WorldWideScience

Sample records for cadmium mercury oxides

  1. Cadmium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Together with zinc and mercury, cadmium belongs to group IIb of the periodic table. It can be found in rocks, soil, water, coal, zinc ore, lead ore, and copper ore. In the environment, cadmium is present predominantly as the oxide or as the chloride, sulfide, or sulfate salt. It has no recognizable

  2. Mercury Cadmium Selenide for Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    were grown using elemental mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and selenium (Se) sources. The beam equiva- lent pressure ( BEP ) emanating from all sources was...flux), the BEP measured for the cracker source was found to vary with the cracking zone temperature, tracking with the data found in Ref. 7. This sug...The Se BEP measured for the typical cracking zone temperature of 800 C was found to be close to a factor of two lower than at the typical effusion cell

  3. Sonochemical synthesis and characterization of new seven coordinated zinc, cadmium and mercury nitrate complexes: New precursors for nanostructure metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, S Mojahedi; Montazerozohori, M; Masoudiasl, A; Houshyar, E; Joohari, S; White, J M

    2018-03-01

    The nitrate complexes of group 12 elements with a tridentate Schiff base ligand (L = (E)-N1-((E)-3- phenylallylidene)-N2-(2-((E)-((E)-3-phenylallylidene) amino)ethyl) ethane-1,2-diamine) were synthesized via sonochemical process and characterized by various physical and chemical methods. The structural analysis of the zinc nitrate complex by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the central atom is seven-coordinated by three nitrogen atoms from the Schiff base ligand as well as four oxygen atoms from two different nitrate anions. The geometry around the metal center can be described as a distorted pentagonal bipyramid. The crystal packing analysis of zinc nitrate complex indicates that the intermolecular interactions related to nitrate groups plays the essential role in the orientation of supramolecular structure. Hirshfeld surfaces (HS) and their corresponding fingerprint plots (FP) have been also used for further investigation of crystal structure of zinc nitrate complex. Furthermore thermal analyses (TG/DTG) of three nanostructure complexes were carried out and discussed. Finally, direct thermolysis of zinc and cadmium nitrate complexes in air atmosphere led to the production of zinc and cadmium oxide nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of cadmium, lead and mercury residual levels in meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of cadmium, lead and mercury residual levels in meat of canned light tuna ( Katsuwonus pelamis and Thunnus albacares ) and fresh little tunny ( Euthynnus alletteratus ) in Libya. ... Surveillance for mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) contamination in tuna products is crucial for consumer food safety.

  5. Dislocation Etching Solutions for Mercury Cadmium Selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1–xCdxTe) for infrared (IR) sensor applications, but etch pit density ( EPD ) measurements are required to measure...dislocations that affect device performance. No EPD solutions have been reported for Hg1–xCdxSe, and standard EPD solutions for Hg1–xCdxTe have proved...ineffective. Thus, a new etching solution is required for EPD measurements of Hg1–xCdxSe. Samples were etched in various solutions and the resulting pits

  6. Analysis and determination of mercury, cadmium and lead in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis and determination of mercury, cadmium and lead in canned tuna fish marketed in Iran. E Rahimi, M Hajisalehi, HR Kazemeini, A Chakeri, A Khodabakhsh, M Derakhshesh, M Mirdamadi, AG Ebadi, A Rezvani, FM Kashkahi ...

  7. Recent developments in cadmium mercury telluride infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, D. E.

    1982-09-01

    A II-VI compound, cadmium mercury telluride, has dominated recent advances in the detection of infrared radiation. Although the main application is in thermal imaging, other applications include instrumentation and guidance. In this paper we describe the history of the development of cadmium mercury telluride as a detector material, with emphasis on the importance of material parameters and the role of the material scientist. High purity material, free from defects and of good crystal quality, is needed in order to ensure good minority carrier lifetime. Because of the segregation of impurities during solidification, material produced by the Bridgman technique offers considerable advantages over material produced by cast recrystallize techniques. Detectors based on a principle established by C.T. Elliott of the RSRE, Malvern, have led to families of thermal imagers that produce near perfect imagery. These detectors incorporate signal processing in the element by providing the time delay and integration functions that are normally performed off the focal plane in conventional serial scanned systems. A particular requirement of these SPRITE detectors is for long minority carrier lifetime. This has called for improvements in both material and fabrication technology which have led to an advanced technology that has benefited all aspects of the manufacture of cadmium mercury telluride detectors. Near background limited performance will be described in both the 8-14 and the 3-5 μm atmospheric transmission bands. There is, however, more image blurring in the 3-5 μm band than occurs in the 8-14 μm band. The direction of present work is towards detectors combining cadmium mercury telluride elements with advanced integrated circuits to provide more complex signal processing in the focal plane. This has been driven by the need to improve the sensitivity of thermal imaging systems where the scan rates are too low to allow useful time delay and integration in SPRITE detectors

  8. Lead, mercury, and cadmium in breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye Yurdakök

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Toxic heavy metals are the major source of environmental pollution in this new millennium. Lead, mercury, and cadmium are the most common toxic heavy metals in the environment. There is no known function of these toxic heavy metals in the human body. In females, toxic heavy metals can be accumulated in maternal body before pregnancy and may be transferred to fetus through placenta and later, via breast milk. Lead previously accumulated in maternal bones can be mobilized along with calcium in order to meet increased calcium needs of the fetus in pregnant women and for the calcium needs in human milk during lactation. Human fetus and infants are susceptible to heavy metal toxicity passing through placenta and breastmilk due to rapid growth and development of organs and tissues, especially central nervous system. However most of the damage is already done by the time the infant is born. Intrauterine lead exposure can cause growth retardation, cognitive dysfunction, low IQ scores on ability tests, and low performance in school. Biological samples, such as umbilical cord blood and breast milk, and less commonly infant hair, are used for biomonitoring of intra-uterine exposure to these toxic chemicals. Although toxic metals and other pollutants may be excreted into breast milk, their effects are unknown and this topic is subject of a growing body of research. Despite the possibility of harm from environmental contaminants in breast milk, breastfeeding is still recommended as the best infant feeding method. In fact, the species-specific components present in breast milk protect infants against infections; promote immune and neurologic system development; and may decrease the risk of disease, including allergies, obesity, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, inflammatory bowel disease, and sudden infant death syndrome. Breastfeeding also facilitates maternal-infant attachment. The potential risk of environmental contaminants that can be transferred from

  9. Blood concentrations of lead, cadmium, mercury and their association with biomarkers of DNA oxidative damage in preschool children living in an e-waste recycling area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xijin; Liao, Weitang; Lin, Yucong; Dai, Yifeng; Shi, Zhihua; Huo, Xia

    2017-06-16

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage occurs in heavy metal exposure, but the simultaneous effect on DNA repair is unknown. We investigated the influence of co-exposure of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) on 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and human repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) mRNA levels in exposed children to evaluate the imbalance of DNA damage and repair. Children within the age range of 3-6 years from a primitive electronic waste (e-waste) recycling town were chosen as participants to represent a heavy metal-exposed population. 8-OHdG in the children's urine was assessed for heavy metal-induced oxidative effects, and the hOGG1 mRNA level in their blood represented the DNA repair ability of the children. Among the children surveyed, 88.14% (104/118) had a blood Pb level >5 μg/dL, 22.03% (26/118) had a blood Cd level >1 μg/dL, and 62.11% (59/95) had a blood Hg level >10 μg/dL. Having an e-waste workshop near the house was a risk factor contributing to high blood Pb (r s  = 0.273, p < 0.01), while Cd and Hg exposure could have come from other contaminant sources. Preschool children of fathers who had a college or university education had significantly lower 8-OHdG levels (median 242.76 ng/g creatinine, range 154.62-407.79 ng/g creatinine) than did children of fathers who had less education (p = 0.035). However, we did not observe a significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of hOGG1 between the different variables. Compared with children having low lead exposure (quartile 1), the children with high Pb exposure (quartiles 2, 3, and 4) had significantly higher 8-OHdG levels (β Q2  = 0.362, 95% CI 0.111-0.542; β Q3  = 0.347, 95% CI 0.103-0.531; β Q4  = 0.314, 95% CI 0.087-0.557). Associations between blood Hg levels and 8-OHdG were less apparent. Compared with low levels of blood Hg (quartile 1), elevated blood Hg levels (quartile 2) were associated with higher 8-OHdG levels (β Q2  = 0

  10. Translocation of mercury and cadmium into the fruiting bodies of six higher fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunnert, H.; Zadrazil, F.

    1983-01-01

    The species- and metal-specific translocation of cadmium and mercury from the substrate to the fruiting bodies of 6 higher fungi has been investigated. The 6 species differed greatly in their ability to translocate cadmium and mercury. The highest translocation rates displayed Pleurotus flabellatus: 75.0% of the applied cadmium and 38.5% of the mercury could be recovered from the fruiting bodies. High translocation rates also found with Pleurotus ostreatus (19.3 and 38.5% for cadmium and mercury, respectively). This compares with only 1.27% of cadmium and 8.42% of mercury in Agaricus bisporus or 3.71% of cadmium and 3.63% of mercury in Pleurotus sajor caju. For Agaricus bisporus it was shown that there was proportionality of translocation over a 1:10 concentration range. In 4 out of 6 species there was a tendency towards higher heavy metal contents in later crops, when calculated on the basis of ..mu..g/g of dry fruiting body. In 4 out of 6 more mercury than cadmium was translocated into the fruiting bodies, the Cd/Hg ratios being 6.6, 2.0, 5.6, and 3.2, respectively. In Pleurotus sajor caju the ratio was about 1. Only in Pleurotus flabellatus more cadmium than mercury was found in the fruiting bodies (Cd/Hg ratio 0.65).

  11. Survey of mercury, cadmium and lead content of household batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recknagel, Sebastian; Radant, Hendrik; Kohlmeyer, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to provide updated information on the development of the potential impact of heavy metal containing batteries on municipal waste and battery recycling processes following transposition of the new EU Batteries Directive 2006/66/EC. A representative sample of 146 different types of commercially available dry and button cells as well as lithium-ion accumulators for mobile phones were analysed for their mercury (Hg)-, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contents. The methods used for preparing the cells and analysing the heavy metals Hg, Cd, and Pb were either developed during a former study or newly developed. Several batteries contained higher mass fractions of mercury or cadmium than the EU limits. Only half of the batteries with mercury and/or lead fractions above the marking thresholds were labelled. Alkaline-manganese mono-cells and Li-ion accumulators, on average, contained the lowest heavy metal concentrations, while zinc-carbon batteries, on average, contained the highest levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cadmium-109 and methyl mercury-203 metabolism, tissue distribution, and secretion into milk of cows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neathery, M.W.; Miller, W.J.; Gentry, R.P.; Stake, P.E.; Blackmon, D.M.

    1974-01-01

    Metabolism of cadmium-109 and methyl mercury-203 was studied in six lactating Jersey cows for 14 days following single tracer oral doses. Most of the cadmium-109 was excreted in feces with only .05% in urine. When the cows were killed 14 to 16 days after dosing, kidney and liver had highest cadmium-109. About .75% of the cadmium-109 was retained in the body with 34% of this in gastrointestinal tract and contents, 32% in liver, and 10% in kidney. In fetal tissues highest cadmium-109 was in kidney, tibia, and liver whereas fetal liver had highest methyl mercury-203. Apparent methyl mercury-203 absorption was 59% with 1.1% in urine. Highest concentration was in kidney, followed by liver, skeletal muscles, heart, smooth muscle, spleen, lung, brain, ovaries, and pancreas. Of total body mercury-203, muscle had about 72% and liver 7%. In 14 days, only .17% of mercury-203 dose was secreted into milk. Cadmium-109 in milk was below detectable limits of .00008% of the dose/day. Feed of cattle kept for meat should be protected from methyl mercury, at least near slaughter. Milk is protected from methyl mercury. In sharp contrast to zinc, little of the ingested cadmium appears in muscle or milk. 31 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  13. Cadmium, lead and mercury exposure in non smoking pregnant women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinwood, A.L., E-mail: a.hinwood@ecu.edu.au [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Callan, A.C.; Ramalingam, M.; Boyce, M. [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027 (Australia); Heyworth, J. [School Population Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McCafferty, P. [ChemCentre, PO Box 1250, Bentley, WA 6983 (Australia); Odland, J.Ø. [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2013-10-15

    Recent literature suggests that exposure to low concentrations of heavy metals may affect both maternal and child health. This study aimed to determine the biological heavy metals concentrations of pregnant women as well as environmental and dietary factors that may influence exposure concentrations. One hundred and seventy three pregnant women were recruited from Western Australia, each providing a sample of blood, first morning void urine, residential soil, dust and drinking water samples. Participants also completed a questionnaire which included a food frequency component. All biological and environmental samples were analysed for heavy metals using ICP-MS. Biological and environmental concentrations of lead and mercury were generally low (Median Pb Drinking Water (DW) 0.04 µg/L; Pb soil <3.0 µg/g; Pb dust 16.5 µg/g; Pb blood 3.67 µg/L; Pb urine 0.55; µg/L Hg DW <0.03; Hg soil <1.0 µg/g; Hg dust <1.0 µg/g; Hg blood 0.46 µg/L; Hg urine <0.40 µg/L). Cadmium concentrations were low in environmental samples (Median CdDW 0.02 µg/L; Cdsoil <0.30 ug/g; Cddust <0.30) but elevated in urine samples (Median 0.55 µg/L, creatinine corrected 0.70 µg/g (range <0.2–7.06 µg/g creatinine) compared with other studies of pregnant women. Predictors of increased biological metals concentrations in regression models for blood cadmium were residing in the Great Southern region of Western Australia and not using iron/folic acid supplements and for urinary cadmium was having lower household annual income. However, these factors explained little of the variation in respective biological metals concentrations. The importance of establishing factors that influence low human exposure concentrations is becoming critical in efforts to reduce exposures and hence the potential for adverse health effects. -- Highlights: • Biological heavy metals concentrations in women in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. • Exposure assessment including environmental, lifestyle and activity

  14. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  15. Critical loads of Cadmium, Lead and Mercury and their exceedances in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettelingh, J.P.; Schutze, G.; Vries, W. de; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Ilyin, I.; Reinds, G.J.; Slootweg, J.; Travnikov, O.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) are known to be transported over relatively long distances from their sources. Deposited metals may accumulate over time in soils and catchments, and then follow varying pathways to endpoints in humans and the environment. Cadmium and lead, that are emitted

  16. Cadmium, mercury and selenium concentrations in mink (Mustela vison) from Yukon, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamberg, Mary [Gamberg Consulting, Box 10460, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 7A1 (Canada)]. E-mail: mary.gamberg@northwestel.net; Boila, Gail [Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N6 (Canada); Stern, Gary [Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N6 (Canada); Roach, Patrick [Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Suite 300, 300 Main Street, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5 (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    Mercury (total and methyl), cadmium and selenium concentrations were measured in liver, kidney and brain tissue from mink trapped from the Yukon Territory from 2001-2002. None of these metals was found at levels of toxicological concern. Total mercury averaged 0.66, 0.92 and 0.22 {mu}g g{sup -1} in mink kidney, liver and brain tissue respectively, while methyl mercury averaged 0.77, 0.85 and 0.21 {mu}g g{sup -1} in the same tissues. Selenium averaged 2.07, 1.40 and 0.39 {mu}g g{sup -1} in mink kidney, liver and brain tissue, while cadmium was only measured in kidneys and averaged 0.22 {mu}g g{sup -1}. All element concentrations are presented on a wet weight basis. Concentrations of total mercury in all tissues were significantly higher in female than male mink, possibly reflecting proportionally greater food consumption by the smaller females. Total mercury concentrations were inversely related to the proportion of mercury present as methylmercury, and positively related to concentrations of selenium, consistent with increasing demethylation of methylmercury, and the formation of mercuric selenide as total concentrations of mercury increased. This relationship was seen most strongly in mink liver, less so in kidneys and not at all in brains where most of the mercury was maintained in the methyl form. There did not appear to be any geographical areas in which mink had obviously higher concentrations of mercury, and there was frequently a relatively large range of mercury levels found in mink from a given trapline. Mink diet may be a factor in this variation. Local environmental levels of cadmium were not reflected in cadmium concentrations in mink tissues. Mercury, cadmium and selenium do not appear to constitute environmental hazards to mink in the Yukon.

  17. Calculation of critical loads for cadmium, lead and mercury; background document to a mapping manual on critical loads of cadmium, lead and mercury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Schütze, G.; Lofts, S.; Tipping, E.; Meili, M.; Römkens, P.F.A.M.; Groenenberg, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    This report on heavy metals provides up-to-date methodologies to derive critical loads for the heavy metals cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) for both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. It presents background information to a Manual on Critical Loads for those metals. Focus is given to the

  18. Human exposure to mercury, lead and cadmium through consumption of canned mackerel, tuna, pilchard and sardine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okyere, H; Voegborlo, R B; Agorku, S E

    2015-07-15

    Total mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) concentrations were determined in canned fish on the Ghanaian market. Total mercury was determined using an automatic mercury analyzer while cadmium and lead levels were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The metal contents in the samples, expressed in μg g(-1) (wet weight), varied from cadmium, and from <0.01 to 1.44 with an average value of 0.72 for lead. The results indicate that canned fish from the Ghanaian market have concentrations well below the permissible FAO/WHO for these toxic metals. Thus considering the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) of Hg, Pb and Cd the levels obtained in this study are unlikely to constitute a significant exposure to the public through consumption of moderate amounts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescent and colorimetric sensors for detection of lead, cadmium, and mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Na; Ren, Wen Xiu; Kim, Jong Seung; Yoon, Juyoung

    2012-04-21

    Exposure to even very low levels of lead, cadmium, and mercury ions is known to cause neurological, reproductive, cardiovascular, and developmental disorders, which are more serious problems for children particularly. Accordingly, great efforts have been devoted to the development of fluorescent and colorimetric sensors, which can selectively detect lead, cadmium, and mercury ions. In this critical review, the fluorescent and colorimetric sensors are classified according to their receptors into several categories, including small molecule based sensors, calixarene based chemosensors, BODIPY based chemosensors, polymer based chemosensors, DNA functionalized sensing systems, protein based sensing systems and nanoparticle based sensing systems (197 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  20. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Vishnu, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institute of Defence Scientists and Technologists, CFEES Complex, Brig. S. K. Majumdar Marg, Delhi 110054 (India); Li, Qing; He, Jiale; Hu, Weida, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Lab for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); He, Kai; Lin, Chun [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2016-08-28

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I–V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I–V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from −9 V to −2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I–V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from −3 V to −5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  1. Critical loads of cadmium, lead and mercury and their exceedances in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettelingh, J.P.; Schütze, G.; Vries, de W.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Ilyin, I.; Reinds, G.J.; Slootweg, J.; Travnikov, O.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter information is summarized on the assessment of the risk of impacts of cadmium, lead and mercury emissions and related depositions of these metals, with an emphasis on natural areas in Europe. Depositions are compared to critical loads to identify areas in Europe where critical loads

  2. Mushroom contamination by mercury, cadmium and lead; Contaminazione di funghi commestibili con mercurio, cadmio e piombo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojmi Di Delupis, G.; Dojmi Di Delupis, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Comparata ed Ecotossicologia

    1996-12-01

    Occurrence and bioaccumulation of mercury, cadmium and lead were found in mushrooms by various researchers. Such mushrooms were often found in polluted areas. Pollution was mainly caused by industrial or mining plants, by some agricultural treatments and by road traffic. Considerations and recommendations concerning food consumption are made.

  3. Dietary intake of heavy metals (cadmium, lead and mercury) by the Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter-Sorkina R de; Bakker MI; Donkersgoed G van; Klaveren JD van; RIKILT Wageningen; SIR

    2003-01-01

    The exposure of the Dutch population to cadmium, lead and mercury via food is assessed based on concentration data from 1999-2002 and on consumption data from the third Dutch National Food Consumption Survey. To this end, the dietary intake estimation method using the MCRA (Monte Carlo Risk

  4. Cadmium, lead, mercury and arsenic in animal feed and feed materials - trend analysis of monitoring results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamse, Paulien; Van der Fels-Klerx, H J Ine; de Jong, Jacob

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to obtain insights into the presence of cadmium, lead, mercury and arsenic in feed materials and feed over time for the purpose of guiding national monitoring. Data from the Dutch feed monitoring programme and from representatives of the feed industry during the period 2007-13 were used. Data covered a variety of feed materials and compound feeds in the Netherlands. Trends in the percentage of samples that exceeded the maximum limit (ML) set by the European Commission, and trends in average, median and 90th percentile concentrations of each of these elements were investigated. Based on the results, monitoring should focus on feed material of mineral origin, feed material of marine origin, especially fish meal, seaweed and algae, as well as feed additives belonging to the functional groups of (1) trace elements (notably cupric sulphate, zinc oxide and manganese oxide for arsenic) and (2) binders and anti-caking agents. Mycotoxin binders are a new group of feed additives that also need attention. For complementary feed it is important to make a proper distinction between mineral and non-mineral feed (lower ML). Forage crops in general do not need high priority in monitoring programmes, although for arsenic grass meal still needs attention.

  5. Association of cadmium, lead and mercury with paraoxonase 1 activity in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Z Pollack

    Full Text Available The activity of paraoxonase 1 (PON1, an antioxidant enzyme whose polymorphisms have been associated with cancer risk, may be associated with metals exposure.To evaluate PON1 activity in relation to cadmium, lead, and mercury levels in healthy, premenopausal women.Women from upstate New York were followed for ≥ two menstrual cycles. Repeated measures linear mixed models estimated the association between cadmium, lead, and mercury levels (by tertile: T1, T2, T3 and PON1 arylesterase (PON1A and PON1 paraoxonase (PON1P activity, separately. Analyses were stratified by PON1 Q192R phenotype and un-stratified.Median blood cadmium, lead, and mercury concentrations were 0.30 µg/L, 0.87 µg/dL, and 1.15 µg/L. In un-stratified analyses cadmium and mercury were associated with decreased PON1A activity (T2 vs. T1; not T3 vs. T1 but metals were not associated with PON1P. Phenotypes were distributed between QQ (n = 99, QR (n = 117, and RR (n = 34. Cadmium was associated with decreased PON1A activity for QR and RR phenotypes comparing T2 vs. T1 (-14.4% 95% confidence interval [CI] [-20.1, -8.4] and -27.9% [-39.5, -14.0],. Lead was associated with decreased PON1A (RR phenotype, T3 vs. T1 -18.9% [-32.5, -2.5]; T2 vs. T1 -19.6% [-32.4, -4.4]. Cadmium was associated with lower PON1P comparing T2 vs. T1 for the RR (-34.9% [-51.5, -12.5] and QR phenotypes (-9.5% [-18.1, 0.0] but not comparing T3 vs. T1. Cadmium was associated with increases in PON1P levels (QQ phenotype, T3 vs. T1 24.5% [7.0, 44.9] and mercury was associated with increased PON1A levels (QQ phenotype, T3 vs. T1 6.2% [0.2, 12.6]. Mercury was associated with decreased PON1P (RR phenotype, T2 vs. T1 -22.8 [-37.8, -4.1].Blood metals were associated with PON1 activity and these effects varied by phenotype. However, there was not a linear dose-response and these findings await replication.

  6. Crystal structure, DNA interaction and thermal analysis data of two new antimicrobial active binuclear cadmium and mercury complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musavi, S. A.; Montazerozohori, M.; Masoudiasl, A.; Naghiha, R.; Joohari, S.; Assoud, A.

    2017-10-01

    Two new binuclear Schiff base complexes with the general formula [CdLBr(μ-Br)]2 (1) and [Hg2L(μ-I)2I2] (2) were prepared by the reaction of 2,2-dimethyl-N,N'- bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine (L), CdBr2 and HgI2. The crystal structure of two complexes was determined by X-ray crystallography. The common structures for four-coordinated compounds are square planar or the tetrahedral geometries, which is evaluated by the Houser angular index (τ4). In [CdLBr(μ-Br)]2 (1), each cadmium center is five-coordinated by two iminic nitrogen atoms from Schiff base ligand, two μ2-bridging bromide anions and one terminal coordinating bromide anion. The metal center in this centrosymmetric dimer has a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. [Hg2L(μ-I)2I2] (2) consists of two four-coordinated mercury centers with different coordination spheres (HgN2I2 for Hg1 and HgI4 for Hg2). The TG/DTG diagrams showed that both complexes were completely decomposed under a nitrogen atmosphere. Furthermore, antibacterial activities of compounds have been screened against various bacteria and fungi by Disk diffusion method. Mercury complex inhibited the growth of the microorganisms more efficient than cadmium complex. DNA cleavage potential of compounds was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis method. Finally, nano-structure cadmium complex was sono-chemically synthesized and applied as precursor for preparation of cadmium oxide nanoparticles.

  7. Girl or boy? Prenatal lead, cadmium and mercury exposure and the secondary sex ratio in the ALSPAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C M; Golding, J; Emond, A M

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prenatal exposure to lead, cadmium and mercury levels on the secondary sex ratio. Whole blood samples were collected from pregnant women enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) study at a median gestational age of 11 weeks and were analyzed for lead, cadmium and mercury. Regression analysis was used to identify associations between maternal lead, cadmium and mercury levels and the secondary sex ratio with adjustment for confounders. There was no evidence for associations between maternal lead, cadmium or mercury levels and the secondary sex ratio in this sample. It appears unlikely that alterations in the secondary sex ratio are influenced by exposure to heavy metals, but further work should be done in large cohorts in other countries to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JoAnn Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this project was to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involved both experimental and modeling efforts. The team was comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective was to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. The results suggested that homogeneous mercury oxidation is below 10% which is not consistent with previous data of others and work which was completed early in this research program. Previous data showed oxidation above 10% and up to 100%. However, the previous data are suspect due to apparent oxidation occurring within the sampling system where hypochlorite ion forms in the KCl impinger, which in turn oxidized mercury. Initial tests with entrained iron oxide particles injected into a flame reactor suggest that iron present on fly ash particle surfaces can promote heterogeneous oxidation of mercury in the presence of HCl under entrained flow conditions. Using the data generated above, with homogeneous reactions accounting for less than 10% of the oxidation, comparisons were made to pilot- and full-scale data. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions, as with the case of iron oxide, and adsorption on solid carbon must be taking place in the full-scale system. Modeling of mercury oxidation using parameters from the literature was conducted to further study the contribution of homogeneous pathways to Hg oxidation in coal combustion systems. Calculations from the literature used rate parameters developed in different studies, in some cases using transition state theory with a range of approaches and basis sets, and in other cases

  9. Estimated long-term dietary exposure to lead, cadmium, and mercury in young Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D W; Woo, H D; Joo, J; Park, K S; Oh, S Y; Kwon, H J; Park, J D; Hong, Y S; Sohn, S J; Yoon, H J; Hwang, M S; Kim, J

    2014-12-01

    Controlling for day-to-day variation is a key issue in estimating long-term dietary exposure to heavy metals using 24-hour recall (24HR) data from a relatively small number of days. This study was conducted to estimate long-term dietary exposure to lead, cadmium and mercury among Korean children using the Iowa State University (ISU) method and to assess the contributions of different food groups to heavy metal intake. We analyzed 2 days of 24HR data from 457 children between 0 and 6 years of age in 2010. Using bootstrapped concentration data for 118 representative foods, 93.5% of total intake was included in the exposure estimates in this study. Using the 2-day exposure data, we estimated long-term exposure by controlling for within-individual variation using the ISU method. The long-term dietary exposure estimates (mean±standard deviation) for lead, cadmium, and mercury were 0.47±0.14, 0.38±0.20, and 0.22±0.08 μg/kg bw/day, respectively. For lead and cadmium, the percentages of children whose exposure was greater than the reference value were 35 and 42%, respectively. Fruits were an important source of lead exposure, and cereal and fish and shellfish made the greatest contributions to the total cadmium and mercury exposure. Our findings also suggest that the long-term exposure to lead and cadmium was somewhat greater than the reference values, whereas mercury exposure was well below than the reference value in this population. Further studies may be necessary to evaluate the food items contributing to heavy metal exposure, and continuous monitoring is needed to ensure the safety of food intake and dietary patterns among vulnerable groups in Korea.

  10. The Determination of Lead, Arsenic, Mercury, Cadmium Contents in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of sixty samples per variety of fish used in this study was prepared for analysis by processes of homogenization and digestion of the whole fish (after their intestines have been removed); after which their individual lead, cadmium, arsenic and chromium contents were estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometry ...

  11. Dielectric properties of some cadmium and mercury amino alcohol complexes at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALAA E. ALI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric properties of some cadmium and mercury amino alcohol complexes were studied within the temperature range of 100–300 K at the frequencies of 100, 300 and 1000 kHz. The polarization mechanisms are suggested and the dependence of both e and tg d on both temperature and frequency are analyzed. The analysis of the data reveals semi-conducting features based mainly on the hopping mechanism.

  12. Cadmium, lead, and mercury levels in feathers of small passerine birds: noninvasive sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Nicola; Ancora, Stefania; di Fazio, Noemi; Leonzio, Claudio

    2008-10-01

    Bird feathers have been widely used as a nondestructive biological material for monitoring heavy metals. Sources of metals taken up by feathers include diet (metals are incorporated during feather formation), preening, and direct contact with metals in water, air, dust, and plants. In the literature, data regarding the origin of trace elements in feathers are not univocal. Only in the vast literature concerning mercury (as methyl mercury) has endogenous origin been determined. In the present study, we investigate cadmium, lead, and mercury levels in feathers of prey of Falco eleonorae in relation to the ecological characteristics (molt, habitat, and contamination by soil) of the different species. Cluster analysis identified two main groups of species. Differences and correlations within and between groups identified by cluster analysis were then checked by nonparametric statistical analysis. The results showed that mercury levels had a pattern significantly different from those of cadmium and lead, which in turn showed a significant positive correlation, suggesting different origins. Nests of F. eleonorae proved to be a good source for feathers of small trans-Saharan passerines collected by a noninvasive method. They provided abundant feathers of the various species in a relatively small area--in this case, the falcon colony on the Isle of San Pietro, Sardinia, Italy.

  13. Cadmium and mercury effects on cellular immunity in terrestrial arthropods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, J.E.; Klaine, S.J. [Inst. of Wildlife and Environmental Toxicology, Pendleton, SC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Toxicology

    1995-12-31

    The field cricket, Acheta domesticus, was used as a test organism to determine the effects of heavy metal exposure on cellular immunity. Insects were separated by sex and exposed to cadmium chloride or mercuric chloride at concentrations of 0, 2.5, and 5.0 ug/g. Exposures consisted of injecting the chemicals into the hemocoel of each insect on days 0, 2, and 4. Hemolymph was collected on day 7 of the study to determine total hemocyte counts, protein levels, and phenoloxidase activity in individual insects. Cadmium chloride decreased the total number of hemocytes in male crickets at 2.5 and 5.0 ug/g and in female crickets at 5.0 ug/g. Protein levels increased in a dose dependent manner in the males but only slightly increased in the females. Mercuric chloride caused a dose-dependent increase in total hemocytes in both male and female crickets. In addition, mercuric chloride caused a dose-dependent increase in protein levels in males but not females.

  14. Hair mercury and urinary cadmium levels in Belgian children and their mothers within the framework of the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirard, Catherine; Koppen, Gudrun; De Cremer, Koen

    2014-01-01

    . Fish or seafood consumption was the other main parameter determining the mercury levels in hair. No relationship was found between smoking status and cadmium or mercury levels, but the studied population included very few smokers. Urinary cadmium levels were higher in both mothers and children living...

  15. Exposure of rainbow trout milt to mercury and cadmium alters sperm motility parameters and reproductive success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Grzegorz J., E-mail: dietrich@pan.olsztyn.pl [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Dietrich, Mariola; Kowalski, R.K. [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Dobosz, Stefan [Department of Salmonid Research, Inland Fisheries Institute, Rutki 83-330 Zukowo (Poland); Karol, Halina; Demianowicz, Wieslaw; Glogowski, Jan [Department of Gamete and Embryo Biology, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland)

    2010-05-10

    In the current work, seminal plasma was used for the first time as an incubation medium for monitoring short-time exposure effects of sublethal concentrations of mercury and cadmium ions on rainbow trout sperm. Sperm motility parameters (CASA) and hatching rates were used as gamete quality markers. Additionally live/dead sperm viability test and comet assay of DNA fragmentation were performed. We demonstrated that computer-assisted sperm motility analysis (CASA) may serve as a predictor of reproductive success, when milt contaminated with heavy metals is used. Results presented in this study demonstrate that mercury ions altered sperm motility characteristics at 1-10 mg Hg{sup 2+}/l and 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/l and hatching rates at 10 mg Hg{sup 2+}/l and 10 mg Cd{sup 2+}/l after 4 h of exposure. Although mercury ions affected sperm motility parameters immediately after dilution with milt as well as at 4 h of exposure, no differences in sperm motility parameters were found between intact and mercury-treated milt after 24 h of exposure. Our results suggest that rainbow trout seminal plasma has a protective role against the toxic effects of mercury ions of rainbow trout sperm motility.

  16. Uptake of arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury from polluted waters by the water hyacinth Eichornia crassipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chigbo, F.E.; Smith, R.W.; Shore, F.L.

    1982-01-01

    The water hyacinth Eichornia crassipes was studied as a pollution monitor for the simultaneous accumulation of arsenic, cadmium, lead and mecury. After cultivation of the plants for 2 days in tanks containing 10 ppm of each of the metals in aqueous solution, the plants were harvested and rinsed with tap water. The leaves and stems were separated and analysed for each of the metals. The ratio of the concentration of arsenic and mercury in the leaves to the concentrations in the stems was found to be 2:1. Cadmium and lead showed a concentration ratio in leaves to stems of about 1:1. The leaf concentration of arsenic was the lowest of the metals of 0.3428 mg g/sup -1/ of dried plant material whilst the leaf concentration of cadmium was highest at 0.5740 mg g/sup -1/ of dried plant material. Control plants were grown in unpolluted water. Plants grown in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi sewage lagoon were also analysed. The mercury concentrations of the leaves of plants grown in the sewage lagoon were significantly different from the control sample which had a concentration of 0.0700 mg g/sup -1/ of dried plant material.

  17. Cadmium induced oxidative stress in Dunaliella salina | Moradshahi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unicellular green algae Dunaliella salina contains various antioxidants which protect the cell from oxidative damage due to environmental stresses such as heavy metal stress. In the present study, the response of D. salina at the stationary growth phase to oxidative stress generated by cadmium chloride was ...

  18. Thermoelectric material comprising scandium doped zinc cadmium oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    There is presented a composition of scandium doped Zinc Cadmium Oxide with the general formula ZnzCdxScyO which the inventors have prepared, and for which material the inventors have made the insight that it is particularly advantageous as an n-type oxide material, such as particularly advantageous...

  19. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of cadmium using a "mercury free" indium film electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhakumar, Sukeri; Mathiyarasu, Jayaraman; Phani, Kanala Lakshimi Narasimha

    2013-10-07

    In this work, the determination of cadmium has been attempted using an indium film electrode in the presence of bromide ions as an additive, for the first time. The electrode was prepared in situ on a glassy carbon substrate and employed in combination with square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The purpose of having bromide ions is to enhance the analytical value of cadmium detection. In the absence of bromide ions, cadmium stripping peaks coalesce with indium and it is difficult to resolve for analytical purposes. The addition of bromide ions strongly influences the peak separation, thanks to the complex-forming characteristics of cadmium with bromide ions. Several key operational parameters influencing the electroanalytical response of indium modified electrodes were examined and optimized, such as deposition potential, pH, bromide ion and indium concentration. The indium modified electrode exhibited well-defined, separated stripping signals and revealed good linear behavior in the examined concentration range from 1 to 25 ng ml(-1). The present method shows a low detection limit value of 0.36 ng ml(-1). These results suggest that the proposed electrode contributes to the wider applicability of electrochemical stripping techniques in connection with "mercury-free" electrodes.

  20. Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2011-12-06

    A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

  1. Growth of cadmium oxide whiskers on cadmium sulphide single crystals with copper as growth activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koparanova, N.; Simov, S. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. po Fizika na Tvyrdoto Tyalo); Genchev, D. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika); Metchenov, G. (Research Inst. of Criminalistics and Criminology, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1985-02-01

    Some results on the growth and morphology of cadmium oxide whiskers, obtained on cadmium sulphide single crystals with copper as a growth activator, are presented in this work. Cadmium oxide whiskers have been obtained on brace 112-bar0 brace faces of cadmium sulphide plates with a copper layer deposited in advance. The whiskers grew during the annealing of the plates in a weak stream of technically pure argon at temperatures 670 to 730 deg C for 15 min to 3.5 h. Details about the procedure have been given elsewhere. The composition and morphology of the whiskers have been studied by an X-ray microanalyser JEOL 35 DDS and a scanning electron microscope JEOL, JSM 35. The optical microscopic observations have shown that after annealing, a gray-black granular layer is formed on the cadmium sulphide single crystals and this layer can easily be separated from the crystal substrate. Under the granular layer the crystal is heavily damaged. The whiskers grow on the granular layer and they are coloured yellow-brown or red-brown. The maximum whisker length attains several hundreds of micrometres and in some cases up to 1 mm or more.

  2. Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2005-07-01

    This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including

  3. Lead, cadmium and mercury contents and bioaccumulation potential of wild edible saprophytic and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Širić, Ivan; Kasap, Ante; Bedeković, Dalibor; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2017-03-04

    Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) contents in ten species of edible mushrooms in Trakošćan, Croatia were determined. In addition, the similarity between the studied species was determined by cluster analysis. The caps and stipes of the fruiting bodies were analysed separately. The analyses were carried out by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The greatest mean lead concentrations of 1.91 and 1.60 mg kg -1 were determined in caps and stipes of Macrolepiota procera. The greatest mean concentrations of cadmium (3.23 and 2.24 mg kg -1 ) were determined in caps and stipes of Agaricus campestris and of mercury (2.56 and 2.35 mg kg -1 ) in Boletus edulis. In terms of the anatomical parts of the fruiting body (cap-stipe), a considerably greater concentration of the analysed elements was found in the cap for all mushroom species. According to calculated bio-concentration factors, all the examined species were found to be bio-accumulators of Cd and Hg. On the basis of the accumulation of the studied metals, great similarity of mushroom species belonging to the same genus and partial similarity of species of the same ecological affiliation was obtained by cluster analysis.

  4. Survey of cosmetics for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Nancy M; Mindak, William R; Gasper, John W; Thompson, Christopher B; Barrows, Julie N

    2014-01-01

    As part of efforts to assess amounts of inorganic element contamination in cosmetics, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration contracted a private laboratory to determine the total content of seven potentially toxic or allergenic elements in 150 cosmetic products of 12 types (eye shadows, blushes, lipsticks, three types of lotions, mascaras, foundations, body powders, compact powders, shaving creams, and face paints). Samples were analyzed for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, and nickel by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and for mercury by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The methods used to determine the elements were tested for validity by using standard reference materials with matrices similar to the cosmetic types. The cosmetic products were found to contain median values of 0.21 mg/kg arsenic, 3.1 mg/kg chromium, 0.91 mg/kg cobalt, 0.85 mg/kg lead, and 2.7 mg/kg nickel. The median values for cadmium and mercury were below the limits of detection of the methods. The contract requirements, testing procedures, and findings from the survey are described.

  5. Optical characterisation of thin film cadmium oxide prepared by a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The optical transmission spectra of transparent conducting cadmium oxide (CdO) thin films deposited by a modified reactive evaporation process onto glass substrates have been measured. The interference fringes were used to calculate the refractive index, thickness variation, average thickness and absorption coefficient ...

  6. Cadmium, lead, mercury and arsenic in animal feed and feed materials – trend analysis of monitoring results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamse, Paulien; Fels, van der Ine; Jong, de Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to obtain insights into the presence of cadmium, lead, mercury and arsenic in feed materials and feed over time for the purpose of guiding national monitoring. Data from the Dutch feed monitoring programme and from representatives of the feed industry during the period 2007–13

  7. Comparison of pollutant emission control strategies for cadmium and mercury in urban water systems using substance flow analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revitt, D. M.; Lundy, L.; Eriksson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    for the evaluation of ECS using substance flow analysis (SFA). The results indicate that the full implementation of existing EU legislation is capable of reducing the total emissions of cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) by between 11% and 20%. The ability to apply voluntary reduction practices is shown...

  8. Mercury, lead, and cadmium in blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, from the Atlantic coast of Florida, USA: a multipredator approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Douglas H; Engel, Marc E

    2014-04-01

    Blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, from the Atlantic coast of Florida were analyzed for total mercury, methylmercury, lead, and cadmium. Paired samples of two tissue types were analyzed for each crab, (1) muscle tissue (cheliped and body muscles) and (2) whole-body tissue (all organs, muscle tissue and connective tissue), for evaluation of the concentration of metals available to human consumers as well as estuarine predators. There were clear patterns of tissue-specific partitioning for each metal. Total mercury was significantly greater in muscle tissue (mean=0.078 µg/g) than in whole-body tissue (mean=0.055 µg/g). Conversely, whole-body concentrations of lead and cadmium (means=0.131 and 0.079 µg/g, respectively) were significantly greater than concentrations in muscle (means=0.02 and 0.029 µg/g, respectively). There were no significant correlations between any metal contaminant and crab size. Cadmium levels were significantly greater in the muscle tissue of females, but, no other sex-related differences were seen for other metals or tissue types. Methylmercury composed 93-100% of the total mercury in tissues. Compared to previous blue crab studies from different regions of the United States, mean concentrations of mercury, lead, and cadmium were relatively low, although isolated groups or individual blue crabs accumulated high metal concentrations. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Heavy Metals (Mercury, Lead and Cadmium Determination in 17 Species of Fish Marketed in Khorramabad City, West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mortazavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals entrance to fish body tissues and transferring to human body systems after their consuming makes numerous undesirable effects and health problems. The aim of this study was to determine some heavy metals (lead, cadmium and mercury in fresh fishes marketed in Khorramabad City, west of Iran. In this descriptive study, five samples of 17 fish species with high consumption were purchased randomly in 2014. Measurement of mercury, lead and cadmium was performed using atomic absorption spectrometry. All measurements were performed three times for each sample. Lead mean levels in fish samples was in the range 0.736 -1.005 ppm, cadmium range was from 0.196 to 0.015 ppm and mean content of mercury was  0.431 - 0.107 ppm. At present mean concentration of lead, mercury and cadmium in supplied fishes muscle is lower than maximum recommended levels according to WHO, EC and FDA guidelines. Based on the obtained results of this study and the importance of heavy metals in foods and their impacts on human health, continuous monitoring of heavy metals levels in foods is necessary.

  10. Environmental exposures to lead, mercury, and cadmium among South Korean teenagers (KNHANES 2010-2013): Body burden and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Soo; Ahn, Jaeouk; Lee, Byung-Kook; Park, Jungsun; Kim, Yangho

    2017-07-01

    Limited information is available on the association of age and sex with blood concentrations of heavy metals in teenagers. In addition, factors such as a shared family environment may have an association. We analyzed data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2010-2013) to determine whether blood levels of heavy metals differ by risk factors such as age, sex, and shared family environment in a representative sample of teenagers. This study used data obtained in the KNHANES 2010-2013, which had a rolling sampling design that involved a complex, stratified, multistage, probability-cluster survey of a representative sample of the non-institutionalized civilian population in South Korea. Our cross-sectional analysis was restricted to teenagers and their parents who completed the health examination survey, and for whom blood measurements of cadmium, lead, and mercury were available. The final analytical sample consisted of 1585 teenagers, and 376 fathers and 399 mothers who provided measurements of blood heavy metal concentrations. Male teenagers had greater blood levels of lead and mercury, but sex had no association with blood cadmium level. There were age-related increases in blood cadmium, but blood lead decreased with age, and age had little association with blood mercury. The concentrations of cadmium and mercury declined from 2010 to 2013. The blood concentrations of lead, cadmium, and mercury in teenagers were positively associated with the levels in their parents after adjustment for covariates. Our results show that blood heavy metal concentrations differ by risk factors such as age, sex, and shared family environment in teenagers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Atomic resolution on the (111 )B surface of mercury cadmium telluride by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Fang-Xing; Hong, Feng; Pan, Bi-Cai; Wang, Yin; Shao, Jun; Shen, Xue-Chu

    2018-01-01

    The real-space atomic surface structure of mercury cadmium telluride was successfully achieved on the (111 )B surface of H g0.78C d0.22Te by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The work casts light on the reconstructions of the (111 )B surface unraveling a (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction induced by adatom adsorption of Cd. The other (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction is clarified to be induced by the single Te vacancy, which is more stable than the reconstruction of multivacancies in contrast to the prevailing view. The simulated STM images are in good agreement with the experiments. We also observed an in situ morphology transition from the (1 ×1 ) structure to those (2 ×2 ) reconstructions, implying the stability of the reconstructions.

  12. Studies of cadmium, mercury and lead in man. The value of X-ray fluorescence measurements in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerjesson, J.

    1996-10-01

    Two XRF methods have been used for in vivo studies of mercury, cadmium and lead. Persons with a history of long-term occupational mercury exposure had elevated mercury concentrations in their kidneys (up to 65 {mu}g/g). The minimum detectable concentration varied between 12 and 45 {mu}g/g. Battery plant workers had elevated cadmium concentrations in their kidneys (up to 350 {mu}g/g) and liver (up to 80 {mu}g/g), with mean values about 3-5 times higher than the general population. The mean ratio between concentrations of cadmium in kidney and liver was 7. Levels in kidney and liver indicated that a simple integration of cadmium in work-place air is not sufficient to describe the body burden. Fingerbone lead in smelters was 6-8 times higher than in members of the general population. The half-time of bone lead in active workers was estimated to about 5 years during the accumulation phase. A model for description of a person`s lead exposure in terms of lead in fingerbone, lead in blood and time of exposure has been developed and can be used, e.g. for retrospective blood lead estimates if the period of exposure and the current fingerbone lead is known. This will be of value for the evaluation of toxic effects of long-term lead exposure when data on previous lead levels are lacking. In total, in vivo measurements of mercury, cadmium and lead give unique information, which has shown to be an important tool for understanding of metal kinetics and toxicity. If the precision and accuracy of the method can be further improved, the technique will also have a given place in the clinical practice. 168 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Concentration of Lead, Mercury, Cadmium, Aluminum, Arsenic and Manganese in Umbilical Cord Blood of Jamaican Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Rahbar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the concentrations of lead, mercury, cadmium, aluminum, and manganese in umbilical cord blood of Jamaican newborns and to explore the possible association between concentrations of these elements and certain birth outcomes. Based on data from 100 pregnant mothers and their 100 newborns who were enrolled from Jamaica in 2011, the arithmetic mean (standard deviation concentrations of cord blood lead, mercury, aluminum, and manganese were 0.8 (1.3 μg/dL, 4.4 (2.4 μg/L, 10.9 (9.2 μg/L, and 43.7 (17.7 μg/L, respectively. In univariable General Linear Models, the geometric mean cord blood aluminum concentration was higher for children whose mothers had completed their education up to high school compared to those whose mothers had any education beyond high school (12.2 μg/L vs. 6.4 μg/L; p < 0.01. After controlling for maternal education level and socio-economic status (through ownership of a family car, the cord blood lead concentration was significantly associated with head circumference (adjusted p < 0.01. Our results not only provide levels of arsenic and the aforementioned metals in cord blood that could serve as a reference for the Jamaican population, but also replicate previously reported significant associations between cord blood lead concentrations and head circumference at birth in other populations.

  14. A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing using environment-friendly slurry for mercury cadmium telluride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Ping; Guo, Dongming; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is developed for mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) semiconductors. Firstly, fixed-abrasive lapping is used to machine the MCT wafers, and the lapping solution is deionized water. Secondly, the MCT wafers are polished using the developed CMP slurry. The CMP slurry consists of mainly SiO2 nanospheres, H2O2, and malic and citric acids, which are different from previous CMP slurries, in which corrosive and toxic chemical reagents are usually employed. Finally, the polished MCT wafers are cleaned and dried by deionized water and compressed air, respectively. The novel approach of CMP is environment-friendly. Surface roughness Ra, and peak-to-valley (PV) values of 0.45, and 4.74 nm are achieved, respectively on MCT wafers after CMP. The first and second passivating processes are observed in electrochemical measurements on MCT wafers. The fundamental mechanisms of CMP are proposed according to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. Malic and citric acids dominate the first passivating process, and the CMP slurry governs the second process. Te4+3d peaks are absent after CMP induced by the developed CMP slurry, indicating the removing of oxidized films on MCT wafers, which is difficult to achieve using single H2O2 and malic and citric acids solutions.

  15. Comparative analysis on the effect of Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) in reducing cadmium, mercury and lead accumulation in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka R; Nwokocha, Magdalene I; Aneto, Imaria; Obi, Joshua; Udekweleze, Damian C; Olatunde, Bukola; Owu, Daniel U; Iwuala, Moses O

    2012-06-01

    L. esculentum (tomato) contain compounds with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, able to synthesize metal chelating proteins. We examined the ability of fruit extract to protect against mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the liver. Rats were fed on tomato mixed with rat chow (10% w/w), while Hg (10 ppm), Cd (200 ppm) and Pb (100 ppm) was given in drinking water. Tomato was administered together with the metals (group 2), a week after exposure (group 3) or a week before metal exposure (group 4) for a period of six weeks. The metal accumulations in the liver were determined using AAS. There was a significant (Ptomato to Cd and Hg accumulation but not to Pb (PTomato reduces uptake while enhancing the elimination of these metals in a time dependent manner. The highest hepatoprotective effect was to Cd followed by Hg and least to Pb. Its administration is beneficial in reducing heavy metal accumulation in the liver. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Lead, Mercury and Selenium Concentrations in Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) from the New Jersey Pine Barrens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Zappalorti, Robert; Pittfield, Taryn; DeVito, Emile

    2017-05-01

    Top trophic level predators are at risk from bioaccumulation of heavy metals from their prey. Using nondestructively collected tissues as a method of assessing metal concentrations in snakes is useful for populations that are threatened or declining. This paper reports concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se) in tissues of Northern pine snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) from the New Jersey Pine Barrens, a relatively pristine, undisturbed habitat. We also determined if skin is an appropriate indicator of internal concentrations and identified the factors (tissue, year of collection, length, sex) that might explain variations in metal concentrations. Because they can grow to 2-m long and live for 25 years, we suggest that these snakes might accumulate heavy metals. Multiple regression models were significant, explaining 16% (lead) to 61% (mercury) of variation by tissue type. For mercury and chromium, size also was significant. The highest concentrations were in liver and kidney for all metals, except chromium and lead. Mercury concentrations in tissues were within the range reported for other snakes and were below effects concentrations in reptiles. The concentrations in skin were correlated with all internal tissues for mercury and for all internal tissues except heart for cadmium. These data show that shed skin can be used as an indicator of metals in pine snakes and that, at present, concentrations of heavy metals in this population are within the range of those found in other snake species from uncontaminated sites.

  17. Hair mercury and urinary cadmium levels in Belgian children and their mothers within the framework of the COPHES/DEMOCOPHES projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirard, Catherine, E-mail: c.pirard@chu.ulg.ac.be [CHU of Liege, Laboratory of Clinical, Forensic and Environmental Toxicology, CHU (B35), 4000 Liege (Belgium); Koppen, Gudrun, E-mail: gudrun.koppen@vito.be [Flemish Institute of Technological Research, Environmental Risk and Health Unit, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Cremer, Koen, E-mail: Koen.DeCremer@wiv-isp.be [Scientific Institute of Public Health, Juliette Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Van Overmeire, Ilse, E-mail: ilse.vanovermeire@wiv-isp.be [Scientific Institute of Public Health, Juliette Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Govarts, Eva, E-mail: eva.govarts@vito.be [Flemish Institute of Technological Research, Environmental Risk and Health Unit, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Dewolf, Marie-Christine, E-mail: marie_christine.dewolf@hainaut.be [Provincial Institute Hainaut Vigilance Sanitaire — Hainaut Hygiène Publique en (HVS-HPH), Boulevard Sainctelette, 55, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Van De Mieroop, Els, E-mail: Els.VanDeMieroop@pih.provant.be [Provincial Institute for Hygiene (PIH), Boomgaardstraat 22 bus 1, 2600 Antwerpen (Belgium); Aerts, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.aerts@milieu.belgie.be [Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment, Place Victor Horta 40/10, 1060 Brussels (Belgium); Biot, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.biot@environnement.belgique.be [Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment, Place Victor Horta 40/10, 1060 Brussels (Belgium); Casteleyn, Ludwine, E-mail: Ludwine.Casteleyn@med.kuleuven.be [University of Leuven, Center for Human Genetics, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Kolossa-Gehring, Marike, E-mail: marike.kolossa@uba.de [Federal Environment Agency, Corrensplatz 1, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Schwedler, Gerda, E-mail: Gerda.Schwedler@uba.de [Federal Environment Agency, Corrensplatz 1, 14195 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2014-02-01

    A harmonized human biomonitoring pilot study was set up within the frame of the European projects DEMOCOPHES and COPHES. In 17 European countries, biomarkers of some environmental pollutants, including urinary cadmium and hair mercury, were measured in children and their mothers in order to obtain European-wide comparison values on these chemicals. The Belgian participant population consisted in 129 school children (6–11 years) and their mothers (≤ 45 years) living in urban or rural areas of Belgium. The geometric mean levels for mercury in hair were 0.383 μg/g and 0.204 μg/g for respectively mothers and children. Cadmium in mother's and children's urine was detected at a geometric mean concentration of respectively 0.21 and 0.04 μg/l. For both biomarkers, levels measured in the mothers and their child were correlated. While the urinary cadmium levels increased with age, no trend was found for hair mercury content, except the fact that mothers hold higher levels than children. The hair mercury content increased significantly with the number of dental amalgam fillings, explaining partially the higher levels in the mothers by their higher presence rate of these amalgams compared to children. Fish or seafood consumption was the other main parameter determining the mercury levels in hair. No relationship was found between smoking status and cadmium or mercury levels, but the studied population included very few smokers. Urinary cadmium levels were higher in both mothers and children living in urban areas, while for mercury this difference was only significant for children. Our small population showed urinary cadmium and hair mercury levels lower than the health based guidelines suggested by the WHO or the JECFA (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives). Only 1% had cadmium level slightly higher than the German HBM-I value (1 μg/l for adults), and 9% exceeded the 1 μg mercury/g hair suggested by the US EPA. - Highlights: • Hair mercury and

  18. Lead, cadmium and mercury in the blood of the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) from the coast of Sinaloa, Gulf of California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Miriam; Castillo-Guerrero, José Alfredo; Ruelas-Inzunza, Jorge; Fernández, Guillermo

    2016-09-15

    We used blood samples of the Blue-footed Booby, considering sex (female and male) and age-class (adult and chick) of individuals at different breeding stages during two breeding seasons (2010-2011 and 2011-2012) in Isla El Rancho, Sinaloa, to determine lead, cadmium, and mercury concentrations. Lead and cadmium concentrations were below our detection limit (0.05 and 0.36ppm, respectively). A higher concentration of mercury was found in early stages of breeding, likely related to changes in mercury environmental availability. Mercury concentrations in adults did not relate with their breeding output. Males and adults had higher mercury concentration than females and chicks. We provide information of temporal, sex and age-related variations in the concentrations of mercury in blood of the Blue-footed Booby. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bioaccumulation of arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and selenium in the benthic and pelagic food chain of Lake Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Leeves, Sara Ann

    2011-01-01

    Increased anthropogenic release of potentially toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and selenium (Se) into freshwater ecosystems over the past century has caused much concern. These elements are well known toxicants in aquatic ecosystems and may exert toxic effects even if present at relatively low concentrations in organisms. In this study, bioaccumulation of As, Cd, Hg, Pb and Se in the pelagic and benthic food chain of Lake Baikal have been inves...

  20. Concentrations of cadmium, mercury and selenium in common eider ducks in the eastern Canadian arctic: Influence of reproductive stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, Mark [Environment Canada, Prairie and Northern Wildlife Research Centre, 115 Perimeter Rd., Saskatoon, SK, S7N 0X4 (Canada)]. E-mail: mark.wayland@ec.gc.ca; Gilchrist, H. Grant [Canadian Wildlife Service, Prairie and Northern Region, Suite 301, 5204-50th St., Yellowknife, NT, X1A 1E2 (Canada); Neugebauer, Ewa [Environment Canada, National Wildlife Research Centre, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Dr., Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    Concentrations and total organ content of mercury, selenium and cadmium, as well as liver, kidney and body mass were determined in female common eiders from 1997 to 2000 at the East Bay Migratory Bird Sanctuary in the eastern Canadian arctic. In 1997 and 1999, female eiders were collected during the pre-nesting period when they eat copious amounts of food and gain substantial weight in preparation for the rigours of nesting. In 1998 and 1999, female eiders were collected during the mid to late stages of the nesting period when they eat very little, if at all, and, as a consequence undergo dramatic weight loss. Total body mass, liver mass and kidney mass were highest in pre-nesting birds, especially in 1997. They were significantly lower in nesting birds collected in 1998 and 2000. In contrast, mercury and cadmium concentrations were lowest in pre-nesting birds collected in 1997 and 1999 and increased to significantly higher concentrations in nesting birds collected in 1998 and 2000. In contrast to these results, the total contents of mercury in liver and cadmium in kidney did not change significantly over the 4-year period. Hepatic selenium concentrations were relatively stable over the 4-year study period while changes in the total content of selenium in the liver paralleled changes in liver mass and body mass. The results suggest that mercury and cadmium concentrations in female common eiders change in response to normal changes in body and organ mass that occur during the reproductive period. Thus, it may be important to consider body condition or reproductive stage when using common eiders (and perhaps other species of sea ducks) in biomonitoring studies or when interpreting concentrations of metals in tissues in terms of the risk they pose to these ducks.

  1. Mercury chloride-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... Key words: Mercury chloride, vitamins C and E, oxidative stress, erythrocytes, in vitro. ... of free radicals induced by oxidative damage to lipids and lipoproteins in various cellular ... metals toxicity in different experimental systems ..... vitamins C, E and beta carotene aganist gamma-ray-induced DNA damage ...

  2. Birth outcome measures and maternal exposure to heavy metals (lead, cadmium and mercury) in Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Shinwari, Neptune; Mashhour, Abdullah; Rabah, Abdullah

    2014-03-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the association between exposure to heavy metals (lead, cadmium and mercury) during pregnancy and birth outcomes in 1578 women aged 16-50 years who delivered in Al-Kharj hospital, Saudi Arabia, in 2005 and 2006. The levels of lead, cadmium and mercury were measured in umbilical cord blood, maternal blood and the placenta. Outcome variables were anthropometric measures taken at birth, along with the risk of being small-for-gestational age (SGA). We selected the 10th percentile as the cutoff for dichotomizing measures of birth outcome. Cadmium, despite its partial passage through the placenta had the most prominent effect on several measures of birth outcome. After adjustment for potential confounders, logistic regression models revealed that crown-heel length (p=0.034), the Apgar 5-minute score (p=0.004), birth weight (p=0.015) and SGA (p=0.049) were influenced by cadmium in the umbilical cord blood. Significant decreases in crown-heel length (p=0.007) and placental thickness (p=0.022) were seen with higher levels of cadmium in maternal blood. As placental cadmium increased, cord length increased (p=0.012) and placental thickness decreased (p=0.032). Only lead levels in maternal blood influenced placental thickness (p=0.011). Mercury in both umbilical cord and maternal blood was marginally associated with placental thickness and placental weight, respectively. Conversely, placental mercury levels significantly influenced head circumference (p=0.017), the Apgar 5-minute score (p=0.01) and cord length (p=0.026). The predictions of these models were further assessed with the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating curves (ROCs), which were modest (larger than 0.5 and smaller than 0.7). The independence of gestational age or preterm births on the observed effect of metals on some measures of birth outcome, suggested detrimental effects of exposure on fetal development. The magnitude of the estimated effects

  3. In situ reduction and functionalization of graphene oxide with l-cysteine for simultaneous electrochemical determination of cadmium(ii), lead(ii), copper(ii), and mercury(ii) ions

    KAUST Repository

    Muralikrishna, S. N.

