify and mask MDRs in shotgun data.With repeats masked prior to assembly,the speed of as sembly was increased with lower error probability.In addition,clone-insert size affects the accuracy of repeat assembly and scaffold construction.We also designed length distribution of clone-inserts using our model.In our simulated genomes of human and rice,the length distribution of repeats in different,so their optimal length distributions of clone-inserts were not the same.Thus with optimal length distribution of clone-inserts,a given genome could be assembled better at lower coverage.

  18. A Statistical Approach Designed for Finding Mathematically De fined Repeats in Shotgun Data and Determining the Length Distri bution of Clone-Inserts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Zhong; Kunlin Zhang; Xiangang Huang; Peixiang Ni; Yujun Han; Kai Wang; Jun Wang; Songgang Li

    2003-01-01

    The large amount of repeats, especially high copy repeats, in the genomes of higher animals and plants makes whole genome assembly (WGA) quite difficult. In order to solve this problem, we tried to identify repeats and mask them prior to assembly even at the stage of genome survey. It is known that repeats of different copy number have different probabilities of appearance in shotgun data, so based on this principle, we constructed a statistical model and inferred criteria for mathematically defined repeats (MDRs) at different shotgun coverages. According to these criteria, we developed software MDRmasker to identify and mask MDRs in shotgun data. With repeats masked prior to assembly, the speed of assembly was increased with lower error probability. In addition, clone-insert size affects the accuracy of repeat assembly and scaffold construction. We also designed length distribution of clone-inserts using our model. In our simulated genomes of human and rice, the length distribution of repeats is different, so their optimal length distributions of clone-inserts were not the same. Thus with optimal length distribution of clone-inserts, a given genome could be assembled better at lower coverage.

  19. Evolution of cagA oncogene of Helicobacter pylori through recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Furuta

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that infects half the human population and causes gastritis, ulcers, and cancer. The cagA gene product is a major virulence factor associated with gastric cancer. It is injected into epithelial cells, undergoes phosphorylation by host cell kinases, and perturbs host signaling pathways. CagA is known for its geographical, structural, and functional diversity in the C-terminal half, where an EPIYA host-interacting motif is repeated. The Western version of CagA carries the EPIYA segment types A, B, and C, while the East Asian CagA carries types A, B, and D and shows higher virulence. Many structural variants such as duplications and deletions are reported. In this study, we gained insight into the relationships of CagA variants through various modes of recombination, by analyzing all known cagA variants at the DNA sequence level with the single nucleotide resolution. Processes that occurred were: (i homologous recombination between DNA sequences for CagA multimerization (CM sequence; (ii recombination between DNA sequences for the EPIYA motif; and (iii recombination between short similar DNA sequences. The left half of the EPIYA-D segment characteristic of East Asian CagA was derived from Western type EPIYA, with Amerind type EPIYA as the intermediate, through rearrangements of specific sequences within the gene. Adaptive amino acid changes were detected in the variable region as well as in the conserved region at sites to which no specific function has yet been assigned. Each showed a unique evolutionary distribution. These results clarify recombination-mediated routes of cagA evolution and provide a solid basis for a deeper understanding of its function in pathogenesis.

  20. Chemical correction of pre-mRNA splicing defects associated with sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein by expanded r(CAG) transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Amit; Parkesh, Raman; Sznajder, Lukasz J.; Childs-Disney, Jessica; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it was reported that expanded r(CAG) triplet repeats (r(CAG)exp) associated with untreatable neurological diseases cause pre-mRNA mis-splicing likely due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) splicing factor. Bioactive small molecules that bind the 5’CAG/3’GAC motif found in r(CAG)exp hairpin structure were identified by using RNA binding studies and virtual screening/chemical similarity searching. Specifically, a benzylguanidine-containing small molecule was found to impro...

  1. CAG tract of MJD-1 may be prone to frameshifts causing polyalanine accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, C; Jannatipour, M; Dion, P; Laganière, J; Sequeiros, J; Brais, B; Rouleau, G A

    2000-08-12

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is one of several disorders caused by the expansion of a coding CAG repeat (exp-CAG). The presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in patients and cellular models of exp-CAG-associated diseases has lead to a nuclear toxicity model. Similar INIs are found in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, which is caused by a short expansion of an alanine-encoding GCG repeat. Here we propose that transcriptional or translational frameshifts occurring within expanded CAG tracts result in the production and accumulation of polyalanine-containing mutant proteins. We hypothesize that these alanine polymers deposit in cells forming INIs and may contribute to nuclear toxicity. We show evidence that supports our hypothesis in lymphoblast cells from MJD patients, as well as in pontine neurons of MJD brain and in in vitro cell culture models of the disease. We also provide evidence that alanine polymers alone are harmful to cells and predict that a similar pathogenic mechanism may occur in the other CAG repeat disorders. PMID:10942424

  2. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct. PMID:17683506

  3. HA novel approach to investigate tissue-specific trinucleotide repeat instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boily Marie-Josee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Huntington's disease (HD, an expanded CAG repeat produces characteristic striatal neurodegeneration. Interestingly, the HD CAG repeat, whose length determines age at onset, undergoes tissue-specific somatic instability, predominant in the striatum, suggesting that tissue-specific CAG length changes could modify the disease process. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the tissue specificity of somatic instability may provide novel routes to therapies. However progress in this area has been hampered by the lack of sensitive high-throughput instability quantification methods and global approaches to identify the underlying factors. Results Here we describe a novel approach to gain insight into the factors responsible for the tissue specificity of somatic instability. Using accurate genetic knock-in mouse models of HD, we developed a reliable, high-throughput method to quantify tissue HD CAG repeat instability and integrated this with genome-wide bioinformatic approaches. Using tissue instability quantified in 16 tissues as a phenotype and tissue microarray gene expression as a predictor, we built a mathematical model and identified a gene expression signature that accurately predicted tissue instability. Using the predictive ability of this signature we found that somatic instability was not a consequence of pathogenesis. In support of this, genetic crosses with models of accelerated neuropathology failed to induce somatic instability. In addition, we searched for genes and pathways that correlated with tissue instability. We found that expression levels of DNA repair genes did not explain the tissue specificity of somatic instability. Instead, our data implicate other pathways, particularly cell cycle, metabolism and neurotransmitter pathways, acting in combination to generate tissue-specific patterns of instability. Conclusion Our study clearly demonstrates that multiple tissue factors reflect the level of

  4. Size polymorphism of chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G molecules is due to length variation in the cytoplasmic heptad repeat region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K;

    1990-01-01

    , which bear intrachain disulfide bonds. All 3-6 bands have different mobilities in SDS gels between different haplotypes, ranging from 30 to 55 kDa. This size polymorphism is not affected by glycosidase treatment or addition of protease inhibitors. Partial proteolysis of cell surface-iodinated B...... that the extracellular regions of these molecules are very similar and that the length polymorphism is due to variations in the cytoplasmic regions. Inspection of the cDNA-derived protein sequence in this region shows many heptad repeats, which may allow variation in length by step deletion and alternative splicing...

  5. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wong

    Full Text Available In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  6. [C-11]raclopride-PET studies of the Huntington's disease rate of progression : Relevance of the trinucleotide repeat length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonini, A; Leenders, KL; Eidelberg, D

    1998-01-01

    We used [C-11]raclopride and positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the relationship between striatal dopamine D2 receptor binding, trinucleotide repeat number (GAG), and subject age in 10 asymptomatic and 8 symptomatic carriers of the Huntington's disease (HD) mutation. In both preclinical an

  7. Isolation and characterization of a full length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyake, M.; Onodera, O.; Ikeuchi, T. [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration characterized by anticipation and variable combination of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choleoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a B37 gene on chromosome 12. To characterize functions of the DRPLA gene product, we isolated several cDNA clones for the DRPLA gene from human adult and fetus brain cDNA libraries, using an oligonucleotide flanking the CAG repeat. The cDNA spans 4247 bp in length and there is only an open reading frame coding for 986 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 291 bp downstream from the initiation methionine and encodes a polyglutamine tract. The deduced amino acid sequence from amino acids residues 582 to 707 has a high homology to published human hippocampus derived expressed sequence (M78755) located at chromosome 1p (63.8% identity), and 3{prime}-untranslated region of the DRPLA cDNA revealed homology to the mouse small nuclear RNA U7 gene (X54165). Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7 knt transcript which is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. In human adult brain, the transcript was broadly expressed including amygdala, caudate nucleus, corpus callosum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, and was not specific to the dentatorubral-pallidoluysian system. The availability of a full length cDNA will be highly useful for analyzing the pathogenesis of this unique neurodegenerative disease as well as for analyzing other CAG repeat related neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Hsp90 modulates CAG repeat instability in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mittelman, David; Sykoudis, Kristen; Hersh, Megan; Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H.

    2010-01-01

    The Hsp90 molecular chaperone has been implicated as a contributor to evolution in several organisms by revealing cryptic variation that can yield dramatic phenotypes when the chaperone is diverted from its normal functions by environmental stress. In addition, as a cancer drug target, Hsp90 inhibition has been documented to sensitize cells to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting a function for Hsp90 in DNA repair. Here we explore the potential role of Hsp90 in modulating the stability of nucleoti...

  9. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  10. Study of the Cytoxin-Associated Gene A (CagA Gene) in Helicobacter pylori Using Gastric Biopsies of Iraqi Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaf, Elham A.; Zahra M Al-Khafaji; Nahi Y Yassen; AL-Abbudi, Fadel A.; Sadwen, Saad N.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: The Helicobacter pylori CagA gene is a major virulence factor that plays an important role in gastric pathologies. The size variation of CagA gene, which is dependent on the 3′ repeat region, contains one or more Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs and CagA multimerization (CM) motifs. Four segments flanking the EPIYA motifs, EPIYA −A, −B, −C, or −D, were reported to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. The aim was to determine the roles of EPIYA...

  11. Synthesis and electrochromic properties of trans-stilbene bearing copolymers obtained with different repeat unit and chain length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Benzotriazole, thiophene and trans-stilbene were used to obtain random copolymers. • Polymer chain length effect was examined via reaction times and feed ratio. • Polymers show processability, multichromicity and fast switching times. -- Abstract: Three new random copolymers containing benzotriazole (BTz), thiophene (Th) and trans-stilbene (St) were synthesized via Stille coupling technique with different monomer ratios. In order to determine the effect of stilbene quantity on electrochromic properties of the polymers, feed ratios of the monomers were altered in chemical polymerization. Polymer chain length effect was also investigated via using different reaction times and the same feed ratio. The characteristics of the synthesized copolymers were compared based on their quantity of stilbene moiety and chain length. Redox potentials and HOMO/LUMO energy levels of all polymers were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. To evaluate the optical properties of the electrochromic copolymers, spectroelectrochemistry technique was used. Optical band gap values of the copolymers were found in the range between 1.85 and 2.06 eV. Optical contrasts and switching ability of the polymer films were determined by square wave chronoamperometry. Solution processable polymers reveal multichromicity upon oxidation and reduction at low potentials, fast switching times and low band gap

  12. Effects of chain length of an amphipathic polypeptide carrying the repeated amino acid sequence (LETLAKA)(n) on α-helix and fibrous assembly formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Imada, Katsumi; Namba, Keiichi; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Kuriki, Yukino; Yoshino, Masakuni; Yazaki, Kazumori; Kojima, Shuichi; Takei, Tsunetomo; Ueda, Takuya; Miura, Kin-ichiro

    2013-04-23

    Polypeptide α3 (21 residues), with three repeats of a seven-amino-acid sequence (LETLAKA)(3), forms an amphipathic α-helix and a long fibrous assembly. Here, we investigated the ability of α3-series polypeptides (with 14-42 residues) of various chain lengths to form α-helices and fibrous assemblies. Polypeptide α2 (14 residues), with two same-sequence repeats, did not form an α-helix, but polypeptide α2L (15 residues; α2 with one additional leucine residue on its carboxyl terminal) did form an α-helix and fibrous assembly. Fibrous assembly formation was associated with polypeptides at least as long as polypeptide α2L and with five leucine residues, indicating that the C-terminal leucine has a critical element for stabilization of α-helix and fibril formation. In contrast, polypeptides α5 (35 residues) and α6 (42 residues) aggregated easily, although they formed α-helices. A 15-35-residue chain was required for fibrous assembly formation. Electron microscopy and X-ray fiber diffraction showed that the thinnest fibrous assemblies of polypeptides were about 20 Å and had periodicities coincident with the length of the α-helix in a longitudinal direction. These results indicated that the α-helix structures were orientated along the fibrous axis and assembled into a bundle. Furthermore, the width and length of fibrous assemblies changed with changes in the pH value, resulting in variations in the charged states of the residues. Our results suggest that the formation of fibrous assemblies of amphipathic α-helices is due to the assembly of bundles via the hydrophobic faces of the helices and extension with hydrophobic noncovalent bonds containing a leucine. PMID:23530905

  13. Genotyping of the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene Isolated From Gastric Biopsies in Shiraz, Southern Iran: A PCR-RFLP and Sequence Analysis Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Moaddeb, Afsaneh; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Firouzi, Roya; Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Farshad, Shohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori. Objectives The aim of this study was to genotype the H. pylori cagA gene isolated from antral biopsies of patients with stomach symptoms, using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Patients and Methods A total of 161 gastric biopsies were collected from patients with stomach symptoms. After isolation of H. pylori from the biopsy culture, the...

  14. Chemical correction of pre-mRNA splicing defects associated with sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein by expanded r(CAG)-containing transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Parkesh, Raman; Sznajder, Lukasz J; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-03-16

    Recently, it was reported that expanded r(CAG) triplet repeats (r(CAG)(exp)) associated with untreatable neurological diseases cause pre-mRNA mis-splicing likely due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) splicing factor. Bioactive small molecules that bind the 5'CAG/3'GAC motif found in r(CAG)(exp) hairpin structure were identified by using RNA binding studies and virtual screening/chemical similarity searching. Specifically, a benzylguanidine-containing small molecule was found to improve pre-mRNA alternative splicing of MBNL1-sensitive exons in cells expressing the toxic r(CAG)(exp). The compound was identified by first studying the binding of RNA 1 × 1 nucleotide internal loops to small molecules known to have affinity for nucleic acids. Those studies identified 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) as a specific binder to RNAs with the 5'CAG/3'GAC motif. DAPI was then used as a query molecule in a shape- and chemistry alignment-based virtual screen to identify compounds with improved properties, which identified 4-guanidinophenyl 4-guanidinobenzoate, a small molecule that improves pre-mRNA splicing defects associated with the r(CAG)(exp)-MBNL1 complex. This compound may facilitate the development of therapeutics to treat diseases caused by r(CAG)(exp) and could serve as a useful chemical tool to dissect the mechanisms of r(CAG)(exp) toxicity. The approach used in these studies, defining the small RNA motifs that bind small molecules with known affinity for nucleic acids and then using virtual screening to optimize them for bioactivity, may be generally applicable for designing small molecules that target other RNAs in the human genomic sequence. PMID:22252896

  15. CagA-mediated pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidpour, Abolghasem

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been described as the main etiologic agent of gastric cancer, causing a considerable rate of mortality and morbidity in human population across the world. Although the infection mainly begins asymptomatically, but simply develops to peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis, lymphoma of the gastric mucosa and eventually adenocarcinoma. The major pathological feature of H. pylori infection is due to the activity of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), a 125-140 kDa protein encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). CagA is also known as the first bacterial onco-protein, ranking the H. pylori-mediated adenocarcinoma as the second most deadly cancer type worldwide. Upon cytoplasmic translocation CagA undergoes interacting with numerous proteins in phosphorylation dependant and independent manners within the gastric epithelial cells. The profound effect of CagA on multiple intracellular pathways causes major consequences such as perturbation of intracellular actin trafficking, stimulation of inflammatory responses and disruption of cellular tight junctions. Such activities of CagA further participate in development of the hummingbird phenotype and gastric cancer. This review is sought to provide a structural and functional analysis of the CagA protein with focus on demonstrating the molecular basis of the mechanism of CagA intracellular translocation and its interaction with intracellular targets. PMID:26796299

  16. [The role of CagA in H. pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) chronically colonizes human gastric epithelium and induces various diseases. But the mechanism of carcinogenesis in H. pylori infection remains to be assessed. We described that after attachment of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells, CagA is injected directly from the bacteria into the cells and undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylated CagA can bind to SHP-2. Deregulation of SHP -2 by CagA may induce abnormal proliferation and movement of gastric epithelial cells. There are two patterns of CagA motifs between East Asian strains and Western strains. East Asian-type CagA confers stronger SHP-2 binding and transforming activities than Western-type CagA. We assessed the association between CagA diversity and clinical outcome in Asian countries, where mortalities from gastric cancer is different. As results, H. pylori infection with East Asian-type CagA was associated with gastric atrophy and cancer. Therefore, persistent active inflammation induced by the East Asian CagA-positive strain may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:19999107

  17. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huyen Mai NT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard in typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, some reports indicated that VNTR typing may be less suitable for Beijing genotype isolates. We therefore compared the performance of internationally standardized RFLP and 24 loci VNTR typing to discriminate among 100 Beijing genotype isolates from the Southern Vietnam. Methods Hundred Beijing genotype strains defined by spoligotyping were randomly selected and typed by RFLP and VNTR typing. The discriminatory power of VNTR and RFLP typing was compared using the Bionumerics software. Results Among 95 Beijing strains available for analysis, 14 clusters were identified comprising 34 strains and 61 unique profiles in 24 loci VNTR typing ((Hunter Gaston Discrimination Index (HGDI = 0.994. 13 clusters containing 31 strains and 64 unique patterns in RFLP typing (HGDI = 0.994 were found. Nine RFLP clusters were subdivided by VNTR typing and 12 VNTR clusters were split by RFLP. Five isolates (5% revealing double alleles or no signal in two or more loci in VNTR typing could not be analyzed. Conclusions Overall, 24 loci VNTR typing and RFLP typing had similar high-level of discrimination among 95 Beijing strains from Southern Vietnam. However, loci VNTR 154, VNTR 2461 and VNTR 3171 had hardly added any value to the level of discrimination.

  18. Serum testosterone levels and androgen receptor CAG polymorphism correlate with hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute liver failure in male HBV carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Yan Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Augmentation of androgen/androgen receptor (AR pathway may influence chronic hepatitis B (CHB more likely in males. AR activity is modulated by a polymorphic CAG repeat sequence in AR exon 1. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum testosterone levels, CAG repeat numbers and hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute liver failure (ALF. METHODS: Three hundred and seventy eight male CHB patients with ALF and 441 asymptomatic HBV carriers (AsCs were recruited. AR CAG repeats numbers were analyzed. The serum testosterone levels of AsCs, ALFs and patients with hepatitis B flare groups, and sequential serum samples, were assessed quantitatively. RESULTS: The median CAG repeat (M-CAG frequency was significantly higher in ALF patients than AsCs (P<0.001. Patients with M-CAG alleles (P<0.001, OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.1-4.2 had the highest risk for ALF. Serum testosterone levels were significantly higher (P<0.001 at hepatitis flare point (8.2 ± 3.0 ng/mL than inactive phase (6.4 ± 2.0 ng/mL. CHB (8.30 ± 2.71 ng/mL, P = 7.6 × 10(-6 and ALF group (2.61 ± 1.83 ng/mL, P = 1.7 × 10(-17 had significantly different levels of testosterone in comparison with AsCs group (6.56 ± 2.36 ng/mL. The serum testosterone levels sharply decreased from hepatitis flare phase to liver failure phase, and tended to be normal at the recovery phase. Male AsCs with M-CAG alleles had significantly lower serum testosterone levels (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: There was a serum testosterone fluctuation during hepatitis B flare and HBV-related ALF, and the median CAG repeats in AR gene exon 1 were associated with lower serum testosterone levels in asymptomatic HBV carriers and an increased susceptibility to HBV-related ALF.

  19. Distinct Diversity of the cag Pathogenicity Island among Helicobacter pylori Strains in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Azuma, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Yamazaki, Shiho; Ohtani, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Suto, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2004-01-01

    The severity of Helicobacter pylori-related disease is correlated with the presence of a cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Genetic diversity within the cag PAI may have a modifying effect on the pathogenic potential of the infecting strain. We analyzed the complete cag PAI sequences of 11 representative Japanese strains according to their vacA genotypes and clinical effects and examined the relationship between the diversity of the cag PAI and clinical features. The cag PAI genes were divided i...

  20. Evaluation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, N. gonorrhoeae Multiantigen Sequence Typing, and Full-Length porB Gene Sequence Analysis for Molecular Epidemiological Typing

    OpenAIRE

    Heymans, Raymond; Golparian, Daniel; Bruisten, Sylvia M; Schouls, Leo M.; Unemo, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    The performance characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis were evaluated, by comparison with N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing and full-length porB sequence typing. Assessment of the relatedness of intra- and interpatient isolates showed that all three genotyping techniques display a high resolution and typeability.

  1. Interactions between CagA and smoking in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qin Wang; Hong Yan; Paul D Terry; Jian-Sheng Wang; Li Cheng; Wen-An Wu; Sen-Ke Hu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To examine the interactions between cytotoxinassociated gene (CagA ) positive Helicobacter pylori infection and smoking in non-cardiac gastric cancer. METHODS: A case-control study (257 cases and 514 frequency-matched controls) was conducted from September 2008 to July 2010 in Xi'an, China. Cases were newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed non-cardiac cancer. Controls were randomly selected from similar communities to the cases and were further matched by sex and age (± 5 years). A face-to-face interview was performed by the investigators for each participant. Data were obtained using a standardized questionnaire that included questions regarding known or suspected lifestyle and environmental risk factors of gastric cancer. A 5 mL sample of fasting venous blood was taken. CagA infection was serologically detected by enzymelinked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Smoking and CagA infection were statistically significant risk factors of non-cardiac cancer. CagA was categorized in tertiles, and the odds ratio (OR) was 12.4 (95% CI: 6.1-20.3, P = 0.003) for CagA after being adjusted for confounding factors when the highexposure category was compared with the low-exposure category. Smokers had an OR of 5.4 compared with subjects who never smoked (95% CI: 2.3-9.0, P = 0.002). The OR of non-cardiac cancer was 3.5 (95% CI: 1.8-5.3) for non-smokers with CagA infection, 3.5 (95% CI: 1.9-5.1) for smokers without CagA infection, and 8.7 (95% CI: 5.1-11.9) for smokers with CagA infection compared with subjects without these risk factors. After adjusting for confounding factors, the corresponding ORs of non-cardiac cancer were 3.2 (95% CI: 1.5-6.8), 2.7 (95% CI: 1.3-4.9) and 19.5 (95% CI: 10.3-42.2), respectively. There was a multiplicative interaction between smoking and CagA , with a synergistic factor of 2.257 (Z = 2.315, P = 0.021). CONCLUSION: These findings support a meaningful interaction between CagA and smoking for the risk of gastric cancer which may have

  2. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whan, Vicki

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified

  3. Molecular analysis of the (CAGN repeat causing Huntington′s disease in 34 Iranian families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hormozian F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington′s disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by chorea and progressive dementia. The mutation causing the disease has been identified as an unstable expansion of a trinucleotide (CAG n at the 5′ end of the IT 15 gene on chromosome 4. We have analyzed the distribution of CAG repeats in 71 Iranian individuals (34 patients and 37 unaffected family members belonging to 31 unrelated families thought to segregate HD. We found one expanded CAG allele in 22 individuals (65% belonging to 21 unrelated families. In these HD patients, expanded alleles varied from 40 to 83 CAG units and normal alleles varied from 13 to 36 CAGs. A significant negative correlation between age at onset of symptoms and size of the expanded CAG allele was found (r= - 0.51; P=0. 1. In addition, we genotyped 25 unrelated control individuals (total of 50 alleles and found normal CAG repeats varying from 10 to 34 units. In conclusion, our results showed that molecular confirmation of the clinical diagnosis in HD should be sought in all suspected patients, making it possible for adequate genetic counseling. This Study is the first report of molecular diagnosis of Huntington disease among Iranian population and ever in Middle East and with regard to high frequency of consanguinity marriage in this region.

  4. Construction of prokaryotic expression system of 2 148-bp fragment from cagA gene and detection of cagA gene, CagA protein in Helicobacter pyloriisolates and its antibody in sera of patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yan; Yuan Wang; Shi-He Shao; Ya-Fei Mao; Hua-Wen Li; Yi-Hui Luo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct a prokaryotic expression system of a Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) cagA gene fragment and establish enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for detecting CagA and its antibody, so as to understand the manner in which the infection of CagA-expressing H pylori (CagA+ H pylori) isolates cause diseases.METHODS: H pylori strains in gastric biopsy specimens from 156 patients with positive results in rapid urease test were isolated. PCR was used to detect the frequency of cagA gene in the 109 H pylori isolates and to amplify a 2 148-bp fragment (cagA1) of cagA gene from a clinical strain Y06. A prokaryotic expression system of cagA1 gene was constructed,and the expression of the target recombinant protein (rCagA1) was examined by SDS-PAGE. Western blotting and immunodiffusion assay were employed to determine the immunoreactivity and antigenicity of rCagA1, respectively.Two ELISAs were established to detect CagA expression in 109 H pylori isolates and the presence of CagA antibody in the corresponding patients′ sera, and the correlations between infection with CagA+ H pylori and gastritis as well as peptic ulcer were analyzed.RESULTS: Of all the clinical specimens obtained, 80.8%(126/156) were found to have H pylori isolates and 97.2%of the isolates (106/109) were positive for caaA gene. In comparison with the reported data, the cloned cagA1fragment possessed 94.83% and 93.30% homologies with the nucleotide and putative amino acid sequences,respectively. The output of rCagA1 produced by the constructed recombinant prokaryotic expression system was approximately 30% of the total bacterial protein, rCagA1was able to bind to the commercial antibody against the whole-cells of H pylori and to induce the immunized rabbits to produce antibody with an immunodiffusion titer of 1:4. A proportion as high as 92.6% of the H pylori isolates (101/109)expressed CagA and 88.1% of the patients′ serum samples (96/109) were CagA antibody-positive. The percentage of

  5. Evidence of functional brain reorganization on the basis of blood flow changes in the CAG140 knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Stefanko, Daniel P; Guo, Yumei; Toy, William A; Petzinger, Giselle M; Jakowec, Michael W; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2016-06-15

    Neuroimaging, especially functional brain mapping, may provide insights into the distributed involvement of multiple brain regions and loops in disorders classically associated with pathology of a localized region. One example is Huntington's disease (HD), typically classified as a basal ganglia disorder. Here, we report genotypic differences in cerebral perfusion mapping in an HD mouse model characterized by a gene knock-in (KI) of a human exon 1 CAG140 expansion repeat (CAG140 KI mice). Animals were examined at 6 months and compared with wild-type littermates. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was mapped in the awake, nonrestrained, male mouse at rest using [C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography and analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. Our results showed significant changes in rCBF between CAG140 KI and WT mice, such that CAG140 KI animals showed hypoperfusion of the basal ganglia motor circuit and hyperperfusion of cerebellar-thalamic and somatosensory regions. Significant hypoperfusion was also noted in CAG140 KI mice in the prelimbic and cingulate cortex (medial prefrontal area) and the hippocampus - areas associated with cognitive processing and mood. Changes in rCBF were apparent in the absence of motor deficits (rotarod test) or atrophy in the striatum (caudate-putamen) or hemispheric volume. Our results suggest a functional reorganization of whole-brain networks at a presymptomatic stage in the life of the CAG140 KI mouse. Functional brain mapping in animals may, in the future, serve as a translational biomarker for identifying sites of early synaptic change in the HD brain and for directing targeted preclinical molecular studies and clinical therapies. PMID:27082842

  6. Exosomes as nanocarriers for systemic delivery of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factor CagA

    OpenAIRE

    Asako Shimoda; Koji Ueda; Shin Nishiumi; Naoko Murata-Kamiya; Sada-atsu Mukai; Shin-ichi Sawada; Takeshi Azuma; Masanori Hatakeyama; Kazunari Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    CagA, encoded by cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA), is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gastric pathogen involved in the development of upper gastrointestinal diseases. Infection with cagA-positive H. pylori may also be associated with diseases outside the stomach, although the mechanisms through which H. pylori infection promotes extragastric diseases remain unknown. Here, we report that CagA is present in serum-derived extracellular vesicles, known as exosomes, in patient...

  7. A comprehensive sequence and disease correlation analyses for the C-terminal region of CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youlin Xia

    Full Text Available Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is known to be associated with the development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma. Currently, the bacterial factors of H. pylori are reported to be important in the development of gastroduodenal diseases. CagA protein, encoded by the cagA, is the best studied virulence factor of H. pylori. The pathogenic CagA protein contains a highly polymorphic Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA repeat region in the C-terminal. This repeat region is reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases. The segments containing EPIYA motifs have been designated as segments A, B, C, and D; however the classification and disease relation are still unclear. This study used 560 unique CagA sequences containing 1,796 EPIYA motifs collected from public resources, including 274 Western and 286 East Asian strains with clinical data obtained from 433 entries. Fifteen types of EPIYA or EPIYA-like sequences are defined. In addition to four previously reported major segment types, several minor segment types (e.g., segment B', B'' and more than 30 sequence types (e.g., ABC, ABD were defined using our classification method. We confirm that the sequences from Western and East Asian strains contain segment C and D, respectively. We also confirm that strains with two EPIYA segment C have a greater chance of developing gastric cancer than those with one segment C. Our results shed light on the relationships between the types of CagAs, the country of origin of each sequence type, and the frequency of gastric disease.

  8. Translocation of Helicobacter pylori CagA into Gastric Epithelial Cells by Type IV Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbreit, Stefan; Püls, Jürgen; Sedlmaier, Bettina; Gerland, Elke; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2000-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. Strains producing the CagA antigen (cagA+) induce strong gastric inflammation and are strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. We show here that such strains translocate the bacterial protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system, encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. CagA is tyrosine-phosphorylated and induces changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation state of distinct cellular proteins. Modulation of host cells by bacterial protein translocation adds a new dimension to the chronic Helicobacter infection with yet unknown consequences.

  9. Distinct Diversity of vacA, cagA, and cagE Genes of Helicobacter pylori Associated with Peptic Ulcer in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Shiho; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Colonization of the stomach mucosa by Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of acute and chronic gastric pathologies in humans. Several H. pylori virulence genes that may play a role in its pathogenicity have been identified. The most important determinants are vacA and cagA in the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) genes. In the present study, to consider the association of molecular genetics between vacA and the cagPAI regarding clinical outcome, we selected H. pylori strains with various gen...

  10. Transcription of TP0126, Treponema pallidum putative OmpW homolog, is regulated by the length of a homopolymeric guanosine repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Brandt, Stephanie L; Ke, Wujian; Reid, Tara B; Molini, Barbara J; Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie; Ciccarese, Giulia; Drago, Francesco; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    An effective mechanism for introduction of phenotypic diversity within a bacterial population exploits changes in the length of repetitive DNA elements located within gene promoters. This phenomenon, known as phase variation, causes rapid activation or silencing of gene expression and fosters bacterial adaptation to new or changing environments. Phase variation often occurs in surface-exposed proteins, and in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the syphilis agent, it was reported to affect transcription of three putative outer membrane protein (OMP)-encoding genes. When the T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain genome was initially annotated, the TP0126 open reading frame was predicted to include a poly(G) tract and did not appear to have a predicted signal sequence that might suggest the possibility of its being an OMP. Here we show that the initial annotation was incorrect, that this poly(G) is instead located within the TP0126 promoter, and that it varies in length in vivo during experimental syphilis. Additionally, we show that TP0126 transcription is affected by changes in the poly(G) length consistent with regulation by phase variation. In silico analysis of the TP0126 open reading frame based on the experimentally identified transcriptional start site shortens this hypothetical protein by 69 amino acids, reveals a predicted cleavable signal peptide, and suggests structural homology with the OmpW family of porins. Circular dichroism of recombinant TP0126 supports structural homology to OmpW. Together with the evidence that TP0126 is fully conserved among T. pallidum subspecies and strains, these data suggest an important role for TP0126 in T. pallidum biology and syphilis pathogenesis. PMID:25802057

  11. Evaluation of the Pattern of EPIYA Motifs in the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene of Patients with Gastritis and Gastric Adenocarcinoma from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar E Silva, Adenielson; Junior, Mario Ribeiro da Silva; Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Santos, Kemper Nunes; da Costa, Renata Aparecida Andrade; Fecury, Amanda Alves; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2014-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of different diseases. The clinical outcome of infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the EPIYA patterns of strains isolated from patients with gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma and correlate these patterns with the histopathological features. Gastric biopsy samples were selected from 384 patients infected with H. pylori, including 194 with chronic gastritis and 190 with gastric adenocarcinoma. The presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYA motif was determined by PCR. The cagA gene was more prevalent in patients with gastric cancer and was associated with a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity, and development of intestinal metaplasia. The number of EPIYA-C repeats showed a significant association with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.92-7.46, and P = 0.002). A larger number of EPIYA-C motifs were also associated with intestinal metaplasia. In the present study, infection with H. pylori strains harboring more than one EPIYA-C motif in the cagA gene was associated with the development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma but not with neutrophil activity or degree of inflammation. PMID:26904732

  12. Construction of full-length cDNA library and development of EST-derived simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers in Senecio scandens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Gang; Ping, Junjiao; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Lei; Xu, Delin

    2014-12-01

    Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don (Compositae) is a crucial source of Chinese traditional medicine with antibacterial properties. We constructed a cDNA library and obtained expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to show the distribution of gene ontology annotations for mRNAs, using an individual plant with superior antibacterial characteristics. Analysis of comparative genomics indicates that the putative uncharacterized proteins (21.07%) might be derived from "molecular function unknown" clones or rare transcripts. Furthermore, the Compositae had high cross-species transferability of EST-derived simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR), based on valid amplifications of 206 primer pairs developed from the newly assembled expressed sequence tag sequences in Artemisia annua L. Among those EST-SSR markers, 52 primers showed polymorphic amplifications between individuals with contrasting diverse antibacterial traits. Our sequence data and molecular markers will be cost-effective tools for further studies such as genome annotation, molecular breeding, and novel transcript profiles within Compositae species. PMID:25007751

  13. Distinct diversity of the cag pathogenicity island among Helicobacter pylori strains in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Yamazaki, Shiho; Ohtani, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Suto, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2004-06-01

    The severity of Helicobacter pylori-related disease is correlated with the presence of a cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Genetic diversity within the cag PAI may have a modifying effect on the pathogenic potential of the infecting strain. We analyzed the complete cag PAI sequences of 11 representative Japanese strains according to their vacA genotypes and clinical effects and examined the relationship between the diversity of the cag PAI and clinical features. The cag PAI genes were divided into two major groups, a Western and a Japanese group, by phylogenetic analysis based on the entire cag PAI sequences. The predominant Japanese strains formed a Japanese cluster which was different from the cluster formed by Western strains. The diversity of the cag PAI was associated with the vacA and cagA genotypes. All strains with the s1c vacA genotype were in the Japanese cluster. In addition, all strains with the East Asian-type cagA genotype were also in the Japanese cluster. Patients infected with the Japanese-cluster strain had high-grade gastric mucosal atrophy. These results suggest that a distinct diversity of the cag PAI of H. pylori is present among Japanese strains and that this diversity may be involved in the development of atrophic gastritis and may increase the risk for gastric cancer. PMID:15184428

  14. Helicobacter pylori CagA protein polymorphisms and their lack of association with pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicole; Acosta; Andrés; Quiroga; Pilar; Delgado; María; Mercedes; Bravo; Carlos; Jaramillo

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA diversity and to evaluate the association between protein polymorphisms and the occurrence of gastric pathologies. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-two clinical isolates of H. pylori cultured from gastric biopsies obtained from Colombian patients with dyspepsia were included as study material. DNA extracted from isolates was used to determine cagA status, amplifying the C-terminal cagA gene region by polymerase chain reaction. One hundred and six strai...

  15. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  16. An RGD helper sequence in CagL of Helicobacter pylori assists in interactions with integrins and injection of CagA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens eConradi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a specific gastric pathogen that colonizes the stomach in more than 50% of the world’s human population. Infection with this bacterium can induce several types of gastric pathology, ranging from chronic gastritis to peptic ulcers and even adenocarcinoma. Virulent H. pylori isolates encode components of a type IV secretion system (T4SS, which form a pilus for the injection of virulence proteins such as CagA into host target cells. This is accomplished by a specialized adhesin on the pilus surface, the protein CagL, a putative VirB5 ortholog, which binds to host cell β1 integrin, triggering subsequent delivery of CagA across the host cell membrane. Like the human extracellular matrix protein fibronectin, CagL contains an RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif and is able to trigger intracellular signaling pathways by RGD-dependent binding to integrins. While CagL binding to host cells is mediated primarily by the RGD motif, we identified an auxiliary binding motif for CagL-integrin interaction. Here, we report on a surface-exposed FEANE (Phe-Glu-Ala-Asn-Glu interaction motif in spatial proximity to the RGD sequence, which enhances the interactions of CagL with integrins. It will be referred to as RGD helper sequence (RHS. Competitive cell adhesion assays with recombinant wild type CagL and point mutants, competition experiments with synthetic cyclic and linear peptides, and peptide array experiments revealed amino acids essential for the interaction of the RHS motif with integrins. Infection experiments indicate that the RHS motif plays a role in the early interaction of H. pylori T4SS with integrin, to trigger signaling and to inject CagA into host cells. We thus postulate that CagL is a versatile T4SS surface protein equipped with at least two motifs to promote binding to integrins, thereby causing aberrant signaling within host cells and facilitating translocation of CagA into host cells, thus contributing directly to H. pylori

  17. Study of the cytoxin-associated gene a (CagA gene in Helicobacter pylori using gastric biopsies of Iraqi patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham A Kalaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The Helicobacter pylori CagA gene is a major virulence factor that plays an important role in gastric pathologies. The size variation of CagA gene, which is dependent on the 3′ repeat region, contains one or more Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA motifs and CagA multimerization (CM motifs. Four segments flanking the EPIYA motifs, EPIYA −A, −B, −C, or −D, were reported to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. The aim was to determine the roles of EPIYA segments and CM motifs in gastroduodenal pathogenesis in an Iraqi population. Patients and Methods: Gastric biopsies were collected from 210 patients with gastritis, duodenal ulcer (DU, gastric ulcer (GU, and gastric cancer (GC. The EPIYA motif genotyping was determined by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The differences in age, gender, and CagA EPIYA motifs of H. pylori between GC, DU, GU and gastritis patients were analyzed using a χ 2 -test. Results : A total of 22 (45.8% strains had three copies of EPIYA (ABC type, 2 (4.16% had four copies (ABCC type, 6 (12.7% had five copies (ABCCC type, 13 (27.08% had two copies (AB type, 3 (6.25% had the BC, and 2 (4.17% had AC motif. The alignment of the deduced protein sequences confirmed that there were no East Asian type EPIYA-D sequences in Iraqi strains. A significant association was found between increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and GU (P ≤ 0.01 compared with gastritis. Conclusions: The structure of the 3′ region of the CagA gene in Iraqi strains was Western type with a variable number of EPIYA-C and CM motifs. A significant association was found between increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and GU compared with gastritis indicating predictive association with the severity of the disease. The GenBank accession numbers for the partial CagA nucleotide sequences determined in this study are JX164093-JX164112.

  18. Repeated Miscarriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ100 PREGNANCY Repeated Miscarriages • What is recurrent pregnancy loss? • What is the likelihood of having repeated miscarriages? • What is the most common cause of miscarriage? • ...

  19. Genetically unstable CXG repeats are structurally dynamic and have a high propensity for folding. An NMR and UV spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Huang, X; Smith, G K; Yang, X; Gao, X

    1996-11-29

    Recent molecular genetics studies have revealed a correlation between spontaneous, progressive expansion of several DNA trinucleotide repeats and certain hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. Triplet repeat (TR) sequences may be present in structured forms that can mediate the processes interrupting normal cellular replication, transcription, or repair activities, eventually leading to gene mutation. Using high resolution NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods, we probed the solution structures and properties of single-stranded TR sequences. These studies have led to the discovery of a new duplex motif (e-motif), present in CCG repeats, and to the elucidation of the structure of the (CTG)3 duplex. In this paper we provide a global picture of the solution behavior of the human disease-related CXG (X = A, C, G, or T) and the comparison GXC (X = A, or T) TR sequences. All six triplet repeats form antiparallel duplexes. The mismatched bases in CAG and CGG repeat duplexes are rather flexible and they do not appear to form stable, paired conformations. By comparison, GAC repeat duplexes and their mismatched A residues are well-structured. Most interestingly, the structures of the disease-related CXG repeats exhibit a propensity for folding at chain lengths as short as 12 residues. Furthermore, the energy barrier for the formation of homo-duplexes from the corresponding complementary hetero-duplexes are much lower for the CXG TR sequences than for the GAC or GTC TR sequences. These results provide insights into the conformation and physiochemical properties of TR sequences. Thus, a basis is provided for further studies of the behavior of long TR sequences in an effort to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of in vivo expansion and function of TR sequences. PMID:8951379

  20. Cloning and sequencing of cagA gene fragment of Helicobacter pylori with coccoid form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Xue-Feng Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and sequence the cagA gene fragment of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) with coccoid form.METHODS: H pylori strain NCTC11637 were transformed to coccoid form by exposure to antibiotics in subinhibitory concentrations. The coccoid H pyloriwas collected. cagA gene of the coccoid H pylori strain was amplified by PCR.After purified, the target fragment was cloned into plasmid pMD-18T. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-cagA was transformed into E. coli JM109. Positive clones were screened and identified by PCR and digestion with restriction endonucleases. The sequence of inserted fragment was then analysed.RESULTS: cagA gene of 3 444 bp was obtained from the coccoid H pylori genome DNA. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-cagA was constructed, then it was digested by BamH Ⅰ+Sac Ⅰ, and the product of digestion was identical with the predicted one. Sequence analysis showed that the homology of coccoid and the reported original sequence H pylori was 99.7%.CONCLUSION: The recombinant plasmid containing cagA gene from coccoid H pylori has been constructed successfully.The coccoid H pylori contain completed cagA gene, which may be related to pathogenicity of them.