    2014-01-01

    One pot reduction and functionalization of graphene oxide (GO) with l-cysteine (l-cys-rGO) at the edges and basal planes of the carbon layers are presented. The l-cys-rGO was characterized by X-ray diffraction studies (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated infrared spectroscopy (ATIR), and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmittance electron microscopy (TEM). The l-cys-rGO was further utilized for the simultaneous electrochemical quantification of environmentally harmful metal ions such as, Cd2+, Pb2+, Cu2+ and Hg2+. Detection limits obtained for these metal ions were 0.366, 0.416, 0.261 and 1.113 μg L-1 respectively. The linear range obtained for Cd2+, Cu2+ and Hg2+ was 0.4 to 2.0 μM and for Pb2+ was 0.4 to 1.2 μM. The detection limits were found to be less than the World Health Organization (WHO) limits. The developed protocol was applied for the determination of the above metal ions in various environmental samples and the results obtained were validated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This journal is

  4. Two-color detector: Mercury-cadmium-telluride as a terahertz and infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizov, F.; Zabudsky, V.; Petryakov, V.; Golenkov, A.; Andreyeva, K.; Tsybrii, Z. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Dvoretskii, S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics of SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, issues associated with the development of infrared (IR) and terahertz (THz) radiation detectors based on HgCdTe are discussed. Two-color un-cooled and cooled to 78 K narrow-gap mercury-cadmium-telluride semiconductor thin layers with antennas were considered both as sub-THz (sub-THz) direct detection bolometers and 3–10 μm IR photoconductors. The noise equivalent power (NEP) for one of the detectors studied at ν ≈ 140 GHz reaches NEP{sub 300 K} ≈ 4.5 × 10{sup −10} W/Hz{sup 1/2} and NEP{sub 78 K} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −9} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. The same detector used as an IR photoconductor showed the responsivity at temperatures T = 78 K and 300 K with signal-to-noise ratio S/N ≈ 750 and 50, respectively, under illumination by using IR monochromator and globar as a thermal source.

  5. Directional solidification of mercury cadmium telluride during the second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillies, D.C.; Lehoczky, S.L.; Szofran, F.R.; Watring, D.A.; Alexander, H.A.; Jerman, G.A. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    As a solid solution semiconductor having a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  6. Mercury and cadmium in ringed seals in the Canadian Arctic: Influence of location and diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tanya M., E-mail: tanya.brown@mun.ca [Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X9 (Canada); Fisk, Aaron T. [Great Lakes Institute of Environmental Research, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4 (Canada); Wang, Xiaowa [Environment Canada, Canada Centre for Inland Waters, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, Ontario L7R 4A6 (Canada); Ferguson, Steven H. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N6 (Canada); Young, Brent G. [University of Manitoba, 500 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Reimer, Ken J. [Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Military College of Canada, PO Box 17000, Stn Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4 (Canada); Muir, Derek C.G. [Environment Canada, Canada Centre for Inland Waters, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, Ontario L7R 4A6 (Canada)

    2016-03-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (THg) and total cadmium (TCd) were determined in muscle and liver of ringed seals (Pusa hispida) from up to 14 locations across the Canadian Arctic. Location, trophic position (TP) and relative carbon source best predicted the THg and TCd concentrations in ringed seals. THg concentrations in ringed seals were highest in the western Canadian Arctic (Beaufort Sea), whereas TCd was highest in the eastern Canadian Arctic (Hudson Bay and Labrador). A positive relationship between THg and TP and a negative relationship between THg and relative carbon source contributed to the geographical patterns observed and elevated THg levels at certain sites. In contrast, a negative relationship between TCd and TP was found, indicating that high TCd concentrations are related to seals feeding more on invertebrates than fish. Feeding ecology appears to play an important role in THg and TCd levels in ringed seals, with biomagnification driving elevated THg levels and a dependence on low-trophic position prey resulting in high TCd concentrations. The present study shows that both natural geological differences and diet variability among regions explain the spatial patterns for THg and TCd concentrations in ringed seals. - Highlights: • Diet and location influenced THg and Cd in ringed seals across the Canadian Arctic. • Biomagnification processes contribute to elevated THg levels in the western Arctic. • Consuming low-trophic position prey explains high Cd levels in the eastern Arctic.

  7. Optical behaviour of cadmium and mercury free eco-friendly lamp nanophosphor for display devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnesh Tiwari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the synthesis of cadmium and mercury free lamp (Y, GdBO3: Eu3+ phosphor which is in nano range useful for display device application. The phosphor doped with Eu3+ was synthesized by the solid state reaction method which is suitable for large scale production and eco-friendly. The prepared phosphor was characterized by the X-ray diffraction technique (XRD, field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The optical behaviour of the prepared phosphor was determined by photoluminescence (PL spectra recorded in room temperature. The PL excitation spectra were found at 470 nm and the emission spectra cover all visible regions (419–625 nm which indicate that the prepared phosphor can act as a single host for white light emitting diode (WLED application and verified by Internationale de I’Eclairage (CIE techniques. The thermoluminescence (TL glow curve was recorded for Eu3+ doped (Y, GdBO3 phosphor. The TL glow curve was recorded for UV, beta and gamma irradiations and also the kinetic parameters were calculated. In addition to this trap parameters of prepared phosphor were studied using computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD.

  8. Ethnic Kawasaki Disease Risk Associated with Blood Mercury and Cadmium in U.S. Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Yeter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD primarily affects children <5 years of age (75%–80% and is currently the leading cause of acquired heart disease in developed nations. Even when residing in the West, East Asian children are 10 to 20 times more likely to develop KD. We hypothesized cultural variations influencing pediatric mercury (Hg exposure from seafood consumption may mediate ethnic KD risk among children in the United States. Hospitalization rates of KD in US children aged 0–4 years (n = 10,880 and blood Hg levels in US children aged 1–5 years (n = 713 were determined using separate US federal datasets. Our cohort primarily presented with blood Hg levels <0.1 micrograms (µg per kg bodyweight (96.5% that are considered normal and subtoxic. Increased ethnic KD risk was significantly associated with both increasing levels and detection rates of blood Hg or cadmium (Cd in a linear dose-responsive manner between ethnic African, Asian, Caucasian, and Hispanic children in the US (p ≤ 0.05. Increasing low-dose exposure to Hg or Cd may induce KD or contribute to its later development in susceptible children. However, our preliminary results require further replication in other ethnic populations, in addition to more in-depth examination of metal exposure and toxicokinetics.

  9. Arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury in canned sardines commercially available in eastern Kentucky, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiber, John G

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen samples of canned sardines, originating from six countries and sold in eastern Kentucky, USA, were analyzed in composites of 3-4 fish each for total arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) and for mercury (Hg) by thermal decomposition amalgamation and AAS. Results in μg/g wet: As 0.49-1.87 (mean: 1.06), Cd<0.01-0.07 (0.03), Pb<0.06-0.27 (0.11), Hg ND <0.09. Values fall generally within readings reported by others, but no internationally agreed upon guidelines have yet been set for As or Cd in canned or fresh fish. The incidence of cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with As ingestion is extraordinarily high here. With the role of food-borne As in human illness presently under scrutiny and its maximum allowable limits in fish being reviewed, more studies of this nature are recommended, especially considering the potential importance of small pelagic fishes as future seafood of choice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of cadmium and mercury on the upper part of skeletal muscle glycolysis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Ramírez-Bajo

    Full Text Available The effects of pre-incubation with mercury (Hg(2+ and cadmium (Cd(2+ on the activities of individual glycolytic enzymes, on the flux and on internal metabolite concentrations of the upper part of glycolysis were investigated in mouse muscle extracts. In the range of metal concentrations analysed we found that only hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, the enzymes that shared the control of the flux, were inhibited by Hg(2+ and Cd(2+. The concentrations of the internal metabolites glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate did not change significantly when Hg(2+ and Cd(2+ were added. A mathematical model was constructed to explore the mechanisms of inhibition of Hg(2+ and Cd(2+ on hexokinase and phosphofructokinase. Equations derived from detailed mechanistic models for each inhibition were fitted to the experimental data. In a concentration-dependent manner these equations describe the observed inhibition of enzyme activity. Under the conditions analysed, the integral model showed that the simultaneous inhibition of hexokinase and phosphofructokinase explains the observation that the concentrations of glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate did not change as the heavy metals decreased the glycolytic flux.

  11. Effects of cadmium and mercury on the upper part of skeletal muscle glycolysis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Bajo, Maria José; de Atauri, Pedro; Ortega, Fernando; Westerhoff, Hans V; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Centelles, Josep J; Cascante, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The effects of pre-incubation with mercury (Hg(2+)) and cadmium (Cd(2+)) on the activities of individual glycolytic enzymes, on the flux and on internal metabolite concentrations of the upper part of glycolysis were investigated in mouse muscle extracts. In the range of metal concentrations analysed we found that only hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, the enzymes that shared the control of the flux, were inhibited by Hg(2+) and Cd(2+). The concentrations of the internal metabolites glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate did not change significantly when Hg(2+) and Cd(2+) were added. A mathematical model was constructed to explore the mechanisms of inhibition of Hg(2+) and Cd(2+) on hexokinase and phosphofructokinase. Equations derived from detailed mechanistic models for each inhibition were fitted to the experimental data. In a concentration-dependent manner these equations describe the observed inhibition of enzyme activity. Under the conditions analysed, the integral model showed that the simultaneous inhibition of hexokinase and phosphofructokinase explains the observation that the concentrations of glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate did not change as the heavy metals decreased the glycolytic flux.

  12. Imprinted genes and the environment: links to the toxic metals arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E; Nye, Monica D; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K; Fry, Rebecca C

    2014-06-11

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology.

  13. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  14. Oxidative stress and DNA damage induced by cadmium in the human keratinocyte HaCaT cell line: role of glutathione in the resistance to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzengue, Yves; Steiman, Régine; Garrel, Catherine; Lefèbvre, Emmanuel; Guiraud, Pascale

    2008-01-14

    Cadmium affects the cellular homeostasis and generates damage via complex mechanisms involving interactions with other metals and oxidative stress induction. In this work we used a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) as a model to study the oxidative damage induced by cadmium to cellular macromolecules, its effect on the antioxidant systems and the role of glutathione in cell protection toward cadmium toxicity. The cells were incubated for 24 and 48 h with cadmium (3, 15, 50 and 100 microM). High doses of cadmium were required to induce a cytotoxicity: 100 microM lead to 30% mortality after 24h and 50% after 48 h. The oxidation of lipids and proteins and the DNA damage, respectively, assessed by thiobarbituric acid reactants determination, thiol group measurement and comet assay, were observed for 50-100 microM cadmium. The cytotoxic effects were strongly correlated to the cellular cadmium content. The glutathione peroxidase and the catalase activities were decreased, while the glutathione reductase activity and the glutathione concentration were increased after cadmium treatment. The superoxide dismutases activities were unchanged. A depletion in glutathione prior to cadmium exposure increased the cytotoxic effects and provoked DNA damage. Our results suggested that the hydroxyl radical could be the major compound involved in the oxidative stress generated by cadmium and that glutathione could play a major role in the protection of HaCaT cells from cytotoxicity but mostly from DNA damage induced by cadmium.

  15. Impact of synbiotic diets including inulin, Bacillus coagulans and Lactobacillus plantarum on intestinal microbiota of rat exposed to cadmium and mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dornoush Jafarpour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of two probiotics and a prebiotic (inulin on intestinal microbiota of rats exposed to cadmium and mercury. Fifty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into nine groups. All groups except control group were fed standard rat chow with 5% inulin and treated as follows: i control (standard diet, ii Lactobacillus plantarum- treated group (1×109 CFU/day, iii Bacillus coagulans-treated group (1×109 spores/day, iv cadmium-treated group (200 μg/rat/day, v L. plantarum and cadmium-treated group, vi B. coagulans and cadmium-treated group, vii mercury-treated group (10 μg/rat/day, viii L. plantarum and mercurytreated group, ix B. coagulans and mercurytreated group. Cadmium, mercury and probiotics were daily gavaged to individual rats for 42 days. Treatment effects on intestinal microbiota composition of rats were determined. Data showed that cadmium and mercury accumulation in rat intestine affected the gastrointestinal tract and had a reduction effect on all microbial counts (total aerobic bacteria, total anaerobic bacteria, total Lactic acid bacteria, L. plantarum and B. coagulans counts compared to the control group. It was also observed that application of synbiotics in synbiotic and heavy metals-treated groups had a significant effect and increased the number of fecal bacteria compared to the heavy metals groups. Based on our study, it can be concluded that L. plantarum and B. coagulans along with prebiotic inulin play a role in protection against cadmium and mercury inhibitory effect and have the potential to be a beneficial supplement in rats’ diets.

  16. Environmental Exposures to Lead, Mercury, and Cadmium and Hearing Loss in Adults and Adolescents: KNHANES 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hyeing; Park, Sung Kyun

    2017-06-08

    The prevalence of hearing loss increases rapidly with aging. Hearing loss is common in all age groups, even in young adults and adolescents. A growing body of evidence has suggested that heavy metals have ototoxic effects, yet few epidemiological studies have investigated the association between heavy metals and hearing loss in a general population that includes adults and adolescents. We examined the association between environmental exposures to lead, mercury, and cadmium and the risk of hearing loss in adults and adolescents while controlling for potential confounding factors, including noise exposures and clinical factors. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 5,187 adults and 853 adolescents in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2012. Pure-tone average (PTA) of hearing thresholds at high frequency (3, 4, and 6 kHz) were computed, and hearing loss was defined as a PTA>25 dB in adults and PTA>15 dB in adolescents. In adults, the highest (vs. lowest) quartiles of blood lead and cadmium were associated with 1.70 (95% CI: 1.25, 2.31) and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.05, 2.05) odds ratios for high-frequency hearing loss (p-trendadults or adolescents. The results of the present study suggest that exposure to environmental lead and cadmium in adults and exposure to environmental cadmium in adolescents may play a role in the risk of hearing loss. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP565.

  17. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and treatments are needed. ELEMENTAL MERCURY Inhaled elemental mercury poisoning may be difficult to treat. The person may ... metals from the body INORGANIC MERCURY For inorganic mercury poisoning, treatment often begins with supportive care. The person ...

  18. Novel oral detoxification of mercury, cadmium, and lead with thiol-modified nanoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangvanich, Thanapon; Morry, Jingga; Fox, Cade; Ngamcherdtrakul, Worapol; Goodyear, Shaun; Castro, David; Fryxell, Glen E; Addleman, Raymond S; Summers, Anne O; Yantasee, Wassana

    2014-04-23

    We have developed a thiol-modified nanoporous silica material (SH-SAMMS) as an oral therapy for the prevention and treatment of heavy metal poisoning. SH-SAMMS has been reported to be highly efficient at capturing heavy metals in biological fluids and water. Herein, SH-SAMMS was examined for efficacy and safety in both in vitro and in vivo animal models for the oral detoxification of heavy metals. In simulated gastrointestinal fluids, SH-SAMMS had a very high affinity (Kd) for methyl mercury (MeHg(I)), inorganic mercury (Hg(II)), lead (Pb(II)), and cadmium (Cd(II)) and was superior to other SAMMS with carboxylic acid or phosphonic acid ligands or commercially available metal chelating sorbents. SH-SAMMS also effectively removed Hg from biologically digested fish tissue with no effect on most nutritional minerals found in fish. SH-SAMMS could hold Hg(II) and MeHg(I) tightly inside the nanosize pores, thus preventing bacteria from converting them to more absorbable forms. Rats fed a diet containing MeHg(I), Cd(II), and Pb(II) and SH-SAMMS for 2 weeks had blood Hg levels significantly lower than rats fed the metal-rich diet only. Upon cessation of the metal-rich diet, continued administration of SH-SAMMS for 2 weeks facilitated faster and more extensive clearance of Hg than in animals not continued on oral SH-SAMMS. Rats receiving SH-SAMMS also suffered less weight loss as a result of the metal exposure. Retention of Hg and Cd in major organs was lowest in rats fed with SH-SAMMS throughout the entire four weeks. The reduction of blood Pb by SH-SAMMS was significant. SH-SAMMS was safe to intestinal epithelium model (Caco-2) and common intestinal bacteria (Escherichia coli). Altogether, it has great potential as a new oral drug for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. This new application is enabled by the installation of tailored interfacial chemistry upon nontoxic nanoporous materials.

  19. Total mercury, cadmium and lead levels in main export fish of Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinadasa, B K K K; Edirisinghe, E M R K B; Wickramasinghe, I

    2014-01-01

    Total mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) levels were determined in the muscle of four commercialised exported fish species Thunnus albacares (yellowfin tuna), Xiphias gladius (swordfish), Makaira indica (black marlin) and Lutjanus sp (red snapper) collected from the Indian Ocean, Sri Lanka, during July 2009-March 2010 and measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results show that swordfish (n = 176) contained the highest total Hg (0.90 ± 0.51 mg/kg) and Cd (0.09 ± 0.13 mg/kg) levels, whereas yellowfin tuna (n = 140) contained the highest Pb levels (0.11 ± 0.16 mg/kg). The lowest total Hg (0.16 ± 0.11 mg/kg), Cd (0.01 ± 0.01 mg/kg) and Pb (0.04 ± 0.04 mg/kg) levels were found in red snapper (n = 28). Black marlin (n = 24) contained moderate levels of total Hg (0.49 ± 0.37), Cd (0.02 ± 0.02) and Pb (0.05 ± 0.05). Even though there are some concerns during certain months of the year, this study demonstrates the safety of main export fish varieties in terms of total Hg, Cd and Pb.

  20. Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in surface soils, Pueblo, Colorado: Implications for population health risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diawara, D.M.; Litt, J.S.; Unis, D.; Alfonso, N.; Martinez, L.A.; Crock, J.G.; Smith, D.B.; Carsella, J.

    2006-01-01

    Decades of intensive industrial and agricultural practices as well as rapid urbanization have left communities like Pueblo, Colorado facing potential health threats from pollution of its soils, air, water and food supply. To address such concerns about environmental contamination, we conducted an urban geochemical study of the city of Pueblo to offer insights into the potential chemical hazards in soil and inform priorities for future health studies and population interventions aimed at reducing exposures to inorganic substances. The current study characterizes the environmental landscape of Pueblo in terms of heavy metals, and relates this to population distributions. Soil was sampled within the city along transects and analyzed for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb). We also profiled Pueblo's communities in terms of their socioeconomic status and demographics. ArcGIS 9.0 was used to perform exploratory spatial data analysis and generate community profiles and prediction maps. The topsoil in Pueblo contains more As, Cd, Hg and Pb than national soil averages, although average Hg content in Pueblo was within reported baseline ranges. The highest levels of As concentrations ranged between 56.6 and 66.5 ppm. Lead concentrations exceeded 300 ppm in several of Pueblo's residential communities. Elevated levels of lead are concentrated in low-income Hispanic and African-American communities. Areas of excessively high Cd concentration exist around Pueblo, including low income and minority communities, raising additional health and environmental justice concerns. Although the distribution patterns vary by element and may reflect both industrial and non-industrial sources, the study confirms that there is environmental contamination around Pueblo and underscores the need for a comprehensive public health approach to address environmental threats in urban communities. ?? Springer 2006.

  1. Lead, mercury, and cadmium exposure and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Stephani [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Arora, Monica [Department of Psychiatry, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68131 (United States); Fernandez, Cristina [Department of Pediatrics, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68131 (United States); Landero, Julio; Caruso, Joseph [Metallomics Center, Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Chen, Aimin, E-mail: aimin.chen@uc.edu [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Background: There is limited research examining the relationship between lead (Pb) exposure and medically diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The role of mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) exposures in ADHD development is even less clear. Objectives: To examine the relationship between Pb, Hg, and Cd and ADHD in children living inside and outside a Lead Investigation Area (LIA) of a former lead refinery in Omaha, NE. Methods: We carried out a case-control study with 71 currently medically diagnosed ADHD cases and 58 controls from a psychiatric clinic and a pediatric clinic inside and outside of the LIA. The participants were matched on age group (5–8, 9–12 years), sex, race (African American or Caucasians and others), and location (inside or outside LIA). We measured whole blood Pb, total Hg, and Cd using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: Inside the LIA, the 27 cases had blood Pb geometric mean (GM) 1.89 µg/dL and the 41 controls had 1.51 µg/dL. Outside the LIA, the 44 cases had blood Pb GM 1.02 µg/dL while the 17 controls had 0.97 µg/dL. After adjustment for matching variables and maternal smoking, socioeconomic status, and environmental tobacco exposure, each natural log unit blood Pb had an odds ratio of 2.52 with 95% confidence interval of 1.07–5.92. Stratification by the LIA indicated similar point estimate but wider CIs. No associations were observed for Hg or Cd. Conclusions: Postnatal Pb exposure may be associated with higher risk of clinical ADHD, but not the postnatal exposure to Hg or Cd. -- Highlights: • Blood Pb levels are associated with ADHD diagnosis in children. • No association was found between blood Cd or Hg levels and ADHD. • Children living close to hazardous waste site need to reduce metal exposure.

  2. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  3. Lead, mercury, and cadmium exposure and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stephani; Arora, Monica; Fernandez, Cristina; Landero, Julio; Caruso, Joseph; Chen, Aimin

    2013-10-01

    There is limited research examining the relationship between lead (Pb) exposure and medically diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The role of mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) exposures in ADHD development is even less clear. To examine the relationship between Pb, Hg, and Cd and ADHD in children living inside and outside a Lead Investigation Area (LIA) of a former lead refinery in Omaha, NE. We carried out a case-control study with 71 currently medically diagnosed ADHD cases and 58 controls from a psychiatric clinic and a pediatric clinic inside and outside of the LIA. The participants were matched on age group (5-8, 9-12 years), sex, race (African American or Caucasians and others), and location (inside or outside LIA). We measured whole blood Pb, total Hg, and Cd using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Inside the LIA, the 27 cases had blood Pb geometric mean (GM) 1.89 µg/dL and the 41 controls had 1.51 µg/dL. Outside the LIA, the 44 cases had blood Pb GM 1.02 µg/dL while the 17 controls had 0.97 µg/dL. After adjustment for matching variables and maternal smoking, socioeconomic status, and environmental tobacco exposure, each natural log unit blood Pb had an odds ratio of 2.52 with 95% confidence interval of 1.07-5.92. Stratification by the LIA indicated similar point estimate but wider CIs. No associations were observed for Hg or Cd. Postnatal Pb exposure may be associated with higher risk of clinical ADHD, but not the postnatal exposure to Hg or Cd. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Scandium-doped zinc cadmium oxide as a new stable n-type oxide thermoelectric material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Li; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn; Bhowmik, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    Scandium-doped zinc cadmium oxide (Sc-doped ZnCdO) is proposed as a new n-type oxide thermoelectric material. The material is sintered in air to maintain the oxygen stoichiometry and avoid instability issues. The successful alloying of CdO with ZnO at a molar ratio of 1 : 9 significantly reduced...... is a good candidate for improving the overall conversion efficiencies in oxide thermoelectric modules. Meanwhile, Sc-doped ZnCdO is robust in air at high temperatures, whereas other n-type materials, such as Al-doped ZnO, will experience rapid degradation of their electrical conductivity and ZT....

  5. What do we know of childhood exposures to metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) in emerging market countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Lindsey M; Mortensen, Mary E; Iossifova, Yulia; Wald, Marlena M; Burgess, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury present potential health risks to children who are exposed through inhalation or ingestion. Emerging Market countries experience rapid industrial development that may coincide with the increased release of these metals into the environment. A literature review was conducted for English language articles from the 21st century on pediatric exposures to arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) top 10 Emerging Market countries: Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, and Turkey. Seventy-six peer-reviewed, published studies on pediatric exposure to metals met the inclusion criteria. The reported concentrations of metals in blood and urine from these studies were generally higher than US reference values, and many studies identified adverse health effects associated with metals exposure. Evidence of exposure to metals in the pediatric population of these Emerging Market countries demonstrates a need for interventions to reduce exposure and efforts to establish country-specific reference values through surveillance or biomonitoring. The findings from review of these 10 countries also suggest the need for country-specific public health policies and clinician education in Emerging Markets.

  6. Contents of cadmium, mercury and lead in fish from the Atlantic sea (Morocco) determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahid, Adil; Hilali, Mustapha; Benlhachimi, Abdeljalil; Bouzid, Taoufiq

    2014-03-15

    As a part of a specific monitoring program, lead (Pb) cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) concentrations in important species of fish from various fishing ports of the southern Kingdom of Morocco (Sardina pilchardus, Scomber scombrus, Plectorhinchus mediterraneus, Trachurus trachurus, Octopus vulgaris, Boops boops, Sarda sarda, Trisopterus capelanus, and Conger conger) were investigated by the Moroccan Reference Laboratory (NRL) for trace elements in foodstuffs of animal origin. The samples were analysed for lead and cadmium by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS); and for mercury by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The results were expressed as μg/g of wet weight (w/w). The levels of Cd, Pb and Hg in muscles of fish were 0.009-0.036, 0.013-0.114 and 0.049-0.194 μg/g, respectively. The present study showed that different metals were present in the sample at different levels but within the maximum residual levels prescribed by the EU for the fish and shellfish from these areas, in general, should cause no health problems for consumers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. What Do We Know of Childhood Exposures to Metals (Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Emerging Market Countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey M. Horton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury present potential health risks to children who are exposed through inhalation or ingestion. Emerging Market countries experience rapid industrial development that may coincide with the increased release of these metals into the environment. A literature review was conducted for English language articles from the 21st century on pediatric exposures to arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in the International Monetary Fund's (IMF top 10 Emerging Market countries: Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, and Turkey. Seventy-six peer-reviewed, published studies on pediatric exposure to metals met the inclusion criteria. The reported concentrations of metals in blood and urine from these studies were generally higher than US reference values, and many studies identified adverse health effects associated with metals exposure. Evidence of exposure to metals in the pediatric population of these Emerging Market countries demonstrates a need for interventions to reduce exposure and efforts to establish country-specific reference values through surveillance or biomonitoring. The findings from review of these 10 countries also suggest the need for country-specific public health policies and clinician education in Emerging Markets.

  8. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skipper, Anthony; Sims, Jennifer N; Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    ... mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG₂) cells...

  9. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic levels in eggs, feathers, and tissues of Canada geese of the New Jersey Meadowlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsipoura, Nellie [New Jersey Audubon Society, 11 Hardscrabble Road, Bernardsville, NJ 07924 (United States); Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Newhouse, Michael [NJ Meadowlands Commission, One DeKorte Park Plaza, Lyndhurst, NJ 07071 (United States); Jeitner, Christian [Division of Life Sciences, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gochfeld, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Mizrahi, David [New Jersey Audubon Society, 11 Hardscrabble Road, Bernardsville, NJ 07924 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The New Jersey Meadowlands are located within the heavily urbanized New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary and have been subject to contamination due to effluent and runoff from industry, traffic, and homes along the Hackensack River and nearby waterways. These extensive wetlands, though heavily impacted by development and pollution, support a wide array of bird and other wildlife species. Persistent contaminants may pose threats to birds in these habitats, affecting reproduction, egg hatchability, nestling survival, and neurobehavioral development. Metals of concern in the Meadowlands include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury. These metals were analyzed in eggs, feathers, muscle, and liver of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) breeding in four wetland sites. We sampled geese collected during control culling (n=26) and collected eggs from goose nests (n=34). Levels of arsenic were below the minimum quantification level (MQL) in most samples, and cadmium and mercury were low in all tissues sampled. Chromium levels were high in feather samples. Mercury levels in eggs of Canada geese, an almost exclusively herbivorous species, were lower (mean {+-}SE 4.29{+-}0.30 {mu}g/g wet weight) than in eggs of omnivorous mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and insectivorous red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) from the Meadowlands, consistent with trophic level differences. However, lead levels were higher in the goose eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) than in the other species. Geese also had higher levels of lead in feathers (1910{+-}386 ng/g) than those seen in Meadowlands passerines. By contrast, muscle and liver lead levels were within the range reported in waterfowl elsewhere, possibly a reflection of metal sequestration in eggs and feathers. Elevated lead levels may be the result of sediment ingestion or ingestion of lead shot and sinkers. Finally, lead levels in goose liver (249{+-}44.7 ng/g) and eggs (161{+-}36.7 ng/g) may pose a

  10. Protective Effect of Cleistocalyx nervosum var. paniala Fruit Extract against Oxidative Renal Damage Caused by Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warut Poontawee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium nephrotoxicity is a serious environmental health problem as it will eventually end up with end stage renal disease. The pathobiochemical mechanism of this toxic heavy metal is related to oxidative stress. This study investigated whether Cleistocalyx nervosum var. paniala fruit extract (CNFE could protect the kidney against oxidative injury caused by cadmium. Initial analysis of the extract revealed antioxidant abilities and high levels of polyphenols, particularly catechin. Its potential renal benefits was further explored in rats treated with vehicle, CNFE, cadmium (2 mg/kg, and cadmium plus CNFE (0.5, 1, 2 g/kg for four weeks. Oxidative renal injury was developed after cadmium exposure as evidenced by blood urea nitrogen and creatinine retention, glomerular filtration reduction, renal structural damage, together with increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, but decreased antioxidant thiols, superoxide dismutase, and catalase in renal tissues. Cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity was diminished in rats supplemented with CNFE, particularly at the doses of 1 and 2 g/kg. It is concluded that CNFE is able to protect against the progression of cadmium nephrotoxicity, mostly via its antioxidant power. The results also point towards a promising role for this naturally-occurring antioxidant to combat other human disorders elicited by disruption of redox homeostasis.

  11. Secondary poisoning of cadmium, copper and mercury: implications for the Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations in water, sediment and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit CE; Wezel AP van; Jager T; Traas TP; CSR

    2000-01-01

    The impact of secondary poisoning on the Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPCs) and Negligible Concentrations (NCs) of cadmium, copper and mercury in water, sediment and soil have been evaluated. Field data on accumulation of these elements by fish, mussels and earthworms were used to derive

  12. Cadmium removal from aqueous solution by green synthesis iron oxide nanoparticles with tangerine peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Miria, Mohammad; Salmani, Mohammad Hossien; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption process by metal oxide nanoparticles has been investigated an effective agent for removing organic and inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of tangerine peel extract as adsorbent for cadmium ions removal from contaminated solution. Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by co-precipitation method and tangerine peel extract was used to prevent accumulation and reduce the diameter of the particles. Effect of various parameters such as contact time, pH, metal concentration and adsorbent dosage was determined on the removal efficiency. The different concentrations of tangerine peel had an impact on the size of nanoparticles. As, increasing the concentration of tangerine peel extract from 2 to 6 % the average size of synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles decreased 200 nm to 50 nm. The maximum removal of cadmium ions (90 %) occurred at pH of 4 and adsorbent dose of 0.4 g/100 ml. Adsorption of cadmium ions by synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles followed Freundlich adsorption model and pseudo-second-order equation. The cadmium ions are usually soluble in acidic pH and the maximum removal of cadmium by green synthesis iron oxide nanoparticles was obtained in the pH of 4, so these nanoparticles can be a good adsorbent for the removal of cadmium from wastewater.

  13. Determining lead, cadmium and mercury in cosmetics using sweeping via dynamic chelation by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Ling; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Chen, Yen-Ling

    2017-03-01

    International limits have been established for metal impurities in cosmetics to prevent overexposure to heavy metal ions. Sweeping via dynamic chelation was developed using capillary electrophoresis to analyze lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) impurities in cosmetics. The sweeping via dynamic chelation mechanism involves a large volume of metal ions being swept by a small quantity of chelating agents that were electrokinetically injected into the capillary to chelate metal ions and increase the detection sensitivity. The optimized conditions were as follows: Firstly, the capillary was rinsed by a 0.6 mM TTAB solution to reverse the EOF. The sample solution, which was diluted using 25 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6.0), was injected into the capillary using a pressure of 3.5 psi for 99.9 s. Then, EDTA was injected at -25 kV for 1 min from the EDTA buffer (25 mM ammonium acetate containing 0.6 mM TTAB and 5 mM EDTA), and the metal ions were swept and stacked simultaneously. Finally, the separation was performed at -20 kV using a separation buffer (100 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6.0)). A small quantity of chelating agents introduced into the capillary could yield 33-, 50- and 100-fold detection improvements for Pb, Cd and Hg, respectively, more sensitive than conventional capillary zone electrophoresis. Correlation coefficients greater than 0.998 indicated that this method exhibited good linearity. The relative standard deviation and relative error were less than 8.7%, indicating high precision and accuracy. The recovery value of the homemade lotion, which was employed to simulate the real sample matrix, was 93-104%, which indicated that the sample matrix does not affect the quantitative results. Finally, commercial cosmetics were employed to demonstrate the feasibility of the method to determine Pb, Cd and Hg without complicated sample pretreatment. Graphical Abstract The procedure of analyzing metal ions in cosmetics by sweeping via dynamic chelation.

  14. Estimation of Seasonal Risk Caused by the Intake of Lead, Mercury and Cadmium through Freshwater Fish Consumption from Urban Water Reservoirs in Arid Areas of Northern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Nevárez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioavailability and hence bioaccumulation of heavy metals in fish species depends on seasonal conditions causing different risks levels to human health during the lifetime. Mercury, cadmium and lead contents in fish from Chihuahua (Mexico water reservoirs have been investigated to assess contamination levels and safety for consumers. Muscle samples of fish were collected across the seasons. Lead and cadmium were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, and mercury by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. The highest concentrations of cadmium (0.235 mg/kg, mercury (0.744 mg/kg and lead (4.298 mg/kg exceeded the maximum levels set by European regulations and Codex Alimentarius. Lead concentrations found in fish from three water reservoirs also surpassed the limit of 1 mg/kg established by Mexican regulations. The provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI suggested by the World Health Organization for methyl mercury (1.6 µg/kg bw per week was exceeded in the spring season (1.94 µg/kg bw per week. This might put consumers at risk of mercury poisoning.

  15. CRYOGENIC TRAPPING OF OXIDIZED MERCURY SPECIES FROM COMBUSTION FLUE GAS. (R827649)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To further understand the speciation and partitioning of mercury species in combustion systems, it is necessary to be able to identify and quantitate the various forms of oxidized mercury. Currently accepted methods for speciating mercury (Ontario Hydro Method, EPA Method 29, ...

  16. Modelling of the mercury loss in fluorescent lamps under the influence of metal oxide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Abreu, A.; Mayer, J.; Lenk, D.; Horn, S.; Konrad, A.; Tidecks, R.

    2016-11-01

    The mercury transport and loss mechanisms in the metal oxide coatings of mercury low pressure discharge fluorescent lamps have been investigated. An existing model based on a ballistic process is discussed in the context of experimental mercury loss data. Two different approaches to the modeling of the mercury loss have been developed. The first one is based on mercury transition rates between the plasma, the coating, and the glass without specifying the underlying physical processes. The second one is based on a transport process driven by diffusion and a binding process of mercury reacting to mercury oxide inside the layers. Moreover, we extended the diffusion based model to handle multi-component coatings. All approaches are applied to describe mercury loss experiments under the influence of an Al 2 O 3 coating.

  17. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that gas-phase OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming gas-phase Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux to the Arctic of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by

  18. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Skipper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a heavy metal that has been shown to cause its toxicity in humans and animals. Many documented studies have shown that cadmium produces various genotoxic effects such as DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Ailments such as bone disease, renal damage, and several forms of cancer are attributed to overexposure to cadmium.  Although there have been numerous studies examining the effects of cadmium in animal models and a few case studies involving communities where cadmium contamination has occurred, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells. To test our hypothesis, cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Lipid hydroperoxide content stress was estimated by lipid peroxidation assay. Genotoxic damage was tested by the means of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment (Annexin-V/PI assay. The result of MTT assay indicated that cadmium chloride induces toxicity to HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, showing a 48 hr-LD50 of 3.6 µg/mL. Data generated from lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant (p < 0.05 increase of hydroperoxide production, specifically at the highest concentration tested. Data obtained from the Comet assay indicated that cadmium chloride causes DNA damage in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A strong concentration-response relationship (p < 0.05 was recorded between annexin V positive cells and cadmium chloride exposure. In summary, these in vitro studies provide clear evidence that cadmium chloride induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and programmed cell death in human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells.

  19. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

  20. Preconcentration of cadmium (II) using synergistic extraction with dithizone and trioctylphosphine oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akaiwa, H.; Kawamoto, H.; Koizumi, T.; Schindler, P.W. (Gunma Univ., Kiryu (Japan). Faculty of Technology)

    1982-04-01

    A preconcentration method for cadmium (II) in natural water based on synergistic extraction is described. Cadmium (II) is extracted as the ternary complex Cd (II)-dithizone-TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) from 2.5 dm/sup 3/ of a water sample into 25 cm/sup 3/ of carbon tetrachloride and back-extracted into 10 cm/sup 3/ of 0.2 mol dm/sup -3/ nitric acid. By using this method, cadmium (II) in natural water with levels below the ppb range could be determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

  1. Occupational cadmium exposure-associated oxidative stress and erythrocyte fragility among jewelry workers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Subhabrata; Brashier, Bill B; Sahu, Subhashis

    2014-09-01

    Cadmium-induced pulmonary and renal target organ effects are well-established although its association with oxidative stress and associated hematological effects for human toxicity remain understudied. In a population of cadmium-exposed male jewelry manufacturing workers (n = 32) and referents without direct exposure (n = 21), all with urinary cadmium quantification, we measured plasma antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase), lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde), erythrocyte fragility, and surface irregularity of the erythrocyte membrane. Compared to referents, exposed workers manifested significantly lower plasma antioxidant enzymes, and increased malondialdehyde and erythrocyte fragility (for all, P toxicity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium lead, and selenium in feathers of pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) from Prince William Sound and the Aleutian Islands of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082 (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)], E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Gochfeld, Michael [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Sullivan, Kelsey [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1011 East Tudor Road, Anchorage, Alaska 99503 (United States); P.O. Box 801, Bethel, Maine, 04217 (United States); Irons, David [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1011 East Tudor Road, Anchorage, Alaska 99503 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium were analyzed in the feathers of pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) from breeding colonies in Prince William Sound and in the Aleutian Islands (Amchitka, Kiska) to test the null hypothesis that there were no differences in metal levels as a function of location, gender, or whether the birds were from oiled or unoiled areas in Prince William Sound. Birds from locations with oil from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill in the environment had higher levels of cadmium and lead than those from unoiled places in Prince William Sound, but otherwise there were no differences in metal levels in feathers. The feathers of pigeon guillemots from Prince William Sound had significantly higher levels of cadmium and manganese, but significantly lower levels of mercury than those from Amchitka or Kiska in the Aleutians. Amchitka had the lowest levels of chromium, and Kiska had the highest levels of selenium. There were few gender-related differences, although females had higher levels of mercury and selenium in their feathers than did males. The levels of most metals are below the known effects levels, except for mercury and selenium, which are high enough to potentially pose a risk to pigeon guillemots and to their predators.

  3. Investigate of atmospheric arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury levels in moss species found around Zilkale, by EDXRF Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akçay, Nilay, E-mail: nilay.akcay@erdogan.edu.tr [Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Physics, Rize (Turkey); Batan, Nevzat, E-mail: nbatan@ktu.edu.tr [Karadeniz Technical University, Maçka Vocational School, Trabzon (Turkey); Çinar, Yunus, E-mail: yunus.cinar@erdogan.edu.tr [Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Vocational School of Technical Studies, Rize (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Zilkale is a castle located in Fırtına Valley and it is one of the most important historical structures in Çamlihemşin district of Rize Province in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. The castle surrounded by very high mountains that poke up into the clouds, and it rains here all year round. Tourism businesses or industrial plants are not so much there yet. In recent years, Zilkale region has begun the attract tourist, people on treaking holidays in the Kaçkar. But many domestic and foreign tourists come to this region by own car or tour buses. The aim of this study is to investigate the atmospheric concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury levels in five different moss species collected around Zilkale by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometry. The average concentrations of heavy metals in moss samples ranged from 0.79-4.63 ppm for arsenic, 54.47-143.39 ppm for chromium, 39.97-81.03 ppm for lead. The values of cadmium and mercury were found below the detection limit. This study has shown that Hypnum cupressiforme, Abietinella abietina, Rhytidium rugosum, Plagiomnium undulate, and Thuidium tamariscinum samples collected around Zilkale were used to assess the potential contamination of atmospheric As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg contamination in the region and made important contributions toward the understanding of atmospheric As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg baseline data can be used for identification of changes in the levels of these heavy metals in the studied area.

  4. Expression of Leaf Proteins in Two Cultivars of Bread Wheat under Cadmium and Mercury Stress Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Raeesi Sadati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is an important source of human food. Cadmium and mercury bind to sulfhydryl groups of structural proteins and enzymes and cause inhibition in activity and decrease in protein production or interfere with the regulation of the enzymes. To study the effect of protein expression under different levels of cadmium and mercury, the experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with three replications in Mohaghegh Ardabili University, Ardabil, Iran. Experimental factors consisted of two Gonbad and Tajan bread what cultivars, heavy metals in seven levels (four concentrations of mercuric chloride in 5, 10, 15 and 20 µM and cadmium chloride at two concentrations of 0.25 and 0.5 mM and sampling time after 8 and 16 hours of treatment. The Bradford method was used for quantitative analysis of proteins and 12% SDS-PAGE and two dimensional electrophorese techniques were hired for analysis of their expression. The results showed that under cadmium and mercury stresses, the total protein content increased compared to the control. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins under cadmium stress showed differential expression of the protein spots on the plant leaves, than the control. In general, changes in the expression of proteins under the effect of cadmium stress were divided into two main categories: Spots 9, 10, 13, 14 and 16 belonged to proteins with reduced expression and the spots 1, 2, 8, 19 and 20 belonged to proteins with increased expression, in comparison to non-stressed control. These spots of up regulated proteins were directly related to the defense system against the heavy metal stress.

  5. Effect of selenium on cadmium-induced oxidative stress and esterase activity in rat organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dzobo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal toxicity is a threat mainly in the industrialised world where industry discharges many toxic metals into the environment. We investigated the effects of two metals cadmium and selenium on the cytosolic antioxidant enzymes and esterases in the liver, kidneys and testes of rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=28 were divided equally into four groups: control, cadmium, selenium and cadmium/selenium. Salts of the metals were administered intraperitoneally for 15 days. In the liver, cadmium treatment (1.67 mg/kg per day resulted in a decrease in catalase activity and an increase superoxide dismutase (SOD activity. Selenium treatment (0.23 mg/kg per day resulted in increases in glutathione s-transferase, catalase and DT-diaphorase activities. Treatment with both cadmium and selenium resulted in an increase in glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity. Esterase activities were significantly lower in the presence of cadmium. In the kidney, cadmium treatment caused a decrease in catalase, DT-diaphorase, and SOD activities and selenium supplementation reversed the cadmium-induced decrease in these enzyme activities. Selenium treatment increased catalase and SOD activities in the kidney. In the testis, cadmium treatment decreased GPx and SOD activities, but at the same time increased catalase and DT-diaphorase activities. Esterase activities increased in the presence of selenium in both the kidney and testis. These results suggest that selenium might be toxic to the liver while at the same time play a protective role against cadmium-induced oxidative stress and toxicity in the kidney and testis.

  6. Protective role of pectin against cadmium-induced testicular toxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriem, Khaled M M; Fathi, Gamal E; Salem, Huda A; Akram, Nabil H; Gamil, Sofie A

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium has been classified as an environmental pollutant and human carcinogen. Pectin is a family of complex polysaccharides that function as hydrating agents and cementing materials for the cellulosic network. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of pectin against cadmium-induced testicular toxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into five equal groups. Groups 1 and 2 were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) saline (1 mg/kg) and pectin (50 mg/kg), respectively, two days/weeks over three weeks period. Groups 3-5 were injected i.p. with 1 mg/kg cadmium two days/week while groups 4 and 5 co-administrated i.p. with 25 and 50 mg/kg pectin, respectively, three days/week over three weeks period. The results of the present work revealed that cadmium-exposed rats showed decrease in serum testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and lactate dehydrogenase. Testicular cholesterol, total protein, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase and reduced glutathione levels were also decreased while testicular malondialdehyde level was increased after cadmium injection. On the other hand, serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, sex hormone binding globulin and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase were increased after cadmium exposure. Cadmium also induced sperms loss. Co-administration of pectin with cadmium restores all the above parameters and sperms to the normal levels where pectin at higher dose was more effective than lower one. These results were supported by histochemical investigations. In conclusion, pectin can counteract the testicular toxicity and oxidative stress induced by cadmium and the effect was dose-dependent.

  7. Cadmium-induced oxidative stress in potato tuber

    OpenAIRE

    Andrzej Stroiński; Monika Kozłowska

    2014-01-01

    Short-term treatment of tuber discs of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) with cadmium chloride elevated the concentration of active oxygen species (.O-2, H202) and activated the antioxidative system. Two cultivars, Bintje and Bzura, susceptible and tolerant, respectively, to cadmium were examined. In more tolerant, control tissues the activity of ascorbic acid peroxidase (AAP) and catalase (CAT) was higher than in the sensitive ones. During first hours of stress, the inhibition of superoxide dism...

  8. Assessment of Four Heavy Metals Mercury, Lead, Copper and Cadmium Levels in Muscles of Import-ed Tilapia to Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behsan Hemmatinezhad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the residues of mercury (Hg, lead (Pb, copper (Cu and cadmium (Cd in the imported tilapia fillets. Thirty random samples from imported tilapia fillets were collected from different markets in Isfahan City, central Iran. They were analyzed using Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (Perkin Elmer 800 for Pb, Cu, Cd and flow injection mercury system (Perkin Elmer 400 for Hg. Out of the 30 tested samples, concentration of Hg, Pb, Cu and Cd in the tilapia fillets samples as mean± standard deviation were 0.083±.016, 0.638±0.067, 0.521± 0.081 and 0.136 ± 0.025 mg/kg, respectively. Among these, amounts obtained for all metals except for lead were lower than the permissible level specified by WHO (P<1%. The Pb concentrations in all examined samples were higher than WHO standards. The continuous consumption of these contaminated fish regularly for long time may lead to health troubles.

  9. Exposure of cultured human proximal tubular cells to cadmium, mercury, zinc and bismuth: toxicity and metallothionein induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, V; Miles, A T; Jenner, W; Hawksworth, G M

    1998-08-14

    The kidney, in particular the proximal convoluted tubule, is a major target site for the toxic effects of various metals. However, little is known about the early effects of these metals after acute exposure in man. In the present study we have evaluated the toxicity of several inorganic metal compounds (CdCl2, HgCl2, ZnCl2, and Bi(NO3)3) and the induction of metallothionein by these compounds in cultured human proximal tubular (HPT) cells for up to 4 days. The results showed that bismuth was not toxic even at the highest dose (100 microM) used, while zinc, cadmium and mercury exhibited varying degrees of toxicity, zinc being the least toxic and mercury the most potent. A significant degree of interindividual variation between the different isolates used in these experiments was also observed. All metals used in the present study induced MT, as revealed by immunocytochemistry. All metals showed maximal induction between 1 and 3 days after treatment. Although a certain amount of constitutive MT was present in the cultures, the intensity of the staining varied with time in culture and between the different isolates studied. No correlation could be made between the intensity of the staining in control cultures (indicating total amount of constitutive MT) and the susceptibility of a given isolate to metal toxicity. Furthermore, no correlation could be made between metal-induced MT and the susceptibility of a given isolate to that particular metal.

  10. Defects and properties of cadmium oxide based transparent conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kin Man, E-mail: kinmanyu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Detert, D. M.; Dubon, O. D. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chen, Guibin [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemistry of Low Dimensional Materials, Huaiyin Normal University, Jiangsu 223300 (China); Zhu, Wei [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics and The Center for Physical Experiments, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu, Chaoping [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Grankowska, S. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institute of Experimental Physics (IEP UW), Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Hsu, L. [Department of Postsecondary Teaching and Learning, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Walukiewicz, Wladek [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    Transparent conductors play an increasingly important role in a number of semiconductor technologies. This paper reports on the defects and properties of Cadmium Oxide, a transparent conducting oxide which can be potentially used for full spectrum photovoltaics. We carried out a systematic investigation on the effects of defects in CdO thin films undoped and intentionally doped with In and Ga under different deposition and annealing conditions. We found that at low growth temperatures (<200 °C), sputter deposition tends to trap both oxygen vacancies and compensating defects in the CdO film resulting in materials with high electron concentration of ∼2 × 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} and mobility in the range of 40–100 cm{sup 2}/V s. Thermal annealing experiments in different ambients revealed that the dominating defects in sputtered CdO films are oxygen vacancies. Oxygen rich CdO films grown by sputtering with increasing O{sub 2} partial pressure in the sputter gas mixture results in films with resistivity from ∼4 × 10{sup −4} to >1 Ω cm due to incorporation of excess O in the form of O-related acceptor defects, likely to be O interstitials. Intentional doping with In and Ga donors leads to an increase of both the electron concentration and the mobility. With proper doping CdO films with electron concentration of more than 10{sup 21 }cm{sup −3} and electron mobility higher than 120 cm{sup 2}/V s can be achieved. Thermal annealing of doped CdO films in N{sub 2} ambient can further improve the electrical properties by removing native acceptors and improving film crystallinity. Furthermore, the unique doping behavior and electrical properties of CdO were explored via simulations based on the amphoteric defect model. A comparison of the calculations and experimental results show that the formation energy of native donors and acceptors at the Fermi stabilization energy is ∼1 eV and that the mobility of sputtered deposited CdO is limited

  11. Synthesis of binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods with sensitive electrochemical sensing performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Yong [Xinjiang Univ., Xinjiang (China). School of Civil Engineering and Architecture; Pei, Lizhai; Wei, Tian [Anhui Univ. of Technology, Anhui (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    2017-07-15

    Binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods have been synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process without templates and additives. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanorods possess single crystalline tetragonal Bi{sub 2}CdO{sub 4} phase. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images show that the length and diameter of the nanorods are 20-300 nm and 5-10 μm, respectively. The formation of the binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods is closely related to the hydrothermal parameters. The electrochemical sensing performance of the binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods has been investigated using the nanorods as glassy carbon electrode modifiers. The detection limit is 0.19 μM with a linear range of 0.0005-2 mM. The nanorod-modified glassy carbon electrode exhibits good electrocatalytic activity toward L-cysteine and great application potential for electrochemical sensors.

  12. Soluble Moringa oleifera leaf extract reduces intracellular cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Tatip, Supinda; Kosasih, Sattawat; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera leaves are a well-known source of antioxidants and traditionally used for medicinal applications. In the present study, the protective action of soluble M. oleifera leaf extract (MOLE) against cadmium toxicity was investigated in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that this extract exhibited a protective effect against oxidative stress induced by cadmium and H2O2 through the reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, not only the co-exposure of soluble MOLE with cadmium but also pretreatment of this extract prior to cadmium exposure significantly reduced the cadmium uptake through an inhibition of Fet4p, a low-affinity iron(II) transporter. In addition, the supplementation of soluble MOLE significantly reduced intracellular iron accumulation in a Fet4p-independent manner. Our findings suggest the potential use of soluble extract from M. oleifera leaves as a dietary supplement for protection against cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluations of Effective Factors on Efficiency Zinc Oxides Nanoparticles in Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Ehrampoush

    2014-09-01

    Results: The results indicated that the adsorption process is affected by different parameters such as initial pollutant concentrations, adsorbent dose, pH, and contact time and Cadmiumremoval efficiency increases with increasing adsorbent dose and reaction time and decreases with increasing initial concentration of Cadmium. Therefore, it is observed that by raising the initial Cadmium concentration, the adsorption rate increases. The maximum efficiency of adsorptionin pH=7amounted to 89.6%. Conclusion: It is concluded that Zinc Oxide nanoparticles have proper efficiency in removal of Cadmium from aqueous solutions and can be used in the treatment of wastewater that contains ion Cadmium. However, its efficiency is deeply dependent on ion strength and the interaction of other metals in wastewater.

  14. Mercury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Irma|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41398625X

    2017-01-01

    Mercury is a naturally occurring metal that exists in several physical and chemical forms. Inorganic mercury refers to compounds formed after the combining of mercury with elements such as chlorine, sulfur, or oxygen. After combining with carbon by covalent linkage, the compounds formed are called

  15. Biomonitoring of Lead, Cadmium, Total Mercury, and Methylmercury Levels in Maternal Blood and in Umbilical Cord Blood at Birth in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mi Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With rising concerns of heavy metal exposure in pregnancy and early childhood, this study was conducted to assess the relationship between the lead, cadmium, mercury, and methylmercury blood levels in pregnancy and neonatal period. The study population included 104 mothers and their children pairs who completed both baseline maternal blood sampling at the second trimester and umbilical cord blood sampling at birth. The geometric mean maternal blood levels of lead, cadmium, total mercury, and methylmercury at the second trimester were 1.02 ± 1.39 µg/dL, 0.61 ± 1.51 µg/L, 2.97 ± 1.45 µg/L, and 2.39 ± 1.45 µg/L, respectively, and in the newborns, these levels at birth were 0.71 ± 1.42 µg/dL, 0.01 ± 5.31 µg/L, 4.44 ± 1.49 µg/L, and 3.67 ± 1.51 µg/L, respectively. The mean ratios of lead, cadmium, total mercury, and methylmercury levels in the newborns to those in the mothers were 0.72, 0.04, 1.76, and 1.81, respectively. The levels of most heavy metals in pregnant women and infants were higher in this study than in studies from industrialized western countries. The placenta appears to protect fetuses from cadmium; however, total mercury and methylmercury were able to cross the placenta and accumulate in fetuses.

  16. Cadmium-induced oxidative stress in potato tuber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Stroiński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term treatment of tuber discs of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. with cadmium chloride elevated the concentration of active oxygen species (.O-2, H202 and activated the antioxidative system. Two cultivars, Bintje and Bzura, susceptible and tolerant, respectively, to cadmium were examined. In more tolerant, control tissues the activity of ascorbic acid peroxidase (AAP and catalase (CAT was higher than in the sensitive ones. During first hours of stress, the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD, CAT and AAP was observed and it comes from inactivation of enzymes by cadmium ions. A subsequent activity increase of the enzymes aroused earlier in tolerant tissues. It seems therefore, that tolerant tissues possess a more efficient antioxidative system.

  17. Oxidation Catalysts for Elemental Mercury in Flue Gases—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Lazar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The removal of mercury from flue gases in scrubbers is greatly facilitated if the mercury is present as water-soluble oxidized species. Therefore, increased mercury oxidation upstream of scrubber devices will improve overall mercury removal. For this purpose heterogeneous catalysts have recently attracted a great deal of interest. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR, noble metal and transition metal oxide based catalysts have been investigated at both the laboratory and plant scale with this objective. A review article published in 2006 covers the progress in the elemental mercury (Hgel catalytic oxidation area. This paper brings the review in this area up to date. To this end, 110 papers including several reports and patents are reviewed. For each type of catalyst the possible mechanisms as well as the effect of flue gas components on activity and stability are examined. Advantages and main problems are analyzed. The possible future directions of catalyst development in this environmental research area are outlined.

  18. Bioavailability and oxidative stress of cadmium to Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinghua; Luo, Jun; Ma, Hongrui; Wang, Xiaorong; Ma, Lena Q

    2013-04-01

    This work set out to study the effects of cadmium (Cd) in sediments on the antioxidant enzyme activities in the digestive gland of Asian clam Corbicula fluminea and to explore the potential for applying these responses to evaluate the Cd-contaminated sediment. Additionally, diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) technique was used to predict the response of its antioxidant defense system. The sediments, collected from Taihu Lake, were spiked with Cd at different concentrations (0.72, 0.91, 1.62, 2.59, 11.2, 20.4 and 40.6 mg kg(-1), dry weight). Asian clam was cultivated for 28 days. Concentrations of Cd in the body of Asian clam had a good relationship with concentrations of Cd in overlying water and sediments, as measured by DGT. Cd affected these biochemical parameters significantly, especially for superoxide (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and glutathione (GSH), which began to show higher sensitivity and have a significant difference in low dosage (0.91 mg Cd kg(-1)) compared with blank. Contents of MDA and MT, which were induced by Cd, increased with the increasing Cd concentration in sediments and reached peak values at 11.2 and 20.4 mg kg(-1), respectively, after 28 days exposure. All of these results suggested that biochemical responses cooperated in detoxifying and maintaining cellular metabolic homeostasis. The R(2) of regression analysis between the contents of MT and the concentrations of Cd measured by DGT, in sediments and soft body were 0.71, 0.94 and 0.88 after 28 days exposure. This suggested that DGT measurement could predict the response of MT. Cd accumulation, GSH and MT were indispensable biomarkers and the MDA content and DGT appeared to be promising biomarkers. The results clearly indicated that Cd could induce oxidative stress in the digestive gland of Asian clam. The combination of biomonitors with DGT can obtain different information about Cd bioavailability and confirm the significance of applying a suite of biomarkers rather than a selective

  19. Nitric Oxide is Protective Against Mercury Induced Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezo Nahavandi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A B S T R A C T Introduction: Mercury is the second most metal pollutant in the world and has the potential to induce many pathologic conditions, especially in nervous system, such as depression. Here we tried to find out if nitric oxide has any possible role in the pathophysiology of depression induced by this metal. Although the role of nitric oxide has been shown in mood control, here we use specific doses of nitric oxide inducer and/or inhibitors which had no effect on normal rats. Methods: 120 male wistar rats weighting 200-250 gram were divided into two main groups: control and methyl mercury(MM treated. Each main group was divided into four different sub-goups: Saline, L-Arginine, L-Name or 7-nitroindazole (7-NI respectively. The duration of taking MM or saline was daily for 15 days for both. After the 15th injection a forced swimming test was done. This test shows behavioral immobility (BI or latency of attempt to escape (LAE, as a depression indicator. Results: Our study showed that low dose L-arginine is protective against MM induced depression as it could turn behavioral immobility (BI to normal levels in groups taking MM plus L-Arginine, while in group taking just MM, BI was much longer showing the intensity of depression. L-Name and 7-NI did aggravated depression in MM groups but not control ones, on the other hand just in the case of 7-NI the result was significant. Discussion: Our results showed 1 MM could induce depression in rat 2 L-Arginine could improve depression to normal situation in MM group, while in control group has no effec 3 7-NI, a selective nNOS inhibitor can aggravate mental depression in intoxicated rats. These results showed the important role of nNOS in protection against MM induced depression.

  20. Conversion of elemental mercury to the oxidized form in a fabric filter baghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManus, T.J.; Agbede, R.O.; Khosah, R.P. [Advanced Technology Systems, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE-FETC) has in the last several years funded efforts on identifying a sampling and analytical method to differentiate and quantify the chemical forms of mercury emitted from coal-fired electric utility boilers. DOE-FETC requested Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) to develop new methodologies for determining the chemical species of mercury in coal flue gas, either by the modification of existing ones or by the introduction of novel methods. Through the efforts of ATS and others, this goal was attained and demonstrated by the final validation of the Ontario-Hydro Method. Also, in these mercury method comparison studies performed by ATS, conversion of elemental mercury to oxidized mercury in a fabric filter baghouse was observed. Investigation of this type of phenomenon was a step beyond mercury species measurement in that this had an impact on the design of mercury control devices for coal-fired power plants which must be mercury species-specific. Moreover, long and short term transport and deposition into the ecosystem with the resulting human and animal toxicity are the ultimate concerns and are all dependent upon the mercury species involved. Results will be reported from a five day study in which mercury species were measured and identified utilizing the Ontario-Hydro Method at the outlet of a baghouse accepting natural gas flue gas spiked with various mercury species.

  1. Oxidative stress in duckweed (Lemna minor L.) caused by short-term cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razinger, Jaka [Department for Environmental Technologies and Biomonitoring, Institute of Physical Biology, Veliko Mlacevo 59, SI-1290 Grosuplje (Slovenia)], E-mail: jaka@ifb.si; Dermastia, Marina [National Institute of Biology, Vecna pot 111, p.p. 141, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koce, Jasna Dolenc [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zrimec, Alexis [Department for Environmental Technologies and Biomonitoring, Institute of Physical Biology, Veliko Mlacevo 59, SI-1290 Grosuplje (Slovenia)

    2008-06-15

    The mechanisms of plant defence against cadmium toxicity have been studied by short-term exposure of Lemna minor L. (common duckweed) to concentrations of CdCl{sub 2} ranging from 0 to 500 {mu}M. High accumulation of cadmium was observed (12,320 {+-} 2155 {mu}g g{sup -1} at 500 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}), which caused a gradual decrease of plant growth, increased lipid peroxidation, and weakened the entire antioxidative defence. Total glutathione concentration decreased significantly; however, the concentration of oxidized glutathione remained stable. The responses of four antioxidant enzymes showed that catalase was the most inhibited after CdCl{sub 2} exposure, ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase moderately, and glutathione reductase least. The total antioxidative potential revealed an induced antioxidative network at 0.1 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2} (137 {+-} 13.2% of the control) and its reduction to only 47.4 {+-} 4.0% of the control at higher cadmium concentrations. The possible application of the examined biomarkers in ecotoxicological research is discussed. - The increase of total antioxidative potential at low cadmium concentration is one of the mechanisms that helps duckweed to cope with cadmium-induced oxidative stress.