  1. Helicobacter pylori cagL amino acid polymorphisms and its association with gastroduodenal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sanket Kumar; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Tripathi, Aparna; Jaiswal, Virendra; Khatoon, Jahanarah; Ghsohal, Uday Chand; Krishnani, Narendra; Husain, Nuzhat

    2013-07-01

    CagL is a pilus protein of Helicobacter pylori that interacts with host cellular α5β1 integrins through its arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif, guiding proper positioning of the T4SS and translocation of CagA. Deletion or sequence variations of cagL significantly diminished the ability of H. pylori to induce secretion of IL-8 by the host cell. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the association of cagL and its amino acid sequence polymorphisms with gastric cancer (GC), peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) as there are no such studies from India. In total, 200 adult patients (NUD 120, PUD 30, GC 50) who underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by rapid urease test, culture, histopathology, and PCR. The collected isolates were screened for cagL genotype by PCR and assessed for amino acid sequence polymorphisms using sequence translation. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in study population was 52.5%. Most of the isolates were cagL genopositive (86.6%), and all had RGD motif in their amino acid sequences. D58 and K59 polymorphisms in cagL-genopositive strains were significantly higher in GC patients (P < 0.05). Combined D58K59 polymorphism was associated with higher risk of GC (3.8-fold) when compared to NUD. In conclusion, H. pylori cagL amino acid polymorphisms such as D58K59 are correlated with a higher risk of GC in the Indian population. Further studies are required to know the exact role of particular cagL amino acid polymorphisms in the pathogenicity of H. pylori infection. PMID:22941498

  2. Determination of genotypic diversity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies from human and animal origins by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat and IS1311 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomski, Nicolas; Thibault, Virginie C; Karoui, Claudine; de Cruz, Krystel; Cochard, Thierry; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Supply, Philip; Biet, Frank; Boschiroli, María Laura

    2010-04-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are ubiquitous bacteria that can be found in water, food, and other environmental samples and are considered opportunistic pathogens for numerous animal species, mainly birds and pigs, as well as for humans. We have recently demonstrated the usefulness of a PCR-based mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing for the molecular characterization of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium strains exclusively isolated from AIDS patients. In the present study we extended our analysis, based on eight MIRU-VNTR markers, to a strain collection comprehensively comprising the other M. avium subspecies, including M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, isolated from numerous animal species, HIV-positive and HIV-negative humans, and environmental sources. All strains were fully typeable, with the discriminatory index being 0.885, which is almost equal to that obtained by IS1311 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing as a reference. In contrast to IS1311 RFLP typing, MIRU-VNTR typing was able to further discriminate M. avium subsp. avium strains. MIRU-VNTR alleles strongly associated with or specific for M. avium subspecies were detected in several markers. Moreover, the MIRU-VNTR typing-based results were consistent with a scenario of the independent evolution of M. avium subsp. avium/M. avium subsp. silvaticum and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, previously proposed on the basis of multilocus sequence analysis. MIRU-VNTR typing therefore appears to be a convenient typing method capable of distinguishing the three main subspecies and strains of the complex and providing new epidemiological knowledge on MAC. PMID:20107094

  3. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

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    Ricardo Mouro Pinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease gene (HTT CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111 mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111 than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111 . Linkage mapping in (B6x129.Hdh(Q111 F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111 mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111 somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3 complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3. The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest

  4. Diagnostic value of CagA IgG in the process to eradicate Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Bang Yang; Pi Long Wang; Ming Ming Gu; Li Hao Chen; Quan Chen; Lin Zhan

    2000-01-01

    AIM To investigate the diagnostic value of CagA IgG in serum.METHODS Seventy three patients with peptic ulcer infected with HP were eradicated by antibioticstherapy. At pretreatment, wk9 and wk20 after treatment, the detection of Hp in gastric muscosa bybacteriologic method were performed, and CagA and whole-cell antigen of HP igG in serum by ELISAmethod were also performed at the same time.RESULTS The IgG titres of Hp CagA and whole-cell antigen changes in accordance with the efficacy ofHp eradicated. The former with an earlier appearance and a greater number of cases decreased to normallevel in comparison with the latter.CONCLUSION CagA IgG is a better index for observing the effectiveness of the eradication of Hp.

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori cagA genotype among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sueptrakool Wisessombat; Chatruthai Meethai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in dyspepsia patients and its relation to virulence factor cagA gene. Methods: In total, 110 gastric biopsies from dyspeptic patients were comparatively studied using rapid urease test and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Multiplex PCR detected three genes of 16S rRNA, cagA, and ureC. H. pylori was detected in 14 gastric biopsies (13%). Significantly higher numbers of female were infected. Furthermore,cag A gene was found in all H. pylori-positive specimens. In addition, the result indicated that the multiplex PCR with annealing temperature at 57 oC was able to effectively amplify specific products. Conclusions:The results confirmed high prevalence of cagA gene in H. pylori among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

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    Backert Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA/B, SabA, AlpA/B, OipA and HopZ and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS. The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  7. Association of cyclooxygenase-2 expression with Hp-cagA infection in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lin Guo; Li-Er Wang; Shu-Yan Du; Chen-Ling Fan; Li Li; Peng Wang; Yuan Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To observe the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and to investigate the association between COX-2expression and infection with cytotoxic-associated gene A( cagA) positive strair Helicobacter pylori ( Hp) in humangastric cancer, and subsequently to provide fresh ideas forthe early prevention of gastric cancer.METHODS: 32 Specimens of gastric cancer andcorresponding adjacent normal gastric mucosa were obtainedfrom patients who had undergone surgical operations ofgastric cancer. All the samples including 1 case of stomachmalignant lymphoma and 31 cases of gastric adenocarcinomawere confirmed by pathology diagnosis. The expression ofCOX-2 in 32 specimens of gastric cancer and correspondingadjacent normal gastric mucosa was quantitativelydetermined and analyzed with Flow Cytometry, and the levelsof COX-2 protein were compared between specimens withcagA+ Hp infection and those without cagA+ Hp infection.The cagA gene in 32 specimens of gastric cancer wasdetected bypolymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.RESULTS: Twenty-seven of 32 (84 %) specimens of gastriccancer showed over-expression of COX-2, compared withthe adjacent normal gastric mucosa. cagA+ gene weredetected from 19 specimens of gastric cancer, but not fromthe other 13 specimens. The levels of COX-2 protein in 19specimens of gastric cancer with cagA+ Hp infection (thenumber of positive cells was 73.82±18.2) were significantlyhigher than those in the 13 specimens without cagA+ Hpinfection (the number of positive cells was 35.92±22.1).CONCLUSION: COX-2 is overexpressed in gastric cancerand cagA+Hp infection could up-regulate the expression ofCOX-2 in gastric cancer in human. There may also existanother way or channel to regulate the expression of COX-2 in gastric cancer in addition to cagA+Hp infection.Therefore, applying COX-2 selective inhibitors could be aneffective and promising way to prevent gastric cancer.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Backert, Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA\\/B, SabA, AlpA\\/B, OipA and HopZ) and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes) pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA\\/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  9. Repeat associated non-ATG translation initiation: one DNA, two transcripts, seven reading frames, potentially nine toxic entities!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Pearson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Diseases associated with unstable repetitive elements in the DNA, RNA, and amino acids have consistently revealed scientific surprises. Most diseases are caused by expansions of trinucleotide repeats, which ultimately lead to diseases like Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, fragile X syndrome, and a series of spinocerebellar ataxias. These repeat mutations are dynamic, changing through generations and within an individual, and the repeats can be bi-directionally transcribed. Unsuspected modes of pathogenesis involve aberrant loss of protein expression; aberrant over-expression of non-mutant proteins; toxic-gain-of-protein function through expanded polyglutamine tracts that are encoded by expanded CAG tracts; and RNA-toxic-gain-of-function caused by transcripts harboring expanded CUG, CAG, or CGG tracts. A recent advance reveals that RNA transcripts with expanded CAG repeats can be translated in the complete absence of a starting ATG, and this Repeat Associated Non-ATG translation (RAN-translation occurs across expanded CAG repeats in all reading frames (CAG, AGC, and GCA to produce homopolymeric proteins of long polyglutamine, polyserine, and polyalanine tracts. Expanded CTG tracts expressing CUG transcripts also show RAN-translation occurring in all three frames (CUG, UGC, and GCU, to produce polyleucine, polycysteine, and polyalanine. These RAN-translation products can be toxic. Thus, one unstable (CAG•(CTG DNA can produce two expanded repeat transcripts and homopolymeric proteins with reading frames (the AUG-directed polyGln and six RAN-translation proteins, yielding a total of potentially nine toxic entities. The occurrence of RAN-translation in patient tissues expands our horizons of modes of disease pathogenesis. Moreover, since RAN-translation counters the canonical requirements of translation initiation, many new questions are now posed that must be addressed. This review covers RAN-translation and some of the pertinent

  10. Helicobacter pylori CagL Hypervariable Motif: A Global Analysis of Geographical Diversity and Association With Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrell, Rebecca J; Zwickel, Nicolas; Reynolds, John; Bulach, Dieter; Kwok, Terry

    2016-06-15

    Previous studies suggest overrepresentation of particular polymorphisms within the Helicobacter pylori CagL hypervariable motif (CagLHM) in gastric cancer-associated isolates. However, these disease correlations were geographically variable and ambiguous. We compared the disease correlation of several hundred geographically diverse CagL sequences and identified 33 CagLHM sequence combinations with disparate geographical distribution, revealing substantial worldwide CagLHM diversity, particularly within Asian countries. Notably, polymorphisms E59 and I60 were significantly overrepresented, whereas D58 and E62 were underrepresented, in gastric cancer-associated H. pylori isolates worldwide. Thus, CagLHM regional diversity may contribute to the varied prevalence of H. pylori-related gastric cancer observed in diverse populations. PMID:26908724

  11. Intergeneration CAG expansion in a Wuhan juvenile-onset Huntingto ndisease family%武汉地区CAG扩增突变致青少年发病的亨廷顿舞蹈病的家系分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘媛; 沈滟; 李和; 王慧; 杨真荣; 陈燕; 唐艳平

    2007-01-01

    目的 对青少年发病的亨廷顿舞蹈病(Huntington disease)家系进行致病IT15基因早期诊断分析,为家系成员提供遗传咨询,并为后续的HD发病机制及实验治疗研究提供依据.方法 按照知情同意原则抽取家系成员外周血,提取基因组DNA,采用改良的降落PCR方法扩增IT15基因致病区域,DNA测序检测异常等位基因(CAG)n三核苷酸重复次数.结果 在该家系三代25名成员中,共发现8名致病IT15基因携带者,其中,Ⅲ10、Ⅲ12、Ⅲ14、Ⅳ3和Ⅴ2 CAG三核苷酸的拷贝数均为48,Ⅳ11和Ⅳ12均为(CAG)67,Ⅳ14为(CAG)63,而对照组35名正常人的CAG三核苷酸的拷贝数为8-25,两者之间没有重叠.结论 家系中第四代致病基因携带者Ⅳ14与第三代患者Ⅲ10比较,CAG三核苷酸重复次数增加15次,即本家系IT15基因在传递过程中发生了扩增突变.同时,扩增突变导致该家系出现青少年发病及遗传早现现象.%Objective To make early diagnosis of IT15 gene mutation in a Wuhan juvenile-onset Huntington disease (HD)family, for providing them with genetic counseling, and making preparation for the further research on pathogenesis and experimental therapy of HD. Methods According to the principle of informed consent, we extracted genomic DNA from peripheral blood samples and carried genetic diagnosis of pathogenic exon 1 of IT15 gene by modified touchdown PCR and DNA sequencing methods. Results Eight of twenty-five family members carried abnormal allele: Ⅲ10, Ⅲ12, Ⅲ14, Ⅳ3,and Ⅴ2 carried (CAG) 48, Ⅳ11 and Ⅳ12 carried (CAG) 67, and Ⅳ14 carried (CAG) 63, in contrast with the 8-25 CAG trinucleotides in the members of control group. Ⅳ14 carried 15 more CAG trinucleotides than her father Ⅲ10. Conclusion The results definitely confirm the diagnosis of HD and indicate the CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion of IT15 gene in this HD family.In addition, CAG expansion results in juvenile-onset and anticipation (characterized

  12. Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genotypes in Cuban and Venezuelan populations

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    Diana Ortiz-Princz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA/vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA among patients with chronic gastritis in Cuba and Venezuela. Gastric antrum biopsies were taken for culture, DNA extraction and PCR analysis. Amplification of vacA and cagA segments was performed using two regions of cagA: 349 bp were amplified with the F1/B1 primers and the remaining 335 bp were amplified with the B7629/B7628 primers. The VA1-F/VA1-R set of primers was used to amplify the 259-bp (s1 or 286-bp (s2 product and the VAG-R/VAG-F set of primers was used to amplify the 567-bp (m1 or 642-bp (m2 regions of vacA. cagA was detected in 87% of the antral samples from Cuban patients and 80.3% of those from Venezuelan patients. All possible combinations of vacA regions were found, with the exception of s2/m1. The predominant combination found in both countries was s1/m1. The percentage of cagA+ strains was increased by the use of a second set of primers and a greater number of strains was amplified with the B7629/B7628 primers in the Cuban patients (p = 0.0001. There was no significant difference between the presence of the allelic variants of vacA and cagA in both populations. The predominant genotype was cagA+/s1m1 in both countries. The results support the necessary investigation of isolates circulating among the human population in each region.

  13. cagE as a biomarker of the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori

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    Ivy Bastos Ramis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastro-duodenal diseases. Genes related to pathogenicity have been described for H. pylori and some of them appear to be associated with more severe clinical outcomes of the infection. The present study investigates the role of cagE as a pathogenicity biomarker of H. pylori compare it to cagA, vacA, iceA and babA2 genes and correlate with endoscopic diagnoses. Methods Were collected biopsy samples of 144 dyspeptic patients at the Hospital of the Federal University of Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. After collection, the samples were sent for histological examination, DNA extraction and detection of all putative pathogenicity genes by PCR. Results Of the 144 patients undergoing endoscopy, 57 (39.6% presented H. pylori by histological examination and PCR by detection of the ureA gene. Based on the endoscopic diagnoses, 45.6% (26/57 of the patients had erosive gastritis, while 54.4% (31/57 had enanthematous gastritis. The genes cagA, cagE, vacAs1/m1, vacAs1/m2 and iceA1 were related to erosive gastritis, while the genes vacAs2/m2, iceA2 and babA2 were associated to enanthematous gastritis. We found a statistically significant association between the presence of cagE and the endoscopic diagnosis. However, we detect no statistically significant association between the endoscopic diagnosis and the presence of cagA, vacA, iceA and babA2, although a biological association has been suggested. Conclusions Thus, cagE could be a risk biomarker for gastric lesions and may contribute to a better evaluation of the H. pylori pathogenic potential and to the prognosis of infection evolution in the gastric mucosa.

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) in an Egyptian family presenting with polyphagia and marked CAG expansion in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aleem, Alice; Zaki, Maha S

    2008-03-01

    We describe an Egyptian family having SCA2 affecting three generations with marked molecular and clinical anticipation observed in the index case. Our proband was a male child starting as early as 2 years old with progressive extrapyramidal manifestations, slow eye movements and cognitive impairment. A history of nonspecific mild developmental delay was recorded. The patient lost all cognitive functions, had persistent dystonic posture, trophic changes, vasomotor instability, dysphagia and died at the age of 7 years. The age at presentation among other affected family members varied between 11 and 45 years old across three generations. The early common neurological symptoms were choreoathetotic movements, myoclonic jerk, gait difficulty, expressionless face and emotional liability. Later, overt ataxia, incoordination, dysarthria, mild dementia and slow eye saccades predominated. Brisk tendon reflexes were detected in three cases. Peripheral nerve affection was a late manifestation. Interestingly, polyphagia and obesity were striking manifestations in the middle stage of the disease; an observation that might support a previously suggested relation between the ataxin-2 gene and body weight. The proband showed an amplified allele with marked CAG expansion in the form of a smear sized 69-75 repeats resulted from maternal transmission. To our knowledge, our index case is the second report in the literature presenting with infantile onset SCA2 and intermediate repeat expansion. This family expands the phenotypic spectrum of early onset SCA2 and points out the importance of considering SCA2 gene analysis in children with progressive neurological impairment and abnormal movements with or without polyphagia. PMID:18297329

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Fe 3 O 4 @C@Ag nanocomposites and their antibacterial performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Haiqing; Cui, Bin; Zhou, Junhong; Zhang, Lulu; Zhang, Ji; Guo, Xiaohui; Guo, Huilin

    2011-09-01

    We synthesized Fe 3O 4@C@Ag nanocomposites through a combination of solvothermal, hydrothermal, and chemical redox reactions. Characterization of the resulting samples by X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and magnetic measurement is reported. Compared to Fe 3O 4@Ag nanocomposites, the Fe 3O 4@C@Ag nanocomposites showed enhanced antibacterial activity. The Fe 3O 4@C@Ag nanocomposites were able to almost entirely prevent growth of Escherichia coli when the concentration of Ag nanoparticles was 10 μg/mL. Antibacterial activity of the Fe 3O 4@C@Ag nanocomposites was maintained for more than 40 h at 37 °C. The intermediate carbon layer not only protects magnetic core, but also improves the dispersion and antibacterial activity of the silver nanoparticles. The magnetic core can be used to control the specific location of the antibacterial agent (via external magnetic field) and to recycle the residual silver nanoparticles. The Fe 3O 4@C@Ag nanocomposites will have potential uses in many fields as catalysts, absorbents, and bifunctional magnetic-optical materials.

  16. ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori cagA infection: evidence of an association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE Mattos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection appear to be dependent on a host of genetic traits and virulence factors possessed by this microorganism. This paper aimed to investigate the association between the ABO histo-blood groups and H. pylori cagA infections. Genomic DNA samples (n = 110 of gastric biopsies obtained from patients with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcers (n = 25 and chronic active gastritis (n = 85 were analyzed by PCR using specific primers for the cagA gene. Of the samples, 66.4% (n = 73 tested positive and 33.6% (n = 37 negative for the gene. The cagA strain was predominant in peptic ulcers (n = 21; 84.0% compared with chronic active gastritis (n = 52; 61.2% (p = 0.05; OR 3.332; 95% CI: 1.050-10.576. Additionally, the cagA strain was prevalent in the type O blood (48/63; 76.2% compared with other ABO phenotypes (25/47; 53.2% (p = 0.01; OR 2.816; 95% CI: 1.246-6.364. These results suggest that H. pylori cagA infection is associated with the O blood group in Brazilian patients suffering from chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcers.

  17. Antibacterial activity of grape extracts on cagA-positive and -negative Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, S; D'Addario, C; Braconi, D; Bernardini, G; Salvini, L; Bonechi, C; Figura, N; Santucci, A; Rossi, C

    2009-11-01

    There is considerable interest in alternative/adjuvant approaches for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori using biologically active compounds, especially antioxidants from plants. In the present work, we tested the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of hydro-alcoholic extracts from Colorino, Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon grape cultivars against H. pylori G21 (cagA-negative, cagA-) and 10K, (cagApositive, cagA+) clinical isolates. We determined the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) by incubating strain suspensions in Brucella broth with fetal bovine serum and samples at different concentrations in a final volume of 100 microl in a microaerobic atmosphere. After incubation, subcultures were carried out on Brucella agar plates which were incubated for 3-5 days in a microaerobic environment. The lowest concentration in broth, where the subculture on agar showed complete absence of growth, was considered the MBC.The Colorino extract showed the highest antibacterial activity against G21 strain (MBC=1.35 mg/ml), while Sangiovese and Carbernet MBCs were 4.0 mg/ml ca. H. pylori 10K was only susceptible to Colorino after 48 hours (MBC = 3.57 mg/ml). Resveratrol exhibited the highest antibacterial activity. interestingly, the most pathogenic strain (10K) was less susceptible to both the grape extracts and the isolated compounds. These results suggest that the administration of grape extracts and wine constituents, in addition to antibiotics, might be useful in the treatment of H. pylori infection. Should the reduced susceptibility of 10K strain be extended to all the cagA+ H. pylori isolates, which are endowed with cancer promoter activity, this observation may help explain why the organisms expressing CagA are more closely associated with atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinoma development. PMID:19933041

  18. The EPIYA-ABCC motif pattern in CagA of Helicobacter pylori is associated with peptic ulcer and gastric cancer in Mexican population

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy Omar; Poblete, Tomás Manuel; Román-Román, Adolfo; Reyes, Salomón; de Sampedro, José; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; ILLADES-AGUIAR, BERENICE; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori chronic infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA)-positive H. pylori strains increase the risk of gastric pathology. The carcinogenic potential of CagA is linked to its polymorphic EPIYA motif variants. The goals of this study were to investigate the frequency of cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori in Mexican patients with gastric pathologies and to assess the association of cagA EPIYA moti...

  19. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine M Hölter

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  20. 18F-FDG PET uptake in the pre-Huntington disease caudate affects the time-to-onset independently of CAG expansion size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test in a longitudinal follow-up study whether basal glucose metabolism in subjects with a genetic risk of Huntington disease (HD) may influence the onset of manifest symptoms. The study group comprised 43 presymptomatic (preHD) subjects carrying the HD mutation. They underwent a 18F-FDG PET scan and were prospectively followed-up for at least 5 years using the unified HD rating scale to detect clinical changes. Multiple regression analysis included subject's age, CAG mutation size and glucose uptake as variables in a model to predict age at onset. Of the 43 preHD subjects who manifested motor symptoms, suggestive of HD, after 5 years from the PET scan, 26 showed a mean brain glucose uptake below the cut-off of 1.0493 in the caudate, significantly lower than the 17 preHD subjects who remained symptom-free (P < 0.0001). This difference was independent of mutation size. Measurement of brain glucose uptake improved the CAG repeat number and age-based model for predicting age at onset by 37 %. A reduced level of glucose metabolism in the brain caudate may represent a predisposing factor that contributes to the age at onset of HD in preHD subjects, in addition to the mutation size. (orig.)

  1. cagA positive Helicobacter pylori in Brazilian children related to chronic gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano Lobo Gatti; Roger de Lábio; Luiz Carlos da Silva; Marília de Arruda Cardoso Smith; Spencer Luiz Marques Payão

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium. It colonizes the gastric mucosa of humans and persists for decades if not treated. Helicobacter pylori infection affects more than half of the world's population and invariably results in chronic gastritis. The cagA gene is present in about 60 to 70% of H. pylori strains; it encodes a high-molecular-weight protein (120 to 140 kDa) and several investigators have noted a correlation between strains that possess cagA and the severit...

  2. L'erbario del Prof. Manlio Chiappini (1924-1998) in Herbarium CAG

    OpenAIRE

    Curreli, Federica; Fogu, Maria Caterina

    2000-01-01

    The herbarium of Chiappini, held in Herbarium CAG of Cagliari University, is presented. Prof. Manlio Chiappini, who dead the 4th of january 1998, teached Botany at the Athenaeum of Cagliari from 1965 to 1987 and from 1965 to 1986 he was director of Botanical Institute and Botanical gardens of Cagliari University. From a research carried out in Herbarium CAG is shown that Chiappini’s herbarium is compound of 1262 exsiccata, referred to 630 specific and subspecific entities (about the 30% of Sa...

  3. Significant association of cagA positive Helicobacter pylori strains with risk of premature myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, M.; Stephens, J.; Thompson, J.; Rathbone, B; Samani, N

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether genetic diversity of Helicobacter pylori influences its association with coronary heart disease, and specifically whether the risk is confined to infection with the more virulent strains bearing the cytotoxin associated gene-A (cagA) antigen.
DESIGN AND SETTING—Case-control study in hospital admitting unselected patients with myocardial infarction.
METHODS AND SUBJECTS—Serological status for cagA and H pylori were determined in 342 cases of acute myocardial in...

  4. CagA and VacA Helicobacter pylori antibodies in gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suriani, Renzo; Colozza, Maurilio; Cardesi, Enrico; Mazzucco, Dario; Marino, Maria; Grosso, Silvia; Sanseverinati, Sabina; Venturini, Ivo; Borghi, Athos; Zeneroli, Maria Luisa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with different genotypes of virulent Helicobacter pylori strains (cytotoxin-associated gene A [CagA]-and/or vacuolating cytotoxin A [VacA]-positive) can play a role in the development of atrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer (DU) and gastric cancer (GC).OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with GC and H pylori-negative histological staining had previously been infected with H pylori CagA- and/or VacA-positive virulent strains.METHODS: Twenty-three GC patients with a mea...

  5. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Thailand: A Nationwide Study of the CagA Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Uchida

    Full Text Available The risk to develop gastric cancer in Thailand is relatively low among Asian countries. In addition, the age-standardized incidence rate (ASR of gastric cancer in Thailand varies with geographical distribution; the ASR in the North region is 3.5 times higher than that in the South region. We hypothesized that the prevalence of H. pylori infection and diversity of CagA phenotype contributes to the variety of gastric cancer risk in various regions of Thailand.We conducted a nationwide survey within Thailand. We determined H. pylori infection prevalence by detecting H. pylori, using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. The anti-CagA antibody and anti-East-Asian type CagA antibody (α-EAS Ab, which showed high accuracy in several East Asian countries, were used to determine CagA phenotype.Among 1,546 patients from four regions, including 17 provinces, the overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 45.9% (710/1,546. Mirroring the prevalence of H. pylori infection, histological scores were the lowest in the South region. Of the 710 H. pylori-positive patients, 93.2% (662 were immunoreactive with the anti-CagA antibody. CagA-negative strain prevalence in the South region was significantly higher than that in other regions (17.9%; 5/28; p < 0.05. Overall, only 77 patients (11.6% were immunoreactive with the α-EAS Ab. There were no differences in the α-EAS Ab immunoreactive rate across geographical regions.This is the first study using immunohistochemistry to confirm H. pylori infections across different regions in Thailand. The prevalence of East-Asian type CagA H. pylori in Thailand was low. The low incidence of gastric cancer in Thailand may be attributed to the low prevalence of precancerous lesions. The low incidence of gastric cancer in the South region might be associated with the lower prevalence of H. pylori infection, precancerous lesions, and CagA-positive H. pylori strains, compared with that in the other regions.

  6. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  7. Inhibition of α-ketoglutarate-and pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes in E. coli by a glutathione S-transferase containing a pathological length poly-Q domain: A possible role of energy deficit in neurological diseases associated with poly-Q expansions?

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Arthur J.L.; Sheu, K-F. Rex; Burke, James R.; Onodera, Osamu; Strittmatter, Warren J.; Roses, Allen D.; Blass, John P.

    1998-01-01

    At least seven adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease (HD), are caused by genes containing expanded CAG triplets within their coding regions. The expanded CAG repeats give rise to extended stretches of polyglutamines (Qn) in the proteins expressed by the affected genes. Generally, n ≥40 in affected individuals and ≤36 in clinically unaffected individuals. The expansion has been proposed to confer a “toxic gain of function” to the mutated protein. Poly-Q domains...

  8. Clinical significance of infection with cag A and vac A positive helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical relevance of infection with different Helicobacter pylori strains was reviewed in this paper. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection most probably include acne rosacea and chronic urticaria, while the importance of H. pylori infection for pathogenesis of growth retardation in children, iron deficiency anemia, coronary heart disease, stroke and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura remains vague. The expression of two H. pylori proteins, cytotoxin associated protein (cag A and vacuolization cytotoxin (vac A is considered to be related with pathogenicity of the bacterium. It is clear that presence of cag A+ strains is important for development of peptic ulcer; nevertheless, it is also protective against esophageal reflux disease. On the other hand, cag A+ strains are common in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma patients, but it seems that certain subtypes of vac A cytotoxin are more important risk factors. Infection with cag A+ strains is more common in patients with acne rosacea, stroke and coronary heart disease.

  9. Diverse Characteristics of the cagA Gene of Helicobacter pylori Strains Collected from Patients from Southern Vietnam with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer▿

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Bui Xuan; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Hiroshi TANAKA; Ly, Le Thanh; Thong, Tran Minh; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Van Long, Dao; Furumatsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases is related to the diversity of Helicobacter pylori strains. CagA-positive strains are more likely to cause gastric cancer than CagA-negative strains. Based on EPIYA (Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala) motifs at the carboxyl terminus corresponding to phosphorylation sites, H. pylori CagA is divided into East Asian CagA and Western CagA. The former type prevails in East Asia and is more closely associated with gastric cancer. The present study used full sequences o...

  10. Induction of CD69 expression by cagPAI-positive Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Mori; Chie Ishikawa; Masachika Senba

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and elucidate the molecular mech-anism that regulates inducible expression of CD69 by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection.METHODS: The expression levels of CD69 in a T-cell line, Jurkat, primary human peripheral blood mononu-clear cells (PBMCs), and CD4+T cells, were assessed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. Activation of CD69 promoter was detected by reporter gene. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in Jurkat cells infected with H. pylori was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The role of NF-κB signaling in H. pylori -induced CD69 expression was analyzed using inhibitors of NF-κB and dominant-negative mutants. The isogenic mutants with disrupted cag pathogenicity island ( cagPAI) and virD4 were used to elucidate the role of cagPAI-encoding type Ⅳ secretion system and CagA in CD69 expression.RESULTS: CD69 staining was detected in mucosal lymphocytes and macrophages in specimens of pa-tients with H. pylori -positive gastritis. Although cagPAI-positive H. pylori and an isogenic mutant of virD4 induced CD69 expression, an isogenic mutant of cag-PAI failed to induce this in Jurkat cells. H. pylori also induced CD69 expression in PBMCs and CD4+T cells. The activation of the CD69 promoter by H. pylori was mediated through NF-κB. Transfection of dominant-negative mutants of IκBs, IκB kinases, and NF-κB-inducing kinase inhibited H. pylori -induced CD69 activation. Inhibitors of NF-κB suppressed H. pylori -induced CD69 mRNA expression.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that H. pylori in-duces CD69 expression through the activation of NF-κB. cagPAI might be relevant in the induction of CD69 expression in T cells. CD69 in T cells may play a role in H. pylori -induced gastritis.

  11. Quantitative analysis of CagA type IV secretion by Helicobacter pylori reveals substrate recognition and translocation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindele, Franziska; Weiss, Evelyn; Haas, Rainer; Fischer, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial type IV secretion systems are protein transporters with a remarkable diversity of substrates and substrate recognition mechanisms. Type IV-secreted proteins often contain C-terminal secretion signals, but may also require other regions for recognition as secretory substrates, or for full secretion efficiency. For example, type IV secretion of CagA, a major pathogenicity factor of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, depends on a C-terminal signal and on N-terminal protein regions. To examine the involvement of individual CagA regions for type IV secretion efficiency, we have established and evaluated a β-lactamase-dependent reporter system which allows quantitative determination of translocation into host cells. For validation, we used this reporter system to obtain quantitative data for type IV secretion of CagA variants with sequential C-terminal truncations. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the CagA C-terminus revealed that none of the characteristic charged residues in this region is necessary for type IV secretion. Translocation rates measured for CagA variants with N-terminal deletions show that CagA does not have an N-terminal signal sequence, but requires its N-terminal domain for efficient secretion. Finally, we provide evidence that only newly synthesized CagA protein is translocated, supporting a model in which type IV secretion is coupled to protein biosynthesis. PMID:26713727

  12. A transgenic Drosophila model demonstrates that the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein functions as a eukaryotic Gab adaptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Botham

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with a spectrum of diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA protein of H. pylori, which is translocated into host cells via a type IV secretion system, is a major risk factor for disease development. Experiments in gastric tissue culture cells have shown that once translocated, CagA activates the phosphatase SHP-2, which is a component of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK pathways whose over-activation is associated with cancer formation. Based on CagA's ability to activate SHP-2, it has been proposed that CagA functions as a prokaryotic mimic of the eukaryotic Grb2-associated binder (Gab adaptor protein, which normally activates SHP-2. We have developed a transgenic Drosophila model to test this hypothesis by investigating whether CagA can function in a well-characterized Gab-dependent process: the specification of photoreceptors cells in the Drosophila eye. We demonstrate that CagA expression is sufficient to rescue photoreceptor development in the absence of the Drosophila Gab homologue, Daughter of Sevenless (DOS. Furthermore, CagA's ability to promote photoreceptor development requires the SHP-2 phosphatase Corkscrew (CSW. These results provide the first demonstration that CagA functions as a Gab protein within the tissue of an organism and provide insight into CagA's oncogenic potential. Since many translocated bacterial proteins target highly conserved eukaryotic cellular processes, such as the RTK signaling pathway, the transgenic Drosophila model should be of general use for testing the in vivo function of bacterial effector proteins and for identifying the host genes through which they function.

  13. Variation in number of cagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation motifs between cultured Helicobacter pylori and biopsy strain DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anneli; Ryberg, Anna; Nosouhi Dehnoei, Marjan; Borch, Kurt; Monstein, Hans-Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori cagA gene encodes a cytotoxin which is activated by phosphorylation after entering the host epithelial cell. Phosphorylation occurs on specific tyrosine residues within EPIYA motifs in the variable 3'-region. Four different cagA EPIYA motifs have been defined according to the surrounding amino acid sequence; EPIYA-A, -B, -C and -D. Commonly, EPIYA-A and -B are followed by one or more EPIYA-C or -D motif. Due to observed discrepancies in cagA genotypes in cultured H. py...

  14. High Prevalence of cagA- and babA2-Positive Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Chih-Ho; Kuo, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Ya-Chi; Chao, Fang-Yu; Poon, Sek-Kwong; Chang, Chi-Sen; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2002-01-01

    Two virulence markers, cagA and babA2, were characterized by PCR in 101 Helicobacter pylori isolates from a population in Taiwan. cagA was detected in 99% of the isolates, while babA2 was present in all of the isolates. Base deletions and substitutions at the forward babA2 primer annealing sites were found. Given their high prevalence, cagA and babA2 cannot be useful markers for predicting the high-risk patients of H. pylori infection in Taiwan.

  15. CagA+ H pylori infection is associated with polarization of T helper cell immune responses in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Kui Wang; Hui-Fang Zhu; Bang-Shun He; Zhen-Yu Zhang; Zhi-Tan Chen; Zi-Zheng Wang; Guan-Ling Wu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immune responses including local and systemic immunity induced by infection with H pylori, especially with CagA+ H pylori strains and the underlying immunopathogenesis.METHODS: A total of 711 patients with different gastric lesions were recruited to determine the presence of H pylori infection and cytotoxin associated protein A (CagA), the presence of T helper (Th) cells and regulatory T (Treg)cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs),expression of plasma cytokines, and RNA and protein expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 in gastric biopsies and PBMCs were determined by rapid urease test, urea [14C]breath test, immunoblotting test, flow cytometry, real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Of the patients, 629 (88.47%) were infected with H pylori; 506 (71.16%) with CagA+ and 123 (17.30%) with CagA- strains. Among patients infected with CagA+ H pylori strains, Th1-mediated cellular immunity was associated with earlier stages of gastric carcinogenesis, while Th2-mediated humoral immunity dominated the advanced stages and was negatively associated with an abundance of Treg cells. However,there was no such tendency in Th1/Th2 polarization in patients infected with CagA- H pylori strains and those without H pylori infection,CONCLUSION: Polarization of Th cell immune responses occurs in patients with CagA+ H pylori infection, which is associated with the stage and severity of gastric pathology during the progression of gastric carcinogenesis. This finding provides further evidence for a causal role of CagA+ H pylori infection in the immunopathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  16. Assessment of East Asian-type cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori using stool specimens from asymptomatic healthy Japanese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Itaru; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kimoto, Ai; Fujimoto, Saori; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2009-09-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that CagA, a virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori and known to have multiple genotypes, plays a critical role in the development of stomach cancer. However, the prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori strains and the cagA genotypes have not been well studied in healthy individuals because of the difficulty in collecting gastric specimens. In the present study, we assessed the prevalence of infection with H. pylori, particularly the strains with the East Asian cagA genotype (which is more potent in causing gastric diseases), among healthy asymptomatic Japanese individuals by a noninvasive method using stool specimens. The H. pylori antigen was detected in 40.3 % of healthy asymptomatic adult individuals (n=186) enrolled in the study. For the detection and genotyping of the cagA gene, DNA was extracted from the stool specimens of these individuals and analysed by PCR. We detected the East Asian cagA genotype in the DNA samples of a significantly high number (63.1 %) of healthy asymptomatic Japanese individuals. These results indicate that a significant number of asymptomatic healthy Japanese individuals were infected with highly virulent H. pylori. PMID:19528144

  17. The Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin CagA is essential for suppressing host heat shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Lang, Ben; J Gorrell, Rebecca; Tafreshi, Mona; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Kwok, Terry; T Price, John

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections typically elicit a strong Heat Shock Response (HSR) in host cells. However, the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has the unique ability to repress this response, the mechanism of which has yet to be elucidated. This study sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms by which H. pylori down-modulates host HSP expression upon infection. Examination of isogenic mutant strains of H. pylori defective in components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS), identified the secretion substrate, CagA, to be essential for down-modulation of the HSPs HSPH1 (HSP105), HSPA1A (HSP72), and HSPD1 (HSP60) upon infection of the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Ectopic expression of CagA by transient transfection was insufficient to repress HSP expression in AGS or HEK293T cells, suggesting that additional H. pylori factors are required for HSP repression. RT-qPCR analysis of HSP gene expression in AGS cells infected with wild-type H. pylori or isogenic cagA-deletion mutant found no significant change to account for reduced HSP levels. In summary, this study identified CagA to be an essential bacterial factor for H. pylori-mediated suppression of host HSP expression. The novel finding that HSPH1 is down-modulated by H. pylori further highlights the unique ability of H. pylori to repress the HSR within host cells. Elucidation of the mechanism by which H. pylori achieves HSP repression may prove to be beneficial in the identification of novel mechanisms to inhibit the HSR pathway and provide further insight into the interactions between H. pylori and the host gastric epithelium. PMID:26928021

  18. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Man [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Li, Fu-gang [Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China); Xie, Xi-sheng [Department of Nephrology, Second Clinical Medical Institution of North Sichuan Medical College (Nanchong Central Hospital), Nanchong City 637400 (China); Wang, Shao-qing [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Fan, Jun-ming, E-mail: junmingfan@163.com [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  19. Prevalence and Correlation with Clinical Diseases of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA Genotype among Gastric Patients from Northeast China

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes have significant genetic heterogenicity, resulting in different clinical outcomes. Northeast part of China has reported high prevalence of H. pylori infections and gastric cancer. Hence, we investigated the H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes with clinical outcomes in Northeast China. Gastric tissue samples (n = 169), chronic gastritis (GIs), gastric ulcer (GU), and gastric cancer (GC) were analysed for 16S rRNA ureA, cagA, and cagA genotypes by PCR. A to...

  20. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sahara Shu; Sugimoto Mitsushige; Vilaichone Ratha-Korn; Mahachai Varocha; Miyajima Hiroaki; Furuta Takahisa; Yamaoka Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori stra...

  1. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells

  2. 家族性亨廷顿病临床和(CAG)n多态性分析%The polymorphism analysis of (CAG)n gene in Huntington's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初海鹰; 王剑锋; 杨佩满; 黄尚志

    2003-01-01

    @@ 亨廷顿病(Huntington's disease, HD)是一种常染色体显性遗传的基底节和大脑皮层变性疾病,临床特征为慢性进行性的舞蹈样动作和痴呆.1993年,分离获得HD相关基因IT15,并确定其开放阅读框架5'端多态性CAG三核苷酸重复序列的过度扩展为致病的突变[1],正常人群(CAG)n拷贝数为11-34个.通过检测CAG拷贝数,可从基因水平确诊HD.基于此,我们对一个家族性HD家系两个病例进行了基因分析.