  2. End-stage renal disease and low level exposure to lead, cadmium and mercury; a population-based, prospective nested case-referent study in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg) cause toxicological renal effects, but the clinical relevance at low-level exposures in general populations is unclear. The objective of this study is to assess the risk of developing end-stage renal disease in relation to Cd, Pb, and Hg exposure. Methods A total of 118 cases who later in life developed end-stage renal disease, and 378 matched (sex, age, area, and time of blood sampling) referents were identified among participants in two population-based prospective cohorts (130,000 individuals). Cd, Pb, and Hg concentrations were determined in prospectively collected samples. Results Erythrocyte lead was associated with an increased risk of developing end-stage renal disease (mean in cases 76 μg/L; odds ratio (OR) 1.54 for an interquartile range increase, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-2.00), while erythrocyte mercury was negatively associated (2.4 μg/L; OR 0.75 for an interquartile range increase, CI 0.56-0.99). For erythrocyte cadmium, the OR of developing end-stage renal disease was 1.15 for an interquartile range increase (CI 0.99-1.34; mean Ery-Cd among cases: 1.3 μg/L). The associations for erythrocyte lead and erythrocyte mercury, but not for erythrocyte cadmium, remained after adjusting for the other two metals, smoking, BMI, diabetes, and hypertension. Gender-specific analyses showed that men carried almost all of the erythrocyte lead and erythrocyte cadmium associated risks. Conclusions Erythrocyte lead is associated with end-stage renal disease but further studies are needed to evaluate causality. Gender-specific analyses suggest potential differences in susceptibility or in exposure biomarker reliability. PMID:23343055

  3. Effect of lead, mercury and cadmium on a sulphate-reducing bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Sathe, V.; Chandramohan, D.

    . & Haanstra, L. (1979). Effects of lead on soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity. Soil Bioi. Biochern, 11, 475-9. Doyle, J. J., Marshall, R. T. & Pfander, W. H. (1975). Effects of cadmium on the growth and uptake ofcadmium by microorganisms. Appl... oftoxicity to growth of these metal salts in a lactate-based medium at 50 J1g mr 1 concentrations was Cd> Pb> Hg and to respiration Pb> Cd> Hg. Inhibitory concentrations (viz. 100 J1g mr 1 ofHgCl z and200 J1g mr 1 ofPb(N0 3 )z) hada stimulatory effect when...

  4. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constance Senior; Temi Linjewile

    2003-10-31

    This is the third Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the second set of mercury measurements was made after the catalysts had been exposed to flue gas for about 2,000 hours. There was good agreement between the Ontario Hydro measurements and the SCEM measurements. Carbon trap measurements of total mercury agreed fairly well with the SCEM. There did appear to be some loss of mercury in the sampling system toward the end of the sampling campaign. NO{sub x} reductions across the catalysts ranged from 60% to 88%. Loss of total mercury across the commercial catalysts was not observed, as it had been in the March/April test series. It is not clear whether this was due to aging of the catalyst or to changes in the sampling system made between March/April and August. In the presence of ammonia, the blank monolith showed no oxidation. Two of the commercial catalysts showed mercury oxidation that was comparable to that in the March/April series. The other three commercial catalysts showed a decrease in mercury oxidation relative to the March/April series. Oxidation of mercury increased without ammonia present. Transient experiments showed that when ammonia was turned on, mercury appeared to desorb from the catalyst, suggesting displacement of adsorbed mercury by the ammonia.

  5. Representative levels of blood lead, mercury, and urinary cadmium in youth: Korean Environmental Health Survey in Children and Adolescents (KorEHS-C), 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burm, Eunae; Song, Inmyung; Ha, Mina; Kim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Kee Jae; Kim, Hwan-Cheol; Lim, Sinye; Kim, Soo-Young; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kim, Su Young; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Sakong, Joon; Kang, Hee-Tae; Son, Mia; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Kim, Yeni; Yang, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Soo-Jong; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kim, Jeongseon; Oh, Seyong; Yu, Jeesuk; Chang, Seong-Sil; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Choi, Youn-Hee; Choi, Wookhee; Kim, Suejin; Yu, Seung Do

    2016-07-01

    This study examined levels of blood lead and mercury, and urinary cadmium, and associated sociodemographic factors in 3-18 year-old Korean children and adolescents. We used the nationally representative Korean Environmental Health Survey in Children and Adolescents data for 2012-2014 and identified 2388 children and adolescents aged 3-18 years. The median and 95th percentile exposure biomarker levels with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Multivariate regression analyses were performed on log transformed exposure biomarker levels adjusted for age, sex, area, household income, and father's education level. The median exposure biomarker levels were compared with data from Germany, the US, and Canada, as well as the levels of Korean children measured at different times. The median levels of blood lead and mercury, as well as urinary cadmium were 1.23μg/dL, 1.80μg/L, and 0.40μg/L (95% CIs, 1.21-1.25, 1.77-1.83, and 0.39-0.41, respectively). The blood lead levels were significantly higher in boys and younger children (pchildren with less educated fathers (p=0.004) after adjusting for covariates. Urinary cadmium level increased with age (pmercury and urinary cadmium were much higher in Korean children and adolescents than those in their peers in Germany, the US, and Canada. Blood lead levels tended to decrease with increasing age and divergence between the sexes, particularly in the early teen years. Median levels of blood lead and urinary cadmium decreased since 2010. Sociodemographic factors, including age, sex, and father's education level were associated with environmental exposure to heavy metals in Korean children and adolescents. These biomonitoring data are valuable for ongoing surveillance of environmental exposure in this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  6. Concentration of lead, cadmium, and mercury in tissues of European beaver (Castor fiber from the north-eastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giżejewska Aleksandra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the concentrations of lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, and mercury (Hg in the liver, kidneys, and muscles of European beavers (Castor fiber and thus to evaluate the degree of heavy metals contamination in Warmia and Mazury region in Poland. The study was conducted on free-living beavers captured in region of Warmia and Mazury during autumn 2011. Concentrations of the elements were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The presence of the metals was detected in all individual tissue samples. Mean Pb and Hg concentrations were relatively low. However, the high mean Cd level, especially in the kidneys (7.933 mg/kg and liver (0.880 mg/kg was demonstrated. Despite the fact that region of Warmia and Mazury is considered to be “ecologically clean”, the conducted studies indicate that systematic monitoring for the presence of heavy metals is necessary not only in industrialised but also in agricultural regions, as well as in natural ecosystems.

  7. Geographic, seasonal and ontogenetic variation in cadmium and mercury concentrations in squid (Cephalopoda: Teuthoidea) from UK waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, G J; Stowasser, G; Hastie, L C; Bustamante, P

    2008-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the tissue samples of two loliginid (Alloteuthis sp. and Loligo forbesi) and two ommastrephid (Todarodes sagittatus and Todaropsis eblanae) squid species collected from research cruise and fishery (market) samples in UK waters during 2004-05. Concentrations of Cd were generally higher in the ommastrephids, in all tissues except muscle. Hg concentrations were higher in T. sagittatus than in the loliginids. In L. forbesi, metal concentrations differed between tissues and also varied in relation to body size, geographic origin, and season. Cd levels decreased with increasing body size. This may be related to a shift in the diet with growth, since small L. forbesi feed on benthic invertebrates that have relatively high Cd concentrations, whereas larger individuals prey mainly on fish that have low Cd concentrations. Hg levels increased with body size, indicating its retention, and they were highest at the end of the spawning season and in squid from the English Channel and the Scottish West Coast. It is likely that the ambient concentration of Hg in seawater plays an important part in its accumulation in squid tissues. As it is a short-lived species, L. forbesi may therefore function as a bioindicator species for Hg contamination of the marine environment. Our results indicate that there is no significant danger to humans from consuming squid from UK waters.

  8. Atmospheric deposition of mercury and cadmium impacts on topsoil in a typical coal mine city, Lianyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Feng, Chunting; Zeng, Guangming; Zhong, Minzhou; Gao, Xiang; Li, Xiaodong; He, Xinyue; Li, Xin; Fang, Yilong; Mo, Dan

    2017-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) in the atmosphere from coal combustion emissions play an important role in soil pollution. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to quantitatively evaluate the atmospheric Hg and Cd deposition and to determine the influence of atmospheric deposition on Hg and Cd contents in surface soil in a typical coal mine city. Atmospheric deposition samples were collected from May 2015 to May 2016 at 17 sites located in industrial, agricultural and forest areas in the Lianyuan city. Atmospheric Hg and Cd deposition fluxes in the different land use types showed high variability. Curvilinear regression analysis suggested that the atmospheric Hg deposition fluxes were positively related with Hg contents in soils (R2 = 0.86359, P atmospheric Cd deposition fluxes were also positively correlated with Cd contents in soils when the site LY02, LY04 and LY05 (all belong to agricultural land) were not included in the fitting (R2 = 0.82458, P atmospheric deposition will increase rapidly in the next 30 years, and the mean value of the increment will reach 2.6007 and 33.344 mg kg-1. After 30 years, the Hg and Cd concentration will increase slowly. The present study advocates that much attention should be paid to the potential ecological hazards in soil resulting from the atmospheric Hg and Cd deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictors of mercury, lead, cadmium and antimony status in Norwegian never-pregnant women of fertile age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fløtre, Christina Herland; Varsi, Kristin; Helm, Thea; Bolann, Bjørn; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    The toxic trace elements mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and antimony (Sb) are transferred over the placenta to the fetus and secreted into the breastmilk. All four elements bioaccumulate in the body and as maternal age at delivery is increasing in industrialized countries, the burden of toxic trace elements in never-pregnant women of fertile age is of concern. Healthy, never-pregnant women aged 18 to 40 years (n = 158) were recruited between June 2012 and March 2015 in Bergen, Norway. Clinical data were collected and non-fasting venous blood samples were analyzed for whole blood Hg, Pb and Cd and serum Sb by ICP-MS and related to diet and life style factors. In a multiple linear regression model, increasing age was associated with higher levels of Hg and Sb, but diet and life style factors were more important predictors. Median whole blood Hg was increased by a factor of 70 in women who had fish for dinner ≥1/week, compared to women who rarely or never ate fish (pnever-pregnant women, age contributed to Hg and Sb levels, but diet and life style factors were stronger determinants of whole blood Hg, Pb, Cd and serum Sb levels. Continuous public actions are needed to reduce modifiable and preventable sources of potentially deleterious toxins to minimize the exposure in children and fertile women.

  10. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S; Holmes, Michael J; Pavlish, John Henry

    2013-08-20

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  11. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edwin S [Grand Forks, ND; Holmes, Michael J [Thompson, ND; Pavlish, John H [East Grand Forks, MN

    2008-10-14

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  12. Removal of Mercury in Liquid Hydrocarbons using Zeolites Modified with Chitosan and Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusrini, E.; Susanto, B. H.; Nasution, D. A.; Jonathan, R.; Khairul, W. M.

    2017-07-01

    Clinoptilolite zeolites were chemically modified with chitosan (Chit) and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) were synthesized for removal of mercury from liquid condensate hydrocarbon. The mercury content was in liquid hydrocarbon which was measured by Lumex mercury analyzer. The performance of sorbents based on zeolites modified chitosan and magnetic nanoparticles were examined on the real liquid condensate hydrocarbon. Removal of mercury using a prestine clinoptilolite zeolites, and zeolites modified chitosan (zeolites-Chit) were ∼4.5, and ∼35%, respectively. The effects of magnetic nanoparticles in zeolites-Chit sorbents were significant to reduce the mercury content in liquid condensate hydrocarbon which were from ∼63 to ∼66%. Increasing the mass ratio of Fe3O4 that influenced to the BET surface area of natural zeolites. Zeolites-Chit-Fe3O4NPs as an efficient sorbents are potential ideal to remove mercury in hydrocarbon for practical applications.

  13. Blood levels of lead, cadmium, and mercury in the Korean population: Results from the Second Korean National Human Exposure and Bio-monitoring Examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ji-Young [Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Hanyang University, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jinheon [Department of Environmental Education, Kongju National University (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Domyung [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Tae, E-mail: jtlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Health, College of Health Science, Korea University, San 1 Jeongreung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, Korea 136-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    In Korea, there have been a number of efforts to measure levels of exposure to environmental pollutants among the population. This paper focuses on investigating the distribution of, extent of, and factors influencing the blood levels of lead, cadmium, and mercury in the Korean population, working from data obtained from the Second Korean National Human Exposure and Bio-monitoring Examination. To that end, blood metal concentrations were analyzed from a total of 2369 participants who were 18 years of age and older. The geometric mean concentrations and their 95% confidence intervals of metals in blood were found to be lead, 1.72 {mu}g/dL (95% CI, 1.68-1.76); cadmium, 1.02 {mu}g/L (95% CI, 1.00-1.05); and mercury, 3.80 {mu}g/L (95% CI, 3.66-3.93). Regression analyses indicate that the levels of metals in the blood are mainly influenced by gender, age, and the education levels of the participants. Current smoking status is also found to be a significant factor for increasing both lead and cadmium levels. Although our study, as the first nationwide survey of exposure to environmental pollutants in Korea, has value on its own, it should be expanded and extended in order to provide information on environmental exposure pathways and to watch for changes in the level of exposure to environmental pollutants among the population.

  14. Changes in body burden of mercury, lead, arsenic, cadmium and selenium in infants during early lactation in comparison with placental transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Mineshi; Chan, Hing Man; Domingo, José L; Kubota, Machi; Murata, Katsuyuki

    2012-10-01

    The developing brains of both fetuses and infants are susceptible to environmental contaminants. However, the contribution of breast-feeding to the element body burden in infants remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to investigate the changes in body burden of elements such as methylmercury, lead, arsenic, cadmium, and selenium in infants during a 3-month breast-feeding period compared with placental transfer of the elements. Element concentrations were measured in maternal and umbilical cord (fetus) red blood cells (RBCs) at parturition and in infant RBCs at 3 months. Most of the mercury in RBCs is in the methyl form, and the total mercury concentration in RBCs reflects methylmercury exposure. The mercury level in cord RBCs was approximately 1.5 times higher than that in mothers, while in infants, it declined by approximately 60% after 3-months' breast-feeding. The cord selenium level was similar to the maternal level, but declined approximately 75% after 3-months' breast-feeding in infants. Lead and arsenic concentrations in cord RBCs were about 60% of the maternal levels, and remained constant until the 3-month study period. The cadmium level in cord RBCs was about 20% of that in maternal RBCs, and remained almost constant until the end of the 3-month study period. In conclusion, although pregnant women should pay attention to avoid high methylmercury exposure, element exposure through breast-feeding does not pose any great concern in this population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are ... National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection ... inadequate human cancer data available for all forms of mercury. Mercuric chloride ...

  16. Stress response to cadmium and manganese in Paracentrotus lividus developing embryos is mediated by nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata [Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy); Romano, Giovanna [Laboratory of Functional and Evolutionary Ecology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy); Palumbo, Anna, E-mail: anna.palumbo@szn.it [Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • NO is produced in sea urchin embryos in response to cadmium and manganese. • Cadmium and manganese affect the expression of specific genes. • NO levels regulate directly or indirectly the expression of some metal-induced genes. • NO is proposed as a sensor of different stress agents in sea urchin embryos. - Abstract: Increasing concentrations of contaminants, often resulting from anthropogenic activities, have been reported to occur in the marine environment and affect marine organisms. Among these, the metal ions cadmium and manganese have been shown to induce developmental delay and abnormalities, mainly reflecting skeleton elongation perturbation, in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, an established model for toxicological studies. Here, we provide evidence that the physiological messenger nitric oxide (NO), formed by L-arginine oxidation by NO synthase (NOS), mediates the stress response induced by cadmium and manganese in sea urchins. When NO levels were lowered by inhibiting NOS, the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. Quantitative expression of a panel of 19 genes involved in stress response, skeletogenesis, detoxification and multidrug efflux processes was followed at different developmental stages and under different conditions: metals alone, metals in the presence of NOS inhibitor, NO donor and NOS inhibitor alone. These data allowed the identification of different classes of genes whose metal-induced transcriptional expression was directly or indirectly mediated by NO. These results open new perspectives on the role of NO as a sensor of different stress agents in sea urchin developing embryos.

  17. Ethnic Kawasaki Disease Risk Associated with Blood Mercury and Cadmium in U.S. Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeter, Deniz; Portman, Michael A; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo; Chan, Wen-Ching; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2016-01-05

    Kawasaki disease (KD) primarily affects children children are 10 to 20 times more likely to develop KD. We hypothesized cultural variations influencing pediatric mercury (Hg) exposure from seafood consumption may mediate ethnic KD risk among children in the United States. Hospitalization rates of KD in US children aged 0-4 years (n = 10,880) and blood Hg levels in US children aged 1-5 years (n = 713) were determined using separate US federal datasets. Our cohort primarily presented with blood Hg levels children in the US (p ≤ 0.05). Increasing low-dose exposure to Hg or Cd may induce KD or contribute to its later development in susceptible children. However, our preliminary results require further replication in other ethnic populations, in addition to more in-depth examination of metal exposure and toxicokinetics.

  18. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  19. ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE INDIRECT RISK OF NATURALLY OCCURING MERCURY AND CADMIUM THROUGH Mugil Sp. AND Geloina sp. CONSUMPTION IN SEGARA ANAKAN ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Noegrohati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Estuarine ecosystem of Segara Anakan is located in south coast of Central Java, shielded from Indian Ocean by Nusakambangan island. The ecosystem of Segara Anakan estuary, Central Java, Indonesia, is influenced by fresh water inflow from Citanduy river basin and Indian sea water mostly by tidal actions through the western opening. The runoff materials continuously entering Segara Anakan from Citanduy catchment area, which geologically consist of weathering products of quarternary volcanic rocks from Galunggung mountain, West Java. Therefore various natural heavy metal contaminants are bound to the estuarine sediments, redistributed and accumulated within the ecosystem. In the present work, the effects of environmental stresses to mercury and cadmium abiotic distribution, and their availability to biotic ecosystems were studied, and consumers indirect risk assesment was carried out. In the laboratory scale studies on the distribution of mercury and cadmium in an estuarine simulation of water-field sediment, it was observed that the metal distribution coefficient decreases as the salinity and the acidity of the medium increases. Monitoring results confirmed that the highest levels of Hg and Cd in water and sediment samples were obtained in dry season. Consequently, the highest levels of Hg and Cd in biotic ecosystem, represented by Mugil sp. and Geloina sp., also obtained in dry season. The body burden of Hg in people of Segara Anakan villages, as indicated by the levels in hair and mother milk samples, taken at the end of the study (dry season 2004, were relatively low, but the levels of Cd in mother milk samples were significantly higher than that of control samples of Jogyakarta (P = 0.05. Consequently, the risk quotient for babies were exceeding the FAO/WHO PTWI. Based on the risk assessment carried out for babies and adults, at the present time it is advisable to consume Mugil sp. and Geloina sp., taken in wet season only and not in dry

  20. Vanadium and cadmium in vivo effects in teleost cardiac muscle: metal accumulation and oxidative stress markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, S S; Martins, H; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2008-03-01

    Several biological studies associate vanadium and cadmium with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes alterations. The present study aims to analyse and compare the oxidative stress responses induced by an acute intravenous exposure (1 and 7 days) to a sub-lethal concentration (5 mM) of two vanadium solutions, containing different vanadate n-oligomers (n=1-5 or n=10), and a cadmium solution on the cardiac muscle of the marine teleost Halobatrachus didactylus (Lusitanian toadfish). It was observed that vanadium is mainly accumulated in mitochondria (1.33+/-0.26 microM), primarily when this element was administrated as decameric vanadate, than when administrated as metavanadate (432+/-294 nM), while the highest content of cadmium was found in cytosol (365+/-231 nM). Indeed, decavanadate solution promotes stronger increases in mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase: +120%; superoxide dismutase: +140%) than metavanadate solution. On contrary, cadmium increases cytosolic catalase (+111%) and glutathione peroxidases (+50%) activities. It is also observed that vanadate oligomers induce in vitro prooxidant effects in toadfish heart, with stronger effects induced by metavanadate solution. In summary, vanadate and cadmium are differently accumulated in blood and cardiac subcellular fractions and induced different responses in enzymatic antioxidant defence mechanisms. In the present study, it is described for the first time the effects of equal doses of two different metals intravenously injected in the same fish species and upon the same exposure period allowing to understand the mechanisms of vanadate and cadmium toxicity in fish cardiac muscle.

  1. Factors Influencing Blood Cadmium and Mercury Concentrations in Residents of Agro-Industries along Nam Phong River, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wannanapa Srathonghon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional analytical study aimed to determine the blood levels of cadmium (B-Cd and mercury (B-Hg and identify the factors influencing heavy metal accumulation in residents of Agro-Industries along the Nam Phong River. Quantitative data were collected, and systematic random sampling was used to obtain 420 samples for questionnaire interview and serum heavy metal testing for B-Cd and B-Hg. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing the accumulation of heavy metals in the population and report mean differences, 95% confidence intervals and p-values. The results indicated that B-Cd levels were within the recommended safety limits for human health (5 µg/dL. However, 4.29% of respondents had Hg levels higher than the recommended safety limits for human health (10 µg/dL. Factors influencing Cd levels included sex (mean difference=0.13 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.03-0.24, p-value=0.02 and smoking (mean difference=0.14 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.09-0.19, p-value<0.001. Factors influencing Hg levels included smoking (mean difference=1.06 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.52-1.61, p-value<0.001, fish consumption (mean difference=1.11 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.22-2.01, p-value=0.01 and river snail consumption (mean difference=0.56 µg/L, 95% CI: 0.03-0.19, p-value=0.03.

  2. The cadmium-tolerant pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutant SGECdt is more sensitive to mercury: assessing plant water relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belimov, Andrey A.; Dodd, Ian C.; Safronova, Vera I.; Malkov, Nikita V.; Davies, William J.; Tikhonovich, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals have multiple effects on plant growth and physiology, including perturbation of plant water status. These effects were assessed by exposing the unique Cd-tolerant and Cd-accumulating pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutant SGECdt and its wild-type (WT) line SGE to either cadmium (1, 4 μM CdCl2) or mercury (0.5, 1, 2 μM HgCl2) in hydroponic culture for 12 days. When exposed to Cd, SGECdt accumulated more Cd in roots, xylem sap, and shoot, and had considerably more biomass than WT plants. WT plants lost circa 0.2 MPa turgor when grown in 4 μM CdCl2, despite massive decreases in whole-plant transpiration rate and stomatal conductance. In contrast, root Hg accumulation was similar in both genotypes, but WT plants accumulated more Hg in leaves and had a higher stomatal conductance, and root and shoot biomass compared with SGECdt. Shoot excision resulted in greater root-pressure induced xylem exudation of SGECdt in the absence of Cd or Hg and following Cd exposure, whereas the opposite response or no genotypic differences occurred following Hg exposure. Exposing plants that had not been treated with metal to 50 μM CdCl2 for 1h increased root xylem exudation of WT, whereas 50 μM HgCl2 inhibited and eliminated genotypic differences in root xylem exudation, suggesting differences between WT and SGECdt plants in aquaporin function. Thus, root water transport might be involved in mechanisms of increased tolerance and accumulation of Cd in the SGECdt mutant. However, the lack of cross-tolerance to Cd and Hg stress in the mutant indicates metal-specific mechanisms related to plant adaptation. PMID:25694548

  3. Bioaccumulation and metallothionein response in the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) after experimental exposure to cadmium and inorganic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudrimont, M.; Metivaud, J.; Maury-Brachet, R.; Ribeyre, F.; Boudou, A. [Univ. Bordeaux I/CNRS, Talence (France). Lab. d`Ecotoxicologie

    1997-10-01

    The involvement of metallothioneins (MTs) in cadmium (Cd) and inorganic mercury (Hg[II]) bioaccumulation by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea was experimentally investigated after 0, 15, 30 and 45 d of exposure from the water column source. Three levels of contamination were studied for each metal: 0, 5, and 35 {micro}g Cd/L and 0, 1.45, and 5 {micro}g Hg/L, with two replicates per condition. Forty eight experimental units (EUs) were conducted simultaneously. The mollusks were fed twice a week by additions of phytoplanktonic algae. Quantification of MTs was done by Hg-saturation assay, using cold Hg(II). A partial purification of these proteins was conducted by gel-filtration chromatography, followed by Cd determinations in the different eluted fractions. Results at the whole organism (soft tissues) and organ or tissue group (gills, mantle, foot, visceral mass) levels show high metal concentrations, with a fourfold greater accumulation of inorganic Hg than Cd after 30 d exposure at the same concentration of 5 {micro}g/L. Gills and visceral mass were the principal storage compartments. A significant increase in MT concentrations was revealed in these two organs after exposure to Cd: ratios between the MT concentrations in contaminated and control mollusks were 2.4 and 2.8, respectively, for 5 and 35 {micro}g Cd/L. Cd burdens in the cytosol and in {le}18-kDa protein fractions, similar to purified mammal MTs, correspond to 30 and 14% of the total Cd accumulated in the whole organisms. No significant increase in MT biosynthesis was observed after exposure to inorganic Hg, despite the high metal concentrations in the organs.

  4. Sputtered cadmium oxide as a surface pretreatment for graphite solid-lubricant films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Sputtered films of cadmium oxide were applied to sand blasted AISI 440C HT stainless steel disks as a surface pretreatment for the application of rubbed graphite films. Mixtures of cadmium oxide and graphite were applied to the nonpretreated sandblasted metal and evaluated. The results were compared to graphite films applied to other commercially available surface pretreatments. It is found that sputtered CdO pretreated surfaces increase the endurance lives of the graphite films and decrease the counterface steady state wear rate of the pins almost an order of magnitude compared to commercially available pretreatments. The CdO additions in general improved the tribological properties of graphite. The greatest benefit occurred when it was applied to the substrate rather than mixing it with the graphite and that sputtered films of CdO perform much better than rubbed CdO films.

  5. Sputtered cadmium oxide as a surface pretreatment for graphite solid lubricant films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Sputtered films of cadmium oxide were applied to sand blasted AISI 440C HT stainless steel disks as a surface pretreatment for the application of rubbed graphite films. Mixtures of cadmium oxide and graphite were applied to the nonpretreated sandblasted metal and evaluated. The results were compared to graphite films applied to other commercially available surface pretreatments. It is found that sputtered CdO pretreated surfaces increase the endurance lives of the graphite films and decrease the counterface steady state wear rate of the pins almost an order of magnitude compared to commercially available pretreatments. The CdO additions in general improved the tribological properties of graphite. The greatest benefit occurred when it was applied to the substrate rather than mixing it with the graphite and that sputtered films of CdO perform much better than rubbed CdO films.

  6. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon

  7. Quaternary oxide halides of group 15 with zinc and cadmium; Quaternaere Oxidhalogenide der Gruppe 15 mit Zink und Cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueck, Nadia

    2014-07-30

    The present thesis ''Quaternary oxide halides of group 15 with zinc and cadmium'' deals with the chemical class of oxide halides, which contain d-block element cations and pnicogens. Over the past few years compounds containing pnicogene cations are intensively investigated. The reason for this is the free electron pair of the Pn{sup 3+} cation, which is responsible for some interesting properties. Free electron pairs do not only impact the spatial structure of molecules but also the properties of materials. The object of this work was the synthesis and characterization of compounds containing Pn{sup 3+} cations with free electron pairs. Due to the structure-determining effect of these free electron pairs and in combination with halides it is possible to synthesize compounds with low-dimensional structures like chains and layers. In these compounds the structure is separated into halophilic and chalcophilic sub-structures, which are held together only by weak Van der Waals forces.

  8. Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André; Steiger, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun, is different in several respects from the other three terrestrial planets. In appearance, it resembles the heavily cratered surface of the Moon, but its density is high, it has a magnetic field and magnetosphere, but no atmosphere or ionosphere. This book reviews the progress made in Mercury studies since the flybys by Mariner 10 in 1974-75, based on the continued research using the Mariner 10 archive, on observations from Earth, and on increasingly realistic models of its interior evolution.

  9. Combined oxidative leaching and electrowinning process for mercury recovery from spent fluorescent lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Cihan; Coskun, Sezen; Akcil, Ata; Beyhan, Mehmet; Üncü, Ismail Serkan; Civelekoglu, Gokhan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, oxidative leaching and electrowinnig processes were performed to recovery of mercury from spent tubular fluorescent lamps. Hypochlorite was found to be effectively used for the leaching of mercury to the solution. Mercury could be leached with an efficiency of 96% using 0.5M/0.2M NaOCl/NaCl reagents at 50°C and pH 7.5 for 2-h. Electrowinning process was conducted on the filtered leaching solutions and over the 81% of mercury was recovered at the graphite electrode using citric acid as a reducing agent. The optimal process conditions were observed as a 6A current intensity, 30g/L of reducing agent concentration, 120min. electrolysis time and pH of 7 at the room temperature. It was found that current intensity and citric acid amount had positive effect for mercury reduction. Recovery of mercury in its elemental form was confirmed by SEM/EDX. Oxidative leaching with NaOCl/NaCl reagent was followed by electrowinning process can be effectively used for the recovery of mercury from spent fluorescent lamps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel fluorescent array for mercury (II) ion in aqueous solution with functionalized cadmium selenide nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Jinlong [School of Chemistry and Enviromental Science, An Qing Normal College, An Qing 246003 (China)]. E-mail: chenjl_4@hotmail.com; Gao Yingchun [School of Chemistry and Enviromental Science, An Qing Normal College, An Qing 246003 (China); Xu, ZhiBing [School of Chemistry and Enviromental Science, AnQing normal College, AnQing 246003 (China); Wu, GenHua [School of Chemistry and Enviromental Science, AnQing normal College, AnQing 246003 (China); Chen, YouCun [School of Chemistry and Enviromental Science, AnQing normal College, AnQing 246003 (China); Zhu, ChangQing [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)]. E-mail: zhucq625@163.com

    2006-09-01

    Mono-disperse CdSe nanoclusters have been prepared facilely and functionalized with L-cysteine through two steps by using safe and low cost substances. They are water-soluble and biocompatible. Especially these functionalized quantum dots can be stably soluble in water more than for 30 days, and the intensity of fluorescence and absorbance was decreased less than 15% of fresh prepared CdSe colloids. These functionalized CdSe QDs exhibited strong specific affinity for mercury (II) through QDs interface functional groups. Based on the quenching of fluorescence signals of functionalized CdSe QDs at 530 nm and no obvious wavelength shift or no new emission band in present of Hg (II) at pH 7.75 of phosphate buffer solution, a simple, rapid and specific array for Hg (II) was proposed. In comparison with conventional organic fluorophores, these nanoparticles are brighter, more stable against photobleaching, and do not suffer from blinking. Under optimum conditions, the response of linearly proportional to the concentration of Hg (II) between 0 and 2.0 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, and the limit of detection is 6.0 x 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation of six replicate measurements is 1.8% for 1.0 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} Hg (II). The mechanism of reaction is also discussed. The proposed method was successfully applied for Hg (II) detection in four real samples with a satisfactory result that was obtained by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS)

  11. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constance Senior

    2004-12-31

    The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

  12. Effects of waterborne cadmium on metabolic rate, oxidative stress, and ion regulation in the freshwater fish, inanga (Galaxias maculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Nicole K; Gaw, Sally; Glover, Chris N

    2018-01-01

    The freshwater fish Galaxias maculatus (inanga) is a widespread Southern hemisphere species, but despite its habitation of lowland near-coastal waters with a high potential for cadmium contamination, nothing is known regarding its sensitivity to this toxic trace metal. Acute (96h) exposures were therefore performed to determine sublethal responses of inanga to waterborne cadmium at a regulatory trigger value (nominally 0.2μgL-1; measured 1μgL-1), an environmental level (measured at 2.5μgL-1), and an effect level (measured at 10μgL-1). Whole body (tissue remaining following excision of kidney and liver) cadmium burden remained constant up until an exposure concentration of 10μgL-1, at which point cadmium concentration increased significantly. A transient effect of cadmium on metabolic rate was observed, with an impaired oxygen consumption noted at 2.5, but not 1 or 10, μg L-1. Cadmium did not impair influx rates of either sodium or calcium, and no effects of cadmium on oxidative stress parameters (catalase activity, lipid peroxidation) were noted in the kidney. However, at cadmium concentrations of 2.5 and 10μgL-1, lipid peroxidation in the liver increased, concomitant with a decline in hepatic catalase activity. These data indicate that there are significant differences in the mechanisms of cadmium toxicity in inanga, relative to better-studied Northern hemisphere species, especially with respect to ionoregulatory impacts. However, effects were induced at cadmium concentrations unlikely to be encountered in any but the most highly contaminated waterways, and thus our data suggest that current trigger values for cadmium concentrations in Australian and New Zealand waters are likely to be protective of inanga. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Role of nitric oxide synthase inhibition in the acute hypertensive response to intracerebroventricular cadmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, Maria Piera; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Volpe, Anna Rita; Emanueli, Costanza; Madeddu, Paolo

    1998-01-01

    In the rat, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of cadmium, a pollutant with long biological half-life, causes a sustained increase in blood pressure at doses that are ineffective by peripheral route. Since cadmium inhibits calcium-calmodulin constitutive nitric oxide (NO) synthase in cytosolic preparations of rat brain, this mechanism may be responsible for the acute pressor action of this heavy metal.To test this possibility, we evaluated the effect of i.c.v. injection of 88 nmol cadmium in normotensive unanaesthetized Wistar rats, which were i.c.v. pre-treated with: (1) saline (control), (2) L-arginine (L-Arg), to increase the availability of substrate for NO biosynthesis, (3) D-arginine (D-Arg), (4) 3-[4-morpholinyl]-sydnonimine-hydrochloride (SIN-1), an NO donor, or (5) CaCl2, a cofactor of brain calcium-calmodulin-dependent cNOSI. In additional experiments, the levels of L-citrulline (the stable equimolar product derived from enzymatic cleavage of L-Arg by NO synthase) were determined in the brain of vehicle- or cadmium-treated rats.The pressor response to cadmium reached its nadir at 5 min (43±4 mmHg) and lasted over 20 min in controls. L-Citrulline/protein content was reduced from 35 up to 50% in the cerebral cortex, pons, hippocampus, striatus, hypothalamus (P<0.01) of cadmium-treated rats compared with controls. Central injection of NG nitro-L-arginine-methylester (L-NAME) also reduced the levels of L-citrulline in the brain.Both the magnitude and duration of the response were attenuated by 1.21 and 2.42 μmol SIN-1 (32±3 and 15±4 mmHg, P<0.05), or 1 μmol CaCl2 (6±4 mmHg, P<0.05). Selectivity of action exerted by SIN-1 was confirmed by the use of another NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). Both L-Arg and D-Arg caused a mild but significant attenuation in the main phase of the pressor response evoked by cadmium. However, only L-Arg reduced the magnitude of the delayed, pressor response. Despite their similarity in

  14. Bioaccumulation of lead, mercury, and cadmium in the greater white-toothed shrew, Crocidura russula, from the Ebro Delta (NE Spain); Sex- and age-dependent variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Chardi, Alejandro [Departament de Biologia Animal (Vertebrats), Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: a.sanchez.chardi@ub.edu; Lopez-Fuster, Maria Jose [Departament de Biologia Animal (Vertebrats), Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Nadal, Jacint [Departament de Biologia Animal (Vertebrats), Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-01-15

    We quantified bioaccumulation of lead, mercury, and cadmium in bones from 105 greater white-toothed shrews (Crocidura russula) collected at the Ebro Delta, a polluted area, and the Medas Islands, a control site. Lead and mercury levels varied with site, age, and sex, although statistical significances depended on each factor. Globally, shrews from the polluted area exhibited significantly higher concentrations of Pb and Hg. Increment of Pb with age was particularly remarkable in wetland animals and was interpreted in relation to human activities, namely hunting. Unlike males, females from the Ebro Delta maintained low Hg levels, which were associated with gestation and lactation. Cadmium levels did not differ between sites, sexes, or ages. This study provides the first data on heavy metals in mammals from this wetland and suggests that C. russula is a good bioindicator of metal pollution. We concluded that sex and age may represent an important source of variation in the bioaccumulation of these metals in wild populations. - Bioaccumulation patterns of Pb and Hg reveal sex and age-related differences in the large bones of the greater white-toothed shrew from a polluted Mediterranean wetland.

  15. Determination of mercury, cadmium, lead, zinc, selenium and iron by ICP-OES in mushroom samples from around thermal power plant in Muğla, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Ibrahim; Solak, M Halil; Uğurlu, Mehmet; Işıloğlu, Mustafa; Arslan, Yasin

    2011-09-01

    Scleroderma verrucosum, Stropharia coronilla, Lactarius deterrimus, Chroogomphus rutilus, Russula delica, Laccaria laccata, Clitocybe odora var. alba, Lyophyllum decastes, Coprinus comatus, Helvella leucomelaena, Melanoleuca cognata, Melanoleuca cognata, Paxina acetabulum, Clitocybe vermicularis, Sarcosphaera crassa, Rhizopogon roseolu and Thelephora caryophyllea were collected from different localities in Muğla-Yatağan region of Turkey. Their trace metals concentrations were determined by ICPOES after microwave digestion. The results were 0.37 ± 0.01-5.28 ± 0.21 for cadmium, 467 ± 19-3,280 ± 131 for iron, 0.69 ± 0.03-9.15 ± 0.37 for lead, 18.70 ± 0.75-67.10 ± 2.68 for selenium, 75 ± 3-213 ± 8 for zinc and 0.15 ± 0.01-0.55 ± 0.01 for mercury (as μg/g). The detection limits for ICPOES were found as 0.25 for Cadmium, 0.2 for iron, 0.1 for lead, 0.5 for selenium, 0.2 for zinc and 0.03 for mercury (as mg L(-1)). The Relatively Standard Deviations (R.S.D.) were found below 4.0%. The accuracy of procedure was confirmed by certified reference material.

  16. Renal and Neurologic Effects of Cadmium, Lead, Mercury, and Arsenic in Children: Evidence of Early Effects and Multiple Interactions at Environmental Exposure Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Burbure, Claire; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Leroyer, Ariane; Nisse, Catherine; Haguenoer, Jean-Marie; Mutti, Antonio; Smerhovský, Zdenek; Cikrt, Miroslav; Trzcinka-Ochocka, Malgorzata; Razniewska, Grazyna; Jakubowski, Marek; Bernard, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic are common environmental pollutants in industrialized countries, but their combined impact on children’s health is little known. We studied their effects on two main targets, the renal and dopaminergic systems, in > 800 children during a cross-sectional European survey. Control and exposed children were recruited from those living around historical nonferrous smelters in France, the Czech Republic, and Poland. Children provided blood and urine samples for the determination of the metals and sensitive renal or neurologic biomarkers. Serum concentrations of creatinine, cystatin C, and β2-microglobulin were negatively correlated with blood lead levels (PbB), suggesting an early renal hyperfiltration that averaged 7% in the upper quartile of PbB levels (> 55 μg/L; mean, 78.4 μg/L). The urinary excretion of retinol-binding protein, Clara cell protein, and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase was associated mainly with cadmium levels in blood or urine and with urinary mercury. All four metals influenced the dopaminergic markers serum prolactin and urinary homovanillic acid, with complex interactions brought to light. Heavy metals polluting the environment can cause subtle effects on children’s renal and dopaminergic systems without clear evidence of a threshold, which reinforces the need to control and regulate potential sources of contamination by heavy metals. PMID:16581550

  17. Transmission electron microscopy study on defects in arsenic-implanted mercury cadmium tellulide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkajun, Nuntaporn

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study extended defects in arsenic-implanted HgCdTe (MCT). Implantation causes defects produced from ion bombardment. Annealing process is used for electrical activation and removing implantation damage. MCT was grown on (211) CdZnTe substrate by MBE method. Arsenic-doped MCT was implanted at room temperature with dual energies to the doses between 1x1010 to 1x1018 As + cm-3. Post isothermal annealing was performed at 436°C for 20 minutes and 250°C for 24 hr. Perfect and Frank dislocation loops were predominantly formed as the primary defects. The amount of the defects depended on a dosage. Extended defects were observed and the damage depth was beyond the ion projected range of implanted ions. No amorphous phase was found in implanted as-implanted MCT even at very high dose. The high degree of bond ionicity was responsible for defect combination to prevent amorphitization. Inside-outside contrast analysis was used for dislocation-loop nature analysis. The result shows that interstitial and vacancy loops were both found. Thus, mercury vacancies, VHg and interstitials, Hgi which are knocked off by implantation are believed that the number of V Hg and Hgi could condense into form vacancies loops and interstitial loops. Arsenic dopant ions, As"i, could also coalesce into interstitial loops. Further annealing caused a change in the dislocation structure to edge dislocation half loops with Burgers vector of ½ inclined to the surface. The defects in the 250 °C annealed samples showed dislocation half loops, dislocation networks and remaining dislocation loops. By increasing temperature to 436 °C or increasing dose the half loops become more widespread. An explanation for the origin of dislocation formed during annealing could be referred to as ⅓ loops transform to ½ loops. The loops were continued to climb by absorption of point defects. The climb towards the surface would be expected since climb to the surface

  18. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-15

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  19. Copper slag as a catalyst for mercury oxidation in coal combustion flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Zhang, Weilin; Wang, Jun; Yang, Zequn; Li, Liqing; Shih, Kaimin

    2017-12-08

    Copper slag is a byproduct of the pyrometallurgical smelting of copper concentrate. It was used in this study to catalyze elemental mercury (Hg0) oxidation in simulated coal combustion flue gas. The copper slag exhibited excellent catalytic performance in Hg0 oxidation at temperatures between 200 °C and 300 °C. At the most optimal temperature of 250 °C, a Hg0 oxidation efficiency of 93.8% was achieved under simulated coal combustion flue gas with both a high Hg0 concentration and a high gas hourly space velocity of 128,000 h-1. Hydrogen chloride (HCl) was the flue gas component responsible for Hg0 oxidation over the copper slag. The transition metal oxides, including iron oxides and copper oxide in the copper slag, exhibited significant catalytic activities in the surface-mediated oxidation of Hg0 in the presence of HCl. It is proposed that the Hg0 oxidation over the copper slag followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism whereby reactive chlorine species that originated from HCl reacted with the physically adsorbed Hg0 to form oxidized mercury. This study demonstrated the possibility of reusing copper slag as a catalyst for Hg0 oxidation and revealed the mechanisms involved in the process and the key factors in the performance. This knowledge has fundamental importance in simultaneously reducing industrial waste and controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Alcohol vapor sensing by cadmium-doped zinc oxide thick films based chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, R. A.; Arora, M.; Chackrabarti, S.; Ahmad, S.; Kumar, J.; Hafiz, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles were derived by simple chemical co-precipitation route using zinc acetate dihydrate and cadmium acetate dihydrate as precursor materials. The thick films were casted from chemical co-precipitation route prepared nanoparticles by economic facile screen printing method. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the film were characterized relevant to alcohol vapor sensing application by powder XRD, SEM, UV-VIS and DC conductivity techniques. The response and sensitivity of alcohol (ethanol) vapor sensor are obtained from the recovery curves at optimum working temperature range from 20∘C to 50∘C. The result shows that maximum sensitivity of the sensor is observed at 25∘C operating temperature. On varying alcohol vapor concentration, minor variation in resistance has been observed. The sensing mechanism of sensor has been described in terms of physical adsorption and chemical absorption of alcohol vapors on cadmium-doped zinc oxide film surface and inside film lattice network through weak hydrogen bonding, respectively.

  1. Cadmium-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in the testes of frog Rana limnocharis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hangjun; Cai Chenchen; Shi Cailei; Cao Hui; Han Ziliu [Department of Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Xuelin Road 16, Xiasha Gaojiao Dongqu, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, 310036 (China); Jia Xiuying, E-mail: hznujiaxiuying@126.com [Department of Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Xuelin Road 16, Xiasha Gaojiao Dongqu, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, 310036 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd can cause vacuoles and deformity of the spermatogenic cells in the frog testes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd can result in oxidative stress in the frog testes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd can induce significantly increase of ROS contents triggered DNA damages in the frog testes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd can cause apoptosis in the testes of male R. limnocharis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis by Cd in the frog testes is related to Caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2 genes. - Abstract: This study explored the genetic damage induced by cadmium exposure in the testes of Rana limnocharis. Healthy adult frogs were exposed to 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10 mg/L of cadmium solution for 14 days. The results showed that exposure to these concentrations increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde content in the testes, clearly indicating a dose-effect relationship. Moreover, the same dosages of Cd{sup 2+} solution increased glutathione (reduced) content, with the values being significantly different from those observed in the control group (P < 0.01). The comet assay results demonstrated that the DNA damage rate, tail length, and tail moment of samples obtained from frogs exposed to 2.5-7.5 mg/L of cadmium solution significantly increased compared with those of samples obtained from the control group (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that cadmium can induce free radical generation, followed by lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. Ultrastructural observation revealed vacuoles in the spermatogenic cells, cell dispersion, incomplete cell structures, and deformed nucleoli. Moreover, cadmium exposure induced significant down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression and up-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 expressions. Taken together, these data indicate that cadmium can induce testicular cell apoptosis in R. limnocharis. Exploring the effects of cadmium on the mechanism of reproductive toxicity in amphibians will help provide a

  2. Ethylene signalling is mediating the early cadmium-induced oxidative challenge in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellingen, Kerim; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Keunen, Els; Cuypers, Ann

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stimulates ethylene biosynthesis. The phytohormone ethylene is a regulator of many developmental and physiological plant processes as well as stress responses. Previous research indicated various links between ethylene signalling and oxidative stress. Our results support a correlation between the Cd-induced oxidative challenge and ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. The effects of 24 or 72 h exposure to 5 μM Cd on plant growth and several oxidative stress-related parameters were compared between wild-type (WT) and ethylene insensitive mutants (etr1-1, ein2-1, ein3-1). Cadmium-induced responses observed in WT plants were mainly affected in etr1-1 and ein2-1 mutants, of which the growth was less inhibited by Cd exposure as compared to WT and ein3-1 mutants. Both etr1-1 and ein2-1 showed a delayed response in the glutathione (GSH) metabolism, including GSH levels and transcript levels of GSH synthesising and recycling enzymes. Furthermore, the expression of different oxidative stress marker genes was significantly lower in Cd-exposed ein2-1 mutants, evidencing that ethylene signalling is involved in early responses to Cd stress. A model for the cross-talk between ethylene signalling and oxidative stress is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of Dietary Intake and Biomarker Levels of Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury among Asian Populations in the United States: NHANES 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Hiroshi; Linder, Stephen; Mitchell, Laura E; Delclos, George L

    2017-03-01

    We have recently shown that biomarker levels of selected metals are higher in Asians than in other U.S. ethnic groups, with important differences within selected Asian subgroups. Much of this difference may be dietary in origin; however, this is not well established. We evaluated dietary intake of toxic metals as a source of increased biomarker levels of metals among U.S. Asians. We estimated daily food consumption and dietary intake of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury by combining 24-hr dietary intake recall data from the 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with data from the USDA Food Composition Intake Database and FDA Total Dietary Study. We analyzed associations between dietary metal intake and biomarker levels of the metals using linear regression. Further, estimated food consumption and metal intake levels were compared between Asians and other racial/ethnic groups (white, black, Mexican American, and other Hispanic) and within three Asian subgroups (Chinese, Indian Asian, and other Asians). Significant associations (p Asians. Asians had the highest daily fish and rice consumption across the racial/ethnic groups. Fish was the major contributor to dietary mercury and total arsenic intake, whereas rice was the major contributor to inorganic arsenic dietary intake. Fish consumption across the Asian subgroups varied, with Asian Indians having lower fish consumption than the other Asian subgroups. Rice consumption was similar across the Asian subgroups. We confirmed that estimated dietary intake of arsenic (total and inorganic) and mercury is significantly associated with their corresponding biomarkers in U.S. Asians, using nationally representative data. In contrast, estimated dietary intake of cadmium and lead were not significantly associated with their corresponding biomarker levels in U.S. Asians. Citation: Awata H, Linder S, Mitchell LE, Delclos GL. 2017. Association of dietary intake and biomarker levels of arsenic

  4. Cadmium induced oxidative stress in kidney epithelia cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    2007-01-01

    . To minimize DCF photo-oxidation, illumination was limited to 100 ms exposures at 30 s intervals. ROS production rate was determined by linear regression analysis of change in the fluorescence intensity (FI) and expressed as increase in fluorescence intensity units (FIU) per min.    In order to evaluate...... that the Cd induced increase in ROS production was inhibited by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, by uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation from respiration with CCCP and by buffering of intracellular calcium with BAPTA. These results indicate that Cd generate a prompt initiation of ROS...

  5. Transformation of cadmium hydroxide to cadmium oxide thin films synthesized by SILAR deposition process: Role of varying deposition cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Nwanya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR was used to deposit nanocrystalline cadmium oxide (CdO thin films on microscopic glass substrates for various cycles (40–120. This is based on alternate dipping of the substrate in CdCl2 solution made alkaline (pH ∼12 with NaOH, rinsing with distilled water, followed by air treatment with air dryer and annealing at 300 °C for 1 h in air. The prepared films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, UV–Visible Spectrophotomer (UV–Vis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The 80th cycle was observed to be the saturation stage for this reaction. The XRD results confirmed the films to be CdO with some Cd(OH2 phase at higher deposition cycles. The films were polycrystalline in nature having high orientation along (111 and (200 planes. As the number of cycles increases the calculated average crystallite sizes increase gradually up till the 80th cycle after which a gradual decrease in the crystallite size was observed with increasing number of cycles. The films’ transmittance in the visible and near infrared region decreased as the number of cycles increased and ranged between 25 and 80%. This work shows the feasibility of using simple SILAR method at room temperature to obtain Cd(OH2 films which are transformed to CdO thin films after annealing.

  6. Cadmium, mercury and lead in the blood of urban women in Croatia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, China, Ecuador and Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pawlas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to make an international comparison of blood levels of cadmium (B-Cd, lead (BPb and mercury (B-Hg of women in seven European, and three non-European cities, and to identify determinants. Materials and Methods: About 50 women (age: 46–62 from each city were recruited (totally 480 in 2006–2009. Interview and questionnaire data were obtained. Blood samples were analysed in one laboratory to avoid interlaboratory variation. Results: Between the European cities, the B-Pb and B-Cd results vary little (range of geometric means: 13.5–27.0 μg/l and 0.25–0.65 μg/l, respectively; the variation of B-Hg was larger (0.40–1.38 μg/l. Between the non-European cities the results for B-Pb, B-Cd and B-Hg were 19.2–68.0, 0.39–0.99 and 1.01–2.73 μg/l, respectively. Smoking was a statistically signifi cant determinant for B-Cd, while fi sh and shellfi sh intakes contributed to B-Hg and B-Pb, amalgam fi llings also contributed to B-Hg. Conclusions: The present results confi rm the previous results from children; the exposure to lead and cadmium varies only little between different European cities suggesting that other factors than the living area are more important. The study also confi rms the previous fi ndings of higher cadmium and lead levels in some non-European cities. The geographical variation for mercury is signifi cant.

  7. Mercury, Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic, Chromium and Selenium in Feathers of Shorebirds during Migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey: Comparing the 1990s and 2011/2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Burger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding temporal changes in contaminant levels in coastal environments requires comparing levels of contaminants from the same species from different time periods, particularly if species are declining. Several species of shorebirds migrating through Delaware Bay have declined from the 1980s to the present. To evaluate some contaminants as cause for the declines, we examine levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium and selenium in feathers of red knot (Calidris canutus, N = 46 individuals, semipalmated sandpiper (Calidris pusilla, N = 70 and sanderling (Calidris alba, N = 32 migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA, from 1991 to 1992 (N = 40, 1995 (N = 28, and 2011–2012 (N = 80 to determine if levels have changed. We found: (1 arsenic, chromium, and lead increased in red knot and decreased in semipalmated sandpiper; (2 cadmium decreased in semipalmated sandpipers; (3 mercury decreased in red knot and sanderlings; (4 selenium decreased in red knot and increased in semipalmated sandpipers. In 2011/2012 there were significant interspecific differences for arsenic, mercury and selenium. Except for selenium, the element levels were well below levels reported for feathers of other species. The levels in feathers in red knots, sanderling, and semipalmated sandpipers from Delaware Bay in 2011/2012 were well below levels in feathers that are associated with effect levels, except for selenium. Selenium levels ranged from 3.0 µg·g−1 dry weight to 5.8 µg·g−1 (semipalmated sandpiper, within the range known to cause adverse effects, suggesting the need for further examination of selenium levels in birds. The levels of all elements were well below those reported for other marine species, except for selenium, which was near levels suggesting possible toxic effects.

  8. Mercury, Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic, Chromium and Selenium in Feathers of Shorebirds during Migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey: Comparing the 1990s and 2011/2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Tsipoura, Nellie; Niles, Lawrence J; Gochfeld, Michael; Dey, Amanda; Mizrahi, David

    2015-02-06

    Understanding temporal changes in contaminant levels in coastal environments requires comparing levels of contaminants from the same species from different time periods, particularly if species are declining. Several species of shorebirds migrating through Delaware Bay have declined from the 1980s to the present. To evaluate some contaminants as cause for the declines, we examine levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium and selenium in feathers of red knot ( Calidris canutus , N = 46 individuals), semipalmated sandpiper ( Calidris pusilla , N = 70) and sanderling ( Calidris alba , N = 32) migrating through Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA, from 1991 to 1992 ( N = 40), 1995 ( N = 28), and 2011-2012 ( N = 80) to determine if levels have changed. We found: (1) arsenic, chromium, and lead increased in red knot and decreased in semipalmated sandpiper; (2) cadmium decreased in semipalmated sandpipers; (3) mercury decreased in red knot and sanderlings; (4) selenium decreased in red knot and increased in semipalmated sandpipers. In 2011/2012 there were significant interspecific differences for arsenic, mercury and selenium. Except for selenium, the element levels were well below levels reported for feathers of other species. The levels in feathers in red knots, sanderling, and semipalmated sandpipers from Delaware Bay in 2011/2012 were well below levels in feathers that are associated with effect levels, except for selenium. Selenium levels ranged from 3.0 µg·g -1 dry weight to 5.8 µg·g -1 (semipalmated sandpiper), within the range known to cause adverse effects, suggesting the need for further examination of selenium levels in birds. The levels of all elements were well below those reported for other marine species, except for selenium, which was near levels suggesting possible toxic effects.

  9. [Cadmium and selenium interaction in mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Maja

    2010-09-01

    Cadmium occurs in the environment naturally and as a pollutant. Its exposure is inevitable and may produce toxic effects in many organs and organ systems through binding to biological structures, accumulation in internal organs or induction of free radical production. Another important aspect of Cd toxicity is its interaction, often anthagonistic, with essential elements. Vice versa, additional intake of the essential elements may have beneficial influence on distribution and toxic effects of cadmium. Selenium is an essential microelement and a constituent of many selenoproteins with antioxidant properties that bind cadmium (and other toxic elements such as mercury or arsenic). This review summarizes results, to date, of cadmium toxicokinetics and toxicodinamics, selenium biokinetics and biodinamics, as well as mechanisms of cadmium-selenium interaction and their impact on the oxidative status derived from the studies based upon mainly on animal experiments and on limited number of human studies. The wide variety of different doses, dose ratios, element administration modes and exposure lenghts of cadmium and selenium often yielded contradictory results. Future studies should be focused on assessment of effects of cadmium and selenium interaction in sensitive population groups and mechanisms of that interaction. Regarding animal studies, doses and exposure should be adjusted to long-term low exposure levels that are usually found in human population.

  10. Protective effect of aqueous Curry leaf (Murraya koenigii) extract against cadmium-induced oxidative stress in rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Elina; Ghosh, Arnab K; Ghosh, Debosree; Mukherjee, Debasri; Chattopadhyay, Aindrila; Dutta, Santanu; Pattari, Sanjib Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish

    2012-05-01

    Treatment of rats with a low dose of cadmium chloride caused a significant damage in the rat cardiac tissue indicated by the increase in the level of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase1 activities. Histological studies confirmed the damage due to cadmium. That cadmium-induced tissue damage was caused due to oxidative stress was evident from the changes observed in the levels of lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione, the protein carbonyl content, and the alterations in the activities of cardiac antioxidant and pro-oxidant enzymes. Treatment of rats with cadmium also caused alterations in the activities of mitochondrial Kreb's cycle as well as respiratory chain enzymes. All these changes were ameliorated when the rats were pre-treated with an aqueous extract of Curry leaf (Murraya koenigii). The studies indicated that the aqueous extract of Curry leaf protects the rat cardiac tissue against cadmium-induced oxidative stress possibly through its antioxidant activity. As curry leaf is consumed by people as part of their diet in India and South-East Asian and some European countries as well, and, as it has no reported side-effects, the results seem to have relevance at places where humans are exposed to cadmium environmentally or occupationally. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement-based modeling of daytime and nighttime oxidation of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Eran; Gabay, Maor; Peleg, Mordechai; Fredj, Erick

    2017-04-01

    Accurate characterization of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) chemical oxidation pathways and their kinetics is critically important for assessing the transfer of atmospheric mercury to bioaquatic systems. Recent comprehensive field measurements have suggested that the nitrate radical (NO3) plays a role in efficient nighttime oxidation of GEM, and that the role of the hydroxyl radical (OH) as a GEM oxidant has been underestimated. We used the CAABA/MECCA chemical box model and additional kinetic calculations to analyze these measurement results, in order to investigate the nighttime and daytime oxidation of GEM. We assumed a second-order reaction for the NO3 induced nighttime oxidation of GEM. Our analysis demonstrated that nighttime oxidation of GEM has to be included in the model to account for the measured variations in nighttime reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) concentration. A lower limit and best-fit rate constant for GEM nighttime oxidation are provided. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a rate for nighttime oxidation of GEM has been determined based on field measurements. Our analysis further indicates that OH has a much more important role in GEM oxidation than commonly considered. A lower-limit rate constant for the OH-RGM reaction is provided.

  12. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  13. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURING LOW RANK FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constance Senior

    2004-07-30

    This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a review of the available data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts from small, laboratory-scale experiments, pilot-scale slipstream reactors and full-scale power plants was carried out. Data from small-scale reactors obtained with both simulated flue gas and actual coal combustion flue gas demonstrated the importance of temperature, ammonia, space velocity and chlorine on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst. SCR catalysts are, under certain circumstances, capable of driving mercury speciation toward the gas-phase equilibrium values at SCR temperatures. Evidence suggests that mercury does not always reach equilibrium at the outlet. There may be other factors that become apparent as more data become available.

  14. Organic selenium supplementation increases mercury excretion and decreases oxidative damage in long-term mercury-exposed residents from Wanshan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Feng; Dong, Zeqin; Chen, Chunying; Li, Bai; Gao, Yuxi; Qu, Liya; Wang, Tianchen; Fu, Xin; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-10-16

    Due to a long history of extensive mercury mining and smelting activities, local residents in Wanshan, China, are suffering from elevated mercury exposure. The objective of the present study was to study the effects of oral supplementation with selenium-enriched yeast in these long-term mercury-exposed populations. One hundred and three volunteers from Wanshan area were recruited and 53 of them were supplemented with 100 μg of organic selenium daily as selenium-enriched yeast while 50 of them were supplemented with the nonselenium-enriched yeast for 3 months. The effects of selenium supplementation on urinary mercury, selenium, and oxidative stress-related biomarkers including malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine were assessed. This 3-month selenium supplementation trial indicated that organic selenium supplementation could increase mercury excretion and decrease urinary malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine levels in local residents.

  15. Stabilization of mercury over Mn-based oxides: Speciation and reactivity by temperature programmed desorption analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Haomiao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ma, Yongpeng [Henan Collaborative Innovation Center of Environmental Pollution Control and Ecological Restoration, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, No. 136, Science Avenue, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Huang, Wenjun; Mei, Jian; Zhao, Songjian; Qu, Zan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yan, Naiqiang, E-mail: nqyan@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Hg-TPD method was used for speciation of mercury species. • Different elements modified MnO{sub x} have different mercury binding state. • Understanding mercury existed state was beneficial for designing novel materials. - Abstract: Mercury temperature-programmed desorption (Hg-TPD) method was employed to clarify mercury species over Mn-based oxides. The elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) removal mechanism over MnO{sub x} was ascribed to chemical-adsorption. HgO was the primary mercury chemical compound adsorbed on the surface of MnO{sub x}. Rare earth element (Ce), main group element (Sn) and transition metal elements (Zr and Fe) were chosen for the modification of MnO{sub x}. Hg-TPD results indicated that the binding strength of mercury on these binary oxides followed the order of Sn-MnO{sub x} < Ce-MnO{sub x} ∼ MnO{sub x} < Fe-MnO{sub x} < Zr-MnO{sub x}. The activation energies for desorption were calculated and they were 64.34, 101.85, 46.32, 117.14, and 106.92 eV corresponding to MnO{sub x}, Ce-MnO{sub x}, Sn-MnO{sub x}, Zr-MnO{sub x} and Fe-MnO{sub x}, respectively. Sn-MnO{sub x} had a weak bond of mercury (Hg-O), while Zr-MnO{sub x} had a strong bond (Hg≡O). Ce-MnO{sub x} and Fe-MnO{sub x} had similar bonds compared with pure MnO{sub x}. Moreover, the effects of SO{sub 2} and NO were investigated based on Hg-TPD analysis. SO{sub 2} had a poison effect on Hg{sup 0} removal, and the weak bond of mercury can be easily destroyed by SO{sub 2}. NO was favorable for Hg{sup 0} removal, and the bond strength of mercury was enhanced.

  16. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the

  17. Comparative analysis of concentrations of lead, cadmium and mercury in cord blood, maternal blood, and breast milk, as well as persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons in maternal milk samples from Germany and Iran; Vergleichende Untersuchungen ueber die Blei-, Cadmium- und Quecksilberkonzentrationen im Nabelschnurblut, im muetterlichen Blut und in der Frauenmilch sowie ueber einige persistente Organochlorverbindungen in der Milch deutscher und iranischer Muetter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javanmardi, F.

    2001-07-01

    The concentration of the heavy metals lead, cadmium and mercury in cord blood, maternal blood and breast milk has been studied. Lead and cadmium were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury was determined using the flow-injection hydride technique. According to the concentrations of heavy metals and chlorinated hydrocarbons we ascertained for the region of Rendsburg, the toxic risk for infants relative to the consumption of contaminated maternal milk can be viewed as very slight. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, die aktuelle Schwermetallbelastung des Nabelschnurblutes, des muetterlichen Blutes und der Muttermilch zu untersuchen. Die Bestimmung von Blei und Cadmium erfolgte mit Hilfe der Atomabsorptionsspektrometrie. Quecksilber wurde mittels der Fliessinjektions-Hydridtechnik bestimmt. Nach den von uns ermittelten Schwermetall- bzw. Chlorkohlenwasserstoffkonzentrationen fuer die Region Rendsburg kann das mit dem Verzehr kontaminierter Muttermilch verbundene toxische Risiko fuer den Saeugling als sehr gering eingeschaetzt werden. (orig.)

  18. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constance Senior; Temi Linjewile

    2003-07-25

    This is the first Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Ceramics GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, analysis of the coal, ash and mercury speciation data from the first test series was completed. Good agreement was shown between different methods of measuring mercury in the flue gas: Ontario Hydro, semi-continuous emission monitor (SCEM) and coal composition. There was a loss of total mercury across the commercial catalysts, but not across the blank monolith. The blank monolith showed no oxidation. The data from the first test series show the same trend in mercury oxidation as a function of space velocity that has been seen elsewhere. At space velocities in the range of 6,000-7,000 hr{sup -1} the blank monolith did not show any mercury oxidation, with or without ammonia present. Two of the commercial catalysts clearly showed an effect of ammonia. Two other commercial catalysts showed an effect of ammonia, although the error bars for the no-ammonia case are large. A test plan was written for the second test series and is being reviewed.

  19. The Homogeneus Forcing of Mercury Oxidation to provide Low-Cost Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Kramlich; Linda Castiglone

    2007-06-30

    Trace amounts of mercury are found in all coals. During combustion, or during thermal treatment in advanced coal processes, this mercury is vaporized and can be released to the atmosphere with the ultimate combustion products. This has been a cause for concern for a number of years, and has resulted in a determination by the EPA to regulate and control these emissions. Present technology does not, however, provide inexpensive ways to capture or remove mercury. Mercury that exits the furnace in the oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) is known to much more easily captured in existing pollution control equipment (e.g., wet scrubbers for SO{sub 2}), principally due to its high solubility in water. Work funded by DOE has helped understand the chemical kinetic processes that lead to mercury oxidation in furnaces. The scenario is as follows. In the flame the mercury is quantitatively vaporized as elemental mercury. Also, the chlorine in the fuel is released as HCl. The direct reaction Hg+HCl is, however, far too slow to be of practical consequence in oxidation. The high temperature region does supports a small concentration of atomic chlorine. As the gases cool (either in the furnace convective passes, in the quench prior to cold gas cleanup, or within a sample probe), the decay in Cl atom is constrained by the slowness of the principal recombination reaction, Cl+Cl+M{yields}Cl{sub 2}+M. This allows chlorine atom to hold a temporary, local superequilibrium concentration . Once the gases drop below about 550 C, the mercury equilibrium shifts to favor HgCl{sub 2} over Hg, and this superequilibrium chlorine atom promotes oxidation via the fast reactions Hg+Cl+M{yields}HgCl+M, HgCl+Cl+M{yields}HgCl{sub 2}+M, and HgCl+Cl{sub 2}{yields}HgCl{sub 2}+Cl. Thus, the high temperature region provides the Cl needed for the reaction, while the quench region allows the Cl to persist and oxidize the mercury in the absence of decomposition reactions that would destroy the HgCl{sub 2}. Promoting

  20. Dynamic measurement of mercury adsorption and oxidation on activated carbon in simulated cement kiln flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    of the sulfite converter is short and typically within 2min. Dynamic mercury adsorption and oxidation tests on commercial activated carbons Darco Hg and HOK standard were performed at 150°C using simulated cement kiln gas and a fixed bed reactor system. It is shown that the converter and analyzer system...

  1. Mercury Oxidation over Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Catalysts - Ph.d. thesis Karin Madsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karin

    The vanadium-based SCR catalyst used for NOx-control promotes the oxidation of elemental mercury Hg0 to Hg2+ in flue gases from coal-fired power plants. Hg2+ is water soluble and can effectively be captured in a wet scrubber. This means that the combination of an SCR with a wet FGD can offer an e...

  2. A baseline study of levels of mercury, arsenic, cadmium and lead in Northeast Arctic cod (Gadus morhua) from different parts of the Barents Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julshamn, Kaare; Duinker, Arne; Nilsen, Bente M; Frantzen, Sylvia; Maage, Amund; Valdersnes, Stig; Nedreaas, Kjell

    2013-02-15

    This study is one of several baseline studies that will provide basic and reliable information about the content of undesirable substances in important species of fish caught in Norwegian waters. Concentrations of metals in the muscle and liver of more than 800 Northeast Arctic cod caught at 32 sites in the Barents Sea are reported. The highest concentration of both mercury in the muscle and cadmium in the liver was found in cod caught in the western part of the Barents Sea, while the highest concentration of total arsenic was found in cod from the eastern part. The arsenic concentrations varied greatly among individual fish, ranging from 0.3 to 170 mg kg(-1) wet weight in the muscle. Such high levels of total arsenic have never previously been reported in any fish, and the primary factor for these high concentrations is likely to be the shrimp in the cod diet. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Local and interannual variations in mercury and cadmium in eggs of eight seabird species of the Sinaloa coast, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyca, Juan P; Castillo-Guerrero, J Alfredo; García-Hernández, Jaqueline; Fernández, Guillermo; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in eggs of 8 seabird species inhabiting 5 coastal ecosystems in Sinaloa, México were determined during 2 breeding seasons (2012 and 2013): blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii), brown booby (Sula leucogaster), double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), magnificent frigatebird (Fregata magnificens), brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), royal tern (Thalasseus maximus), laughing gull (Leucophaeus atricilla), and Heermann's gull (Larus heermanni). The interspecific differences found in the concentrations of both metals were attributed to the diet and foraging ecology of the species. The highest Hg concentrations were detected in piscivorous species (brown pelican, 0.42 µg/g; brown booby, 0.31 µg/g; blue-footed booby, 0.26 µg/g; and double-crested cormorant, 0.23 µg/g); whereas species with more varied diets presented the highest Cd concentrations (Heermann's gull, 0.31 µg/g; laughing gull, 0.27 µg/g; and magnificent frigatebird, 0.27 µg/g). Cadmium concentrations were significantly greater in 2013 than 2012 for most species, and brown pelican and laughing gull also had higher Hg concentrations in 2013 in Santa María Bay, suggesting a relationship as a result of the changes either in oceanographic conditions or in continental runoff. Mercury concentrations in brown pelican and Cd concentrations in Heermann's gull and laughing gull were above threshold levels for adverse effects on reproduction and survival. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2330-2338. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  4. Levels of lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium in clays for oral use on the Dutch market and estimation of associated risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeuwijk, N M; Klerx, W N M; Kooijman, M; Hoogenboom, L A P; Rietjens, I M C M; Martena, M J

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women in Africa, Asia and Suriname, and some immigrants in Western societies, traditionally consume clay products known by a variety of names such as mabele, calabash chalk, sikor and pimba. Furthermore, clay is used for health purposes in Western societies. Because certain clays can contain high levels of metals and metalloids, the aim of this study was to determine lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium in clay products for oral use available on the Dutch market. Traditional clays originating from Africa (n = 10) and Suriname (n = 26), and health clays (n = 27) were sampled from 2004 up to and including 2012. Total metal and metalloid contents were measured by ICP-MS and showed maximum levels of lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium of 99.7, 45.1, 2.2 and 0.75 mg kg⁻¹, respectively. In the absence of maximum limits for these type of clays, the potential exposure was estimated from the determined concentration, the estimated daily use level of the clays, and the estimated bioaccessibility of the different metals and arsenic. The intake estimates were compared with existing health-based guidance values. For lead, the use of 34 of the 36 traditional clays and two of the 27 health clays would result in intake levels exceeding the toxicological limit by up to 20-fold. Use of 15 of the 35 traditional clays and 11 of the 27 health clays would result in intake levels exceeding the toxicological limit for inorganic arsenic by up to 19-fold. Although limited bioaccessibility from the clay may limit the exposure and exceedance of the health-based guidance values, it was concluded that lead and arsenic intakes from some clay products could be of concern also because of their use by pregnant women and the potential developmental toxicity. As a result the use of these products, especially by pregnant women, should be discouraged.

  5. Behavioral alterations in offspring of female rats repeatedly exposed to cadmium oxide by inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barański, B

    1984-07-01

    Prolonged exposure of female rats to cadmium oxide aerosols (0.02 and 0.16 mg Cd/m3) in air had no effect on fertility. Viability and postnatal growth of the offspring of dams that were exposed to 0.16 mg Cd/m3 before and during gestation, however, were depressed. Forepaw muscular strength and endurance of pups in all groups were similar. Maternal Cd exposure resulted in reduction of exploratory motor activity in 3-month-old pups from the 0.16 mg Cd/m3 group and male offspring from the 0.02 mg Cd/m3 group. Dose-dependent decreases of avoidance acquisition were seen in female offspring but not in males. In the open-field test, the ambulation of 5-month-old males from the 0.16 mg Cd/m3 was lowered, whereas in females from the 0.02 mg Cd/m3 group it was enhanced. The results indicate central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction in offspring of female rats exposed to low concentrations of cadmium oxide by inhalation.

  6. Nano-composites chitosan-curcumin synergistically inhibits the oxidative stress induced by toxic metal cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Taweel, Gasem M Abu; Hidayathulla, Syed

    2017-12-08

    The present study intends to compare the influence of pre-treatment with nanoparticles of curcumin (Cr-NPS), chitosan (Ch-NPS) and nanocomposites chitosan-curcumin (CC-NPS) on cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative damage in the liver, kidneys, and blood indices in Swiss strain adult male mice. The pretreated mice with Cr-NPS, Ch-NPS, and CC-NPS were exposed to Cd (10mg/kg) for three weeks. The non-enzymatic Oxidative Stress (OS) indices like lipid peroxides (TBARS), reduced total glutathione (GSH), enzymatic OS indices like catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were estimated together with some blood indices. Cadmium was able to induce a significant increase in TBARS and a significant decrease in GSH, GST, CAT and SOD levels in all the tissues, which were pretreated with nanocomposite. Furthermore, the blood indices like counts of red and white blood cells, platelets, hemoglobin and packed cell volume were also depleted due to Cd exposure but remained unaffected and kept under normal levels in pretreated mice group. The results indicate that Cr-NPS, Ch-NPS, and CC-NPS may act as natural antioxidants and when compared among the three, CC-NPS appears to be the best antioxidant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The potential role of combined anti-oxidants against cadmium toxicity on liver of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuturk, Meral; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Tunali, Sevim

    2007-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a widely distributed toxic trace metal, has been shown to accumulate in liver after long- and short-term exposure. Cd (2 mg/kg/day CdCl2) was intraperitoneally given to rats for eight days. Vitamin C (250 mg/kg/day) + vitamin E (250 mg/kg/day) + sodium selenate (0.25 mg/kg/day) were given to rats by oral means. The animals were treated by anti-oxidants one hour prior to treatment with Cd every day. The degenerative changes were observed in the groups given only Cd and anti-oxidants + Cd. Metallothionein (MT) immunoreactivity increased in cytoplasm of hepatocytes of the rats given Cd when compared with controls. In a number of cells with Cd and anti-oxidants treatment, immunoreactivity increase was more than in the group given Cd only and nuclear MT expression was also detected. Cell proliferation was assessed with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. PCNA expressions increased in all groups more than in the controls. Anti-oxidants treatment increased cell proliferation. In the animals administered with Cd, an increase in serum aspartate (AST) and alanine (ALT) aminotransferases, liver glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were observed. On the other hand, in the rats treated with anti-oxidants and Cd, serum AST and ALT, liver glutathione and LPO levels decreased. As a result, these results suggest that combined anti-oxidants treatment might be useful in protection of liver against Cd toxicity.

  8. Observations and Model Analysis of Enhanced Oxidized Mercury in the Free Troposphere during NOMADSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, L.; Shah, V.; Ambrose, J. L., II; Jaffe, D. A.; Jaegle, L.; Selin, N. E.; Song, S.; Festa, J.; Stutz, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a hazardous neurotoxic pollutant with complex atmospheric speciation and chemistry. It exists in the atmosphere primarily as gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), with a lifetime on the order of months, while oxidized Hg is more water soluble and deposits readily. Thus, Hg is considered both a local and a global pollutant. There are significant limitations in our understanding of global Hg cycling, including the sources and chemical mechanisms producing enhanced oxidized Hg in the free troposphere. Ground-based and airborne studies have associated free tropospheric oxidized Hg with GEM oxidation and atmospheric subsidence. Chemical transport models suggest that free tropospheric GEM oxidation is largely attributable to bromine (Br) atoms. During the 2013 Nitrogen Oxidants Mercury and Aerosol Distributions Sources and Sinks (NOMADSS) campaign, we sought to quantify the distribution and chemical transformation of Hg species in the free troposphere over the southeastern US. Enhanced oxidized Hg over North Texas was associated with long-range transport and subsidence from the sub-tropical Pacific free troposphere, where GEOS-Chem predicts air enriched in oxidized Hg. Bromine oxide (BrO) concentrations were also elevated over North Texas, perhaps supporting halogen oxidation as a source of free tropospheric oxidized Hg. Over the Atlantic Ocean, oxidized Hg up to 680 pg m-3 was associated with GEM oxidation and subsidence within the Atlantic high pressure system. The standard GEOS-Chem model underestimates free tropospheric oxidized Hg in these locations by a factor of three to ten, possibly due to underestimation of Br concentrations and/or uncertainty in the Hg+Br rate constant. We investigate GEOS-Chem's improved ability to reproduce the observed concentrations by tripling free tropospheric Br in the tropics and implementing a faster Hg+Br oxidation mechanism. Results have important implications for our understanding of global-scale atmospheric Hg chemistry and

  9. Adsorption of Cadmium Ions from Water on Double-walled Carbon Nanotubes/Iron Oxide Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Seffah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A new material (DWCNT/iron oxide for heavy metals removal was developed by combining the adsorption features of double-walled carbon nanotubes with the magnetic properties of iron oxides. Batch experiments were applied in order to evaluate adsorption capacity of the DWCNT/iron oxide composite for cadmium ions. The influence of operating parameters such as pH value, amount of adsorbent, initial adsorbate concentration and agitation speed was studied. The adsorption capacity of the DWCNT/iron oxide adsorbent for Cd2+ ions was 20.8 mg g-1, which is at the state of the art. The obtained results revealed that DWCNT/iron oxide composite is a very promising adsorbent for removal of Cd2+ ions from water under natural conditions. The advantage of the magnetic composite is that it can be used as adsorbent for contaminants in water and can be subsequently controlled and removed from the medium by a simple magnetic process.

  10. Electroactive behavior assessment of poly(acrylic acid)-graphene oxide composite hydrogel in the detection of cadmium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bejarano-Jimenez, A.; Escobar-Barrios, V.A.; Kleijn, J.M.; Oritz-Ledon, C.A.; Chazaro-Ruiz, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    Super absorbent polymers of acrylic acid-graphene oxide (PAA-GO) were synthesized with different percentage of chemical neutralization (0, 10, and 20%) of the acrylic acid monomer before its polymerization. The influence of their swelling and adsorption/desorption capacity of cadmium ions in aqueous

  11. Cadmium toxicity in cultured tomato cells - Role of ethylene, proteases and oxidative stress in cell death signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Woltering, E.J.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Harren, F.J.M.; Cristescu, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the ability of cadmium to induce programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells and to determine the involvement of proteolysis, oxidative stress and ethylene. Tomato suspension cells were exposed to treatments with CdSO4 and cell death was calculated after fluorescein

  12. Oxidation of elemental mercury in the atmosphere; Constraints imposed by global scale modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergan, Torbjoern; Rodhe, Henning [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    2000-05-01

    Based on the global mercury model published by Bergan et al. (1999), we present here further results from simulations where the central theme has been to evaluate the role of ozone and the hydroxyl radical as possible gas phase oxidants for the oxidation of elemental mercury in the atmosphere. The magnitude of natural and man-made mercury emissions are taken from recent literature estimates and the flux from land areas is assumed to vary by season. We consider only two mercury reservoirs, elemental mercury, Hg{sup 0}, and the more soluble divalent form, Hgll. Wet and dry deposition of Hgll is explicitly treated. Applying monthly mean fields of ozone for the oxidation of gas phase Hg{sup 0} and using the reaction rate by Hall (1995) yields a global transformation of Hg{sup 0} to Hgll which is too slow to keep the simulated concentration of Hg{sup 0} near observed values. This shows that there are additional important removal processes for Hg{sup 0} or that the reaction rate proposed by Hall (1995) is too slow. A simulation in which the oxidation rate was artificially increased, so that the global turn-over time of Hg{sup 0} was one year and the simulated average concentration of Hg{sup 0} was realistic, produced latitudinal and seasonal variations in Hg{sup 0} that did not support the hypothesis that gas phase reaction with O{sub 3} is the major oxidation process for Hg{sup 0}. Recent studies indicate that OH may be an important gas phase oxidant for Hg{sup 0}. Using OH as the oxidant and applying the preliminary oxidation rate by Sommar et al. (1999) gave an unrealistically large removal of Hg{sup 0} from the atmosphere. From calculations using a slower reaction rate, corresponding to a turn-over time of Hg{sup 0} of one year, we calculated concentrations of both Hg{sup 0} in surface air and Hgll in precipitation which correspond, both in magnitude and temporal variation, to seasonal observations in Europe and North America. This result supports the suggestion that

  13. Bioavailability of cadmium adsorbed on various oxides minerals to wetland plant species Phragmites australis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang He, E-mail: he.wangworld@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jia Yongfeng, E-mail: yongfeng.jia@iae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang Shaofeng [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhu Huijie; Wu Xing [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2009-08-15

    The bioavailability of heavy metals strongly depends on their speciation in the environment. The effect of different chemical speciations of cadmium ions (i.e. adsorbed on different oxide minerals) on its bioavailability to wetland plant Phragmites australis was studied. Goethite, magnetite, gibbsite, alumina, and manganese oxide were chosen as representatives of metal (hydr)oxides commonly present in sediment. The cultivar system with Hoagland solution as nutrition supply, and single metal oxide with adsorbed Cd as contaminant was applied to study Cd accumulation by P. australis. The bioaccumulation degree in root after the 45-day treatment followed the order: Al(OH){sub 3} > Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > MnO{sub 2} > FeOOH. The concentration of Cd in stem and leaf followed a similar order although it was considerably lower than that in root. Low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs), acetic acid, malic acid and citric acid were used to evaluate the desorbability of Cd from different oxides, which can be indicative of Cd-oxide bonding strength and Cd bioavailability. Desorption of Cd by acetic acid and malic acid followed the order: Al(OH){sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > FeOOH > MnO{sub 2}, while by citric acid: Al(OH){sub 3} {>=} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} > FeOOH > MnO{sub 2}. This was consistent with the Cd accumulation degree in the plant. Cd adsorbed on Al(OH){sub 3} was the most easily desorbable species and most bioavailable to P. australis among the oxide minerals, whereas MnO{sub 2} adsorbed Cd was least desorbable by LMWOAs hence constituted the least bioavailable Cd species adsorbed on the oxide minerals.

  14. Net Oxidation Rates of Gaseous Elemental Mercury in Simulated Urban Smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, K. M.; Rutter, A. P.; Lehr, R. M.; Parman, A.; Schauer, J. J.; Griffin, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Regulations to protect human health and ecosystem integrity from environmental mercury rely in part on an accurate scientific understanding of atmospheric processes that lead to its dry and wet deposition. One key process is the oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) to reactive mercury (RM), which is more readily dry and wet deposited than GEM. Previous research provides reaction kinetics of GEM oxidation by ozone and the hydroxyl radical in homogeneous reaction systems propagated in small halocarbon coated reactors. In order to more closely represent complex atmospheric reaction systems, we conducted experiments in a 9-cubic-meter Teflon smog chamber irradiated with UV lights, generating both homogeneous and heterogeneous photochemical reaction systems consisting of volatile organic compounds (VOC), ozone, and hydroxyl radicals. The reaction kinetics of ozone and GEM (enriched in the 198 stable isotope) were measured to provide a consistency check with previous publications. VOCs were added to the chamber to study the impact of ozone and reactive photochemical intermediates produced by precursors such as propene, isoprene, alpha-pinene, and toluene. Propene was chosen as a VOC that would not lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) but would provide reactive organic intermediates and secondary hydroxyl radicals when reacted with ozone. The results from these experiments were compared to those in which SOA precursors (isoprene, alpha-pinene, toluene) were added to assess the effects of a partially oxygenated organic particle surface on the photochemical oxidation chemistry of GEM. Less than half of the GEM conversion to RM observed in the classically studied Hg-ozone reaction was observed when non-SOA and SOA forming VOCs were added the reaction chamber. This result likely indicates the presence of a reductive pathway when oxidized VOCs are present and supports recent findings by Si and Ariya (2008). A zero-dimensional model has been constructed and will be

  15. Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colacino, Justin A.; Arthur, Anna E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Rozek, Laura S., E-mail: rozekl@umich.edu

    2014-05-01

    Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized. We used data from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet's role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP. Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level. - Highlights: • Cadmium may cause chronic disease through oxidative stress or inflammation. • We developed a score to quantify dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake. • Cadmium was associated with markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake mitigated the effects of cadmium exposure. • Dietary interventions may be effective against chronic cadmium toxicity.

  16. Revealing a room temperature ferromagnetism in cadmium oxide nanoparticles: An experimental and first-principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Bououdina, Mohamed

    2015-03-26

    We obtain a single cadmium oxide phase from powder synthesized by a thermal decomposition method of cadmium acetate dehydrate. The yielded powder is annealed in air, vacuum, and H2 gas in order to create point defects. Magnetization-field curves reveal the appearance of diamagnetic behavior with a ferromagnetic component for all the powders. Powder annealing under vacuum and H2 atmosphere leads to a saturation magnetization 1.15 memu g-1 and 1.2 memu g-1 respectively with an increase by 45% and 16% compared to the one annealed in air. We show that annealing in vacuum produces mainly oxygen vacancies while annealing in H2 gas creates mainly Cd vacancy leading to room temperature ferromagnetic (RTFM) component together with known diamagnetic properties. Ab initio calculations performed on the CdO nanoparticles show that the magnetism is governed by polarized hybrid states of the Cd d and O p orbitals together with the vacancy. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  17. The Danish contribution to the European DEMOCOPHES project: A description of cadmium, cotinine and mercury levels in Danish mother-child pairs and the perspectives of supplementary sampling and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mørck, Thit A. [Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nielsen, Flemming [Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Nielsen, Jeanette K.S.; Jensen, Janne F.; Hansen, Pernille W.; Hansen, Anne K.; Christoffersen, Lea N. [Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Siersma, Volkert D. [The Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, Ida H.; Hohlmann, Linette K. [Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Skaanild, Mette T. [Danish Environmental Protection Agency (Denmark); Frederiksen, Hanne [Department of Growth and Reproduction, University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Biot, Pierre [Federal Public Service Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment, Brussels (Belgium); Casteleyn, Ludwine [University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Schwedler, Gerda [Federal Environment Agency (UBA), Berlin (Germany); Castaño, Argelia [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); Angerer, Jürgen; Koch, Holger M. [Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (IPA), Bochum (Germany); Esteban, Marta [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-08-15

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an important tool, increasingly used for measuring true levels of the body burdens of environmental chemicals in the general population. In Europe, a harmonized HBM program was needed to open the possibility to compare levels across borders. To explore the prospect of a harmonized European HBM project, DEMOCOPHES (DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale) was completed in 17 European countries. The basic measurements performed in all implemented countries of DEMOCOPHES included cadmium, cotinine and phthalate metabolites in urine and mercury in hair. In the Danish participants, significant correlations between mothers and children for mercury in hair and cotinine in urine were found. Mercury in hair was further significantly associated with intake of fish and area of residence. Cadmium was positively associated with BMI in mothers and an association between cadmium and cotinine was also found. As expected high cotinine levels were found in smoking mothers. For both mercury and cadmium significantly higher concentrations were found in the mothers compared to their children. In Denmark, the DEMOCOPHES project was co-financed by the Danish ministries of health, environment and food safety. The co-financing ministries agreed to finance a number of supplementary measurements of substances of current toxicological, public and regulatory interest. This also included blood sampling from the participants. The collected urine and blood samples were analyzed for a range of other persistent and non-persistent environmental chemicals as well as two biomarkers of effect. The variety of supplementary measurements gives the researchers further information on the exposure status of the participants and creates a basis for valuable knowledge on the pattern of exposure to various chemicals. - Highlights: • Levels of cadmium, mercury and cotinine in the Danish subpopulation are comparable to levels in the

  18. Cadmium induced-oxidative stress in pituitary gland is reversed by removing the contamination source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miler, Eliana A; Nudler, Silvana I; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Cabilla, Jimena P; Ronchetti, Sonia A; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2010-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd(2+)) is one of the most important environmental contaminants and acts as an endocrine disruptor. Previously, we have demonstrated that the simultaneous administration of Cd(2+) and melatonin (Mel) in drinking water impaired metal-induced oxidative stress in rat anterior pituitary gland. The aim of this study was to investigate if a treatment started after the toxic manifestations of Cd( 2+) became evident could reverse the effects of the metal. Animals exposed to Cd(2+) (5 parts per million [ppm], 30 days) were treated with Mel or without the metal during the next 1 or 2 months. Cd(2+) exposure increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a biomarker of oxidative stress, and an a posteriori Mel treatment reversed oxidative stress induced by Cd(2+). This effect was also observed 1 month after metal removal. The Cd(2+)-induced increase in metallothionein-1 (MT-1) and nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) expression were also reversed by metal removal. In addition, serum prolactin and luteinizing hormone levels affected by Cd( 2+) exposure were normalized. Considering that the manifestations of Cd(2+) intoxication become evident only after a certain period of metal accumulation, these results show that metal removal is enough to reverse Cd(2+) effects in anterior pituitary gland and bring to light the relevance of moving away the individual from the contamination source.

  19. Cadmium induced MTs synthesis via oxidative stress in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianghai; Zhang, Yingmei; Huang, Dejun; Song, Gang

    2005-12-01

    Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, exposed to CdCl2 for 17 h was analysed with reference to survival, MTs and oxidative stress biomarkers. An enhanced accumulation of MDA and the increased activities of SOD and GPx in the Cd-treated yeasts under aerobic condition indicated CdCl2-caused oxidative stress in S. cerevisiae. MTs were significantly induced by CdCl2 under aerobic condition and the induced MTs contents were positively correlated with the accumulation of MDA in this study. However, MTs induction can be prominently inhibited by coincubation with NAC or anaerobic culture via eliminating ROS. This oxidative stress reduction was reflected by the decreases in MDA level and SOD and GPx activities. The results suggest that MTs inductive activity of cadmium in yeast cells was mediated by oxidative stress. In addition, increase of MTs contents was observed in cells untreated with CdCl2 under anaerobic conditions or coincubation with NAC, suggesting MTs are also susceptive to reductive stress.

  20. Effect of selenium on cadmium-induced oxidative stress and esterase activity in rat organs

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Dzobo; Yogeshkumar S. Naik

    2013-01-01

    Metal toxicity is a threat mainly in the industrialised world where industry discharges many toxic metals into the environment. We investigated the effects of two metals cadmium and selenium on the cytosolic antioxidant enzymes and esterases in the liver, kidneys and testes of rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=28) were divided equally into four groups: control, cadmium, selenium and cadmium/selenium. Salts of the metals were administered intraperitoneally for 15 days. In the liver, cadmium tr...

  1. Cadmium-induced malignant transformation in rat liver cells: role of aberrant oncogene expression and minimal role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Diwan, Bhalchandra A; Reece, Jeffrey M; Bortner, Carl D; Pi, Jingbo; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P

    2005-04-10

    Our study examined the role of oxidative stress and aberrant gene expression in malignant transformation induced by chronic, low-level cadmium exposure in non-tumorigenic rat liver epithelial cell line, TRL 1215. Cells were cultured in 1.0 microM cadmium (as CdCl(2)) for up to 28 weeks and compared to passage-matched control cells. The level of cadmium used for transformation produced no evidence of increased superoxide (O(2) (-*.)) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels in the early stages of exposure (hr). The chronic cadmium exposed liver epithelial cells (CCE-LE) were hyperproliferative with a growth rate about 3-fold higher than control cells. CCE-LE cells produced highly aggressive tumors upon inoculation into mice confirming malignant transformation. Analysis of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) showed that CCE-LE cells possessed markedly lower basal levels of intracellular O(2) (-*.)and H(2)O(2) and were very tolerant to high-dose (50 microM) cadmium-induced ROS. Time course studies showed the production of ROS by high-dose cadmium was abolished well in advance of malignant transformation. In contrast, marked overexpression of the oncogenes c-myc and c-jun occurred in transformed CCE-LE cells as evidenced by up to 10-fold increases in both transcript and protein. A significant increase in DNA-binding activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappaB occurred in CCE-LE cells. Increases in oncogene expression and transcription factor activity occurred concurrently with malignant transformation. Thus, cadmium-induced ROS occurs as an early, high-dose event but is abolished well in advance of malignant transformation. Low-level chronic cadmium triggers oncogene overexpression possibly by altering critical transcription factor activity. Such changes in cellular gene expression likely culminate in the loss of growth control and cadmium-induced neoplastic transformation in CCE-LE cells, whereas generation of ROS by cadmium seemed to play a minimal role

  2. Concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury and selenium in drinking water in the Autonomous Community of Valencia, Spain; Concentraciones de plomo, cadmio, cromo, mercurio y selenio en agua potable de la Comunidad Valenciana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fos Claver, S.; Vitoria Minana, I. [Universidad de Valencia (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    The object was to establish the degree to which the drinking water of the Autonomous Community of Valencia, Spain, is contaminated by various toxic elements; lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury and selenium. The method used was to study 423 samples of drinking water taken in 1997 from 407 different municipal districts in the Autonomous Community of Valencia covering a total population of 2,400,000 inhabitants. The concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury and selenium were determined. The results obtained indicate that 31.9% of the samples had undetectable concentrations of these elements, while 67.8% had concentrations of a least one of these elements at values lying between the guideline level and the maximum permitted concentration. Only 0.3% of the samples presented any toxic concentration. Therefore the conclusion reached was that the drinking water of the Autonomous Community of Valencia has acceptable concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury and selenium and does not present any health risks in this regard. (Author) 48 refs.

  3. Low mercury concentration produces vasoconstriction, decreases nitric oxide bioavailability and increases oxidative stress in rat conductance artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núbia Belem Lemos

    Full Text Available Mercury is an environmental pollutant that reduces nitric oxide (NO bioavailability and increases oxidative stress, having a close link with cardiovascular diseases, as carotid atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease and hypertension. One of the main sites affected by oxidative stress, which develops atherosclerosis, is the aorta. Under acute exposure to low mercury concentrations reactive oxygen species (ROS production were only reported for resistance vessels but if low concentrations of mercury also affect conductance arteries it is still unclear. We investigated the acute effects of 6 nM HgCl(2 on endothelial function of aortic rings measuring the reactivity to phenylephrine in rings incubated, or not, with HgCl(2 for 45 min, the protein expression for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 and the AT1 receptor. HgCl(2 increased Rmax and pD2 to phenylephrine without changing the vasorelaxation induced by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. Endothelial damage abolished the increased reactivity to phenylephrine. The increase of Rmax and pD2 produced by L-NAME was smaller in the presence of HgCl(2. Enalapril, losartan, indomethacin, furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, superoxide dismutase and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin reverted HgCl(2 effects on the reactivity to phenylephrine, COX-2 protein expression was increased, and AT1 expression reduced. At low concentration, below the reference values, HgCl(2 increased vasoconstrictor activity by reducing NO bioavailability due to increased ROS production by NADPH oxidase activity. Results suggest that this is due to local release of angiotensin II and prostanoid vasoconstrictors. Results also suggest that acute low concentration mercury exposure, occurring time to time could induce vascular injury due to endothelial oxidative stress and contributing to increase peripheral resistance, being a high risk factor for public health.

  4. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constance Senior

    2004-04-30

    This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

  5. Reversal of Cadmium-induced Oxidative Stress in Chicken by Herbal Adaptogens Withania Somnifera and Ocimum Sanctum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharavi, K.; Reddy, A. Gopala; Rao, G. S.; Reddy, A. Rajasekhara; Rao, S. V. Rama

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the herbal adaptogens Withania somnifera and Ocimum sanctum on cadmium-induced oxidative toxicity in broiler chicken. Cadmium administration at the rate of 100 ppm orally along with feed up to 28 days produced peroxidative damage, as indicated by increase in TBARS, reduction in glutathione (GSH) concentration in liver and kidney, and increase in catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) of erythrocytes. Herbal adaptogens Withania somnifera roots and Ocimum sanctum leaf powder administration at the rate of 0.1% through feed reversed the antioxidant enzyme of RBC, i.e., CAT and SOD, nonenzymatic antioxidants GSH and lipid peroxidation marker TBARS of liver and kidney. Liver and kidney tissue repair and normal function was assessed by alanine aminotransaminase for liver and creatinine and blood urea nitrogen for kidney. In conclusion, oral administration of Withania somnifera root and Ocimum sanctum leaf powder prevented cadmium-induced peroxidation of tissues. PMID:21170246

  6. Study of removal of Direct Yellow 12 by cadmium oxide nanowires loaded on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang, E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University Yasouj 75914-35 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghian, Batuol [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University Yasouj 75914-35 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokhdan, Syamak Nasiri, E-mail: syamak.nasiri@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University Yasouj 75914-35 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pebdani, Arezou Amiri [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University Yasouj 75914-35 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahraei, Reza; Daneshfar, Ali; Mihandoost, Asma [Department of Chemistry, University of Ilam, P.O. Box: 65315-516, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    In this research, cadmium oxide nanowires loaded on activated carbon (CdO-NW-AC) has been synthesized by a simple procedure and characterized by different techniques such as XRD, SEM and UV–vis spectrometry. This new adsorbent has been efficiently utilized for the removal of the Direct Yellow 12 (DY-12) from wastewater. To obtain maximum DY-12 removal efficiency, the influences of variables such as pH, DY-12 concentration, amount of CdO-NW-AC, contact time, and temperature have been examined and optimized in a batch method. Following the variable optimization, the experimental equilibrium data (at different concentration of DY-12) was fitted to conventional isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin. The applicability of each method is based on the R{sup 2} and error analysis for each model. It was found that the experimental equilibrium data well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model. The dependency of removal process to time and the experimental data follow second order kinetic model with involvement of intraparticle diffusion model. The negative value of Gibbs's free energy and positive value of adsorption enthalpy show the spontaneous and endothermic nature of adsorption process. - Graphical abstract: Typical FE-SEM image of the CdO nanowires. Highlights: ► Cadmium oxide nanowires loaded on activated carbon was utilized as an adsorbent. ► It was used for the removal of Direct Yellow 12 from aqueous solutions. ► The adsorption of Direct Yellow 12 on this adsorbent is endothermic in nature. ► The adsorption equilibrium data was well described by the Langmuir isotherm model.

  7. Theoretical evaluation on selective adsorption characteristics of alkali metal-based sorbents for gaseous oxidized mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongjian; Duan, Yufeng; Zhu, Chun; Cai, Tianyi; Li, Chunfeng; Cai, Liang

    2017-10-01

    Alkali metal-based sorbents are potential for oxidized mercury (Hg 2+ ) selective adsorption but show hardly effect to elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) in flue gas. Density functional theory (DFT) was employed to investigate the Hg 0 and HgCl 2 adsorption mechanism over alkali metal-based sorbents, including calcium oxide (CaO), magnesium oxide (MgO), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium chloride (NaCl). Hg 0 was found to weakly interact with CaO (001), MgO (001), KCl (001) and NaCl (001) surfaces while HgCl 2 was effectively adsorbed on top-O and top-Cl sites. Charge transfer and bond population were calculated to discuss the covalency and ionicity of HgCl 2 bonding with the adsorption sites. The partial density of states (PDOS) analysis manifests that HgCl 2 strongly interacts with surface sites through the orbital hybridizations between Hg and top O or Cl. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energy and Mulliken electronegativity are introduced as the quantitative criteria to evaluate the reactivity of mercury species and alkali metal-based sorbents. HgCl 2 is identified as a Lewis acid and more reactive than Hg 0 . The Lewis basicity of the four alkali metal-based sorbents is predicted as the increasing order: NaCl < MgO < KCl < CaO, in consistence with the trend of HgCl 2 adsorption energies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Cadmium Stress on Non-enzymatic Antioxidant and Nitric Oxide Levels in Two Varieties of Maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Faboya, Oluwabamise Lekan; Olayide, Israel; Faboya, Opeyemi Ayodeji; Ijabadeniyi, Tosin

    2017-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic heavy metals that inhibit physiological processes of plants. Hence, the present study sought to investigate the effect of cadmium-contaminated seeds from two varieties of maize (Zea mays) on non-enzymatic antioxidant and nitric oxide levels. Seeds of yellow and white maize were exposed to different concentrations of Cd (0, 1, 3 and 5 ppm) for two weeks. The results from this study revealed that both varieties of maize bio-accumulate Cd in leaves in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, Cd exposure caused a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in total phenolic, GSH and nitric oxide (NO) levels at the highest concentration tested when compared with control. Therefore, the observed decrease in NO and endogenous antioxidant status by Cd treatment in maize plants could suggest some possible mechanism of action for Cd-induced oxidative stress and counteracting effect of the plants against Cd toxicity.

  9. Amelioration of cadmium- and mercury-induced liver and kidney damage in rats by genetically engineered probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 producing pyrroloquinoline quinone with oral supplementation of citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuvanshi, Ruma; Chaudhari, Archana; Kumar, G Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidants, chelating agents, and probiotics are used to manage the toxic effects of cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg). The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effects of antioxidants, chelating agents, and probiotics against heavy metal toxicity. Genetically modified probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN-20) producing a potent water soluble antioxidant pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was supplemented with oral citric acid and compared with another genetically modified probiotic EcN-21 producing PQQ and citric acid against oxidative stress induced by Cd and Hg. Rats were independently given 100 ppm Cd and 80 ppm Hg in drinking water for 4 wk. EcN-20 was found to be more effective than EcN-2 (EcN strain with genomic integration of vgb and gfp genes) with orally given PQQ against oxidative stress induced by Cd and Hg. EcN-20 supplemented with oral citric acid was more effective against Cd and Hg toxicity compared with EcN-2+citric acid (oral), EcN-2+PQQ (oral), EcN-2+PQQ (oral)+citric acid (oral), EcN-20, and EcN-21. However, protection shown by EcN-21 was similar to EcN-20. The combination therapy involving probiotic EcN-20 producing PQQ with citric acid given orally was found to be a moderately effective strategy against toxicity induced by Cd and Hg, whereas the protective effect of EcN-21 was the same as EcN-20. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Blood lead, cadmium and mercury among children from urban, industrial and rural areas of Fez Boulemane Region (Morocco): relevant factors and early renal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laamech, Jawhar; Bernard, Alfred; Dumont, Xavier; Benazzouz, Bouchra; Lyoussi, Badiaa

    2014-08-01

    To describe blood lead (Pb-B), cadmium (Cd-B) and mercury (Hg-B) levels in children living in urban, industrial and rural areas in Fez city (north of Morocco) and to identify the determinants and some renal effects of exposure. The study was conducted from June 2007 to January 2008 in 209 school children (113 girls, 96 boys), aged 6-12 years, from urban, industrial and rural areas in Fez city. Interview and questionnaires data were obtained. Blood and urinary samples were analyzed. The mean of blood lead levels (Pb-B) in our population was 55.53 μg/l (range: 7.5-231.1 μg/l). Children from the urban area had higher blood lead levels (BLLs) mean (82.36 μg/l) than children from industrial and rural areas (48.23 and 35.99 μg/l, respectively); with no significant difference between boys and girls. BLLs were associated with traffic intensity, passive smoking and infancy in the urban area. The mean of blood cadmium levels (BCLs) was 0.22 μg/l (range: 0.06-0.68 μg/l), with no difference between various areas. Rural boys had higher BCLs mean than rural girls, but no gender influence was noticed in the other areas. BCLs were associated with the number of cigarettes smoked at children's homes. The blood mercury levels (BMLs) mean was 0.49 μg/l (range: 0.01-5.31 μg/l). The BMLs mean was higher in urban and industrial areas than in the rural area with no gender-related difference. BMLs were associated with amalgam fillings and infancy in the urban area. About 8% of the children had BLLs ≥ 100 μg/l particularly in the urban area, microalbuminuria and a decrease in height were noticed in girls from the inner city of Fez and that can be related to high BLLs (89.45 μg/l). There is a need to control and regulate potential sources of contamination by these trace elements in children; particularly for lead.

  11. Blood lead, cadmium and mercury among children from urban, industrial and rural areas of Fez Boulemane Region (Morocco: Relevant factors and early renal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawhar Laamech

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe blood lead (Pb-B, cadmium (Cd-B and mercury (Hg-B levels in children living in urban, industrial and rural areas in Fez city (north of Morocco and to identify the determinants and some renal effects of exposure. Material and Methods: The study was conducted from June 2007 to January 2008 in 209 school children (113 girls, 96 boys, aged 6-12 years, from urban, industrial and rural areas in Fez city. Interview and questionnaires data were obtained. Blood and urinary samples were analyzed. Results: The mean of blood lead levels (Pb-B in our population was 55.53 μg/l (range: 7.5-231.1 μg/l. Children from the urban area had higher blood lead levels (BLLs mean (82.36 μg/l than children from industrial and rural areas (48.23 and 35.99 μg/l, respectively; with no significant difference between boys and girls. BLLs were associated with traffic intensity, passive smoking and infancy in the urban area. The mean of blood cadmium levels (BCLs was 0.22 μg/l (range: 0.06-0.68 μg/l, with no difference between various areas. Rural boys had higher BCLs mean than rural girls, but no gender influence was noticed in the other areas. BCLs were associated with the number of cigarettes smoked at children's homes. The blood mercury levels (BMLs mean was 0.49 μg/l (range: 0.01-5.31 μg/l. The BMLs mean was higher in urban and industrial areas than in the rural area with no gender-related difference. BMLs were associated with amalgam fillings and infancy in the urban area. About 8% of the children had BLLs ≥ 100 μg/l particularly in the urban area, microalbuminuria and a decrease in height were noticed in girls from the inner city of Fez and that can be related to high BLLs (89.45 μg/l. Conclusions: There is a need to control and regulate potential sources of contamination by these trace elements in children; particularly for lead.

  12. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model ( R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  13. Sn-Mn binary metal oxides as non-carbon sorbent for mercury removal in a wide-temperature window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangkun; Xu, Haomiao; Qu, Zan; Huang, Wenjun; Chen, Wanmiao; Ma, Yongpeng; Zhao, Songjian; Liu, Ping; Yan, Naiqiang

    2014-08-15

    A series of Sn-Mn binary metal oxides were prepared through co-precipitation method. The sorbents were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (powder XRD), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), H2-temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NH3-temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) methods. The capability of the prepared sorbents for mercury adsorption from simulated flue gas was investigated by fixed-bed experiments. Results showed that mercury adsorption on pure SnO2 particles was negligible in the test temperature range, comparatively, mercury capacity on MnOx at low temperature was relative high, but the capacity would decrease significantly when the temperature was elevated. Interestingly, for Sn-Mn binary metal oxide, mercury capacity increased not only at low temperature but also at high temperature. Furthermore, the impact of SO2 on mercury adsorption capability of Sn-Mn binary metal oxides was also investigated and it was noted that the effect at low temperature was different comparing with that of high temperature. The mechanism was investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTs). Moreover, a mathematic model was built to calculate mercury desorption activation energy from Sn to Mn binary metal oxides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early life low-level cadmium exposure is positively associated with increased oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippler, Maria [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Bakhtiar Hossain, Mohammad [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Lindh, Christian [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Moore, Sophie E. [MRC Keneba, MRC Laboratories (Gambia); Kabir, Iqbal [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Vahter, Marie [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Broberg, Karin, E-mail: karin.broberg_palmgren@med.lu.se [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh)

    2012-01-15

    Environmental exposure to cadmium (Cd) is known to induce oxidative stress, a state of imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability to detoxify them, in adults. However, data are lacking on potential effects in early-life. We evaluated urinary concentrations of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a recognized marker of oxidative DNA damage, in relation to Cd exposure in 96 predominantly breast-fed infants (11-17 weeks of age) in rural Bangladesh. Urinary 8-oxodG was measured using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and Cd in urine and breast milk by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Median concentration of 8-oxodG was 3.9 nmol/L, urinary Cd 0.30 {mu}g/L, and breast-milk Cd 0.13 {mu}g/L. In linear regression analyses, urinary 8-oxodG was positively associated with Cd in both urine (p=0.00067) and breast milk (p=0.0021), and negatively associated with body weight (kg; p=0.0041). Adjustment for age, body weight, socio-economic status, urinary arsenic, as well as magnesium, calcium, and copper in breast milk did not change the association between Cd exposure and urinary 8-oxodG. These findings suggest that early-life low-level exposure to Cd via breast milk induces oxidative stress. Further studies are warranted to elucidate whether this oxidative stress is associated with impaired child health and development.

  15. Cadmium-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic changes in the testis of freshwater crab, Sinopotamon henanense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Wang

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd, one of the most toxic environmental and industrial pollutants, is known to exert gonadotoxic and spermiotoxic effects. In the present study, we examined the toxic effect of Cd on the testis of freshwater crab, Sinopotamon henanense. Crabs were exposed to different Cd concentrations (from 0 to 116.00 mg·L(-1 for 7 d. Oxidative stress and apoptotic changes in the testes were detected. The activities of SOD, GPx and CAT initially increased and subsequently decreased with increasing Cd concentrations, which was accompanied with the increase in malondialdehyde (MDA and H(2O(2 content in a concentration-dependent manner. Typical morphological characteristic and physiological changes of apoptosis were observed using a variety of methods (HE staining, AO/EB double fluorescent staining, Transmission Electron Microscope observation and DNA fragmentation analysis, and the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 were increased in a concentration-dependent manner after Cd exposure. These results led to the conclusion that Cd could induced oxidative damage as well as apoptosis in the testis, and the apoptotic processes may be mediated via mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway by regulating the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9.

  16. Oxidative stress, bioelements and androgen status in testes of rats subacutely exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuric, Ana; Begic, Aida; Gobeljic, Borko; Stanojevic, Ivan; Ninkovic, Milica; Vojvodic, Danilo; Pantelic, Ana; Zebic, Goran; Prokic, Vera; Dejanovic, Bratislav; Stojanovic, Ivana; Pavlica, Marina; Djukic, Dusan; Saso, Luciano; Djurdjevic, Dragan; Pavlovic, Milos; Topic, Aleksandra; Vujanovic, Dragana; Stevnovic, Ivana; Djukic, Mirjana

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to examine testicular toxicity of cadmium (Cd), focusing on oxidative stress (OS), essential metals and androgenic status and morphological changes. Male Wistar rats [controls and four Cd-subgroups (n = 6) organized according to the exposure (1, 3, 10 and 21 days)] were intraperitoneally (i.p.) treated with 1 mg CdCl2/kg/day. Testicular Cd deposition was noticed from the 1st day. After 10 and 21 days, copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) increased by 60-109% and 43-67%, respectively, while zinc (Zn) decreased by 24-33%. During 1-21 days of the exposure, decrease in testicular total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione-s-transferase (GST) activities occurred gradually by 30-78% and 15-84%, respectively, while superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) increased gradually by 114-271%. After 10-21 days, decrease in testicular catalase (CAT) activity appeared by 13-31%. After 21 days, malondialdehyde (MDA) decreased by 44% and the ratio of oxidized glutathione/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH) increased by 130% in testes of the rats exposed to Cd. Additionally, decreased testicular testosterone level and the relative testes mass, along with induced microscopic and macroscopic changes were occured, what can be explained as the consequence of instantly developed OS, impaired essential metals status and Cd testicular deposition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Selenium alleviates cadmium toxicity by preventing oxidative stress in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Issam; Chtourou, Yacine; Djebali, Wahbi

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the possible mediatory role of selenium (Se) in protecting plants from cadmium (Cd) toxicity. The exposure of sunflower seedlings to 20μM Cd inhibited biomass production, decreased chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations and strongly increased accumulation of Cd in both roots and shoots. Similarly, Cd enhanced hydrogen peroxides content and lipid peroxidation as indicated by malondialdehyde accumulation. Pre-soaking seeds with Se (5, 10 and 20μM) alleviated the negative effect of Cd on growth and led to a decrease in oxidative injuries caused by Cd. Furthermore, Se enhanced the activities of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase, but lowered that of superoxide dismutase and guaiacol peroxidase. As important antioxidants, ascorbate and glutathione contents in sunflower leaves exposed to Cd were significantly decreased by Se treatment. The data suggest that the beneficial effect of Se during an earlier growth period could be related to avoidance of cumulative damage upon exposure to Cd, thus reducing the negative consequences of oxidative stress caused by heavy metal toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Cadmium, lead and mercury concentrations and their influence on morphological parameters in blood donors from different age groups from southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Monika; Binkowski, Łukasz J; Błaszczyk, Martyna; Paluch, Joanna; Wojtaś, Włodzimierz; Massanyi, Peter; Stawarz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Due to industrial development, environmental contamination with metals increases which leads to higher human exposure via air, water and food. In order to evaluate the level of the present exposition, the concentrations of metals can be measured in such biological materials as human blood. In this study, we assessed the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) in blood samples from male blood donors from southern Poland (Europe) born in 1994 (n=30) and between 1947 and 1955 (n=30). Higher levels of Pb were seen in the group of older men (4.48 vs 2.48μg/L), whereas the Hg levels were lower (1.78 vs 4.28μg/L). Cd concentrations did not differ between age groups (0.56μg/L). The levels of Cd and Pb in older donors were significantly correlated (Spearman R 0.5135). We also observed a positive correlation between the number of red blood cells (RBC) and Hg concentrations in the older group (Spearman R 0.4271). Additionally, we noted numerous correlations among morphological parameters. Based on our results, we can state that metals influence the blood morphology and their concentrations in blood vary among age groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Concentration of four heavy metals (cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic) in organs of two cyprinid fish (Cyprinus carpio and Capoeta sp.) from the Kor River (Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mansour; Taherianfard, Mahnaz

    2010-09-01

    Concentration of heavy metals in aquatic animals mainly occurs due to industrial contamination. In this study, the concentrations of four heavy metals (cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic) in organs of two cyprinid fish and in water collected from three sections of the Kor River, Iran were determined using the inductively coupled plasma method. Pathological and hormonal changes due to metal contamination were also measured. The concentrations of heavy metals in tissue of fish from the middle sampling zone were significantly higher (p 0.05) were detected between the two sexes and species. High levels of metals were found in the ovaries and testes; estradiol in females and progesterone and testosterone in males from the middle study site were significantly (p < 0.05) lower than values from the other two sites. Pathological changes in blood cells, liver, and kidneys of fishes were significantly higher in highly polluted areas (middle sampling zone). These results show that industrial activities have polluted the river and that the maximum concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Hg were higher than the permissible levels for human consumption.

  20. Bioaccumulation of mercury, cadmium, zinc, chromium, and lead in muscle, liver, and spleen tissues of a large commercially valuable catfish species from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio P. Arantes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amounts of heavy metals entering aquatic environments can result in high accumulation levels of these contaminants in fish and their consumers, which pose a serious risk to ecosystems and human health. We investigated the concentrations of mercury (Hg, cadmium (Cd, zinc (Zn, chromium (Cr, and lead (Pb in muscle, liver, and spleen tissues of Pseudoplatystoma corruscans specimens collected from two sites on the Paraopeba River, Brazil. The level of heavy metals concentrations in the tissues was often higher in viscera (i.e. liver and spleen than in muscle, and thus, the viscera should not be considered for human consumption. Correlations between metal concentrations and fish size were not significant. Although the levels of muscle bioaccumulation of Hg, Cd, Zn, Cr, and Pb, generally do not exceed the safe levels for human consumption, the constant presence of heavy metals in concentrations near those limits considered safe for human consumption, is a reason for concern, and populations who constantly consume fish from polluted rivers should be warned. Our findings also indicate that in a river network where certain areas are connected to other areas with high rates of environmental pollutants, people should be cautious about the regular consumption of fish, even when the fish consumed are caught in stretches of the basin where contamination levels are considered low, since many of the freshwater fish with high commercial value, such as the catfish surubim, are migratory.

  1. Rapid long-wave infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements using a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Eiei; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Jia, Yingqing; Trivedi, Sudhir; D'souza, Arvind I; Decuir, Eric A; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S; Samuels, Alan C

    2015-11-20

    In this work, we develop a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system that is capable of rapidly capturing (∼1-5  s) a broad spectrum of atomic and molecular laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region (∼5.6-10  μm). Similar to the conventional UV-Vis LIBS, a broadband emission spectrum of condensed phase samples covering the whole 5.6-10 μm region can be acquired from just a single laser-induced microplasma or averaging a few single laser-induced microplasmas. Atomic and molecular signature emission spectra of solid inorganic and organic tablets and thin liquid films deposited on a rough asphalt surface are observed. This setup is capable of rapidly probing samples "as is" without the need of elaborate sample preparation and also offers the possibility of a simultaneous UV-Vis and LWIR LIBS measurement.

  2. Influence of Arsenic (III, Cadmium (II, Chromium (VI, Mercury (II, and Lead (II Ions on Human Triple Negative Breast Cancer (HCC1806 Cell Cytotoxicity and Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsdale F. Mehari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hazardous consequences of heavy metal ions (HMIs on human health necessitate the immediate need to probe fundamentally the interactions and cytotoxic effects of HMIs on humans. This study investigated the influence of five toxic HMIs (arsenic (As (III, cadmium (Cd (II, chromium (Cr (VI, mercury (Hg (II, and lead (Pb (II on human TNBC (HCC 1806 cell viability using optical microscopy, trypan blue dye-exclusion assays, and flow cytometry. The TNBC cells were exposed to varying concentrations of HMIs for 24 and 48 hours. We evaluated the influence of the concentrations and duration of HMIs exposure on TNBC cell viability. Light microscopy, cell viability assays, revealed that after 48-hour treatment of TNBC cells with 1 x 10-5 M of As (III, Cd (II, Hg (II, Cr (IV, and Pb (II resulted in cell viabilities of 23%, 34%, 35%, 56%, 91% respectively, suggesting that As (III has the greatest cytotoxicity (77% cell death while Pb (II showed the least (9% cell death. Furthermore, flow cytometry revealed that while Pb (II, As (III and Cr (IV had significant increases in cell death, Hg (II caused a G1 arrest. Together, this study revealed that HMIs cause a differential cytotoxic effect on TNBC cells and suggest that they may have very different genotoxic targets and implications in their mutagenic potential.

  3. Mercury oxidation from bromine chemistry in the free troposphere over the southeastern US

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    S. Coburn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The elevated deposition of atmospheric mercury over the southeastern United States is currently not well understood. Here we measure partial columns and vertical profiles of bromine monoxide (BrO radicals, a key component of mercury oxidation chemistry, to better understand the processes and altitudes at which mercury is being oxidized in the atmosphere. We use data from a ground-based MAX-DOAS instrument located at a coastal site ∼  1 km from the Gulf of Mexico in Gulf Breeze, FL, where we had previously detected tropospheric BrO (Coburn et al., 2011. Our profile retrieval assimilates information about stratospheric BrO from the WACCM chemical transport model (CTM, and uses only measurements at moderately low solar zenith angles (SZAs to estimate the BrO slant column density contained in the reference spectrum (SCDRef. The approach has 2.6 degrees of freedom, and avoids spectroscopic complications that arise at high SZA; knowledge about SCDRef further helps to maximize sensitivity in the free troposphere (FT. A cloud-free case study day with low aerosol load (9 April 2010 provided optimal conditions for distinguishing marine boundary layer (MBL: 0–1 km and free-tropospheric (FT: 1–15 km BrO from the ground. The average daytime tropospheric BrO vertical column density (VCD of ∼  2.3  ×  1013 molec cm−2 (SZA  <  70° is consistent with our earlier reports on other days. The vertical profile locates essentially all tropospheric BrO above 4 km, and shows no evidence for BrO inside the MBL (detection limit  <  0.5 pptv. BrO increases to  ∼  3.5 pptv at 10–15 km altitude, consistent with recent aircraft observations. Our case study day is consistent with recent aircraft studies, in that the oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM by bromine radicals to form gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM is the dominant pathway for GEM oxidation throughout the troposphere above Gulf

  4. Protective effects of selenium against cadmium induced hematological disturbances, immunosuppressive, oxidative stress and hepatorenal damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Boshy, Mohamed E; Risha, Engy F; Abdelhamid, Fatma M; Mubarak, Mohammad S; Hadda, Taibi Ben

    2015-01-01

    increased IFN-γ, GSH level, CAT, and GPx activities, as well as lymphocyte count while IL-10 was decreased. Selenium in combination with cadmium, significantly improved the elevation of serum IL-1β, IL-6, TNF α, IL-10 and malondialdehyde in addition to enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activities of GSH, CAT, GPx and SOD. Moreover, selenium has ameliorated the cadmium-induced liver and kidney damage by improving hepatic and renal markers. The results of this investigation demonstrated that selenium has the potential to countermeasure the immunosuppressive as well as hepatic and renal oxidative damage induced by cadmium in rats; selenium has shown promising effects against Cd toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Localisation of the sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitochondria using top-down elasticity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesseler, A; Brand, M D

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the significant sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitocondria. We simplified the system to three convenient subsystems linked via the production or consumption of a common intermediate, namely protonmotive force. The three subsystems were substrate oxidation, which produces protonmotive force, and the proton leak reactions and the phosphorylation reactions, which consume protonmotive force. By measuring the effect of cadmium on the kinetic response of each subsystem to protonmotive force (top-down elasticity analysis), we found that cadmium stimulated proton leak reactions and strongly inhibited substrate oxidation, but had no measurable effect on the phosphorylation reactions. Cadmium therefore decreases the amount of ATP produced/oxygen consumed (the effective P/O ratio) not by inhibiting the phosphorylation reactions directly, but by inhibiting the production of protonmotive force and by diverting proton flux from phosphorylation reactions to the proton leak reactions.