  3. A yeast tRNA mutant that causes pseudohyphal growth exhibits reduced rates of CAG codon translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Alain J; Betney, Russell; Ciandrini, Luca; Schwenger, Alexandra C M; Romano, M Carmen; Stansfield, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the SUP70 gene encodes the CAG-decoding tRNA(Gln)(CUG). A mutant allele, sup70-65, induces pseudohyphal growth on rich medium, an inappropriate nitrogen starvation response. This mutant tRNA is also a UAG nonsense suppressor via first base wobble. To investigate the basis of the pseudohyphal phenotype, 10 novel sup70 UAG suppressor alleles were identified, defining positions in the tRNA(Gln)(CUG) anticodon stem that restrict first base wobble. However, none conferred pseudohyphal growth, showing altered CUG anticodon presentation cannot itself induce pseudohyphal growth. Northern blot analysis revealed the sup70-65 tRNA(Gln)(CUG) is unstable, inefficiently charged, and 80% reduced in its effective concentration. A stochastic model simulation of translation predicted compromised expression of CAG-rich ORFs in the tRNA(Gln)(CUG)-depleted sup70-65 mutant. This prediction was validated by demonstrating that luciferase expression in the mutant was 60% reduced by introducing multiple tandem CAG (but not CAA) codons into this ORF. In addition, the sup70-65 pseudohyphal phenotype was partly complemented by overexpressing CAA-decoding tRNA(Gln)(UUG), an inefficient wobble-decoder of CAG. We thus show that introducing codons decoded by a rare tRNA near the 5' end of an ORF can reduce eukaryote translational expression, and that the mutant tRNA(CUG)(Gln) constitutive pseudohyphal differentiation phenotype correlates strongly with reduced CAG decoding efficiency. PMID:23146061

  4. The frequency of Helicobacter pylor infection and cagA expression in the Korean patients with gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori infection had been approved as a group 1 carcinogen by the international agency for research on cancer. However the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not so definite in South Asia including Korea, and the role of cagA gene of H.pylori in gastric carcinogenesis was a controversial issue. The aims of this study were firstly to study in vivo expression frequency of 16S rRNA and cagA gene of H.pylori, secondly to study the association between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer, the association between cagA expression and gastric cancer in Korean patients. In vivo expression rate of 16S rRNA was 74 % of gastric carcinoma patients and cagA expression rate was 51 % of gastric carcinoma patients with H.pylori infection. Although 90 % of gastric carcinoma patients had H.pylori infection, the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not significant. And there was no significant association between cagA expression and gastric carcinoma. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  5. An inverse relationship between CagA+ strains of Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of erosive GERD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is investigating the association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and its cytogenetic-associated gene A (cag A) strain with reflux esophagitis. In a case-control setting (May 2005-2006), patients with reflux esophagitis (case group) were compared with age and gender matched people suffering from symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease with normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings (control group) in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The rates of H. pylori and its cagA positive infections were separately compared between the 2 groups and the subgroups with different severity of reflux esophagitis. Ninety-two and 93 patients were enrolled in the case and control groups. The rate of H.pylori infection was significantly lower in case group (81.5%versus 87.10%, p=0.29, odd ratio 0.654, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.293 to 1.495). The CagA positive infections were found significantly more frequent in the control group (59.1% versus 40.2%, p=0.01, odd ratio 0.465, 95% CI 0.258 to 0.836). There was no significant difference between the severity subgroups of the disease for H. pylori (p=0.30) or cagA positive infection rates (p=0.40). The cagA positive strains might have a protective effect against reflux esophagitis. (author)

  6. The frequency of Helicobacter pylor infection and cagA expression in the Korean patients with gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sook Hyang; Kim, Yoo Chul [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection had been approved as a group 1 carcinogen by the international agency for research on cancer. However the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not so definite in South Asia including Korea, and the role of cagA gene of H.pylori in gastric carcinogenesis was a controversial issue. The aims of this study were firstly to study in vivo expression frequency of 16S rRNA and cagA gene of H.pylori, secondly to study the association between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer, the association between cagA expression and gastric cancer in Korean patients. In vivo expression rate of 16S rRNA was 74 % of gastric carcinoma patients and cagA expression rate was 51 % of gastric carcinoma patients with H.pylori infection. Although 90 % of gastric carcinoma patients had H.pylori infection, the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not significant. And there was no significant association between cagA expression and gastric carcinoma. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  7. Purification and relationship with gastric disease of a 130 kDa(CagA) protein of Helicobacter pylorl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶少菁; 方平楚; 毛国根; 厉朝龙; 丘翔; 陈海洋

    2003-01-01

    Objective:The aims of this research were to purify and identify the 130 kDa(CagA) protein of H.pylori clinical isolate HP97002 and evaluate the relationships between the purified 130 kDa(CagA) pro-tein and gastric diseases.Methods:The procedure for isolating the protein included 6 mol/L guanidine ex-tract,size exclusion chromatography and elusion from gel.Sera of 68 patients with gastric diseases(44 with chronic gastritis,15 with atrophic gastritis,7 with peptic ulcer disease,2 with gastric cancer) were obtained,and the serological response to CagA was studied by Westem-blot using the purified protein,Results;The pu-rified protein was 130 kDa and preserved good antigenicity and revealed basic isoelectric point about of 8.1. Among 68 sera,43 sera could recognize the purified protein associated with chronic agastritis 47.7%(21/44),atrophic gastritis 86.7%(13/15),peptic ulcer disease 100%(7/7),gastric cancer 100%(2/2).Compared with each other,the difference was significant(x2=13.327,P=0.004),and 130 kDa(CagA) protein was associated with severe gastric diseases(rs=0.442,P=0.001).Conclusion:The 130 kDa(CagA) protein was associated wih severe gastric diseases.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Thailand: A Nationwide Study of the CagA Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Tomohisa; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Pittayanon, Rapat; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Kishida, Tetsuko; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Mahachai, Varocha

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk to develop gastric cancer in Thailand is relatively low among Asian countries. In addition, the age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) of gastric cancer in Thailand varies with geographical distribution; the ASR in the North region is 3.5 times higher than that in the South region. We hypothesized that the prevalence of H. pylori infection and diversity of CagA phenotype contributes to the variety of gastric cancer risk in various regions of Thailand. Methods We conducted a...

  9. Clinical significance of Helicobacter pylori cagA and iceA genotype status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser; Amjad; Hussain; Ali; Osman; Najibah; Abdul; Razak; Junaini; Kassian; Jeffri; Din; Nasuruddin; bin; Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the presence of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) virulence factors and clinical outcome in H.pylori infected patients.METHODS:A prospective analysis of ninety nine H.pylori-positive patients who underwent endoscopy in our Endoscopy suite were included in this study.DNA was isolated from antral biopsy samples and the presence of cagA,iceA,and iceA2 genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction and a reverse hybridization technique.Screening for H.pylori infection was performed in all patie...

  10. Specific serum immunoglobulin G to Hpylori and CagA in healthy children and adults (south-east of Iran)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Jafarzadeh; MT Rezayati; M Nemati

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the serologic IgG response to H pylori and CagA across age groups and in healthy children and adults.METHODS: Totally, 386 children aged 1-15 years and 200 adults aged 20-60 years, were enrolled to study. The serum samples of participant were tested for presence of anti-//pylori and anti-CagA IgG by using ELJSA method.RESULTS: The seroprevalence of H pylori in adults was significantly higher than that observed in children (67.5% vs 46.6%; P < 0.000003). In children, the seropositivity rate in males (51.9%) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that observed in females (41.7%). The prevalence of serum anti-CagA antibody was 72.8% and 67.4% in infected children and adults, respectively. The mean titer of serum anti-CagA antibodies was significantly higher among children in comparison to adults (64.1 Uarb/mL vs 30.7; P < 0.03). In infected children and adults the prevalence of serum anti-CagA antibody was higher in males compared to females (78.4% vs 66.3%; P = 0.07 and 75.6% vs 54.71%; P < 0.04, respectively). The age-specific prevalence of anti-H pylori and anti-CagA antibody (in infected subjects) was 37.6% and 59.57% at age 1-5 years, 46.9% and 75% at age 6-10 years, 54.9% and 79.45% at age 11-15, 59.01% and 83.33% at age 20-30 years, 66.6% and 60.52% at age 31-40 years, 73.46% and 63.88% at age 41-50 years and 75.75% and 60% at age 51-60 years with mean titer of anti-CagA antibody of 75.94, 63.32, 57.11, 52.06, 23.62, 21.52 and 21.80 Uarb/mL, respectively. There was significant difference between mean serum anti-CagA antibody in age subgroups (P < 0.001).CONCLUSION: These results showed that anti-//pylori and anti-CagA antibodies were common in the children and adults. The///7y/0//-specific antibodies influenced by age and sex of subjects. Moreover, it seems that males are more susceptible to infection with CagA+ strains compared to females. The seroprevalence of anti-CagA antibody was increased with age, up to 30 years and then decreased. It

  11. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion. PMID:26557697

  12. Relation of Cag-A-positive Helicobacter pylori strain and some inflammatory markers in patients with ischemic heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mashad, Noha; El-Emshaty, Wafaa M; Arfat, Manal S; Koura, Bothina A; Metwally, Shereen S

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a potential link between infectious agents and athero-sclerosis has been suggested. H. pylori strains bearing the cytotoxin associated gene A (Cag-A) provoked a heightened inflammatory response in vivo and showed stronger relation to gastric complication of this infection. The association between Cag-A positive strain and vascular diseases producing conflicting results. So, the present study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of H. pylori Cag-A positive strains as a risk factor among different groups of ischemic heart disease and to study its interaction with high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) and IL6 as inflammatory host responses. The present study was conducted on anti H. pylori IgG positive 60 ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients and 20 apparently healthy individuals as a control group. IHD patients were classified into 3 groups: (group I) with acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina pectoris patients (group II), chronic stable angina pectoris patients (group III). For all patients and control groups serum anti Cag-A IgG, IL6, hs-CRP, CK, CKMB, LDH, AST and Lipid profile were estimated. IL6 and hs-CRP levels were increased in groups I, II and III as compared with group IV (P < 0.001) with positive correlation between IL6 and hs-CRP in groups I, II and III (P < 0.05). The percentage of anti Cag-A positive cases was similar among the patient groups, but significantly higher than in the control group. Thus, infection with Cag-A positive H. pylori strain may play a role as a risk factor in development of ischemic heart diseases through provocation of high inflammatory response or through other mechanism. Therefore eradication of this infection is important as it is much less expensive than long term treatment of the other risk factors. PMID:20726321

  13. Transgenic Expression of the Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factor CagA Promotes Apoptosis or Tumorigenesis through JNK Activation in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Wandler, Anica M.; Guillemin, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori infects an estimated 50% of the world's population and is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Strains of H. pylori that can inject the CagA effector protein into host cells are known to be more virulent, but the potential contributions of host genetics to pathogenesis are not well-understood. Using transgenic Drosophila melanogaster, we show that the genetic context of both the host cells in which CagA is expressed...

  14. Radiosynthesis and biodistribution of [11C]AG957 a potential tyrphostin radiotracer for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The chemical compound AG957 is an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase p210bcr-abl, an enzyme which is found exclusively in patients suffering from chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). We have recently improved our original radio synthesis of AG957 using the PET isotope C-11, thus enabling us to produce larger quantities (60-70 mCi) of the radiotracer. Due to the instability of [11C]AG957 towards oxygen, the formulation had to be stabilised using 0.01 mg/mL of ascorbic acid in 10% ethanol. We are currently evaluating the potential use of this compound as a diagnostic tool for the staging as well as the assessment of response to treatment of CML using PET. So far, studies of the biodistribution of [11C]AG957 in normal and leukaemia bearing mice have been undertaken. Our results have shown that AG957 is metabolised quickly in vivo, most likely forming the respective quinone. This leads to a high reuptake into the bloodstream approximately 20 minutes after injection of the radioligand. As a consequence, poor tumour image quality can be expected due to high levels of blood pool activity. These findings highlight the need to find more stable derivatives of AG957 which retain specificity for the p210bcr-abl receptor. Currently, work is under way to find such compounds and to assess their biological properties. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  15. Distribution of cagG gene in Helicobacter pylori isolates from Chinese patients with different gastroduodenal diseases and its clinical and pathological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu; Zhao-Shen Li; Zhen-Xing Tu; Guo-Ming Xu; Yan-Fang Gong; Xiao-Hua Man

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the distribution of cagG gene of Helicobacter pylori(Hpylori) isolates cultured from patients with various digestive diseases and its relationship with gastroduodenal diseases.METHODS: cagG was amplified by polymerase chain reaction in 145 H pylori isolates cultured from patients with chronic gastritis (n=72), duodenal ulcer (n=48), gastric ulcer (n=17), or gastric and duodenal ulcer (n=8), and the relationship between cagGstatus and the grade of gastric mucosal inflammation was determined.RESULTS: cagG was present in 91.7% of the 145 H pylori isolates, with the rates were 90.3%, 93.8%, 88.2% and 100.0%, respectively, in those from patients with chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric and duodenal ulcer. There was no significant difference among the four groups (P>0.05). The average grade of gastric mucosal inflammation in the antrum and corpus was 1.819±0.325and 1.768±0.312, respectively in cagG positive patients,whereas the average inflammation grade was 1.649±0.297,1.598±0.278 respectively in cagG negative cases (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: cagG gene of H pylori was quite conservative,and most H pylori strains in Chinese patients were cagG positive.cagG status was not related to clinical outcome or the degree of gastric mucosal inflammation. Therefore, cagG can notbe used as a single marker for discrimination of H pylori strains with respect to a specific digestive disease.

  16. PILER-CR: Fast and accurate identification of CRISPR repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Sequencing of prokaryotic genomes has recently revealed the presence of CRISPR elements: short, highly conserved repeats separated by unique sequences of similar length. The distinctive sequence signature of CRISPR repeats can be found using general-purpose repeat- or pattern-finding software tools. However, the output of such tools is not always ideal for studying these repeats, and significant effort is sometimes needed to build additional tools and perform manual analys...

  17. In Silico Profiling of the Potentiality of Curcumin and Conventional Drugs for CagA Oncoprotein Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Akhileshwar K; Tewari, Mallika; Shukla, Hari S; Roy, Bijoy K

    2015-08-01

    The oncoprotein cytotoxic associated gene A (CagA) of Helicobacter pylori plays a pivotal role in the development of gastric cancer, so it has been an important target for anti-H. pylori drugs. Conventional drugs are currently being implemented against H. pylori. The inhibitory role of plant metabolites like curcumin against H. pylori is still a major scientific challenge. Curcumin may represent a novel promising drug against H. pylori infection without producing side effects. In the present study, a comparative analysis between curcumin and conventional drugs (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, pantoprazole, and metronidazole) was carried out using databases to investigate the potential of curcumin against H. pylori targeting the CagA oncoprotein. Curcumin was filtered using Lipinski's rule of five and the druglikeness property for evaluation of pharmacological properties. Subsequently, molecular docking was employed to determine the binding affinities of curcumin and conventional drugs to the CagA oncoprotein. According to the results obtained from FireDock, the binding energy of curcumin was higher than those of amoxicillin, pantoprazole, and metronidazole, except for clarithromycin, which had the highest binding energy. Accordingly, curcumin may become a promising lead compound against CagA+ H. pylori infection. PMID:25996140

  18. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes and cagA status and their relationship to associated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Hou; Zhen Xing Tu; Guo Ming Xu; Yan Fang Gong; Xu Hui Ji; Zhao Shen Li

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) is a major causativebacterium of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans, and associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer[1 -8]. An important virulant factor of H. pylori is the vacuolating cytotoxin ( VacA ) encoded by vacA that induces cytoplasmic vacuolation in target cells both in vitro and in vivo[9-11]. VacA is produced as a 140 kDa precursor which contains an N-terminal signal peptide and an approximately 33 kDa C-terminal outer membrance exporter. The precursor is cleaved at both N-terminal and C-terminal and secreted into the extracellular milieu as a 95 kDa mature protein. The mature protein futher undergoes specific cleavage to yield 37 kDa and 58 kDa subunits[12-14] Although vacA is present in all H. pylori strains, only about 50% to 60% of strains can induce vacuolation of epithelial cells as assessed by the HeLa cell assay. vacA shows considerable genetic variation in H. pylori isolated from all over the world and contains at least two variable regions. The s region exists as sl or s2 allelic types. Among type sl strains, subtypes sla and slb have been identified. The m region occurs as ml or m2 allelic types. Specific vacA genotype of H. pylori strains are associated with the production of the cytotoxin in vitro, epithelial damage in vivo, and clinical consequences[15-27]. The other virulant factor is the cytotoxin-associated protein (CagA) encoded by the cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA). The cagA gene is present in about 60% to 70% of strains and all of these strains express the cagA. The presence of cagA is also associated with the production of the cytotoxin in vitro, and clinical outcome[24-30]. The aim of this study was (i) to identify vacA genotypes and cagA status of H. pylori isolated from Chinese patients; (ii) to evaluation the relatioship beween vacA genotypes, cagA status and related gastroenterological disorders.

  19. Application of PCR amplicon sequencing using a single primer pair in PCR amplification to assess variations in Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Anneli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of various EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs in the CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to contribute to pathogenesis in adults. In this study, a unique PCR assay and sequencing strategy was developed to establish the number and variation of cagA EPIYA motifs. Findings MDA-DNA derived from gastric biopsy specimens from eleven subjects with gastritis was used with M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primers for amplification of the cagA EPIYA motif region. Automated capillary electrophoresis using a high resolution kit and amplicon sequencing confirmed variations in the cagA EPIYA motif region. In nine cases, sequencing revealed the presence of AB, ABC, or ABCC (Western type cagA EPIYA motif, respectively. In two cases, double cagA EPIYA motifs were detected (ABC/ABCC or ABC/AB, indicating the presence of two H. pylori strains in the same biopsy. Conclusion Automated capillary electrophoresis and Amplicon sequencing using a single, M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primer pair in PCR amplification enabled a rapid molecular typing of cagA EPIYA motifs. Moreover, the techniques described allowed for a rapid detection of mixed H. pylori strains present in the same biopsy specimen.

  20. Helicobacter pylori cagA and iceA genotypes status and risk of peptic ulcer in Saudi patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to determine the prevalence of cagA+ and iceA genotypes among Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolates from a group of Saudi patients with gastric complaints, and to find out any significant correlation between these strains and severe gastric clinical outcomes such as peptic ulcer and gastric cancer in Saudi population. A total of 1104 gastric biopsies from 368 patients who presented with symptoms suggestive of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, or gastric carcinoma were taken from the main hospitals in the Western region of Saudi Arabia from July 2004 to July 2005. We cultured the samples for H. pylori and a polymerase chain reaction was carried out to check for the presence or absence of cagA gene and the status of iceA genotypes. Among the 368 suspected patients to be infected with H. pylori by means of clinical features and endoscopic findings; 103 (28%) were positive using culture technique. The relation of the presence of cagA and the development of cases to gastritis and ulcer was statistically significant (p=0.0001). Furthermore, this study revealed that 100% of ulcer cases were infected with iceA1 with a statistically significant correlation (p=0.0001), while 94.6% of gastritis and 90.9% of normal were infected with iceA2 (p=0.0001). Moreover cagA+/iceA1 combined genotypes was statistically correlated with peptic ulcer (100%) but not cagA-/iceA1 (0%; p=0.0001).Certain H. pylori genotypes were more virulent than others. Multiple clinical implications based on these finding might be studied further.(author)

  1. Molecular interactions between MUC1 epithelial mucin, β-catenin, and CagA proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eGuang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-8-driven neutrophil infiltration of the gastric mucosa is pathognomonic of persistent Helicobacter pylori infection. Our prior study showed that ectopic over-expression of MUC1 in human AGS gastric epithelial cells reduced H. pylori-stimulated IL-8 production compared with cells expressing MUC1 endogenously. Conversely, Muc1 knockout (Muc1-/- mice displayed an increased level of transcripts encoding the keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, the murine equivalent of human IL-8, in gastric mucosa compared with Muc1(+/+ mice during experimental H. pylori infection. The current study tested the hypothesis that a decreased IL-8 level observed following MUC1 over-expression is mediated through the ability of MUC1 to associate with β-catenin, thereby inhibiting H. pylori-induced β-catenin nuclear translocation. Increased neutrophil infiltration of the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected Muc1(-/- mice was observed compared with Muc1(+/+ wild type littermates, thus defining the functional consequences of increased KC expression in the Muc1-null animals. Protein co-immunoprecipitation (coIP studies using lysates of untreated or H. pylori-treated AGS cells demonstrated that (a MUC1 formed a coIP complex with β-catenin and CagA, (b MUC1 over-expression reduced CagA/β-catenin coIP, and (c in the absence of MUC1 over-expression, H. pylori infection increased the nuclear level of β-catenin, (d whereas MUC1 over-expression decreased bacteria-driven β-catenin nuclear localization. These results suggest that manipulation of MUC1 expression in gastric epithelia may be an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit H. pylori-dependent IL-8 production, neutrophil infiltration, and stomach inflammation.

  2. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahara Shu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori strains found in Southeast Asia and examined their association with gastroduodenal disease. Methods To determine the cagA status, cagA EPIYA motifs, and vacA genotypes of H. pylori, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 previous reports for 1,281 H. pylori strains detected from several Southeast Asian countries. Results The respective frequencies of cagA-positive and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotypes among examined subjects were 93% (1,056/1,133, 98% (1,010/1,033, 58% (581/1,009, and 96% (248/259, respectively. Stratification showed significant variation in the frequencies of cagA status and vacA genotypes among countries and the individual races residing within each respective country. The frequency of the vacA m-region genotype in patients infected with East Asian-type strains differed significantly between the northern and southern areas of Vietnam (p vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains was associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio: 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.12, p = 0.046 and 2.83, 1.50-5.34, p = 0.001, respectively in the examined Southeast Asian populations. Conclusions Both Western- and East Asian-type strains of H. pylori are found in Southeast Asia and are predominantly cagA-positive and vacA s1 type. In Southeast Asia, patients infected with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains have an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease. Thus, testing for this genotype and the presence of cagA may have clinical usefulness.

  3. Estimation of genome length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The genome length is a fundamental feature of a species. This note outlined the general concept and estimation method of the physical and genetic length. Some formulae for estimating the genetic length were derived in detail. As examples, the genome genetic length of Pinus pinaster Ait. and the genetic length of chromosome Ⅵ of Oryza sativa L. were estimated from partial linkage data.

  4. Burden of hospital admission and repeat angiography in angina pectoris patients with and without coronary artery disease: a registry-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Jespersen

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate risk of hospitalization due to cardiovascular disease (CVD and repeat coronary angiography (CAG in stable angina pectoris (SAP with no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD versus obstructive CAD, and asymptomatic reference individuals. METHODS AND RESULTS: We followed 11,223 patients with no prior CVD having a first-time CAG in 1998-2009 due to SAP symptoms and 5,695 asymptomatic reference individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study through registry linkage for 7.8 years (median. In recurrent event survival analysis, patients with SAP had 3-4-fold higher risk of hospitalization for CVD irrespective of CAG findings and cardiovascular comorbidity. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios(95%CI for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries was 3.0(2.5-3.5, for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 3.9(3.3-4.6 and for 1-3-vessel disease 3.6-4.1(range(all P<0.001. Mean accumulated hospitalization time was 3.5(3.0-4.0(days/10 years follow-up in reference individuals and 4.5(3.8-5.2/7.0(5.4-8.6/6.7(5.2-8.1/6.1(5.2-7.4/8.6(6.6-10.7 in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries/angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD/1-, 2-, and 3-vessel disease, respectively (all P<0.05, age-adjusted. SAP symptoms predicted repeat CAG with multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries being 2.3(1.9-2.9, for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 5.5(4.4-6.8 and for obstructive CAD 6.6-9.4(range(all P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with SAP symptoms and angiographically normal coronary arteries or angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD suffer from considerably greater CVD burdens in terms of hospitalization for CVD and repeat CAG compared with asymptomatic reference individuals even after adjustment for cardiac risk factors and exclusion of cardiovascular comorbidity as cause. Contrary to common perception, excluding obstructive CAD by CAG in such

  5. Repeater For A Digital-Communication Bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Guzman, Esteban; Olson, Stephen; Heaps, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Digital repeater circuit designed to extend range of communication on MIL-STD-1553 bus beyond original maximum allowable length of 300 ft. Circuit provides two-way communication, one way at time, and conforms to specifications of MIL-STD-1553. Crosstalk and instability eliminated.

  6. Longer-Baseline Telescopes Using Quantum Repeaters

    OpenAIRE

    Gottesman, Daniel; Jennewein, Thomas; Croke, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to building interferometric telescopes using ideas of quantum information. Current optical interferometers have limited baseline lengths, and thus limited resolution, because of noise and loss of signal due to the transmission of photons between the telescopes. The technology of quantum repeaters has the potential to eliminate this limit, allowing in principle interferometers with arbitrarily long baselines.

  7. Comparison of seven techniques for typing international epidemic strains of Clostridium difficile: restriction endonuclease analysis, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, PCR-ribotyping, multilocus sequence typing, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, amplified fragment length polymorphism, and surface layer protein A gene sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, George; Thompson, Angela; Johnson, Stuart; Brazier, Jon; Kuijper, Ed; Pepin, Jacques; Frost, Eric H; Savelkoul, Paul; Nicholson, Brad; van den Berg, Renate J; Kato, Haru; Sambol, Susan P; Zukowski, Walter; Woods, Christopher; Limbago, Brandi; Gerding, Dale N; McDonald, L Clifford

    2008-02-01

    Using 42 isolates contributed by laboratories in Canada, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States, we compared the results of analyses done with seven Clostridium difficile typing techniques: multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), surface layer protein A gene sequence typing (slpAST), PCR-ribotyping, restriction endonuclease analysis (REA), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We assessed the discriminating ability and typeability of each technique as well as the agreement among techniques in grouping isolates by allele profile A (AP-A) through AP-F, which are defined by toxinotype, the presence of the binary toxin gene, and deletion in the tcdC gene. We found that all isolates were typeable by all techniques and that discrimination index scores for the techniques tested ranged from 0.964 to 0.631 in the following order: MLVA, REA, PFGE, slpAST, PCR-ribotyping, MLST, and AFLP. All the techniques were able to distinguish the current epidemic strain of C. difficile (BI/027/NAP1) from other strains. All of the techniques showed multiple types for AP-A (toxinotype 0, binary toxin negative, and no tcdC gene deletion). REA, slpAST, MLST, and PCR-ribotyping all included AP-B (toxinotype III, binary toxin positive, and an 18-bp deletion in tcdC) in a single group that excluded other APs. PFGE, AFLP, and MLVA grouped two, one, and two different non-AP-B isolates, respectively, with their AP-B isolates. All techniques appear to be capable of detecting outbreak strains, but only REA and MLVA showed sufficient discrimination to distinguish strains from different outbreaks. PMID:18039796

  8. High diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda López-Vidal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008, and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003. A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036. A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003. Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work.

  9. Helicobacter pylori CagA induces tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation by upregulating DNMT1 via AKT-NFκB pathway in gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He-xiao; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jian-fang; Su, Li-ping; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zheng-gang; Yan, Min; Liu, Bingya

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in tumor suppressor gene prompter is one of the most characteristic abnormalities in Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC). Here, we investigated the pathogenic and molecular mechanisms underlying hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in HP induced GC development. We found that tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation, represented by MGMT, positively correlated with CagA in clinical specimens, gastric tissues from HP infected C57 mice and GC cell lines transfected by CagA or treated by HP infection. CagA enhanced PDK1 and AKT interaction and increased AKT phosphorylation. The P-AKT subsequent activated NFκB, which then bound to DNMT1 promoter and increased its expression. Finally, the upregulated DNMT1 promoted tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation with MGMT as a representative. In conclusion, CagA increased tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation via stimulating DNMT1 expression through the AKT-NFκB pathway. PMID:26848521

  10. Helicobacter pylori CagA induces tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation by upregulating DNMT1 via AKT-NFκB pathway in gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-Gui; Hu, Lei; Zang, Ming De; Wang, He-Xiao; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jian-Fang; Su, Li-Ping; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Yan, Min; Liu, Bingya

    2016-03-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in tumor suppressor gene prompter is one of the most characteristic abnormalities in Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC). Here, we investigated the pathogenic and molecular mechanisms underlying hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in HP induced GC development. We found that tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation, represented by MGMT, positively correlated with CagA in clinical specimens, gastric tissues from HP infected C57 mice and GC cell lines transfected by CagA or treated by HP infection. CagA enhanced PDK1 and AKT interaction and increased AKT phosphorylation. The P-AKT subsequent activated NFκB, which then bound to DNMT1 promoter and increased its expression. Finally, the upregulated DNMT1 promoted tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation with MGMT as a representative. In conclusion, CagA increased tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation via stimulating DNMT1 expression through the AKT-NFκB pathway. PMID:26848521

  11. A specific A/T polymorphism in Western tyrosine phosphorylation B-motifs regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA epithelial cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Song Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA. Database searching revealed strong non-random distribution of the B-motifs (including EPIYA and EPIYT in Western H. pylori isolates. In silico analysis of Western H. pylori CagA sequences provided evidence that the EPIYT B-TPMs are significantly less associated with gastric cancer than the EPIYA B-TPMs. By generating and using a phosphorylated CagA B-TPM-specific antibody, we demonstrated the phosphorylated state of the CagA B-TPM EPIYT during H. pylori co-culture with host cells. We also showed that within host cells, CagA interaction with phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase was B-TPM tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent, and the recombinant CagA with EPIYT B-TPM had higher affinity to PI3-kinase and enhanced induction of AKT than the isogenic CagA with EPIYA B-TPM. Structural modeling of the CagA B-TPM motif bound to PI3-kinase indicated that the threonine residue at the pY+1 position forms a side-chain hydrogen bond to N-417 of PI3-kinase, which cannot be formed by alanine. During co-culture with AGS cells, an H. pylori strain with a CagA EPIYT B-TPM had significantly attenuated induction of interleukin-8 and hummingbird phenotype, compared to the isogenic strain with B-TPM EPIYA. These results suggest that the A/T polymorphisms could regulate CagA activity through interfering with host signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis, thus influencing cancer risk.

  12. Helicobacter pylori counteracts the apoptotic action of its VacA toxin by injecting the CagA protein into gastric epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Oldani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is responsible for gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcers but is also a high risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. The most pathogenic H. pylori strains (i.e., the so-called type I strains associate the CagA virulence protein with an active VacA cytotoxin but the rationale for this association is unknown. CagA, directly injected by the bacterium into colonized epithelium via a type IV secretion system, leads to cellular morphological, anti-apoptotic and proinflammatory effects responsible in the long-term (years or decades for ulcer and cancer. VacA, via pinocytosis and intracellular trafficking, induces epithelial cell apoptosis and vacuolation. Using human gastric epithelial cells in culture transfected with cDNA encoding for either the wild-type 38 kDa C-terminal signaling domain of CagA or its non-tyrosine-phosphorylatable mutant form, we found that, depending on tyrosine-phosphorylation by host kinases, CagA inhibited VacA-induced apoptosis by two complementary mechanisms. Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA prevented pinocytosed VacA to reach its target intracellular compartments. Unphosphorylated CagA triggered an anti-apoptotic activity blocking VacA-induced apoptosis at the mitochondrial level without affecting the intracellular trafficking of the toxin. Assaying the level of apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells infected with wild-type CagA(+/VacA(+H. pylori or isogenic mutants lacking of either CagA or VacA, we confirmed the results obtained in cells transfected with the CagA C-ter constructions showing that CagA antagonizes VacA-induced apoptosis. VacA toxin plays a role during H. pylori stomach colonization. However, once bacteria have colonized the gastric niche, the apoptotic action of VacA might be detrimental for the survival of H. pylori adherent to the mucosa. CagA association with VacA is thus a novel, highly ingenious microbial strategy to locally protect its

  13. A Specific A/T Polymorphism in Western Tyrosine Phosphorylation B-Motifs Regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA Epithelial Cell Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Traube, Leah; Jindal, Shawn; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Sticht, Heinrich; Backert, Steffen; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA...

  14. An analysis of patients receiving emergency CAG without PCI and the value of GRACE score in predicting PCI possibilities in NSTE-ACS patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Bo-Da; Zu, Ling-Yun; Mi, Lin; WANG, GUI-SONG; Guo, Li-Jun; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background There are patients who underwent emergency coronary angiography (CAG) but did not receive percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of this study was to analyze these reasons. Methods This is a single-center retrospective study. We recruited 201 consecutive patients who received emergency CAG but did not receive PCI. To investigate the value of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score in predicting PCI possibilities in non-ST segment elevation acute corona...

  15. Construction and Expression of Helicobacter Pylori Virulence Factor CagA Prokaryotic Expression Vector%幽门螺杆菌细胞毒素相关蛋白CagA原核表达载体的构建及诱导表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨贵珍; 王易

    2012-01-01

    目的 构建幽门螺杆菌细胞毒素相关蛋白CagA的原核表达载体并诱导表达,为进一步利用此表达载体研究中药的抗幽门螺杆菌的机制提供物质条件.方法 以幽门螺杆菌基因组为模板,通过PCR体外扩增cagA基因,将cagA基因插入带绿色荧光蛋白标签的原核表达载体PET34b,利用含氨苄青霉素的LB平皿筛选阳性克隆子,以IPTG诱导含重组子PET34b-cagA的E.coli DH5α表达CagA蛋白.结果 PCR扩增出3 400 bp的DNA片段,SDS-PAGE电泳显示出有分子量128 kD的蛋白条带.结论 成功克隆并表达了幽门螺杆菌毒力因子CagA,为后续研究中药抗幽门螺杆菌奠定了物质基础.%Objective To construct the prokaryotic expression vector PET34b-cagA of H. pylori virulence factor CagA and induce the expression in order to further study the mechanism of Chinese medicines against H. pyloriMethods cagA gene of H. pylori was amplified by PCR. the cagA gene was inserted into expression vector PET34b, and LB plate containing ampicillin was used to screen positive clones. E. coli DH5α containing the positive recombinant PET34b-cagA was induced by IPTG to express CagA protein. Results 3 400 bp DNA fragment was amplified by PCR, and a 128 kDa protein band was displayed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Conclusion The H. pylori virulence factor CagA was successfully cloned and expressed, which may provide a foundation for the study on Chinese medicines against H. pylori.

  16. Polymorphic repeat in AIB1 does not alter breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    having one or more involved nodes (OR 1.07, 95% Cl 0.64-1.78), or with cancers with a hormone-dependent phenotype (ER-positive: OR 1.16, 95% Cl 0.81-1.65; Table 3). No associations were observed among women who had one or more alleles with 26 glutamine repeats or fewer, with or without a family history of breast cancer (family history: OR 1.09; 95% Cl 0.46-2.58; no family history: OR 0.94; 95% Cl 0.68-1.31; test for interaction P = 0.65). We also did not observe associations with breast cancer risk to be modified by other established breast cancer risk factors. Among postmenopausal controls not using postmenopausal hormones, geometric least-squared mean plasma levels of estrone sulfate and estrone were similar among carriers and noncarriers of AIB1 alleles with 26 glutamine repeats or fewer (both differences: ≤ +3.5%; P >0.50). Mean levels of estradiol were slightly, but nonsignificantly elevated among carriers of alleles with 26 glutamine repeats or fewer (+11.6%; P = 0.08). In this population-based nested case-control study, women with at most 26 repeating glutamine codons (CAG/CAA) within the carboxyl terminus of AIB1 were not at increased risk for breast cancer. We did not observe shorter repeat alleles to be positively associated with breast cancer grouped by histologic subtype, stage of disease, or by ER and PR status. These data suggest that AIB1 repeat length is not a strong independent risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer, and does not modify the clinical presentation of the tumor among Caucasian women in the general population

  17. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  18. Association of smoking, alcohol and NSAIDs use with expression of cag A and cag T genes of Helicobacter pylori in salivary samples of asymptomatic subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pinaki Ghosh; Subhash Laxmanrao Bodhankar

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To determine the association of smoking, alcohol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use with presence and virulence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in a representative sample of a random adult population of asymptomatic subjects. Methods:Non virulent 16S rRNA and virulent cag A and T genes from salivary samples of 854 asymptomatic subjects were determined using polymerase chain reaction. The presence and absence of virulent and non virulent infection was statistically compared with consumption of smoking, alcohol and NSAIDs. Results:The prevalence of infection in male and female subjects was found to be 69.25%and 66.90%, respectively. The prevalence of infection in the population of asymptomatic subjects with respect to consumption of alcohol was as follows:current (31.22%), former (52.20%) and never (43.58%). The prevalence of infection in the population of asymptomatic subjects with respect to smoking of cigarettes was as follows:current (88.80%), former (57.14%) and never (33.33%). The prevalence of infection in the subject population consuming NSAIDs and not consuming NSAIDs frequently was found to be 82.75%and 21.16%, respectively. Virulence in male and female subjects was found to be 60.00%and 50.00%, respectively. The presence of virulent infection in the population of asymptomatic subjects with respect to consumption of alcohol was as follows:current (28.57%), former (40.15%) and never (50.00%). The prevalence of virulent infection in the population of asymptomatic subjects with respect to smoking of cigarettes was as follows:current (79.32%), former (75.00%) and never (50.00%). The prevalence of virulent infection in the subject population consuming NSAIDs and not consuming NSAIDs frequently was found to be 88.23%and 66.66%, respectively. Conclusions:It can be concluded that smoking and NSAIDs consumption are aggravating factors for virulence of H. pylori and alcohol can inhibit H. pylori infection in asymptomatic

  19. Spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7 in Indian population: predilection of ATXN7-CAG expansion mutation in an ethnic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Faruq

    2015-01-01

    Interpretations & conclusion : Our results show that presenece of SCA7 is relatively rare and confined to one ethnic group from Haryana region of India. We observed a homogeneous phenotypic expression of SCA7 mutation as described earlier and an earlier age of onset in our patients with CAG <49. The identification of pre-mutable allele in IE-N-LP2 suggests this population to be at the risk of SCA7.

  20. Hydrogen Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori Plays a Role in Gastric Carcinogenesis through Facilitating CagA Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that augments gastric cancer risk is the CagA cytotoxin. A carcinogenic derivative strain, 7.13, that has a greater ability to translocate CagA exhibits much higher hydrogenase activity than its parent noncarcinogenic strain, B128. A Δhyd mutant strain with deletion of hydrogenase genes was ineffective in CagA translocation into human gastric epithelial AGS cells, while no significant attenuation of cell adhesion was observed. The quinone reductase inhibitor 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) was used to specifically inhibit the H2-utilizing respiratory chain of outer membrane-permeabilized bacterial cells; that level of inhibitor also greatly attenuated CagA translocation into AGS cells, indicating the H2-generated transmembrane potential is a contributor to toxin translocation. The Δhyd strain showed a decreased frequency of DNA transformation, suggesting that H. pylori hydrogenase is also involved in energizing the DNA uptake apparatus. In a gerbil model of infection, the ability of the Δhyd strain to induce inflammation was significantly attenuated (at 12 weeks postinoculation), while all of the gerbils infected with the parent strain (7.13) exhibited a high level of inflammation. Gastric cancer developed in 50% of gerbils infected with the wild-type strain 7.13 but in none of the animals infected with the Δhyd strain. By examining the hydrogenase activities from well-defined clinical H. pylori isolates, we observed that strains isolated from cancer patients (n = 6) have a significantly higher hydrogenase (H2/O2) activity than the strains isolated from gastritis patients (n = 6), further supporting an association between H. pylori hydrogenase activity and gastric carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:27531909

  1. Structural biology studies of CagA from Helicobacter pylori and histone chaperone CIA/ASF1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structures of proteins and their complexes have become critical information for molecular-based life science. Biochemical and biological analysis based on tertiary structural information is a powerful tool to unveil complex molecular processes in the cell. Here, we present two examples of the structure-based life science study, structural biology studies of CagA, an effector protein from Helicobacter pylori, and histone chaperone CIA/ASF1, which is involved in transcription initiation. (author)

  2. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from northeastern Brazil with upper gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyssa Quezado de Figueiredo Cavalcante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastric inflammation and significantly increases the risk of duodenal and gastric ulcer disease and distal gastric carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from a Brazilian region where there is a high prevalence of gastric cancer. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to investigate vacA mosaicism and cagA status in the gastric mucosa of 134 H. pylori-positive patients, including 76 with gastritis: 28 with peptic ulcer disease and 30 with gastric cancer. The s1m1 variant was the predominant vacA genotype observed, whereas the s1 allele was more frequently observed in patients with more severe diseases associated with H. pylori infection [p = 0.03, odds ratio (OR = 5.72, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.15-38.60]. Furthermore, all of the s1 alleles were s1b. Mixed vacA m1/m2 strains were found more frequently in patients with gastric cancer and a cagA-positive status was significantly associated with gastric cancer (p = 0.016, OR = 10.36, 95% CI = 1.35-217.31. Patients with gastric cancer (21/21, 100%, p = 0.006 or peptic ulcers (20/21, 95%, p = 0.02 were more frequently colonised by more virulent H. pylori strains compared to gastritis patients (41/61, 67.2%. In conclusion, in the northeastern of Brazil, which is one of the regions with the highest prevalence of gastric cancer in the country, infection with the most virulent H. pylori strains, carrying the cagA gene and s1m1 vacA alleles, predominates and is correlated with more severe H. pylori-associated diseases.

  3. Survey of simple sequence repeats in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, L; Huang, J F; Feng, G Q; Wang, X W; Wang, Y; Chen, B Y; Qiao, Y S

    2013-01-01

    The use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, as genetic markers has become popular due to their abundance and variation in length among individuals. In this study, we investigated linkage groups (LGs) in the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and demonstrated variation in the abundances, densities, and relative densities of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were more common than longer repeats in all LGs examined. Perfect SSRs were the predominant SSR type found and their abundance was extremely stable among LGs and chloroplasts. Abundances of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were positively correlated with LG size, whereas those of tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide SSRs were not. Generally, in each LG, the abundance, relative abundance, relative density, and the proportion of each unique SSR all declined rapidly as the repeated unit increased. Furthermore, the lengths and frequencies of SSRs varied among different LGs. PMID:23979890

  4. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  5. Telomere Length Correlates with Life Span of Dog Breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Laura J. Fick; Gordon H. Fick; Zichen Li; Eric Cao; Bo Bao; Doug Heffelfinger; Heidi G. Parker; Elaine A. Ostrander; Karl Riabowol

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric DNA repeats are lost as normal somatic cells replicate. When telomeres reach a critically short length, a DNA damage signal is initiated, inducing cell senescence. Some studies have indicated that telomere length correlates with mortality, suggesting that telomere length contributes to human life span; however, other studies report no correlation, and thus the issue remains controversial. Domestic dogs show parallels in telomere biology to humans, with similar telomere length, telom...