  6. Reciprocal Interactions between Cadmium-Induced Cell Wall Responses and Oxidative Stress in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loix, Christophe; Huybrechts, Michiel; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Gielen, Marijke; Keunen, Els; Cuypers, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution renders many soils across the world unsuited or unsafe for food- or feed-orientated agriculture. The main mechanism of Cd phytotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress, amongst others through the depletion of glutathione. Oxidative stress can damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to growth inhibition or even cell death. The plant cell has a variety of tools to defend itself against Cd stress. First and foremost, cell walls might prevent Cd from entering and damaging the protoplast. Both the primary and secondary cell wall have an array of defensive mechanisms that can be adapted to cope with Cd. Pectin, which contains most of the negative charges within the primary cell wall, can sequester Cd very effectively. In the secondary cell wall, lignification can serve to immobilize Cd and create a tougher barrier for entry. Changes in cell wall composition are, however, dependent on nutrients and conversely might affect their uptake. Additionally, the role of ascorbate (AsA) as most important apoplastic antioxidant is of considerable interest, due to the fact that oxidative stress is a major mechanism underlying Cd toxicity, and that AsA biosynthesis shares several links with cell wall construction. In this review, modifications of the plant cell wall in response to Cd exposure are discussed. Focus lies on pectin in the primary cell wall, lignification in the secondary cell wall and the importance of AsA in the apoplast. Regarding lignification, we attempt to answer the question whether increased lignification is merely a consequence of Cd toxicity, or rather an elicited defense response. We propose a model for lignification as defense response, with a central role for hydrogen peroxide as substrate and signaling molecule. PMID:29163592

  7. Reciprocal Interactions between Cadmium-Induced Cell Wall Responses and Oxidative Stress in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Loix

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd pollution renders many soils across the world unsuited or unsafe for food- or feed-orientated agriculture. The main mechanism of Cd phytotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress, amongst others through the depletion of glutathione. Oxidative stress can damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to growth inhibition or even cell death. The plant cell has a variety of tools to defend itself against Cd stress. First and foremost, cell walls might prevent Cd from entering and damaging the protoplast. Both the primary and secondary cell wall have an array of defensive mechanisms that can be adapted to cope with Cd. Pectin, which contains most of the negative charges within the primary cell wall, can sequester Cd very effectively. In the secondary cell wall, lignification can serve to immobilize Cd and create a tougher barrier for entry. Changes in cell wall composition are, however, dependent on nutrients and conversely might affect their uptake. Additionally, the role of ascorbate (AsA as most important apoplastic antioxidant is of considerable interest, due to the fact that oxidative stress is a major mechanism underlying Cd toxicity, and that AsA biosynthesis shares several links with cell wall construction. In this review, modifications of the plant cell wall in response to Cd exposure are discussed. Focus lies on pectin in the primary cell wall, lignification in the secondary cell wall and the importance of AsA in the apoplast. Regarding lignification, we attempt to answer the question whether increased lignification is merely a consequence of Cd toxicity, or rather an elicited defense response. We propose a model for lignification as defense response, with a central role for hydrogen peroxide as substrate and signaling molecule.

  8. Cadmium-induced changes in the growth and oxidative metabolism of pea plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandalio, L M; Dalurzo, H C; Gómez, M; Romero-Puertas, M C; del Río, L A

    2001-11-01

    The effect of growing pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants with CdCl(2) (0-50 microM) on different plant physiological parameters and antioxidative enzymes of leaves was studied in order to know the possible involvement of this metal in the generation of oxidative stress. In roots and leaves of pea plants Cd produced a significant inhibition of growth as well as a reduction in the transpiration and photosynthesis rate, chlorophyll content of leaves, and an alteration in the nutrient status in both roots and leaves. The ultrastructural analysis of leaves from plants grown with 50 microM CdCl(2), showed cell disturbances characterized by an increase of mesophyll cell size, and a reduction of intercellular spaces, as well as severe disturbances in chloroplast structure. Alterations in the activated oxygen metabolism of pea plants were also detected, as evidenced by an increase in lipid peroxidation and carbonyl-groups content, as well as a decrease in catalase, SOD and, to a lesser extent, guaiacol peroxidase activities. Glutathione reductase activity did not show significant changes as a result of Cd treatment. A strong reduction of chloroplastic and cytosolic Cu,Zn-SODs by Cd was found, and to a lesser extent of Fe-SOD, while Mn-SOD was only affected by the highest Cd concentrations. Catalase isoenzymes responded differentially, the most acidic isoforms being the most sensitive to Cd treatment. Results obtained suggest that growth of pea plants with CdCl(2) can induce a concentration-dependent oxidative stress situation in leaves, characterized by an accumulation of lipid peroxides and oxidized proteins as a result of the inhibition of the antioxidant systems. These results, together with the ultrastructural data, point to a possible induction of leaf senescence by cadmium.

  9. Preventive effects of β-cryptoxanthin against cadmium-induced oxidative stress in the rat testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ran Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available β-cryptoxanthin (CRY, a major carotenoid of potential interest for health, is obtained naturally from orange vegetables and fruits. A few research studies have reported that CRY could decrease oxidative stress and germ cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of CRY on acute cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 -induced oxidative damage in rat testes. For this study, 24 rats were divided into four groups, one of which serves as a control group that received intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of corn oil and physiological saline. The other rats were i.p. injected with CRY (10 μg kg−1 every 8 h, beginning 8 h before CdCl 2 (2.0 mg kg−1 treatment. The pathological and TUNEL findings revealed that CRY ameliorated the Cd-induced testicular histological changes and germ cell apoptosis in the rats. Furthermore, the Cd-induced decrease in the testicular testosterone (T level was attenuated after CRY administration (P < 0.05. The administration of CRY significantly reversed the Cd-induced increases in the lipid peroxide (LPO and malondialdehyde (MDA levels (P < 0.01. The testicular antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione (GSH were decreased by treatment with Cd alone but were restored by CRY co-treatment. These results demonstrated that the application of CRY can enhance the tolerance of rats to Cd-induced oxidative damage and suggest that it has promised as a pharmacological agent to protect against Cd-induced testicular toxicity.

  10. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Morrill, Mike [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, JoAnn S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Silcox, Geoffrey D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-06-01

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  11. Bis(3-methyl-2-pyridyl)ditelluride and pyridyl tellurolate complexes of zinc, cadmium, mercury: Synthesis, characterization and their conversion to metal telluride nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedarnath, G; Jain, Vimal K; Wadawale, Amey; Dey, Gautam K

    2009-10-21

    Treatment of an acetonitrile solution of metal chloride with bis(3-methyl-2-pyridyl)ditelluride, [Te(2)(pyMe)(2)], in the same solvent yielded complexes of composition [MCl(2){Te(2)(pyMe)(2)}] (M = Zn or Cd) whereas reactions of [MCl(2)(tmeda)] with NaTepyR (R = H or Me) gave tellurolate complexes of the general formula [M(TepyR)(2)] (M = Cd or Hg). When the cadmium complex [Cd(Tepy)(2)] was crystallized in the presence of excess tmeda, [Cd(Tepy)(2)(tmeda)] was formed exclusively. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, uv-vis, (1)H NMR data. The crystal structures of [ZnCl(2){Te(2)(pyMe)(2)}] and [Cd(Tepy)(2)(tmeda)] were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the former zinc is coordinated to nitrogen atoms of the pyridyl group, while in the latter the coordination environment around tetrahedral cadmium is defined by the two neutral nitrogen atoms of tmeda, and two pyridyl tellurolate ligands. Thermal behavior of some of these complexes was studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Pyrolysis of [M(Tepy)(2)] in a furnace or in coordinating solvents such as hexadecylamine/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (HDA/TOPO) at 350 and 160 degrees C, respectively gave MTe nanoparticles, which were characterized by uv-vis, photoluminiscence, XRD, EDAX and TEM.

  12. Roles of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in the alleviation of cadmium-induced oxidative damage in alfalfa seedling roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Wang, Yanqin; Shen, Wenbiao

    2012-06-01

    Despite hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and nitric oxide (NO) are important endogenous signals or bioregulators involved in many vital aspects of plant growth and responses against abiotic stresses, little information was known about their interaction. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of H(2)S and NO on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants exposed to cadmium (Cd) stress. Pretreatment with an H(2)S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and well-known NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) decreased the Cd toxicity. This conclusion was supported by the decreases of lipid peroxidation as well as the amelioration of seedling growth inhibition and Cd accumulation, in comparison with the Cd-stressed alone plants. Total activities and corresponding transcripts of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase were modulated differentially, thus leading to the alleviation of oxidative damage. Effects of H(2)S above were reversed by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO), the specific scavenger of NO. By using laser confocal scanning microscope combined with Greiss reagent method, further results showed that NO production increased significantly after the NaHS pretreatment regardless of whether Cd was applied or not, all of which were obviously inhibited by cPTIO. These decreases of NO production were consistent with the exaggerated syndromes associated with Cd toxicity. Together, above results suggested that NO was involved in the NaHS-induced alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings, and also indicated that there exists a cross-talk between H(2)S and NO responsible for the increased abiotic stress tolerance.

  13. Mercury distribution and lipid oxidation in fish muscle: Effects of washing and isoelectric protein precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Y.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Ren, L.; Egelandsdal, B.; Richards, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all the mercury (Hg) in whole muscle from whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and walleye (Sander vitreus) was present as methyl mercury (MeHg). The Hg content in whole muscle from whitefish and walleye was 0.04-0.09 and 0.14-0.81 ppm, respectively. The myofibril fraction contained approximately three-fourths of the Hg in whitefish and walleye whole muscle. The sarcoplasmic protein fraction (e.g., press juice) was the next most abundant source of Hg. Isolated myosin, triacylglycerols, and cellular membranes contained the least Hg. Protein isolates prepared by pH shifting in the presence of citric acid did not decrease Hg levels. Addition of cysteine during washing decreased the Hg content in washed muscle probably through the interaction of the sulfhydryl group in cysteine with MeHg. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were lower during 2 ??C storage in isolates prepared by pH shifting compared to those of washed or unwashed mince from whole muscle. This was attributed to removing some of the cellular membranes by pH shifting. Washing the mince accelerated lipid peroxide formation but decreased secondary lipid oxidation products compared to that of the unwashed mince. This suggested that there was a lipid hydroperoxide generating system that was active upon dilution of aqueous antioxidants and pro-oxidants. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dumkova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level.

  15. Oxidative and interactive challenge of cadmium and ocean acidification on the smooth scallop Flexopecten glaber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Alessandro; Benedetti, Maura; Fattorini, Daniele; Regoli, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) may affect sensitivity of marine organisms to metal pollution modulating chemical bioavailability, bioaccumulation and biological responsiveness of several cellular pathways. In this study, the smooth scallop Flexopecten glaber was exposed to various combinations of reduced pH (pH/pCO 2 7.4/∼3000 μatm) and Cd (20 μg/L). The analyses on cadmium uptake were integrated with those of a wide battery of biomarkers including metallothioneins, single antioxidant defenses and total oxyradical scavenging capacity in digestive gland and gills, lysosomal membrane stability and onset of genotoxic damage in haemocytes. Reduced pH slightly increased concentration of Cd in scallop tissues, but no effects were measured in terms of metallothioneins. Induction of some antioxidants by Cd and/or low pH in the digestive gland was not reflected in variations of the total oxyradical scavenging capacity, while the investigated stressors caused a certain inhibition of antioxidants and reduction of the scavenging capacity toward peroxyl radical in the gills. Lysosomal membrane stability and onset of genotoxic damages showed high sensitivity with possible synergistic effects of the investigated factors. The overall results suggest that indirect effects of ocean acidification on metal accumulation and toxicity are tissue-specific and modulate oxidative balance through different mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems. © 2015 SETAC.

  17. Oxidative stress in rat liver during acute cadmium and ethanol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of binge drinking on prooxidant/antioxidant system in rat liver in acute cadmium (Cd intoxication. In experiment male Wistar rats were used and divided into following groups: 1. control, 2. ethanol-treated group, in five subsequent doses of 2 g/kg administered by orogastric tube, 3. Cd-treated group in a single dose of 2.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, 4. group that received Cd 12 hours after the last dose of ethanol. Blood and liver samples were collected for determination of oxidative stress parameters, 24 hours after treatment. When administered in combination, ethanol and Cd induced a more pronounced increase in serum and liver malondialdehyde level than either of these substances alone (p<0.01. Liver manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD activity was increased both in ethanol and Cd-treated group (p<0.01, while liver copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD activity was elevated in Cd group only. However, when administered in combination, ethanol and Cd induced a more pronounced decrease in liver MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD activity 24 hours after treatment (p<0.01. Based on our study, it can be concluded that ethanol may act sinergistically with Cd in inducing lipid peroxidation and reduction in liver SOD activity.

  18. Analysis of metal profile in soybean after cadmium-induced oxidative damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Felici

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of cadmium (Cd on soybean seedlings growth and the relationship with the distribution and concentration of macro-microelements. Methods: The ions concentrations were determined by ICP-MS. The extraction efficiency and digestion time were optimized. Also, oxidative stress parameters were determined and related with metal content. Results: The accumulated amount of dry matter in roots and leaves was lower in the Cd-treated group. Regression analysis showed that the exposure to Cd affected the accumulated amount of dry matter as well as the content of mineral elements in the analysis samples. In Cd treated plants, electrical conductivity increased respect to the controls, indicating that ionic permeability became altered. A strong inhibition of the chlorophylls (chl biosynthesis in the Cd-treated group was also demonstrated by a decrease of chla and chlb concentration. This result was related with the observed significant decrease in the Mg uptake at the roots and leaves level. Conclusions: The stress caused by Cd exposure, evidenced by significantly high hydrogen peroxide levels in roots and leaves after 24 h and the content of specific macro-microelements is a factor that affects the accumulation of dry matter, electrical conductivity and chlorophylls concentration

  19. Novel Aluminum Oxide-Impregnated Carbon Nanotube Membrane for the Removal of Cadmium from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsanullah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An aluminum oxide-impregnated carbon nanotube (CNT-Al2O3 membrane was developed via a novel approach and used in the removal of toxic metal cadmium ions, Cd(II. The membrane did not require any binder to hold the carbon nanotubes (CNTs together. Instead, the Al2O3 particles impregnated on the surface of the CNTs were sintered together during heating at 1400 °C. Impregnated CNTs were characterized using XRD, while the CNT-Al2O3 membrane was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Water flux, contact angle, and porosity measurements were performed on the membrane prior to the Cd(II ion removal experiment, which was conducted in a specially devised continuous filtration system. The results demonstrated the extreme hydrophilic behavior of the developed membrane, which yielded a high water flux through the membrane. The filtration system removed 84% of the Cd(II ions at pH 7 using CNT membrane with 10% Al2O3 loading. A maximum adsorption capacity of 54 mg/g was predicted by the Langmuir isotherm model for the CNT membrane with 10% Al2O3 loading. This high adsorption capacity indicated that adsorption was the main mechanism involved in the removal of Cd(II ions.

  20. Electrochemical supercapacitors of cobalt hydroxide nanoplates grown on conducting cadmium oxide base-electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailas K. Tehare

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dopant-free and cost-effective sprayed cadmium oxide (CdO conducting base-electrodes, obtained at different concentrations (0.5, 1 and 1.5 M, characterized for their structures, morphologies and conductivities by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electrical conductivity measurements, respectively, are employed as base-electrodes for growing cobalt hydroxide (Co(OH2 nanoplates using a simple electrodeposition method which further are envisaged for electrochemical supercapacitor application. Polycrystalline nature and mushroom-like plane-views are confirmed from the structure and morphology analyses. Both CdO and CdO–Co(OH2 electrodes reveal specific capacitances as high as 312 F g−1 and 1119 F g−1, respectively, in 0.1 M KOH electrolyte at 10 mV s−1 sweep rate. Optimized Co(OH2–CdO configuration electrode demonstrates energy density of 98.83 W h kg−1 and power density of 0.75 kW kg−1. In order to investigate the charge transfer kinematics electrochemical impedance measurements are carried out and explored.

  1. The effect of cadmium toxicity on renal nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyupek, Sedat; Oksay, Taylan; Sütçü, Recep; Armagan, Abdullah; Gökalp, Osman; Perk, Hakki; Delibas, Namik

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cadmium (Cd) toxicity on renal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes. The study was carried out on 18 inbred male (Cd group: 10 and control group: 8) Wistar rats. Cd group received drinking water containing 15 mg/L Cd for 30 days; and at the end of the 30 days, plasma Cd was analysed. One kidney was snap frozen to assess the endothelial NOS (eNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expressions by Western blot analyses, and the other kidney was preserved for histopathological examination. Plasma Cd levels were significantly elevated in the Cd group. The Western blot analyses found higher levels of eNOS, iNOS and nNOS in the Cd group but only eNOS and nNOS levels were statistically significant. There was no difference in pathological assessment of the renal tissues. Cd toxicity increases NOS isoenzyme levels and may affect renal physiology.

  2. Effects of molybdenum and cadmium on the oxidative damage and kidney apoptosis in Duck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lele; Cao, Huabin; Luo, Junrong; Liu, Ping; Wang, Tiancheng; Hu, Guoliang; Zhang, Caiying

    2017-11-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential element for human beings and animals; however, high dietary intake of Mo can lead to adverse reactions. Cadmium (Cd) is one of the major transitional metals which has toxic effects in animals. To investigate the co-induced toxic effects of Mo and Cd on oxidative damage and kidney apoptosis in duck, 120 ducks were randomly divided into control group and 5 treatment groups which were treated with a commercial diet containing different dosages of Mo and Cd. Kidney samples were collected on the 60th and 120th days to determine the mRNA expression levels of ceruloplasmin (CP), metallothionein (MT), Bak-1, and Caspase-3 by quantitative RT-PCR. Additionally, we also determined the antioxidant activity indexes and contents of Mo, Cd, copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and selenium (Se) in serum. Meanwhile, ultrastructural changes of the kidney were observed. The results showed that glutathione reductase (GR) activity and CP level in serum were decreased in combination groups. In addition, the antioxidant indexes were decreased in co-treated groups compared with single treated groups. The mRNA expression levels of Bak-1 and Caspase-3 increased in co-treated groups. The mRNA expression level of CP in high-dose combination group was downregulated, while the mRNA expression of MT was upregulated except for low-dose Mo group. Additionally, in the later period the content of Cu in serum decreased in joint groups while the contents of Mo and Cd increased. In addition, ultrastructural changes showed mitochondrial crest fracture, swelling, deformed nuclei, and karyopyknosis in co-treated groups. Taken together, it was suggested that dietary Mo and Cd might lead to oxidative stress, kidney apoptosis and disturb homeostasis of trace elements in duck, and it showed a possible synergistic relationship between the two elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Coprecipitation mechanisms and products in manganese oxidation in the presence of cadmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, J.D.; Lind, Carol J.

    1991-01-01

    Manganese oxidation products were precipitated in an aerated open-aqueous system where a continuous influx of mixed Mn2+ and Cd2+ solution was supplied and pH was maintained with an automated pH-stat adding dilute NaOH. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction identified the solids produced as mixtures of Cd2Mn34+O8, Mn2+2Mn4+3O8, MnO2 (ramsdellite), and CdCO3. Mean oxidation numbers of the total precipitated Mn as great as 3.6 were reached during titrations. During subsequent aging in solution, oxidation numbers between 3.8 and 3.9 were reached in some precipitates in less than 40 days. Conditional oxidation rate constants calculated from a crystal-growth equation applied to titration data showed the overall precipitation rate, without considering manganese oxidation state in the precipitate, was increased by a factor of ~4 to ~7 when the mole ratio (Cd/Mn + Cd) of cadmium in the feed solution was 0.40 compared with rate constants for hausmannite (Mn2+Mn23+O4 precipitation under similar conditions but without accessory metals. Kinetic experiments were made to test effects of various Cd/Mn + Cd mole ratios and rates of addition of the feed solution, different temperatures from 5.0 to 35??C, and pH from 8.0 to 9.0. Oxidation rates were slower when the Cd mole ratio was less than 0.40. The rate increased by a factor of ~10 when pH was raised one-half unit. The effect of temperature on the rate constants was also substantial, but the meaning of this is uncertain because the rate of formation of Mn4+ oxide in the absence of Cd or other accessory metals was too slow to be measurable in titration experiments. The increased rate of Mn4+ oxide formation in the presence of Cd2+ can be ascribed to the formation of a labile adsorbed intermediate, CdMn2O4 Int, an analog of hausmannite, formed on precipitate surfaces at the beginning of the oxidation process. The increased lability of this structure, resulting from coordination-chemical behavior of Cd2+ during the titration

  4. Temperature dependence of long-term cadmium toxicity in the zebrafish is not explained by liver oxidative stress: Evidence from transcript expression to physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergauwen, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.vergauwen@ua.ac.be [Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research (SPHERE), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Hagenaars, An, E-mail: an.hagenaars@ua.ac.be [Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research (SPHERE), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Blust, Ronny, E-mail: ronny.blust@ua.ac.be [Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research (SPHERE), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Knapen, Dries, E-mail: dries.knapen@ua.ac.be [Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research (SPHERE), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Gamete Research Center (GRC), Veterinary Physiology and Biochemistry, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Standard ecotoxicity tests are performed at species' specific standard temperatures, but temperature is known to affect chemical toxicity. A temperature increase has been shown to increase cadmium toxicity in several aquatic species but information in fish is scarce. Based on literature we hypothesize that with increasing temperature, cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress increase, resulting in increased toxicity. In this study zebrafish acclimated to 12, 18, 26 (standard temperature) or 34 Degree-Sign C for one month, were exposed to 5 {mu}M cadmium for 4 or 28 days at the respective acclimation temperature. Cadmium toxicity (mortality) increased with increasing temperature. PCA showed that the high mortality at 34 Degree-Sign C was closely correlated to an increasing tissue cadmium accumulation with increasing temperature, but not to liver oxidative damage under the form of protein carbonyl content or lipid peroxidation (measured as malondialdehyde levels) or liver antioxidative potential. Instead, acclimation to 12 Degree-Sign C induced the highest oxidative damage to liver proteins and lipids, and transcript levels of glucose-6P-dehydrogenase, 6P-gluconate-dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase were particularly good markers of cold-induced oxidative stress. At this low temperature there was no interaction with cadmium exposure and there was no sign of cadmium sensitivity. Contrastingly, the combined effect of high temperature and cadmium exposure on mortality proved synergistic. Therefore we conclude that interactions between temperature and cadmium toxicity increased with increasing temperature and that this probably played part in increasing cadmium sensitivity. Increased cadmium compartmentalization and protein carbonyl content in liver of zebrafish acclimated to the standard temperature of 26 Degree-Sign C probably played part in increased sensitivity towards the same cadmium body burden compared to lower temperatures. On the one hand we

  5. Changes in mercury and cadmium concentrations and the feeding behaviour of beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) near Somerset Island, Canada, during the 20th century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outridge, P.M. [Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa, K1A 0E8 (Canada)]. E-mail: OUTRIDGE@NRCAN.GC.CA; Hobson, K.A. [Canadian Wildlife Service, 115 Perimeter Road, Saskatoon, S7N 0X4 (Canada); Savelle, J.M. [Department of Anthropology, McGill University, 855 Sherbrooke Street, Montreal, H3A 2T7 (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    Beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) continues to be an important food species for Arctic communities, despite concerns about its high mercury (Hg) content. We investigated whether Hg and cadmium (Cd) concentrations had changed during the 20th century in beluga near Somerset Island in the central Canadian Arctic, using well-preserved teeth collected from historical sites (dating to the late 19th century and 1926-1947) and during subsistence hunts in the late 1990s. Mercury concentrations in both historical and modern teeth were correlated with animal age, but 1990s beluga exhibited a significantly more rapid accumulation with age than late 19th century animals, indicating that Hg concentrations or bioavailability in their food chain had increased during the last century. The geometric mean tooth Hg concentration in modern 30 year old animals was 7.7 times higher than in the late 19th century, which corresponds to threefold higher concentrations in muktuk and muscle. Teeth from 1926 to 1947 were similar in Hg content to the late 19th century, suggesting that the increase had occurred sometime after the 1940s. In contrast, tooth Cd was not correlated with animal age and decreased during the last 100 years, indicating that anthropogenic Cd was negligible in this population. Late 19th century beluga displayed a greater range of prey selection (tooth {delta} {sup 15}N values: 15.6-20.5%o) than modern animals ({delta} {sup 15}N: 17.2-21.1%o). To prevent this difference from confounding the temporal Hg comparison, the Hg-age relationships discussed above were based on historical animals, which overlapped isotopically with the modern group. Tooth {delta} {sup 13}C also changed to isotopically more depleted values in modern animals, with the most likely explanation being a significant shift to more pelagic-based feeding. Industrial Hg pollution is a plausible explanation for the recent Hg increase. However, without further investigation of the relationship between the range

  6. [Evaluation of human health risk for a population from Cali, Colombia, by exposure to lead, cadmium, mercury, 2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid and diuron associated with water and food consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, Ghisliane; Zapata, Andrés Mauricio; Páez, Martha Isabel; Méndez, Fabián; Peña, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to pollutants such as pesticides and heavy metals has been linked to health problems. Several studies have revealed the presence of these contaminants in Cali; however, there is no information available about the main routes of exposure and risk of these contaminants. To estimate the risk associated with the intake of cadmium, lead and mercury, and pesticides 2,4-D and diuron through the consumption of water and food in a population in Cali. Population and environmental data were obtained, and a risk assessment was performed using United States Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. The concentrations of the evaluated pollutants were below permissible levels as established by the Colombian Ministerio de Ambiente, Vivienda y Desarrollo Territorial (3 µg/L -1 of cadmium; 10 µg/L -1 of lead; 1 µg/L -1 of mercury; 1 µg/L -1 of 2,4 D; 1 µg/L -1 of diuron). Salema butterfish ( Peprilus snyderi ) samples contained levels of cadmium between 20 and 80 µg/kg -1 , which are below the permissible limit set by the World Health Organization (100 µg/kg -1 ). The results of the risk assessment indicated that the carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic attributable risk to population health from the intake of food contaminants was below the maximum level permitted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. It is believed that the findings in previous studies on pollutants may have been due to specific contamination events; therefore, monitoring and early warning about water intake is recommended. Furthermore, the report of cadmium being found in fish consumed as food suggests the need for quality control by regulators.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and crystal structure of mercury(II) complex containing new phosphine oxide salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee, Sepideh; Kooti, Nadieh; Gable, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    The reaction of new phosphonium-phosphine oxide salt [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]Br (1) with mercury(II) iodide in a methanolic solution yielded [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]2[Hg2I5Br](2). These two compounds were fully characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H, 31P, and 13C NMR spectra. Crystal and molecular structure of 2 has been determined by means of X-ray diffraction. In mercury compound, the phosphine oxide salt is found as a counter ion letting the mercury(II) ion to bound halides to all four coordination sites and to give dimermercurate(II) ions as the structure-constructing species. The neighboring [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]2+cations are joined together by intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds to give a 1-D chain structure along the crystallographic b-axis. The [Hg2I5Br]2-anions act as cross-linkers between neighbouring strands extending the supramolecular structure into 2D layers in (110) planes as well as balances the charge of the complex. The significant effects of Csbnd H⋯X (Xdbnd O, Br and I) and π⋯π aromatic interactions play a major role in the crystal packing of compound 2.

  8. Environmental and Economic Efficiency of Comprehensive Technology of Sulfur Oxides, Nitrogen Oxides and Mercury Removal from Flue Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigashkina Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the issues of environmental and economic efficiency of the comprehensive technology of removing sulphur and nitrogen oxides and mercury from flue gases. The purpose of the study is to justify the choice of the methods for the analysis of environmental and economic effectiveness of the designed air protection activities and to perform a number of calculations. The article analyses main processing methods for reducing the concentration of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in the flue gases from the combustion of coal fuels, thus generating maximum ecological and economic benefits. The main result of the work is development of the adapted system of technical, environmental and economic indicators characterizing the high efficiency of the proposed technical solutions. The results of the study can be recommended to heating enterprises in support of effective environment-friendly management decisions justifying implementation of appropriate flue gas cleaning technologies.

  9. Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenicity in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishak, Yaser Khaje; Payahoo, Laleh; Osatdrahimi, Alireza; Nourazarian, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Cancer, a serious public health problem in worldwide, results from an excessive and uncontrolled proliferation of the body cells without obvious physiological demands of organs. The gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, stomach and intestine, is a unique organ system. It has the highest cancer incidence and cancer- related mortality in the body and is influenceed by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the various chemical elements recognized in the nature, some of them including zinc, iron, cobalt, and copper have essential roles in the various biochemical and physiological processes, but only at low levels and others such as cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic, and nickel are considered as threats for human health especially with chronic exposure at high levels. Cadmium, an environment contaminant, cannot be destroyed in nature. Through impairment of vitamin D metabolism in the kidney it causes nephrotoxicity and subsequently bone metabolism impairment and fragility. The major mechanisms involved in cadmium carcinogenesis could be related to the suppression of gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, inhibition of apoptosis, and induction of oxidative stress. In addition, cadmium may act through aberrant DNA methylation. Cadmium affects multiple cellular processes, including signal transduction pathways, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Down-regulation of methyltransferases enzymes and reduction of DNA methylation have been stated as epigenetic effects of cadmium. Furthermore, increasing intracellular free calcium ion levels induces neuronal apoptosis in addition to other deleterious influence on the stability of the genome.

  10. Lead and other heavy metals (cadmium and mercury accumulation in bivalve mollusks (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Ruditapes spp. and Crassostrea gigas sampled in Sardinia in 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Piras

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sardinian shellfish farming, like the national, is mainly focused on mussels and carpet-shell clams, still less on cupped oyster farming. After Olbia’s Gulf, various lagoon areas along the coastal perimeter have been interested to shellfish farming. They are transitional waters, whose state of pollution must be evaluated both as ecosystem’s health and as directly/indirectly human risk. This also applies to heavy metals such as lead, cadmium and mercury, arising both from anthropogenic that geological-natural activity. The aim of the present study is to investigate the variability of the concentrations of these metals in different mollusks to make a comparative assessment, detect trends (over the five-years or cyclicrecurring and identify hot spots. In 2008- 2012, 984 samples have been analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique. Of them, 599 in pre-marketing (for classification of production areas or their monitoring and the remaining during marketing. The difference between the average levels of the three metals in the different mollusks species was statistically significant, with Pb>Cd>Hg, and there was evidence of a gradual downward trend, albeit moderate, in the contamination levels, with a significant seasonality in concentrations levels, of lead in particular. Also comparisons between the bio-monitored coastal areas were statistically different. Since the samples were representative of the entire production of bivalve mollusks in Sardinia and the contamination allowable limits have never been exceeded in the products marketed, it can be concluded that these products are safe, pointing out that maintenance of monitoring/surveillance plans provides useful information species-dependent, site-specific and temporal trends.

  11. Radioactive zinc ( sup 65 Zn), zinc, cadmium, and mercury in the Pacific Hake, Merluccius productus (Ayres), off the West Coast of the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.

    1974-06-01

    The Pacific Hake, Merluccius productus (Ayers) was used to monitor the waters off Puget Sound and the West Coast of the US for zinc(Zn), cadmium(Cd), mercury(Hg) and {sup 65}Zn. The Columbia River is not the source of Zn, Cd or Hg contamination, but is the source of {sup 65}Zn, with the concentration in the Hake reflecting the position of the Columbia River plume. Zn and Cd accumulation in the Hake were fit to the equation Y=B{sub 1}+B{sub 2}e{sup B}{sub 3}X where Y is the concentration of the element and X is the length or weight of the fish. Biological attributes were assigned to the other parameters as follows: B{sub 1} is the asymptotic value for Zn or Cd at chemical maturity; B{sub 2} is the location of the curve with respect to the length or weight of the fish; and B{sub 3} is a constant pertaining to the rate of change of Zn or Cd. Although Zn, Cd and Hg are all Group 2B elements, only the concentrations of Zn and Cd were correlated for all locations; Hg concentrations varied as a function of location. Zn and Cd concentrations increase with fish size and approach an asymptotic value at maturity, while Hg concentrations were linear and the slope is a function of sampling location. Zn and Cd levels are regulated in the adult, while Hg continues to increase with age. It may be significant that the age distribution of fish caught commercially coincides with the maximum concentration of Zn and Cd. 195 refs., 30 figs., 10 tabs. (MHB)

  12. Distribution of three non-essential trace metals (Cadmium, Mercury and Lead in the organs of fish from Aiba Reservoir, Iwo, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatosin Ebenezer Atobatele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of non-essential trace elements in some vital organs of 11 fish species from Aiba Reservoir, Iwo, Nigeria was assessed between November 2010 and June 2011. The fish species belong to seven families; family Mormyridae, family Cyprinidae, family Hepsetidae and family Channidae each with one species; family Bagridae and family Clariidae each with two species; and family Cichlidae with three species. All families, except Clariidae and Channidae, are common in the daily catch from the reservoir. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to determine the levels of cadmium, mercury and lead in fish organs. The concentration of toxic trace metals in fish ranged from 0.001 to 0.100 ppm (Cd, 0.000–0.067 ppm (Hg and 0.001–0.125 ppm (Pb dry weight. This study shows similarity (p > 0.05 in the distribution of Cd, Hg and Pb among fish species; and a non-uniform distribution of toxic trace metals within fish organs with Kidney > Liver > Gill ≥ Intestine ≥ Muscle. Canonical variate analysis shows clear discrimination of Clarias macromystax and Channa obscura for gill trace metal levels of Cd, Hg and Pb while Labeo senegalensis and Oreochromis niloticus were discriminated for liver trace metal values of Cd and Pb only when compared to other fish species studied. The discrimination of some fish species based on trace metals in the gills and liver suggests different regulatory strategies for trace metal accumulation. Variation due to comparison among different fish species from the same water body suggests that accumulation may be species dependent. Differential accumulation of toxic trace metals in fish organs makes them good bioindicators of freshwater contamination.

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MERCURY AS WELL AS CADMIUM AND ANTHOCYANIN CONTENTS IN WILD FOREST FRUITS FROM ENVIRONMENTALLY BURDEN REGION OF THE SLOVAKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Zupka

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between total mercury as well as cadmium contents and total anthocyanins content in wild forest fruit berries collected in environemtally burden region of Stredny Spis in the Slovakia was investigated in this study. From the sampling points of different localities of this region small berries were sampled: blackberries (6 localities, blackthorns (5 localities, rosehips (6 localities, hawthorn fruits. Metal determinations were performed in a Varian AA240Z (Varian, Australia atomic absorption spectrometer with Zeeman background correction. Total anthocyanin content (TA in fruits was determined spectrophotometrically using the spectrophotometer (Shimadzu UV/VIS – 1240, Japan. With exception of three samples in all other fruit samples the hygienic limit for Cd (30 μg/kg given for foodstuffs by Slovak Republic Food Codex was exceeded. Only in one fruit sample the determined Hg content was higher than hygienic limit (30 μg/kg. Total anthocyanin content expressed as mg cyanidin equivalents/kg of fresh matter (mg CE/kg FM was in range 370 – 830 in blackberries (Rubus Fruticosus, 2500 – 3000 in rosehips (Rosa rubiginosa, 213 in raspberries (Prunus spinosa and 317 mg CE/kg FM in hawthorn berries (Crataegus laevigata. The strong statistical dependences between investigated parameters: Hg – TA in blackthorns, , Cd – TA in raspberries, Hg – TA in raspberries, Cd – TA in hawthorn and Hg – TA in hawthorn were confirmed based on the values of correlation coefficients (R= 0.6958, R= 0.9633, R= 0.9163, R= 0.8587 and R= 0.8938 , respectively.

  14. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  15. Roles of Escherichia coli ZinT in cobalt, mercury and cadmium resistance and structural insights into the metal binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaço, H G; Santo, P E; Matias, P M; Bandeiras, T M; Vicente, J B

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia coli ZinT is a metal binding protein involved in zinc homeostasis, with additional putative functions in the resistance against other metals. Herein, a method was designed and implemented to evaluate from a structural and functional viewpoint metal binding to E. coli ZinT in 96-well microtiter plates. The isolated ZinT was mixed with several metal ions and their binding ability was determined by differential scanning fluorimetry. From the positive hits, six metal ions were evaluated in terms of their toxicity towards an E. coli strain depleted of ZinT (ΔzinT) using as control a strain deleted in the galT gene (ΔgalT). The different sensitivities of each strain to the tested metals revealed novel roles of ZinT in the resistance to cobalt, cadmium and mercury. This approach provides a valuable and reliable platform for the analysis of metal binding and its functional implications, extendable to other metal binding proteins. In combination with the developed platform, structural studies were performed with ZinT, with the zinc-loaded crystallographic structure being obtained at 1.79 Å resolution. Besides the canonical zinc-binding site located near the N-terminus, the herein reported dimeric ZinT structure unravelled extra zinc binding sites that support its role in metal loading and/or transport. Altogether, the designed experimental platform allowed revealing new roles for the ZinT protein in microbial resistance to heavy metal toxicity, as well as structural insights into the ZinT metal binding mechanism.

  16. Comparative oxidative stress, metallothionein induction and organ toxicity following chronic exposure to arsenic, lead and mercury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, S; Flora, G; Bhatnagar, P; Flora, S J S

    2014-06-22

    Globally, arsenic, mercury and lead constitutes as the three most hazardous environmental toxicants perturbing imbalance in pro—oxidant and antioxidant homeostasis. Individual toxicity of these environmental toxicants is well known but there is lack of comparative data on variables indicative of oxidative stress. We thus investigated the effects of chronic exposure to sodium arsenite, mercuric chloride and lead acetate on blood and tissue oxidative stress, metal concentration and metallothionein (MT) contents. Male rats were exposed to sodium arsenite, mercuric chloride and lead acetate (0.05 mg/kg each, orally, once daily) for 6 months. Arsenic, mercury and lead exposure led to a significant inhibition of blood δ—aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and glutathione level supported by increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). The level of inhibition was more pronounced in case of lead followed by mercury and arsenic. These metals/ metalloid significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity accompanied by a decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) levels in blood and tissues. Mercury alone produced a significant induction of hepatic and renal MT concentrations. Serum transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities increased significantly on exposure to arsenic and mercury exposure suggesting liver injury which was less pronounced in case of lead exposure. These biochemical alterations were supported by increased arsenic, mercury and lead concentrations in blood and soft tissues. The present study suggests that exposure to sodium arsenite and mercuric chloride lead to more pronounced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity while lead acetate caused significant alterations in haem synthesis pathway compared to two other thiol binding metal/metalloid.

  17. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Flux from Substrates Associated with Industrial Scale Gold Mining in Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Gaseous elemental and oxidized mercury (Hg) fluxes were measured in a laboratory setting from substrate materials derived from industrial-scale open pit gold mining operations in Nevada, USA. Mercury is present in these substrates at a range of concentrations (10 - 40000 ng g-1), predominantly of local geogenic origin in association with the mineralized gold ores, but altered and redistributed to a varying degree by subsequent ore extraction and processing operations, including deposition of Hg recently emitted to the atmosphere from large point sources on the mines. Waste rock, heap leach, and tailings material usually comprise the most extensive and Hg emission relevant substrate surfaces. All three of these material types were collected from active Nevada mine sites in 2010 for previous research, and have since been stored undisturbed at the University of Nevada, Reno. Gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) flux was previously measured from these materials under a variety of conditions, and was re-measured in this study, using Teflon® flux chambers and Tekran® 2537A automated ambient air analyzers. GEM flux from dry undisturbed materials was comparable between the two measurement periods. Gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) flux from these materials was quantified using an active filter sampling method that consisted of polysulfone cation-exchange membranes deployed in conjunction with the GEM flux apparatus. Initial measurements conducted within greenhouse laboratory space indicate that in dry conditions GOM is deposited to relatively low Hg cap and leach materials, but may be emitted from the much higher Hg concentration tailings material.

  18. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constance Senior

    2004-10-29

    This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

  19. Parameterizing soil emission and atmospheric oxidation-reduction in a model of the global biogeochemical cycle of mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Tetsuro; Ikemoto, Hisatoshi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Hasome, Hisashi; Ueda, Hiromasa

    2013-01-01

    Using the GEOS-Chem atmosphere-land-ocean coupled mercury model, we studied the significances of two processes, soil emission and atmospheric oxidation-reduction, in the global biogeochemical cycling of mercury and their parametrization to improve model performance. Implementing an empirical equation for soil emission flux (Esoil) including soil mercury concentration, solar radiation, and surface air temperature as parameters enabled the model to reproduce the observed seasonal variations of Esoil, whereas the default setting, which uses only the former two parameters, failed. The modified setting of Esoil also increased the model-simulated atmospheric concentration in the summertime surface layer of the lower- and midlatitudes and improved the model reproducibility for the observations in Japan and U.S. in the same period. Implementing oxidation of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) by ozone with an updated rate constant, as well as the oxidation by bromine atoms (Br) in the default setting, improved the model reproducibility for the dry deposition fluxes observed in Japan. This setting, however, failed to reproduce the observed seasonal variations of atmospheric concentrations in the Arctic sites due to the imbalance between oxidation and reduction, whereas the model with Br as the sole Hg(0) oxidant in the polar atmosphere could capture the variations.

  20. Waterborne cadmium and nickel impact oxidative stress responses and retinoid metabolism in yellow perch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defo, Michel A. [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, Québec G1K 9A9 (Canada); Bernatchez, Louis [Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C. [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, Québec G1K 9A9 (Canada); Couture, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.couture@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, Québec G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cd and Ni affected indicators of retinoid metabolism and oxidative stress in fish. • Liver rdh-2 transcription levels increase in fish exposed to waterborne Cd. • Liver REH and LdRAT activities increase with increasing kidney Cd concentration. • Changes at molecular levels do not always mean changes at the functional levels. • Multi-level biological approaches are needed when assessing fish metal toxicology. - Abstract: In this experiment, we studied the transcriptional and functional (enzymatic) responses of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) to metal stress, with a focus on oxidative stress and vitamin A metabolism. Juvenile yellow perch were exposed to two environmentally relevant concentrations of waterborne cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni) for a period of 6 weeks. Kidney Cd and Ni bioaccumulation significantly increased with increasing metal exposure. The major retinoid metabolites analyzed in liver and muscle decreased with metal exposure except at high Cd exposure where no variation was reported in liver. A decrease in free plasma dehydroretinol was also observed with metal exposure. In the liver of Cd-exposed fish, both epidermal retinol dehydrogenase 2 transcription level and corresponding enzyme activities retinyl ester hydrolase and lecithin dehydroretinyl acyl transferase increased. In contrast, muscle epidermal retinol dehydrogenase 2 transcription level decreased with Cd exposure. Among antioxidant defences, liver transcription levels of catalase, microsomal glutathione-S-transferase-3 and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were generally enhanced in Cd-exposed fish and this up-regulation was accompanied by an increase in the activities of corresponding enzymes, except for microsomal glutathione-S-transferase. No consistent pattern in antioxidant defence responses was observed between molecular and biochemical response when fish were exposed to Ni, suggesting a non-synchronous response of antioxidant defence in fish exposed to

  1. Changes in tissue oxidative stress, brain biogenic amines and acetylcholinesterase following co-exposure to lead, arsenic and mercury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Shruti; Bhatnagar, Pradeep; Flora, S J S

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the toxic effects of individual, combined (binary and ternary) exposure to lead, arsenic and mercury on, (i) oxidative stress (ii) alterations in brain biogenic amines and (iii) tissue metals concentration. Rats were exposed to lead, arsenic and mercury either individually (30 ppm in drinking water), various binary (15 ppm each) or ternary combination (10 ppm each) for a period of 6 months. Lead + arsenic and lead + arsenic + mercury co-exposure led to a significant increase in the blood oxidative stress. Mercury + arsenic and lead + arsenic + mercury co-exposure produced a more pronounced hepatotoxicity while, lead + arsenic and lead + arsenic + mercury produced a significant increase in hepatic oxidative stress. Kidney oxidative stress and changes in brain biogenic amines were more prominent in animals exposed to three metals. Accumulation of three metals did not exhibit the pattern as in the case of oxidative stress. Exposure to two toxic metals also showed less accumulation of toxic metals suggesting possible antagonism. The present study thus provides some interesting observations on the interaction between lead, arsenic and mercury. Co-exposure to lead + arsenic + mercury led to a more pronounced increase in oxidative stress in liver and kidneys compared to other exposed groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cadmium-manganese oxide composite thin films: Synthesis, characterization and photoelectrochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoor, M.A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Faculty of Science, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Ebadi, M. [Solar Energy Research Institute, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Mazhar, M., E-mail: mazhar42pk@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Huang, N.M. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Faculty of Science, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Mun, L.K.; Misran, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Basirun, W.J. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Institute of Nanotechnology and Catalysis (NanoCat), University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2017-01-15

    Ceramic composite CdO–Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films have been deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) using a 1:1 mixture of cadmium complex, [Cd(dmae){sub 2}(OAc){sub 2}]·H{sub 2}O (1) (where dmae = 2-dimethylaminoethanolato and OAc = acetato), and diacetatomanganese (II). The phase purity, stoichiometry and thickness of the films were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infra-red (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), UV–Vis spectroscopy and profilometer. The FEG-SEM analysis illustrated that the morphology of the fabricated films was influenced by the type of solvent. The optical direct band gap of the film fabricated from THF solution was 1.95 eV. From the current–voltage characteristics it is evident that the CdO–Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite semiconductor electrode exhibits n-type behaviour and the photocurrent density was found to be dependent on the deposition medium. The film deposited from THF solution displayed maximum photocurrent density of 4.80 mA cm{sup −2} at 0.65 V vs. Ag/AgCl/3 M KCl (∼1.23 V vs. RHE) in 0.5 M NaOH electrolyte. - Highlights: • Single crystal X-ray structure of [Cd(dmae){sub 2}(OAc){sub 2}]·H{sub 2}O (1). • CdO-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite photoanode thin films. • Optical band gap of CdO-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} photoanode. • Photoelectrochemical and EIS studies.

  3. Study on the role of catalase for uptake of metallic mercury Part 3 In vitro oxidation of metallic mercury by catalase and hydrogen peroxide generated by several oxidase system

    OpenAIRE

    劒持,堅志

    1984-01-01

    In vitro oxidation of metallic mercury by catalase and hydrogen peroxide generated by the glucose-glucose oxidase system, D-alanine-D-amino acid oxidase system and xanthine-xanthine oxidase-superoxide dismutase system was investigated. In vitro oxidation of metallic mercury by catalase and hydrogen peroxide generated by the reaction with glucose and glucose oxidase was observed in erythrocytes and crystalline beef liver catalase solution. The uptake depended on the concentration of glucose ox...

  4. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ADDITION ON MERCURY OXIDATION BY SCR CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED SUBBITUMINOUS COAL FLUE GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An entrained flow reactor is used to study the effect of addition of chlorine-containing species on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo)by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst in simulated subbituminous coal combustion flue gas. The combustion flue gas was doped wit...

  5. MERCURY OXIDATION PROMOTED BY A SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED POWDER RIVER BASIN COAL COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Power River Basin (PRB) coal combustion ...

  6. Influence of chronic cadmium exposure on the tissue distribution of copper and zinc and oxidative stress parameters in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Onur; Yazihan, Nuray; Kocak, Mehtap Kacar; Sayal, Ahmet; Akcil, Ethem

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oral cadmium (Cd) intoxication on the antioxidant response and its relationship with essential bioelements like copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). The experimental group was chronically exposed to Cd daily for 8 weeks via consumption of water containing 15 ppm cadmium chloride. Cu, Zn, and Cd concentrations and oxidative stress parameters were analyzed in liver, kidney, and heart tissues. Exposure to Cd led to a significant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase in all considered samples while a significant increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase except for the kidney. We found a significant increase in malondialdehyde concentration in the tissues except for heart. Also oral administration of Cd caused a significant reduction of Zn and Cu in the tissues. Our results allow us to hypothesize that higher Cd concentration in the tissues causes oxidative stress by increasing malondialdehyde as a means of altering antioxidant defense system and deterioration of bioelements in rat liver, kidney, and heart. In addition, further studies are needed to explain the effect of long-term, low-dose exposure to Cd on distribution of bioelements and its relationship with oxidative stress. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Cadmium Sulphide-Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified Photoelectrode-Based Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Copper(II) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I; Lim, H N; Huang, N M; Pandikumar, A

    2016-01-01

    A photoelectrochemical (PEC) sensor with excellent sensitivity and detection toward copper (II) ions (Cu2+) was developed using a cadmium sulphide-reduced graphene oxide (CdS-rGO) nanocomposite on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, with triethanolamine (TEA) used as the sacrificial electron donor. The CdS nanoparticles were initially synthesized via the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using cadmium acetate and thiourea as the precursors to Cd2+ and S2-, respectively. Graphene oxide (GO) was then dip-coated onto the CdS electrode and sintered under an argon gas flow (50 mL/min) for the reduction process. The nanostructured CdS was adhered securely to the ITO by a continuous network of rGO that also acted as an avenue to intensify the transfer of electrons from the conduction band of CdS. The photoelectrochemical results indicated that the ITO/CdS-rGO photoelectrode could facilitate broad UV-visible light absorption, which would lead to a higher and steady-state photocurrent response in the presence of TEA in 0.1 M KCl. The photocurrent decreased with an increase in the concentration of Cu2+ ions. The photoelectrode response for Cu2+ ion detection had a linear range of 0.5-120 μM, with a limit of detection (LoD) of 16 nM. The proposed PEC sensor displayed ultra-sensitivity and good selectivity toward Cu2+ ion detection.

  8. Testing the genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and oxidative stress of cadmium and nickel and their additive effect in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Habit, Ola H; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the ability of cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni) to induce genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and oxidative stress in bone marrow cells of male mice. Aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations (CA) showed that Cd is a stronger mutagen than Ni. Cd and Ni increased significantly the incidences of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). Also, the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes to normochromatic erythrocytes (PCE/NCE) suggests that treatment with higher doses of the two metals increased the cytotoxicity. Numerical chromosomal aberrations increased hypoploidy with the treatment which reached two to three times of the frequency of hyperploidy. The results showed that both Cd and Ni are aneugenic that act on kinetochores and cause malsegregation of chromosomes as well as being clastogenic. Both Cd and Ni increased single-break aberrations and also Cd and Ni were found to induce significant DNA damage in mouse bone marrow cells as assessed by the comet assay. In addition to the cytotoxicity results, biochemical analysis in bone marrow revealed a dose-dependent increase of oxidative stress markers. According to the results obtained, genotoxicity and cytotoxicity effects of cadmium and nickel in vivo are dose-dependent and are associated with oxidative stress and their combined effect is less than their expected additive effect, and it could be concluded that there are no synergistic effects resulting from the combined application of both metals.

  9. The role of intracellular oxidation in death induction (apoptosis and necrosis) in human promonocytic cells treated with stress inducers (cadmium, heat, X-rays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, A; García-Bermejo, L; Troyano, A; Vilaboa, N E; Fernández, C; de Blas, E; Aller, P

    2001-04-01

    Treatment of U-937 human promonocytic cells with the stress inducers cadmium chloride (2 h at 200 microM), heat (2 h at 42.5 C) or X-rays (20 Gy), followed by recovery, caused death by apoptosis and stimulated caspase-3 activity. In addition, all stress agents caused intracellular oxidation, as measured by peroxide and/or anion superoxide accumulation. However, while pre-incubation with antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine or butylated hydroxyanisole) inhibited the induction of apoptosis by cadmium and X-rays, it did not affect the induction by heat-shock. Pre-incubation for 24 h with the GSH-depleting agent L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) switched the mode of death from apoptosis to necrosis in cadmium-treated cells. By contrast, BSO only caused minor modifacions in the rate of apoptosis without affecting the mode of death in heat- and X-rays-treated cells. BSO potentiated peroxide accumulation in cells treated with both cadmium and X-rays. However, while the accumulation of peroxides was stable in the case of cadmium, it was transient in the case of X-rays. Moreover, the administration of antioxidants during the recovery period sufficed to prevent necrosis and restore apoptosis in BSO plus cadmium-treated cells. Cadmium and X-rays caused a decrease in intracellular ATP levels, but the decrease was similar in both apoptotic and necrotic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that (i) stress inducers cause intracellular oxidation, but oxidation is not a general requirement for apoptosis; and (ii) the duration of the oxidant state seems to be critical in determining the mode of death.

  10. Oxidative stress and repetitive element methylation changes in artisanal gold miners occupationally exposed to mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M. Narváez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg exposure is a public health concern due to its persistence in the environment and its high toxicity. Such toxicity has been associated with the generation of oxidative stress in occupationally exposed subjects, such as artisanal gold miners. In this study, we characterize occupational exposure to Hg by measuring blood, urine and hair levels, and investigate oxidative stress and DNA methylation associated with gold mining. To do this, samples from 53 miners and 36 controls were assessed. We show higher levels of oxidative stress marker 8-OHdG in the miners. Differences in LINE1 and Alu(Yb8 DNA methylation between gold miners and control group are present in peripheral blood leukocytes. LINE1 methylation is positively correlated with 8-OHdG levels, while XRCC1 and LINE1 methylation are positively correlated with Hg levels. These results suggest an effect of Hg on oxidative stress and DNA methylation in gold miners that may have an impact on miners’ health.

  11. Relationship between genotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by mercury on common carp (Cyprinus carpio) tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Medina, Sandra; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Ruiz-Lara, Karina; Islas-Flores, Hariz; Gasca-Pérez, Eloy

    2017-11-01

    Mercury is one of the most toxic metals in aquatic systems since it is able to induce neurobehavioral disorders as well as renal and gastrointestinal tract damage. The common carp Cyprinus carpio is an important species from both an ecological and economic viewpoint as it is consumed in many countries, the top producers being Mexico, China, India and Japan. The present study aimed to evaluate the relation between Hg-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in diverse tissues of C. carpio. Specimens were exposed to 0.01mgHg/L (the maximum permissible limit for aquatic life protection), and lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated at 96h. Micronuclei frequency and DNA damage by comet assay were determined at 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h. Hg induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity on exposed fish, since inhibition of antioxidant enzymes activity and increases in lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and micronuclei frequency occurred. Blood, gill and liver were more susceptible to oxidative stress, while blood were more sensitive to genotoxicity. In conclusion, Hg at concentrations equal to the maximum permissible limit for aquatic life protection induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity on C. carpio, and these two effects prove to be correlated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of the epithelial transport of toxic metal ions, particularly mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic, zinc, and copper. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1975--December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, R. H.

    1978-10-01

    Investigations were undertaken to elucidate the mode of transepithelial transport of potentially toxic metal ions across the gastrointestinal tract, with primary attention given to cadmium, zinc, and arsenic. In addition, the toxic effects of cadmium on the metabolism of vitamin D and calcium have been investigated in some detail. Several approaches have been taken, including studies on the localization of heavy metals in the intestinal mucosa, the effects of cadmium on various parameters of calcium metabolism, the modes of intestinal absorption of cadmium, arsenate, and zinc, and the interactions of heavy metals with each other and with calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. Details of these experiments are attached in the Comprehensive Progress Report.

  13. Subtropical subsidence and surface deposition of oxidized mercury produced in the free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Viral; Jaeglé, Lyatt

    2017-07-01

    Oxidized mercury (Hg(II)) is chemically produced in the atmosphere by oxidation of elemental mercury and is directly emitted by anthropogenic activities. We use the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with gaseous oxidation driven by Br atoms to quantify how surface deposition of Hg(II) is influenced by Hg(II) production at different atmospheric heights. We tag Hg(II) chemically produced in the lower (surface-750 hPa), middle (750-400 hPa), and upper troposphere (400 hPa-tropopause), in the stratosphere, as well as directly emitted Hg(II). We evaluate our 2-year simulation (2013-2014) against observations of Hg(II) wet deposition as well as surface and free-tropospheric observations of Hg(II), finding reasonable agreement. We find that Hg(II) produced in the upper and middle troposphere constitutes 91 % of the tropospheric mass of Hg(II) and 91 % of the annual Hg(II) wet deposition flux. This large global influence from the upper and middle troposphere is the result of strong chemical production coupled with a long lifetime of Hg(II) in these regions. Annually, 77-84 % of surface-level Hg(II) over the western US, South America, South Africa, and Australia is produced in the upper and middle troposphere, whereas 26-66 % of surface Hg(II) over the eastern US, Europe, and East Asia, and South Asia is directly emitted. The influence of directly emitted Hg(II) near emission sources is likely higher but cannot be quantified by our coarse-resolution global model (2° latitude × 2.5° longitude). Over the oceans, 72 % of surface Hg(II) is produced in the lower troposphere because of higher Br concentrations in the marine boundary layer. The global contribution of the upper and middle troposphere to the Hg(II) dry deposition flux is 52 %. It is lower compared to the contribution to wet deposition because dry deposition of Hg(II) produced aloft requires its entrainment into the boundary layer, while rain can scavenge Hg(II) from higher altitudes more readily. We find

  14. Short-term metallothionein inductions in the edible cockle Cerastoderma edule after cadmium or mercury exposure: Discrepancy between mRNA and protein responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul-Pont, Ika, E-mail: i.paulpont@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France); Gonzalez, Patrice, E-mail: p.gonzalez@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France); Baudrimont, Magalie, E-mail: m.baudrimont@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France); Nili, Hanane, E-mail: h.nili@etu.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France); Montaudouin, Xavier de, E-mail: x.de-montaudouin@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr [Universite Bordeaux 1 - CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, CNRS, Station Marine d' Arcachon, Place du Dr. Peyneau, Arcachon 33120 (France)

    2010-05-05

    Metallothioneins (MT) are essential metal binding proteins involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in living organisms. Numerous studies have focused on MT response to metal exposure and showed an important variability according to species, metal, concentration and time of exposure. In this study, the expression of one isoform of MT gene (Cemt1) and associated MT protein synthesis were determined after 1, 3, 9, 24, 72 and 168 h of cadmium (Cd) or mercury (Hg) exposures in gills of the cockle Cerastoderma edule. This experiment, carried out in laboratory conditions, revealed that in Cd-exposed cockles, induction of Cemt1 is time-dependent following a 'pulse-scheme' with significant upregulation at 24 h and 168 h intersected by time point (72 h) with significant downregulation. MT protein concentration increases with time in gills of exposed cockles in relation with the progressive accumulation of Cd in soluble fraction. On contrary, Hg exposure does not lead to any induction of Cemt1 mRNA expression or MT protein synthesis compared to control, despite a higher accumulation of this metal in gills of cockles compared to Cd. The localization of Hg (85-90%) is in insoluble fraction, whereas MT was located in the cytoplasm of cells. This gives us a first clue to understand the inability of Hg to activate MT synthesis. However, other biochemical processes probably occur in gills of C. edule since the remaining soluble fraction of Hg exceeds MT sequestration ability. Finally, since one of the first main targets of metal toxicity in cells was the mitochondria, some genes involved in mitochondria metabolism were also analyzed in order to assess potential differences in cellular damages between two metal exposures. Indeed, until T{sub 168}, no impact on mitochondrial genes was shown following Hg exposure, despite the complete lack of MT response. This result indicated the presence of other effective cellular ligands which sequester the cytosolic fraction of

  15. Bioavailability of cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and zinc in subtropical coastal lagoons from the southeast Gulf of California using mangrove oysters (Crassostrea corteziensis and Crassostrea palmula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Osuna, Federico; Osuna-Martínez, Carmen C

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were assessed in the edible tissues of Crassrotrea corteziensis oysters collected during the rainy and dry seasons in 27 sites from 8 coastal lagoons of the southeast Gulf of California. In addition, C. palmula oysters were sampled at 9 sites from the same mangrove roots where C. corteziensis oysters were collected. Metal analyses were performed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Cd, Cu, and Zn), graphite furnace (Pb), and cold vapor detection (Hg). The obtained mean levels were (µg g(-1) dry weight) as follows: Cd 6.05 ± 2.77, Cu 60.0 ± 33.4, Hg 0.38 ± 0.17, Pb 1.11 ± 0.63, and Zn 777 ± 528 µg g(-1). For all metals except Hg, the concentrations were greater during dry season than during rainy seasons. The high levels, particularly that for Cd, were related to upwelling along the eastern Gulf of California. High Hg levels in the rainy season were associated with the transport of materials from the watershed to the lagoon. Shrimp farming, agriculture, and other sources were considered as potential sources to explain the differences in metal bioavailability in the 8 lagoons. The mean concentrations of Cd (Santa María-La Reforma lagoon), Cu [San Ignacio-Navachiste-El Macapule (SINM), Urías (URI), and Altata-Ensenada del Pabellón lagoons], and zinc (Zn) (URI, Santa María-Ohuira-Topolobampo, El Colorado, and SINM lagoons) during the dry season were greater than the maximum permissible limits. C. palmula collected in 8 sites where they were present simultaneously with C. corteziensis had consistently greater metal levels than C. corteziensis, but correlation analyses showed a high and significant (P < 0.05) correlation between metal concentrations in both species. The correlation equations obtained are useful where the same species is not distributed and is necessary to compare results from distinct regions.