  6. H pylori infection and systemic antibodies to CagA and heat shock protein 60 in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Lenzi; Fabio Rollo; Ranuccio Nuti; Natale Figura; Alberto Palazzuoli; Nicola Giordano; Giuliano Alegente; Catia Gonnelli; Maria Stella Campagna; Annalisa Santucci; Michele Sozzi; Panagiotis Papakostas

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the overall prevalence of H pylori and CagA positive H pylori infection and the prevalence of other bacterial and viral causes of chronic infection in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), and the potential role of anti-heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) antibody response to these proteins in increasing the risk of CHD development.METHODS: Eighty patients with CHD and 160 controls were employed. We also compared the levels of antiheat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) antibodies in the two groups. The H pylori infection and the CagA status were determined serologically, using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and a Western blotting method developed in our laboratory.Systemic antibodies to Hsp60 were determined by a sandwich ELISA, using a polyclonal antibody to Hsp60 to sensitise polystyrene plates and a commercially available human Hsp60 as an antigen.RESULTS: The overall prevalence of H pylori infection was 78.7% (n = 63) in patients and 76.2% (n =122) in controls (P = 0.07). Patients infected by CagApositive (CagA+) H pylori strains were 71.4% (n = 45) vs 52.4% of infected controls (P = 0.030, OR = 2.27). Systemic levels of IgG to Hsp60 were increased in H pylorinegative patients compared with uninfected controls (P< 0.001) and CagA-positive infected patients compared with CagA-positive infected controls (P = 0.007).CONCLUSION: CagA positive H pylori infection may concur to the development of CHD; high levels of antiHsp60 antibodies may constitute a marker and/or a concomitant pathogenic factor of the disease.

  7. Prevalence and Correlation with Clinical Diseases of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA Genotype among Gastric Patients from Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes have significant genetic heterogenicity, resulting in different clinical outcomes. Northeast part of China has reported high prevalence of H. pylori infections and gastric cancer. Hence, we investigated the H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes with clinical outcomes in Northeast China. Gastric tissue samples (n=169, chronic gastritis (GIs, gastric ulcer (GU, and gastric cancer (GC were analysed for 16S rRNA ureA, cagA, and cagA genotypes by PCR. A total of 141 (84% cases were found positive for H. pylori by 16S rRNA and ureA. GC showed high H. pylori infection (93% compared with GIs (72% and GU (84%. The vacAs1am1 was highly found in GC (40% and GU (36%, vacAs1am2 in GIs (33%, vacAs1bm1 (14% and vacAs1bm2 (8% in GU cases, and s2m1 in normal cases (33%, while vacAs1cm1 showed low frequency in GIs (2% and GU (3% and GC showed negative result. The East-Asian cagA strain was highly observed in GC (43%, as compared to GIs (41% and GU (20%. The East-Asian cagA/vacAs1am1 was significantly higher in GC (23% than in GU (22% and GIs (145 patients. The East-Asian type cagA with vacAs1a and vacAm1 is the most predominant genotype in H. pylori strains of Northeast China.

  8. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  9. Honesty through repeated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Patricia; Zollman, Kevin J S

    2016-04-21

    In the study of signaling, it is well known that the cost of deception is an essential element for stable honest signaling in nature. In this paper, we show how costs for deception can arise endogenously from repeated interactions between individuals. Utilizing the Sir Philip Sidney game as an illustrative case, we show that repeated interactions can sustain honesty with no observable signal costs, even when deception cannot be directly observed. We provide a number of potential experimental tests for this theory which distinguish it from the available alternatives. PMID:26869213

  10. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene*

    OpenAIRE

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The (GGGGCC)n hexanucleotide repeat expansion of C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of ALS-FTD. Results: C9orf72 repeat expansion increases instability and decreases replication efficiency by disrupting replication fork progression. Conclusion: C9orf72 repeat length and replication direction contribute to repeat instability in human cells. Significance: DNA replication-induced instability at the C9orf72 GGGGCC repeat can lead to further expansion and more severe disease.

  11. The Presence of Clitoromegaly in the Nonclassical Form of 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency Could Be Partially Modulated by the CAG Polymorphic Tract of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gomes, Larissa; Bugano Diniz Gomes, Diogo; Marcondes, José Antônio Miguel; Madureira, Guiomar; de Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Bachega, Tânia A. Sartori Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Background In the nonclassical form (NC), good correlation has been observed between genotypes and 17OH-progesterone (17-OHP) levels. However, this correlation was not identified with regard to the severity of hyperandrogenic manifestations, which could depend on interindividual variability in peripheral androgen sensitivity. Androgen action is modulated by the polymorphic CAG tract (nCAG) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and by polymorphisms in 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) enzyme, both of which are involved in the severity of hyperandrogenic disorders. Objectives To analyze whether nCAG-AR and SRD5A2 polymorphisms influence the severity of the nonclassical phenotype. Patients NC patients (n = 114) diagnosed by stimulated-17OHP ≥10 ng/mL were divided into groups according to the beginning of hyperandrogenic manifestations (pediatric and adolescent/adult) and CYP21A2 genotypes (C/C: homozygosis for mild mutations; A/C: compound heterozygosis for severe/mild mutations). Methods CYP21A2 mutations were screened by allelic-specific PCR, MLPA and/or sequencing. HpaII-digested and HpaII-undigested DNA samples underwent GeneScan analysis to study nCAG, and the SRD5A2 polymorphisms were screened by RLFP. Results Mean nCAG did not differ among pediatric, adolescent/adult and asymptomatic subjects. In the C/C genotype, we observed a significantly lower frequency of longer CAG alleles in pediatric patients than in adolescent/adults (p = 0.01). In patients carrying the A/C genotype, the frequencies of shorter and longer CAG alleles did not differ between pediatric patients and adolescent/adults (p>0.05). Patients with clitoromegaly had significantly lower weighted CAG biallelic mean than those without it: 19.1±2.7 and 21.6±2.5, respectively (p = 0.007), independent of the CYP21A2 genotype's severity. The SRD5A2 polymorphisms were not associated with the variability of hyperandrogenic NC phenotypes. Conclusions In this series, we observed a modulatory effect of the CAG

  12. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  13. Triggering of repeated earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Zakrzhevskaya, N. A.; Sobolev, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the world's earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.5 for 1960-2013, it is shown that they cause global-scale coherent seismic oscillations which most distinctly manifest themselves in the period interval of 4-6 min during 1-3 days after the event. After these earthquakes, a repeated shock has an increased probability to occur in different seismically active regions located as far away as a few thousand km from the previous event, i.e., a remote interaction of seismic events takes place. The number of the repeated shocks N( t) decreases with time, which characterizes the memory of the lithosphere about the impact that has occurred. The time decay N( t) can be approximated by the linear, exponential, and powerlaw dependences. No distinct correlation between the spatial locations of the initial and repeated earthquakes is revealed. The probable triggering mechanisms of the remote interaction between the earthquakes are discussed. Surface seismic waves traveling several times around the Earth's, coherent oscillations, and global source are the most preferable candidates. This may lead to the accumulation and coalescence of ruptures in the highly stressed or weakened domains of a seismically active region, which increases the probability of a repeated earthquake.

  14. Detection of H pylori infection by ELISA and Western blot techniques and evaluation of anti CagA seropositivity in adult Turkish dyspeptic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (O)zlem Yilmaz; Nazime (S)en; Ahmet Ali Küpelio(g)lu; (I)lkay (S)im(s)ek

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect H pylori infection and to evaluate the anti CagA seropositivity in adult Turkish dyspeptic patients. METHODS: We evaluated anti-H pylori IgA, IgG and anti-CagA antibodies using commercial enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and Western blot in dyspeptic Turkish patients. H pylori status was determined by histology and rapid urease testing.RESULTS: Fifty-six patients were entered. Forty-eight (85.7%) out of the 56 patients were positive for H pylori.H pylori IgG seropositivity was 82.1%, IgA seropositivity 48.2%. CagA ELISA showed that IgG was positive in 50% and IgA in 30.4% of those with H pylori infections.Western blot showed that IgG seropositivity was 80.4%and IgA seropositivity 33.9%. Western blot detected IgG antibodies with reactivity to CagA in 50%, VacA in 62.5%, UreB in 87.5%, UreA in 80.4%, and OMP in 57.1%. None of the tests had a sensitivity and specificity above 80%.CONCLUSION: None of these commercial tests seems clinically useful for H pylori detection in adult dyspeptic patients, while Western blot can give seropositivity and determine anti-CagA, VacA virulence factor status of Turkish dyspeptic patients in the Izmir region.

  15. A yeast tRNA mutant that causes pseudohyphal growth exhibits reduced rates of CAG codon translation

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Alain J; Betney, Russell; Ciandrini, Luca; Schwenger, Alexandra C M; Romano, M. Carmen; Stansfield, Ian

    2012-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the SUP70 gene encodes the CAG-decoding tRNAGln CUG. A mutant allele, sup70-65 , induces pseudohyphal growth on rich medium, an inappropriate nitrogen starvation response. This mutant tRNA is also a UAG nonsense suppressor via first base wobble. To investigate the basis of the pseudohyphal phenotype, 10 novel sup70 UAG suppressor alleles were identified, defining positions in the tRNAGln CUG anticodon stem that restrict first base wobble. However, none conferred p...

  16. Role of vacuolating cytotoxin VacA and cytotoxin-associated antigen CagA of Helicobacter pylori in the progression of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Mi-Ran; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Joo; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Sung, Soo-Eun; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Lee, Hye Seung; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-11-01

    Helicobacter (H.) pylori strains that express the cagA and s1a vacA genes are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. Here, we examined the association between the products of these virulence genes with the development of gastric cancer by immunohistochemical staining of gastric biopsy specimens taken from 208 routine gastroscopies and 43 gastric cancer patients. The correlation was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. CagA and VacA expressions in gastric mucosa were significantly associated with chronic gastritis (CG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM), respectively, accompanying CG independent of age. The association of CagA expression with IM accompanying CG was increased in patients over 50-year old (p subsequent progression of IM from CG with an increasing age. PMID:25038872

  17. Explaining the length threshold of polyglutamine aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of a length threshold, of about 35 residues, above which polyglutamine repeats can give rise to aggregation and to pathologies, is one of the hallmarks of polyglutamine neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease. The reason why such a minimal length exists at all has remained one of the main open issues in research on the molecular origins of such classes of diseases. Following the seminal proposals of Perutz, most research has focused on the hunt for a special structure, attainable only above the minimal length, able to trigger aggregation. Such a structure has remained elusive and there is growing evidence that it might not exist at all. Here we review some basic polymer and statistical physics facts and show that the existence of a threshold is compatible with the modulation that the repeat length imposes on the association and dissociation rates of polyglutamine polypeptides to and from oligomers. In particular, their dramatically different functional dependence on the length rationalizes the very presence of a threshold and hints at the cellular processes that might be at play, in vivo, to prevent aggregation and the consequent onset of the disease. (paper)

  18. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  19. High Frequency of cagA and vacA s1a/m2 Genotype among Helicobacter pylori Infected Gastric Biopsies of Pakistani Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vacuolating cytotoxin VacA and cytotoxin associated gene product CagA, encoded by vacA and cagA are major virulence determinants associated with pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori. The presence and prevalence of two major H. pylori virulence associated genes among gastric biopsies of Pakistani children were investigated in the current study. Fifty one gastric biopsy specimens of children were analysed for 16S rRNA, vacA and cagA genes using PCR. The results showed that 21 (41.2% biopsies were positive for H. pylori as determined by 16S rRNA PCR. In the 21 H. pylori positive gastric biopsies, 19 (90.5% showed vacA s1a, 1 (4.75% was vacA s1b and 1 (4.75% was vacA s2 whereas, 5 (23.8% were vacA m1 and 16 (76.2% were vacA m2. None of the H. pylori positive biopsies carried vacA s1c subtype. The cagA gene was found in 13 (61.9% of H. pylori infected biopsies and different vacA combinations were found with or without cagA gene. H. pylori was detected with high frequency of cagA while vacA s1a and vacA m2 regions with vacA s1a/m2 genotype were predominant in H. pylori infected gastric biopsies of children.

  20. Expression of cagA, virB/D Complex and/or vacA Genes in Helicobacter pylori Strains Originating from Patients with Gastric Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkaradkiewicz, Andrzej; Karpiński, Tomasz M; Linke, Krzysztof; Majewski, Przemysław; Rożkiewicz, Dorota; Goślińska-Kuźniarek, Olga

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori, particularly in the context of its carcinogenic activity, we analysed expression of virulence genes: cagA, virB/D complex (virB4, virB7, virB8, virB9, virB10, virB11, virD4) and vacA in strains of the pathogen originating from persons with gastric diseases. The studies were conducted on 42 strains of H. pylori isolated from patients with histological diagnosis of non-atrophic gastritis-NAG (group 1, including subgroup 1 containing cagA+ isolates and subgroup 2 containing cagA- strains), multifocal atrophic gastritis-MAG (group 2) and gastric adenocarcinoma-GC (group 3). Expression of H. pylori genes was studied using microarray technology. In group 1, in all strains of H. pylori cagA+ (subgroup 1) high expression of the gene as well as of virB/D was disclosed, accompanied by moderate expression of vacA. In strains of subgroup 2 a moderate expression of vacA was detected. All strains in groups 2 and 3 carried cagA gene but they differed in its expression: a high expression was detected in isolates of group 2 and its hyperexpression in strains of group 3 (hypervirulent strains). In both groups high expression of virB/D and vacA was disclosed. Our results indicate that chronic active gastritis may be induced by both cagA+ strains of H. pylori, manifesting high expression of virB/D complex but moderate activity of vacA, and cagA- strains with moderate expression of vacA gene. On the other hand, in progression of gastric pathology and carcinogenesis linked to H. pylori a significant role was played by hypervirulent strains, manifesting a very high expression of cagA and high activity of virB/D and vacA genes. PMID:26866365

  1. Measuring the orbit length of the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The orbit length in the Tevatron was measured when coasting beam was first obtained. The method was time-of-flight, using a vernier phase comparison between beam pickup signals and a synthesizer sine wave. Some effort was spent making a stable phase detector so that it would not be a limiting factor. The results exhibited a repeatability of a few Hz at 53 MHz, corresponding to a mean radius measurement to 0.1 mm. 5 refs., 4 figs

  2. Progressive GAA.TTC repeat expansion in human cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Ditch

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansion is the genetic basis for a sizeable group of inherited neurological and neuromuscular disorders. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by GAA.TTC repeat expansion in the first intron of the FXN gene. The expanded repeat reduces FXN mRNA expression and the length of the repeat tract is proportional to disease severity. Somatic expansion of the GAA.TTC repeat sequence in disease-relevant tissues is thought to contribute to the progression of disease severity during patient aging. Previous models of GAA.TTC instability have not been able to produce substantial levels of expansion within an experimentally useful time frame, which has limited our understanding of the molecular basis for this expansion. Here, we present a novel model for studying GAA.TTC expansion in human cells. In our model system, uninterrupted GAA.TTC repeat sequences display high levels of genomic instability, with an overall tendency towards progressive expansion. Using this model, we characterize the relationship between repeat length and expansion. We identify the interval between 88 and 176 repeats as being an important length threshold where expansion rates dramatically increase. We show that expansion levels are affected by both the purity and orientation of the repeat tract within the genomic context. We further demonstrate that GAA.TTC expansion in our model is independent of cell division. Using unique reporter constructs, we identify transcription through the repeat tract as a major contributor to GAA.TTC expansion. Our findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms responsible for GAA.TTC expansion in human cells.

  3. Einstein's Length Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein's length measuring procedure of a rod moving with velocity υ (0 ≤ |υ| < c) is discussed. The part of this procedure, namely measuring the length of the resting (υ = 0) rod, is realizable and leads to the elongation of the moving rod. The other part of Einstein's procedure, measuring the length of the moving (υ ≠ 0) rod, is not realizable and leads to the contraction of the moving rod. As the result of this procedure the moving rod contraction concept is supposed physically unfounded. (author). 8 refs; 1 fig

  4. A Characteristic Particle Length

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    It is argued that there are characteristic intervals associated with any particle that can be derived without reference to the speed of light $c$. Such intervals are inferred from zeros of wavefunctions which are solutions to the Schr\\"odinger equation. The characteristic length is $\\ell=\\beta^2\\hbar^2/(8Gm^3)$, where $\\beta=3.8\\dots$; this length might lead to observational effects on objects the size of a virus.

  5. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  6. 5meCpG epigenetic marks neighboring a primate-conserved core promoter short tandem repeat indicate X-chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Brum Machado

    Full Text Available X-chromosome inactivation (XCI is the epigenetic transcriptional silencing of an X-chromosome during the early stages of embryonic development in female eutherian mammals. XCI assures monoallelic expression in each cell and compensation for dosage-sensitive X-linked genes between females (XX and males (XY. DNA methylation at the carbon-5 position of the cytosine pyrimidine ring in the context of a CpG dinucleotide sequence (5meCpG in promoter regions is a key epigenetic marker for transcriptional gene silencing. Using computational analysis, we revealed an extragenic tandem GAAA repeat 230-bp from the landmark CpG island of the human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 RP2 promoter whose 5meCpG status correlates with XCI. We used this RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat to develop an allele-specific 5meCpG-based PCR assay that is highly concordant with the human androgen receptor (AR exonic tandem CAG repeat-based standard HUMARA assay in discriminating active (Xa from inactive (Xi X-chromosomes. The RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat contains neutral features that are lacking in the AR disease-linked tandem CAG repeat, is highly polymorphic (heterozygosity rates approximately 0.8 and shows minimal variation in the Xa/Xi ratio. The combined informativeness of RP2/AR is approximately 0.97, and this assay excels at determining the 5meCpG status of alleles at the Xp (RP2 and Xq (AR chromosome arms in a single reaction. These findings are relevant and directly translatable to nonhuman primate models of XCI in which the AR CAG-repeat is monomorphic. We conducted the RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat assay in the naturally occurring chimeric New World monkey marmoset (Callitrichidae and found it to be informative. The RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat will facilitate studies on the variable phenotypic expression of dominant and recessive X-linked diseases, epigenetic changes in twins, the physiology of aging hematopoiesis, the pathogenesis of age-related hematopoietic

  7. Repeatability of DTI-based skeletal muscle fiber tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Wilson, Kevin J.; Ding, Zhaohua; Damon, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based muscle fiber tracking enables the measurement of muscle architectural parameters, such as pennation angle (θ) and fiber tract length (Lft), throughout the entire muscle. Little is known, however, about the repeatability of either the muscle architectural measures or the underlying diffusion measures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the repeatability of DTI fiber tracking-based measurements and θ and Lft. Four DTI acquisitions were perf...

  8. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  9. Differentiation of Strains of Xylella fastidiosa by a Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Coletta-Filho, Helvécio Della; Takita, Marco Aurélio; de Souza, Alessandra Alves; Aguilar-Vildoso, Carlos Ivan; Machado, Marcos Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Short sequence repeats (SSRs) with a potential variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci were identified in the genome of the citrus pathogen Xylella fastidiosa and used for typing studies. Although mono- and dinucleotide repeats were absent, we found several intermediate-length 7-, 8-, and 9-nucleotide repeats, which we examined for allelic polymorphisms using PCR. Five genuine VNTR loci were highly polymorphic within a set of 27 X. fastidiosa strains from different hosts. The highest ave...

  10. Folding and unfolding mechanism of highly stable full-consensus ankyrin repeat proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wetzel, S K; Settanni, G.; Kenig, M; Binz, H K; Plückthun, A

    2008-01-01

    Full-consensus designed ankyrin repeat proteins were designed with one to six identical repeats flanked by capping repeats. These proteins express well in Escherichia coli as soluble monomers. Compared to our previously described designed ankyrin repeat protein library, randomized positions have now been fixed according to sequence statistics and structural considerations. Their stability increases with length and is even higher than that of library members, and those with more than three int...

  11. Tracheoesophageal fistula length decreases over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nancy; Kearney, Ann; Damrose, Edward J

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to demonstrate that the length of the tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis changes over time and to determine whether the prosthesis length over time increased, decreased, or showed no predictable change in size. A retrospective chart review was performed at a tertiary care referral center. Patients who underwent either primary or secondary tracheoesophageal puncture between January 2006 and August 2014 were evaluated. Patients were excluded if the tracheoesophageal prosthesis size was not consistently recorded or if they required re-puncturing for an extruded prosthesis. Data analyzed included patient demographics and the length of the tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis at each change. A total of 37 patients were identified. The mean age was 64 years. Seventy-six percent were male. 24 % underwent primary tracheoesophageal puncture and 76 % underwent secondary tracheoesophageal puncture. The length of the prosthesis decreased over time (median Kendall correlation coefficient = -0.60; mean = -0.44) and this correlation between length and time was significant (p = 0.00085). Therefore, in conclusion, tracheoesophageal prosthesis length is not constant over time. The tracheoesophageal wall thins, necessitating placement of shorter prostheses over time. Patients with a tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis will require long-term follow-up and repeat sizing of their prosthesis. Successful tracheoesophageal voicing will require periodic reevaluation of these devices, and insurers must, therefore, understand that long-term professional care will be required to manage these patients and their prostheses. PMID:26951219

  12. Disruption of cagA, the apoprotein gene of chromoprotein antibiotic C-1027, eliminates holo-antibiotic production, but not the cytotoxic chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhihui; Wang, Lifei; Wang, Songmei; Li, Guangwei; Hong, Bin

    2009-11-01

    C-1027 is a chromoprotein of the nine-membered enediyne antitumour antibiotic family, comprising apoprotein to stabilize and transport the enediyne chromophore. The disruption of apoprotein gene cagA within the C-1027 biosynthetic gene cluster abolished C-1027 holo-antibiotic production detected by an antibacterial assay, as well as the expression of the apoprotein and C-1027 chromophore extracted following protein precipitation of the culture supernatant. Complementation of the cagA-disrupted mutant AKO with the intact cagA gene restored C-1027 production, suggesting that cagA is indispensable for holo-antibiotic production. Overexpression of cagA in the wild-type strain resulted in a significant increase in C-1027 production as expected. Surprisingly, electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS and ESI-MS/MS analyses suggested that the AKO mutant still produced the C-1027 enediyne chromophore [m/z=844 (M+H)(+)] and its aromatized product [m/z=846 (M+H)(+)]. Consistent with this, the results from gene expression analysis using real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR showed that transcripts of the positive regulator sgcR3 and the structural genes sgcA1, sgcC4, sgcD6 and sgcE were readily detected in the AKO mutant as well as in the wild-type and the complementation strain. These results provided, for the first time, evidence suggesting that the apoprotein of C-1027 is not essential in the self-resistance mechanism for the enediyne chromophore. PMID:19845765

  13. Comparison of three PCR methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA and detection of cagA gene in gastric biopsy specimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Smith; AO Coker; KS Oyedeji; AO Arigbabu; F Cantet; F Megraud; OO Ojo; AO Uwaifo; JA Otegbayo; SO Ola

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To comparatively evaluate PCR and other diagnostic methods (the rapid urease test and / or culture) in order to determine which of the three PCR methods (ureA, glmM and 26-kDa, SSA gene) was most appropriate in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) infection and also to evaluate the detection of a putative virulence marker of H pylori, the cagA gene, by PCR in biopsy specimens.METHODS: One hundred and eighty-nine biopsy specimens were collected from 63 patients (three biopsies each)undergoing upper gastroduodenal endoscopy for various dyspeptic symptoms. The PCR methods used to detect H pylori DNA directly from biopsies were the glmM, 26-kDa,ureA and then cagA was used to compare the culture technique and CLO for urease with the culture technique being used as the gold standard.RESULTS: Thirty-five percent of the biopsies were positive for Hpylori DNA using the 3 PCR methods, while 68% of these were positive for the cagA gene. Twenty-four percent of the biopsies were negative for H pylori DNA in all PCR methods screened. The remaining 41% were either positive for ureA gene only, glmMonly, 26-kDa only, or ureA + glmM,ureA + 26-kDa, glmM + 26-kDa. Out of the 35% positive biopsies, 41% and 82% were positive by culture and CLO respectively, while all negative biopsies were also negative by culture and cagA. Cag A+ infection was also predominantly found in Hpylori DNA of the biopsies irrespective of the clinical diagnosis.CONCLUSION: This method is useful for correctly identifying infections caused by H pylori and can be easily applied in our laboratory for diagnostic purposes.

  14. Expression of cytokeratins in Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis of adult patients infected with cagA + strains: An immunohistochemical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vera Todorovic; Aleksandra Sokic-Milutinovic; Neda Drndarevic; Marjan Micev; Olivera Mlitrovic; Ivan Nikolic; Thomas Wex; Tomica Milosavljevic; Peter Malfertheiner

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of different cytokeratins (CKs) in gastric epithelium of adult patients with chronic gastritis infected with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) cagA + strains.METHODS: The expression of CK 7, 8, 18, 19 and 20 was studied immunohistochemically in antral gastric biopsies of 84 patients. All the CKs were immunostained in cagA +H pylori gastritis (57 cases), non-Hpylori gastritis (17 cases) and normal gastric mucosa (10 cases).RESULTS: In cagA+ Hpylori gastritis, CK8 was expressed comparably to the normal antral mucosa from surface epithelium to deep glands. Distribution of CK18 and CK 19 was unchanged, i.e. transmucosal,but intensity of the expression was different in foveolar region in comparison to normal gastric mucosa. Cytokeratin 18 immunoreactivity was significantly higher in the foveolar epithelium of H pylori-positive gastritis compared to both Hpylori-negative gastritis and controls.On the contrary, decrease in CK19 immunoreactivity occurred in foveolar epithelium of H pylori-positive gastritis. In both normal and inflamed antral mucosa without H pylori infection, CK20 was expressed strongly/ moderately and homogenously in surface epithelium and upper foveolar region, but in H pylori-induced gastritis significant decrease of expression in foveolar region was noted. Generally, in both normal antral mucosa and H pylori-negative gastritis, expression of CK7 was not observed, while in about half cagA+ H pylori-infected patients, moderate focal CK7 immunoreactivity of the neck and coiled gland areas was registered, especially in areas with more severe inflammatory infiltrate.CONCLUSION: Alterations in expression of CK 7, 18,19 and 20 together with normal expression of CK8 occur in antral mucosa of H pylori-associated chronic gastritis in adult patients infected with cagA+ strains. Alterations in different cytokeratins expression might contribute to weakening of epithelial tight junctions observed in H pylori-infected gastric mucosa.

  15. DNA repeat arrays in chicken and human genomes and the adaptive evolution of avian genome size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piontkivska Helen

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birds have smaller average genome sizes than other tetrapod classes, and it has been proposed that a relatively low frequency of repeating DNA is one factor in reduction of avian genome sizes. Results DNA repeat arrays in the sequenced portion of the chicken (Gallus gallus autosomes were quantified and compared with those in human autosomes. In the chicken 10.3% of the genome was occupied by DNA repeats, in contrast to 44.9% in human. In the chicken, the percentage of a chromosome occupied by repeats was positively correlated with chromosome length, but even the largest chicken chromosomes had repeat densities much lower than those in human, indicating that avoidance of repeats in the chicken is not confined to minichromosomes. When 294 simple sequence repeat types shared between chicken and human genomes were compared, mean repeat array length and maximum repeat array length were significantly lower in the chicken than in human. Conclusions The fact that the chicken simple sequence repeat arrays were consistently smaller than arrays of the same type in human is evidence that the reduction in repeat array length in the chicken has involved numerous independent evolutionary events. This implies that reduction of DNA repeats in birds is the result of adaptive evolution. Reduction of DNA repeats on minichromosomes may be an adaptation to permit chiasma formation and alignment of small chromosomes. However, the fact that repeat array lengths are consistently reduced on the largest chicken chromosomes supports the hypothesis that other selective factors are at work, presumably related to the reduction of cell size and consequent advantages for the energetic demands of flight.

  16. 4p16.3 haplotype modifying age at onset of Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørremølle, A; Budtz-Jørgensen, E; Fenger, K;

    2009-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat sequence in the HD gene. Although the age at onset is correlated to the CAG repeat length, this correlation only explains approximately half of the variation in onset age. Less variation between siblings indicates that the variation is, in...... part, explained by genetic modifiers. We analyzed polymorphic loci within or close to the HD gene on the HD chromosome in Danish HD patients. We found one specific haplotype segregating with later age at onset, compared with patients with similar CAG repeat length and another haplotype. The nine Danish...

  17. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease: segregation patterns and factors influencing instability of expanded CAG transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, G N; Kersting, N; Krum-Santos, A C; Santos, A S P; Furtado, G V; Pacheco, D; Gonçalves, T A; Saute, J A; Schuler-Faccini, L; Mattos, E P; Saraiva-Pereira, M L; Jardim, L B

    2016-08-01

    Controversies about Mendelian segregation and CAG expansion (CAGexp) instabilities during meiosis in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) need clarification. Additional evidence about these issues was obtained from the cohort of all SCA3/MJD individuals living in South Brazil. A survey was carried out to update information registered since 2001. Deaths were checked with the Public Information System, and data was made anonymous. Anticipation and delta-CAGexp from parent-offspring pairs, and delta-CAGexp between siblings were obtained. One hundred and fifty-nine families (94% of the entire registry) were retrieved, comprising 3725 living individuals as of 2015, 625 of these being symptomatic. Minimal prevalence was 6:100,000. Carriers of a CAGexp represented 65.6% of sibs in the genotyped offspring (p meiosis was weakly influenced by the age of the transmitting parent at the time of conception. PMID:26693702

  18. Evaluation of immobilized metal affinity chromatography kits for the purification of histidine-tagged recombinant CagA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Cebrail; Uslu, Merve; Yazici, Duygu; Salih, Barik A

    2016-05-15

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) technique is used for fast and reliable purification of histidine(His)-tagged recombinant proteins. The technique provides purification under native and denaturing conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate three commercially available IMAC kits (Thermo Scientific, GE Healthcare and Qiagen) for the purification of a 6xHis-tagged recombinant CagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein from IPTG-induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) culture. The kits were tested according to the manufacturer instructions and the protein was purified with only GE Healthcare and Qiagen kits under denaturing conditions. 1% (w/v) SDS was used as denaturing agent in PBS instead of extraction reagent of Thermo Scientific kit to lyse bacterial cells from 100ml culture. The 6xHis-tagged recombinant protein was purified by the three kits equally. PMID:26657801

  19. Helicobacter pylori iceA, clinical outcomes, and correlation with cagA: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Shiota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the iceA (induced by contact with epithelium allelic types of Helicobacter pylori have been reported to be associated with peptic ulcer, the importance of iceA on clinical outcomes based on subsequent studies is controversial. The aim of this study was to estimate the magnitude of the risk for clinical outcomes associated with iceA. METHODS: A literature search was performed using the PubMed and EMBASE databases for articles published through April 2011. Published case-control studies examining the relationship between iceA and clinical outcomes (gastritis, peptic ulcer, including gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer were included. RESULTS: Fifty studies with a total of 5,357 patients were identified in the search. Infection with iceA1-positive H. pylori increased the overall risk for peptic ulcer by 1.26-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.45. However, the test for heterogeneity was significant among these studies. Sensitivity analysis showed that the presence of iceA1 was significantly associated with peptic ulcer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.08-1.44. The presence of iceA2 was inversely associated with peptic ulcer (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.65-0.89. The presence of iceA was not associated with gastric cancer. Most studies examined the cagA status; however, only 15 studies examined the correlation and only 2 showed a positive correlation between the presence of cagA and iceA1. CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis confirmed the importance of the presence of iceA for peptic ulcer, although the significance was marginal.

  20. Telomere length correlates with life span of dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Laura J; Fick, Gordon H; Li, Zichen; Cao, Eric; Bao, Bo; Heffelfinger, Doug; Parker, Heidi G; Ostrander, Elaine A; Riabowol, Karl

    2012-12-27

    Telomeric DNA repeats are lost as normal somatic cells replicate. When telomeres reach a critically short length, a DNA damage signal is initiated, inducing cell senescence. Some studies have indicated that telomere length correlates with mortality, suggesting that telomere length contributes to human life span; however, other studies report no correlation, and thus the issue remains controversial. Domestic dogs show parallels in telomere biology to humans, with similar telomere length, telomere attrition, and absence of somatic cell telomerase activity. Using this model, we find that peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) telomere length is a strong predictor of average life span among 15 different breeds (p Dogs lose telomeric DNA ~10-fold faster than humans, which is similar to the ratio of average life spans between these species. Breeds with shorter mean telomere lengths show an increased probability of death from cardiovascular disease, which was previously correlated with short telomere length in humans. PMID:23260664

  1. Androgen receptor polyglutamine repeat number: models of selection and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Calen P; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-02-01

    Variation in polyglutamine repeat number in the androgen receptor (AR CAGn) is negatively correlated with the transcription of androgen-responsive genes and is associated with susceptibility to an extensive list of human disease. Only a small portion of the heritability for many of these diseases is explained by conventional SNP-based genome-wide association studies, and the forces shaping AR CAGn among humans remains largely unexplored. Here, we propose evolutionary models for understanding selection at the AR CAG locus, namely balancing selection, sexual conflict, accumulation-selection, and antagonistic pleiotropy. We evaluate these models by examining AR CAGn-linked susceptibility to eight extensively studied diseases representing the diverse physiological roles of androgens, and consider the costs of these diseases by their frequency and fitness effects. Five diseases could contribute to the distribution of AR CAGn observed among contemporary human populations. With support for disease susceptibilities associated with long and short AR CAGn, balancing selection provides a useful model for studying selection at this locus. Gender-specific differences AR CAGn health effects also support this locus as a candidate for sexual conflict over repeat number. Accompanied by the accumulation of AR CAGn in humans, these models help explain the distribution of repeat number in contemporary human populations. PMID:23467468

  2. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  3. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  4. Relativistic length agony continued

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redžić D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redžić 2008b, we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the ‘pole in a barn’ paradox. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171028

  5. Large Polyglutamine Repeats Cause Muscle Degeneration in SCA17 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases, large polyQ repeats cause juvenile cases with different symptoms than those of adult-onset patients, who carry smaller expanded polyQ repeats. The mechanisms behind the differential pathology mediated by different polyQ repeat lengths remain unknown. By studying knockin mouse models of spinal cerebellar ataxia-17 (SCA17, we found that a large polyQ (105 glutamines in the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP preferentially causes muscle degeneration and reduces the expression of muscle-specific genes. Direct expression of TBP with different polyQ repeats in mouse muscle revealed that muscle degeneration is mediated only by the large polyQ repeats. Different polyQ repeats differentially alter TBP’s interaction with neuronal and muscle-specific transcription factors. As a result, the large polyQ repeat decreases the association of MyoD with TBP and DNA promoters. Our findings suggest that specific alterations in protein interactions by large polyQ repeats may account for the unique pathology in juvenile polyQ diseases.

  6. PILER-CR: Fast and accurate identification of CRISPR repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of prokaryotic genomes has recently revealed the presence of CRISPR elements: short, highly conserved repeats separated by unique sequences of similar length. The distinctive sequence signature of CRISPR repeats can be found using general-purpose repeat- or pattern-finding software tools. However, the output of such tools is not always ideal for studying these repeats, and significant effort is sometimes needed to build additional tools and perform manual analysis of the output. Results We present PILER-CR, a program specifically designed for the identification and analysis of CRISPR repeats. The program executes rapidly, completing a 5 Mb genome in around 5 seconds on a current desktop computer. We validate the algorithm by manual curation and by comparison with published surveys of these repeats, finding that PILER-CR has both high sensitivity and high specificity. We also present a catalogue of putative CRISPR repeats identified in a comprehensive analysis of 346 prokaryotic genomes. Conclusion PILER-CR is a useful tool for rapid identification and classification of CRISPR repeats. The software is donated to the public domain. Source code and a Linux binary are freely available at http://www.drive5.com/pilercr.

  7. A Novel Algorithm for Finding Interspersed Repeat Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongdong Li; Zhengzhi Wang; Qingshan Ni

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of repeats in the DNA sequences is an important subject in bioinformatics. In this paper, we propose a novel projection-assemble algorithm to find unknown interspersed repeats in DNA sequences. The algorithm employs random projection algorithm to obtain a candidate fragment set, and exhaustive search algorithm to search each pair of fragments from the candidate fragment set to find potential linkage, and then assemble them together. The complexity of our projection-assemble algorithm is nearly linear to the length of the genome sequence, and its memory usage is limited by the hardware. We tested our algorithm with both simulated data and real biology data, and the results show that our projection-assemble algorithm is efficient. By means of this algorithm, we found an un-labeled repeat region that occurs five times in Escherichia coli genome, with its length more than 5,000 bp, and a mismatch probability less than 4%.

  8. 78 FR 65594 - Vehicular Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (May 1, 1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using the... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 90 Vehicular Repeaters AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed... the Commission's rules to allow the licensing and operation of vehicular repeater systems and...

  9. Exact Tandem Repeats Analyzer (E-TRA): A new program for DNA sequence mining

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Karaca; Mehmet Bilgen; A. Naci Onus; Ayse Gul Ince; Safinaz Y. Elmasulu

    2005-04-01

    Exact Tandem Repeats Analyzer 1.0 (E-TRA) combines sequence motif searches with keywords such as ‘organs’, ‘tissues’, ‘cell lines’ and ‘development stages’ for finding simple exact tandem repeats as well as non-simple repeats. E-TRA has several advanced repeat search parameters/options compared to other repeat finder programs as it not only accepts GenBank, FASTA and expressed sequence tags (EST) sequence files, but also does analysis of multiple files with multiple sequences. The minimum and maximum tandem repeat motif lengths that E-TRA finds vary from one to one thousand. Advanced user defined parameters/options let the researchers use different minimum motif repeats search criteria for varying motif lengths simultaneously. One of the most interesting features of genomes is the presence of relatively short tandem repeats (TRs). These repeated DNA sequences are found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, distributed almost at random throughout the genome. Some of the tandem repeats play important roles in the regulation of gene expression whereas others do not have any known biological function as yet. Nevertheless, they have proven to be very beneficial in DNA profiling and genetic linkage analysis studies. To demonstrate the use of E-TRA, we used 5,465,605 human EST sequences derived from 18,814,550 GenBank EST sequences. Our results indicated that 12.44% (679,800) of the human EST sequences contained simple and non-simple repeat string patterns varying from one to 126 nucleotides in length. The results also revealed that human organs, tissues, cell lines and different developmental stages differed in number of repeats as well as repeat composition, indicating that the distribution of expressed tandem repeats among tissues or organs are not random, thus differing from the un-transcribed repeats found in genomes.

  10. Distance and Cable Length Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sergio Elias; Acosta, Leopoldo; Toledo, Jonay

    2009-01-01

    A simple, economic and successful design for distance and cable length detection is presented. The measurement system is based on the continuous repetition of a pulse that endlessly travels along the distance to be detected. There is a pulse repeater at both ends of the distance or cable to be measured. The endless repetition of the pulse generates a frequency that varies almost inversely with the distance to be measured. The resolution and distance or cable length range could be adjusted by varying the repetition time delay introduced at both ends and the measurement time. With this design a distance can be measured with centimeter resolution using electronic system with microsecond resolution, simplifying classical time of flight designs which require electronics with picosecond resolution. This design was also applied to position measurement. PMID:22303169

  11. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  12. Sequence repeats and protein structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Trinh X.; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-01

    Repeats are frequently found in known protein sequences. The level of sequence conservation in tandem repeats correlates with their propensities to be intrinsically disordered. We employ a coarse-grained model of a protein with a two-letter amino acid alphabet, hydrophobic (H) and polar (P), to examine the sequence-structure relationship in the realm of repeated sequences. A fraction of repeated sequences comprises a distinct class of bad folders, whose folding temperatures are much lower than those of random sequences. Imperfection in sequence repetition improves the folding properties of the bad folders while deteriorating those of the good folders. Our results may explain why nature has utilized repeated sequences for their versatility and especially to design functional proteins that are intrinsically unstructured at physiological temperatures.

  13. Identical repeated backbone of the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identical sequences with a minimal length of about 300 base pairs (bp have been involved in the generation of various meiotic/mitotic genomic rearrangements through non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR events. Genomic disorders and structural variation, together with gene remodelling processes have been associated with many of these rearrangements. Based on these observations, we identified and integrated all the 100% identical repeats of at least 300 bp in the NCBI version 36.2 human genome reference assembly into non-overlapping regions, thus defining the Identical Repeated Backbone (IRB of the reference human genome. Results The IRB sequences are distributed all over the genome in 66,600 regions, which correspond to ~2% of the total NCBI human genome reference assembly. Important structural and functional elements such as common repeats, segmental duplications, and genes are contained in the IRB. About 80% of the IRB bp overlap with known copy-number variants (CNVs. By analyzing the genes embedded in the IRB, we were able to detect some identical genes not previously included in the Ensembl release 50 annotation of human genes. In addition, we found evidence of IRB gene copy-number polymorphisms in raw sequence reads of two diploid sequenced genomes. Conclusions In general, the IRB offers new insight into the complex organization of the identical repeated sequences of the human genome. It provides an accurate map of potential NAHR sites which could be used in targeting the study of novel CNVs, predicting DNA copy-number variation in newly sequenced genomes, and improve genome annotation.