  16. Oxidative injury induced by cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in A549 cells and rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Jiang, Chunyang; Alattar, Mohamed; Hu, Xiaoli; Ma, Dong; Liu, Huibin; Meng, Chunyan; Cao, Fuyuan; Li, Weihong; Li, Qingzhao

    2015-01-01

    Rod-shaped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS NPs) are becoming increasingly important in many industrial fields, but their potential hazards remain unknown. This study aimed to explore the patterns and mechanisms of lung injury induced by CdS NPs. A549 cells and rats were exposed to two types of CdS NPs with a same diameter of 20-30 nm but different lengths, CdS1 (80-100 nm) and CdS2 (110-130 nm). The using doses were included 10 μg/ml and 20 μg/ml two types of CdS NPs for cellular experiments and five times dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for rats' exposure. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue staining were used to detect the A549 cell mortality percentage. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined in A549 cell. The vigor of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the contents of catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected both in A549 cells and in rats' serum and lung tissues. The cellular morphological changes were observed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the pathological changes were observed in rats' lung tissue. CdS NPs significantly increased A549 cell mortality percentage. The CdS NPs also increased the levels of ROS and MDA content, whereas they decreased SOD and CAT activities. In parallel, similar changes of the contents of MDA, SOD and CAT were also observed in the sera and lung tissues of CdS NP-treated rats. The cellular TEM detection revealed that two types of CdS nanorods appeared as orderly arranged rounded fat droplets separately and leading to nucleus condensation (CdS1). These cellular and rats' tissues changes in the group treated with CdS1 were more significant than the CdS2 groups. Furthermore, CdS NPs induced many pathological changes, including emphysematous changes in rat lung tissue. Especially visible lung consolidation can be observed in the CdS1 group. CdS NPs induce oxidative injury in the respiratory system, and their toxic effects may be related to grain length.

  17. Cadmium effect on oxidative metabolism of pea (Pisum sativum L.) roots. Imaging of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide accumulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Romero-Puertas, María C; Zabalza, Ana; Corpas, Francisco J; Gómez, Manuel; Del Río, Luis A; Sandalio, Luisa M

    2006-08-01

    Growth of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants with 50 microM CdCl2 for 15 d produced a reduction in the number and length of lateral roots, and changes in structure of the principal roots affecting the xylem vessels. Cadmium induced a reduction in glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASC) contents, and catalase (CAT), GSH reductase (GR) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities. CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was also diminished by the Cd treatment, although Mn-SOD was slightly increased. CAT and CuZn-SOD were down-regulated at transcriptional level, while Mn-SOD, Fe-SOD and GR were up-regulated. Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels by fluorescence and confocal laser microscopy (CLM) showed an over-accumulation of O2*- and H2O2, and a reduction in the NO content in lateral and principal roots. ROS overproduction was dependent on changes in intracellular Ca+2 content, and peroxidases and NADPH oxidases were involved. Cadmium also produced an increase in salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) contents. The rise of ET and ROS, and the NO decrease are in accordance with senescence processes induced by Cd, and the increase of JA and SA could regulate the cellular response to cope with damages imposed by cadmium.

  18. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma injection for elemental mercury oxidation in a simulated flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Jiang, Yuze; Wang, Tiecheng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2014-03-15

    The use of non-thermal plasma (NTP) injection approach to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in simulated flue gas at 110°C was studied, where a surface discharge plasma reactor (SDPR) inserted in the simulated flue duct was used to generate and inject active species into the flue gas. Approximately 81% of the Hg(0) was oxidized and 20.5μgkJ(-1) of energy yield was obtained at a rate of 3.9JL(-1). A maximal Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was found with a change in the NTP injection air flow rate. A high Hg(0) oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O2, H2O, SO2, NO and HCl. Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N2 metastable states and UV-light) were found to contribute to Hg(0) oxidation, with ozone playing a dominant role. The deposited mercury species on the internal surface of the flue duct was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the deposit was identified as HgO. The mercury species is thought to primarily exist in the form of HgO(s) by adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Influence of protective metal-oxide layers on the mercury exhaustion in fluorescent lamps. Measurement and modeling.; Einfluss von Metalloxidschutzschichten auf die Quecksilberaufzehrung in Leuchtstofflampen. Messung und Modellierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Abreu, Alexandre

    2012-07-30

    The thesis deals with mercury consumption in fluorescent lamps comprising different metal oxide coatings. The amount of bound mercury was determined by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (CVAAS) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). RBS offers the possibility to distinguish between mercury bound in the coating and in the glass envelope. Using the acquired data a mathematical model on the basis of a diffusion equation was developed. The model describes the transport and the binding of the mercury in the coatings and in the glass envelope. It is able to describe the behavior of different lamps for burning times up to 8000 h. Unfortunately, no data was available for longer burning periods.

  20. Is oxidative stress related to cadmium accumulation in the Mollusc Crassostrea angulata?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macías-Mayorga, Dayanara, E-mail: dayanara.macias@uleam.edu.ec [Instituto de Ciencias Marinas de Andalucía (CSIC), Campus Río San Pedro, S/N, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Departamento Central De Investigación (DCI), Universidad Laica Eloy Alfaro de Manabí, Vía San Mateo, Manta (Ecuador); Laiz, Irene [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Río San Pedro, S/N, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Blasco, Julián [Instituto de Ciencias Marinas de Andalucía (CSIC), Campus Río San Pedro, S/N, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The cadmium accumulation in C. angulata tended toward a stationary state. • Metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) is clearly induced by Cd accumulation. • The MTLP detoxification mechanism is affected at high Cd concentrations. • Cadmium toxicity causes GSH levels to decrease and inhibits antioxidant enzymes. - Abstract: The kinetics of cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills and digestive gland of Crassotrea angulata at three concentrations of cadmium (0.088 μM, 0.44 μM and 2.22 μM) was monitored for 28 days. The relationship between accumulation and toxicity was studied using metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) concentration and reduced glutathione levels (GSH) as biochemical endpoints. The activity of enzymes which form part of the antioxidant defense system, in particular glutathione reductase (GR), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), as enzymatic endpoints, was also assessed. A first order kinetic model demonstrated that the accumulation process does not take place linearly, as the Cd concentration in gills and digestive gland tended toward a stationary state. Metallothionein-like protein is clearly induced by Cd accumulation; however, at high Cd concentrations the detoxification mechanism of this protein is affected. High Cd concentrations (2.22 μM) lead to a decrease in GSH levels, and also inhibit antioxidant enzyme activities, demonstrating the adverse effect of this metal on the antioxidant balance system.

  1. Ascorbic acid, garlic extract and taurine alleviate cadmium-induced oxidative stress in freshwater catfish (Clarias batrachus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Puneet, E-mail: puneetbiochem@gmail.com [Aquatic Biotechnology and Fish Pathology Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, M.J.P. Rohilkhand University, Bareilly-243 006 (India); Prasad, Y. [Aquatic Biotechnology and Fish Pathology Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, M.J.P. Rohilkhand University, Bareilly-243 006 (India); Patra, A.K. [West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, Kolkata-700037 (India); Ranjan, R.; Swarup, D.; Patra, R.C. [Division of Medicine, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar-243122 (India); Pal, Satya [Env. Eng. Lab., Deptt. of Civil Engineering, I.I.T., Roorkee-247667 (India)

    2009-09-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate bioaccumulation potential of cadmium (Cd) and changes in oxidative stress indices in liver and kidney tissues from Cd-exposed catfish (Clarias batrachus) with or without simultaneous treatment of water with ascorbic acid, garlic extract or taurine. C. batrachus (n = 324) with average length of 20 {+-} 4 cm and weight of 86 {+-} 5 g were used for the present investigation. Fishes were divided into nine groups (I to IX) each comprising 36 fishes. The fishes of groups II, III, IV and V were challenged with 5 ppm of cadmium chloride monohydrate (CdCl{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O), whereas groups VI, VII, VIII and IX were exposed to 10 ppm CdCl{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O solution for a period of 45 days. Group I was kept as negative control and the fishes of this group were maintained in water containing no added Cadmium. Group II and VI were maintained as Cd exposed non treated control to serve as positive controls. Fishes of III and VII, IV and VIII, V and IX received ascorbic acid (5 ppm), extract of dried garlic (5 ppm) or taurine (5 ppm), respectively during the entire experiment period. The concentrations of Cd in liver and kidney increased significantly following exposure to Cd and the level continued to rise with the increase in exposure duration. Treatment of tank water with ascorbic acid, garlic or taurine significantly reduced the Cd concentrations in tissues compared to the positive control group, but the level in Cd exposed groups was greater than the negative control group. Fishes exposed to Cd and treated with ascorbic acid, garlic or taurine had reduced oxidative stress as evidenced from lower concentration of lipid peroxides and higher activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver, kidney and erythrocytes compared to fishes exposed to Cd. The reduction in Cd induced oxidative stress was highest in ascorbic acid treated group followed by garlic and taurine treatment. The results suggest that ascorbic acid, garlic and

  2. Ameliorative effects of Rosmarinus officinalis leaf extract and Vitamin C on cadmium-induced oxidative stress in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anazi, Marim Saleh; Virk, Promy; Elobeid, Mai; Siddiqui, Muzammil Iqbal

    2015-11-01

    The present studywas undertaken to assess the bioaccumulation potential of cadmium in liver, kidney, gills and muscles of freshwater fish, Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and the changes in oxidative stress indices in liver and kidney with or without simultaneous treatment with waterborne vitamin C and rosemary leaf extract. Adult tilapia were divided into seven groups. Six groups were exposed to sublethal concentrations of Cd, three groups to 5 ppm, while other three to 10 ppm. Two groups from each of the Cd exposed groups were treated with Vitamin C (5ppm) and rosemary leaf extract (2.5 ppm) for a period of 21 days. Cadmium concentration in liver, kidneys and gills was significantly higher in the cadmium exposed groups being invariably high in the groups exposed to 10 ppm CdCl2.H2O.Treatment with Vitamin C and rosemary leaf extract significantly reduced cadmium concentration in comparison to non-treated Cd exposed groups. Treatment with Vitamin C and rosemary leaf extract significantly reduced oxidative stress in Cd exposed fish as evidenced from lower concentration of lipid peroxides and reduced activity of catalase and higher activity of superoxide dismutase in liver and kidney as compared to control fish. Reduction in Cd induced oxidative stress and bioaccumulation was comparable between the two antioxidant treatments, Vitamin C and rosemary leaf extract. The key findings suggest that both the antioxidants used showed ameliorative potential to reduce tissue accumulation of Cd and associated oxidative stress in fresh water fish, Nile tilapia.

  3. Associations of neonatal lead, cadmium, chromium and nickel co-exposure with DNA oxidative damage in an electronic waste recycling town

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Wenqing; Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jingwen; Wu, Kusheng, E-mail: kswu@stu.edu.cn

    2014-02-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of toxic heavy metal co-exposure on DNA oxidative damage in neonates from a primitive e-waste recycling region, Guiyu town, China. Methods: Our participants included 201 pregnant women: 126 from Guiyu town and 75 from Jinping district of Shantou city, where no e-waste recycling and dismantling activities existed. Structured interview questionnaires were administered to the pregnant women and umbilical cord blood (UCB) samples were collected after delivery. The UCB concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, and nickel were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Levels of UCB plasma 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, a DNA oxidative damage biomarker) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Our results suggested that UCB lead and cadmium concentrations in neonates of Guiyu were significantly higher than those of Jinping (lead: median 110.45 ng/mL vs. 57.31 ng/mL; cadmium: median 2.50 ng/mL vs. 0.33 ng/mL, both P < 0.001). Parents' residence in Guiyu, and parents' work related to e-waste recycling were the risk factors associated with neonate's UCB lead and cadmium levels. No significant difference of UCB plasma 8-OHdG levels was found between Guiyu and the control area. After adjusting for potential confounders, cord plasma 8-OHdG concentrations (ng/mL) were positively associated with blood cadmium (β = 0.126 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.055 to 0.198 ng/mL), chromium (β = 0.086 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.014 to 0.158 ng/mL) and nickel (β = 0.215 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.113 to 0.317 ng/mL) concentrations. Conclusions: The primitive e-waste recycling and dismantling activities may contribute to the elevated umbilical cord blood toxic heavy metal levels in neonates born in Guiyu. Exposures to cadmium, chromium and nickel were associated with increased oxidative DNA damage in neonates. - Highlights: • DNA oxidative damage levels (8-OHdG) in neonates from Guiyu were assessed.

  4. Associations of blood lead, cadmium, and mercury with estimated glomerular filtration rate in the Korean general population: Analysis of 2008-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yangho [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Kook, E-mail: bklee@sch.ac.kr [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between blood lead, cadmium, and mercury levels with estimated glomerular filtration rate in a general population of South Korean adults. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based on data obtained in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) (2008-2010). The final analytical sample consisted of 5924 participants. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the MDRD Study equation as an indicator of glomerular function. Results: In multiple linear regression analysis of log2-transformed blood lead as a continuous variable on eGFR, after adjusting for covariates including cadmium and mercury, the difference in eGFR levels associated with doubling of blood lead were -2.624 mL/min per 1.73 m Superscript-Two (95% CI: -3.803 to -1.445). In multiple linear regression analysis using quartiles of blood lead as the independent variable, the difference in eGFR levels comparing participants in the highest versus the lowest quartiles of blood lead was -3.835 mL/min per 1.73 m Superscript-Two (95% CI: -5.730 to -1.939). In a multiple linear regression analysis using blood cadmium and mercury, as continuous or categorical variables, as independent variables, neither metal was a significant predictor of eGFR. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI values for reduced eGFR calculated for log2-transformed blood metals and quartiles of the three metals showed similar trends after adjustment for covariates. Discussion: In this large, representative sample of South Korean adults, elevated blood lead level was consistently associated with lower eGFR levels and with the prevalence of reduced eGFR even in blood lead levels below 10 {mu}g/dL. In conclusion, elevated blood lead level was associated with lower eGFR in a Korean general population, supporting the role of lead as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease.

  5. Measurement of Gaseous Oxidized Mercury at a SEARCH Network Site in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Gustin, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    There are three operationally defined forms of mercury (Hg) that have been measured in the atmosphere. These include gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM), and particle-bound Hg (PBM). The chemical compounds that make up GOM are currently not well understood, and because of this we do not understand its transport and fate. Additionally, there are limitations associated with the current measurement method, the Tekran 2537/1130/1135 system. Recent work has shown that this system underestimates GOM concentrations, and may not measure all forms. Here we describe work building on ongoing research that focuses on understanding the limitations associated with the instrument, and the chemical forms of GOM. Mercury data have been collected at a Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network site, Outlying Landing Field (OLF), by the University of Nevada-Reno since 2006. This site is located near the Gulf of Mexico in western Florida. This site is potentially influenced by multiple Hg sources including marine air, electricity generating facilities, mobile sources, and long range transport from high elevation and inland regions. Recent work using data from this location and two others in Florida indicated that on top of background deposition, Hg input to OLF is due to local mobile sources, and long range transport in the spring. Air masses with different chemistry have been hypothesized to carry different GOM compounds. To test this hypothesis, an active Hg sampling system that collects GOM on nylon and cation-exchange membranes is being deployed at OLF. Measurements started March 2013. Here we will present data collected so far, and compare concentrations measured to those obtained using a Tekran system. Ancillary data including meteorology, criteria air pollutants, and those collected using surrogated surfaces for dry Hg deposition and Hg passive samplers will be applied to help understand the sources of GOM. Back trajectory analyses

  6. Deciphering potential chemical compounds of gaseous oxidized mercury in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Miller, Matthieu B.; Edgerton, Eric; Sexauer Gustin, Mae

    2017-02-01

    The highest mercury (Hg) wet deposition in the United States of America (USA) occurs along the Gulf of Mexico, and in the southern and central Mississippi River Valley. Gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) is thought to be a major contributor due to high water solubility and reactivity. Therefore, it is critical to understand concentrations, potential for wet and dry deposition, and GOM compounds present in the air. Concentrations and dry-deposition fluxes of GOM were measured and calculated for Naval Air Station Pensacola Outlying Landing Field (OLF) in Florida using data collected by a Tekran® 2537/1130/1135, the University of Nevada Reno Reactive Mercury Active System (UNRRMAS) with cation exchange and nylon membranes, and the Aerohead samplers that use cation-exchange membranes to determine dry deposition. Relationships with Tekran®-derived data must be interpreted with caution, since the GOM concentrations measured are biased low depending on the chemical compounds in air and interferences with water vapor and ozone.Criteria air pollutants were concurrently measured. This allowed for comparison and better understanding of GOM.In addition to other methods previously applied at OLF, use of the UNRRMAS provided a platform for determination of the chemical compounds of GOM in the air. Results from nylon membranes with thermal desorption analyses indicated seven GOM compounds in this area, including HgBr2, HgCl2, HgO, Hg-nitrogen and sulfur compounds, and two unknown compounds. This indicates that the site is influenced by different gaseous phase reactions and sources. Using back-trajectory analysis during a high-GOM event related to high CO, but average SO2, indicated air parcels moved from the free troposphere and across Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama at low elevation (Henry's Law constants.

  7. Protective effect of Bacopa monniera on methyl mercury-induced oxidative stress in cerebellum of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Shobana, Chandrasekar; Christinal, Johnson; Anusha, Chandran

    2012-08-01

    Methyl mercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant leading to neurological and developmental deficits in animals and human beings. Bacopa monniera (BM) is a perennial herb and is used as a nerve tonic in Ayurveda, a traditional medicine system in India. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether Bacopa monniera extract (BME) could potentially inhibit MeHg-induced toxicity in the cerebellum of rat brain. Male Wistar rats were administered with MeHg orally at a dose of 5 mg/kg b.w. for 21 days. Experimental rats were given MeHg and also administered with BME (40 mg/kg, orally) for 21 days. After the treatment period, we observed that MeHg exposure significantly inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and increased the glutathione reductase activity in cerebellum. It was also found that the level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was increased with the concomitant decrease in the glutathione level in MeHg-induced rats. These alterations were prevented by the administration of BME. Behavioral interference in the MeHg-exposed animals was evident through a marked deficit in the motor performance in the rotarod task, which was completely recovered to control the levels by BME administration. The total mercury content in the cerebellum of MeHg-induced rats was also increased which was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The levels of NO(2) (-) and NO(3) (-) in the serum were found to be significantly increased in the MeHg-induced rats, whereas treatment with BME significantly decreased their levels in serum to near normal when compared to MeHg-induced rats. These findings strongly implicate that BM has potential to protect brain from oxidative damage resulting from MeHg-induced neurotoxicity in rat.

  8. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun M. Baesman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5 medium via methane oxidation.

  9. Cadmium Sulphide-Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified Photoelectrode-Based Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Copper(II Ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ibrahim

    Full Text Available A photoelectrochemical (PEC sensor with excellent sensitivity and detection toward copper (II ions (Cu2+ was developed using a cadmium sulphide-reduced graphene oxide (CdS-rGO nanocomposite on an indium tin oxide (ITO surface, with triethanolamine (TEA used as the sacrificial electron donor. The CdS nanoparticles were initially synthesized via the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD method using cadmium acetate and thiourea as the precursors to Cd2+ and S2-, respectively. Graphene oxide (GO was then dip-coated onto the CdS electrode and sintered under an argon gas flow (50 mL/min for the reduction process. The nanostructured CdS was adhered securely to the ITO by a continuous network of rGO that also acted as an avenue to intensify the transfer of electrons from the conduction band of CdS. The photoelectrochemical results indicated that the ITO/CdS-rGO photoelectrode could facilitate broad UV-visible light absorption, which would lead to a higher and steady-state photocurrent response in the presence of TEA in 0.1 M KCl. The photocurrent decreased with an increase in the concentration of Cu2+ ions. The photoelectrode response for Cu2+ ion detection had a linear range of 0.5-120 μM, with a limit of detection (LoD of 16 nM. The proposed PEC sensor displayed ultra-sensitivity and good selectivity toward Cu2+ ion detection.

  10. Cadmium Sulphide-Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified Photoelectrode-Based Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Copper(II) Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I; Lim, H. N; Huang, N. M; Pandikumar, A

    2016-01-01

    A photoelectrochemical (PEC) sensor with excellent sensitivity and detection toward copper (II) ions (Cu2+) was developed using a cadmium sulphide-reduced graphene oxide (CdS-rGO) nanocomposite on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, with triethanolamine (TEA) used as the sacrificial electron donor. The CdS nanoparticles were initially synthesized via the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using cadmium acetate and thiourea as the precursors to Cd2+ and S2-, respectively. Graphene oxide (GO) was then dip-coated onto the CdS electrode and sintered under an argon gas flow (50 mL/min) for the reduction process. The nanostructured CdS was adhered securely to the ITO by a continuous network of rGO that also acted as an avenue to intensify the transfer of electrons from the conduction band of CdS. The photoelectrochemical results indicated that the ITO/CdS-rGO photoelectrode could facilitate broad UV-visible light absorption, which would lead to a higher and steady-state photocurrent response in the presence of TEA in 0.1 M KCl. The photocurrent decreased with an increase in the concentration of Cu2+ ions. The photoelectrode response for Cu2+ ion detection had a linear range of 0.5–120 μM, with a limit of detection (LoD) of 16 nM. The proposed PEC sensor displayed ultra-sensitivity and good selectivity toward Cu2+ ion detection. PMID:27176635

  11. Cadmium-induced oxidative stress and antioxidative enzyme response in water hyacinth and salvinia

    OpenAIRE

    Vestena, Silvane; Cambraia, Jose; Ribeiro, Cleberson; Oliveira, Juraci A.; Oliva, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    The reactive oxygen species generation, lipid peroxidation and antioxidative enzyme response of water hyacinth and salvinia to Cd were evaluated. Cadmium was absorbed/accumulated mainly in the roots, but significant amounts also translocated to the leaves. No Cd effect on dry weight was detected, although toxicity symptoms were visible. Superoxide and H2O2 concentrations increased, in addition to lipid peroxidation in both species, especially in the leaves of salvinia. In general, antioxidati...

  12. Effect of chronic exposure to cadmium on serum lipid, lipoprotein and oxidative stress indices in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarghandian Saeed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is an environmental toxic metal implicated in lipid abnormalities. The present study was designed to elucidate the possible association between chronic exposure to Cd concentration and alterations in plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and oxidative stress indices in rats. Sixteen male rats were assigned to 2 groups of 8 rats each (test and control. The Cd-exposed group obtained drinking water containing cadmium chloride (CdCl2 in the concentration of 2.0 mg Cd/L in drinking water for 3 months. At the end of the experimental period, blood samples were obtained to determine the changes of serum triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, reduced glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA and also serum Cd contents. The results of the present study indicated that Cd administration significantly increased the serum levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, MDA and Cd with reduction in the HDL-C and GSH levels. In conclusion, evidence is presented that chronic exposure to low Cd concentration can adversely affect the lipid and lipoprotein profile via lipid peroxidation.

  13. The role of iron compounds and hydrogen peroxideon the oxidation of metallic mercury

    OpenAIRE

    愛甲,博美

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of metallic mercury with ferric and ferrous ions was studied. The results were; (1) Mercury uptake of free ferric ion increased with hydrogen peroxide, the maximum uptake was 1.0 mM. However, ferric ion was not taken up without hydrogen peroxide. (2) In the presence of ferric and ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide, mercury uptake was maximum when the mole ratio (Fe(3+)/Fe(2+)) was 0.1.

  14. Protective Effects of Dietary Spirulina platensis against Cadmium-Induced Oxidative Stress in Gills of Rainbow Trout

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    Hamid Evaz-Zadeh Samani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of feeds with cadmium leads to oxidative stress in vital tissues such as gills and affects the fish survival. Therefore, an increase in the capacity of the antioxidant defense system and detoxification system of fish may reduce adverse effects of pollutants. This study investigated the protective effects of microalga Spirulina platensis against oxidative stress in gills of cadmium-treated rainbow trout. Methods: This study was conducted at Fish Farm, Almas-Dime Village, Koohrang, Charmahal & Bakhtiari Province, Iran from April to July 2016. Rainbow trout were allocated into five groups of which one group received normal feed and served as control. Fish from group II received 0.2 mg CdCl2 per 1 kg feed. Groups III-V were fed with enriched diet with 2.5, 5 and 10 g S. platensis per 1 kg feed, respectively and simultaneously treated with 0.2 mg kg-1 CdCl2 for 21 d. Changes in biochemical parameters including alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, malondialdehyde (MDA as marker of lipid peroxidation and cellular total antioxidant capacity were evaluated. Results: Oral exposure to CdCl2 caused a significant increase in MDA levels and altered AST, ALT, ALP and LDH activities in gills (P<0.05. The cellular antioxidant capacity was significantly lowered in CdCl2-treated fish as compared to the control group (P<0.05. Oral administration of S. platensis significantly ameliorated these changes in certain biochemical parameters in gills of CdCl2-treated fish. Conclusion: The findings indicate that S. platensis has protective effects against toxic influence of CdCl2 on certain biochemical parameters in gills of fish.

  15. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma injection for elemental mercury oxidation in a simulated flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Jiang, Yuze [Shandong Electric Power Research Institute, Jinan 250002 (China); Wang, Tiecheng [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: lijie@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Wu, Yan [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The use of non-thermal plasma injection approach to oxidize Hg{sup 0} in simulated flue gas at 110 °C was studied. • A high Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO and HCl. • Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N{sub 2} metastable states and UV-light) contributed to Hg{sup 0} oxidation. • Mercury species mainly existed in the form of HgO(s) adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase. - Abstract: The use of non-thermal plasma (NTP) injection approach to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in simulated flue gas at 110 °C was studied, where a surface discharge plasma reactor (SDPR) inserted in the simulated flue duct was used to generate and inject active species into the flue gas. Approximately 81% of the Hg{sup 0} was oxidized and 20.5 μg kJ{sup −1} of energy yield was obtained at a rate of 3.9 J L{sup −1}. A maximal Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was found with a change in the NTP injection air flow rate. A high Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO and HCl. Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N{sub 2} metastable states and UV-light) were found to contribute to Hg{sup 0} oxidation, with ozone playing a dominant role. The deposited mercury species on the internal surface of the flue duct was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the deposit was identified as HgO. The mercury species is thought to primarily exist in the form of HgO(s) by adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase.

  16. Oxidative stress in rat liver during acute cadmium and ethanol intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Radosavljević Tatjana; Mladenović Dušan; Ninković Milica; Vučević Danijela; Boričić Ivan; Ješić-Vukićević Rada; Šljivančanin Tamara; Lopičić Srđan; Todorović Vera

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of binge drinking on prooxidant/antioxidant system in rat liver in acute cadmium (Cd) intoxication. In experiment male Wistar rats were used and divided into following groups: 1. control, 2. ethanol-treated group, in five subsequent doses of 2 g/kg administered by orogastric tube, 3. Cd-treated group in a single dose of 2.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, 4. group that received Cd 12 hours after the last dose of ethanol. Blood and liver sampl...

  17. N-acetylcysteine effectively mitigates cadmium-induced oxidative damage and cell death in Leydig cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Smita; Mitra, Sumonto; Lakhera, Pramesh C; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to cause severe damage to various organs including lung, liver, kidney, brain and reproductive system. Several studies have reported the induction of oxidative stress pathways following Cd exposure. Since oxidative stress is also deemed responsible for inducing male infertility, a growing worldwide concern, we tried to understand whether the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can be a potential therapeutic agent to counter Cd toxicity using primary Leydig cells. This study highlights the initial cellular alterations which culminate in cell death induction. Primary Leydig cells were isolated from 28-day-old male Wistar rats, exposed to various concentrations of Cd in vitro and biochemical and cell death parameters were evaluated to understand the effect of Cd. NAC pre-treatment was done to understand its protective efficacy. Following Cd exposure to Leydig cells in vitro, we found simultaneous intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) increase and reduction in mitochondrial membrane polarization at 30 min, followed by significant induction of reactive oxygen species and MAPK-extracellular-regulated kinases with concurrent glutathione depletion at 1 h, and significant cell death (both necrotic and apoptotic) at 6 and 18 h, respectively. Pre-treatment with NAC abrogated all these toxic manifestations and showed significantly reduced cell death. NAC also rescued the expression of 3-βHSD, a major steroidogenic protein. Taken together, these data illustrated that NAC can be used as a potential protective agent against Cd-induced testicular toxicity, especially with regards to oxidative stress-induced Leydig cell toxicity.

  18. A novel pre-oxidation method for elemental mercury removal utilizing a complex vaporized absorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yi, E-mail: zhaoyi9515@163.com; Hao, Runlong; Guo, Qing

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An innovative liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) for Hg{sup 0} removal was prepared. • A novel integrative process for Hg{sup 0} removal was proposed. • The simultaneous removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. • The reaction mechanism of simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} was proposed. - Abstract: A novel semi-dry integrative method for elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) removal has been proposed in this paper, in which Hg{sup 0} was initially pre-oxidized by a vaporized liquid-phase complex absorbent (LCA) composed of a Fenton reagent, peracetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl), after which Hg{sup 2+} was absorbed by the resultant Ca(OH){sub 2}. The experimental results indicated that CH{sub 3}COOOH and NaCl were the best additives for Hg{sup 0} oxidation. Among the influencing factors, the pH of the LCA and the adding rate of the LCA significantly affected the Hg{sup 0} removal. The coexisting gases, SO{sub 2} and NO, were characterized as either increasing or inhibiting in the removal process, depending on their concentrations. Under optimal reaction conditions, the efficiency for the single removal of Hg{sup 0} was 91%. Under identical conditions, the efficiencies of the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} were 100%, 79.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Finally, the reaction mechanism for the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NO and Hg{sup 0} was proposed based on the characteristics of the removal products as determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), the analysis of the electrode potentials, and through data from related research references.

  19. Mercury- and silver-rich ferromanganese oxides, southern California Borderland: Deposit model and environmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J.R.; Koschinsky, A.; McIntyre, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury- and silver-enriched ferromanganese oxide crusts were recovered at water depths of 1,750 tol,300 m from La Victoria knoll, located about 72 km off the coast of northern Baja California. No other ferromanganese precipitate found so far in the modern ocean basins is similarly enriched in Hg and Ag. The precipitates consist of submetallic gray, brecciated, Mn oxide layers overlain by brown earthy, laminated Fe-Mn oxide crusts. Both oxide types are rich in Hg (to 10 ppm) and Ag (to 5.5 ppm). The Mn-rich layers are composed of ??MnO2, with lesser amounts of 10A?? and 7A?? manganates, whereas the Mn phase in the Fe-Mn crusts is solely ??MnO2. The Fe phase in both layers is X-ray amorphous. Established criteria for distinguishing hydrothermal versus hydrogenetic crusts indicate that the Mn-rich layers are predominantly of low-temperature hydrothermal origin, whereas the Fe-Mn crusts are hydrogenetic, although there is some overlap in the source of chemical components in both types. La Victoria knoll is uplifted continental basement rock with basalt, andesite, and schist cropping out at the surface; the knoll may have an intrusive core. The Hg and Ag were derived from leaching by hydrothermal fluids of organic matter-rich sediments in basins adjacent to La Victoria knoll and, to a lesser extent, from continental basement rocks underlying the knoll and adjacent basins. Both rock types are notably enriched in Ag and Hg. Faults were the main fluid transport pathway, and hydrothermal circulation was driven by high heat flow associated with thinned crust. Other elements derived from the hydrothermal fluids include Tl, Cd, Cr, and Li. The main host for Hg and Ag is FeOOH, although MnO2 likely hosts some of the Ag. Minor sulfide and barite also may contain small amounts of these metals. Possible analogs in the geologic record for this deposit type are found in the Basin and Range province of the western United States and Mexico. The discovery highlights the fact that

  20. Mercury in Arctic snow: Quantifying the kinetics of photochemical oxidation and reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, E.A. [Department of Environmental Science, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada); Environmental Science Programme, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Mallory, M.L. [Department of Biology, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada); Ziegler, S.E. [Environmental Science Programme, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada); Tordon, R. [Environment Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada); O' Driscoll, N.J., E-mail: nelson.odriscoll@acadiau.ca [Department of Environmental Science, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Controlled experiments were performed with frozen and melted Arctic snow to quantify relationships between mercury photoreaction kinetics, ultra violet (UV) radiation intensity, and snow ion concentrations. Frozen (− 10 °C) and melted (4 °C) snow samples from three Arctic sites were exposed to UV (280–400 nm) radiation (1.26–5.78 W · m{sup −2}), and a parabolic relationship was found between reduction rate constants in frozen and melted snow with increasing UV intensity. Total photoreduced mercury in frozen and melted snow increased linearly with greater UV intensity. Snow with the highest concentrations of chloride and iron had larger photoreduction and photooxidation rate constants, while also having the lowest Hg(0) production. Our results indicate that the amount of mercury photoreduction (loss from snow) is the highest at high UV radiation intensities, while the fastest rates of mercury photoreduction occurred at both low and high intensities. This suggests that, assuming all else is equal, earlier Arctic snow melt periods (when UV intensities are less intense) may result in less mercury loss to the atmosphere by photoreduction and flux, since less Hg(0) is photoproduced at lower UV intensities, thereby resulting in potentially greater mercury transport to aquatic systems with snowmelt. - Highlights: • Mercury photochemical kinetics were studied in frozen and melted Arctic snow. • UV-induced photoreduction and photooxidation rate constants were quantified. • Chloride ion, iron, and DOC influence mercury photoreactions in snow. • Frozen and melted snow have different mercury photoreduction characteristics. • Kinetic information provided can be used to model mercury fate in the Arctic.

  1. Mercury Calibration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    actual capabilities of the current calibration technology. As part of the current effort, WRI worked with Thermo Fisher elemental mercury calibrator units to conduct qualification experiments to demonstrate their performance characteristics under a variety of conditions and to demonstrate that they qualify for use in the CEM calibration program. Monitoring of speciated mercury is another concern of this research. The mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are comprised of both elemental and oxidized mercury. Current CEM analyzers are designed to measure elemental mercury only. Oxidized mercury must first be converted to elemental mercury prior to entering the analyzer inlet in order to be measured. CEM systems must demonstrate the ability to measure both elemental and oxidized mercury. This requires the use of oxidized mercury generators with an efficient conversion of the oxidized mercury to elemental mercury. There are currently two basic types of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) generators used for this purpose. One is an evaporative HgCl{sub 2} generator, which produces gas standards of known concentration by vaporization of aqueous HgCl{sub 2} solutions and quantitative mixing with a diluent carrier gas. The other is a device that converts the output from an elemental Hg generator to HgCl{sub 2} by means of a chemical reaction with chlorine gas. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer system involves reaction of elemental mercury vapor with chlorine gas at an elevated temperature. The draft interim protocol for oxidized mercury units involving reaction with chlorine gas requires the vendors to demonstrate high efficiency of oxidation of an elemental mercury stream from an elemental mercury vapor generator. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer unit is designed to operate at the power plant stack at the probe outlet. Following oxidation of elemental mercury from reaction with chlorine gas, a high temperature module reduces the mercuric chloride back to elemental mercury. WRI

  2. [Mercury contact dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarasa, J G; Huguet, J; Alomar, A; Calderon, P G

    1983-01-01

    Eight female patients with contact allergy to Mercury were studied with the L. T. T. and the Histamine degranulation test of basophiles. In the eight cases the L. T. T. was specific. P. H. A. (an inspecific lymphocyte stimulator lectin) and the Histamine degranulation basophile test, were used as controls. Thirty subjects were used as controls. All of them were negative to the patch test with mercury at 0,5% in petrolatum. No atopic antecedents were among them and their families. No once case of lymphocyte activity to mercury was observed. Mercury acetate solutions at: 12,5 ng/ml. 25 ng/ml and 5 ng/ml were employed. This salt was the unique useful for the L. T. T. practice. Extremely difficulties for the solubilization of mercury bichloride, mercury oxide, phenyl mercury and ammoniated mercury, impaired the L. T. T. with these salts.

  3. Superb adsorption capacity and mechanism of flowerlike magnesium oxide nanostructures for lead and cadmium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Yan; Qu, Jin; Wei, Fang; Liu, Hua; Song, Wei-Guo

    2012-08-01

    A facile method based on microwave-assisted solvothermal process has been developed to synthesize flowerlike MgO precursors, which were then transformed to MgO by simple calcinations. All the chemicals used (magnesium nitrate, urea, and ethanol) were low cost and environmentally benign. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution TEM, and N(2) adsorption-desorption methods. These flowerlike MgO nanostructures had high surface area and showed superb adsorption properties for Pb(II) and Cd(II), with maximum capacities of 1980 mg/g and 1500 mg/g, respectively. All these values are significantly higher than those reported on other nanomaterials. A new adsorption mechanism involving solid-liquid interfacial cation exchange between magnesium and lead or cadmium cations was proposed and confirmed.

  4. Cadmium effects on oxidative metabolism in a marine seagrass: Posidonia oceanica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamoutene, D.; Romeo, M.; Gnassia, M. [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Posidonia oceanica, a seagrass in contact with sediment, is an interesting organism for environmental biomonitoring. In fact, up to now, scientists have studied some pollutant effects on growth rate leaf length, or productivity of this species. In recent years, the topic of metabolism of xenobiotics in plants has arisen. Many of the environmental chemicals are biotransformed by plants in a manner similar to those in mammalian systems. Studies of the influence of pollutants on biotransformation enzymes in posidonia oceanica are of great interest in pollution monitoring programs especially in the Mediterranean sea. In a previous study, we characterized some enzymatic systems involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics in Posidonia oceanica. This study was designed to determine the effects of cadmium on certain biochemical functions in this species.

  5. Secondary poisoning of cadmium, copper and mercury: implications for the Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations in water, sediment and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit CE; van Wezel AP; Jager T; Traas TP; CSR

    2000-01-01

    De betekenis van doorvergiftiging voor de Maximum Toelaatbaar Risiconiveau's (MTRs) en Verwaarloosbaar Risiconiveau's (VRs) van cadmium, koper en kwik in water, sediment en bodem is geevalueerd. Veldgegevens met betrekking tot de accumulatie van deze elementen door vissen, mosselen en

  6. Improved Sensitization of Zinc Oxide Nanorods by Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots through Charge Induced Hydrophilic Surface Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Laxman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on UV-mediated enhancement in the sensitization of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs on zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods, improving the charge transfer efficiency across the QD-ZnO interface. The improvement was primarily due to the reduction in the interfacial resistance achieved via the incorporation of UV light induced surface defects on zinc oxide nanorods. The photoinduced defects were characterized by XPS, FTIR, and water contact angle measurements, which demonstrated an increase in the surface defects (oxygen vacancies in the ZnO crystal, leading to an increase in the active sites available for the QD attachment. As a proof of concept, a model cadmium telluride (CdTe QD solar cell was fabricated using the defect engineered ZnO photoelectrodes, which showed ∼10% increase in photovoltage and ∼66% improvement in the photocurrent compared to the defect-free photoelectrodes. The improvement in the photocurrent was mainly attributed to the enhancement in the charge transfer efficiency across the defect rich QD-ZnO interface, which was indicated by the higher quenching of the CdTe QD photoluminescence upon sensitization.

  7. Thymol Ameliorates Cadmium-Induced Phytotoxicity in the Root of Rice (Oryza sativa) Seedling by Decreasing Endogenous Nitric Oxide Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Zhi Qi; Hu, Liang-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Han, Fengxiang X; Zhou, Li-Gang; Chen, Jian

    2017-08-30

    Thymol has been developed as medicine and food preservative due to its immune-regulatory effect and antimicrobial activity, respectively. However, little is currently known about the role of thymol in the modulation of plant physiology. In the present study, we applied biochemical and histochemical approaches to investigate thymol-induced tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings against Cd (cadmium) stress. Thymol at 20 μM recovered root growth completely upon CdCl2 exposure. Thymol pronouncedly decreased Cd-induced ROS accumulation, oxidative injury, cell death, and Cd2+ accumulation in roots. Pharmaceutical experiments suggested that endogenous NO mediated Cd-induced phytotoxicity. Thymol decreased Cd-induced NO accumulation by suppressing the activity of NOS (nitric oxide synthase) and NR (nitrate reductase) in root. The application of NO donor (SNP, sodium nitroprusside) resulted in the increase in endogenous NO level, which in turn compromised the alleviating effects of thymol on Cd toxicity. Such findings may helpful to illustrate the novel role of thymol in the modulation of plant physiology, which may be applicable to improve crop stress tolerance.

  8. Oxidative stress parameters induced by exposure to either cadmium or 17β-estradiol on Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes. The role of signaling molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsogiannaki, Sophia [Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Zoology Department, School of Biology, Faculty of Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Franzellitti, Silvia [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); Fabbri, Elena [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, via Selmi 3, 40100 Bologna (Italy); Kaloyianni, Martha, E-mail: kaloyian@bio.auth.gr [Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Zoology Department, School of Biology, Faculty of Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •Oxidative parameters in Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes were measured. •Comparison between cadmium and 17β-estradiol cytotoxicity is discussed. •NHE, PKC, PI3-K, NADPH oxidase, NO synthase, JNK involvement was observed. •Protective role of cAMP is suggested. •Signaling molecules studied could constitute novel biomarkers. -- Abstract: The aim of the present study was to determine and compare the possible effects of exposure to an estrogen, 17β-estradiol and to a metal, cadmium on oxidative parameters of Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes and to elucidate the signaling pathways that probably mediate the studied effects exerted by these two chemicals. In addition, it was of interest to investigate if the studied parameters could constitute biomarkers for aquatic pollution monitoring. Our results suggest that micromolar concentrations of either cadmium or 17β-estradiol affected the redox status of mussels by modulating oxidative parameters and antioxidant enzymes gene expression in mussel M. galloprovincialis hemocytes. In particular, our results showed that treatment of hemocytes with either 5 μM of cadmium chloride or with 25 nM of 17β-estradiol for 30 min caused significant increased ROS production; this led to oxidative damage exemplified by significant increased DNA damage, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation, as well as increased mRNA levels of the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismoutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Furthermore, our results suggest that either cadmium or 17β-estradiol signal is mediated either through one of the already known pathways initiated by photatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3 K) and reaching Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger (NHE) probably through protein kinase C (PKC) or a kinase-mediated signaling pathway that involves in most of the cases NHE, PKC, Ca{sup 2+}-dependent PKC isoforms, PI3-K, NADPH oxidase, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and

  9. Effects of cadmium stress on growth and anti-oxidative systems in Achnatherum inebrians symbiotic with Neotyphodium gansuense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xingxu [Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystems, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Pastoral Agriculture Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, P.O. Box 61, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu (China); Li Chunjie, E-mail: chunjie@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystems, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Pastoral Agriculture Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, P.O. Box 61, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu (China); Nan Zhibiao [Key Laboratory of Grassland Agro-Ecosystems, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Pastoral Agriculture Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, P.O. Box 61, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu (China)

    2010-03-15

    The effects of cadmium on biomass production and growth parameters of drunken horse grass (Achnatherum inebrians) over an 8-week period were determined in a controlled-environment experiment. Changes were determined for relative water content, anti-oxidative enzymes (i.e., catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)) and for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content, as well as levels of proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), and chlorophylls 'a' and 'b' present within leaves infected with Neotyphodium gansuense vs. non-infected controls. Observations began 4 weeks after addition of CdCl{sub 2} (0, 50, 100 and 200 {mu}M) to the nutrient solution. Under high concentrations (100 and 200 {mu}M) of CdCl{sub 2}, endophyte-infected plants produced more biomass and had higher values for plant height and tiller number compared to non-infected controls, but there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) under 0 and 50 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}. Anti-oxidative enzyme activities, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, and chlorophylls 'a' and 'b' levels increased, but proline and malondialdehyde content declined in the infected plants vs. non-infected plants under high (100 and 200 {mu}M) concentrations of CdCl{sub 2}. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) under 0 and 50 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}. Endophyte infection was concluded to be of benefit to the growth and anti-oxidative mechanisms within A. inebrians under high concentrations exposures to CdCl{sub 2}.

  10. Acute exposure to waterborne cadmium induced oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the brain, ovary and liver of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jia-Lang, E-mail: zhengjialang@aliyun.com; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Wu, Chang-Wen; Lv, Zhen-Ming

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Cd induced oxidative stress and immunotoxicity by the generation of ROS. • The toxic effects depended on exposure time and different tissues. • Nrf2 and NF-κB mediated antioxidant and inflammatory responses. • Gene changed at transcriptional, translational, post-translational levels. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental contaminant that poses serious risks to aquatic organisms and their associated ecosystem. The mechanisms underlying Cd-induced oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in fish remain largely unknown. In this study, adult female zebrafish were exposed to 0 (control), 1 mg L{sup −1} Cd for 24 h and 96 h, and the oxidative stress and inflammatory responses induced by Cd were evaluated in the brain, liver and ovary. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased in a time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in the brain and liver. The increase may result from the disturbance of genes including copper and zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and ciclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) at mRNA, protein and activity levels. Although ROS, NO and MDA were not significantly affected by Cd in the ovary, the up-regulation of Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, iNOS, and COX-2 was observed. Exposure to Cd induced a sharp increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the brain, liver and ovary, possibly contributing to activate inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we also found a dramatic increase in mRNA levels of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) at 24 h in the liver and ovary. The corresponding changes in the mRNA levels of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1a and Keap1b) and the inhibitor of κBα (IκBαa and IκBαb) may contribute to regulate the transcriptional activity of Nrf2 and NF-κB, respectively. Contrarily, mRNA levels of Nrf2, NF-κB, Keap1, Keap1b, IκBαa and IκBαb remained

  11. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R. [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, Santiago [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Peçanha, Franck [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Angela [Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922, Alcorcón (Spain); Fortuño, Ana [Área de Ciencias Cardiovasculares, Centro de Investigación Médica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31008, Pamplona (Spain); Cachofeiro, Victoria [Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Tejerina, Teresa [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  12. Transparent semiconducting amorphous cadmium-gallium-tin oxide films by magnetron sputtering with water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Hiroshi; Koyamaishi, Yusuke; Sato, Chiyuki; Kimura, Yota

    2017-06-01

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors (including transparent ones) are attractive materials for next-generation optoelectronic applications. One of the difficulties with amorphous oxide semiconductors is the lack of high mobility (>10 cm2 V-1 s-1) at low carrier density (radio-frequency magnetron sputtering with a water-vapor pressure ≥0.25 Pa. In these amorphous films, the threshold carrier density for obtaining high mobility (˜10 cm2 V-1 s-1) is possibly four orders of magnitude lower than that in conventional amorphous oxide semiconductors such as amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O.

  13. Associations of neonatal lead, cadmium, chromium and nickel co-exposure with DNA oxidative damage in an electronic waste recycling town.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wenqing; Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jingwen; Wu, Kusheng

    2014-02-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of toxic heavy metal co-exposure on DNA oxidative damage in neonates from a primitive e-waste recycling region, Guiyu town, China. Our participants included 201 pregnant women: 126 from Guiyu town and 75 from Jinping district of Shantou city, where no e-waste recycling and dismantling activities existed. Structured interview questionnaires were administered to the pregnant women and umbilical cord blood (UCB) samples were collected after delivery. The UCB concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, and nickel were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Levels of UCB plasma 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, a DNA oxidative damage biomarker) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results suggested that UCB lead and cadmium concentrations in neonates of Guiyu were significantly higher than those of Jinping (lead: median 110.45 ng/mL vs. 57.31 ng/mL; cadmium: median 2.50 ng/mL vs. 0.33 ng/mL, both Pe-waste recycling were the risk factors associated with neonate's UCB lead and cadmium levels. No significant difference of UCB plasma 8-OHdG levels was found between Guiyu and the control area. After adjusting for potential confounders, cord plasma 8-OHdG concentrations (ng/mL) were positively associated with blood cadmium (β=0.126 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.055 to 0.198 ng/mL), chromium (β=0.086 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.014 to 0.158 ng/mL) and nickel (β=0.215 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.113 to 0.317 ng/mL) concentrations. The primitive e-waste recycling and dismantling activities may contribute to the elevated umbilical cord blood toxic heavy metal levels in neonates born in Guiyu. Exposures to cadmium, chromium and nickel were associated with increased oxidative DNA damage in neonates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitigation of gaseous mercury emissions from waste-to-energy facilities: Homogeneous and heterogeneous Hg-oxidation pathways in presence of fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumayor, M; Svoboda, K; Švehla, J; Pohořelý, M; Šyc, M

    2017-10-27

    This study describes the main mechanisms that take part in the mercury homogeneous oxidation pathway in presence of some of the main reactive compounds formed during waste incineration processes (O2, HCl, SO2 and NO). Series of model, synthetic dry flue gases were used to elucidate the effects of HCl, SO2, NO and their proportions in the gas on mercury behaviour. Three samples of fly ash collected from a MSWI facility were characterized and evaluated both for Hg heterogeneous oxidation and Hg removal in a laboratory scale device. The results obtained in this study showed that homogeneous mercury oxidation in the models MSWI and coal combustion flue gas atmospheres was 52 ± 5% and 25%, respectively. SO2, NO and HCl have a synergetic effect in Hg oxidation in presence of oxygen, but the main differences found are mainly caused by the strong influence of HCl and the likely inhibitory oxidation effects of SO2. Surface area together with carbon and chloride content of the fly ashes were correlated with their capacity for Hg-heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption. The sample of fly ash with relatively high content of unburnt carbon and chlorine, and with BET surface (2.42 m(2)/g) was able to remove up to 100% of Hg(0) (g) during 300 min. The results obtained in this study provide a complete overview of the behaviour of mercury during MSWI processes and may help to clarify the fate/behaviour of mercury in a filter (e.g. electrostatic precipitator) providing a deeper knowledge about the impacts of fly ash properties on mercury fate in waste incineration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential of mercury-resistant marine bacteria for detoxification of chemicals of environmental concern

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.; Bhosle, N.B.; Garg, A.; Vardanyan, L.; Nagle, V.L.; Fukami, K.

    waters of India were evaluated for their ability to biotransform the heavy metals mercury, cadmium and lead as well as xenobiotics like polychlorinated biphenyls and tributyltin. These salt-tolerant bacteria removed mercury by means of volatilization...

  16. Role of Nrf2 antioxidant defense in mitigating cadmium-induced oxidative stress in the olfactory system of zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lu; Gallagher, Evan P., E-mail: evang3@uw.edu

    2013-01-15

    Exposure to trace metals can disrupt olfactory function in fish leading to a loss of behaviors critical to survival. Cadmium (Cd) is an olfactory toxicant that elicits cellular oxidative stress as a mechanism of toxicity while also inducing protective cellular antioxidant genes via activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway. However, the molecular mechanisms of Cd-induced olfactory injury have not been characterized. In the present study, we investigated the role of the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense pathway in protecting against Cd-induced olfactory injury in zebrafish. A dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant genes associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress was observed in the olfactory system of adult zebrafish following 24 h Cd exposure. Zebrafish larvae exposed to Cd for 3 h showed increased glutathione S-transferase pi (gst pi), glutamate–cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (gclc), heme oxygenase 1 (hmox1) and peroxiredoxin 1 (prdx1) mRNA levels indicative of Nrf2 activation, and which were blocked by morpholino-mediated Nrf2 knockdown. The inhibition of antioxidant gene induction in Cd-exposed Nrf2 morphants was associated with disruption of olfactory driven behaviors, increased cell death and loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Nrf2 morphants also exhibited a downregulation of OSN-specific genes after Cd exposure. Pre-incubation of embryos with sulforaphane (SFN) partially protected against Cd-induced olfactory tissue damage. Collectively, our results indicate that oxidative stress is an important mechanism of Cd-mediated injury in the zebrafish olfactory system. Moreover, the Nrf2 pathway plays a protective role against cellular oxidative damage and is important in maintaining zebrafish olfactory function. -- Highlights: ► Oxidative stress is an important mechanism of Cd-mediated olfactory injury. ► Cd induces antioxidant gene expression in the zebrafish olfactory system. ► The

  17. [A study of the literature on the concentrations of arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury in body fluids and tissues to define normal values and detection of overload. 1. Description of analytical methods and arsenic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, P; Schweinsberg, F

    1988-07-01

    The present review covers 208 papers dealing with determination of the metals arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury in human biologic material. A comprehensive data bank survey of the literature from January 1980 to April 1984 was conducted and supplemented by review of some earlier publications. As shown by comparison of the results from a number of papers, the various state-of-the-art methods for determining metal content in biologic materials (e.g., atomic absorption spectrophotometry, neutron activation analysis, and x-ray fluorescent analysis) appear to be equally sensitive and reliable. These detection methods are suited to determination of the above metals in the following media: arsenic in urine, hair; cadmium in blood, urine, hair, renal cortex; lead in blood, hair; mercury in blood, urine, hair. To permit better comparison of the results presented in various publications, agreement must be reached on use of uniform concentration units and participation in quality control programs. Safe levels of chronic biological exposure overlap with concentrations which cause health effects or measurable impairment of body function over a wide range. Individual sensitivity to biological exposure varies. In a number of studies, metal concentrations are measured in symptom-free persons which cause symptoms in persons examined in other studies. Due to differences in the sensitivity of detection of symptoms, the range of minimum levels of biological exposure considered to be associated with deleterious health effects (levels of critical exposure) is unacceptably broad. Minimum levels of critical exposure should protect against development of early symptoms of toxicity. If the lowest published critical levels of biological exposure are taken as a cutoff, then a sizable portion of the persons currently revealing metal exposure in any of the reported media exceeds such levels. Symptoms of detrimental effects should be detectable in such persons and should be investigated. In

  18. Solanum torvum Swartz. fruit attenuates cadmium-induced liver and kidney damage through modulation of oxidative stress and glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, C H; Subastri, A; Suyavaran, A; Subbaiah, K C V; Valluru, L; Thirunavukkarasu, C

    2016-04-01

    Increased levels of environmental pollutants are linked to almost all human disorders; the efficient method to manage the human health is through naturally available dietary molecule. Solanum torvum (ST) Swartz (Solanaceae) commonly called Turkey Berry is found in Africa, Asia, and South America. Its fruit, part of traditional Indian cuisine, is a widely consumed nutritious herb, acclaimed for its medicinal value. ST aqueous extract (STAe) (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg b.w., 6 days; oral) against acute Cadmium (Cd) (6.3 mg/kg b.w., single dose; oral) toxicity was evaluated in rats. Protective effect was assessed using serum markers, tissue antioxidants, oxidant derivatives, glycoprotein, and histopathological studies. The activities of serum marker enzymes were increased (40-60 %); antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and CAT, GSH, and its metabolic enzyme activities were decreased (50-80 %) in the liver and kidney upon Cd intoxication. During STAe pre-treatment, at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w., the above changes were brought to near normal (25-63 %). Tissue 4-hydroxynonenal, 3-nitrotyrosine, and protein carbonyls were increased (8-15 fold) in Cd-alone-treated rats, whereas pre-supplementation of STAe significantly decreased their levels and inhibited the protein glycosylation effectively. The pharmacological effect of STAe was confirmed by histopathological observations. Based on previous literature and present investigation, we conclude that ST may serve as a potential functional food against environmental contaminant such as heavy metal-induced oxidative stress.

  19. Design of 3D MnO2/Carbon sphere composite for the catalytic oxidation and adsorption of elemental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haomiao; Jia, Jinping; Guo, Yongfu; Qu, Zan; Liao, Yong; Xie, Jiangkun; Shangguan, Wenfeng; Yan, Naiqiang

    2017-08-08

    Three-dimensional (3D) MnO2/Carbon Sphere (MnO2/CS) composite was synthesized from zero-dimensional carbon spheres and one-dimensional α-MnO2 using hydrothermal method. The hierarchical MnO2/CS composite was applied for the catalytic oxidation and adsorption of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from coal-fired flue gas. The characterization results indicated that this composite exhibits a 3D urchin morphology. Carbon spheres act as the core and α-MnO2 nano-rods grew on the surface of carbon spheres. This 3D hierarchical structure benefits the enlargement of surface areas and pore volumes. Hg(0) removal experimental results indicated that the MnO2/CS composite has an outstanding Hg(0) removal performance due to the higher catalytic oxidation and adsorption performance. MnO2/CS composite had higher than 99% Hg(0) removal efficiency even after 600min reaction. In addition, the nano-sized MnO2/CS composite exhibited better SO2 resistance than pure α-MnO2. Moreover, the Hg-TPD results indicated that the adsorbed mercury can release from the surface of MnO2/CS using a thermal decomposition method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of silver/gold nanocages onto indium tin oxide glass as a reagentless plasmonic mercury sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Daodan; Hu, Tingting; Chen, Na [The Key Lab of Health Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang, Wei, E-mail: zhangwei@cigit.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Multi-scale Manufacturing Technology, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400714 (China); Di, Junwei, E-mail: djw@suda.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Health Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Suzhou, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • A reagentless, sensitive and selective optical sensor for detection of Hg(II) was developed. • Silver–gold nanocages were prepared on the transparent indium tin oxide coated glass surface. • The nanomaterials could act as optical sensing probe as well as reducing agent. • The plasmonic sensor could be used to detect mercury ions in field analysis. Abstract: We demonstrate the utilization of silver/gold nanocages (Ag/Au NCs) deposited onto transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) film glass as the basis of a reagentless, simple and inexpensive mercury probe. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak wavelength was located at ~800 nm. By utilizing the redox reaction between Hg²⁺ ions and Ag atoms that existed in Ag/Au NCs, the LSPR peak of Ag/Au NCs was blue-shifted. Thus, we develop an optical sensing probe for the detection of Hg²⁺ ions. The LSPR peak changes were lineally proportional to the concentration of Hg²⁺ ions over the range from 10 ppb to 0.5 ppm. The detection limit was ~5 ppb. This plasmonic probe shows good selectivity and high sensitivity. The proposed optical probe is successfully applied to the sensing of Hg²⁺ in real samples.

  1. Uncertainties of Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Measurements Using KCl-Coated Denuders, Cation-Exchange Membranes, and Nylon Membranes: Humidity Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-05-19

    Quantifying the concentration of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and identifying the chemical compounds in the atmosphere are important for developing accurate local, regional, and global biogeochemical cycles. The major hypothesis driving this work was that relative humidity affects collection of GOM on KCl-coated denuders and nylon membranes, both currently being applied to measure GOM. Using a laboratory manifold system and ambient air, GOM capture efficiency on 3 different collection surfaces, including KCl-coated denuders, nylon membranes, and cation-exchange membranes, was investigated at relative humidity ranging from 25 to 75%. Recovery of permeated HgBr2 on KCl-coated denuders declined by 4-60% during spikes of relative humidity (25 to 75%). When spikes were turned off GOM recoveries returned to 60 ± 19% of permeated levels. In some cases, KCl-coated denuders were gradually passivated over time after additional humidity was applied. In this study, GOM recovery on nylon membranes decreased with high humidity and ozone concentrations. However, additional humidity enhanced GOM recovery on cation-exchange membranes. In addition, reduction and oxidation of elemental mercury during experiments was observed. The findings in this study can help to explain field observations in previous studies.

  2. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  3. Dynamic oxidation of gaseous mercury in the Arctic troposphere at polar sunrise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Steve E; Brooks, Steve; Lin, C J

    2002-01-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally distributed air toxin with a long atmospheric residence time. Any process that reduces its atmospheric lifetime increases its potential accumulation in the biosphere. Our data from Barrow, AK, at 71 degrees N show that rapid, photochemically driven ox...

  4. Exciting imperfection. Real-structure effects in magnesium-, cadmium-, and zinc-oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleife, Andre

    2010-07-01

    We employ recent ab-initio methods and theoretical spectroscopy techniques that rely on heavy numerical calculations to describe electronic excitations in non-ideal crystals of three group-II oxides. We study the ideal equilibrium polymorphs of these oxides, for gaining a thorough understanding as well as the necessary confidence in our approaches to generalize and apply them to the electronic excitations in imperfect crystals. As such imperfections we take the influence of strain, the alloying of the different oxides, an intrinsic point defect, and free electrons in the lowest conduction band into account. We employ the DFT results as input in order to compute quasiparticle electronic structures, which are in good agreement with experimental findings. According to Hedin's equations for interacting electrons, the electron-hole interaction is taken into account by solving a Bethe-Salpeter equation for the polarization function. Thereafter the equilibrium polymorphs of ideal bulk MgO, ZnO, and CdO and investigates the structure of their valence and conduction bands are described. We present densities of states and effective masses, as well as natural band discontinuities. Furthermore, our description of the dielectric function, which takes excitonic effects into account, enables us to derive the electron-energy loss function. The influence of uniaxial and biaxial strain on the ordering of the valence bands in ZnO is investigated. In addition, we explore the electronic band structure of the non-equilibrium wurtzite structures of MgO and CdO. We predict valence-band splittings and band gaps as they might occur at interfaces of Mgo or CdO with ZnO substrates. Thereafter we study pseudobinary alloys by means of a cluster expansion method. Due to the different crystal structures of the respective oxides, i.e. rocksalt and wurtzite, the description of their heterostructural combination has to be achieved. The electronic and optical properties of the group-II oxide

  5. Effect of pregnancy on the levels of blood cadmium, lead, and mercury for females aged 17-39 years old: data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ram B

    2013-01-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination survey for the years 2003-2010 were used (n = 4700) to evaluate the effect of age, parity, body mass index (BMI), race/ethnicity, pregnancy, iron (Fe) storage status, smoking status, and fish/shellfish consumption on the levels of blood cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and total mercury (Hg)for females aged 17-39 years old. Regression analysis was used to fit models for each of the three metals. For all three metals, age was positively and BMI was negatively associated with levels of these metals in blood. Smokers had statistically significantly higher levels of Cd and Pb irrespective of race/ethnicity and Fe storage status as compared to nonsmokers. Novel to this study, pregnancy was found to be associated with significantly lower levels of Cd, Pb, and Hg irrespective of race/ethnicity and Fe storage status as compared to nonpregnant females. It is conceivable that pregnancy may thus accelerate clearance of these metals from blood. Fish/shellfish consumption was associated with higher levels of Hg but not with Cd levels.

  6. Chronic dietary mercury exposure causes oxidative stress, brain lesions, and altered behaviour in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berntssen, Marc H.G.; Aatland, Aase; Handy, Richard D

    2003-10-08

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) parr were fed for 4 months on fish meal based diets supplemented with mercuric chloride (0, 10, or 100 mg Hg kg{sup -1} DW) or methylmercury chloride (0, 5, or 10 mg Hg kg{sup -1} DW) to assess the effects of inorganic (Hg) and organic dietary mercury on brain lipid peroxidation and neurotoxicity. Lipid peroxidative products, endogenous anti oxidant enzymes, brain histopathology, and overall behaviour were measured. Methylmercury accumulated significantly in the brain of fish fed 5 or 10 mg kg{sup -1} by the end of the experiment, and inorganic mercury accumulated significantly in the brain only at 100 mg kg{sup -1} exposure levels. No mortality or growth reduction was observed in any of the exposure groups. Fish fed 5 mg kg{sup -1} methylmercury had a significant increase (2-fold) in the antioxidant enzyme super oxide dismutase (SOD) in the brain. At dietary levels of 10 mg kg{sup -1} methylmercury, a significant increase (7-fold) was observed in lipid peroxidative products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) and a subsequently decrease (1.5-fold) in anti oxidant enzyme activity (SOD and glutathione peroxidase, GSH-Px). Fish fed 10 mg kg{sup -1} methylmercury also had pathological damage (vacoulation and necrosis), significantly reduced neural enzyme activity (5-fold reduced monoamine oxidase, MAO, activity), and reduced overall post-feeding activity behaviour. Pathological injury started in the brain stem and became more widespread in other areas of the brain at higher exposure levels. Fish fed 100 mg Hg kg{sup -1} inorganic mercury had significant reduced neural MAO activity and pathological changes (astrocyte proliferation) in the brain, however, neural SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activity, lipid peroxidative products (TBARS), and post feeding behaviour did not differ from controls. Compared with other organs, the brain is particular susceptible for dietary methylmercury induced lipid peroxidative stress at relative low

  7. Perturbed Angular Correlation Study of the Static and Dynamic Aspects of Cadmium and Mercury Atoms Inside and Attached to a C60 Fullerene Cage

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Satyendra K; Banerjee, Debasish; Johnston, Karl; Das, Parnika; Butz, Tilman; Amaral, Vitor S; Correia, Joao G; Barbosa, Marcelo B

    2014-01-01

    30 keV Cd-111m and 50 keV Hg-199m beams from ISOLDE were used to implant on preformed targets of C-60 with a thickness of 1 mg cm(-2). Endofullerene compounds, viz. Cd-111m@C-60 and Hg-199m@C-60 formed during implantation were separated by filtration through micropore filter paper followed by solvent extraction. Dried samples of the endofullerene compounds were counted for the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) measurement using the coincidence of the 151-245 keV cascade of Cd-111m and the 374 158 keV cascade of Hg-199m on a six LaBr3(Ce) detector system coupled with digital electronics. The results for 111mCd@C60 indicate a single static component (27\\%) and a fast relaxing component (73\\%), the latter implying that the cadmium atom moves rapidly inside the cage at room temperature. The quadrupole interaction frequency and asymmetry parameter of the cadmium atom occupying the static site in C60 are omega(Q) = 8.21(36) Mrad s(-1) and eta = 0.41(9), respectively. The fast relaxation con...

  8. Oxidative stress, endocrine disruption, and malformation of Bufo gargarizans embryo exposed to sub-lethal cadmium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Zhang, Yuhui; Chai, Lihong; Wang, Hongyuan

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical for vertebrate postembryonic development as well as embryonic development. Chinese toad (Bufo gargarizans) embryos were exposed to different concentrations of cadmium (5, 50, 100, 200 and 500μg Cd L-1) for 7days. Malformations were monitored daily, and growth and development of embryos were measured at day 4 and 7, and type 2 and 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2 and Dio3), thyroid hormone receptors (TRα and TRβ) mRNA levels were also measured to assess disruption of TH synthesis. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) mRNA expression were examined to evaluate the ability of scavenging ROS. Our results demonstrated a bimodal inhibitory effect of Cd on the embryo growth and development of Bufo gargarizans. Reduced mean stage, total length and weight were observed at 5, 50, 200 and 500, but not at 100μg Cd L-1. Embryos malformation occurred in all cadmium treatments. Morphological abnormalities of embryos are characterized by axial flexures, abdominal edema, stunted growth and fin flexure. Real-time PCR results show that exposure to cadmium down-regulated TRα and Dio3 mRNA expression and up-regulated Dio2 mRNA level. SOD and GPx mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated after cadmium exposure. We concluded that cadmium could change mRNA expression of TRα, Dio2 and Dio3 leading the inhibition of growth and development of B. gargarizans embryo, which suggests that cadmium might have the endocrine-disrupting effect in embryos. Moreover, the reduced ability of scavenging ROS induced by cadmium might be responsible for the teratogenic effects of cadmium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cadmium Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    using for commercial applications Other zinc alloys Zinc cobalt , tin zinc, zinc iron Passivation Cadmium, ZnNi, SnZn, ZnCo, ZnFe, and...for Change Cadmium passivated with hexavalent chromium has been in use for many decades Cadmium is toxic, and is classified as a priority...Executive Orders 13514 & 13423 DoD initiatives – Young memo (April 2009) DFAR restricting use of hexavalent chromium Allows the use of hexavalent

  10. Gibberellic acid alleviates cadmium toxicity by reducing nitric oxide accumulation and expression of IRT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiao Fang [State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Jiang, Tao [Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Zhi Wei [State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Lei, Gui Jie [Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shi, Yuan Zhi [The Key Laboratory of Tea Chemical Engineering, Ministry of Agriculture, Yunqi Road 1, Hangzhou 310008 (China); Li, Gui Xin, E-mail: guixinli@zju.edu.cn [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zheng, Shao Jian [State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Key Laboratory of Conservation Biology for Endangered Wildlife of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd reduces endogenous GA levels in Arabidopsis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GA exogenous applied decreases Cd accumulation in plant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GA suppresses the Cd-induced accumulation of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased NO level downregulates the expression of IRT1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppressed IRT1 expression reduces Cd transport across plasma membrane. - Abstract: Gibberellic acid (GA) is involved in not only plant growth and development but also plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here it was found that treating the plants with GA concentrations from 0.1 to 5 {mu}M for 24 h had no obvious effect on root elongation in the absence of cadmium (Cd), whereas in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, GA at 5 {mu}M improved root growth, reduced Cd content and lipid peroxidation in the roots, indicating that GA can partially alleviate Cd toxicity. Cd{sup 2+} increased nitric oxide (NO) accumulation in the roots, but GA remarkably reduced it, and suppressed the up-regulation of the expression of IRT1. In contrary, the beneficial effect of GA on alleviating Cd toxicity was not observed in an IRT1 knock-out mutant irt1, suggesting the involvement of IRT1 in Cd{sup 2+} absorption. Furthermore, the GA-induced reduction of NO and Cd content can also be partially reversed by the application of a NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione [GSNO]). Taken all these together, the results showed that GA-alleviated Cd toxicity is mediated through the reduction of the Cd-dependent NO accumulation and expression of Cd{sup 2+} uptake related gene-IRT1 in Arabidopsis.

  11. Lanthanum rather than cadmium induces oxidative stress and metabolite changes in Hypericum perforatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babula, Petr; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Kovacik, Jozef; Hedbavny, Josef; Hlavna, Marián

    2015-04-09

    Physiology, oxidative stress and production of metabolites in Hypericum perforatum exposed to moderate Cd and/or La concentration (10 μM) were studied. La evoked increase in reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and proline but suppressed growth, tissue water content, glutathione, ascorbic acid and affected mineral nutrient contents more than Cd while the impact of Cd+La was not synergistic. Similar trend was observed at the level of superoxide dismutase gene expression. Shoot Cd amount increased in Cd+La while only root La increased in the same treatment. Extensive quantification of secondary metabolites revealed that La affected phenolic acids more pronouncedly than Cd in shoots and roots. Flavonols were suppressed by La that could contribute to the appearance of oxidative damage. Procyanidins increased in response to La in the shoots but decreased in the roots. Metabolic responses in Cd+La treatment resembled those of La treatment (almost identically in the roots). Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity was mainly suppressed by La. The presence of La also depleted amount of hypericin and expression of its putative gene (hyp-1) showed similar trend but accumulation of hyperforin increased under Cd or La excess. Clear differences in the stem and root anatomy in response to Cd or La were also found. Overall, H. perforatum is La-sensitive species and rather Cd ameliorated negative impact of La. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dysprosium-doped cadmium oxide as a gateway material for mid-infrared plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachet, Edward; Shelton, Christopher T.; Harris, Joshua S.; Gaddy, Benjamin E.; Irving, Douglas L.; Curtarolo, Stefano; Donovan, Brian F.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Sharma, Peter A.; Sharma, Ana Lima; Ihlefeld, Jon; Franzen, Stefan; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2015-04-01

    The interest in plasmonic technologies surrounds many emergent optoelectronic applications, such as plasmon lasers, transistors, sensors and information storage. Although plasmonic materials for ultraviolet-visible and near-infrared wavelengths have been found, the mid-infrared range remains a challenge to address: few known systems can achieve subwavelength optical confinement with low loss in this range. With a combination of experiments and ab initio modelling, here we demonstrate an extreme peak of electron mobility in Dy-doped CdO that is achieved through accurate ‘defect equilibrium engineering’. In so doing, we create a tunable plasmon host that satisfies the criteria for mid-infrared spectrum plasmonics, and overcomes the losses seen in conventional plasmonic materials. In particular, extrinsic doping pins the CdO Fermi level above the conduction band minimum and it increases the formation energy of native oxygen vacancies, thus reducing their populations by several orders of magnitude. The substitutional lattice strain induced by Dy doping is sufficiently small, allowing mobility values around 500 cm2 V-1 s-1 for carrier densities above 1020 cm-3. Our work shows that CdO:Dy is a model system for intrinsic and extrinsic manipulation of defects affecting electrical, optical and thermal properties, that oxide conductors are ideal candidates for plasmonic devices and that the defect engineering approach for property optimization is generally applicable to other conducting metal oxides.

  13. Cadmium oxide nanoparticles grown in situ on reduced graphene oxide for enhanced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye under ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Ojha, Animesh K; Walkenfort, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    Cadmium oxide (CdO) nanoparticles (NPs), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and rGO-CdO nanocomposites have been synthesized using one step hydrothermal method. The structural and optical properties of CdO NPs, rGO, and rGO-CdO nanocomposites were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), Raman spectroscopy (RS), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis.) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy techniques. The rGO has a sharp 2D peak compared to GO. The sharp nature of 2D band may be due to the larger contribution from single layer sheet. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized samples has been investigated under UV irradiation. The results of photocatalytic measurements revealed that ~80% of MB dye is degraded by adding the rGO-CdO nanocomposites as photocatalysts into the dye solution. The decrease in the intensity of emission peaks indicates that the photogenerated charge carriers have been transferred from CdO NPs to rGO sheets, which causes to increase the density of O2(-) and OH radicals in the dye solution. The CdO nanoparticles gown on the rGO sheets showed enhanced ferromagnetism (FM) at room temperature, which may be attributed to the short range magnetic interaction of magnetic moments of CdO NPs and spin units present on the rGO sheets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mercury oxidation via chlorine, bromine, and iodine under atmospheric conditions: thermochemistry and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzmendi-Murua, Itsaso; Castillo, Álvaro; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2014-04-24

    Emissions of gaseous mercury from combustion sources are the major source of Hg in the atmosphere and in environmental waters and soils. Reactions of Hg(o)(g) with halogens are of interest because they relate to mercury and ozone depletion events in the Antarctic and Arctic early spring ozone hole events, and the formation of Hg-halides (HgX2) is a method for removal of mercury from power generation systems. Thermochemistry and kinetics from published theoretical and experimental studies in the literature and from computational chemistry are utilized to compile a mechanism of the reactions considered as contributors to the formation of HgX2 (X = Cl, Br, I) to understand the reaction paths and mechanisms under atmospheric conditions. Elementary reaction mechanisms are assembled and evaluated using thermochemistry for all species and microscopic reversibility for all reactions. Temperature and pressure dependence is determined with quantum Rice Ramsperger Kassel (RRK) analysis for k(E) and master equation analysis for fall-off. We find that reactions of mercury with a small fraction of the reactor surface or initiation by low concentrations of halogen atoms is needed to explain the experimental conversion of Hg to HgX2 in the gas phase. The models do not replicate data from experiments that do not explicitly provide an atom source. The Hg insertion reaction into X2 (Hg + X2 → HgX2) that has been reported is further studied, and we find agreement with studies that report high barriers. The high barriers prevent this insertion path from explaining the experimental data on HgX2 formation and Hg conversion under atmospheric conditions. Mechanism studies with low initial concentrations of halogen radicals show significant conversion of Hg under the experimental conditions.

  15. Exogenous application of calcium and silica alleviates cadmium toxicity by suppressing oxidative damage in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rajneesh Kumar; Pandey, Poonam; Rajpoot, Ritika; Rani, Anjana; Gautam, Arti; Dubey, R S

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the possible roles of calcium (Ca(2+)) and silica (Si) in protection against oxidative damage due to Cd(2+) toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings grown in hydroponics. Rice seedlings raised for 12 days in hydroponics containing Cd(NO3)2 (75 μM) showed reduced growth; increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (O2 (·-) and H2O2), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and protein carbonylation; and increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) compared to untreated controls. Exogenously added Ca(2+) (2 mM) and Si (200 μM) significantly alleviated negative effect of Cd(2+) by restoration of growth of the seedlings, suppression of Cd(2+) uptake and restoration of root plasma membrane integrity. The levels of O2 (·-), H2O2, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls were much lower when Ca(2+) and Si were added in the growth medium along with Cd(2+) as compared to Cd-alone-treated seedlings. Ca(2+) and Si lowered Cd-induced increase in SOD, GPX and APX activities while they elevated Cd-induced decline in CAT activity. Using histochemical staining of O2 (·-) and H2O2 in leaf tissues, it was further confirmed that added Ca(2+) and Si suppressed Cd-induced accumulation of O2 (·-) and H2O2 in the leaves. The results suggest that exogenous application of Ca(2+) and Si appears to be advantageous for rice plants in alleviating Cd(2+) toxicity effects by reducing Cd(2+) uptake, decreasing ROS production and suppressing oxidative damage. The observations indicate that Ca(2+) and Si treatments can help in reducing Cd(2+) toxicity in rice plants.

  16. Lanthanum rather than cadmium induces oxidative stress and metabolite changes in Hypericum perforatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babula, Petr [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Klejdus, Bořivoj [Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); CEITEC–Central European Institute of Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kovacik, Jozef, E-mail: jozkovacik@yahoo.com [Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); CEITEC–Central European Institute of Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Hedbavny, Josef; Hlavna, Marián [Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • Impact of La, Cd and Cd + La on the metabolism of Hypericum perforatum was compared. • La stimulated ROS and suppressed growth and basic antioxidants more than Cd. • Impact of Cd + La was not synergistic including the sod gene expression. • La depleted hypericin and hyp-1 gene expression but amount of hyperforin increased. • La reduced flavonols and procyanidins mainly in the roots and affected anatomy - Abstract: Physiology, oxidative stress and production of metabolites in Hypericum perforatum exposed to moderate Cd and/or La concentration (10 μM) were studied. La evoked increase in reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde and proline but suppressed growth, tissue water content, glutathione, ascorbic acid and affected mineral nutrient contents more than Cd while the impact of Cd + La was not synergistic. Similar trend was observed at the level of superoxide dismutase gene expression. Shoot Cd amount increased in Cd + La while only root La increased in the same treatment. Extensive quantification of secondary metabolites revealed that La affected phenolic acids more pronouncedly than Cd in shoots and roots. Flavonols were suppressed by La that could contribute to the appearance of oxidative damage. Procyanidins increased in response to La in the shoots but decreased in the roots. Metabolic responses in Cd + La treatment resembled those of La treatment (almost identically in the roots). Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity was mainly suppressed by La. The presence of La also depleted amount of hypericin and expression of its putative gene (hyp-1) showed similar trend but accumulation of hyperforin increased under Cd or La excess. Clear differences in the stem and root anatomy in response to Cd or La were also found. Overall, H. perforatum is La-sensitive species and rather Cd ameliorated negative impact of La.

  17. Calcium, zinc and vitamin E ameliorate cadmium-induced renal oxidative damage in albino Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeepkiran Jangampalli Adi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to examine the protective effects of supplementation with calcium + zinc (Ca + Zn or vitamin E (Vit-E on Cd-induced renal oxidative damage. Young albino Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g (n = 6 control rats, Cd, Cd + Ca + Zn, and Cd + Vit-E experimental groups and the experimental period was 30 days. Rats were exposed to Cd (20 mg/kg body weight alone treated as Cd treated group and the absence or presence of Ca + Zn (2 mg/kg each or Vit-E (20 mg/kg body weight supplementation treated as two separate groups. The activities of the stress marker enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and lipid peroxidase (LPx were determined in renal mitochondrial fractions of experimental rats. We observed quantitative changes in SOD isoenzymatic patterns by non-denaturing PAGE analysis, and quantified band densities. These results showed that Cd exposure leads to decreases in SOD, CAT, GR, and GPx activities and a concomitant increase in LPx and GST activities. Ca + Zn and Vit-E administration with Cd significantly reversed Cd-induced perturbations in oxidative stress marker enzymes. However, Vit-E showed more inhibitory activity against Cd than did Ca + Zn, and it protected against Cd-induced nephrotoxicity.

  18. Mercury levels assessment and its relationship with oxidative stress biomarkers in children from three localities in Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Méndez, Jorge A; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor E; Fargher, Lane F; Moo-Puc, Rosa E

    2016-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that is released into the environment from geologic and anthropogenic sources. Once it enters an organism, it generates several toxicity mechanisms and oxidative stress has been proposed as the main one. Metal susceptibility is greater in children, which is a result of their physiology and behavior. In Yucatan, Mexico, burning of unregulated garbage dumps and household trash, ingestion of top marine predators, and pottery manufacturing are among the conditions that could promote Hg exposure. However, for Yucatan, there are no published studies that report Hg levels and associated oxidative stress status in children. Therefore, this study aimed to assess Hg levels in blood and urine and oxidative stress biomarkers levels in a sample of 107 healthy children from three localities in Yucatan, Mexico, as well as investigate the relationship between these parameters. Hg was detected in 11 (10.28%) of blood samples and 38 (35.51%) of urine samples collected from the participating children. Fourteen subjects showed Hg above recommended levels. The oxidative stress biomarkers were slightly elevated in comparison with other studies and were statistically different between the sampling sites. No linear correlation between Hg levels and oxidative stress biomarkers was found. Nevertheless, exploratory univariate and multivariate analysis showed non-linear relations among the measured variables. Globally, the study provides, for the first time, information regarding Hg levels and their relationship with oxidative stress biomarkers in a juvenile population from Mexico's southeast (Yucatan) region. In agreement with worldwide concern about Hg, this study should stimulate studies on metal monitoring in humans (especially children) among scientists working in Mexico, the establishment of polices for its regulation, and the reduction of human health risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of aniline on cadmium adsorption by sulfanilic acid-grafted magnetic graphene oxide sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin-jiang; Liu, Yun-guo; Zeng, Guang-ming; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xi; Chen, An-wei; Wang, Ya-qin; Guo, Yi-Mming; Li, Ting-ting; Zhou, Lu; Liu, Shao-heng; Zeng, Xiao-xia

    2014-07-15

    Cd(II) has posed severe health risks worldwide. To remove this contaminant from aqueous solution, the sulfanilic acid-grafted magnetic graphene oxide sheets (MGOs/SA) were prepared and characterized. The mutual effects of Cd(II) and aniline adsorption on MGOs/SA were studied. The effects of operating parameters such as pH, ionic strength, contact time and temperature on the Cd(II) enrichment, as well as the adsorption kinetics and isotherm were also investigated. The results demonstrated that MGOs/SA could effectively remove Cd(II) and aniline from the aqueous solution and the two adsorption processes were strongly dependent on solution pH. The Cd(II) adsorption was reduced by the presence of aniline at pH5.4. The presence of Cd(II) diminished the adsorption capacity for aniline at pHaniline adsorption at pH>7.8. The decontamination of Cd(II) by MGOs/SA was influenced by ionic strength. Besides, the adsorption process could be well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion study revealed that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-limiting step for the adsorption process. Moreover, the experimental data of isotherm followed the Freundlich isotherm model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide - cysteine cycle system enhances cadmium tolerance through alleviating cadmium-induced oxidative stress and ion toxicity in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Honglei; Wang, Xiaofeng; Dou, Yanhua; Liu, Dan; Si, Wantong; Fang, Hao; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Shaolin; Xi, Jiejun; Li, Jisheng

    2016-12-22

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a common toxic heavy metal ion. We investigated the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and cysteine (Cys) in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The expression of H2S synthetic genes LCD and DES1 were induced by Cd2+ within 3 h, and endogenous H2S was then rapidly released. H2S promoted the expression of Cys synthesis-related genes SAT1 and OASA1, which led to endogenous Cys accumulation. The H2S and Cys cycle system was stimulated by Cd2+ stress, and it maintained high levels in plant cells. H2S inhibited the ROS burst by inducing alternative respiration capacity (AP) and antioxidase activity. H2S weakened Cd2+ toxicity by inducing the metallothionein (MTs) genes expression. Cys promoted GSH accumulation and inhibited the ROS burst, and GSH induced the expression of phytochelatin (PCs) genes, counteracting Cd2+ toxicity. In summary, the H2S and Cys cycle system played a key role in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The Cd2+ tolerance was weakened when the cycle system was blocked in lcddes1-1 and oasa1 mutants. This paper is the first to describe the role of the H2S and Cys cycle system in Cd2+ stress and to explore the relevant and specificity mechanisms of H2S and Cys in mediating Cd2+ stress.

  1. Microplastics cause neurotoxicity, oxidative damage and energy-related changes and interact with the bioaccumulation of mercury in the European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax (Linnaeus, 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Luís Gabriel Antão; Vieira, Luís Russo; Branco, Vasco; Figueiredo, Neusa; Carvalho, Felix; Carvalho, Cristina; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2018-02-01

    Microplastics pollution is a global paradigm that raises concern in relation to environmental and human health. This study investigated toxic effects of microplastics and mercury in the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), a marine fish widely used as food for humans. A short-term (96 h) laboratory bioassay was done by exposing juvenile fish to microplastics (0.26 and 0.69 mg/L), mercury (0.010 and 0.016 mg/L) and binary mixtures of the two substances using the same concentrations, through test media. Microplastics alone and mercury alone caused neurotoxicity through acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, increased lipid oxidation (LPO) in brain and muscle, and changed the activities of the energy-related enzymes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). All the mixtures caused significant inhibition of brain AChE activity (64-76%), and significant increase of LPO levels in brain (2.9-3.4 fold) and muscle (2.2-2.9 fold) but not in a concentration-dependent manner; mixtures containing low and high concentrations of microplastics caused different effects on IDH and LDH activity. Mercury was found to accumulate in the brain and muscle, with bioaccumulation factors of 4-7 and 25-40, respectively. Moreover, in the analysis of mercury concentrations in both tissues, a significant interaction between mercury and microplastics was found. The decay of mercury in the water increased with microplastics concentration, and was higher in the presence of fish than in their absence. Overall, these results indicate that: microplastics influence the bioaccumulation of mercury by D. labrax juveniles; microplastics, mercury and their mixtures (ppb range concentrations) cause neurotoxicity, oxidative stress and damage, and changes in the activities of energy-related enzymes in juveniles of this species; mixtures with the lowest and highest concentrations of their components induced different effects on some biomarkers. These findings and other published

  2. Distribution and age-related bioaccumulation of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As) in tissues of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European catfish (Sylurus glanis) from the Buško Blato reservoir (Bosnia and Herzegovina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Has-Schön, Elizabeta; Bogut, Ivan; Vuković, Rosemary; Galović, Dalida; Bogut, Ante; Horvatić, Janja

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the bioaccumulation of Pb, Hg, Cd, and As in tissues of carp (Cyprinus carpio) and catfish (Silurus glanis) from Buško Blato in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Arsenic concentrations were below the Maximal Admissible Concentration (MAC) for Croatia and other countries. Mercury concentrations were below 1 mg kg(-1), but in most muscle samples of both species and all catfish liver samples, the values were higher than 0.5 mg kg(-1) (higher than the MAC for many countries including Croatia). Lead concentrations were higher than 1 mg kg(-1) (the MAC for Croatia) in most muscle samples; all kidney and most catfish liver samples also exceeded 1 mg kg(-1). Cadmium concentrations in all tissues, other than the gonads, were higher than 0.1 mg kg(-1) (MAC for Croatia), with the highest concentrations found in the kidneys. The only gender difference was found in carp, where a 68.4% higher concentration of As was found in the fry compared to the milt (P<0.05). Concentrations of all of the elements were higher in catfish compared to carp for most tissues. Significant correlations were found between all of the elements in the muscles and the liver of carp. In catfish, the muscles were the only tissue in which multiple correlations were found. Linear positive correlations with age and body mass were demonstrated for the concentrations of all heavy metals for all tissues except the gonads in both fish species. We concluded that significant heavy metal accumulation in carp and a catfish tissues correlates with age and body mass; bioaccumulation is species- and tissue-specific and is different for each element. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analytical Performances of Nanostructured Gold Supported on Metal Oxide Sorbents for the Determination of Gaseous Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Emmanuel; Amouroux, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured gold supported TiO2, ZnO, and Al2O3 materials (1% w/w Au) were tested as sorbents for gaseous mercury (Hg) trapping and preconcentration. Their analytical performances were first compared with the one of traditional gold wool trap for the quantification of Hg standards injected into the argon flow followed by thermal desorption at 600°C and CVAFS detection. Good linearity and reproducibility were obtained, especially for Au/TiO2 material (R 2 = 0.995; slope: 1.39) in the volume range of 10 to 60 µL (132–778 pg Hg). This latter even showed a better performance compared to pure Au in the volume range of 10 to 100 µL (132–1329 pg Hg) when the carrier gas flow was increased from 60 to 100 mL min−1. The method detection limit (MDL) obtained with Au/TiO2 trap (0.10 pg Hg0 L−1) was suitable for total gaseous mercury (TGM) determination. Au/TiO2 was, therefore, used in trapping and determining TGM in collected air samples. TGM values in the samples ranged from 6 to 10 ng m−3. Similar results were obtained with the commercial gold-coated sand trap which showed an average TGM concentration of 7.8 ± 0.9 ng m−3. PMID:24808914

  4. Facile covalent immobilization of cadmium sulfide quantum dots on graphene oxide nanosheets : preparation, characterization, and optical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Choi, Byung Choon; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2010-01-01

    A facile approach for the preparation of a novel hybrid material containing graphene and an inorganic semiconducting material, cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs), is demonstrated for the first time. First, amino-functionalized CdS QDs were prepared by modifications of the kinetic trapping

  5. Synergy of CuO and CeO2 combination for mercury oxidation under low-temperature selective catalytic reduction atmosphere

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hailong

    2016-07-19

    Synergy for low temperature Hg0 oxidation under selective catalytic reduction (SCR) atmosphere was achieved when copper oxides and cerium oxides were combined in a CuO-CeO2/TiO2 (CuCeTi) catalyst. Hg0 oxidation efficiency as high as 99.0% was observed on the CuCeTi catalyst at 200 °C, even the gas hourly space velocity was extremely high. To analyze the synergistic effect, comparisons of catalyst performance in the presence of different SCR reaction gases were systematically conducted over CuO/TiO2 (CuTi), CeO2/TiO2 (CeTi) and CuCeTi catalysts prepared by sol-gel method. The interactions between copper oxides and cerium oxides in CuCeTi catalyst yielded more surface chemisorbed oxygen, and facilitated the conversion of gas-phase O2 to surface oxygen, which are favorable for Hg0 oxidation. Copper oxides in the combination interacted with NO forming more chemisorbed oxygen for Hg0 oxidation in the absence of gas-phase O2. Cerium oxides in the combination promoted Hg0 oxidation through enhancing the transformations of NO to NO2. In the absence of NO, NH3 exhibited no inhibitive effect on Hg0 oxidation, because enough Lewis acid sites due to the combination of copper oxides and cerium oxides scavenged the competitive adsorption between NH3 and Hg0. In the presence of NO, although NH3 lowered Hg0 oxidation rate through inducing reduction of oxidized mercury, complete recovery of Hg0 oxidation activity over the CuCeTi catalyst was quickly achieved after cutting off NH3. This study revealed the synergistic effect of the combination of copper oxides and cerium oxides on Hg0 oxidation, and explored the involved mechanisms. Such knowledge would help obtaining maximum Hg0 oxidation co-benefit from SCR units in coal-fired power plants.

  6. Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

    2007-03-31

    Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

  7. The dynamic changes of the plasma membrane proteins and the protective roles of nitric oxide in rice subjected to heavy metal cadmium stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming eYang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The heavy metal cadmium is a common environmental contaminant in soils and has adverse effects on crop growth and development. The signaling processes in plants that initiate cellular responses to environmental stress have been shown to be located in the plasma membrane (PM. A better understanding of the PM proteome in response to environmental stress might provide new insights for improving stress-tolerant crops. Nitric oxide (NO is reported to be involved in the plant response to cadmium (Cd stress. To further investigate how NO modulates protein changes in the plasma membrane during Cd stress, a quantitative proteomics approach based on isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ was used to identify differentially regulated proteins from the rice plasma membrane after Cd or Cd and NO treatment. Sixty-six differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which, many function as transporters, ATPases, kinases, metabolic enzymes, phosphatases and phospholipases. Among these, the abundance of phospholipase D (PLD was altered substantially after the treatment of both Cd and Cd and NO. Transient expression of the PLD fused with green fluorescent peptide (GFP in rice protoplasts showed that the Cd and NO treatment promoted the accumulation of PLD in the plasma membrane. Addition of NO also enhanced Cd-induced PLD activity and the accumulation of phosphatidic acid (PA produced through PLD activity. Meanwhile, NO elevated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and caused the accumulation of glutathione both which function to reduce Cd-induced H2O2 accumulation. Taken together, we suggest that NO signaling is associated with the accumulation of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione and PA which increases cadmium tolerance in rice via the antioxidant defense system.

  8. Dispersive solid phase micro-extraction of mercury(II from environmental water and vegetable samples with ionic liquid modified graphene oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollahpour Atefeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new dispersive solid phase micro-extraction (dispersive-SPME method for separation and preconcentration of mercury(II using ionic liquid modified magnetic reduced graphene oxide (IL-MrGO nanoparticles, prior to the measurement by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS has been developed. The IL-MrGO composite was characterized by Brunauer– Emmett–Teller method (BET for adsorption-desorption measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The method is based on the sorption of mercury( II on IL-MrGO nanoparticles due to electrostatic interaction and complex formation of ionic liquid part of IL-MrGO with mercury(II. The effect of experimental parameters for preconcentration of mercury(II, such as solution type, concentration and volume of the eluent, pH, time of the sorption and desorption, amount of the sorbent and coexisting ion concentration have been optimized. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 0.08–10 ng mL-1 with a determination coefficient of 0.9995. The limit of detection (LOD of the method at a signal to noise ratio of 3 was 0.01 ng mL-1. Intra-day and inter-day precisions were obtained equal to 3.4 and 4.5 %, respectively. The dispersive solid phase micro-extraction of mercury(II on IL-MrGO nanoparticles coupled with cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry was successfully used for extraction and determination of mercury(II in water and vegetable samples.

  9. Cadmium exposure induces hematuria in Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Seok [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myounghee, E-mail: dkkim73@gmail.com [Department of Dental Hygiene, College of Health Science, Eulji University, Gyeonggi-do 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su Mi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Pyo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sejoong [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Kwon Wook [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chun Soo [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 156-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Dong Ki [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Introduction: Toxic heavy metals have adverse effects on human health. However, the risk of hematuria caused by heavy metal exposure has not been evaluated. Methods: Data from 4701 Korean adults were obtained in the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2008–2010). Blood levels of the toxic heavy metals cadmium, lead, and mercury were measured. Hematuria was defined as a result of ≥+1 on a urine dipstick test. The odds ratios (ORs) for hematuria were measured according to the blood heavy metal levels after adjusting for multiple variables. Results: Individuals with blood cadmium levels in the 3rd and 4th quartiles had a greater OR for hematuria than those in the 1st quartile group: 3rd quartile, 1.35 (1.019–1.777; P=0.037); 4th quartile, 1.52 (1.140–2.017; P=0.004). When blood cadmium was considered as a log-transformed continuous variable, the correlation between blood cadmium and hematuria was significant: OR, 1.97 (1.224–3.160; P{sub trend}=0.005). In contrast, no significant correlations between hematuria and blood lead or mercury were found in the multivariate analyses. Discussion: The present study shows that high cadmium exposure is associated with a risk of hematuria. -- Highlights: • A high level of blood cadmium is associated with a high risk of hematuria. • This correlation is independent of several confounding factors. • Blood levels of lead and mercury are not associated with risk of hematuria. • This is the first study on the correlation between cadmium exposure and hematuria risk.

  10. Integrated removal of NO and mercury from coal combustion flue gas using manganese oxides supported on TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shibo; Zhao, Yongchun; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Lulu; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-03-01

    A catalyst composed of manganese oxides supported on titania (MnOx/TiO2) synthesized by a sol-gel method was selected to remove nitric oxide and mercury jointly at a relatively low temperature in simulated flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The physico-chemical characteristics of catalysts were investigated by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, etc. The effects of Mn loading, reaction temperature and individual flue gas components on denitration and Hg(0) removal were examined. The results indicated that the optimal Mn/Ti molar ratio was 0.8 and the best working temperature was 240°C for NO conversion. O2 and a proper ratio of [NH3]/[NO] are essential for the denitration reaction. Both NO conversion and Hg(0) removal efficiency could reach more than 80% when NO and Hg(0) were removed simultaneously using Mn0.8Ti at 240°C. Hg(0) removal efficiency slightly declined as the Mn content increased in the catalysts. The reaction temperature had no significant effect on Hg(0) removal efficiency. O2 and HCl had a promotional effect on Hg(0) removal. SO2 and NH3 were observed to weaken Hg(0) removal because of competitive adsorption. NO first facilitated Hg(0) removal and then had an inhibiting effect as NO concentration increased without O2, and it exhibited weak inhibition of Hg(0) removal efficiency in the presence of O2. The oxidation of Hg(0) on MnOx/TiO2 follows the Mars-Maessen and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Heat indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation and metal transport show dependence of cadmium pollution history in the liver of female zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing-Ling; Guo, Sai-Nan; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Lv, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Xia, Hu

    2017-10-01

    Environmental stressors such as high temperature and metal exposure may occur sequentially, simultaneously, previously in aquatic ecosystems. However, information about whether responses to high temperature depend on Cd exposure history is still unknown in fish. Zebrafish were exposed to 0 (group 1), 2.5 (group 2) and 5μg/L (group 3) cadmium (Cd) for 10 weeks, and then each group was subjected to Cd-free water maintained at 26°C and 32°C for 7days respectively. 26 indicators were used to compare differences between 26°C and 32°C in the liver of female zebrafish, including 5 biochemical indicators (activity of Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and iNOS; LPO; MT protein), 8 molecular indicators of oxidative stress (mRNA levels of Nrf2, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, HSF1, HSF2, HSP70, MTF-1 and MT), 5 molecular indicators of inflammation (mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS and NF-κB), 8 molecular indicators of metal transport (mRNA levels of, ZnT1, ZnT5, ZIP8, ZIP10, ATP7A, ATP7B and CTR1). All biochemical indicators were unchanged in group 1 and changed in group 2 and 3. Contrarily, differences were observed in almost all of molecular indicators of inflammation and metal transport in group 1, about half in group 2, and few in group 3. We also found that all molecular indicators of oxidative stress in group 2 and fewer in group 1 and 3 were significantly affected by heat. Our data indicated that heat indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation and metal transport showed dependence of previous cadmium exposure in the liver of zebrafish, emphasizing metal pollution history should be carefully considered when evaluating heat stress in fish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Structure and properties of YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductor doped with bulk cadmium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Echresh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the Y1-xCdxBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductor with x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 are prepared using the solid state method and the structure, electrical resistance, critical current density and critical temperature of it, have been studied. The results show that these doping do not affect so much on the structure and lattice parameters. The electrical resistance of samples increased with doping. A little amount of doping cadmium improve critical current density such that the sample x=0.1 has a maximum critical current density among the samples. The critical temperature with doping cadmium up to x=0.2 has little fluctuation and its variation can be ignored, but by increasing up to x=0.5 the critical temperature decreases gradually.

  13. Determination of Zinc, Cadmium, Lead, Copper and Silver Using a Carbon Paste Electrode and a Screen Printed Electrode Modified with Chromium(III Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Koudelkova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the preparation and electrochemical application of a chromium(III oxide modified carbon paste electrode (Cr-CPE and a screen printed electrode (SPE, made from the same material and optimized for the simple, cheap and sensitive simultaneous determination of zinc, cadmium, lead, copper and the detection of silver ions, is described. The limits of detection and quantification were 25 and 80 µg·L−1 for Zn(II, 3 and 10 µg·L−1 for Cd(II, 3 and 10 µg·L−1 for Pb(II, 3 and 10 µg·L−1 for Cu(II, and 3 and 10 µg·L−1 for Ag(I, respectively. Furthermore, this promising modification was transferred to the screen-printed electrode. The limits of detection for the simultaneous determination of zinc, cadmium, copper and lead on the screen printed electrodes were found to be 350 µg·L−1 for Zn(II, 25 µg·L−1 for Cd(II, 3 µg·L−1 for Pb(II and 3 µg·L−1 for Cu(II. Practical usability for the simultaneous detection of these heavy metal ions by the Cr-CPE was also demonstrated in the analyses of wastewaters.

  14. Cadmium-induced testicular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Erica R; Mruk, Dolores D; Porto, Catarina S; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn(2+) and/or Ca(2+) mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  15. Effects of individual and combined toxicity of bisphenol A, dibutyl phthalate and cadmium on oxidative stress and genotoxicity in HepG 2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling

    2017-07-01

    Bisphenol A, dibutyl phthalate and cadmium can be found in environment simultaneously. Several studies suggested that they had genotoxic effect. In this study, mono-exposure and co-exposure treatments, designed by 3 × 3 full factorial, were established to determine the individual toxicity and binary mixtures' combined effects on the oxidative stress and genotoxicity in HepG 2 cells. The highest oxidative damage was observed in the Cd treatments groups. Compared with control groups, the maximum level of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde were ∼1.4 fold and ∼2.22 fold respectively. And a minimum level of superoxide dismutase activity was found with the decrease of 43%. The mechanism that excessive oxidative stress led to the DNA damage was inferred. However, cells treated with BPA showed the worst DNA damage rather than Cd, which may because Cd mainly damages DNA repairing mechanism. For the joint effect, different interactions can be found in different biological endpoints for different combinations since different mechanisms have been clarified in mixture toxicity studies. It is sure that the co-exposure groups enhanced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity compared to the mono-exposures. Synergistic and additive interactions were considered, which means greater threat to organisms when exposed to multiple estrogenic endocrine disruptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CeO2-TiO2 catalysts for catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury in low-rank coal combustion flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Wu, Chang-Yu; Li, Ying; Zhang, Junying

    2011-09-01

    CeO(2)-TiO(2) (CeTi) catalysts synthesized by an ultrasound-assisted impregnation method were employed to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in simulated low-rank (sub-bituminous and lignite) coal combustion flue gas. The CeTi catalysts with a CeO(2)/TiO(2) weight ratio of 1-2 exhibited high Hg(0) oxidation activity from 150 to 250 °C. The high concentrations of surface cerium and oxygen were responsible for their superior performance. Hg(0) oxidation over CeTi catalysts was proposed to follow the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism whereby reactive species from adsorbed flue gas components react with adjacently adsorbed Hg(0). In the presence of O(2), a promotional effect of HCl, NO, and SO(2) on Hg(0) oxidation was observed. Without O(2), HCl and NO still promoted Hg(0) oxidation due to the surface oxygen, while SO(2) inhibited Hg(0) adsorption and subsequent oxidation. Water vapor also inhibited Hg(0) oxidation. HCl was the most effective flue gas component responsible for Hg(0) oxidation. However, the combination of SO(2) and NO without HCl also resulted in high Hg(0) oxidation efficiency. This superior oxidation capability is advantageous to Hg(0) oxidation in low-rank coal combustion flue gas with low HCl concentration.

  17. Sinapic acid ameliorate cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity: In vivo possible involvement of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation via NF-κB downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad; Raish, Mohammad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz; Attia, Sabry M; Alsaad, Abdulaziz M S; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2017-04-01

    Cadmium (CD), an environmental and industrial pollutant, generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NOS responsible for oxidative and nitrosative stress that can lead to nephrotoxic injury, including proximal tubule and glomerulus dysfunction. Sinapic acid (SA) has been found to possess potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. We aimed to examine the nephroprotective, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects of SA against CD-induced nephrotoxicity and its underlying mechanism. Kidney functional markers (serum urea, uric acid, creatinine, LDH, and calcium) and histopathological examinations of the kidney were used to evaluate CD-induced nephrotoxicity. Oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation and total protein), renal nitrosative stress (nitric oxide), antioxidant enzymes (catalase and NP-SH), inflammation markers (NF-κB [p65], TNF-α, IL-6, and myeloperoxidase [MPO]), and apoptotic markers (caspase 3, Bax, and Bcl-2) were also assessed. SA (10 and 20mg/kg) pretreatment restored kidney function, upregulated antioxidant levels, and prevented the elevation of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide levels, significantly reducing oxidative and nitrosative stress. CD upregulated renal cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6), nuclear NF-κB (p65) expression, NF-κB-DNA-binding activity, and MPO activity, which were significantly downregulated upon SA pretreatment. Furthermore, SA treatment prevented the upregulation of caspase 3 and Bax protein expression and upregulated Bcl-2 protein expression. SA pretreatment also alleviated the magnitude of histological injuries and reduced neutrophil infiltration in renal tubules. We conclude that the nephroprotective potential of SA in CD-induced nephrotoxicity might be due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic potential via downregulation of oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in the kidney. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Oxidation of mercury by CuBr2 decomposition under controlled-release membrane catalysis condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin-Gang; Qu, Zan; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Guo, Yong-Fu; Xie, Jiang-Kun; Jia, Jin-Ping

    2014-02-01

    CuBr2 in the multi-porous ceramic membrane can release Br2 at high temperature, which was employed as the oxidant for Hg0 oxidation. Hg0 oxidation efficiency was studied by a membrane catalysis device. Meanwhile, a reaction and in situ monitoring device was designed to avoid the impact of Br2 on the downstream pipe. The result showed that the MnO(x)/alpha-Al2O3 catalysis membrane had a considerable "controlled-release" effect on Br2 produced by CuBr2 decomposition. The adsorption and reaction of Hg0 and Br2 on the surface of catalysis membrane obeyed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The removal efficiency of Hg0 increased with the rising of Br2 concentration. However, when Br2 reached a certain concentration, the removal efficiency was limited by adsorption rate and reaction rate of Hg0 and Br2 on the catalysis membrane. From 473 K to 573 K, the variation of Hg0 oxidation efficiency was relatively stable. SO2 in flue gas inhibited the oxidation of Hg0 while NO displayed no obvious effect.

  19. Cadmium toxicity to ringed seals (Phoca hispida): an epidemiological study of possible cadmium-induced nephropathy and osteodystrophy in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Qaanaaq in Northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Hansen, C; Dietz, R; Leifsson, P S

    2002-01-01

    The Greenland marine food chains contain high levels of cadmium, mercury and selenium. Concentrations of cadmium in the kidney of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from the municipalities of Qaanaaq and Upernavik (Northwest Greenland) are among the highest recorded in the Arctic. The purpose of the st......The Greenland marine food chains contain high levels of cadmium, mercury and selenium. Concentrations of cadmium in the kidney of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from the municipalities of Qaanaaq and Upernavik (Northwest Greenland) are among the highest recorded in the Arctic. The purpose....... Experience from cadmium-poisoned humans and laboratory mammals indicates that concentrations above 50-200 microg/g wet wt. may induce histopathological changes. Overall, 31 of the ringed seals had cadmium concentrations in the kidney cortex above 50 microg/g wet wt., 11 had concentrations above 100 and one...

  20. INVESTIGATING OXIDATION MECHANISMS OF HGO IN THE FREE TROPOSPHERE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON LONG RANGE MERCURY TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORD initiated automated speciated mercury measurements at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), a high altitude research station (~11,500 feet) in 2001. Mercury monitoring at MLO was supplemented with trace element aerosol, criteria gas, and gas and particulate halide measurement...

  1. Electrospun cerium-based TiO2 nanofibers for photocatalytic oxidation of elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lulu; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying

    2017-10-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation is an attractive method for Hg-rich flue gas treatment. In the present study, a novel cerium-based TiO2 nanofibers was prepared and selected as the catalyst to remove mercury in flue gas. Accordingly, physical/chemical properties of those nanofibers were clarified. The effects of some important parameters, such as calcination temperature, cerium dopant content and different illumination conditions on the removal of Hg(0) using the photocatalysis process were investigated. In addition, the removal mechanism of Hg(0) over cerium-based TiO2 nanofibers focused on UV irradiation was proposed. The results show that catalyst which was calcined at 400 °C exhibited better performance. The addition of 0.3 wt% Ce into TiO2 led to the highest removal efficiency at 91% under UV irradiation. As-prepared samples showed promising stability for long-term use in the test. However, the photoluminescence intensity of nanofibers incorporating ceria was significantly lower than TiO2, which was attributed to better photoelectron-hole separation. Although UV and O2 are essential factors, the enhancement of Hg(0) removal is more obviously related to the participation of catalyst. The coexistence of Ce(3+) and Ce(4+), which leads to the efficient oxidation of Hg(0), was detected on samples. Hg(2+) is the final product in the reaction of Hg(0) removal. As a consequence, the emissions of Hg(0) from flue gas can be significantly suppressed. These indicate that combining photocatalysis technology with cerium-based TiO2 nanofibers is a promising strategy for reducing Hg(0) efficiently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cadmium telluride quantum dots cause oxidative stress leading to extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kathy C; Willmore, William G; Tayabali, Azam F

    2013-04-05

    The mechanisms of toxicity related to human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell exposures to cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) were investigated. CdTe-QDs caused cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treated cells showed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Altered antioxidant levels were demonstrated by depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), a decreased ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) and an increased NF-E2-related Factor 2 (Nrf2) activation. Enzyme assays showed that superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was elevated whereas catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities were depressed. Further analyses revealed that CdTe-QD exposure resulted in apoptosis, indicated by changes in levels of caspase-3 activity, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage and phosphatidylserine externalization. Extrinsic apoptotic pathway markers such as Fas levels and caspase-8 activity increased as a result of CdTe-QD exposure. Involvement of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was indicated by decreased levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) protein and mitochondrial cytochrome c, and by increased levels of mitochondrial Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and cytosolic cytochrome c. Further, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk1/2), and p38 were all activated. Our findings reveal that CdTe-QDs cause oxidative stress, interfere with antioxidant defenses and activate protein kinases, leading to apoptosis via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Since the effects of CdTe-QDs on selected biomarkers were similar or greater compared to those of CdCl2 at equivalent concentrations of cadmium, the study suggests that the toxicity of CdTe-QDs arises from a combination of the effects of cadmium and ROS generated from the NPs. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-Apoptotic and Anti-Oxidant Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Cadmium-Induced Testicular Toxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erboga, Mustafa; Kanter, Mehmet; Aktas, Cevat; Bozdemir Donmez, Yeliz; Fidanol Erboga, Zeynep; Aktas, Emel; Gurel, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a serious environmental and occupational contaminant and may represent a serious health hazard to humans and other animals. Cd is reported to induce the generation of reactive oxygen species, and induces testicular damage in many species of animals. The goal of our study was to examine the anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on Cd-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and testicular injury in rats. A total of 40 male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups: control, CAPE alone, Cd-treated, and Cd-treated with CAPE; each group consisted of 10 animals. To induce toxicity, Cd (1 mg/kg body weight) was dissolved in normal saline and subcutaneously injected into rats for 30 days. The rats in CAPE-treated group were given a daily dose of 10 μmol/kg body weight of CAPE by using intraperitoneal injection. This application was continued daily for a total of 30 days. To date, no examinations of the anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant properties of CAPE on Cd-induced apoptosis, oxidative damage, and testicular injury in rat testes have been reported. CAPE-treated animals showed an improved histological appearance and serum testosterone levels in Cd-treated group. Our data indicate a significant reduction in the number of apoptotic cells in testis tissues of the Cd-treated group with CAPE treatment. Moreover, CAPE significantly suppressed lipid peroxidation, compensated deficits in the anti-oxidant defenses in testes tissue resulted from Cd administration. These findings suggest that the protective potential of CAPE in Cd toxicity might be due to its anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, which could be useful for achieving optimum effects in Cd-induced testicular injury.

  4. Adsorption of mercury ions from wastewater by a hyperbranched and multi-functionalized dendrimer modified mixed-oxides nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, M; Mousavinia, F; Khalafi-Nezhad, A; Firouzabadi, H; Abbaspourrad, A

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a novel heterogeneous nanodendrimer with generation of G2.0 was prepared by individual grafting of diethylenetriamine, triazine and l-cysteine methyl ester on the modified aluminum-silicate mixed oxides as a potent adsorbent of Hg(II) ions from aqueous media. The prepared nanodendrimer was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum (1H NMR and 13C NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectroscopy (DR UV-Vis), zeta potential (ζ), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption experiments at -196°C and elemental analysis. Equilibrium and kinetic models for Hg(II) ions removal were used by investigating the effect of the contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial Hg(II) ions concentrations, effect of solution's temperature, interfering ions, and initial pH. The contact time to approach equilibrium for higher removal was 6min (3232mgg-1). The removal of Hg(II) ions has been assessed in terms of pseudo-first- and -second-order kinetics, and the Freundlich, Langmuir and Sips isotherms models have also been applied to the equilibrium removal data. The removal kinetics followed the mechanism of the pseudo-second order equation, where the chemical sorption is the rate-limiting step of removal process and not involving mass transfer in solution, which was further proved by several techniques such as zeta potential, FT-IR and DS UV-vis. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) implied that the removal of mercury ions was feasible, spontaneous and chemically exothermic in nature between 15 and 80°C. The nanodendrimer indicated high reusability due to its high removal ability after 15 adsorption-desorption runs. The adsorption mechanisms of Hg(II) ions onto the nanodendrimer was further studied by diverse techniques such as FTIR, EDS, zeta potential, DR UV-Vis spectroscopy and SEM. The

  5. The role of chitosan as nanofiller of graphite oxide for the removal of toxic mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzas, George Z; Travlou, Nikolina A; Deliyanni, Eleni A

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the role of chitosan (CS) as nanofiller of graphite oxide (GO) in order to prepare composite materials with improved Hg(II) adsorption properties. The removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions was studied using adsorbents as graphite oxide (GO), graphite oxide nanofilled with chitosan (GO/CS) and magnetic chitosan (GO/mCS). Many possible interactions between materials and Hg(II) were observed after adsorption and explained via characterization with various techniques (SEM/EDAX, FTIR, XRD, DTG). The adsorption evaluation was done studying various parameters as the effect of pH (both in adsorption and desorption), contact time (pseudo-second order fitting), temperature (isotherms at 25, 45, 65 °C), in line with a brief thermodynamic analysis (ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0)). The maximum adsorption capacity (fitting with Langmuir model) of GO at 25 °C was Qmax=187 mg/g, while after the CS nanofilling (formation of the composite GO/CS), Qmax was increased to 381 mg/g with a further enhancement for GO/mCS (Qmax=397 mg/g). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mercury and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  7. [Mercury poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication. Copyright © 2010 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Pan, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of

  9. Protective effect of zinc supplementation against cadmium-induced oxidative stress and the RANK/RANKL/OPG system imbalance in the bone tissue of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzóska, Malgorzata M., E-mail: Malgorzata.Brzoska@umb.edu.pl; Rogalska, Joanna

    2013-10-01

    It was investigated whether protective influence of zinc (Zn) against cadmium (Cd)-induced disorders in bone metabolism may be related to its antioxidative properties and impact on the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κΒ (RANK)/RANK ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) system. Numerous indices of oxidative/antioxidative status, and Cd and Zn were determined in the distal femur of the rats administered Zn (30 and 60 mg/l) or/and Cd (5 and 50 mg/l) for 6 months. Soluble RANKL (sRANKL) and OPG were measured in the bone and serum. Zn supplementation importantly protected from Cd-induced oxidative stress preventing protein, DNA, and lipid oxidation in the bone. Moreover, Zn protected from the Cd-induced increase in sRANKL concentration and the sRANKL/OPG ratio, and decrease in OPG concentration in the bone and serum. Numerous correlations were noted between indices of the oxidative/antioxidative bone status, concentrations of sRANKL and OPG in the bone and serum, as well as the bone concentrations of Zn and Cd, and previously reported by us in these animals (Brzóska et al., 2007) indices of bone turnover and bone mineral density. The results allow us to conclude that the ability of Zn to prevent from oxidative stress and the RANK/RANKL/OPG system imbalance may be implicated in the mechanisms of its protective impact against Cd-induced bone damage. This paper is the first report from an in vivo study providing evidence that beneficial Zn impact on the skeleton under exposure to Cd is related to the improvement of the bone tissue oxidative/antioxidative status and mediating the RANK/RANKL/OPG system. - Highlights: • Cd induces oxidative stress in the bone tissue. • Cd disturbs bone metabolism via disorder of the RANK/RANKL/OPG system balance. • Zn supplementation protects from Cd-induced oxidative stress in the bone tissue. • Zn protects from the RANK/RANKL/OPG system imbalance caused by Cd in the bone tissue. • Enhanced Zn intake protects from Cd

  10. Kinetics of the synthesis of ultradisperse cadmium and zinc oxide-like powders in a plasma-solution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, K. V.; Shutov, D. A.; Rybkin, V. V.; Ivanov, A. N.; Gromov, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    The action of the DC glow discharge on the cadmium and zinc nitrates water solution in the absence of additional reagents and without electrodes-solution contact was shown to result in the production of the solids in the liquid phase. The atmospheric pressure direct current discharge was excited in the ambient air by applying a high direct voltage to two pointed titanium electrodes placed above liquid anode and liquid cathode in the H-shaped cell. The discharge current was varied in the range of 30-70 mA and the initional solutions concentrations were 5 mM. The kinetics of particles formation was studied using turbidimetry and nephelometry methods.

  11. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Cadmium Zinc Sulfide Nanocomposite with Controlled Band Gap for Large-Area Thin-Film Optoelectronic Device Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sk; Chakraborty, Koushik; Pal, Tanusri; Ghosh, Surajit

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we report the one pot single step solvothermal synthesis of reduced grapheme oxide-cadmium zinc sulfide (RGO-Cd0.5Zn0.5S) composite. The reduction in graphene oxide (GO), synthesis of Cd0.5Zn0.5S (mentioned as CdZnS in the text) nanorod and decoration of CdZnS nanorods onto RGO sheet were done simultaneously. The structural, morphological and optical properties were studied thoroughly by different techniques, such as XRD, TEM, UV-Vis and PL. The PL intensity of CdZnS nanorods quenches significantly after the attachment of RGO, which confirms photoinduced charge transformation from CdZnS nanorods to RGO sheet through the interface of RGO-CdZnS. An excellent photocurrent generation in RGO-CdZnS thin-film device has been observed under simulated solar light irradiation. The photocurrent as well as photosensitivity increases linearly with the solar light intensity for all the composites. Our study establishes that the synergistic effect of RGO and CdZnS in the composite is capable of getting promising applications in the field of optoelectronic devising.

  12. Studies on the protective effect of the artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf extract against cadmium toxicity-induced oxidative stress, hepatorenal damage, and immunosuppressive and hematological disorders in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Boshy, Mohamed; Ashshi, Ahmad; Gaith, Mazen; Qusty, Naeem; Bokhary, Thalat; AlTaweel, Nagwa; Abdelhady, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    Our objective was to explore the protective effect of artichoke leaf extract (ALE) against cadmium (Cd) toxicity-induced oxidative organ damage in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups of eight animals each. The first group was assigned as a control. Groups 2-4 were orally administered with ALE (300 mg/kg bw), Cd (CdCl2, 100 mg/L drinking water), and ALE plus Cd, respectively, daily for 4 weeks. After treatment with Cd, the liver and kidney malondialdehyde (MDA) increased significantly compared with the control rats. The sera interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and IL-10, liver transaminase, urea, creatinine, and peripheral neutrophil count were significantly increased in Cd-exposed rats compared to the control group. The reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) decreased in the liver and kidney in Cd-exposed group. In combination treatment, Cd and ALE significantly improved immune response, an antioxidant system, and hepatorenal function with a significant decline in MDA. In conclusion, ALE ameliorates the immunosuppressive and hepatorenal oxidative injury stimulated by Cd in rats. These results suggest that artichoke has shown promising effects against adverse effects of Cd toxicity.