  14. Associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA de Helicobacter pylori e úlcera duodenal em crianças no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Ashour Abdussalam Ali Ramadam; Gusmão Valquíria Ribeiro de; Magalhães Paula Prazeres; Collares Guilherme Birchal; Mendes Edilberto Nogueira; Queiroz Dulciene Maria de Magalhães; Rocha Gifone Aguiar; Rocha Andreia Maria Camargos; Carvalho Anfrisina Sales Teles

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori é o principal agente de gastrite em seres humanos e fator de risco para úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. A evolução da infecção está relacionada a diversos fatores, inclusive bacterianos, como presença de cagA e genótipo s1-m1 do vacA, associados com o desenvolvimento de úlcera e adenocarcinoma gástrico. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA em H. pylori isolado de crianças e relacionar os achados com a doença apresentada pelo pac...

  15. Analysis of serum antibody profile against H pylori VacA and CagA antigens in Turkish patients with duodenal ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusuf Erzin; Sibel Altun; Ahmet Dobrucali; Mustafa Aslan; Sibel Erdamar; Ahmet Dirican; Murat Tuncer; Bekir Kocazeybek

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the frequency of seropositivity against CagA, VacA proteins and to determine their independent effects on the development of duodenal ulcer (DU) in Turkish patients.METHODS:The study was designed as a prospective one from a tertiary referral hospital. Dyspeptic patients who were referred to our endoscopy unit for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between June 2003 and March 2004 and diagnosed to have DU or nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) were included. Biopsies from the antrum and body of the stomach were taken in order to assess the current H pylori status by histology, rapid urease test and culture.Fasting sera were obtained from all patients and H pylori status of all sera was determined by IgG antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. All seropositive patients were further analysed using Western blot assays detecting IgG antibodies against CagA and VacA proteins. The x2 test was used for statistical comparison of the values and age-sex adjusted multiple regression analysis was used to determine the independent effects of CagA and VacA seropositivities on the development of DU.RESULTS:Sixty-three patients with DU and 62 patients with NUD were eligible for the final analysis. Seropositivity for anti-CagA was detected in 51 of 62 (82%), and in 55 of 63 (87%) patients with NUD and DU, respectively (P = no significance), and seropositivity for antiVacA was found in 25 of 62 (40%) and in 16 of 63 (25%) patients, with NUD and DU, respectively.CONCLUTSION: These findings suggest that none of these virulence factors is associated with the development of DU in the studied Turkish patients with dyspepsia.

  16. [Clinical efficacy of decitabine combined with modified CAG regimen for relapsed-refractory acute myeloid leukemia with AML1-ETO⁺].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yu; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Zhang, Qi; Niu, Jian-Hua; Yang, Hua; Liu, Shi-Yan; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Li

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics of relapsed-refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with AML1-ETO⁺, and its therapeutic efficacy and side effects when decitabine combined with modified CAG regimen was used. Clinical data of 5 cases of AML with AML1-ETO⁺ from January 2013 to Agust 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. The analyzed data included age, sex, initial symptoms, peripheral blood and bone marrow characteristics. Meanwhile, the therapeutic effecacy and side effects of decitabine combined with modified CAG regimen were evaluated. The 5 patients were with median age of 35 (17-43) years. Among these 5 patients, 2 patients were relapsed and other 3 patients were relapsed-refractory patients, their median white blood cell count was 12.55 (7.8-66.55) × 10⁹/L, median platelets count was 44 (20-72) × 10⁹/L, median hemoglobin level was 110 (77-128) g/L, median lactate dehydrogenase level was 312.9 U/L (123.6-877.8) at the initial diagnosis. The results showed that after decitabine combined with modified CAG regimen was administered, 4 patients achieved complete remission, 1 patient did not achieve remission, the overall remission rate was 80% (4/5). The main side effects of this regimen was myelosuppression, these were no new lung infection and other serious complications, one case without complete remission treated with FLAG once again died of heart failure when being mobilized for transplantation. It is concluded that according to preliminary results of decitabine combined with modified CAG regimen for relapsed and refractory AML patients with AML1-ETO⁺ displays higher remission rate and lower side effects, which worthy to further explore for clinal application. PMID:25338566

  17. Association of CagA and VacA presence with ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a Turkish population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kantarceken Bulent; Hilmioglu Fatih; Aladag Murat; Atik Esin; Koksal Fatih; Harputluoglu MMMurat; Harputluoglu Hakan; Karincaoglu Melih; Ates Mehmet; Yildirim Bulent

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The mostly known genotypic virulence features, of H. pyloriare cytotoxin associated gene A (ragA) and Vacuolating cytotoxin gene A (VacA). We investigated the association of these major virulence factors with ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in our region.METHODS: One hundred and forty two dyspeptic patients were studied (average age 44.8±15.9 years, range 15-87years, 64 males and 78 females). Antral and corpus biopsies were taken for detecting and genotyping of H. pylori. 107patients who were H. pylori positive by histological assessment were divided into three groups according to endoscopic findings: Duodenal ulcer (DU), gastric ulcer (GU)and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect CagA and VacA genes of H.pylori using specific primers.RESULTS: H.pyloriwas isolated from 75.4 % (107/142) of the patients. Of the 107 patients, 66 (61.7 %) were cagApositive and 82 (76.6 %) were Vacl-positive. CagA gene was positively associated with DU and GU (P<0.01, P<0.02),but not with NUD (P>0.05). Although VacA positivity in ulcer patients was higher than that in NUD group, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: There is a significantly positive association between CagA genes and DU and GU. The presence of VacA is not a predictive marker for DU, GU, and NUD in our patients.

  18. Survey of extrachromosomal circular DNA derived from plant satellite repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macas Jiří

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Satellite repeats represent one of the most dynamic components of higher plant genomes, undergoing rapid evolutionary changes of their nucleotide sequences and abundance in a genome. However, the exact molecular mechanisms driving these changes and their eventual regulation are mostly unknown. It has been proposed that amplification and homogenization of satellite DNA could be facilitated by extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA molecules originated by recombination-based excision from satellite repeat arrays. While the models including eccDNA are attractive for their potential to explain rapid turnover of satellite DNA, the existence of satellite repeat-derived eccDNA has not yet been systematically studied in a wider range of plant genomes. Results We performed a survey of eccDNA corresponding to nine different families and three subfamilies of satellite repeats in ten species from various genera of higher plants (Arabidopsis, Oryza, Pisum, Secale, Triticum and Vicia. The repeats selected for this study differed in their monomer length, abundance, and chromosomal localization in individual species. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis followed by Southern blotting, eccDNA molecules corresponding to all examined satellites were detected. EccDNA occurred in the form of nicked circles ranging from hundreds to over eight thousand nucleotides in size. Within this range the circular molecules occurred preferentially in discrete size intervals corresponding to multiples of monomer or higher-order repeat lengths. Conclusion This work demonstrated that satellite repeat-derived eccDNA is common in plant genomes and thus it can be seriously considered as a potential intermediate in processes driving satellite repeat evolution. The observed size distribution of circular molecules suggests that they are most likely generated by molecular mechanisms based on homologous recombination requiring long stretches of sequence

  19. Full-length huntingtin levels modulate body weight by influencing insulin-like growth factor 1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Xie, Yuanyun; Skotte, Niels Henning;

    2010-01-01

    Levels of full-length huntingtin (FL htt) influence organ and body weight, independent of polyglutamine length. The growth hormone-insulin like growth factor-1 (GH-IGF-1) axis is well established as a regulator of organ growth and body weight. In this study, we investigate the involvement...... of the IGF-1 pathway in mediating the effect of htt on body weight. IGF-1 expression was examined in transgenic mouse lines expressing different levels of FL wild-type (WT) htt (YAC18 mice), FL mutant htt (YAC128 and BACHD mice) and truncated mutant htt (shortstop mice). We demonstrate that htt influences...... body weight by modulating the IGF-1 pathway. Plasma IGF-1 levels correlate with body weight and htt levels in the transgenic YAC mice expressing human htt. The effect of htt on IGF-1 expression is independent of CAG size. No effect on body weight is observed in transgenic YAC mice expressing...

  20. Association Between Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2 Virulence Factors and Gastric Mucosal Interleukin-33 mRNA Expression and Clinical Outcomes in Dyspeptic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Bahreini, Rasol; Bagheri, Nader; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been reported in more than half of the world human population. It is associated with gastric inflammation and noticeable infiltration of the immune cells to the stomach mucosa by several cytokines secretion. IL-1β, IL-18 have been shown to contribute to H. pylori induced gastritis, but the details of inflammation and association of virulence factors remain unclear. IL-1 cytokine family has a new additional cytokine, Interleukin-33 (IL-33), which is contemplated to have an important role for host defense against microorganisms. H. pylori virulence factors important in gastritis risk are the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) and babA. This study evaluated IL-33 mucosal mRNA expression levels in infected and uninfected patients and its relationship with bacterial virulence factors cagA, babA2 and type of gastritis. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 79 H. pylori-infected patients and 51 H. pylori-negative patients. Mucosal IL-33 mRNA expression levels in gastric biopsies were assessed using real-time PCR. Existence of virulence factors were detected by PCR. IL-33 mRNA expression was significantly higher in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients (Pchronic gastritis patients compared with patients with active gastritis (Pchronic gastritis and severity of inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. PMID:27014647

  1. Prevalence of cagA and vacA genes in isolates from patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito Carlos AA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Geographical differences in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori genes and their association with disease severity have been identified. This study analyzes the prevalences of the cagA gene and alleles of the vacA gene in H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases in isolates from Recife, PE, Brazil. Gastric biopsy of 61 H. pylori-positive patients were submitted to DNA extraction and gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction. Among the 61 patients, 21 suffered from duodenal ulcer (DU and 40 from gastritis (GT. The prevalence of H. pylori strains harbouring the cagA gene was higher in the DU group (90.5% than in the GT group (60% (p = 0.02. The vacA gene was amplified in 56 out of 61 biopsies, of which 43 (76.8% contained bacteria carrying the s1 allele and 13 (23.2% the s2. However, the prevalence of the vacA s1 genotying was the same in either DU or GT group. The majority of the s1-typed strains, 39 (90.7% out of 43, were subtype s1b. In resume there was a strong association between the H. pylori cagA+ gene and DU. However, there were no differences between the DU and GT groups in relation to the vacA s1 and s2 alleles distribution, albeit the subtype s1b was predominat.

  2. Ambiguities of the Rate of Oxygen Formation During Stellar Helium Burning in the 12C(a,g) Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gai, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The rate of oxygen formation determines the C/O ratio during stellar helium burning. It is the single most important nuclear input of stellar evolution theory including the evolution of Type II and Type Ia supernova. Yet the low energy cross section of the fusion of 4He + 12C denoted as the 12C(a,g)16O reaction still remains uncertain after forty years of extensive work. We analyze and critically review the most recent measurements of complete angular distributions of the outgoing gamma-rays at very low energies (Ecm > 1.0 MeV). Our analysis of the angular distribution measured with the EUROGAM/GANDI arrays lead us to conclude considerably larger error bars than published hence they are excluded from the current sample of "world data". We show that the current sample of "world data" of the measured E2 cross section factors below 1.7 MeV cluster to two distinct groups that lead to two distinct extrapolations of SE2(300) ~ 60 or ~ 154 keVb. We point to a much neglected discrepancy between the measured E1-E2 pha...

  3. Effect of the Major Repeat Sequence on Chromosome Loss in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Lephart, Paul R.; Chibana, Hiroji; Magee, Paul T.

    2005-01-01

    The major repeat sequence (MRS) is found at least once on all but one chromosome in Candida albicans, but as yet it has no known relation to the phenotype. The MRS affects karyotypic variation by serving as a hot spot for chromosome translocation and by expanding and contracting internal repeats, thereby changing chromosome length. Thus, MRSs on different chromosomes and those on chromosome homologues can differ in size. We proposed that the MRS's unique repeat structure and, more specificall...

  4. An analysis of patients receiving emergency CAG without PCI and the value of GRACE score in predicting PCI possibilities in NSTE-ACS patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo-Da ZHOU; Ling-Yun ZU; Lin MI; Gui-Song WANG; Li-Jun GUO; Wei GAO

    2015-01-01

    Background There are patients who underwent emergency coronary angiography (CAG) but did not receive percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of this study was to analyze these reasons. Methods This is a single-center retrospective study. We recruited 201 consecutive patients who received emergency CAG but did not receive PCI. To investigate the value of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score in predicting PCI possibilities in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) pa-tients, we recruited 80 consecutive patients who presented with NSTE-ACS and received emergency CAG as well as emergency PCI. Re-sults Among the 201 patients who received emergency CAG but did not receive PCI, 26%patients had final diagnosis other than coronary heart disease. In the patients with significant coronary artery stenosis, 23 patients (11.5%) were recommended to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), one patient (0.5%) refused PCI; 13 patients (6.5%) with significant thrombus burden were treated with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist;74 patients (36.8%) were treated with drug therapy because no severe stenosis (>70%) was present in the crime vessel. Moreover, 80 of the 201 patients were presented with NSTE-ACS (excluding those patients with final diagnosis other than coronary heart disease, excluding those patients planned for CABG treatment), referred as non PCI NSTE-ACS. When comparing their GRACE scores with 80 consecutive patients presented with NSTE-ACS who received emergency CAG as well as emergency PCI (referred as PCI NSTE-ACS), we found that PCI NSTE-ACS patients had significantly higher GRACE scores compared with non PCI NSTE-ACS patients. We then used Receiver Operator Characteristic Curve (ROC) to test whether the GRACE score is good at evaluating the possibilities of PCI in NSTE-ACS patients. The area under the curve was 0.854 ± 0.030 (P<0.001), indicating good predictive value. Furthermore, we analyzed results derived

  5. Precision and Accuracy Studies with Kajaani Fiber Length Analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copur, Yalcin; Makkonen, Hannu

    The aim of this study was to test the measurement precision and accuracy of the Kajaani FS-100 giving attention to possible machine error in the measurements. Fiber length of pine pulps produced using polysulfide, kraft, biokraft and soda methods were determined using both FS-100 and FiberLab automated fiber length analyzers. The measured length values were compared for both methods. The measurement precision and accuracy was tested by replicated measurements using rayon stable fibers. Measurements performed on pulp samples showed typical length distributions for both analyzers. Results obtained from Kajaani FS-100 and FiberLab showed a significant correlation. The shorter length measurement with FiberLab was found to be mainly due to the instrument calibration. The measurement repeatability tested for Kajaani FS-100 indicated that the measurements are precise.

  6. Telomerase activity and telomere length in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, G T; Lee, H S; Chen, C H; Chiou, L L; Lin, Y W; Lee, C Z; Chen, D S; Sheu, J C

    1998-11-01

    Telomerase activity is activated and telomere length altered in various types of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 39 HCC tissues and the corresponding non-tumour livers were analysed and correlated with clinical parameters. Telomere length was determined by terminal restriction fragment assay, and telomerase activity was assayed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol. Telomerase activity was positive in 24 of the 39 tumour tissues (1.15-285.13 total product generated (TPG) units) and in six of the 39 non-tumour liver tissues (1.05-1.73 TPG units). In the 28 cases analysed for telomere length, telomere length was shortened in 11 cases, lengthened in six cases, and unaltered in 11 cases compared with non-tumour tissues. Neither telomere length nor telomerase activity was correlated to any clinical parameters. PMID:10023320

  7. Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitti, Metin; Cusick, Brian; Aksak, Burak; Nese, Alper; Lee, Hyung-il; Dong, Hongchen; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2009-10-01

    This work reports on repeatable adhesive materials prepared by controlled grafting of dangling hetero chains from polymer elastomers. The dangling chain elastomer system was prepared by grafting poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) chains from prefunctionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer networks using atom transfer radical polymerization. To study the effects of chain growth and network strain as they relate to network adhesion mechanics, various lengths of PBA chains with degree of polymerizations (DP) of 65, 281, 508, and 1200 were incorporated into the PDMS matrix. PBA chains with a DP value of 281 grafted from a flat PDMS substrate showed the highest (approximately 3.5-fold) enhancement of nano- and macroscale adhesion relative to a flat raw (ungrafted and not prefunctionalized) PDMS substrate. Moreover, to study the effect of PBA dangling chains on adhesion in fibrillar elastomer structures inspired by gecko foot hairs, a dip-transfer fabrication method was used to graft PBA chains with a DP value of 296 from the tip endings of mushroom-shaped PDMS micropillars. A PBA chain covered micropillar array showed macroscale adhesion enhancement up to approximately 7 times relative to the flat ungrafted prefunctionalized PDMS control substrate, showing additional nonoptimized approximately 2-fold adhesion enhancement due to fibrillar structuring and mushroom-shaped tip ending. These dangling hetero chains on elastomer micro-/nanofibrillar structures may provide a novel fabrication platform for multilength scale, repeatable, and high-strength fibrillar adhesives inspired by gecko foot hairs. PMID:20355863

  8. Relative Telomere Length and Cognitive Decline in the Nurses’ Health Study

    OpenAIRE

    Devore, Elizabeth E.; Prescott, Jennifer; De Vivo, Immaculata; Grodstein, Francine

    2011-01-01

    Telomeres are short DNA repeats on the ends of mammalian chromosomes, which can undergo incomplete replication leading to gradual shortening with each cell cycle. Age and oxidative stress are contributors to telomere shortening; thus, telomere length may be a composite measure of biologic aging, and a potential predictor of health status in older adults. We evaluated whether relative telomere length (the proportion of telomere repeat copy number to single gene copy number, using a real-time P...

  9. Deletion of the major peroxiredoxin Tsa1 alters telomere length homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    LU, Jian; Vallabhaneni, Haritha; Yin, Jinhu; Liu, Yie

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are proposed to play a major role in telomere length alterations during aging. The mechanisms by which ROS disrupt telomeres remain unclear. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, telomere DNA consists of TG(1-3) repeats, which are maintained primarily by telomerase. Telomere length maintenance can be modulated by the expression level of telomerase subunits and telomerase activity. Additionally, telomerase-mediated telomere repeat addition is negatively modulated by the le...

  10. Evaluation of DNB test repeatability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repeatability of DNB tests was evaluated by carrying out DNB runs at the same conditions in two different test sections. The resulting matched pairs of DNB runs were then subjected to an extensive statistical analysis. This analysis indicates that individual runs using different test sections are repeatable within approximately 8 percent, and that the means of two different data sets should fall within approximately 2 percent of each other. The repeatability within a set, i.e., from the same test section, was found to be approximately 6.4 percent. An evaluation of the uncertainties by analysis of errors inherent in geometrical and physical parameters results in an estimated set-to-set repeatability for an individual run of 7.6 percent which is in good agreement with the 8 percent error found in the data analysis. For repeatability of an individual run within a set, 6.8 percent was estimated from the test parameters, compared to 6.4 percent determined by data analysis. (U.S.)

  11. Two tandemly repeated telomere-associated sequences in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C M; Wang, C T; Wang, C J; Ho, C H; Kao, Y Y; Chen, C C

    1997-12-01

    Two tandemly repeated telomere-associated sequences, NP3R and NP4R, have been isolated from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. The length of a repeating unit for NP3R and NP4R is 165 and 180 nucleotides respectively. The abundance of NP3R, NP4R and telomeric repeats is, respectively, 8.4 x 10(4), 6 x 10(3) and 1.5 x 10(6) copies per haploid genome of N. plumbaginifolia. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that NP3R is located at the ends and/or in interstitial regions of all 10 chromosomes and NP4R on the terminal regions of three chromosomes in the haploid genome of N. plumbaginifolia. Sequence homology search revealed that not only are NP3R and NP4R homologous to HRS60 and GRS, respectively, two tandem repeats isolated from N. tabacum, but that NP3R and NP4R are also related to each other, suggesting that they originated from a common ancestral sequence. The role of these repeated sequences in chromosome healing is discussed based on the observation that two to three copies of a telomere-similar sequence were present in each repeating unit of NP3R and NP4R. PMID:9451957

  12. Robustness of BW Aberrance Indices Against Test Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Wei Huang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Many research had shown person fit indices might be influenced by the factor of test length on their detection rates of aberrant responses. The purpose of this study was to examine test length effects on the BW aberrance indices. Three conditions were designed in this study: test length (K, including 25, 50,100, and 200 items, ability ratio (T/K, defined as the total person score divided by test length K, and error ratio (E/K, defined as the number of errors within ability level divided by test length. Four 100-person times varying-item data matrices (100x25, 100x50, 100x100, and 100x200 were randomly generated and permuted 500 times for each data matrix through 20 repeats. Results showed that after partialling out the factors of E/K and T/K, the effect of test length on the association between the two indices was very slight. In nonlinear regression analyses, E/K and T/K can predict more than 76 and 73 percent of the variances of the B index and that of the W index, respectively, but test length with both very slight contributions on them. Furthermore, a very good model fit generated from SEM analyses also showed the effect of test length on the B and W indices were very tiny. All these pieces of evidence endorsed the B and W indices were robust with test length.

  13. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol. PMID:25903096

  14. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  15. Repeating seismic events in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaff, David P; Richards, Paul G

    2004-02-20

    About 10% of seismic events in and near China from 1985 to 2000 were repeating events not more than about 1 kilometer from each other. We cross-correlated seismograms from approximately 14,000 earthquakes and explosions and measured relative arrival times to approximately 0.01 second, enabling lateral location precision of about 100 to 300 meters. Such precision is important for seismic hazard studies, earthquake physics, and nuclear test ban verification. Recognition and measurement of repeating signals in archived data and the resulting improvement in location specificity quantifies the inaccuracy of current procedures for picking onset times and locating events. PMID:14976310

  16. Multifunctional Fe3O4@C@Ag hybrid nanoparticles: Aqueous solution preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Ag-loaded Fe3O4@C magnetic-optical bifunctional materials have been investigated. ► The magnetism was studied at the room temperature. ► The photocatalytic activity was evaluated under visible light irradiation. ► Ag-loaded Fe3O4@C nanocomposites show superior magnetism and photocatalytic activity. ► A simple synthetic process was discussed. - Abstract: The paper describes a kind of multifunctional Fe3O4@C@Ag hybrid nanoparticles, which can be successfully synthesized using a simple route based on directly adsorption and spontaneous reduction of silver ions onto the surface shell of carbon-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The as-prepared samples have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and UV–vis spectrum (UV–vis). The Ag nanocrystals loaded on the surface shell of carbon-coated magnetic nanoparticles are nearly spherical with an average diameter of 10 nm. And the carbonaceous polysaccharides shell obtained using an glucose hydrothermal reaction act as a role of a bridge between magnetic Fe3O4 core and noble metallic Ag nanocrystals. The as-prepared samples can be used as an effective catalyst for the photodegradation of organic dyes (neutral red) under the exposure of visible light. Results show that the as-prepared samples have a degradation rate of 93.7% for dyes within 30 min, which indicates their high-efficiency and rapid photocatalytic activity

  17. 幽门螺杆菌毒素相关蛋白A的EPIYA多态性对胃上皮细胞AGS形态及IL-8表达的影响%Effects of the Patterns of Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA Motifs on AGF Cell Morphology and IL-8 Secretion Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹿; 王艳春; 陶好霞; 袁盛凌; 王令春; 刘纯杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of the patterns of EPIYA motifs of Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A(CagA) on the cell morphology and the IL-8 secretion levels of AGS cells. Methods: The differ⁃ent genotypes of EPIYA motifs of cagA were designed and the codons were humanized, then the synthetic frag⁃ments were assembled and constructed into pcDNA3.1 vector. The recombinants were transfected into AGS cells and the effects of patterns of EPIYA motifs of CagA on cell morphology and the IL-8 secretion levels were ob⁃served. Results: Cellular morphological observation was conducted every 6 h after the transfection, and the num⁃bers of hummingbird-like cells were counted at 24 and 36 h respectively. The statistical results showed that all CagA genotypes could increase the number of cells with hummingbird-like change. Compared with the mock-vehi⁃cle controls, all the six CagA types showed a remarkably significant differences; compared with CagA ABCCC, the five CagA types left showed a remarkably significant differences. In addition, IL-8 secreted by these cells 12 and 36 h after transfection was detected respectively. The statistical analysis revealed that, at 12 h after transfection, the secretion of IL-8 began to appear difference among the six CagA types; at 36 h after transfection, compared with the mock-vehicle controls, CagA ABD, CagA J-Western, CagA ABDD and CagA ABCCC showed a remark⁃ably significant differences. Although both CagA ABD and CagA ABDD belonged to East Asian type, they had sig⁃nificantly different effects on the IL-8 secretion levels of AGS cells. Meanwhile, both CagA ABC and CagA ABCCC which belonged to Western type had significantly different effects on the IL-8 secretion levels too. Con⁃clusion: CagA virulent factor of H.pylori caused cell hummingbird phenotype and increased the IL-8 secretion lev⁃els of AGS cells. The number of EPIYA-C motif was positively correlated with hummingbird-cell formation, and the

  18. Coevolution between simple sequence repeats (SSRs and virus genome size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xiangyan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relationship between the level of repetitiveness in genomic sequence and genome size has been investigated by making use of complete prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, but relevant studies have been rarely made in virus genomes. Results In this study, a total of 257 viruses were examined, which cover 90% of genera. The results showed that simple sequence repeats (SSRs is strongly, positively and significantly correlated with genome size. Certain repeat class is distributed in a certain range of genome sequence length. Mono-, di- and tri- repeats are widely distributed in all virus genomes, tetra- SSRs as a common component consist in genomes which more than 100 kb in size; in the range of genome  Conclusions We conducted this research standing on the height of the whole virus. We concluded that genome size is an important factor in affecting the occurrence of SSRs; hosts are also responsible for the variances of SSRs content to a certain degree.

  19. Associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA de Helicobacter pylori e úlcera duodenal em crianças no Brasil VacA alleles, cagA, and duodenal ulcer in children in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Abdussalam Ali Ramadam Ashour; Valquíria Ribeiro de Gusmão; Paula Prazeres Magalhães; Guilherme Birchal Collares; Edilberto Nogueira Mendes; Dulciene Maria de Magalhães Queiroz; Gifone Aguiar Rocha; Andreia Maria Camargos Rocha; Anfrisina Sales Teles Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori é o principal agente de gastrite em seres humanos e fator de risco para úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. A evolução da infecção está relacionada a diversos fatores, inclusive bacterianos, como presença de cagA e genótipo s1-m1 do vacA, associados com o desenvolvimento de úlcera e adenocarcinoma gástrico. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA em H. pylori isolado de crianças e relacionar os achados com a doença apresentada pelo pac...

  20. FETAL FOOT LENGTH AND HAND LENGTH: RELATIONSHIP WITH CROWN RUMP LENGTH AND GESTATIONAL AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Estimation of gestational age of fetus is of great medicolegal importance. Multiple parameters of the fetal anatomical measurements are in use. However, gestational age assessment may be difficult in fetus with anencephaly, hydrocephalus, short limb dysplasia, post mortem destruction or in mutilated case. Study of literature suggests that fetal foot has a characteristic pattern of normal growth and the fetal foot shows gradual increase in length relative to the length of the embryo and could be used to estimate gestational age. The purpose of the present study is to determine the accuracy in estimating gestational age using fetal foot and hand length by studying its relation with crown rump length in the foetuses of Manipuri origin. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 1 To study the relationship between fetal crown rump length and fetal hand and foot length, thereby determining the accuracy in estimating gestational age by a cross-sectional study. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 formalin fixed fetuses of Manipuri origin, obtained from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, were included in the study, carried out in the Department of Anatomy, from February 2015 to July 2015. The parameters studied were crown rump length, foot length and hand length of fetuses. The data was analysed using SPSS software by regression analysis. Graphs were also plotted to determine pattern of growth and their correlation with crown rump length if any. RESULTS A total of 100 fetuses were studied, of which 43 were females and 57 were males. The mean foot length and hand length progressively increased with increase in crown rump length. Measurements were not significantly different in right or left side or among male and female fetuses. A statistically significant linear relationship was seen between foot length and crown rump length of the fetus (r=0.980, p<0.0001 and hand length and crown rump length of the fetus

  1. CagA status & genetic characterization of metronidazole resistant strains of H. pylori from: A region at high risk of gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Jin-Yong; Yue, Jing; Wang, Ming-Yi; Song, Wen-chong; Gao, Xiao-zhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of study was to determine relationship between cagA and genetic characterization of metronidazole (MTZ) resistant H. pylori strains from a region at high risk of gastric cancer. Methods: 172 H. pylori strains were isolated from the patients with dyspeptic symptoms, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for MTZ was assessed by E-test. rdxA and frxA genes were amplified using PCR among the MTZ resistant isolates. The status of the plasmid and classes 1~3 integrons were inv...

  2. A Semiparametric Bayesian Model for Repeatedly Repeated Binary Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana, Fernando A.; Müller, Peter; Rosner, Gary L.; Mary V Relling

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the analysis of data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays comparing tumor and normal tissues. The data consist of sequences of indicators for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and involve three nested levels of repetition: chromosomes for a given patient, regions within chromosomes, and SNPs nested within regions. We propose to analyze these data using a semiparametric model for multi-level repeated binary data. At the top level of the hierarchy we assume a sampling model fo...

  3. From Concrete to Abstract in the Measurement of Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Andreas; Fisher, William P., Jr.

    2013-09-01

    The concatenation of units of length is widely viewed as the paradigmatic expression of fundamental measurement. Survey, assessment, and test scores in educational and psychological measurement are often interpreted in ways that assume a concatenation of units to have been established, even though these assumptions are rarely stated or tested. A concatenation model for measurement is shown to be equivalent to a Rasch model: any two units of measurement placed end to end must together be of the same length as either one of them added to itself. This additive principle and a concatenation model of measurement together serve as a heuristic guide for organizing two experimental approaches to calibrating instruments for measuring length. The capacity to reproduce the unit of measurement from theory with no need for repeated empirical calibration experiments, as in the geometrical bisection of the line and the resultant halving of the length measure, is highlighted as essential to demonstrating a thorough understanding of the construct.

  4. From Concrete to Abstract in the Measurement of Length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concatenation of units of length is widely viewed as the paradigmatic expression of fundamental measurement. Survey, assessment, and test scores in educational and psychological measurement are often interpreted in ways that assume a concatenation of units to have been established, even though these assumptions are rarely stated or tested. A concatenation model for measurement is shown to be equivalent to a Rasch model: any two units of measurement placed end to end must together be of the same length as either one of them added to itself. This additive principle and a concatenation model of measurement together serve as a heuristic guide for organizing two experimental approaches to calibrating instruments for measuring length. The capacity to reproduce the unit of measurement from theory with no need for repeated empirical calibration experiments, as in the geometrical bisection of the line and the resultant halving of the length measure, is highlighted as essential to demonstrating a thorough understanding of the construct

  5. [Telomere length and telomerase activity in hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashio, R; Kitamoto, M; Nakanishi, T; Takaishi, H; Takahashi, S; Kajiyama, G

    1998-05-01

    Telomerase activity and terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length were examined in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Telomerase activity was assayed by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) connected with an internal telomerase assay standard (ITAS). The incidence of strong telomerase activity (highly variable level compared with the activity of non-cancerous liver tissue) was 79% in well, 84% in moderately, and 100% in poorly differentiated HCC, while 0% in non-cancerous liver tissues. The incidence of TRF length alteration (reduction or elongation) was 53% in HCC. The incidence of TRF alteration was significantly higher in HCC exceeding 3 cm in diameter, moderately or poorly differentiated in histology. Telomerase activity was not associated with TRF length alteration in HCC. In conclusion, strong telomerase activity and TRF length alteration increased with HCC tumor progressions. PMID:9613130

  6. Adaptive subdivision and the length and energy of Bézier curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens

    1997-01-01

    combination, and it forms the basis for a fast adaptive algorithm, which determines the arc-length of a Bézier curve.The energy of a curve is half the square of the curvature integrated with respect to arc-length. Like in the case of the arc-length, it is possible to use the chord-length and polygon-length of...... sum of the chord-lengths of the pieces, and less than the sum of the polygon-lengths of the pieces. Under repeated subdivisions, the difference between this lower and upper bound gets arbitrarily small.If $L_c$ denotes the total chord-length of the pieces and $L_p$ denotes the total polygon-length of...... the pieces of a subdivided Bézier curve to estimate the energy of the Bézier curve....

  7. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  8. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  9. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Péter Kovács; András Csontos; Balázs Heilig; András Koppán

    2013-01-01

    The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried ...

  10. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vattipally B Sreenu; Pankaj Kumar; Javaregowda Nagaraju; Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive nucleotide sequences of motifs of length 1–6 bp. They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes. Microsatellites undergo mutations in the form of insertions and deletions (INDELS) of their repeat units with some bias towards insertions that lead to microsatellite tract expansion. Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these enzymes and as a null hypothesis one could expect these genomes to harbour many long tracts. It is therefore interesting to analyse the mycobacterial genomes for distribution and abundance of microsatellites tracts and to look for potentially polymorphic microsatellites. Available mycobacterial genomes, Mycobacterium avium, M. leprae, M. bovis and the two strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and H37Rv) were analysed for frequencies and abundance of SSRs. Our analysis revealed that the SSRs are distributed throughout the mycobacterial genomes at an average of 220–230 SSR tracts per kb. All the mycobacterial genomes contain few regions that are conspicuously denser or poorer in microsatellites compared to their expected genome averages. The genomes distinctly show scarcity of long microsatellites despite the absence of a post-replicative DNA repair system. Such severe scarcity of long microsatellites could arise as a result of strong selection pressures operating against long and unstable sequences although influence of GC-content and role of point mutations in arresting microsatellite expansions can not be ruled out. Nonetheless, the long tracts occasionally found in coding as well as non-coding regions may account for limited genome plasticity in these genomes.

  11. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  12. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  13. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaques of dyspeptic patients from Marília, São Paulo, Brazil: presence of vacA and cagA genes

    OpenAIRE

    LT Rasmussen; RW de Labio; Neto, A. C.; LC Silva; VF Queiroz; MAC Smith; SLM Payão

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative bacterium, possesses two important virulence factors: the vacuolating toxin (vacA), and the cytotoxin-associated gene product (cagA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of H. pylori in the stomach and oral cavity of humans and compare the cagA and vacA genotypes of H. pylori found in different samples (stomach, saliva and dental plaque) from the same patient. Gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaques were obtained from 62 dyspeptic...

  14. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K; Tsai, Y C; Spruck, C H; Miyao, N; Nichols, P W; Hermann, G G; Horn, T; Steven, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X chr...

  15. Control of telomere length by a trimming mechanism that involves generation of t-circles

    OpenAIRE

    Hilda A Pickett; Cesare, Anthony J.; Johnston, Rebecca L; Neumann, Axel A.; Reddel, Roger R

    2009-01-01

    Telomere lengths are maintained in many cancer cells by the ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase but can be further elongated by increasing telomerase activity through the overexpression of telomerase components. We report here that increased telomerase activity results in increased telomere length that eventually reaches a plateau, accompanied by the generation of telomere length heterogeneity and the accumulation of extrachromosomal telomeric repeat DNA, principally in the form of telomeric ...

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Length Variation and Heteroplasmy in Populations of White Sturgeon (Acipenser Transmontanus)

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J R; Beckenbach, A. T.; Smith, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Southern blot analysis was used to quantify the extent of mtDNA D-loop length variation in two populations of white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus. Over 42% of individuals were heteroplasmic for up to six different mtDNA length variants attributable to varying copy numbers of an 82-bp repeat sequence. Chi-square analyses revealed that the frequencies of length genotypes and the incidence of heteroplasmy were significantly different between Fraser and Columbia River sturgeon populations but...

  17. 胃癌组织中幽门螺杆菌cagA和vacA的表达及与其感染的相关性%Expression of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA and their correlations with Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟书娟; 陈军; 詹瑧; 杨丹丹; 刘亚平

    2006-01-01

    目的:研究H pylori cagA和H pylori vacA在胃癌、胃黏膜不典型增生和胃炎组织中的表达及与H pylori感染的相关性.方法:采用Warthin-Starry嗜银染色法检测胃癌组织39例,胃黏膜不典型增生组织24例和慢性胃炎组织33例中H pylori感染情况;PCR法检测上述标本H pylori cagA和H pylori vacA的表达.结果:胃癌组织中H pylori,H pylori cagA+株和H pylori vacA+株感染率显著高于慢性胃炎组织(χ2=7.00,P<0.05;χ2=15.20,P<0.05;χ2=12.43,P<0.05);胃黏膜不典型增生组织中H pylori,H pylori cagA+株和H pylori vacA+株感染率显著高于慢性胃炎组织(χ2=6.25,P<0.05;χ2=11.04,P<0.05;χ2=11.61,P<0.05);低分化胃癌组织中H pylori,H pylori cagA+和H pylori vacA+株感染率显著高于高中分化胃癌组织(χ2=8.19,P<0.05;χ2=13.14,P<0.05;χ2=6.62,P<0.05).慢性胃炎、不典型增生和胃癌组织中H pylori与H pylori cagA和H pylori vacA表达均呈正相关(慢性胃炎:r=0.56,P<0.01;r=0.64,P<0.01;不典型增生组织:r=0.64,P<0.01;r=0.92,P<0.01;胃癌:r=0.90,P<0.01;r=0.95,P<0.01).结论:H pylori感染是慢性胃炎向胃黏膜不典型增生及胃癌发展的重要启动因子,H pylori感染可能通过诱导cagA表达促使胃黏膜上皮细胞增殖加快,诱导vacA表达促使胃黏膜上皮细胞损伤;他们的协同作用可能在胃癌发生、发展过程中发挥了重要作用.

  18. Correlations between the CagA Antigen and Serum Levels of Anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG and IgA in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Chun Woo; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae-Young; Jun, Jin-Su; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2016-03-01

    We tested correlations between anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG and IgA levels and the urease test, anti-CagA protein antibody, degree of gastritis, and age. In total, 509 children (0-15 years) were enrolled. Subjects were stratified as 0-4 years (n = 132), 5-9 years (n = 274), and 10-15 years (n = 103) and subjected to the urease test, histopathology, ELISA, and western blot using whole-cell lysates of H. pylori strain 51. The positivity rate in the urease test (P = 0.003), the degree of chronic gastritis (P = 0.021), and H. pylori infiltration (P pylori IgG was 732.5 IU/mL at 0-4 years, 689.0 IU/mL at 5-9 years, and 966.0 IU/mL at 10-15 years (P pylori IgA was 61.0 IU/mL at 0-4 years, 63.5 IU/mL at 5-9 years, and 75.0 IU/mL at 10-15 years (P pylori IgG and IgA titers increased with the urease test grade, chronic gastritis degree, active gastritis, and H. pylori infiltration. Presence of CagA-positivity is well correlated with a high urease test grade and high anti-H. pylori IgG/IgA levels. PMID:26955243

  19. Serum concentrations of Helicobacter pylori IgG and the virulence factor CagA in patients with ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, A; Esmaeeli-Nadimi, A; Nemati, M; Tahmasbi, M; Ahmadi, P

    2010-10-01

    To compare the serum concentrations of IgG to Helicobacter pylori and its virulence factor CagA in patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD), we recruited 120 patients with IHD [acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n = 60); unstable angina (UA) (n = 60)] and 60 sex- and age-matched healthy controls in this study. The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgG was 86.7% in AMI, 91.7% in UA patients and 58.3% in the control group with mean titres of 33.2 U/ml [standard error (SE) 4.76], 57.96 U/ml (SE 7.54) and 25.72 U/ml (SE 4.01) respectively. The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori in the patient groups was significantly higher than the control group. The mean levels of anti-H. pylori in the AMI and UA groups were also significantly higher than in the control group. The seroprevalence and mean titre of anti-CagA IgG did not differ significantly between patient and control groups. PMID:21222419

  20. Capsaicin consumption, Helicobacter pylori CagA status and IL1B-31C>T genotypes: a host and environment interaction in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Camargo, M Constanza; Schneider, Barbara G; Sicinschi, Liviu A; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Correa, Pelayo; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2012-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has been associated with a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to most countries, available information on GC mortality trends showed a gradual increase in Mexico. Our aim was to explore potential interactions among dietary (chili pepper consumption), infectious (Helicobacter pylori) and genetic factors (IL1B-31 genotypes) on GC risk. The study was performed in three areas of Mexico, with different GC mortality rates. We included 158 GC patients and 317 clinical controls. Consumption of capsaicin (Cap), the pungent active substance of chili peppers, was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. H. pylori CagA status was assessed by ELISA, and IL1B-31 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays and Pyrosequencing in DNA samples. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate potential interactions. Moderate to high Cap consumption synergistically increased GC risk in genetically susceptible individuals (IL1B-31C allele carriers) infected with the more virulent H. pylori (CagA+) strains. The combined presence of these factors might explain the absence of a decreasing trend for GC in Mexico. However, further research on gene-environment interactions is required to fully understand the factors determining GC patterns in susceptible populations, with the aim of recommending preventive measures for high risk individuals. PMID:22414649

  1. Trinucleotide GAA Repeats Dictate pMGA Gene Expression in Mycoplasma gallisepticum by Affecting Spacing between Flanking Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Li; Panangala, Victor S.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    The pMGA genes of the avian respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum encode a family of hemagglutinins that are subject to phase variation. A trinucleotide GAA repeat region is located upstream of the pMGA transcription start site. The length of the repeat region varies at a high frequency due to changes in the number of repeat units. Previous studies have shown that pMGA genes are transcribed when 12 GAA repeats are present but are not transcribed when the number of repeats is not 12. T...

  2. Telomere Length Correlates with Life Span of Dog Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Fick

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Telomeric DNA repeats are lost as normal somatic cells replicate. When telomeres reach a critically short length, a DNA damage signal is initiated, inducing cell senescence. Some studies have indicated that telomere length correlates with mortality, suggesting that telomere length contributes to human life span; however, other studies report no correlation, and thus the issue remains controversial. Domestic dogs show parallels in telomere biology to humans, with similar telomere length, telomere attrition, and absence of somatic cell telomerase activity. Using this model, we find that peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC telomere length is a strong predictor of average life span among 15 different breeds (p < 0.0001, consistent with telomeres playing a role in life span determination. Dogs lose telomeric DNA ∼10-fold faster than humans, which is similar to the ratio of average life spans between these species. Breeds with shorter mean telomere lengths show an increased probability of death from cardiovascular disease, which was previously correlated with short telomere length in humans.

  3. Templated synthesis of DNA nanotubes with controlled, predetermined lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Pik Kwan; Altvater, Florian; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2010-08-01

    We report a DNA-templated approach to construct nanotubes with controlled lengths and narrow molecular weight distribution, allowing the deliberate variation of this length. This approach relies on the facile and modular assembly of a DNA guide strand of precise length that contains single-stranded gaps repeating at every 50 nm. This is followed by positioning triangular DNA "rungs" on each of these single-stranded gaps and adding identical linking strands to the two other sides of the triangles to close the DNA nanotubes. The length of the guide strand can be deliberately changed. We show the use of this approach to produce nanotubes with lengths of 1 microm or 500 nm and narrow length distributions. This is in contrast to nontemplated approaches, which lead to long and polydisperse nanotubes. We also demonstrate the encapsulation of 20 nm gold nanoparticles within these well-defined nanotubes to form finite lines of gold nanoparticles with longitudinal plasmon coupling, with a number of potential nanophotonic applications. This guiding strand approach is a useful tool in the creation of DNA nanostructures, in this case allowing the use of a simple template generated by a minimal number of DNA strands to program the length and molecular weight distribution of assemblies, as well as to organize any number of DNA-labeled nano-objects into finite structures. PMID:20662492

  4. Minimum Length from First Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Calmet, X; Hsu, S D H; Calmet, Xavier; Graesser, Michael; Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2005-01-01

    We show that no device or gedanken experiment is capable of measuring a distance less than the Planck length. By "measuring a distance less than the Planck length" we mean, technically, resolve the eigenvalues of the position operator to within that accuracy. The only assumptions in our argument are causality, the uncertainty principle from quantum mechanics and a dynamical criteria for gravitational collapse from classical general relativity called the hoop conjecture. The inability of any gedanken experiment to measure a sub-Planckian distance suggests the existence of a minimal length.

  5. Infección por Helicobacter pylori en la Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba.Prevalencia de las cepas cagA positivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gutiérrez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe una gran falta de información acerca de la infección por Helicobacter pylori en los países de la región del Caribe. Nuestros objetivos en este estudio fueron determinar la prevalencia, la resistencia a los antibióticos y los factores de virulencia de la bacteria. La medida de la prevalencia de la infección por H. pylori se determinó en un grupo de pacientes a los que se les practicó una endoscopia en tres centros hospitalarios de La Ciudad de La Habana, lo que nos permitió evaluar la resistencia a la claritromicina y la presencia de cagA + en las cepas obtenidas. De las endoscopias realizadas se obtuvieron 117 biopsias gástricas, procedentes de tres centros hospitalarios de La Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba: Instituto de Oncología, Instituto de Gastroenterología y el Hospital Calixto García. Las biopsias fueron mantenidas a –70 ºC para posterior cultivo en tres medios diferentes (dos selectivos y uno no selectivo y su posterior incubación por 7 días a 37 ºC en una atmósfera de microaerofilia. La presencia de H. pylori fue identificada por la presencia de diferentes enzimas (oxidasa, catalasa, ureasa. Se realizó la extracción del DNA y la PCR, donde se utilizó el primer H2761676 y se amplificó con 397 fragmentos del gen cagA. La susceptibilidad a la claritromicina fue medida por el método de difusión en gel. Diagnóstico endoscópico: (1 cáncer gástrico; (19 úlcera duodenal; (8 úlcera gástrica; (89 dispepsias no ulcerosas, incluyendo (62 gastritis; (9 hernia hiatal; (2 reflujo biliar; (1 pólipo gástrico; (15 panendoscopias normales. Del total de 117 biopsias realizadas, 83 fueron positivas a la infección por H.pylori (70,9% . De las 35 cepas a las que se les realizó presencia de cagA+ resultaron positivas 31 (88,5%. Solo el 3% de las cepas fueron resistentes a la claritromicina. La prevalencia de la infección por H. pylori en la población sintomática de La Ciudad de La Habana es la misma que la reportada en

  6. Definition of Magnetic Exchange Length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo, GS; Hong, YK; Park, J; Lee, J; Lee, W; Choi, BC

    2013-08-01

    The magnetostatic exchange length is an important parameter in magnetics as it measures the relative strength of exchange and self-magnetostatic energies. Its use can be found in areas of magnetics including micromagnetics, soft and hard magnetic materials, and information storage. The exchange length is of primary importance because it governs the width of the transition between magnetic domains. Unfortunately, there is some confusion in the literature between the magnetostatic exchange length and a similar distance concerning magnetization reversal mechanisms in particles known as the characteristic length. This confusion is aggravated by the common usage of two different systems of units, SI and cgs. This paper attempts to clarify the situation and recommends equations in both systems of units.

  7. The crystal structures of dystrophin and utrophin spectrin repeats: implications for domain boundaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidharan Muthu

    Full Text Available Dystrophin and utrophin link the F-actin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane via an associated glycoprotein complex. This functionality results from their domain organization having an N-terminal actin-binding domain followed by multiple spectrin-repeat domains and then C-terminal protein-binding motifs. Therapeutic strategies to replace defective dystrophin with utrophin in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy require full-characterization of both these proteins to assess their degree of structural and functional equivalence. Here the high resolution structures of the first spectrin repeats (N-terminal repeat 1 from both dystrophin and utrophin have been determined by x-ray crystallography. The repeat structures both display a three-helix bundle fold very similar to one another and to homologous domains from spectrin, α-actinin and plectin. The utrophin and dystrophin repeat structures reveal the relationship between the structural domain and the canonical spectrin repeat domain sequence motif, showing the compact structural domain of spectrin repeat one to be extended at the C-terminus relative to its previously defined sequence repeat. These structures explain previous in vitro biochemical studies in which extending dystrophin spectrin repeat domain length leads to increased protein stability. Furthermore we show that the first dystrophin and utrophin spectrin repeats have no affinity for F-actin in the absence of other domains.

  8. Pythagorean Triangles with Repeated Digits-Repeated Bases

    CERN Document Server

    Muzaffar, Habib

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, in the winter issue of the journal Mathematics and Computer education (see [1]), Monte Zerger posed the following problem. He had noticed the Pythagorean triple (216,630,666);(216)^2+(630)^2=(666)^2. Note that 216=6^3 and 666 is the hypotenuse length. The question was then, whether there existed a digit d and a positive integer k(other than the above); such that d^k is the leglength of a Pythagorean triangle whose hypotenuse length has exactly k digits, each being equal to d. In 1999, F.Luca and P.Bruckman, answered the above question in the negative. In 2001, K.Zelator(see [2]), took this question further and showed that no Pythagorean triangle exists such that one leg has length d^k, while the other leglegth has exactly k digits in its decimal expansion, with each digit bein equal to d. In this work, we explore the above phenomenon from the point of view of number bases other than 10. We prove five Theorems. As an example, in Theorem 1, we prove that there exists no Pythagorean triangle with one of...

  9. Minimum Length from First Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Calmet, Xavier; Graesser, Michael; Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2005-01-01

    We show that no device or gedanken experiment is capable of measuring a distance less than the Planck length. By "measuring a distance less than the Planck length" we mean, technically, resolve the eigenvalues of the position operator to within that accuracy. The only assumptions in our argument are causality, the uncertainty principle from quantum mechanics and a dynamical criteria for gravitational collapse from classical general relativity called the hoop conjecture. The inability of any g...

  10. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  12. Telomerase Repeated Amplification Protocol (TRAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are found at the end of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, and proteins that bind to telomeres protect DNA from being recognized as double-strand breaks thus preventing end-to-end fusions (Griffith et al., 1999). However, due to the end replication problem and other factors such as oxidative damage, the limited life span of cultured cells (Hayflick limit) results in progressive shortening of these protective structures (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex telomerase-consisting of a protein catalytic component hTERT and a functional RNA component hTR or hTERC- counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric repeats to the end of chromosomes in ~90% of primary human tumors and in some transiently proliferating stem-like cells (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). This results in continuous proliferation of cells which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, telomere biology has a central role in aging, cancer progression/metastasis as well as targeted cancer therapies. There are commonly used methods in telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) (Mender and Shay, 2015b), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this detailed protocol we describe Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). The TRAP assay is a popular method to determine telomerase activity in mammalian cells and tissue samples (Kim et al., 1994). The TRAP assay includes three steps: extension, amplification, and detection of telomerase products. In the extension step, telomeric repeats are added to the telomerase substrate (which is actually a non telomeric oligonucleotide, TS) by telomerase. In the amplification step, the extension products are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers (TS upstream primer and ACX downstream primer) and in the detection step, the presence or absence of telomerase is

  13. Role of CCAA Nucleotide Repeats in Regulation of Hemoglobin and Hemoglobin-Haptoglobin Binding Protein Genes of Haemophilus influenzae

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zhen; Jin, Hongfan; Whitby, Paul W.; Morton, Daniel J.; Stull, Terrence L.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae utilizes hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin as heme sources. The H. influenzae hemoglobin- and hemoglobin-haptoglobin binding protein genes, hgpA, hgpB, and hgpC, contain lengths of tetrameric CCAA repeats. Using an hgpA-lacZ translational gene fusion, we demonstrate phase-variable expression of lacZ associated with alteration in the length of the CCAA repeat region.

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... live birth before age 20. Problem Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 ...

  15. Scalable production in human cells and biochemical characterization of full-length normal and mutant huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Huang

    Full Text Available Huntingtin (Htt is a 350 kD intracellular protein, ubiquitously expressed and mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Huntington's disease (HD is caused by a CAG triplet amplification in exon 1 of the corresponding gene resulting in a polyglutamine (polyQ expansion at the N-terminus of Htt. Production of full-length Htt has been difficult in the past and so far a scalable system or process has not been established for recombinant production of Htt in human cells. The ability to produce Htt in milligram quantities would be a prerequisite for many biochemical and biophysical studies aiming in a better understanding of Htt function under physiological conditions and in case of mutation and disease. For scalable production of full-length normal (17Q and mutant (46Q and 128Q Htt we have established two different systems, the first based on doxycycline-inducible Htt expression in stable cell lines, the second on "gutless" adenovirus mediated gene transfer. Purified material has then been used for biochemical characterization of full-length Htt. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs were determined and several new phosphorylation sites were identified. Nearly all PTMs in full-length Htt localized to areas outside of predicted alpha-solenoid protein regions. In all detected N-terminal peptides methionine as the first amino acid was missing and the second, alanine, was found to be acetylated. Differences in secondary structure between normal and mutant Htt, a helix-rich protein, were not observed in our study. Purified Htt tends to form dimers and higher order oligomers, thus resembling the situation observed with N-terminal fragments, although the mechanism of oligomer formation may be different.

  16. Essays in the theory of repeated games

    OpenAIRE

    Osório-Costa, António Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This thesis comprises three essays in economic theory. The first two are in the theory of repeated games. The third is also a theoretical contribution, which mixes con- cepts both from repeated games and the theory of incentives. The first chapter is a novel contribution to frequent monitoring in repeated games. The second one, studies for the first time, infinitely repeated games where the repetitions of the stage game are random. The last chapter, studies the provision of incentives in a pr...

  17. Lambda Exonuclease Digestion of CGG Trinucleotide Repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Conroy, R. S.; Koretsky, A P; Moreland, J.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome and other triplet repeat diseases are characterized by an elongation of a repeating DNA triplet. The ensemble-averaged lambda exonuclease digestion rate of different substrates, including one with an elongated FMR1 gene containing 120 CGG repeats, was measured using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using magnetic tweezers sequence-dependent digestion rates and pausing was measured for individual lambda exonucleases. Within the triplet repeats a lower average and na...

  18. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaques of dyspeptic patients from Marília, São Paulo, Brazil: presence of vacA and cagA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LT Rasmussen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative bacterium, possesses two important virulence factors: the vacuolating toxin (vacA, and the cytotoxin-associated gene product (cagA. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of H. pylori in the stomach and oral cavity of humans and compare the cagA and vacA genotypes of H. pylori found in different samples (stomach, saliva and dental plaque from the same patient. Gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaques were obtained from 62 dyspeptic adults. DNA was extracted and evaluated for the presence of H. pylori and the alleles cagA and vacA. Persons with gastritis had a higher frequency of H. pylori -positive samples in the stomach while positive samples from gastric biopsies were significantly correlated with those from the oral cavity. There was a high H. pylori frequency in patients while the cagA gene was associated with vacA s1 alleles in gastric biopsies. Our results suggest a reservoir of the species in the oral cavity and that, in one patient, more than one H. pylori strain may exist in the saliva, dental plaque and stomach. We found a relationship between gastric infection and the bacterium in the oral cavity, with the cytotoxin genotype varying between saliva and dental plaque.

  19. A polymorphic repeat in the IGF1 promoter influences the risk of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Bolton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of high-throughput genetic assays for tandem repeats, there is a paucity of knowledge about the role they may play in disease. A polymorphic CA repeat in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1 has been studied extensively over the past 10 years for association with the risk of developing breast cancer, among other cancers, with variable results. The aim of this study was to determine if this CA repeat is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Using a case–control design, we analysed the length of this CA repeat in a series of breast cancer and endometrial cancer cases and compared this with a control population. Our results showed an association when both alleles were considered in breast and endometrial cancers (P=0.029 and 0.011, respectively, but this did not pass our corrected threshold for significance due to multiple testing. When the allele lengths were analysed categorically against the most common allele length of 19 CA repeats, an association was observed with the risk of endometrial cancer due to a reduction in the number of long alleles (P=0.013. This was confirmed in an analysis of the long alleles separately for endometrial cancer risk (P=0.0012. Our study found no association between the length of this polymorphic CA repeat and breast cancer risk. The significant association observed between the CA repeat length and the risk of developing endometrial cancer has not been previously reported.

  20. A polymorphic repeat in the IGF1 promoter influences the risk of endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Katherine A; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Attia, John; Bowden, Nikola A

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of high-throughput genetic assays for tandem repeats, there is a paucity of knowledge about the role they may play in disease. A polymorphic CA repeat in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1 has been studied extensively over the past 10 years for association with the risk of developing breast cancer, among other cancers, with variable results. The aim of this study was to determine if this CA repeat is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Using a case–control design, we analysed the length of this CA repeat in a series of breast cancer and endometrial cancer cases and compared this with a control population. Our results showed an association when both alleles were considered in breast and endometrial cancers (P=0.029 and 0.011, respectively), but this did not pass our corrected threshold for significance due to multiple testing. When the allele lengths were analysed categorically against the most common allele length of 19 CA repeats, an association was observed with the risk of endometrial cancer due to a reduction in the number of long alleles (P=0.013). This was confirmed in an analysis of the long alleles separately for endometrial cancer risk (P=0.0012). Our study found no association between the length of this polymorphic CA repeat and breast cancer risk. The significant association observed between the CA repeat length and the risk of developing endometrial cancer has not been previously reported. PMID:27090263

  1. Isolation and characterization of repeat elements of the oak genome and their application in population analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four minisatellite sequence elements have been identified and isolated from the genome of the oak species Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. Minisatellites 1 and 2 are putative members of repeat families, while minisatellites 3 and 4 show repeat length variation among individuals of test populations. A 590 base pair (bp) long element has also been identified which reveals individual-specific autoradiographic patterns when used as probe in Southern hybridisations of genomic oak DNA. (author)

  2. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  3. When Does Length Cause the Word Length Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Annie; Neath, Ian; Bireta, Tamra J.; Surprenant, Aimee M.

    2011-01-01

    The word length effect, the finding that lists of short words are better recalled than lists of long words, has been termed one of the benchmark findings that any theory of immediate memory must account for. Indeed, the effect led directly to the development of working memory and the phonological loop, and it is viewed as the best remaining…

  4. Continuously variable focal length lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  5. Graduated compression stockings: knee length or thigh length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkö, T; Cooke, E A; McNally, M A; Mollan, R A

    2001-02-01

    The mechanisms by which graduated compression stockings prevent deep venous thrombosis are not completely understood. In the current study the physiologic effect of low-pressure graduated compression stockings on the venous blood flow in the lower limb and the practical aspects of their use were assessed. Patients having elective orthopaedic surgery at a university orthopaedic department were randomized into five groups to wear two different types of graduated compression stockings in thigh and knee lengths. Patients in the fifth control group did not wear graduated compression stockings. Venous occlusion strain gauge plethysmography was used to measure venous flow. After 20-minutes bed rest there was a highly significant increase in venous capacitance and venous outflow in patients in all of the four groups wearing stockings. There was no difference in the mean of the percentage change of venous capacitance in patients in the four groups wearing stockings. The knee length Brevet stockings were less efficient in increasing the venous outflow. There was no significant change in the venous capacitance and venous outflow in patients in the control group. Visual assessment of the fit and use of stockings was done, and patients' subjective opinion of comfort was sought. The knee length graduated compression stockings wrinkled significantly less, and significantly fewer patients reported discomfort with them. All stockings were reported to be difficult to use. Thigh and knee length stockings have a significant effect on decreasing venous stasis of the lower limb. Knee length graduated compression stockings are similarly efficient in decreasing venous stasis, but they are more comfortable to wear, and they wrinkle less. PMID:11210954

  6. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  7. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility

  8. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  9. Summary of neutron scattering lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All available neutron-nuclei scattering lengths are collected together with their error bars in a uniform way. Bound scattering lengths are given for the elements, the isotopes, and the various spin-states. They are discussed in the sense of their use as basic parameters for many investigations in the field of nuclear and solid state physics. The data bank is available on magnetic tape, too. Recommended values and a map of these data serve for an uncomplicated use of these quantities. (orig.)

  10. Slip length measurement using BBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadegan, Adib; Snoeyink, Craig

    2015-11-01

    We will be presenting experimental characterizations of slip lengths of fluids in nano/micro channels. These channels are becoming increasingly important in sensor and separations applications. However, crucial questions still remain on the mechanisms that govern slip-length behavior. We used Bessel Beam microscopy (BBM), a novel super-resolution imaging system, in conjunction with TIRF system. These two, together led us to be able to do Particle Tracking Velocimetry with significantly higher accuracy than previously possible. We will be presenting results demonstrating the feasibility of this approach and advantages that make this method unique.

  11. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  12. Soroprevalência de anticorpos contra o antígeno CagA do Helicobacter pylori em pacientes com úlcera gástrica na região Norte do Brasil Seroprevalence of antibodies against the CagA antigen the Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastric ulcer in the North region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Caricio Martins

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available O Helicobacter pylori é um agente patogênico largamente distribuído no mundo, estando envolvido no desenvolvimento de várias doenças gastrointestinais. Atualmente a infecção pela cepa virulenta (CagA+ do H. pylori é considerado um dos principais fatores etiológicos para o desenvolvimento de ulcerações gástricas. Baseado nessa informação, investigamos a soroprevalência das cepas virulentas entre os pacientes com úlcera gástrica da nossa região, utilizando testes sorológicos para detecção de anticorpos contra o H. pylori e a proteína CagA. Sendo observado que 82% (45/55 dos pacientes estavam infectados pela cepa virulenta, entre esses 89% (40/45 apresentaram grau de inflamação aumentado na mucosa gástrica, com denso infiltrado de leucócitos no tecido, o que provavelmente favoreceu a formação das ulcerações gástricas.Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic agent with a worldwide distribution and is involved in the development of many gastrointestinal diseases. Nowadays infection with the virulent strain CagA+ of H. pylori is considered one of the main etiological factors in the development of gastric ulcer. Based on this information, we investigated the seroprevalence of virulent strains among patients with gastric ulcer from one region, using serologic tests to detect antibodies against H. pylori and CagA protein. Infection by the virulent strain was found in 82% (40/55 of the patients, and among these, 89% (40/45 presented an increased degree of inflammation in the gastric mucosa, with a dense infiltration of leukocytes in the tissue, which probably favored the formation of gastric ulcer. We concluded that the presence of the virulent strain is related to the development of an increased inflammation in the gastric mucosa.

  13. Heteroplasmy of Short Tandem Repeats in Mitochondrial DNA of Atlantic Cod, Gadus Morhua

    OpenAIRE

    Arnason, E.; RAND, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) contains a tandem array of 40-bp repeats in the D-loop region of the molecule. Variation among molecules in the copy number of these repeats results in mtDNA length variation and heteroplasmy (the presence of more than one form of mtDNA in an individual). In a sample of fish collected from different localities around Iceland and off George's Bank, each individual was heteroplasmic for two or more mtDNAs ranging in repeat copy number fro...

  14. Brain stem and cerebellum volumetric analysis of Machado Joseph disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S T Camargos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3(MJD/SCA3, is the most frequent late onset spinocerebellar ataxia and results from a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 gene. Previous studies have found correlation between atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem with age and CAG repeats, although no such correlation has been found with disease duration and clinical manifestations. In this study we test the hypothesis that atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem in MJD/SCA3 is related to clinical severity, disease duration and CAG repeat length as well as to other variables such as age and ICARS (International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Whole brain high resolution MRI and volumetric measurement with cranial volume normalization were obtained from 15 MJD/SCA3 patients and 15 normal, age and sex-matchedcontrols. We applied ICARS and compared the score with volumes and CAG number, disease duration and age. We found significant correlation of both brain stem and cerebellar atrophy with CAG repeat length, age, disease duration and degree of disability. The Spearman rank correlation was stronger with volumetric reduction of the cerebellum than with brain stem. Our data allow us to conclude that volumetric analysis might reveal progressive degeneration after disease onset, which in turn is linked to both age and number of CAG repeat expansions in SCA 3.

  15. A Novel Signal Processing Measure to Identify Exact and Inexact Tandem Repeat Patterns in DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification and analysis of repetitive patterns are active areas of biological and computational research. Tandem repeats in telomeres play a role in cancer and hypervariable trinucleotide tandem repeats are linked to over a dozen major neurodegenerative genetic disorders. In this paper, we present an algorithm to identify the exact and inexact repeat patterns in DNA sequences based on orthogonal exactly periodic subspace decomposition technique. Using the new measure our algorithm resolves the problems like whether the repeat pattern is of period P or its multiple (i.e., 2P, 3P, etc., and several other problems that were present in previous signal-processing-based algorithms. We present an efficient algorithm of O(NLw logLw, where N is the length of DNA sequence and Lw is the window length, for identifying repeats. The algorithm operates in two stages. In the first stage, each nucleotide is analyzed separately for periodicity, and in the second stage, the periodic information of each nucleotide is combined together to identify the tandem repeats. Datasets having exact and inexact repeats were taken up for the experimental purpose. The experimental result shows the effectiveness of the approach.

  16. Remark on pion scattering lengths

    CERN Document Server

    Black, Deirdre; Jora, Renata; Park, Nae Woong; Schechter, Joseph; Shahid, M Naeem

    2009-01-01

    It is noted that the pattern of chiral perturbation theory predictions for both the isotopic spin 0 and isotopic spin 2 s-wave pion-pion scattering lengths to orders $p^2$, $p^4$ and $p^6$ seems to agree with the corresponding pattern of the tree level predictions of the SU(2) linear sigma model.

  17. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianHua; RUAN ShiPing

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavitation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator, which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emergence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects, of both model and prototype, on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length below aerators was suggested, which considers overall effects of the above mentioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  18. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavi-tation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator,which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emer-gence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects,of both model and prototype,on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length be-low aerators was suggested,which considers overall effects of the above men-tioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  19. Cyclic Codes of Length 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manju Pruthi

    2001-11-01

    In this paper explicit expressions of + 1 idempotents in the ring $R = F_q[X]/\\langle X^{2^m}-1\\rangle$ are given. Cyclic codes of length 2 over the finite field , of odd characteristic, are defined in terms of their generator polynomials. The exact minimum distance and the dimension of the codes are obtained.

  20. Helicobacter pylori genotyping from American indigenous groups shows novel Amerindian vacA and cagA alleles and Asian, African and European admixture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Camorlinga-Ponce

    Full Text Available It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D, Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America.

  1. Improvement of neuropathology and transcriptional deficits in CAG 140 knock-in mice supports a beneficial effect of dietary curcumin in Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickey Miriam A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound No disease modifying treatment currently exists for Huntington's disease (HD, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the formation of amyloid-like aggregates of the mutated huntingtin protein. Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound with Congo red-like amyloid binding properties and the ability to cross the blood brain barrier. CAG140 mice, a knock-in (KI mouse model of HD, display abnormal aggregates of mutant huntingtin and striatal transcriptional deficits, as well as early motor, cognitive and affective abnormalities, many months prior to exhibiting spontaneous gait deficits, decreased striatal volume, and neuronal loss. We have examined the ability of life-long dietary curcumin to improve the early pathological phenotype of CAG140 mice. Results KI mice fed a curcumin-containing diet since conception showed decreased huntingtin aggregates and increased striatal DARPP-32 and D1 receptor mRNAs, as well as an amelioration of rearing deficits. However, similar to other antioxidants, curcumin impaired rotarod behavior in both WT and KI mice and climbing in WT mice. These behavioral effects were also noted in WT C57Bl/6 J mice exposed to the same curcumin regime as adults. However, neither locomotor function, behavioral despair, muscle strength or food utilization were affected by curcumin in this latter study. The clinical significance of curcumin's impairment of motor performance in mice remains unclear because curcumin has an excellent blood chemistry and adverse event safety profile, even in the elderly and in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Conclusion Together with this clinical experience, the improvement in several transgene-dependent parameters by curcumin in our study supports a net beneficial effect of dietary curcumin in HD.

  2. Seismic Hazard and Fault Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, N. M.; Jackson, D. D.; Mualchin, L.

    2005-12-01

    If mx is the largest earthquake magnitude that can occur on a fault, then what is mp, the largest magnitude that should be expected during the planned lifetime of a particular structure? Most approaches to these questions rely on an estimate of the Maximum Credible Earthquake, obtained by regression (e.g. Wells and Coppersmith, 1994) of fault length (or area) and magnitude. Our work differs in two ways. First, we modify the traditional approach to measuring fault length, to allow for hidden fault complexity and multi-fault rupture. Second, we use a magnitude-frequency relationship to calculate the largest magnitude expected to occur within a given time interval. Often fault length is poorly defined and multiple faults rupture together in a single event. Therefore, we need to expand the definition of a mapped fault length to obtain a more accurate estimate of the maximum magnitude. In previous work, we compared fault length vs. rupture length for post-1975 earthquakes in Southern California. In this study, we found that mapped fault length and rupture length are often unequal, and in several cases rupture broke beyond the previously mapped fault traces. To expand the geologic definition of fault length we outlined several guidelines: 1) if a fault truncates at young Quaternary alluvium, the fault line should be inferred underneath the younger sediments 2) faults striking within 45° of one another should be treated as a continuous fault line and 3) a step-over can link together faults at least 5 km apart. These definitions were applied to fault lines in Southern California. For example, many of the along-strike faults lines in the Mojave Desert are treated as a single fault trending from the Pinto Mountain to the Garlock fault. In addition, the Rose Canyon and Newport-Inglewood faults are treated as a single fault line. We used these more generous fault lengths, and the Wells and Coppersmith regression, to estimate the maximum magnitude (mx) for the major faults in

  3. Damage of repeatedly nitrocarburised steel dies for aluminium extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Firrao, Donato; Scavino, Giorgio; Matteis, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The dies employed for the hot extrusion of aluminium alloys are subjected to repeated cycles of nitriding, or nitrocarburising, after service periods of given length. Three dies, fabricated with ISO X40CrMoV5-1 (AISI H13) steel and liquid nitrocarburised, were examined either in the asfabricated condition, or after one service period, or after 12 nitrocarburising and service cycles (end of life). Samples cut from the die subjected to one service period were re-nitrocarburised for increasing d...

  4. Branch migration displacement assay with automated heuristic analysis for discrete DNA length measurement using DNA microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Pourmand, Nader; Caramuta, Stefano; Villablanca, Andrea; Mori, Silvia; Karhanek, Miloslav; Wang, Shan X.; Ronald W Davis

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of short tandem repeats (STRs) plays an important role in forensic science, human identification, genetic mapping, and disease diagnostics. Traditional STR analysis utilizes gel- or column-based approaches to analyze DNA repeats. Individual STR alleles are separated and distinguished according to fragment length; thus the assay is generally hampered by its low multiplex capacity. However, use of DNA microarray would employ a simple hybridization and detection for field forensics ...

  5. Optimization of sequence alignment for simple sequence repeat regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbonnaya Francis C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs, are tandemly repeated DNA sequences, including tandem copies of specific sequences no longer than six bases, that are distributed in the genome. SSR has been used as a molecular marker because it is easy to detect and is used in a range of applications, including genetic diversity, genome mapping, and marker assisted selection. It is also very mutable because of slipping in the DNA polymerase during DNA replication. This unique mutation increases the insertion/deletion (INDELs mutation frequency to a high ratio - more than other types of molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs. SNPs are more frequent than INDELs. Therefore, all designed algorithms for sequence alignment fit the vast majority of the genomic sequence without considering microsatellite regions, as unique sequences that require special consideration. The old algorithm is limited in its application because there are many overlaps between different repeat units which result in false evolutionary relationships. Findings To overcome the limitation of the aligning algorithm when dealing with SSR loci, a new algorithm was developed using PERL script with a Tk graphical interface. This program is based on aligning sequences after determining the repeated units first, and the last SSR nucleotides positions. This results in a shifting process according to the inserted repeated unit type. When studying the phylogenic relations before and after applying the new algorithm, many differences in the trees were obtained by increasing the SSR length and complexity. However, less distance between different linage had been observed after applying the new algorithm. Conclusions The new algorithm produces better estimates for aligning SSR loci because it reflects more reliable evolutionary relations between different linages. It reduces overlapping during SSR alignment, which results in a more realistic

  6. Phase behavior of polyion-surfactant ion complex salts: effects of surfactant chain length and polyion length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Anna; Norrman, Jens; Piculell, Lennart

    2006-06-01

    The aqueous phase behavior of a series of complex salts, containing cationic surfactants with polymeric counterions, has been investigated by visual inspection and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The salts were alkyltrimethylammonium polyacrylates, CxTAPAy, based on all combinations of five surfactant chain lengths (C6, C8, C10, C12, and C16) and two lengths of the polyacrylate chain (30 and 6 000 repeating units). At low water contents, all complex salts except C6TAPA6000 formed hexagonal and/or cubic Pm3n phases, with the hexagonal phase being favored by lower water contents. The aggregate dimensions in the liquid crystalline phases changed with the surfactant chain length. The determined micellar aggregation numbers of the cubic phases indicated that the micelles were only slightly aspherical. At high water contents, the C6TAPAy salts were miscible with water, whereas the other complex salts featured wide miscibility gaps with a concentrated phase in equilibrium with a (sometimes very) dilute aqueous solution. Thus, the attraction between oppositely charged surfactant aggregates and polyions decreases with decreasing surfactant chain length, and with decreasing polyion length, resulting in an increased miscibility with water. The complex salt with the longest surfactant chains and polyions gave the widest miscibility gap, with a concentrated hexagonal phase in equilibrium with almost pure water. A decrease in the attraction led to cubic-micellar and micellar-micellar coexistence in the miscibility gap and to an increasing concentration of the complex salt in the dilute phase. For each polyion length, the mixtures for the various surfactant chain lengths were found to conform to a global phase diagram, where the surfactant chain length played the role of an interaction parameter. PMID:16722736

  7. Dominant cagA/vacA genotypes and coinfection frequency of H. Pylori in peptic ulcer or chronic gastritis patients in Zhejiang Province and correlations among different genotypes, coinfection and severity of the diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue-jun; YAN Jie; SHEN Yue-fang

    2005-01-01

    Background Almost half of the world's population suffer from the Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection, but only some individuals develop gastric diseases with clinical symptoms. One reason for the phenomenon may be the different pathogenicity of infected H. Pylori strains. The presence of cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) and expression of vacuolating cytotoxin activity encoded by vacuolating cytotoxin gene A (vacA) are considered the two major virulent markers of H. Pylori. The aim of this study was to detect dominant cagA/vacA genotypes and coinfection frequency of H. Pylori in patients with peptic ulceration (PU) or chronic gastritis (CG), and to determine correlations among different cagA/vacA genotypes, coinfection and severity of the diseases. Methods For each of 139 patients in Zhejiang Province who had been diagnosed as PU or CG based on clinical symptoms and gastroscopy, two gastric biopsy specimens (one from antrum and the other from corpus) for H. Pylori isolation were taken by two different disinfected biopsy forceps. One hundred and fifty-six H. Pylori strains were isolated from both the antrum and corpus biopsy specimens of 78 patients (36 PU and 42 CG). PCRs were performed to detect cagA genes, and signal (s) and middle (m) regions of vacA genes in the H. Pylori isolates. The amplified fragments of dominant vacA gene s and m subtypes from representative H. Pylori isolates were sequenced after TA cloning. Dominant cagA/vacA genotypes of the H. Pylori isolates, coinfection frequency and correlations among the different genotypes, coinfection and severity of the diseases were determined.Results Of the H. Pylori strains isolated from the antrum specimens, 96.2% were cagA gene positive, as were 97.4% of the H. Pylori strains isolated from the corpus specimens. Only one s region subtype (s1a) and four m region subtypes m1, m2, m1b and m1b-m2 of vacA gene were found. The proportions of vacA gene subtypes s1a/m1, s1a/m2, s1a/m1b and s1a/m1b-m2 in the

  8. INTERPOLATION WITH RESTRICTED ARC LENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Petrov

    2003-01-01

    For given data (ti,yi), I= 0,1,…,n,0 = t0 <t1 <…<tn = 1we study constrained interpolation problem of Favard type inf{‖f"‖∞|f∈W2∞[0,1],f(ti)=yi,i=0,…,n,l(f;[0,1])≤l0}, wherel(f";[0,1])=∫1 0 / 1+f'2(x)dx is the arc length off in [0,1]. We prove the existence of a solution f* of the above problem, that is a quadratic spline with a second derivative f"* , which coincides with one of the constants - ‖f"*‖∞,0,‖f"*‖∞ between every two consecutive knots. Thus, we extend a result ofKarlin concerning Favard problem, to the case of restricted length interpolation.

  9. Length of a Hanging Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Costello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shape of a cable hanging under its own weight and uniform horizontal tension between two power poles is a catenary. The catenary is a curve which has an equation defined by a hyperbolic cosine function and a scaling factor. The scaling factor for power cables hanging under their own weight is equal to the horizontal tension on the cable divided by the weight of the cable. Both of these values are unknown for this problem. Newton's method was used to approximate the scaling factor and the arc length function to determine the length of the cable. A script was written using the Python programming language in order to quickly perform several iterations of Newton's method to get a good approximation for the scaling factor.

  10. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  11. Minimal Length, Measurability and Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Shalyt-Margolin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a continuation of the previous papers written by the author on the subject. In terms of the measurability (or measurable quantities notion introduced in a minimal length theory, first the consideration is given to a quantum theory in the momentum representation. The same terms are used to consider the Markov gravity model that here illustrates the general approach to studies of gravity in terms of measurable quantities.

  12. Repeated Sprints: An Independent Not Dependent Variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jonathan M; Macpherson, Tom W; Spears, Iain R; Weston, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    The ability to repeatedly perform sprints has traditionally been viewed as a key performance measure in team sports, and the relationship between repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and performance has been explored extensively. However, when reviewing the repeated-sprint profile of team-sports match play it appears that the occurrence of repeated-sprint bouts is sparse, indicating that RSA is not as important to performance as commonly believed. Repeated sprints are, however, a potent and time-efficient training strategy, effective in developing acceleration, speed, explosive leg power, aerobic power, and high-intensity-running performance--all of which are crucial to team-sport performance. As such, we propose that repeated-sprint exercise in team sports should be viewed as an independent variable (eg, a means of developing fitness) as opposed to a dependent variable (eg, a means of assessing fitness/performance). PMID:27197118

  13. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing

    OpenAIRE

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval en...

  14. Modeling Variability in the Progression of Huntington's Disease A Novel Modeling Approach Applied to Structural Imaging Markers from TRACK-HD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J H; Sampaio, C

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel, general class of disease progression models for Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disease caused by a cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) triplet repeat expansion on the huntingtin gene. Models are fit to a selection of structural imaging markers from the TRACK 36-month database. The models are of mixed effects type and should be useful in predicting any continuous marker of HD state as a function of age and CAG length (the genetic factor that drives HD pathology). The effects of age and CAG length are modeled using flexible regression splines. Variability not accounted for by age, CAG length, or covariates is modeled using terms that represent measurement error, population variability (random slopes/intercepts), and variability due to the dynamics of the disease process (random walk terms). A Kalman filter is used to estimate variances of the random walk terms. PMID:27481337

  15. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kass, D.H. [Louisiana State Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  16. Measuring Repeatability of the Focus-variable Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Řezníček

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the field of photogrammetry, the optical system, usually represented by the glass lens, is used for metric purposes. Therefore, the aberration characteristics of such a lens, inducing deviations from projective imaging, has to be well known. However, the most important property of the metric lens is the stability of its glass and mechanical elements, ensuring long-term reliability of the measured parameters. In case of a focus-variable lens, the repeatability of the lens setup is important as well. Lenses with a fixed focal length are usually considered as “fixed” though, in fact, most of them contain one or more movable glass elements, providing the focusing function. In cases where the lens is not equipped with fixing screws, the repeatability of the calibration parameters should be known. This paper derives simple mathematical formulas that can be used for measuring the repeatability of the focus-variable lenses, and gives a demonstrative example of such measuring. The given procedure has the advantage that only demanded parameters are estimated, hence, no unwanted correlations with the additional parameters exist. The test arrangement enables us to measure each demanded magnification of the optical system, which is important in close-range photogrammetry.

  17. A general kinetic method to predict sequence length distributions for non-linear irreversible multicomponent polymerizations

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Rolando; Costa, Mário Rui

    2006-01-01

    A method to predict the sequence length distribution (SLD) for homogeneous non-linear irreversible multicomponent polymerizations is described. With more than two monomers, it also predicts chain length distributions of the sub-domains containing a prescribed sub-set of the repeating units, but in all possible orderings. Its goal is the analysis of polymerization systems involving complex kinetic schemes in an automated way. The radical terpolymerization of two vinyl monomers with a divinyl m...

  18. Bayes Estimation of Queue Length

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnal, Pavel

    Praha : ÚTIA AV ČR, 2006 - (Přikryl, J.; Šmídl, V.). s. 47-48 [International PhD Workshop on Interplay of Societal and Technical Decision-Making, Young Generation Viewpoint /7./. 25.09.2006-30.09.2006, Hrubá Skála] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100750401; GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : traffic flow * queue length * occupancy * intensity Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  19. Bayes Estimation of Queue Length

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnal, Pavel

    Praha : ÚTIA AV ČR, 2006 - ( And rýsek, J.), s. 1-8 [International PhD Workshop on Interplay of Societal and Technical Decision-Making, Young Generation Viewpoint /7./. Hrubá Skála (CZ), 25.09.2006-30.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA AV ČR 1ET100750401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Bayes estimation * queue length * traffic flow * occupancy * intensity Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  20. Minimal Length, Measurability and Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Shalyt-Margolin, A E

    2016-01-01

    The present work is a continuation of the previous papers written by the author on the subject. In terms of the measurability (or measurable quantities) notion introduced in a minimal length theory, first the consideration is given to a quantum theory in the momentum representation. The same terms are used to consider the Markov gravity model that here illustrates the general approach to studies of gravity in terms of measurable quantities. This paper is dedicated to the 75th Anniversary of Professor Vladimir Grigor'evich Baryshevsky.

  1. Corner detection using arc length-based angle estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shizheng; Yang, Dan; Huang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaohong; Qu, Ying; Tu, Liyun; Ren, Zemin

    2015-11-01

    We present a corner-detection method named arc length-based angle estimator (AAE). Different from most of the existing approaches, AAE focuses on employing angle detection for finding corners, because angle is an important measure for discrete curvature. AAE provides a new robust solution to the estimation of the K-cosine. In AAE, the K-cosine estimation issue in the x, y space is considered as the problem of the slope estimations in the s, x and s, y spaces, where s is the arc length. Then, weighted least square fitting is employed to address such a slope estimation issue. Experimental results demonstrate that AAE can achieve promising performance in comparison with some recent state-of-the-art approaches under two commonly used evaluation metrics, namely average repeatability and localization error criteria.

  2. Extensive length variation in the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer of yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakou, Bidénam; Angers, Bernard; Glémet, Hélène

    2016-03-01

    The intergenic spacer (IGS) is located between ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies. Within the IGS, regulatory elements for rRNA gene transcription are found, as well as a varying number of other repetitive elements that are at the root of IGS length heterogeneity. This heterogeneity has been shown to have a functional significance through its effect on growth rate. Here, we present the structural organization of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) IGS based on its entire sequence, as well as the IGS length variation within a natural population. Yellow perch IGS structure has four discrete regions containing tandem repeat elements. For three of these regions, no specific length class was detected as allele size was seemingly normally distributed. However, for one repeat region, PCR amplification uncovered the presence of two distinctive IGS variants representing a length difference of 1116 bp. This repeat region was also devoid of any CpG sites despite a high GC content. Balanced selection may be holding the alleles in the population and would account for the high diversity of length variants observed for adjacent regions. Our study is an important precursor for further work aiming to assess the role of IGS length variation in influencing growth rate in fish. PMID:26841134

  3. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  4. Study on relationship between CAG repeat in IT15 gene and clinical phenotype of Huntington's disease%IT15基因CAG重复次数与亨廷顿病临床表型的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王育新; 张本恕

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨IT15基因CAG重复次数与亨廷顿病发病年龄、认知及情感障碍等临床表型之间的关系.方法 采用非变性聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳及银染法检测29例患者IT15基因的CAG重复次数.采用亨廷顿病统一评定量表(UHDRS)和简易智能精神状态检查量表(MMSE)对患者的运动、智能、精神和执行能力进行评分.结果 29例患者的IT15基因的基因型均为杂合子,致病CAG重复次数为40~62,正常CAG重复次数为13~28次.致病CAG重复次数与发病年龄之间呈负相关(r=-0.539,P<0.01);总体执行能力与精神状态评分(r=-0.642,P<0.01)、运动评分(r=-0.766,P<0.01)呈负相关,与MMSE呈正相关(r=0.500,P<0.01).结论 IT15基因致病CAG重复次数只能解释约36%的发病年龄的变化,不能作为预测亨廷顿病发病年龄的独立因子.运动症状、精神和智能障碍的加重,严重影响患者的总体执行能力.

  5. Heteroplasmy, length and sequence variation in the mtDNA control regions of three percid fish species (Perca fluviatilis, Acerina cernua, Stizostedion lucioperca).

    OpenAIRE

    Nesbø, C. L.; Arab, M O; Jakobsen, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the control region and flanking tRNA genes of perch (Perca fluviatilis) mtDNA was determined. The organization of this region is similar to that of other vertebrates. A tandem array of 10-bp repeats, associated with length variation and heteroplasmy was observed in the 5' end. While the location of the array corresponds to that reported in other species, the length of the repeated unit is shorter than previously observed for tandem repeats in this region. The repeat...

  6. Repeat prescribing: a role for community pharmacists in controlling and monitoring repeat prescriptions.

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, C.; Matheson, C.; Williams, S; Williams, P.; Donnan, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditional systems of managing repeat prescribing have been criticised for their lack of clinical and administrative controls. AIM: To compare a community pharmacist-managed repeat prescribing system with established methods of managing repeat prescribing. METHOD: A randomised controlled intervention study (19 general medical practices, 3074 patients, 62 community pharmacists). Patients on repeat medication were given sufficient three-monthly scripts, endorsed for monthly dispens...

  7. Repeating and not so Repeating Large Earthquakes in the Mexican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Singh, S.; Iglesias, A.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2013-12-01

    The rupture area and recurrence interval of large earthquakes in the mexican subduction zone are relatively small and almost the entire length of the zone has experienced a large (Mw≥7.0) earthquake in the last 100 years (Singh et al., 1981). Several segments have experienced multiple large earthquakes in this time period. However, as the rupture areas of events prior to 1973 are only approximately known, the recurrence periods are uncertain. Large earthquakes occurred in the Ometepec, Guerrero, segment in 1937, 1950, 1982 and 2012 (Singh et al., 1981). In 1982, two earthquakes (Ms 6.9 and Ms 7.0) occurred about 4 hours apart, one apparently downdip from the other (Astiz & Kanamori, 1984; Beroza et al. 1984). The 2012 earthquake on the other hand had a magnitude of Mw 7.5 (globalcmt.org), breaking approximately the same area as the 1982 doublet, but with a total scalar moment about three times larger than the 1982 doublet combined. It therefore seems that 'repeat earthquakes' in the Ometepec segment are not necessarily very similar one to another. The Central Oaxaca segment broke in large earthquakes in 1928 (Mw7.7) and 1978 (Mw7.7) . Seismograms for the two events, recorded at the Wiechert seismograph in Uppsala, show remarkable similarity, suggesting that in this area, large earthquakes can repeat. The extent to which the near-trench part of the fault plane participates in the ruptures is not well understood. In the Ometepec segment, the updip portion of the plate interface broke during the 25 Feb 1996 earthquake (Mw7.1), which was a slow earthquake and produced anomalously low PGAs (Iglesias et al., 2003). Historical records indicate that a great tsunamigenic earthquake, M~8.6, occurred in the Oaxaca region in 1787, breaking the Central Oaxaca segment together with several adjacent segments (Suarez & Albini 2009). Whether the updip portion of the fault broke in this event remains speculative, although plausible based on the large tsunami. Evidence from the

  8. Trinucleotide repeat expansions catalyzed by human cell-free extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer R Stevens; Elaine E Lahue; Guo-Min Li; Robert S Lahue

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions cause 17 heritable human neurological disorders.In some diseases,somatic expansions occur in non-proliferating tissues such as brain where DNA replication is limited.This finding stimulated significant interest in replication-independent expansion mechanisms.Aberrant DNA repair is a likely source,based in part on mouse studies showing that somatic expansions are provoked by the DNA repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3complex).Biochemical studies to date used cell-free extracts or purified DNA repair proteins to yield partial reactions at triplet repeats.The findings included expansions on one strand but not the other,or processing of DNA hairpin structures thought to be important intermediates in the expansion process.However,it has been difficult to recapitulate complete expansions in vitro,and the biochemical role of MutSβ remains controversial.Here,we use a novel in vitro assay to show that human cell-free extracts catalyze expansions and contractions of trinucleotide repeats without the requirement for DNA replication.The extract promotes a size range of expansions that is similar to certain diseases,and triplet repeat length and sequence govern expansions in vitro as in vivo.MutSβ stimulates expansions in the extract,consistent with aberrant repair of endogenous DNA damage as a source of expansions.Overall,this biochemical system retains the key characteristics of somatic expansions in humans and mice,suggesting that this important mutagenic process can be restored in the test tube.

  9. Tandemly repeated DNA families in the mouse genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilova Ekaterina V

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional and morphological studies of tandem DNA repeats, that combine high portion of most genomes, are mostly limited due to the incomplete characterization of these genome elements. We report here a genome wide analysis of the large tandem repeats (TR found in the mouse genome assemblies. Results Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified large TR with array size more than 3 kb in two mouse whole genome shotgun (WGS assemblies. Large TR were classified based on sequence similarity, chromosome position, monomer length, array variability, and GC content; we identified four superfamilies, eight families, and 62 subfamilies - including 60 not previously described. 1 The superfamily of centromeric minor satellite is only found in the unassembled part of the reference genome. 2 The pericentromeric major satellite is the most abundant superfamily and reveals high order repeat structure. 3 Transposable elements related superfamily contains two families. 4 The superfamily of heterogeneous tandem repeats includes four families. One family is found only in the WGS, while two families represent tandem repeats with either single or multi locus location. Despite multi locus location, TRPC-21A-MM is placed into a separated family due to its abundance, strictly pericentromeric location, and resemblance to big human satellites. To confirm our data, we next performed in situ hybridization with three repeats from distinct families. TRPC-21A-MM probe hybridized to chromosomes 3 and 17, multi locus TR-22A-MM probe hybridized to ten chromosomes, and single locus TR-54B-MM probe hybridized with the long loops that emerge from chromosome ends. In addition to in silico predicted several extra-chromosomes were positive for TR by in situ analysis, potentially indicating inaccurate genome assembly of the heterochromatic genome regions. Conclusions Chromosome-specific TR had been predicted for mouse but no reliable cytogenetic probes were

  10. Variation of the neurofilament medium KSP repeat sub-domain across mammalian species: implications for altering axonal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, D M; Carpenter, C; Yager, C; Golik, B; Barry, K J; Shen, H; Mikse, O; Eggert, L S; Schulz, D J; Garcia, M L

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of larger mammals resulted in a corresponding increase in peripheral nerve length. To ensure optimal nervous system functionality and survival, nerve conduction velocities were likely to have increased to maintain the rate of signal propagation. Increases of conduction velocities may have required alterations in one of the two predominant properties that affect the speed of neuronal transmission: myelination or axonal diameter. A plausible mechanism to explain faster conduction velocities was a concomitant increase in axonal diameter with evolving axonal length. The carboxy terminal tail domain of the neurofilament medium subunit is a determinant of axonal diameter in large caliber myelinated axons. Sequence analysis of mammalian orthologs indicates that the neurofilament medium carboxy terminal tail contains a variable lysine-serine-proline (KSP) repeat sub-domain flanked by two highly conserved sub-domains. The number of KSP repeats within this region of neurofilament medium varies among species. Interestingly, the number of repeats does not change within a species, suggesting that selective pressure conserved the number of repeats within a species. Mapping KSP repeat numbers onto consensus phylogenetic trees reveals independent KSP expansion events across several mammalian clades. Linear regression analyses identified three subsets of mammals, one of which shows a positive correlation in the number of repeats with head-body length. For this subset of mammals, we hypothesize that variations in the number of KSP repeats within neurofilament medium carboxy terminal tail may have contributed to an increase in axonal caliber, increasing nerve conduction velocity as larger mammals evolved. PMID:20008369

  11. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications. PMID:24943491

  12. Geometry of area without length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pei-Ming; Inami, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    To define a free string by the Nambu-Goto action, all we need is the notion of area, and mathematically the area can be defined directly in the absence of a metric. Motivated by the possibility that string theory admits backgrounds where the notion of length is not well defined but a definition of area is given, we study space-time geometries based on the generalization of a metric to an area metric. In analogy with Riemannian geometry, we define the analogues of connections, curvatures, and Einstein tensor. We propose a formulation generalizing Einstein's theory that will be useful if at a certain stage or a certain scale the metric is ill defined and the space-time is better characterized by the notion of area. Static spherical solutions are found for the generalized Einstein equation in vacuum, including the Schwarzschild solution as a special case.

  13. Geometry of Area Without Length

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    To define a free string by the Nambu-Goto action, all we need is the notion of area, and mathematically the area can be defined directly in the absence of a metric. Motivated by the possibility that string theory admits backgrounds where the notion of length is not well defined but a definition of area is given, we study space-time geometries based on the generalization of metric to area metric. In analogy with Riemannian geometry, we define the analogues of connections, curvatures and Einstein tensor. We propose a formulation generalizing Einstein's theory that will be useful if at a certain stage or a certain scale the metric is ill-defined and the space-time is better characterized by the notion of area. Static spherical solutions are found for the generalized Einstein equation in vacuum, including the Schwarzschild solution as a special case.

  14. Simple sequence repeat variations expedite phage divergence: Mechanisms of indels and gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tiao-Yin

    2016-07-01

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities and influence prokaryotic communities on Earth. Comparing closely related genomes sheds light on molecular events shaping phage evolution. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) variations impart over half of the genomic changes between T7M and T3, indicating an important role of SSRs in accelerating phage genetic divergence. Differences in coding and noncoding regions of phages infecting different hosts, coliphages T7M and T3, Yersinia phage ϕYeO3-12, and Salmonella phage ϕSG-JL2, frequently arise from SSR variations. Such variations modify noncoding and coding regions; the latter efficiently changes multiple amino acids, thereby hastening protein evolution. Four classes of events are found to drive SSR variations: insertion/deletion of SSR units, expansion/contraction of SSRs without alteration of genome length, changes of repeat motifs, and generation/loss of repeats. The categorization demonstrates the ways SSRs mutate in genomes during phage evolution. Indels are common constituents of genome variations and human diseases, yet, how they occur without preexisting repeat sequence is less understood. Non-repeat-unit-based misalignment-elongation (NRUBME) is proposed to be one mechanism for indels without adjacent repeats. NRUBME or consecutive NRUBME may also change repeat motifs or generate new repeats. NRUBME invoking a non-Watson-Crick base pair explains insertions that initiate mononucleotide repeats. Furthermore, NRUBME successfully interprets many inexplicable human di- to tetranucleotide repeat generations. This study provides the first evidence of SSR variations expediting phage divergence, and enables insights into the events and mechanisms of genome evolution. NRUBME allows us to emulate natural evolution to design indels for various applications. PMID:27133219

  15. Microsatellite Length Scoring by Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing - Effects of Sequence Structure and PCR Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljegren, Mikkel Meyn; de Muinck, Eric Jacques; Trosvik, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are DNA sequences consisting of repeated, short (1-6 bp) sequence motifs that are highly mutable by enzymatic slippage during replication. Due to their high intrinsic variability, microsatellites have important applications in population genetics, forensics, genome mapping, as well as cancer diagnostics and prognosis. The current analytical standard for microsatellites is based on length scoring by high precision electrophoresis, but due to increasing efficiency next-generation sequencing techniques may provide a viable alternative. Here, we evaluated single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing, implemented in the PacBio series of sequencing apparatuses, as a means of microsatellite length scoring. To this end we carried out multiplexed SMRT sequencing of plasmid-carried artificial microsatellites of varying structure under different pre-sequencing PCR regimes. For each repeat structure, reads corresponding to the target length dominated. We found that pre-sequencing amplification had large effects on scoring accuracy and error distribution relative to controls, but that the effects of the number of amplification cycles were generally weak. In line with expectations enzymatic slippage decreased proportionally with microsatellite repeat unit length and increased with repetition number. Finally, we determined directional mutation trends, showing that PCR and SMRT sequencing introduced consistent but opposing error patterns in contraction and expansion of the microsatellites on the repeat motif and single nucleotide level. PMID:27414800

  16. Microsatellite Length Scoring by Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing - Effects of Sequence Structure and PCR Regime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Meyn Liljegren

    Full Text Available Microsatellites are DNA sequences consisting of repeated, short (1-6 bp sequence motifs that are highly mutable by enzymatic slippage during replication. Due to their high intrinsic variability, microsatellites have important applications in population genetics, forensics, genome mapping, as well as cancer diagnostics and prognosis. The current analytical standard for microsatellites is based on length scoring by high precision electrophoresis, but due to increasing efficiency next-generation sequencing techniques may provide a viable alternative. Here, we evaluated single molecule real time (SMRT sequencing, implemented in the PacBio series of sequencing apparatuses, as a means of microsatellite length scoring. To this end we carried out multiplexed SMRT sequencing of plasmid-carried artificial microsatellites of varying structure under different pre-sequencing PCR regimes. For each repeat structure, reads corresponding to the target length dominated. We found that pre-sequencing amplification had large effects on scoring accuracy and error distribution relative to controls, but that the effects of the number of amplification cycles were generally weak. In line with expectations enzymatic slippage decreased proportionally with microsatellite repeat unit length and increased with repetition number. Finally, we determined directional mutation trends, showing that PCR and SMRT sequencing introduced consistent but opposing error patterns in contraction and expansion of the microsatellites on the repeat motif and single nucleotide level.

  17. Finding and Characterizing Repeats in Plant Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Jacques; Peterlongo, Pierre; Tempel, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a particularly high proportion of repeated structures of various types. This chapter proposes a guided tour of available software that can help biologists to look for these repeats and check some hypothetical models intended to characterize their structures. Since transposable elements are a major source of repeats in plants, many methods have been used or developed for this large class of sequences. They are representative of the range of tools available for other classes of repeats and we have provided a whole section on this topic as well as a selection of the main existing software. In order to better understand how they work and how repeats may be efficiently found in genomes, it is necessary to look at the technical issues involved in the large-scale search of these structures. Indeed, it may be hard to keep up with the profusion of proposals in this dynamic field and the rest of the chapter is devoted to the foundations of the search for repeats and more complex patterns. The second section introduces the key concepts that are useful for understanding the current state of the art in playing with words, applied to genomic sequences. This can be seen as the first stage of a very general approach called linguistic analysis that is interested in the analysis of natural or artificial texts. Words, the lexical level, correspond to simple repeated entities in texts or strings. In fact, biologists need to represent more complex entities where a repeat family is built on more abstract structures, including direct or inverted small repeats, motifs, composition constraints as well as ordering and distance constraints between these elementary blocks. In terms of linguistics, this corresponds to the syntactic level of a language. The last section introduces concepts and practical tools that can be used to reach this syntactic level in biological sequence analysis. PMID:26519414

  18. Unexpanded and intermediate CAG polymorphisms at the SCA2 locus (ATXN2) in the Cuban population: evidence about the origin of expanded SCA2 alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffita-Mesa, José Miguel; Velázquez-Pérez, Luis C; Santos Falcón, Nieves; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; González Zaldívar, Yanetza; Vázquez Mojena, Yaimee; Almaguer-Gotay, Dennis; Almaguer Mederos, Luis Enrique; Rodríguez Labrada, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The role of short, large or intermediate normal alleles (ANs) of the ataxin-2 gene in generating expanded alleles (EAs) causing spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is poorly understood. It has been postulated that SCA2 prevalence is related to the frequency of large ANs. SCA2 shows the highest worldwide prevalence in Cuban population, which is therefore a unique source for studying the relationship between the frequency of large and intermediate alleles and the frequency of SCA2 mutation. Through genetic polymorphism analyses in a comprehensive sample (∼3000 chromosomes), we show that the frequency of large ANs in the ataxin-2 gene is the highest worldwide, although short ANs are also frequent. This highly polymorphic population displayed also high variability in the CAG sequence, featured by loss of the anchor CAA interruption(s). In addition, large ANs showed germinal and somatic instability. Our study also includes related genotypic, genealogical and haplotypic data and provides substantial evidence with regard to the role of large and intermediate alleles in the generation of pathological EAs. PMID:21934711

  19. Prediction, Optimization and Learning in Repeated Games

    OpenAIRE

    Nachbar, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Consider a two-player discounted repeated game in which each player optimizes with respect to prior beliefs about his opponent's repeated game strategy. One would like to argue that if beliefs are cautious then players will learn as the game unfolds to predict the continuation path of play. If this conjecture were true then a convergence result due to Kalai and Lehrer would imply that the continuation path would asymptotically resemble the path of a Nash equilibrium. One would thus have const...

  20. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  1. Nonneutral evolution of tandem repeats in the mitochondrial DNA control region of lagomorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casane, D; Dennebouy, N; de Rochambeau, H; Mounolou, J C; Monnerot, M

    1997-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) contains a tandem array of 153-bp repeats in the vicinity of the replication origin of the H-stand. Variation among molecules in the number of these repeats results in inter- and intraindividual length polymorphism (heteroplasmy). Generally, in an individual, one predominant molecular type is observed, the others representing a low percentage of the mtDNA content. At the tissue level, we observe a particular distribution of this polymorphism in the gonads compared with liver, kidneys, or brain, implying a relationship between the differentiation status of the cells and the types of new mtDNA molecules which appear and accumulate during lifetime. Similar tandem repeats were also found in the mtDNA noncoding region of European hares (Lepus europaeus), a cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus), and a pika (Ochotona rufescens). The lengths and the sequences of these units evolve rapidly and in a concerted way, but the number of repeats is maintained in a narrow range, and an internal 20-bp segment is highly conserved. Constraints restrict the evolution of the primary sequence of these repeated units, the number of which is probably controlled by a stabilizing selection. PMID:9254915

  2. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors. PMID:16421768

  3. Information, polarization and term length in democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers term lengths in a representative democracy where the political issue divides the population on the left-right scale. Parties are ideologically different and better informed about the consequences of policies than voters are. A short term length makes the government more accou...... the uncertainty is large and parties are not very polarized. Partisan voters always prefer a long term length. When politicians learn while in office a long term length becomes more attractive for swing voters....

  4. Length Mutations in Human Mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Cann, R. L.; Wilson, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    By high-resolution, restriction mapping of mitochondrial DNAs purified from 112 human individuals, we have identified 14 length variants caused by small additions and deletions (from about 6 to 14 base pairs in length). Three of the 14 length differences are due to mutations at two locations within the D loop, whereas the remaining 11 occur at seven sites that are probably within other noncoding sequences and at junctions between coding sequences. In five of the nine regions of length polymor...

  5. Scaling of avian primary feather length

    OpenAIRE

    Nudds, Robert L.; Kaiser, Gary V.; Dyke, Gareth J.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the avian wing has long fascinated biologists, yet almost no work includes the length of primary feathers in consideration of overall wing length variation. Here we show that the length of the longest primary feather ( ) contributing to overall wing length scales with negative allometry against total arm (ta = humerus+ulna+manus). The scaling exponent varied slightly, although not significantly so, depending on whether a species level analysis was used or phylogeny was contro...

  6. Leishmania donovani has distinct mannosylphosphoryltransferases for the initiation and elongation phases of lipophosphoglycan repeating unit biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descoteaux, A; Mengeling, B J; Beverley, S M; Turco, S J

    1998-07-01

    Lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is the predominant surface glycoconjugate of Leishmania promastigotes and plays several roles in the infectious cycle of this protozoan parasite. The salient feature of LPG is the presence of 15-30 copies of a disaccharide-phosphate repeating unit Gal(beta1,4)Man(alpha1-PO4), which is also found on many other secreted molecules (secretory acid phosphatase, phosphoglycan, proteophosphoglycan). This structural diversity suggests that a multiplicity of enzymes mediating repeating unit addition may exist, especially for the mannosylphosphoryltransferases (MPTs), which initiate repeating unit synthesis. This work has taken a combined biochemical-genetic approach to resolve this issue. An lpg- mutant of Leishmania donovani, JEDI, was obtained by antibody selection against cells expressing a repeating unit epitope of LPG. Metabolic and surface labeling experiments revealed that JEDI cells accumulated a truncated form of LPG bearing only a single repeating unit: [Gal(beta 1,4)Man(alpha1-PO4)][Gal(alpha1,6)Gal(alpha1,3)Gal(f)(beta1,3)[Glc(alpha 1-PO4)]Man(alpha1,3)Man(alpha1,4)GlcN(alpha1,6)]-PI. Enzymatic assays of microsomal preparations showed that JEDI lacked MPT activity when tested with a repeating unit acceptor but retained wild-type levels of the MPT activity with an LPG glycan core acceptor. These data indicate that at least two distinct MPT activities are required for LPG repeating unit synthesis: one involved in the 'initiation' of repeating unit synthesis on the LPG core (iMPT), and a second (lacking in JEDI) participating in the 'elongation' phase of repeating unit addition (eMPT), leading to the mature full-length LPG. PMID:9719508

  7. Normal ATXN3 allele but not CHIP polymorphisms modulates age at onset in Machado-Joseph Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes C. França Jr

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age at onset (AO in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD is closely associated with the length of the CAG repeat at the mutant ATXN3 allele, but there are other intervening factors. Experimental evidence indicates that the normal ATXN3 allele and the C-terminal heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP may be genetic modifiers of AO in MJD. Methods: To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the length of normal and expanded CAG repeats at the ATXN3 gene in 210 unrelated patients with MJD. In addition, we genotyped five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the CHIP gene. We first compared the frequencies of the different genotypes in two subgroups of patients who were highly discordant for AO after correction for the length of the expanded CAG allele. The possible modifier effect of each gene was then evaluated in a stepwise multiple linear regression model. Results: AO was associated with the length of the expanded CAG allele (r2 = 0.596, p<0.001. Frequencies of the normal CAG repeats at the ATXN3 gene and of CHIP polymorphisms did not differ significantly between groups with highly discordant ages at onset. However, addition of the normal allele improved the model fit for prediction of AO (r2 = 0.604, p=0.014. Indeed, we found that the normal CAG allele at ATXN3 had a positive independent effect on AO. Conclusion: The normal CAG repeat at the ATXN3 gene has a small but significant influence on AO of MJD.

  8. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service...

  9. A wide angle low coherence interferometry based eye length optometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadway, Alexander; Siegwart, John; Wildsoet, Christine; Norton, Thomas; Zhang, Yuhua

    2015-03-01

    Interest in eye growth regulation has burgeoned with the rise in myopia prevalence world-wide. Eye length and eye shape are fundamental metrics for related research, but current in vivo measurement techniques are generally limited to the optical axis of the eye. We describe a high resolution, time domain low coherence interferometry based optometer for measuring the eye length of small animals over a wide field of view. The system is based upon a Michelson interferometer using a superluminescent diode as a source, including a sample arm and a reference arm. The sample arm is split into two paths by a polarisation beam splitter; one focuses the light on the cornea and the other focuses the light on the retina. This method has a high efficiency of detection for reflections from both surfaces. The reference arm contains a custom high speed linear motor with 25 mm stroke and equipped with a precision displacement encoder. Light reflected from the cornea and the retina is combined with the reference beam to generate low coherence interferograms. Two galvo scanners are employed to steer the light to different angles so that the eye length over a field of view of 20° × 20° can be measured. The system has an axial resolution of 6.8 μm (in air) and the motor provides accurate movement, allowing for precise and repeatable measurement of coherence peak positions. Example scans from a tree shrew are presented.

  10. Alu repeats as markers for human population genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bazan, H. [Louisiana State Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Medical Center] [and others

    1993-09-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 97.9% nucleotide identity with each other and an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence. HS Alu family members are thought to be derived from a single source ``master`` gene, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 in. and 3 in. unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allows the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of an Alu repeat. Individual HS Alu sequences were found to be either monomorphic or dimorphic for the presence or absence of each repeat. The monomorphic HS Alu family members inserted in the human genome after the human/great ape divergence (which is thought to have occurred 4--6 million years ago), but before the radiation of modem man. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem man (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project as well. HS Alu family member insertion dimorphism differs from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) because individuals share HS Alu family member insertions based upon identity by descent from a common ancestor as a result of a single event which occurred one time within the human population. The VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times within a population and are identical by state only.

  11. Self-assembly and sequence length dependence on nanofibrils of polyglutamine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayathullah, Mohammed; Tan, Aaron; Jeyaraj, Rebecca; Lam, James; Cho, Nam-Joon; Liu, Corey W; Manoukian, Martin A C; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is recognized as a currently incurable, inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the accumulation of misfolded polyglutamine (polyQ) peptide aggregates in neuronal cells. Yet, the mechanism by which newly formed polyQ chains interact and assemble into toxic oligomeric structures remains a critical, unresolved issue. In order to shed further light on the matter, our group elected to investigate the folding of polyQ peptides - examining glutamine repeat lengths ranging from 3 to 44 residues. To characterize these aggregates we employed a diverse array of technologies, including: nuclear magnetic resonance; circular dichroism; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and atomic force microscopy. The data we obtained suggest that an increase in the number of glutamine repeats above 14 residues results in disordered loop structures, with different repeat lengths demonstrating unique folding characteristics. This differential folding manifests in the formation of distinct nano-sized fibrils, and on this basis, we postulate the idea of 14 polyQ repeats representing a critical loop length for neurotoxicity - a property that we hope may prove amenable to future therapeutic intervention. Furthermore, FRET measurements on aged assemblages indicate an increase in the end-to-end distance of the peptide with time, most probably due to the intermixing of individual peptide strands within the nanofibril. Further insight into this apparent time-dependent reorganization of aggregated polyQ peptides may influence future disease modeling of polyQ-related proteinopathies, in addition to directing novel clinical innovations. PMID:26874369

  12. Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Razavi, Mohsen; Majedi, A. Hamed

    2010-09-01

    A feasible route toward implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/35106500 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss and other sources of inefficiency in the channel and measurement modules. We then use our results to find the generation rate of secure key bits for QKD systems that rely on DLCZ quantum repeaters. We compare the key generation rate per logical memory employed in the two cases with and without a repeater node. We find the crossover distance beyond which the repeater system outperforms the nonrepeater one. That provides us with the optimum internode distancing in quantum repeater systems. We also find the optimal excitation probability at which the QKD rate peaks. Such an optimum probability, in most regimes of interest, is insensitive to the total distance.

  13. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David H Warshauer; Jennifer D Churchill; Nicole Novroski; Jonathan L King; Bruce Budowle

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics). The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles.

  14. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  15. The CMV early enhancer/chicken β actin (CAG promoter can be used to drive transgene expression during the differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells into vascular progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couchman John R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse embryonic stem cells cultured in vitro have the ability to differentiate into cells of the three germ layers as well as germ cells. The differentiation mimics early developmental events, including vasculogenesis and early angiogenesis and several differentiation systems are being used to identify factors that are important during the formation of the vascular system. Embryonic stem cells are difficult to transfect, while downregulation of promoter activity upon selection of stable transfectants has been reported, rendering the study of proteins by overexpression difficult. Results CCE mouse embryonic stem cells were differentiated on collagen type IV for 4–5 days, Flk1+ mesodermal cells were sorted and replated either on collagen type IV in the presence of VEGFA to give rise to endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells or in collagen type I gels for the formation of vascular tubes. The activity of the CMV and β-actin promoters was downregulated during selection of stable transfectants and during differentiation to the Flk1 stage, while the CMV immediate enhancer/β-actin promoter in the pCAGIPuro-GFP vector led to 100% of stably transfected undifferentiated and differentiated cells expressing GFP. To further test this system we expressed syndecan-2 and -4 in these cells and demonstrated high levels of transgene expression in both undifferentiated cells and cells differentiated to the Flk1 stage. Conclusion Vectors containing the CAG promoter offer a valuable tool for the long term expression of transgenes during stem cell differentiation towards mesoderm, while the CMV and β-actin promoters lead to very poor transgene expression during this process.

  16. Helicobacter pylori-induced IL-1β secretion in innate immune cells is regulated by the NLRP3 inflammasome and requires the cag pathogenicity island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, Raphaela P; Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Groß, Christina; Anderl, Florian; Müller, Anne; Vieth, Michael; Busch, Dirk H; Prazeres da Costa, Clarissa; Ruland, Jürgen; Groß, Olaf; Gerhard, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Infection with the gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is the most prevalent chronic bacterial infection, affecting ∼50% of the world's population, and is the main risk factor of gastric cancer. The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β plays a crucial role in the development of gastric tumors and polymorphisms in the IL-1 gene cluster leading to increased IL-1β production have been associated with increased risk for gastric cancer. To be active, pro-IL-1β must be cleaved by the inflammasome, an intracellular multiprotein complex implicated in physiological and pathological inflammation. Recently, H. pylori was postulated to activate the inflammasome in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells; however, the molecular mechanisms as well as the bacterial virulence factor acting as signal 2 activating the inflammasome remain elusive. In this study, we analyzed the inflammasome complex regulating IL-1β upon H. pylori infection as well as the molecular mechanisms involved. Our results indicate that H. pylori-induced IL-1β secretion is mediated by activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 inflammasome. We also show that reactive oxygen species, potassium efflux, and lysosomal destabilization are the main cellular mechanisms responsible of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain family, pyrin domain-containing 3 inflammasome activation upon H. pylori infection, and identify vacuolating cytotoxin A and cag pathogenicity island as the bacterial virulence determinants involved. Moreover, in vivo experiments indicate an important role for the inflammasome in the onset and establishment of H. pylori infection and in the subsequent inflammatory response of the host. PMID:25172489

  17. Multifunctional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C@Ag hybrid nanoparticles: Aqueous solution preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Hongxia [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Niu, Helin, E-mail: niuhelin@ahu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Li, Ping; Tao, Zhiyin; Mao, Changjie; Song, Jiming; Zhang, Shengyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Ag-loaded Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C magnetic-optical bifunctional materials have been investigated. ► The magnetism was studied at the room temperature. ► The photocatalytic activity was evaluated under visible light irradiation. ► Ag-loaded Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C nanocomposites show superior magnetism and photocatalytic activity. ► A simple synthetic process was discussed. - Abstract: The paper describes a kind of multifunctional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@C@Ag hybrid nanoparticles, which can be successfully synthesized using a simple route based on directly adsorption and spontaneous reduction of silver ions onto the surface shell of carbon-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The as-prepared samples have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and UV–vis spectrum (UV–vis). The Ag nanocrystals loaded on the surface shell of carbon-coated magnetic nanoparticles are nearly spherical with an average diameter of 10 nm. And the carbonaceous polysaccharides shell obtained using an glucose hydrothermal reaction act as a role of a bridge between magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core and noble metallic Ag nanocrystals. The as-prepared samples can be used as an effective catalyst for the photodegradation of organic dyes (neutral red) under the exposure of visible light. Results show that the as-prepared samples have a degradation rate of 93.7% for dyes within 30 min, which indicates their high-efficiency and rapid photocatalytic activity.

  18. Statins Attenuate Helicobacter pylori CagA Translocation and Reduce Incidence of Gastric Cancer: In Vitro and Population-Based Case-Control Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jung Lin

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The correlation of Helicobacter pylori and the etiology of gastric cancer was substantially certain. Cholesterol-rich microdomains (also called lipid rafts, which provide platforms for signaling, are associated with H. pylori-induced pathogenesis leading to gastric cancer. Patients who have been prescribed statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, have exhibited a reduced risk of several types of cancer. However, no studies have addressed the effect of statins on H. pylori-associated gastric cancer from the antineoplastic perspective. In this study, we showed that treatment of gastric epithelial cells with simvastatin reduced the level of cellular cholesterol and led to attenuation of translocation and phosphorylation of H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA, which is recognized as a major determinant of gastric cancer development. Additionally, a nationwide case-control study based on data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD was conducted. A population-based case-control study revealed that patients who used simvastatin exhibited a significantly reduced risk of gastric cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.70-0.83. In patients exhibiting H. pylori infection who were prescribed simvastatin, the adjusted OR for gastric cancer was 0.25 (95% CI = 0.12-0.50. Our results combined an in vitro study with a nationwide population analysis reveal that statin use might be a feasible approach to prevent H. pylori-associated gastric cancer.

  19. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver’s cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51–71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction

  20. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  1. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  2. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80–90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60–90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  3. DNA Slippage Occurs at Microsatellite Loci without Minimal Threshold Length in Humans: A Comparative Genomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of microsatellite, or short tandem repeats (STRs), is well documented for long, polymorphic loci, but much less is known for shorter ones. For example, the issue of a minimum threshold length for DNA slippage remains contentious. Model-fitting methods have generally concluded that slippage only occurs over a threshold length of about eight nucleotides, in contradiction with some direct observations of tandem duplications at shorter repeated sites. Using a comparative analysis of the human and chimpanzee genomes, we examined the mutation patterns at microsatellite loci with lengths as short as one period plus one nucleotide. We found that the rates of tandem insertions and deletions at microsatellite loci strongly deviated from background rates in other parts of the human genome and followed an exponential increase with STR size. More importantly, we detected no lower threshold length for slippage. The rate of tandem duplications at unrepeated sites was higher than expected from random insertions, providing evidence for genome-wide action of indel slippage (an alternative mechanism generating tandem repeats). The rate of point mutations adjacent to STRs did not differ from that estimated elsewhere in the genome, except around dinucleotide loci. Our results suggest that the emergence of STR depends on DNA slippage, indel slippage, and point mutations. We also found that the dynamics of tandem insertions and deletions differed in both rates and size at which these mutations take place. We discuss these results in both evolutionary and mechanistic terms. PMID:20624737

  4. Learning with repeated-game strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannou, Christos A.; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the “Grim-Trigger.” In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates betwe...

  5. Repeating pneumatic pellet injector in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A repeating pneumatic pellet injector has been developed and constructed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This injector can provide repetitive pellet injection to fuel tokamak plasmas for an extended period of time, aiming at the improvement of plasma performance. The pellets with nearly identical speed and mass can be repeatedly injected with a repetition rate of 2-3.3 Hz and a speed of up to 1.7 km/s by controlling the temperature of the cryogenic system, the piston speed and the pressure of the propellant gas. (author)

  6. Presence of alternative lengthening of telomeres associated circular extrachromosome telomere repeats in primary leukemia cells of chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Samassekou, Oumar; Malina, Abba; Hébert, Josée; Yan, Ju

    2013-01-01

    Background The predominant mechanism by which human tumors maintain telomere length is via telomerase. In ~10% of tumor samples, however, telomere length is conserved, despite no detectable telomerase activity, in part through activation of the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway. Methods We studied the circular extra-chromosomal telomeric repeat (ECTR), an ALT hallmark, and telomerase activity in 24 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in chronic phase (CP). Results We iden...

  7. Short Tandem Repeats in Human Exons: A Target for Disease Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villesen Palle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years it has been demonstrated that structural variations, such as indels (insertions and deletions, are common throughout the genome, but the implications of structural variations are still not clearly understood. Long tandem repeats (e.g. microsatellites or simple repeats are known to be hypermutable (indel-rich, but are rare in exons and only occasionally associated with diseases. Here we focus on short (imperfect tandem repeats (STRs which fall below the radar of conventional tandem repeat detection, and investigate whether STRs are targets for disease-related mutations in human exons. In particular, we test whether they share the hypermutability of the longer tandem repeats and whether disease-related genes have a higher STR content than non-disease-related genes. Results We show that validated human indels are extremely common in STR regions compared to non-STR regions. In contrast to longer tandem repeats, our definition of STRs found them to be present in exons of most known human genes (92%, 99% of all STR sequences in exons are shorter than 33 base pairs and 62% of all STR sequences are imperfect repeats. We also demonstrate that STRs are significantly overrepresented in disease-related genes in both human and mouse. These results are preserved when we limit the analysis to STRs outside known longer tandem repeats. Conclusion Based on our findings we conclude that STRs represent hypermutable regions in the human genome that are linked to human disease. In addition, STRs constitute an obvious target when screening for rare mutations, because of the relatively low amount of STRs in exons (1,973,844 bp and the limited length of STR regions.

  8. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P 60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection. PMID:26268795

  9. Horizontal well length optimization considering wellbore hydraulics

    OpenAIRE

    Syed, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal wells covering entire length of the reservoirs are not economically suitable. Frictional pressure drops increases with the increase in well length and flow rates. Optimal Horizontal length is estimated through economic analysis i.e. Net present Value of the project (NPV). Well construction costs including incremental costs of drilling horizontal section, friction losses in horizontal section, Hydrocarbon prices and Drainage area affect NPV. This thesis work estimates NPV and Produc...

  10. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  11. Fibonacci Lengths of Certain Nilpotent 2-Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. DOOSTIE; A. T. ADNANI

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study two classes of 2-generated 2-groups of nilpotency class 2 classified by Kluempen in 2002 and also a class of finite 2-groups of high nilpotency class for their Fibonacci lengths.Their involvement in certain interesting sequences of Tribonacci numbers gives us some explicit formulas for the Fibonacci lengths and this adds to the small class of finite groups for which the Fibonacci length are known.

  12. Microevolution of the Direct Repeat Region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Implications for Interpretation of Spoligotyping Data

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, R. M.; E.M. Streicher; Sampson, S. L.; van der Spuy, G. D.; Richardson, M; Nguyen, D.; Behr, M A; Victor, T C; Van Helden, P D

    2002-01-01

    The direct repeat (DR) region has been determined to be an important chromosomal domain for studying the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite this, very little is known about microevolutionary events associated with clonal expansion and how such events influence the interpretation of both restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and spoligotype data. This study examined the structure of the DR region in three independently evolving lineages of M. tuberculosis with a combina...

  13. Variant repeats are interspersed throughout the telomeres and recruit nuclear receptors in ALT cells

    OpenAIRE

    Conomos, Dimitri; Stutz, Michael D.; Hills, Mark; Neumann, Axel A.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Reddel, Roger R; Hilda A Pickett

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres in cells that use the recombination-mediated alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway elicit a DNA damage response that is partly independent of telomere length. We therefore investigated whether ALT telomeres contain structural abnormalities that contribute to ALT activity. Here we used next generation sequencing to analyze the DNA content of ALT telomeres. We discovered that variant repeats were interspersed throughout the telomeres of ALT cells. We found that the C-type...

  14. Repeated Recovery of Staphylococcus saprophyticus From the Urogenital Tracts of Women: Persistence Vs. Recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Rupp, M E; J. Han; Goering, R. V.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether colonization was persistent or recurrent in a small group of women who had repeated recovery of Staphylococcus saprophyticus from their urogenital tracts. Methods: Paired isolates of S. saprophyticus from each of the study subjects were genotypically typed by plasmid fingerprinting and comparison of chromosomal-DNA restriction fragment-length polymorphism patterns by field-inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) and contour-clamped ho...

  15. Distribution and characterization of staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRUs) and potential use for strain differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardy, K.J.; Ussery, David; Oppenheim, B.A.;

    2004-01-01

    are similar to those used in the study of the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clades. Seven VNTRs, termed staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRUs), distributed around the genome are described, occurring in both unique and multiple sites, and varying in length from 48 to 159 bp......, indicating that VNTRs may be a more appropriate evolutionary marker for studying transmission events and the geographical spread of S. aureus clades....

  16. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    1995-01-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattl

  17. Cumulative Intertrial Inhibition in Repeated Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    In the present study the author examined visual search when the items remain visible across trials but the location of the target varies. Reaction times for inefficient search cumulatively increased with increasing numbers of repeated search trials, suggesting that inhibition for distractors carried over successive trials. This intertrial…

  18. Is Retrieval Mediated after Repeated Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, James A.; Healy, Alice F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2 main experiments, the mediated priming effect was used to determine whether retrieval continues to be mediated after repeated testing. In each experiment, participants used the keyword method to learn French vocabulary, then completed a modified lexical decision task in which they first translated a French word, and then made a lexical…

  19. On balanced minimal repeated measurements designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeel Ahmad Mir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated Measurements designs are concerned with scientific experiments in which each experimental unit is assigned more than once to a treatment either different or identical. This class of designs has the property that the unbiased estimators for elementary contrasts among direct and residual effects are obtainable. Afsarinejad (1983 provided a method of constructing balanced Minimal Repeated Measurements designs p < t , when t is an odd or prime power, one or more than one treatment may occur more than once in some sequences and  designs so constructed no longer remain uniform in periods. In this paper an attempt has been made to provide a new method to overcome this drawback. Specifically, two cases have been considered                RM[t,n=t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=1 for balanced minimal repeated measurements designs and  RM[t,n=2t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=2 for balanced  repeated measurements designs. In addition , a method has been provided for constructing              extra-balanced minimal designs for special case RM[t,n=t2/(p-1,p], λ2=1.

  20. Tacit Collusion in Repeated Contests with Noise

    OpenAIRE

    James W. Boudreau; Shunda, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the determinants of tacit collusion in an infinitely repeated contest with noise in the contest success function. Sustaining collusion via Nash reversion strategies is easier the more noise there is, and is more difficult the larger is the contest's prize value. An increase in the contest's number of players can make sustaining collusion either more or less difficult.

  1. Testing Multiple Outcomes in Repeated Measures Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M.; Sajobi, Tolulope

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates procedures for controlling the familywise error rate (FWR) when testing hypotheses about multiple, correlated outcome variables in repeated measures (RM) designs. A content analysis of RM research articles published in 4 psychology journals revealed that 3 quarters of studies tested hypotheses about 2 or more outcome…

  2. Building Fluency through the Repeated Reading Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    For the last two years the author has used Repeated Reading (RR) to teach reading fluency in English as a Foreign Language classrooms in colleges and universities in Japan. RR is a method where the student reads and rereads a text silently or aloud from two to four times to reach a predetermined level of speed, accuracy, and comprehension. RR…

  3. Childhood experiences and repeated suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Gertrud; Nielsen, Bent; Rask, P;

    1991-01-01

    that the psychological climate of the home may be more important than the rupture of early home life. It is noteworthy that the group of repeaters, as against the first-evers, could be characterized by personality disorders and abuse, especially of alcohol: disorders known to be precipitated by a discordant childhood...

  4. A Structured Group Program for Repeat Dieters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Describes a structured group program for women who repeatedly diet and may be at risk of developing more serious eating disorders. Discusses sessions focusing on eating behavior as well as internal factors that contribute to low body esteem and food and weight preoccupation. Evaluates effectiveness of program by self-reports of members of two…

  5. Preventing Repeat Teen Births PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-02

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  6. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  7. Characterization of simple sequence repeats (SSRs from Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae expressed sequence tags (ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamarsheh Omar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phlebotomus papatasi is a natural vector of Leishmania major, which causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in many countries. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs, or microsatellites, are common in eukaryotic genomes and are short, repeated nucleotide sequence elements arrayed in tandem and flanked by non-repetitive regions. The enrichment methods used previously for finding new microsatellite loci in sand flies remain laborious and time consuming; in silico mining, which includes retrieval and screening of microsatellites from large amounts of sequence data from sequence data bases using microsatellite search tools can yield many new candidate markers. Results Simple sequence repeats (SSRs were characterized in P. papatasi expressed sequence tags (ESTs derived from a public database, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. A total of 42,784 sequences were mined, and 1,499 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 3.5% and an average density of 15.55 kb per SSR. Dinucleotide motifs were the most common SSRs, accounting for 67% followed by tri-, tetra-, and penta-nucleotide repeats, accounting for 31.1%, 1.5%, and 0.1%, respectively. The length of microsatellites varied from 5 to 16 repeats. Dinucleotide types; AG and CT have the highest frequency. Dinucleotide SSR-ESTs are relatively biased toward an excess of (AXn repeats and a low GC base content. Forty primer pairs were designed based on motif lengths for further experimental validation. Conclusion The first large-scale survey of SSRs derived from P. papatasi is presented; dinucleotide SSRs identified are more frequent than other types. EST data mining is an effective strategy to identify functional microsatellites in P. papatasi.

  8. Accuracy of velocities from repeated GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, V.; Sanli, D. U.; Arslan, E.

    2015-04-01

    Today repeated GPS measurements are still in use, because we cannot always employ GPS permanent stations due to a variety of limitations. One area of study that uses velocities/deformation rates from repeated GPS measurements is the monitoring of crustal motion. This paper discusses the quality of the velocities derived using repeated GPS measurements for the aim of monitoring crustal motion. From a global network of International GNSS Service (IGS) stations, we processed GPS measurements repeated monthly and annually spanning nearly 15 years and estimated GPS velocities for GPS baseline components latitude, longitude and ellipsoidal height. We used web-based GIPSY for the processing. Assuming true deformation rates can only be determined from the solutions of 24 h observation sessions, we evaluated the accuracy of the deformation rates from 8 and 12 h sessions. We used statistical hypothesis testing to assess the velocities derived from short observation sessions. In addition, as an alternative control method we checked the accuracy of GPS solutions from short observation sessions against those of 24 h sessions referring to statistical criteria that measure the accuracy of regression models. Results indicate that the velocities of the vertical component are completely affected when repeated GPS measurements are used. The results also reveal that only about 30% of the 8 h solutions and about 40% of 12 h solutions for the horizontal coordinates are acceptable for velocity estimation. The situation is much worse for the vertical component in which none of the solutions from campaign measurements are acceptable for obtaining reliable deformation rates.

  9. pMGA Phenotypic Variation in Mycoplasma gallisepticum Occurs In Vivo and Is Mediated by Trinucleotide Repeat Length Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Glew, M D; Browning, Glenn F.; Markham, Philip F.; Ian D. Walker

    2000-01-01

    Chickens were infected with a pathogenic strain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and the expression of pMGA, the major surface protein, was inferred by examination of colonies from ex vivo cells. Within 2 days postinfection, 40% of cells had ceased the expression of the original pMGA surface protein (pMGA1.1), and by day 6, the majority of recovered cells were in this category. The switch in pMGA phenotype which had occurred in vivo was reversible, since most colonies produced from ex vivo progen...

  10. Smoking and perceived stress in relation to short salivary telomere length among caregivers of children with disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoli; Velez, Juan Carlos; Barbosa, Clarita; Pepper, Micah; Andrade, Asterio; Stoner, Lee; Vivo, Immaculata; Gelaye, Bizu; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Telomere length (TL), the length of repeated DNA sequence that forms protective caps at the end of chromosomes, has emerged as a novel biomarker of cell aging and oxidative stress. There is increasing research exploring the associations of smoking and perceived stress with TL, and the results are inconsistent. This study aimed to examine whether smoking and perceived stress were associated with shortened salivary TL among primary caregivers of children with disabilities. Using a quantitative ...

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans POT-2 telomere protein represses a mode of alternative lengthening of telomeres with normal telomere lengths

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chen; Shtessel, Ludmila; Brady, Megan M.; Ahmed, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    Canonical telomere repeats at chromosome termini can be maintained by a telomerase-independent pathway termed alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). Human cancers that survive via ALT can exhibit long and heterogeneous telomeres, although many telomerase-negative tumors possess telomeres of normal length. Here, we report that Caenorhabditis elegans telomerase mutants that survived via ALT possessed either long or normal telomere lengths. Most ALT strains displayed end-to-end chromosome f...

  12. A Conserved DNA Repeat Promotes Selection of a Diverse Repertoire of Trypanosoma brucei Surface Antigens from the Genomic Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovel-Miner, Galadriel; Mugnier, Monica R.; Goldwater, Benjamin; Cross, George A. M.; Papavasiliou, F. Nina

    2016-01-01

    African trypanosomes are mammalian pathogens that must regularly change their protein coat to survive in the host bloodstream. Chronic trypanosome infections are potentiated by their ability to access a deep genomic repertoire of Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) genes and switch from the expression of one VSG to another. Switching VSG expression is largely based in DNA recombination events that result in chromosome translocations between an acceptor site, which houses the actively transcribed VSG, and a donor gene, drawn from an archive of more than 2,000 silent VSGs. One element implicated in these duplicative gene conversion events is a DNA repeat of approximately 70 bp that is found in long regions within each BES and short iterations proximal to VSGs within the silent archive. Early observations showing that 70-bp repeats can be recombination boundaries during VSG switching led to the prediction that VSG-proximal 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology. Yet, this long held assumption had not been tested and no specific function for the conserved 70-bp repeats had been demonstrated. In the present study, the 70-bp repeats were genetically manipulated under conditions that induce gene conversion. In this manner, we demonstrated that 70-bp repeats promote access to archival VSGs. Synthetic repeat DNA sequences were then employed to identify the length, sequence, and directionality of repeat regions required for this activity. In addition, manipulation of the 70-bp repeats allowed us to observe a link between VSG switching and the cell cycle that had not been appreciated. Together these data provide definitive support for the long-standing hypothesis that 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology during switching. Yet, the fact that silent archival VSGs are selected under these conditions suggests the 70-bp repeats also direct DNA pairing and recombination machinery away from the closest homologs (silent BESs) and toward the rest of the archive. PMID

  13. A Conserved DNA Repeat Promotes Selection of a Diverse Repertoire of Trypanosoma brucei Surface Antigens from the Genomic Archive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galadriel Hovel-Miner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are mammalian pathogens that must regularly change their protein coat to survive in the host bloodstream. Chronic trypanosome infections are potentiated by their ability to access a deep genomic repertoire of Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG genes and switch from the expression of one VSG to another. Switching VSG expression is largely based in DNA recombination events that result in chromosome translocations between an acceptor site, which houses the actively transcribed VSG, and a donor gene, drawn from an archive of more than 2,000 silent VSGs. One element implicated in these duplicative gene conversion events is a DNA repeat of approximately 70 bp that is found in long regions within each BES and short iterations proximal to VSGs within the silent archive. Early observations showing that 70-bp repeats can be recombination boundaries during VSG switching led to the prediction that VSG-proximal 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology. Yet, this long held assumption had not been tested and no specific function for the conserved 70-bp repeats had been demonstrated. In the present study, the 70-bp repeats were genetically manipulated under conditions that induce gene conversion. In this manner, we demonstrated that 70-bp repeats promote access to archival VSGs. Synthetic repeat DNA sequences were then employed to identify the length, sequence, and directionality of repeat regions required for this activity. In addition, manipulation of the 70-bp repeats allowed us to observe a link between VSG switching and the cell cycle that had not been appreciated. Together these data provide definitive support for the long-standing hypothesis that 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology during switching. Yet, the fact that silent archival VSGs are selected under these conditions suggests the 70-bp repeats also direct DNA pairing and recombination machinery away from the closest homologs (silent BESs and toward the rest of

  14. Quantum graphs with time dependent bond lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usually a graph is considered to be built up by vertices connected by bonds with fixed lengths. In experimental realizations of graphs, for example by optical fiber networks, the bonds usually slightly change their lengths randomly caused e.g. by thermal fluctuations. We study perturbatively the effect of these fluctuations on the properties of graphs and discuss the experimental relevance.

  15. The chain-length dependence test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Matthew T; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2006-01-01

    Trends obtained from systematic studies based on chain-length variation have provided valuable insight and understanding into the behavior of m-phenylene ethynylene foldamers. The generalization of this experimental approach, the chain-length dependence test, is useful for studying solution conformation, packing in the solid state, specific intrachain interactions, and the contributions of end groups to a particular property. PMID:16411735

  16. Analysis of ureteral length in adult cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. F. Novaes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In some occasions, correlations between human structures can help planning surgical intra-abdominal interventions. The previous determination of ureteral length helps pre-operatory planning of surgeries, reduces costs of auxiliary exams, the correct choice of double-J catheter with low morbidity and fewer symptoms, and an adequate adhesion to treatment. Objective To evaluate ureteral length in adult cadavers and to analyze its correlation with anthropometric measures. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to January 2012 we determined ureteral length of adult cadavers submitted to necropsy and obtained the following measures: height, distance from shoulder to wrist, elbow-wrist, xiphoid appendix-umbilicus, umbilicus-pubis, xiphoid appendix-pubis and between iliac spines. We analyzed the correlations between ureteral length and those anthropometric measures. Results We dissected 115 ureters from 115 adult corpses from April 2009 to January 2012. Median ureteral length didn't vary between sexes or according to height. It was observed no correlation among ureteral length and all considered anthropometric measures in all analyzed subgroups and in general population. There were no significant differences between right and left ureteral measures. Conclusions There is no difference of ureteral length in relation to height or gender (male or female. There is no significant correlation among ureteral length and the considered anthropometric measures.

  17. Individual Telomere Lengths in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumar Samassekou

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a neoplasia characterized by proliferation of a myeloid cell lineage and chromosome translocation t(9;22 (q34;q11.2. As in the case of most cancers, the average telomere length in CML cells is shorter than that in normal blood cells. However, there are currently no data available concerning specific individual telomere length in CML. Here, we studied telomere length on each chromosome arm of CML cells. In situ hybridization with peptide nucleic acid probes was performed on CML cells in metaphase. The fluorescence intensity of each specific telomere was converted into kilobases according to the telomere restriction fragment results for each sample. We found differences in telomere length between short arm ends and long arm ends. We observed recurrent telomere length changes as well as telomere length maintenance and elongation in some individual telomeres. We propose a possible involvement of individual telomere length changes to some chromosomal abnormalities in CML. We suggest that individual telomere length maintenance is chromosome arm-specific associated with leukemia cells.

  18. Cognitive and neural correlates of the 5-repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene in a population lacking the 7-repeat allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Tomita, Hiroaki; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Ono, Chiaki; Yu, Zhiqian; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-04-15

    The 5-repeat allele of a common length polymorphism in the gene that encodes the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) is robustly associated with the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and substantially exists in Asian populations, which have a lower ADHD prevalence. In this study, we investigated the effect of this allele on microstructural properties of the brain and on its functional activity during externally directed attention-demanding tasks and creative performance in the 765 Asian subjects. For this purpose, we employed diffusion tensor imaging, N-back functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms, and a test to measure creativity by divergent thinking. The 5-repeat allele was significantly associated with increased originality in the creative performance, increased mean diffusivity (the measure of how the tissue includes water molecules instead of neural and vessel components) in the widespread gray and white matter areas of extensive areas, particularly those where DRD4 is expressed, and reduced task-induced deactivation in the areas that are deactivated during the tasks in the course of both the attention-demanding working memory task and simple sensorimotor task. The observed neural characteristics of 5-repeat allele carriers may lead to an increased risk of ADHD and behavioral deficits. Furthermore, the increased originality of creative thinking observed in the 5-repeat allele carriers may support the notion of the side of adaptivity of the widespread risk allele of psychiatric diseases. PMID:25659462

  19. String matching with variable length gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Vildhøj, Hjalte Wedel;

    2012-01-01

    We consider string matching with variable length gaps. Given a string T and a pattern P consisting of strings separated by variable length gaps (arbitrary strings of length in a specified range), the problem is to find all ending positions of substrings in T that match P. This problem is a basic...... primitive in computational biology applications. Let m and n be the lengths of P and T, respectively, and let k be the number of strings in P. We present a new algorithm achieving time O(nlogk+m+α) and space O(m+A), where A is the sum of the lower bounds of the lengths of the gaps in P and α is the total...

  20. Evaluation of the Repeatability and the Reproducibility of AL-Scan Measurements Obtained by Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the repeatability and reproducibility of ocular biometry and intraocular lens (IOL power measurements obtained by ophthalmology residents using an AL-Scan device, a novel optical biometer. Methods. Two ophthalmology residents were instructed regarding the AL-Scan device. Both performed ocular biometry and IOL power measurements using AL-Scan, three times on each of 128 eyes, independently of one another. Corneal keratometry readings, horizontal iris width, central corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth, pupil size, and axial length values measured by both residents were recorded together with IOL power values calculated on the basis of four different IOL calculation formulas (SRK/T, Holladay, and HofferQ. Repeatability and reproducibility of the measurements obtained were analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Results. Repeatability (ICC, 0.872-0.999 for resident 1 versus 0.905-0.999 for resident 2 and reproducibility (ICC, 0.916-0.999 were high for all biometric measurements. Repeatability (ICC, 0.981-0.983 for resident 1 versus 0.995-0.996 for resident 2 and reproducibility were also high for all IOL power measurements (ICC, 0.996 for all. Conclusions. The AL-Scan device exhibits good repeatability and reproducibility in all biometric measurements and IOL power calculations, independent of the operator concerned.

  1. Conservation of human chromosome 13 polymorphic microsatellite (CA){sub n} repeats in chimpanzees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, R.; Shriver, M.D.; Yu, L.M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    Tandemly repeated (dC-dA){sub n} {center_dot} (dG-dT){sub n} sequences occur abundantly and are found in most eukaryotic genomes. To investigate the level of conservation of these repeat sequences in nonhuman primates, the authors have analyzed seven human chromosome 13 dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeat loci in chimpanzees by DNA amplification using primers designed for analysis of human loci. Comparable levels of polymorphism at these loci in the two species, revealed by the number of alleles, heterozygosity, and allele sizes, suggest that the (CA){sub n} repeat arrays and their genomic locations are highly conserved. Even though the proportion of shared alleles between the two species varies enormously and the modal alleles are not the same, allelic lengths at each locus in the chimpanzees are detected within the bounds of the allele size range observed in humans. A similar observation has been noted in a limited number of gorillas and orangutans. Using a new measure of genetic distance that takes into account the size of alleles, they have compared the genetic distance between humans and chimpanzees. The genetic distance between these two species was found to be ninefold smaller than expected assuming there is no selection or mutational bias toward retention of (CA){sub n} repeat arrays. These findings suggest a functional significance for these microsatellite loci. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Activity of telomerase and telomeric length in Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korandová, Michala; Frydrychová, Radmila Čapková

    2016-06-01

    Telomerase is an enzyme that adds repeats of DNA sequences to the ends of chromosomes, thereby preventing their shortening. Telomerase activity is associated with proliferative status of cells, organismal development, and aging. We report an analysis of telomerase activity and telomere length in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Telomerase activity was found to be regulated in a development and caste-specific manner. During the development of somatic tissues of larval drones and workers, telomerase activity declined to 10 % of its level in embryos and remained low during pupal and adult stages but was upregulated in testes of late pupae, where it reached 70 % of the embryo level. Upregulation of telomerase activity was observed in the ovaries of late pupal queens, reaching 160 % of the level in embryos. Compared to workers and drones, queens displayed higher levels of telomerase activity. In the third larval instar of queens, telomerase activity reached the embryo level, and an enormous increase was observed in adult brains of queens, showing a 70-fold increase compared to a brain of an adult worker. Southern hybridization of terminal TTAGG fragments revealed a high variability of telomeric length between different individuals, although the same pattern of hybridization signals was observed in different tissues of each individual. PMID:26490169

  3. Assembly-free genome comparison based on next-generation sequencing reads and variable length patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Comin, Matteo; Schimd, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Background With the advent of Next-Generation Sequencing technologies (NGS), a large amount of short read data has been generated. If a reference genome is not available, the assembly of a template sequence is usually challenging because of repeats and the short length of reads. When NGS reads cannot be mapped onto a reference genome alignment-based methods are not applicable. However it is still possible to study the evolutionary relationship of unassembled genomes based on NGS data. Results...

  4. Length and Sequence Variation in Evening Bat D-Loop Mtdna

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, G S; Chapman, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    Length variation in D-loop mitochondrial DNA was observed after amplification with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 28% of 195 evening bats, Nycticeius humeralis, from seven colonies. Nucleotide sequences of PCR products show that this heteroplasmy is characterized by an 81-bp region which is tandemly repeated five to eight times. Southern blots using PCR products as probes on HaeIII genomic digests confirm the presence of heteroplasmy. Furthermore, densitometry of electrophoresed PCR p...

  5. Learning with repeated-game strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Christos A; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the "Grim-Trigger." In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the "Win-Stay, Lose-Shift" and "Grim-Trigger" strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes. PMID:25126053

  6. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information. PMID:24575886

  7. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium

  8. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.bruneau@u-cergy.fr [Laboratoire AGM, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Site Saint-Martin, BP 222, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Joye, Alain, E-mail: Alain.Joye@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institut Fourier, UMR 5582, CNRS-Université Grenoble I, BP 74, 38402 Saint-Martin d’Hères (France); Merkli, Marco, E-mail: merkli@mun.ca [Department of Mathematics and Statistics Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL Canada A1C 5S7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  9. Nonparametric additive regression for repeatedly measured data

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, R. J.

    2009-05-20

    We develop an easily computed smooth backfitting algorithm for additive model fitting in repeated measures problems. Our methodology easily copes with various settings, such as when some covariates are the same over repeated response measurements. We allow for a working covariance matrix for the regression errors, showing that our method is most efficient when the correct covariance matrix is used. The component functions achieve the known asymptotic variance lower bound for the scalar argument case. Smooth backfitting also leads directly to design-independent biases in the local linear case. Simulations show our estimator has smaller variance than the usual kernel estimator. This is also illustrated by an example from nutritional epidemiology. © 2009 Biometrika Trust.

  10. Learning With Repeated-Game Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Ioannou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2x2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we fi□nd that the strategy with the most occurrences is the Grim-Trigger. In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the Win-Stay, Lose-Shift and Grim-Trigger strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes.

  11. Soft gamma repeaters activity in time

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S B

    2008-01-01

    In this short note I discuss the hypothesis that bursting activity of magnetars evolves in time analogously to the glitching activity of normal radio pulsars (i.e. sources are more active at smaller ages), and that the increase of the burst rate follows one of the laws established for glitching radio pulsars. If the activity of soft gamma repeaters decreases in time in the way similar to the evolution of core-quake glitches ($\\propto t^{5/2}$), then it is more probable to find the youngest soft gamma repeaters, but the energy of giant flares from these sources should be smaller than observed $10^{44}$ --$10^{46}$ ergs as the total energy stored in a magnetar's magnetic field is not enough to support thousands of bursts similar to the prototype 5 March 1979 flare.

  12. Tandem repeat markers as novel diagnostic tools for high resolution fingerprinting of Wolbachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riegler Markus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strains of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis are extremely diverse both genotypically and in terms of their induced phenotypes in invertebrate hosts. Despite extensive molecular characterisation of Wolbachia diversity, little is known about the actual genomic diversity within or between closely related strains that group tightly on the basis of existing gene marker systems, including Multiple Locus Sequence Typing (MLST. There is an urgent need for higher resolution fingerprinting markers of Wolbachia for studies of population genetics, horizontal transmission and experimental evolution. Results The genome of the wMel Wolbachia strain that infects Drosophila melanogaster contains inter- and intragenic tandem repeats that may evolve through expansion or contraction. We identified hypervariable regions in wMel, including intergenic Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTRs, and genes encoding ankyrin (ANK repeat domains. We amplified these markers from 14 related Wolbachia strains belonging to supergroup A and were successful in differentiating size polymorphic alleles. Because of their tandemly repeated structure and length polymorphism, the markers can be used in a PCR-diagnostic multilocus typing approach, analogous to the Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA established for many other bacteria and organisms. The isolated markers are highly specific for supergroup A and not informative for other supergroups. However, in silico analysis of completed genomes from other supergroups revealed the presence of tandem repeats that are variable and could therefore be useful for typing target strains. Conclusions Wolbachia genomes contain inter- and intragenic tandem repeats that evolve through expansion or contraction. A selection of polymorphic tandem repeats is a novel and useful PCR diagnostic extension to the existing MLST typing system of Wolbachia, as it allows rapid and inexpensive high-throughput fingerprinting of

  13. Repeated Predictable Stress Causes Resilience against Colitis-Induced Behavioral Changes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Hassan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an increased risk of mental disorders and can be exacerbated by stress. In this study which was performed with male 10-week old C57Bl/6N mice, we used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis to evaluate behavioral changes caused by intestinal inflammation, to assess the interaction between repeated psychological stress (water avoidance stress, WAS and colitis in modifying behavior, and to analyze neurochemical correlates of this interaction. A 7-day treatment with DSS (2 % in drinking water decreased locomotion and enhanced anxiety-like behavior in the open field test and reduced social interaction. Repeated exposure to WAS for 7 days had little influence on behavior but prevented the DSS-induced behavioral disturbances in the open field and social interaction tests. In contrast, repeated WAS did not modify colon length, colonic myeloperoxidase content and circulating proinflammatory cytokines, parameters used to assess colitis severity. DSS-induced colitis was associated with an increase in circulating neuropeptide Y (NPY, a rise in the hypothalamic expression of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and a decrease in the hippocampal expression of NPY mRNA, brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA. Repeated WAS significantly decreased the relative expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in the hippocampus. The effect of repeated WAS to blunt the DSS-evoked behavioral disturbances was associated with a rise of circulating corticosterone and an increase in the expression of hypothalamic NPY mRNA. These results show that experimental colitis leads to a particular range of behavioral alterations which can be prevented by repeated WAS, a model of predictable chronic stress, while the severity of colitis remains unabated. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying the resilience effect of repeated WAS involves hypothalamic NPY and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  14. Kidney Length in Normal Korean Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal length offers important information to detect or follow-up various renal diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the kidney length of normal Korean children in relation to age, height, weight, body surface area (BSA), and body mass index (BMI). Children between 1 month and 15 years of age without urological abnormality were recruited. Children below 3rd percentile and over 97th percentile for height or weight were excluded. Both renal lengths were measured in the prone position three times and then averaged by experienced radiologists. The mean length and standard deviation for each age group was obtained, and regression equation was calculated between renal length and age, weight, height, BSA, and BMI, respectively. Renal length was measured in 550 children. Renal length grows rapidly until 24 month, while the growth rate is reduced thereafter. The regression equation for age is: renal length (mm) = 45.953 + 1.064 x age (month, ≤ 24 months) (R2 = 0.720) or 62.173 + 0.203 x age (months, > 24 months) (R2 = 0.711). The regression equation for height is: renal length (mm) = 24.494 + 0.457 x height (cm) (R2 = 0.894). The regression equation for weight is: renal length (mm) = 38.342 + 2.117 x weight (kg, ≤18 kg) (R2 = 0.852) or 64.498 + 0.646 x weight (kg, > 18 kg) (R2 = 0.651). The regression equation for BSA is: renal length (mm) = 31.622 + 61.363 x BSA (m2, ≤ 0.7) (R2 = 0.857) or 52.717 + 29.959 x BSA (m2, > 0.7) (R2 = 0.715). The regression equation for BMI is: renal length (mm) = 44.474 + 1.163 x BMI (R2 = 0.079). This study provides data on the normal renal length and its association with age, weight, height, BSA and BMI. The results of this study will guide the detection and follow-up of renal diseases in Korean children

  15. Hypoglycaemic hemiplegia: a repeat SPECT study.

    OpenAIRE

    Shintani, S; Tsuruoka, S; Shiigai, T

    1993-01-01

    During a hypoglycaemic right hemiplegia induced by a deliberate overdose of oral hypoglycaemics, brain CT and angiography revealed no abnormalities. SPECTs made one day and six days later showed relative hypoperfusion in the left hemisphere. Repeat SPECT study suggested that the left hemisphere was more vulnerable than the right in the cerebral blood perfusion. This vulnerability might provoke the right hemiplegia in a critical condition, such as severe hypoglycaemia.

  16. Engineering RNA sequence specificity of Pumilio repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2006-01-01

    Puf proteins bind RNA sequence specifically and regulate translation and stability of target mRNAs. A “code” for RNA recognition has been deduced from crystal structures of the Puf protein, human Pumilio1, where each of eight repeats binds an RNA base via a combination of three side chains at conserved positions. Here, we report the creation of seven soluble mutant proteins with predictably altered sequence specificity, including one that binds tightly to adenosine-uracil-rich element RNA. Th...

  17. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    OpenAIRE

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Morling, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range.

  18. Digital Repeat Analysis; Setup and Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Nol, J.; Isouard, G.; Mirecki, J.

    2006-01-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiolo...

  19. Repeatability and Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    SIGMOD has offered, since 2008, to verify the experiments published in the papers accepted at the conference. This year, we have been in charge of reproducing the experiments provided by the authors (repeatability), and exploring changes to experiment parameters (workability). In this paper, we a...... find that most experiments are distributed as Linux packages accompanied by instructions on how to setup and run the experiments. We are still far from the vision of executable papers...

  20. Capacities of repeater-assisted quantum communications

    OpenAIRE

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We establish the ultimate rates for transmitting quantum information, distilling entanglement, and distributing secret keys in repeater-assisted quantum communications, under the most fundamental decoherence models for both discrete and continuous variable systems, including lossy channels, quantum-limited amplifiers, dephasing and erasure channels. These capacities are derived considering the most general adaptive protocols for quantum and private communication between the two end-points of ...

  1. Aging and Repeated Thought Suppression Success

    OpenAIRE

    Ann E Lambert; Smyth, Frederick L.; Jessica R Beadel; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differe...

  2. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Lonneville; Carine Delbrouck; Cécile Renier; Daniel Devriendt; Nicolas Massager

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods : A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The me...

  3. Quantum Key Distribution over Probabilistic Quantum Repeaters

    OpenAIRE

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Razavi, Mohsen; Majedi, A. Hamed

    2010-01-01

    A feasible route towards implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters, by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property, in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss a...

  4. Electrochemical detection of DNA triplet repeat expansion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Vojtíšková, Marie; Paleček, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 21 (2004), s. 6532-6533. ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004402; GA AV ČR IBS5004355; GA AV ČR KJB4004302; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA triplet repeat expansion * PCR amplification * neurodegenerative diseases Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.903, year: 2004

  5. Multiplexed Memory-Insensitive Quantum Repeaters

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, O. A.; Jenkins, S. D.; Kuzmich, A.; Kennedy, T. A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Long-distance quantum communication via distant pairs of entangled quantum bits (qubits) is the first step towards more secure message transmission and distributed quantum computing. To date, the most promising proposals require quantum repeaters to mitigate the exponential decrease in communication rate due to optical fiber losses. However, these are exquisitely sensitive to the lifetimes of their memory elements. We propose a multiplexing of quantum nodes that should enable the construction...

  6. Repeated Optional Gambles and Risk Aversion

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Gollier

    1996-01-01

    We analyze in this paper the effect of age on the optimal dynamic strategy toward repeated independent gambles. When deciding to accept or to reject a lottery that is offered today, the gambler knows how many lotteries can yet be played in the future. We first characterize the optimal dynamic strategy when future lotteries are identically distributed. We show that the existence of future lotteries always increases the willingness to gamble today. When the sequence of lotteries is independent ...

  7. Reinforcement, repeated games, and local interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchkamp, Oliver; Nagel, Rosemarie

    2002-01-01

    We investigate and compare different approaches to derive strategies from laboratory data in prisoners' dilemmas experiments. While theory suggests more cooperation in spatial structures than in spaceless ones, we find in our experiments either the opposite or no difference. In this paper we investigate to which degree learning and reinforcement explains this dependence on structure and information. Starting from a very simple model we gradually develop a setup where players use repeated game...

  8. Cataractogenesis after Repeat Laser in situ Keratomileusis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M. Mansour; Ghabra, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    There has been the unsubstantiated clinical impression that laser refractive surgery accelerates cataract development along with solid experimental data about the cataractogenic effects of excimer laser treatment. We present the first documented case of significant cataract formation in a young myope after repeat excimer laser ablation necessitating phacoemulsification with a posterior chamber implant. Proposed explanations include focusing of the ablation wave on the posterior capsule (acous...

  9. Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Patients with Gastric Ulcer and Non Ulcer Disease using RFLP-PCR of ureAB, vacA , cagA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Farshad

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Different studies show that the reasons for clinically diverse outcomes of infections caused by H. pylori may include host and environmental factors as well as differences in the prevalence or expression of bacterial virulence factors. The aim of this study was to study the distribution of different genotypes of major virulence factors cagA, vacA and ureAB among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric ulcer (ulcerative disease and patients with gastritis (non ulcerative disease.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 65 H. pylori strains, 30 from patients with gastric ulcer and 35 from patients with non ulcerative gastritis disease were investigated by RFLP-PCR.Results: The prevalence of vacA-positive strains in ulcerative patients was significantly more than that in non ulcerative patients (P0.05.Conclusion: It seems that in the patients under our study the presence of cagA gene may not necessarily be a risk factor for ulcer disease, while a homologous genotype of vacA appears to be associated with an increase risk of ulcer development. Lastly, despite the existence of a high degree of genomic variability within ureAB, conserved DNA banding profiles are distributed in our areas.

  10. Multiplexing schemes for quantum repeater networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Luciano; Van Meter, Rodney

    2011-08-01

    When built, quantum repeaters will allow the distribution of entangled quantum states across large distances, playing a vital part in many proposed quantum technologies. Enabling multiple users to connect through the same network will be key to their real-world deployment. Previous work on repeater technologies has focussed only on simple entanglment production, without considering the issues of resource scarcity and competition that necessarily arise in a network setting. In this paper we simulated a thirteen-node network with up to five flows sharing different parts of the network, measuring the total throughput and fairness for each case. Our results suggest that the Internet-like approach of statistical multiplexing use of a congested link gives the highest aggregate throughput. Time division multiplexing and buffer space multiplexing were slightly less effective, but all three schemes allow the sum of multiple flows to substantially exceed that of any one flow, improving over circuit switching by taking advantage of resources that are forced to remain idle in circuit switching. All three schemes proved to have excellent fairness. The high performance, fairness and simplicity of implementation support a recommendation of statistical multiplexing for shared quantum repeater networks.

  11. Penile length and circumference: an Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promodu, K; Shanmughadas, K V; Bhat, S; Nair, K R

    2007-01-01

    Apprehension about the normal size of penis is a major concern for men. Aim of the present investigation is to estimate the penile length and circumference of Indian males and to compare the results with the data from other countries. Results will help in counseling the patients worried about the penile size and seeking penis enlargement surgery. Penile length in flaccid and stretched conditions and circumference were measured in a group of 301 physically normal men. Erected length and circumference were measured for 93 subjects. Mean flaccid length was found to be 8.21 cm, mean stretched length 10.88 cm and circumference 9.14 cm. Mean erected length was found to be 13.01 cm and erected circumference was 11.46 cm. Penile dimensions are found to be correlated with anthropometric parameters. Insight into the normative data of penile size of Indian males obtained. There are significant differences in the mean penile length and circumference of Indian sample compared to the data reported from other countries. Study need to be continued with a large sample to establish a normative data applicable to the general population. PMID:17568760

  12. Axial length variability in cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the mean axial length and biometric measures in patients undergoing cataract surgery and further compare the variability of axial length between the gender and with age. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Eye Unit I, Department of Ophthalmology, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Hyderabad, Pakistan from January 2010 to December 2012. Methodology: All patients referred for cataract surgery were assessed. The study included 886 eyes which were straightforward cataract cases with no other ocular problem. The data was collected for axial length, keratometric values and Intra-Ocular Lens (IOL) power prior to cataract surgery. The collected data was then analyzed using SPSS version 19 for windows software. Results: Gender based comparison showed significant difference in age, axial length, keratometric values and IOL power between the two groups (p=0.000). 86% of the eyes had an axial length between 21.00 mm and 23.99 mm. In univariate analysis there was significant (p=0.000) relation between overall age and axial length. The keratometric values ranged between 36.75 D and 52.50 D. Majority of the IOL powers ranged between 20.00 D and 23.00 D. Conclusion: The mean axial length of patients undergoing cataract surgery was 22.96 +- 1.04 mm, was comparable to Indian and Chinese population but shorter than the Western population. Females had shorter axial lengths, similar to other studies. Axial length was positively associated with age among the females, the cause of which is yet to be determined. (author)

  13. Sub-picosecond electron bunch length measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A subpicosecond electron bunch length measuring system has been developed at the SUNSHINE facility. The method is based on an autocorrelation technique in the frequency domain utilizing the coherent radiation emitted from the electron bunch at wavelengths equal and longer than the bunch length. The radiation spectrum is the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and measuring this spectrum in a far-infrared Michelson interferometer allows the determination of the bunch length down to the femto-second regime. The experimental setup and measurement of subpicosecond electron pulses including possible improvements to maximize the bunch information available from an interferogram will be described

  14. Paternal age and telomere length in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob B; Dalgård, Christine; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Halekoh, Ulrich; Möller, Sören; Kimura, Masayuki; Horvath, Kent; Kark, Jeremy D; Christensen, Kaare; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Aviv, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length, a highly heritable trait, is longer in offspring of older fathers. This perplexing feature has been attributed to the longer telomeres in sperm of older men and it might be an 'epigenetic' mechanism through which paternal age plays a role in telomere length regulation in humans....... Based on two independent (discovery and replication) twin studies, comprising 889 twin pairs, we show an increase in the resemblance of leukocyte telomere length between dizygotic twins of older fathers, which is not seen in monozygotic twins. This phenomenon might result from a paternal age...

  15. Stylish lengths: Mate choice in flowers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B T Ramesha; M D Yetish; G Ravikanth; K N Ganeshaiah; Jaboury Ghazoul; R Uma Shaanker

    2011-06-01

    The styles of flowers may represent an arena for pollen competition in the race to fertilize ovules. Accordingly, selection should favour a longer ‘race’ to better discriminate among variable pollen by increasing style length. Sampling across a taxonomically diverse range of wild and outcrossed species, we found that the distribution of style lengths within plants were skewed towards longer styles, as predicted. In self-pollinated domesticated species, where discrimination among pollen is less important, we found no such pattern. We conclude that style length is under directional selection towards longer styles as a mechanism for mate choice among pollen of variable quality.

  16. Reduced Fetal Telomere Length in Gestational Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jian; Ye, Junyi; Wu, Yanting; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Qiong; Han, Cong; Ye, Xiaoqun; Wang, Hanzhi; Jing HE; Huang, Hefeng; Liu, Yun; Dong, Minyue

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an important complication of pregnancy that poses significant threats to women and their offspring. Telomere length shortens as cellular damage increases and is associated with metabolic diseases. Telomere length in fetal leucocytes was determined in 82 infants of women with GDM (N = 82) and 65 normal pregnant women (N = 65). Women with preeclampsia (N = 45) and gestational hypertension (N = 23) were also studied. In the GDM group, telomere length was si...

  17. Bunch Length Measurements in SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, W.J.; Fisher, A.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; Sebek, J.; /SLAC; Lumpkin, A.; /Argonne; Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley; Mok, W.; /Unlisted

    2007-11-28

    A series of bunch length measurements were made in SPEAR3 for two different machine optics. In the achromatic optics the bunch length increases from the low-current value of 16.6ps rms to about 30ps at 25ma/bunch yielding an inductive impedance of -0.17{Omega}. Reducing the momentum compaction factor by a factor of {approx}60 [1] yields a low-current bunch length of {approx}4ps rms. In this paper we review the experimental setup and results.

  18. Inproved grade length limitation of freeways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING En-hui; PEI Yu-long

    2006-01-01

    A method of ascertaining grade length limitation of freeways in mountain terrain is presented. The relationship models between 15th percentile speeds and grades were built through the surveys and analyses of operation speeds on 7 typical sections of 3 freeways in mountain terrain. Using 15th percentile and 85th percentile as speed limitations, the methods of determining admitted velocities were put forward according to the grades. Deceleration distances of longitudinal slopeways were analyzed utilizing the theories of vehicle. According to the results of analysis, grade length limitation was loosed. Finally the values of grade length limitation for freeways were put forward. The results could be used as references for freeway design.

  19. The tree length of an evolving coalescent

    CERN Document Server

    Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Weisshaupt, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A well-established model for the genealogy of a large population in equilibrium is Kingman's coalescent. For the population together with its genealogy evolving in time, this gives rise to a time-stationary tree-valued process. We study the sum of the branch lengths, briefly denoted as tree length, and prove that the (suitably compensated) sequence of tree length processes converges, as the population size tends to infinity, to a limit process with cadlag paths, infinite infinitesimal variance, and a Gumbel distribution as its equilibrium.

  20. A Complete and Accurate Ab Initio Repeat Finding Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shuaibin; Chen, Xinwu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoli; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-03-01

    It has become clear that repetitive sequences have played multiple roles in eukaryotic genome evolution including increasing genetic diversity through mutation, changes in gene expression and facilitating generation of novel genes. However, identification of repetitive elements can be difficult in the ab initio manner. Currently, some classical ab initio tools of finding repeats have already presented and compared. The completeness and accuracy of detecting repeats of them are little pool. To this end, we proposed a new ab initio repeat finding tool, named HashRepeatFinder, which is based on hash index and word counting. Furthermore, we assessed the performances of HashRepeatFinder with other two famous tools, such as RepeatScout and Repeatfinder, in human genome data hg19. The results indicated the following three conclusions: (1) The completeness of HashRepeatFinder is the best one among these three compared tools in almost all chromosomes, especially in chr9 (8 times of RepeatScout, 10 times of Repeatfinder); (2) in terms of detecting large repeats, HashRepeatFinder also performed best in all chromosomes, especially in chr3 (24 times of RepeatScout and 250 times of Repeatfinder) and chr19 (12 times of RepeatScout and 60 times of Repeatfinder); (3) in terms of accuracy, HashRepeatFinder can merge the abundant repeats with high accuracy. PMID:26272474