  13. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  14. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  15. Insights into the mechanisms underlying mercury-induced oxidative stress in gills of wild fish (Liza aurata) combining {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics and conventional biochemical assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappello, Tiziana, E-mail: tcappello@unime.it [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Brandão, Fátima, E-mail: fatimabrandao@ua.pt [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Guilherme, Sofia; Santos, Maria Ana [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Maisano, Maria; Mauceri, Angela [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Canário, João [Centro de Química Estrutural, Instítuto Superíor Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Pacheco, Mário; Pereira, Patrícia [Department of Biology and CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress has been described as a key pathway to initiate mercury (Hg) toxicity in fish. However, the mechanisms underlying Hg-induced oxidative stress in fish still need to be clarified. To this aim, environmental metabolomics in combination with a battery of conventional oxidative stress biomarkers were applied to the gills of golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) collected from Largo do Laranjo (LAR), a confined Hg contaminated area, and São Jacinto (SJ), selected as reference site (Aveiro Lagoon, Portugal). Higher accumulation of inorganic Hg and methylmercury was found in gills of fish from LAR relative to SJ. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics revealed changes in metabolites related to antioxidant protection, namely depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and its constituent amino acids, glutamate and glycine. The interference of Hg with the antioxidant protection of gills was corroborated through oxidative stress endpoints, namely the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities at LAR. The increase of total glutathione content (reduced glutathione + oxidized glutathione) at LAR, in parallel with GSH depletion aforementioned, indicates the occurrence of massive GSH oxidation under Hg stress, and an inability to carry out its regeneration (glutathione reductase activity was unaltered) or de novo synthesis. Nevertheless, the results suggest the occurrence of alternative mechanisms for preventing lipid peroxidative damage, which may be associated with the enhancement of membrane stabilization/repair processes resulting from depletion in the precursors of phosphatidylcholine (phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine), as highlighted by NMR spectroscopy. However, the observed decrease in taurine may be attributable to alterations in the structure of cell membranes or interference in osmoregulatory processes. Overall, the novel concurrent use of metabolomics and conventional oxidative stress endpoints demonstrated to

  16. Haem oxygenase-1 is involved in salicylic acid-induced alleviation of oxidative stress due to cadmium stress in Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiti; Li, Le; Gao, Zhaozhou; Wu, Honghong; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao

    2012-09-01

    This work examines the involvement of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in salicylic acid (SA)-induced alleviation of oxidative stress as a result of cadmium (Cd) stress in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seedling roots. CdCl(2) exposure caused severe growth inhibition and Cd accumulation, which were potentiated by pre-treatment with zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPPIX), a potent HO-1 inhibitor. Pre-treatment of plants with the HO-1 inducer haemin or SA, both of which could induce MsHO1 gene expression, significantly reduced the inhibition of growth and Cd accumulation. The alleviation effects were also evidenced by a decreased content of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). The antioxidant behaviour was confirmed by histochemical staining for the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity. Furthermore, haemin and SA pre-treatment modulated the activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD), or their corresponding transcripts. Significant enhancement of the ratios of reduced/oxidized homoglutathione (hGSH), ascorbic acid (ASA)/dehydroascorbate (DHA), and NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+), and expression of their metabolism genes was observed, consistent with a decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) distribution in the root tips. These effects are specific for HO-1, since ZnPPIX blocked the above actions, and the aggravated effects triggered by SA plus ZnPPIX were differentially reversed when carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two catalytic by-products of HO-1, was added. Together, the results suggest that HO-1 is involved in the SA-induced alleviation of Cd-triggered oxidative stress by re-establishing redox homeostasis.

  17. In vitro cadmium-induced alterations in growth and oxidative metabolism of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, M K; Mei, Lei; Najeeb, Ullah; Khan, Muhammad Azim; Deeba, Farah; Raza, Irum; Batool, Aliya; Zhu, S J

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic pollutant, which cause both dose- and time-dependent physiological and biochemical alterations in plants. The present in vitro study was undertaken to explore Cd-induced physiological and biochemical changes in cotton callus culture at 0, 550, 700, 850, and 1000 μM Cd for four different stress periods (7, 14, 21, and 28 days). At 1000 μM Cd, mean growth values were lower than their respective control. The cell protein contents decreased only after 7-day and 14-day stress treatment. At 550 μM Cd, malondialdehyde (MDA) contents decreased after various stress periods except 21-day period. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity at 1000 μM Cd improved relative to its respective controls in the first three stress regimes. Almost a decreasing trend in the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and peroxidase (POD) activities at all Cd levels after different stress periods was noticed. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity descended over its relevant controls in the first three stress regimes except at 700 μM Cd after 14- and 21-day stress duration. Moreover, catalase (CAT) mean values significantly increased as a whole. From this experiment, it can be concluded that lipid peroxidation as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was relatively higher as has been revealed by higher MDA contents and greater SOD, CAT activities.

  18. Hematological Changes Induced by Mercury Ions and Ionizing Radiation in Experimental Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Yun-Jong; Choi, Dae-Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Hyang [Biotechnology Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cebulska-Wasilewska, Antonina [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    Toxic metals such as lead, chromium, cadmium, mercury and arsenic are widely found in our environment. Humans are exposed to these metals from numerous sources, including contaminated air, water, soil and food. Mercury, one of the most diffused and hazardous organ specific environmental contaminants, exists in a wide variety of physical and chemical states, each of which has unique characteristics for a target organ specificity. Although reports indicate that mercury induces deleterious damage, little is known about its effects on living organisms. Ionizing radiation, an extensively used therapeutic modality in oncology, not only eradicates neoplastic cells but also generates inevitable side effects for normal tissues. Such biological effects are made through the production of reactive oxygen species which include a superoxide anion, a hydroxyl radical and a hydrogen peroxide. These reactive species may contribute to the radiation-induced cytotoxicity (e.g., chromosome aberrations, protein oxidation, and muscle injury) and to the metabolic and morphologic changes (e.g., increased muscle proteolysis and changes in the central nervous system) in animals and humans. In the present study, radioimmunoassay of the cortisol in the serum and the analysis of the hematological components and enzymes related to a tissue injury were carried out to evaluate the effects of mercury chloride in comparison with those of ionizing radiation.

  19. Measurements to understand the role of the sub Arctic environment on boundary layer ozone, gaseous mercury and bromine oxide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netcheva, S.; Bottenheim, J.; Staebler, R.; Steffen, A.; Bobrowski, N.; Moores, J.

    2009-04-01

    Marine Boundary Layer spring time ozone (O3) and Gaseous Elemental Mercury (GEM) depletion episodes in Polar Regions and the role played by reactive halogen species have been studied for several years. Understanding of the photochemistry involved has improved significantly in the last few years, but many questions remain. The key in filling many gaps of information is in conducting systematic measurements over freezing and thawing surfaces of big water basins in Polar Regions where depletion episodes are thought to originate. Regardless of extensive research in the field, data sets collected over the ice are limited due to logistics and engineering challenges. The fast changing Arctic environment with its potential implications for climate change and human and ecosystem health demand urgent development of a predictive capability that could only be achieved by complete quantitative understanding of these phenomena. The Out On The Ice (OOTI) mini atmospheric chemistry laboratory was developed in 2004 specifically to permit collecting data at remote locations in an autonomous way. The system is battery powered, easily transported by snowmobile and quickly deployed at a target location. The equipment has undergone multiple engineering and instrumentation improvements. In its current version, it conducts fully automated measurements of O3, GEM and carbon dioxide (CO2) simultaneously at two levels: right above a surface of interest and at 2.5 meters. This is accomplished by utilizing two identical sets of instruments (2B for O3 and Gardis for GEM), or by continuous valve switching (CO2). A vertical profile of bromine oxide is determined by scanning the collecting optics of a Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer through different elevation angles. Furthermore a full set of meteorological data is acquired in parallel with the chemical measurements in order to evaluate environmental and air mass transport contributions. We will present results from data collected

  20. Oxidative stress response of Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) to mercury and selenium bioaccumulation in liver, kidney, and brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Adelsbach, Terrence L.; Stebbins, Katherine R.

    2011-01-01

    Bioindicators of oxidative stress were examined in prebreeding and breeding adult and chick Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) and in prebreeding adult Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in San Francisco Bay, California. Highest total mercury (THg) concentrations (mean±standard error;μg/g dry wt) in liver (17.7±1.7), kidney (20.5±1.9), and brain (3.0±0.3) occurred in breeding adult Forster's terns. The THg concentrations in liver were significantly correlated with hepatic depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH), increased oxidized glutathione (GSSG):GSH ratio, and decreased hepatic gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity in adults of both tern species. Prefledging Forster's tern chicks with one-fourth the hepatic THg concentration of breeding adults exhibited effects similar to adults. Total mercury-related renal GSSG increased in adults and chicks. In brains of prebreeding adults, THg was correlated with a small increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) activity, suggestive of a compensatory response. Brain THg concentrations were highest in breeding adult Forster's terns and brain tissue exhibited increased lipid peroxidation as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, loss of protein bound thiols (PBSH), and decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes, GSSG reductase (GSSGrd), and G-6-PDH. In brains of Forster's tern chicks there was a decrease in total reduced thiols and PBSH. Multiple indicator responses also pointed to greater oxidative stress in breeding Forster's terns relative to prebreeding terns, attributable to the physiological stress of reproduction. Some biondicators also were related to age and species, including thiol concentrations. Enzymes GGT, G-6-PDH, and GSSGred activities were related to species. Our results indicate that THg concentrations induced oxidative stress in terns, and suggest that histopathological, immunological, and behavioral effects may occur in terns as reported in other species.

  1. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of KPb{sub 4−x}Ca{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5) for oxidation of cadmium at graphite electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahrich, Sara [Univ Hassan 1, Laboratoire de Chimie et Modélisation Mathématique, Faculté Polydisciplinaire, 25000 Khouribga (Morocco); Univ Hassan 1, Laboratoire Sciences des Matériaux, des Milieux et de la Modélisation, Faculté Polydisciplinaire, 25000 Khouribga (Morocco); Manoun, Bouchaib [Univ Hassan 1, Laboratoire Sciences des Matériaux, des Milieux et de la Modélisation, Faculté Polydisciplinaire, 25000 Khouribga (Morocco); El Mhammedi, Moulay Abderrahim, E-mail: elmhammedi@yahoo.fr [Univ Hassan 1, Laboratoire de Chimie et Modélisation Mathématique, Faculté Polydisciplinaire, 25000 Khouribga (Morocco)

    2017-02-15

    Chemically modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) for cadmium (II) analysis has been constructed by mixing KPb{sub 4−x}Ca{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5) (CaLA) and graphite powder. The lacunar apatite was synthesized using solid reaction and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The refinement study was carried out using Rietveld method where the obtained results show a good agreement between the observed and calculated patterns. The detection of cadmium (II) was investigated in acetate buffer (pH 4.5) using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). The limit of detection obtained under the optimized experimental conditions was 5.35 × 10{sup −7} mol L{sup −1} with a relative standard deviation of 2.37%. Possible interferences were tested and evaluated in 5.0 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} cadmium (II) in the presence of other inorganic ions. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine cadmium (II) in seawater and mussel samples. Hence, the satisfactory results confirm the applicability of this sensor in practical analysis. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of new lacunar apatites KPb{sub 4−x}Ca{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5). • Structural refinement of these compounds using Rietveld method. • A study of Ca doping effect in lacunar apatites for detecting Cd (II). • The electrochemical oxidation of Cd (II) was performed at CaLA-CPE using DPASV. • The proposed method was evaluated to detect cadmium in seawater and mussel samples.

  2. Basic Information about Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Environment Contact Us Share Basic Information about Mercury On this page: What is mercury? Emissions of ... Consumer products that traditionally contain mercury What is Mercury? Mercury is a naturally-occurring chemical element found ...

  3. Heat-induced oxidative stress and inflammation involve in cadmium pollution history in the spleen of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Jiang; Guo, Sai-Nan; Zhu, Qing-Ling; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Zheng, Jia-Lang

    2017-10-24

    Zebrafish were exposed to 0, 2.5 and 5 μg/L cadmium (Cd) for 10 weeks, and then each group was exposed to 26 °C(control) and 32 °C (high temperature) for 7 days. 22 indicators were compared between 26 °C and 32 °C in the spleen, including body weight, LPO and NO levels, activity levels of Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and iNOS, MTs protein levels, and mRNA levels of Nrf2, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, HSF1, HSF2, HSP70, MTF-1, MTs, IL-6, IL-10, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS and NF-κB. Most indicators were not significantly affected by heat in fish from no Cd pollution. However, almost all of indicators were responsive to heat in fish pre-exposed to Cd. Several indicators were sensitive to heat in fish pre-exposed to 2.5 μg/L Cd such as iNOS activities, and mRNA levels of iNOS and IL-10. Most other indicators were sensitive to heat in fish pre-exposed to 5 μg/L. The mRNA levels of HSP70 and MTF-1 were up-regulated by heat in fish pre-exposed to 0, 2.5 and 5 μg/L Cd. However, the magnitude of increase was the greatest in fish pre-exposed to 5 μg/L Cd. These differences between control and high temperature would serve as biomarkers to distinguish healthy from Cd-polluted group. The findings imply that metal pollution history should be carefully considered when screening heat biomarkers in fish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Nitric oxide improves S-assimilation and GSH production to prevent inhibitory effects of cadmium stress on photosynthesis in mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Per, Tasir S; Masood, Asim; Khan, Nafees A

    2017-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important gaseous signalling molecule that participates in many developmental and physiological processes, including defense responses against toxic metals in plants. The role of NO in cadmium (Cd)-induced toxic effects on photosynthesis was examined in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) plants. Exposure of plants to 50 μM Cd significantly enhanced oxidative stress (H2O2 content and lipid peroxidation) and impaired plant growth and photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence and reduced chlorophyll content and stomatal conductance. However, the exogenous application of 100 μM sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a donor of NO) reversed the effects of Cd through its stimulation of ROS-scavenging compounds (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase and reduced glutathione). Exogenous SNP significantly increased plant growth, photosynthesis and chlorophyll content and diminished the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2) and TBARS content. It also reduced the effects of Cd on thylakoid membrane of the chloroplasts. Application of SNP together with 1.0 mM SO42- showed better responses than SNP alone. The protective effect of NO was achieved through enhanced production of reduced glutathione (GSH). GSH biosynthesis in plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a GSH biosynthetic inhibitor, was not completely inhibited in presence of NO and S, suggesting that NO stimulated S-assimilation and GSH production of Cd exposed plants. This study concludes that NO counteracts Cd toxicity in B. juncea strongly by regulating S-assimilation and GSH production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Utilization of reduced graphene oxide/cadmium sulfide-modified carbon cloth for visible-light-prompt photoelectrochemical sensor for copper (II) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, C Y; Lim, H N; Pandikumar, A; Huang, N M; Ng, Y H

    2016-03-05

    A newly developed CdS/rGO/CC electrode was prepared based on a flexible carbon cloth (CC) substrate with cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The CdS was synthesized using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method, and the graphene oxide was thermally reduced on the modified electrode surface. The existence of rGO in the CdS-modified electrode increased the photocurrent intensity of the CdS/rGO/CC-modified electrode by three orders of magnitude, compared to that of the CdS/ITO electrode and two orders of magnitude higher than the CdS/CC electrode. A new visible-light-prompt photoelectrochemical sensor was developed based on the competitive binding reaction of Cu(2+) and CdS on the electrode surface. The results showed that the effect of the Cu(2+) on the photocurrent response was concentration-dependent over the linear ranges of 0.1-1.0 μM and 1.0-40.0 μM with a detection limit of 0.05 μM. The results of a selectivity test showed that this modified electrode has a high response toward Cu(2+) compared to other heavy metal ions. The proposed CdS/rGO/CC electrode provided a significantly high potential current compared to other reported values, and could be a practical tool for the fast, sensitive, and selective determination of Cu(2+). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Utilization of reduced graphene oxide/cadmium sulfide-modified carbon cloth for visible-light-prompt photoelectrochemical sensor for copper (II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foo, C.Y. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Lim, H.N., E-mail: janetlimhn@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Functional Device Laboratory, Institute of Advance Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Pandikumar, A.; Huang, N.M. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ng, Y.H. [Particles and Catalysis Research Group, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • CdS/rGO-modified carbon cloth for detection of copper(II). • Two linear detection range of 0.1 μM to 1.0 μM and 1.0 μM to 40.0 μM. • Detection limit of 0.05 μM and 0.50 μM. - Abstract: A newly developed CdS/rGO/CC electrode was prepared based on a flexible carbon cloth (CC) substrate with cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The CdS was synthesized using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method, and the graphene oxide was thermally reduced on the modified electrode surface. The existence of rGO in the CdS-modified electrode increased the photocurrent intensity of the CdS/rGO/CC-modified electrode by three orders of magnitude, compared to that of the CdS/ITO electrode and two orders of magnitude higher than the CdS/CC electrode. A new visible-light-prompt photoelectrochemical sensor was developed based on the competitive binding reaction of Cu{sup 2+} and CdS on the electrode surface. The results showed that the effect of the Cu{sup 2+} on the photocurrent response was concentration-dependent over the linear ranges of 0.1–1.0 μM and 1.0–40.0 μM with a detection limit of 0.05 μM. The results of a selectivity test showed that this modified electrode has a high response toward Cu{sup 2+} compared to other heavy metal ions. The proposed CdS/rGO/CC electrode provided a significantly high potential current compared to other reported values, and could be a practical tool for the fast, sensitive, and selective determination of Cu{sup 2+}.

  7. Effect of Cigarette Smoking on Concentrations of Cadmium and Lead and on the Oxidative Damage in Human Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziler, Ali Riza; Aydemir, Birsen; Onaran, Ilhan; Alici, Bülent; Özkara, Hamdi; Akyolcu, Mehmet Can

    2007-04-01

    Cigarette smoking induced a significant oxidant effect to free radical-related male infertility. Semen and blood obtained from 50 subfertile men (n=26 smokers, n=24 nonsmokers) and from 45 fertile men (n=23 smokers, n=22 nonsmokers) volunteers were examined. The levels of ROS, MDA and protein carbonyls were significantly increased in smokers subfertile men. The results indicate that Cd and Pb levels of smoking subfertile men in seminal plasma and spermatozoa could affect semen quality and oxidative damage in human sperm cells.

  8. Insights into the mechanisms underlying mercury-induced oxidative stress in gills of wild fish (Liza aurata) combining (1)H NMR metabolomics and conventional biochemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Tiziana; Brandão, Fátima; Guilherme, Sofia; Santos, Maria Ana; Maisano, Maria; Mauceri, Angela; Canário, João; Pacheco, Mário; Pereira, Patrícia

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress has been described as a key pathway to initiate mercury (Hg) toxicity in fish. However, the mechanisms underlying Hg-induced oxidative stress in fish still need to be clarified. To this aim, environmental metabolomics in combination with a battery of conventional oxidative stress biomarkers were applied to the gills of golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) collected from Largo do Laranjo (LAR), a confined Hg contaminated area, and São Jacinto (SJ), selected as reference site (Aveiro Lagoon, Portugal). Higher accumulation of inorganic Hg and methylmercury was found in gills of fish from LAR relative to SJ. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics revealed changes in metabolites related to antioxidant protection, namely depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and its constituent amino acids, glutamate and glycine. The interference of Hg with the antioxidant protection of gills was corroborated through oxidative stress endpoints, namely the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities at LAR. The increase of total glutathione content (reduced glutathione+oxidized glutathione) at LAR, in parallel with GSH depletion aforementioned, indicates the occurrence of massive GSH oxidation under Hg stress, and an inability to carry out its regeneration (glutathione reductase activity was unaltered) or de novo synthesis. Nevertheless, the results suggest the occurrence of alternative mechanisms for preventing lipid peroxidative damage, which may be associated with the enhancement of membrane stabilization/repair processes resulting from depletion in the precursors of phosphatidylcholine (phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine), as highlighted by NMR spectroscopy. However, the observed decrease in taurine may be attributable to alterations in the structure of cell membranes or interference in osmoregulatory processes. Overall, the novel concurrent use of metabolomics and conventional oxidative stress endpoints demonstrated to be

  9. The Cadmium Isotope Record of the Great Oxidation Event from the Turee Creek Group, Hamersley Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouchami, W.; Busigny, V.; Philippot, P.; Galer, S. J. G.; Cheng, C.; Pecoits, E.

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of the ocean, atmosphere and biosphere throughout Earth's history has impacted on the biogeochemistry of some key trace metals that are of particular importance in regulating the exchange between Earth's reservoirs. Several geochemical proxies exhibit isotopic shifts that have been linked to major changes in the oxygenation levels of the ancient oceans during the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE) between 2.45 and 2.2 Ga and the Neoproterozoic Oxygenation Event at ca. 0.6 Ga. Studies of the modern marine biogeochemical cycle of the transition metal Cadmium have shown that stable Cd isotope fractionation is mainly driven by biological uptake of light Cd into marine phytoplankton in surface waters leaving behind the seawater enriched in the heavy Cd isotopes. Here we use of the potential of this novel proxy to trace ancient biological productivity which remains an enigma, particularly during the early stages of Earth history. The Turee Creek Group in the Hamersley Basin, Australia, provides a continuous stratigraphic sedimentary section covering the GOE and at least two glacial events, offering a unique opportunity to examine the changes that took place during these periods and possibly constrain the evolution, timing and onset of oxygenic photosynthesis. Stable Cd isotope data were obtained on samples from the Boolgeeda Iron Fm. (BIFs), the siliciclastic and carbonate successions of Kungara (including the Meteorite Bore Member) and the Kazputt Fm., using a double spike technique by TIMS (ThermoFisher Triton) and Cd concentrations were determined by isotope dilution. The Boolgeeda BIFs have generally low Cd concentrations varying between 8 and 50ppb, with two major excursions marked by an increase in Cd content, reaching similar levels to those in the overlying Kungarra Fm. (≥150 ppb). These variations are associated with a large range in ɛ112/110Cd values (-2 to +2), with the most negative values typically found in the organic and Cd-rich shales and

  10. Agaricus blazei Murill Polysaccharides Protect Against Cadmium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Damage in Chicken Spleens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wanqiu; Lv, Ai; Li, Ruyue; Tang, Zequn; Ma, Dexing; Huang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Ruili; Ge, Ming

    2017-10-14

    Agaricus blazei Murill polysaccharide (ABP) has exhibited antioxidant and immunoregulatory activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ABP on cadmium (Cd)-induced antioxidant functions and inflammatory damage in chicken spleens. In this study, groups of 7-day-old chickens were fed with normal saline (0.2 mL single/day), CdCl2 (140 mg/kg/day), ABP (30 mg/mL, 0.2 mL single/day), and Cd + ABP (140 mg/kg/day + 0.2 mL ABP). Spleens were separated on the 20th, 40th, and 60th day for each group. The Cd contents, expression of melanoma-associated differentiation gene 5 (MDA5) and its downstream signaling molecules (interferon promoter-stimulating factor 1 (IPS-1), transcription factors interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and nuclear factor kappa-light chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB)), the content of cytokines (interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and beta interferon (IFN-β)), protein levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs), levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and histopathological changes of spleens were detected on the 20th, 40th, and 60th day. The results showed that ABP significantly reduced the accumulation of Cd in the chicken spleens and reduced the expression of MDA5, IPS-1, IRF-3, and NF-κB; their downstream inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-β; and the protein levels of HSPs (HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90) in spleens. The activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GSH-Px) significantly increased, and the level of MDA decreased in the ABP + Cd group. The results indicate that ABP has a protective effect on Cd-induced damage in chicken spleens.

  11. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  12. Mercury removal sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  13. Grape seed proanthocyanidins ameliorates cadmium-induced renal injury and oxidative stress in experimental rats through the up-regulation of nuclear related factor 2 and antioxidant responsive elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazima, Bashir; Manoharan, Vaihundam; Miltonprabu, Selvaraj

    2015-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) preferentially accumulates in the kidney, the major target for Cd-related toxicity. Cd-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been considered crucial mediators for renal injury. The biologically significant ionic form of cadmium (Cd(+)) binds to many bio-molecules, and these interactions underlie the toxicity mechanisms of Cd. The present study was hypothesized to explore the protective effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSP) on Cd-induced renal toxicity and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Male Wistar rats were treated with Cd as cadmium chloride (CdCl2, 5 mg·kg(-1) bw, orally) and orally pre-administered with GSP (100 mg·kg(-1) bw) 90 min before Cd intoxication for 4 weeks to evaluate renal damage of Cd and antioxidant potential of GSP. Serum renal function parameters (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine) levels in serum and urine, renal oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, enzymatic, and non-enzymatic antioxidants), inflammatory (NF-κB p65, NO, TNF-α, IL-6), apoptotic (caspase-3, caspase-9, Bax, Bcl-2), membrane bound ATPases, and Nrf2 (HO-1, keap1, γ-GCS, and μ-GST) markers were evaluated in Cd-treated rats. Pretreatment with GSP revealed a significant improvement in renal oxidative stress markers in kidneys of Cd-treated rats. In addition, GSP treatment decreases the amount of iNOS, NF-κB, TNF-α, caspase-3, and Bax and increases the levels Bcl-2 protein expression. Similarly, mRNA and protein analyses substantiated that GSP treatment notably normalizes the renal expression of Nrf2/Keap1 and its downstream regulatory proteins in the Cd-treated rats. Histopathological and ultra-structural observations also demonstrated that GSP effectively protects the kidney from Cd-induced oxidative damage. These findings suggest that GSP ameliorates renal dysfunction and oxidative stress through the activation of Nrf2 pathway in Cd-intoxicated rats.

  14. Oxidative stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana roots and leaves exposed to cadmium, uranium or a combination of both stressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horemans, N.; Saenen, E.; Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Hendrix, S.; Keunen, E.; Cuypers, A. [Hasselt University, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Agoralaan, Building D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear energy production or NORM industry released low amounts of radioactive substances together with non-radioactive substances (e.g., heavy metals, organic chemicals) to the environment. As sessile organisms, plants are commonly exposed to a number of adverse conditions and therefore it is interesting to study the stress responses of plants induced by the single stressors as well as in a in a multi-pollution set-up. The aim of this study was to understand and predict fast induced oxidative stress responses in plants exposed to Cd and U or a combination of both stressors. Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown hydroponically for 18 days were exposed to a Cd (5 μM) or {sup 238}U (25 μM) or an equi-toxic mixture of Cd and {sup 238}U (2.5 μM + 12.5 μM) for 24 h. As expected both metals were taken up into the plants with Cd being more readily transported to the leaves than U. The root-to-shoot ratio was approximately 1,3 for Cd whereas it was above 3500 for U. For both U and Cd the root-to-shoot ratio was not affected under multiple exposure conditions used here. Notwithstanding the limited exposure time, leave and root fresh weight was already decreasing in U-treated plants. For Cd or Cd+U a decreasing but at this point not significant trend was visible. As U concentrations in the leaves were very low the decrease in leaf fresh weight is possibly due to signaling from the roots rather than a direct toxicity of U. The oxidative stress response was investigated by measuring the transcription of selected pro- and anti-oxidative genes, anti-oxidative enzyme capacities and concentration and redox status of major anti-oxidative metabolites. Cd strongly up-regulated lipoxygenase (LOX1) and NADPH-oxidases (RBOHD or C in roots and leaves, respectively) whereas this was not found in the U-treated plants. For the anti-oxidative response related enzymes both Cd and U induced a decrease in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (CSD1,2) and a concomitant increase in Fe-SOD (FSD1). However

  15. Oral exposure of mice to cadmium (II), chromium (VI) and their mixture induce oxidative- and endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated apoptosis in the livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Zhang, Songbin; Tao, Runhua; Huang, Jie; He, Xingzhi; Qu, Lanya; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-06-01

    Health concerns regarding the environmental heavy metals in wildlife and humans have increased in recent years. We evaluated the effects of exposure of mice to low doses of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and their mixtures on oxidative- and ER-stress. Male adult mice were orally exposed to Cd (0.5 and 2 mg kg(-1) ), Cr (1 and 4 mg kg(-1) ) and binary Cd+Cr mixtures (0.25 + 05 and 1 + 2 mg kg(-1) ) daily for 36 days. We observed that the bioaccumulation of Cd and Cr in the liver in a dose-dependent manner, and the Cd and Cr contents in the 2 mg kg(-1) Cd and 4 mg kg(-1) Cr treated groups reached 2.43 and 3.46 µg g(-1) liver weight. In addition, treatments with 2 mg kg(-1) Cd, 4 mg kg(-1) Cr or their mixture (1 + 2 mg kg(-1) ) significantly decreased body and liver weights, increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the liver. Moreover, Cd and Cr exposures also elevated the transcription of the oxidative- and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress related genes including Cat, Gpx, heme oxygenase 1 (Ho-1), regulated protein 78 (Grp78), activating transcription factor 6 (Atf6) and proaoptotic CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (Chop) in a dose dependent manner in the liver. And hepatic cytochrome c levels increased in all Cd, Cr or their mixture treated groups. Furthermore, the transcriptional status and the activities of Caspase 9 and Caspase 3 were increased significantly in the liver when exposed to high doses of Cd, Cr or their mixture. These results suggested that a long period exposure of mice to Cd or Cr has the potential to elicit oxidative- and ER-stress mediated apoptosis in their livers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 693-705, 2016. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chronic waterborne zinc and cadmium exposures induced different responses towards oxidative stress in the liver of zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jia-Lang, E-mail: zhengjialang@aliyun.com [National Engineering Research Center of Marine Facilities Aquaculture, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316022 (China); Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Wu, Chang-Wen [National Engineering Research Center of Marine Facilities Aquaculture, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316022 (China); Li, Wei-Ye [Zhoushan fisheries research institute, Zhoushan 316022 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Zn and Cd induced some differences in oxidative damage in the liver of zebrafish. • Zn and Cd enhanced expression of Cu/Zn-SOD and CAT through Nrf2 pathway. • Zn and Cd did not affected protein levels of CAT. • Cd inhibited biological activities of Cu/Zn-SOD and CAT proteins. • Zn stimulated activity and protein levels of Cu/Zn-SOD. - Abstract: Based on the same toxic level of 0.6% LC{sub 50} for 96-h and the severe situation of water pollution, we compared effects of chronic Zn (180 μg L{sup −1}) and Cd exposures (30 μg L{sup −1}) on growth, survival, histology, ultrastructure, and oxidative stress in the liver of zebrafish for 5 weeks. Growth performance and survival rate remained relatively constant under Zn stress, but was reduced under Cd exposure. Cd exposure also induced severe pyknotic nuclei, evident ultrastructure damage, and considerable lipid inclusions in the hepatocytes. However, these phenomena were not pronounced under Zn exposure. The negative effects caused by Cd may be explained by an increase in hepatic oxidative damage, as reflected by the enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonylation (PC). The reduced activity of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) and catalase (CAT) may result in the enhanced hepatic oxidative damage, though the mRNA and protein levels of both genes increased and remained unchanged respectively. On the contrary, Zn up-regulated the levels of mRNA, protein and activity of Cu/Zn-SOD, which may contribute to the decreased LPO levels. Nonetheless, the sharply up-regulated mRNA levels of CAT did not induce an increase in the protein and activity levels of CAT under Zn stress. Furthermore, transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression parelleled with its target genes, suggesting that Nrf2 is required for the protracted induction of antioxidant genes. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that essential and non-essential metals induced some differences in

  17. Magnesium taurate prevents cataractogenesis via restoration of lenticular oxidative damage and ATPase function in cadmium chloride-induced hypertensive experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2016-12-01

    Previously we found that hypertension potentiates the risk the cataractogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of magnesium taurate (MgT) on hypertension and associated lenticular damages against cadmium chloride (CdCl2)-induced hypertensive animals. Male Sprague-Dawley albino rats (150-180g) were assigned to five experimental groups (n=6). Among the five groups, normal group received 0.3% carboxymethyl cellulose (10ml/kg/day, p.o.). Hypertension control group received CdCl2 (0.5mg/kg/day, i.p.). Tests and standard groups received MgT (3 and 6mg/kg/day, p.o.) and amlodipine (3mg/kg/day, p.o.) concurrently with CdCl2 respectively, for six consecutive weeks. Blood pressure, heart rate, and eyes were examined biweekly, and pathophysiological parameters in serum and eye lenses were evaluated after six weeks of the experimental protocol. The chronic administration of MgT concurrently with CdCl2 significantly restored the blood pressure, serum and lens antioxidants (CAT, SOD, GPx, and GSH), MDA level, and ions (Na+, K+, and Ca2+). Additionally, MgT treatment led to significant increase in the lens proteins (total and soluble), Ca2+ ATPase, and Na+K+ ATPase activity as compared to hypertension control group. Ophthalmoscope observations indicated that MgT treatments delayed the progression of cataract against the hypertensive state. The study shows that MgT prevents the progression of cataractogenesis via restoration of blood pressure, lenticular oxidative damages, and lens ATPase functions in the hypertensive state. The results suggest that MgT supplement may play a beneficial role to manage hypertension and associated cataractogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Cadmium-induced oxidative stress and histological damage in the myocardium. Effects of a soy-based diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferramola, Mariana L.; Pérez Díaz, Matías F.F. [Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, IMIBIO-SL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina); Honoré, Stella M.; Sánchez, Sara S. [Department of Development Biology, INSIBIO, National University of Tucumán, CONICET-UNT, Tucumán (Argentina); Antón, Rosa I. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, INQUISAL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina); Anzulovich, Ana C. [Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, IMIBIO-SL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina); Giménez, María S., E-mail: mgimenez@unsl.edu.ar [Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, IMIBIO-SL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina)

    2012-12-15

    Cd exposure has been associated to an augmented risk for cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of 15 and 100 ppm of Cd on redox status as well as histological changes in the rat heart and the putative protective effect of a soy-based diet. Male Wistar rats were separated into 6 groups and treated during 60 days as follows: groups (1), (2) and (3) were fed a casein-based diet; groups (4), (5) and (6), a soy-based diet; (1) and (4) were given tap water; (2) and (5) tap water containing 15 ppm of Cd{sup 2+}; and (3) and (6) tap water containing 100 ppm of Cd{sup 2+}. Serum lipid peroxides increased and PON-1 activity decreased in group (3). Lipoperoxidation also increased in the heart of all intoxicated groups; however protein oxidation only augmented in (3) and reduced glutathione levels diminished in (2) and (3). Catalase activity increased in groups (3) and (6) while superoxide dismutase activity increased only in (6). Glutathione peroxidase activity decreased in groups (3) and (6). Nrf2 expression was higher in groups (3) and (6), and MTI expression augmented in (3). Histological examination of the heart tissue showed the development of hypertrophic and fusion of cardiomyocytes along with foci of myocardial fiber necrosis. The transmission electron microscopy analysis showed profound ultra-structural damages. No protection against tissue degeneration was observed in animals fed the soy-based diet. Our findings indicate that even though the intake of a soy-based diet is capable of ameliorating Cd induced oxidative stress, it failed in preventing cardiac damage. -- Highlights: ► Cd intoxication produces extracellular and ultrastructural damage in the myocardium. ► The intake of a soy-based diet ameliorated Cd-induced oxidative stress. ► Cd-induced myocardial damage wasn't prevented by the intake of a soy-based diet. ► Cd-induced myocardial degeneration may not be caused by oxidative stress generation. ► Histology evaluation is needed to

  19. Adsorción de cadmio, cromo y mercurio en suelos del Valle del Cauca a varios valores de pH Cadmium, chromium and mercury adsorption on Cauca Valley soils as a function of pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García O. Álvaro

    1991-12-01

    were collected and prepared for sorption experiments adjusting the pH to 5.7,6.5 and 7.8 values using, 1,4 and 12% acetic acid or 0.01 N NaOH. Six saturating solution of each metal (0.0, 0.28, 0.56, 1.12 and 2.25 mg L-1 were added to 0.25 g air dried and ground to pass a 2-mm sieve soil samples. The soil solution suspensions were shaken for 25 minutes and then extracted with 0.01N HC1. Cadmium; Cr and Hg concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrofotometry. The difference between the initial and final metal solution concentration was considered to be soil adsorbed and the amount 0.01 N HC1 extracted as the metal retained by the soil. Cadmium adsorption in all the soils was higher at neutral or alkaline pH values due to the predominance of divalent solubles or insoluble metalanion complexes formed in the soil at pH values higter than 7.0. The Cr and Hg adsorption is higher at acid values of pH due to the formation of complexes with the organic matter (chelation or with Fe, Al or Mn hydrous oxids wich are favoreced at this pH values. The lower 0.01N HC1 extraction (higher retention was observed at pH values 6.4-6.6 in all the soils suggesting that in this range of pH this heavy metals are strongly adsorbed by the exchange complex and are not available to plants.

  20. The effects of cadmium exposure on the oxidative state and cell death in the gill of freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiang Wang

    Full Text Available We studied here the short-term toxicity effects of Cd on the oxidative state and cell death in the gill of freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense. Crabs were exposed to Cd that resulted in Cd accumulation and a significant increase in the metallothionein (MT level in the gill, but MT level increased disproportionally compared to the Cd accumulation with an extension of exposure time. Significant changes in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were observed. An increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and lipid peroxidation (LPO was detected that will cause oxidative stress. Histological abnormalities of the gills were discovered, including the expansion of gill cavity, a decrease in the numbers of connection of the upper and the lower of the gill lamellae and epithelial cells, and an increase in the number of hemocytes. The results of a TUNEL test and transmission electron microscope (TEM showed that more gill cells had apoptotic characteristics after 48 h of Cd treatment compared to the control, but epithelial cell necrosis and inflammatory response appeared only after 72 h. It was concluded that (1 Cd induced the ROS production and accumulation through inhibiting antioxidant enzyme activities and exceeding the saturation values of MT binging; (2 Cd led to lipid peroxidation and histopathological alternations; and (3 Cd induced apoptotic response at short time exposure, followed by necrotic features and inflammatory reaction after longer time exposure.

  1. Mercury Flow Through the Mercury-Containing Lamp Sector of the Economy of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This Scientific Investigations Report examines the flow of mercury through the mercury-containing lamp sector of the U.S. economy in 2001 from lamp manufacture through disposal or recycling. Mercury-containing lamps illuminate commercial and industrial buildings, outdoor areas, and residences. Mercury is an essential component in fluorescent lamps and high-intensity discharge lamps (high-pressure sodium, mercury-vapor, and metal halide). A typical fluorescent lamp is composed of a phosphor-coated glass tube with electrodes located at either end. Only a very small amount of the mercury is in vapor form. The remainder of the mercury is in the form of either liquid mercury metal or solid mercury oxide (mercury oxidizes over the life of the lamp). When voltage is applied, the electrodes energize the mercury vapor and cause it to emit ultraviolet energy. The phosphor coating absorbs the ultraviolet energy, which causes the phosphor to fluoresce and emit visible light. Mercury-containing lamps provide more lumens per watt than incandescent lamps and, as a result, require from three to four times less energy to operate. Mercury is persistent and toxic within the environment. Mercury-containing lamps are of environmental concern because they are widely distributed throughout the environment and are easily broken in handling. The magnitude of lamp sector mercury emissions, estimated to be 2.9 metric tons per year (t/yr), is small compared with the estimated mercury losses of the U.S. coal-burning and chlor-alkali industries, which are about 70 t/yr and about 90 t/yr, respectively.

  2. Combination of maghemite and titanium oxide nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol-alginate encapsulated beads for cadmium ions removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidnia, Zohreh; Idris, Ani [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, johor bahru (Malaysia)

    2015-06-15

    Both maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were mixed at various ratios and embedded in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-alginate beads. These beads were tested for photocatalytic behavior in eliminating toxic Cd(Ⅱ) from the aqueous solution. The photocatalytic experiments were performed under sunlight irradiation at various pH, initial feed concentrations and γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}: TiO{sub 2} ratios. The recycling attribute of these beads was also investigated. The results revealed that 100% of the Cd(Ⅱ) was eliminated in 150 minutes at pH 7 under sunlight. It shows that maghemite and titania PVA-alginate beads can be readily isolated from the aqueous solution after the photocatalyst process and reused for at least six times without losing their initial properties.

  3. [Influence of oxidative processes in mitochondria on contractility of the frog Rana temporaria heart muscle. Effects of cadmium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemarova, I V; Korotkov, S M; Nesterov, V P

    2011-01-01

    The inotropic Cd2+ action on frog heart is studied with taking into account its toxic effects upon mitochondria. Cd2+ at concentrations of 1, 10, and 20 microM is established to decrease dosedependently (21.3, 50.3, and 72.0%, respectively) the muscle contraction amplitude; this is explained by its competitive action on the potential-controlled Ca2(+)-channels of the L-type (Ca 1.2). In parallel experiments on isolated rat heart mitochondria (RHM) it was shown that Cd2+ at concentrations of 15 and 25 microM produces swelling of non-energized and energized mitochondria in isotonic (with KNO2 and NH4NO3) and hypoosmotic (with 25 mM CH3COOK) media. Study of oxidative processes in RHM by polarographic method has shown 20 microM Cd2+ to disturb activity of respiratory mitochondrial chain. The rate of endogenous respiration of isolated mitochondria in the medium with Cd2+ in the presence of malate and succinate was approximately 5 times lower than in control. In experimental preparations, addition into the medium of DNP-uncoupler of oxidation and phosphorylation did not cause an increase of the oxygen consumption rate. Thus, the obtained data indicate that a decrease in the cardiac muscle contractility caused by Cd2+ is due not only to its direct blocking action on Ca2(+)-channels, but also is mediated by toxic effect on rat heart mitochondria, which was manifested as an increase in ion permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), acceleration of the energy-dependent K+ transport into the matrix of mitochondria, and inhibition of their respiratory chain.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated apoptosis under cadmium-induced oxidative stress is regulated by autophagy, which is sensitized by tumor suppressor p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Keum-Young; Oh, Seon-Hee

    2016-10-07

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible cytoprotective enzyme. It is often overexpressed in different types of cancers and promotes cell survival. However, the role of HO-1 and the underlying molecular mechanism of cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells remain undefined. Here we show that the role of HO-1 under Cd-induced oxidative stress is dependent upon autophagy, which is sensitized by the tumor suppressor p53. The sensitivity to Cd was 3.5- and 14-fold higher in p53-expressing YD8 and H460 cells than in p53-null YD10B and H1299 cells, respectively. The levels of p53 in YD8 and H460 cells decreased in a Cd concentration-dependent manner, which was inhibited by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine. In both cell lines, Cd exposure resulted in caspase-3-mediated PARP-1 cleavage and the induction of CHOP, LC3-II, and HO-1, which were limited in YD10B and H1299 cells exposed to high concentrations of Cd. Cd exposure to p53-overexpressing YD10B cells enhanced Cd-induced HO-1 and LC3-II levels, whereas genetic knockdown of p53 in YD8 cells resulted in the suppression of Cd-induced levels of HO-1 and LC3-II, indicating that p53 is required in the sensing of HO-1 and induction of autophagy. The inhibition of autophagy using small interfering RNA (siRNA) for the autophagy-related gene atg5 enhanced HO-1, CHOP, and PARP-1 cleavage induced by Cd. However, transfection with HO-1 siRNA increased Cd-induced LC3-II, and suppressed the expression of CHOP and cleavage of PARP-1. Collectively, the role of HO-1 in apoptosis could be modulated by autophagy, which is sensitized by p53 expression in human cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  6. Synthesized chitosan/ iron oxide nanocomposite and shrimp shell in removal of nickel, cadmium and lead from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Keshvardoostchokami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an easy synthesized method for preparation of chitosan/iron oxide nanocomposite as a bio-sorbent has been applied. Analytical techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction; Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to survey of morphological structure and the functional groups characterization. The histogram of frequency of particle size confirmed that medium size of the synthesized nanoparticles was 50 nm. Beside the obtained nanocomposite, application of chitosan as the precursor and shrimp shell as natural chitin and a natural polymer were assessed as adsorbents for decontamination of Ni2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ as examples of heavy metals from drinking water. Batch studies were performed for adsorption experiments by changing variables such as pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. Based on the experimental sorption capacities, 58, 202 and 12 mg of Ni, Cd and Pb per g of Chitosan-Fe2O3 nanocomposite as adsorbent respectively, confirm that combination of Fe2O3 nanoparticles with chitosan makes a more efficient adsorbent than chitosan and chitin. Adsorbents in uptake of the mentioned heavy metals are in the order of Chitosan-Fe2O3 nanocomposite > chitosan> chitin. In addition, the kinetics and isotherm investigations were surveyed. Moreover, it has been shown that the synthesized nanocomposite significantly reduces the amount of the mentioned ions from the real wastewater sample.

  7. Oxidative damage, ultrastructural alterations and gene expressions of hemocytes in the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanying; Jing, Weixin; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wang, Lan

    2017-04-01

    Toxicity of Cd was tested with the hemocytes of the freshwater crab, Sinopotamon henanense, which were exposed to concentrations of 0, 0.725, 1.450, and 2.900mgL -1 Cd for 7, 14 and 21 d. We investigated the effects of Cd on the total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative damage of biomarkers, such as malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl derivates (PCO), and DNA-protein crosslink (DPC). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was applied to assess ultrastructural changes of hemocytes. The mRNA expression levels of prophenoloxidase (proPO), lysozyme (LSZ), metallothionein (MT), and the activity of phenoloxidase (PO) were also determined. Our results showed that TAC was inhibited by Cd, resulting in an increase of MDA contents, PCO contents, and DPC levels in hemocytes, respectively. Ultrastructural observations revealed that chromatin condensation, nucleus deformation, mitochondrial dilation, rough endoplasmatic reticulum (rER) degranulation and secondary or tertiary lysosomes were observed in hemocytes of crabs exposed to Cd. Meanwhile, the expression levels of proPO were down-regulated, while the activity of PO was up-regulated in hemocytes. The expression levels of LSZ and MT were up-regulated to some extent. Our findings suggest these parameters could be used as biomarkers in the monitoring of heavy metal pollution and quantitative risk assessments of pollutant exposure. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Lead and cadmium-induced oxidative stress impacting mycelial growth of Oudemansiella radicata in liquid medium alleviated by microbial siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan-Ru; Zhang, Xi-Yu; Deng, Jia-Yu; Zhao, Qi-Qi; Xu, Heng

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the effects of siderophores produced by six bacteria on mycelium growth, Cd and Pb accumulation, lipid peroxidation, protein content and antioxidant enzyme in Oudemansiella radicata were investigated in Cd and Pb-containing liquid medium. The results showed that inoculation with siderophore-containing filtrates (SCF) partly enhanced the growth of O. radicata after 15 days, with 0.8-32.4% biomass increase for Cd and 0.7-20.8% for Pb compared to control(s), which lacked siderophore. The maximum enhancement for accumulation were found to be confined to Bacillus sp. FFQ2(s) (26.5%) for Cd and Pseudomonas sp. CY63(s) (158.9%) for Pb. A significant decrease in MDA content indicated that lipid peroxidation in O. radicata was alleviated by siderophores. Besides, antioxidant enzyme SOD and POD activities also displayed obviously decrease in SCF-treated mycelium compared to control(s) treatment, while CAT activity did not present significant change. Protein level in O. radicata treated by SCF increased from 0.3 to 138.0% for Cd and from 10.9 to 107.1% for Pb compared to control(s). Therefore, the present work suggests that microbial siderophores can reduce the toxicity of metals to mycelium and then alleviate heavy metals-inducing oxidative stress in O. radicata.

  9. Mercury and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Mercury and pregnancy Mercury and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... vision problems. How can you be exposed to mercury? Mercury has several forms: It can be a ...

  10. Hepatoprotective activity of Moringa oleifera against cadmium toxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetu Toppo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present investigation has been conducted to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of Moringa oleifera against cadmium-induced toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: For this study, 18 Wistar albino rats were taken. Control group, Group I rats were given cadmium chloride @ 200 ppm per kg and Group II rats were treated with M. oleifera extract @ 500 mg/kg along with cadmium chloride @ 200 ppm per kg (daily oral for 28 days. On 29th day, animals were slaughtered and various parameters were determined. Serum biomarkers, oxidative stress parameters, histomorphological examination were carried out with estimation of cadmium concentration in liver tissues. Results: Oral administration of cadmium chloride @ 200 ppm/kg for 28 days resulted in a significant increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine transaminase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, significant (p≤0.01 increase of lipid peroxidation (LPO and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD, and increase in cadmium accumulation in liver. Treatment with M. oleifera @ 500 mg/kg significantly (p<0.01 decreased the elevated ALP, AST, ALT, LPO levels and increase in SOD levels, and as compared to cadmium chloride treated group. However, there was no significant difference in cadmium concentration in liver when compared with cadmium chloride treated group. Conclusion: The study conclude that supplementation of M. oleifera (500 mg/kg, daily oral for 28 days has shown protection against cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity.

  11. Transcriptional and biochemical markers in transplanted Perca flavescens to characterize cadmium- and copper-induced oxidative stress in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defo, Michel A. [Institut National De La Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 De La Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada); Bernatchez, Louis [Institut De Biologie Intégrative Et Des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C.; Couture, Patrice [Institut National De La Recherche Scientifique (INRS), Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490 De La Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Four-weeks exposure is sufficient to increase kidney metal levels in wild perch. • Cd and Cu affected indicators of retinoid metabolism and oxidative stress in fish. • Multi-level biological approaches are needed when assessing fish metal toxicology. • Changes at molecular level do not always mean changes at the functional level. • Wild juvenile perch may partly adjust to metal contamination by plastic responses. - Abstract: Despite recent progress achieved in elucidating the mechanisms underlying local adaptation to pollution, little is known about the evolutionary change that may be occurring at the molecular level. The goal of this study was to examine patterns of gene transcription and biochemical responses induced by metal accumulation in clean yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and metal depuration in contaminated fish in a mining and smelting region of Canada. Fish were collected from a reference lake (lake Opasatica) and a Cd, Cu and Zn contaminated lake (lake Dufault) located in the Rouyn-Noranda region (Qc, Canada) and caged for one or four weeks in their own lake or transplanted in the other lake. Free-ranging fish from the same lakes were also collected. Kidney Cd and Cu concentrations in clean fish caged in the contaminated lake increased with the time of exposure, but metal depuration did not occur in contaminated fish caged in the clean lake. After 4 weeks, the major retinoid metabolites analysed, the percentage of free dehydroretinol (dROH) and the retinol dehydrogenase-2 (rdh-2) transcription level in liver decreased in clean fish transplanted into the metal-contaminated lake, suggesting that metal exposure negatively impacted retinoid metabolism. However, we observed an increase in almost all of the retinoid parameters analysed in fish from the metal-impacted lake caged in the same lake, which we interpret as an adaptation response to higher ambient metal concentration. In support of this hypothesis, liver transcription levels

  12. Association of mercury and selenium with altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in diving ducks from the San Francisco Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Marn, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    Adult male greater scaup (Aythya marila) (GS), surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)(SS), and ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) (RD) were collected from Suisun Bay and coastal Tomales Bay in the greater San Francisco Bay area to assess exposure to inorganic contaminants. Hepatic selenium (Se) concentrations were highest in GS (geometric mean = 67 ppm, dw) and SS (119 ppm) in Suisun Bay, whereas hepatic mercury (Hg) was highest (19 ppm) in GS and SS from Tomales Bay. Hepatic Se and Hg were lower in RD and did not differ between locations. Hepatic supernatants were assayed for enzymes related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant activity including: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-peroxidase), glutathione reductase (GSSG-reductase), and glutathione-S-transferase (GSH-transferase). GSH-peroxidase activity was higher in SS and RD, and G-6-PDH higher in GS and SS from Suisun Bay than Tomales Bay. GSSG-reductase was higher in SS from Suisun Bay. The ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) was greater in all species from Tomales Bay. The following significant relationships were found in one or more species with increasing hepatic Hg concentration: lower body, liver and heart weights; decreased hepatic GSH concentration, G-6-PDH and GSH-peroxidase activities; increased ratio of GSSG to GSH, and increased GSSG-reductase activity. With increasing hepatic Se concentration, GSH-peroxidase increased but GSH decreased. It is concluded that measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. Concentrations of mercury and selenium and variable affected have been associated with adverse effects on reproduction and neurological function in experimental studies with mallards.

  13. Cadmium-Induced Testicular Toxicity, Oxidative Stress and Histopathology in Wistar Rats: Sustained Effects of Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Vernonia Amygdalina (Del. Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Eseigbe Imafidon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cadmium (Cd is a toxic heavy metal of both environmental and occupational concerns. The health impact of ethno-botanical approaches in attempts to ameliorate its deleterious effects in biological systems should be an area of scientific interest since established therapies are often burdened with undesirable side effects. Aim: To determine the effects of polyphenol-rich extract of the leaf of Vernonia amygdalina (PEVA on Cd-induced testicular toxicity, oxidative stress, and histopathology in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: A total of twenty five (25 male Wistar rats were divided into five groups as follows: Group 1 (Control received distilled water (0.2 ml/100 g i.p. for 5 consecutive days and thereafter left untreated for 28 days. Group 2 received Cd alone at 5 mg/kg (i.p. for 5 consecutive days. Group 3 was pre-treated with Cd as Group 2 and thereafter left untreated for a period of 28 days, whereas Groups 4 and 5 were pre-treated with Cd as Group 2 and thereafter received PEVA (orally at two dose levels (200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively for 28 days. Results: Cd administration induced reproductive toxicity as evidenced by lowered level of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone (P < 0.05; perturbation of sperm characterization (P < 0.05; deleterious disruptions of the antioxidant system as evidenced by lowered levels of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase as well as elevation in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances level (P < 0.05; decrease in relative testicular weight (P < 0.05; and severe disseminated necrosis of the seminiferous tubules with terminally undifferentiated/necrotic cells as revealed by the histopathological examination. These conditions were sustained following administration of the two dose levels of PEVA. Conclusion: PEVA administration is not a suitable therapeutic choice for fertility enhancement in male Wistar rat model of Cd-induced decline in reproductive function

  14. OsACA6, a P-type 2B Ca(2+) ATPase functions in cadmium stress tolerance in tobacco by reducing the oxidative stress load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Devesh; Huda, Kazi Md Kamrul; Banu, Mst Sufara Akhter; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Gill, Sarvjeet Singh; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-10-01

    The present study demonstrates the first direct evidence of the novel role of OsACA6 in providing Cd (2+) stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco by maintaining cellular ion homeostasis and modulating ROS-scavenging pathway. Cadmium, a non-essential toxic heavy metal, interferes with the plant growth and development. It reaches the leaves through xylem and may become part of the food chain, thus causing detrimental effects to human health. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop strategies for engineering plants for Cd(2+) tolerance and less accumulation. The members of P-type ATPases family transport metal ions including Cd(2+), and thus play important role an ion homeostasis. The present study elucidates the role of P-type 2B Ca(2+) ATPase (OsACA6) in Cd(2+) stress tolerance. The transcript levels of OsACA6 were up-regulated upon Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) exposure. Transgenic tobacco expressing OsACA6 showed tolerance towards Cd(2+) stress as demonstrated by several physiological indices including root length, biomass, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide content. The roots of the transgenic lines accumulated more Cd(2+) as compared to shoot. Further, confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that Cd(2+) exposure altered Ca(2+) uptake in OsACA6 transgenic plants. OsACA6 expression in tobacco also protected the transgenic plants from oxidative stress by enhancing the activity of enzymatic (SOD, CAT, APX, GR) and non-enzymatic (GSH and AsA) antioxidant machinery. Transgenic lines also tolerated Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) stress; however, tolerance for these ions was not as significant as observed for Cd(2+) exposure. Thus, overexpression of OsACA6 confers Cd(2+) stress tolerance in transgenic lines by maintaining cellular ion homeostasis and modulating reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging pathway. The results of the present study will help to develop strategies for engineering Cd(2+) stress tolerance in economically important crop plants.

  15. FrnE, a cadmium-inducible protein in Deinococcus radiodurans, is characterized as a disulfide isomerase chaperone in vitro and for its role in oxidative stress tolerance in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Joe, Min-Ho; Misra, H S; Lim, Sang-Yong; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 exposed to a lethal dose of cadmium shows differential expression of a large number of genes, including frnE (drfrnE) and some of those involved in DNA repair and oxidative stress tolerance. The drfrnE::nptII mutant of D. radiodurans showed growth similar to that of the wild type, but its tolerance to 10 mM cadmium and 10 mM diamide decreased by ~15- and ~3-fold, respectively. These cells also showed nearly 6 times less resistance to gamma radiation at 12 kGy and ~2-fold-higher sensitivity to 40 mM hydrogen peroxide than the wild type. In trans expression of drFrnE increased cytotoxicity of dithiothreitol (DTT) in the dsbA mutant of Escherichia coli. Recombinant drFrnE showed disulfide isomerase activity and could maintain insulin in its reduced form in the presence of DTT. While an equimolar ratio of wild-type protein could protect malate dehydrogenase completely from thermal denaturation at 42 °C, the C22S mutant of drFrnE provided reduced protection to malate dehydrogenase from thermal inactivation. These results suggested that drFrnE is a protein disulfide isomerase in vitro and has a role in oxidative stress tolerance of D. radiodurans possibly by protecting the damaged cellular proteins from inactivation.

  16. Mercury toxicity and neurodegenerative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carocci, Alessia; Rovito, Nicola; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Genchi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    important mechanism by which mercury causes toxicity appears to bemitochondrial damage via depletion of GSH (Nicole et a!. 1998), coupled with binding to thiol groups ( -SH), which generates free radicals. Mercury has a high affinity for thiol groups ( -SH) and seleno groups ( -SeH) that are present in amino acids as cysteine and N-acetyl cysteine, lipoic acid, proteins, and enzymes. N-acetylcysteine and cysteine are precursors for the biosynthesis of GSH, which is among the most powerful intracellular antioxidants available to protect against oxidative stress and inflammation.Mercury and methylmercury induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which reduces ATP synthesis and increases lipid, protein and DNA peroxidation. The content of metallothioneines, GSH, selenium and fish high in omega-3 fatty acids appear to be strongly related with degree of inorganic and organic mercury toxicity, and with the protective detoxifying mechanisms in humans. In conclusion, depletion of GSH,breakage of mitochondria, increased lipid peroxidation, and oxidation of proteins and DNA in the brain, induced by mercury and his salts, appear to be important factors in conditions such as ALS and AD (Bains and Shaw 1997; Nicole eta!. 1998;Spencer eta!. 1998; Alberti et a!. 1999).

  17. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  18. Oxidative Stress in Fish induced by Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Kováčik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollutants represent a risk factor for human and animals in all areas of occurrence. Environmental pollution caused by anthropogenic activities is a major problem in many countries. Numbers of studies deals with cumulation of xenobiotics in tissues but not all respond to the real impact on living organisms. Freshwater fishes are exposed to several anthropogenic contaminants. The most commonly studied are three metals: mercury (Hg, lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd. These contaminants could have several impacts to oxidative stress. In the normal healthy cell, ROS and pro-oxidant products are detoxified by antioxidant defences. Redox-active or Redox-inactive metals may cause an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Mercury has a high affinity for thiol groups, and can non-specifically affect several enzymes, e. g. GSH (glutathione, which can induce GSH depletion and oxidative stress in tissue, also can induce lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The toxicity of Cd to aquatic species depends on speciation, with the free ion, Cd2+ concentration being proportional to bioavailability. Cadmium toxicity worsened of Ca, Na, and Mg ions homeostasis. Lead can be toxic to nervous and skeletal systems; at cellular level can cause apoptosis, also can affect mitochondria, neurotransmitters, and can substitute for Ca.

  19. Cadmium toxicity to ringed seals (Phoca hispida): an epidemiological study of possible cadmium-induced nephropathy and osteodystrophy in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Qaanaaq in Northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Hansen, C; Dietz, R; Leifsson, P S

    2002-01-01

    of the study was to determine whether cadmium-induced damage in the kidneys and the skeletal system could be detected among 100 ringed seals from Northwest Greenland. The cadmium concentrations in the kidney cortex ranged from 0 to 248 microg/g wet weight (mean=44.5, N=100) in the 99 kidneys examined...... or osteodystrophy. This might be explained by the composition of the ringed seals diet, which contains high levels of vitamin D, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, selenium and protein. These elements are all likely to counteract cadmium-induced damage. It is speculated that ringed seal are not particularly vulnerable......The Greenland marine food chains contain high levels of cadmium, mercury and selenium. Concentrations of cadmium in the kidney of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from the municipalities of Qaanaaq and Upernavik (Northwest Greenland) are among the highest recorded in the Arctic. The purpose...

  20. Exogenous Glutathione Enhances Mercury Tolerance by Inhibiting Mercury Entry into Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Ok Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing understanding of the crucial roles of glutathione (GSH in cellular defense against heavy metal stress as well as oxidative stress, little is known about the functional role of exogenous GSH in mercury (Hg tolerance in plants. Here, we provide compelling evidence that GSH contributes to Hg tolerance in diverse plants. Exogenous GSH did not mitigate the toxicity of cadmium (Cd, copper (Cu, or zinc (Zn, whereas application of exogenous GSH significantly promoted Hg tolerance during seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, tobacco, and pepper. By contrast, addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis, severely retarded seed germination and seedling growth of the plants in the presence of Hg. The effect of exogenous GSH on Hg specific tolerance was also evident in the presence of other heavy metals, such as Cd, Cu, and Zn, together with Hg. GSH treatment significantly decreased H2O2 and O2- levels and lipid peroxidation, but increased chlorophyll content in the presence of Hg. Importantly, GSH treatment resulted in significantly less accumulation of Hg in Arabidopsis plants, and thin layer chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that GSH had much stronger binding affinity to Hg than to Cd, Cu, or Zn, suggesting that tight binding of GSH to Hg impedes Hg uptake, leading to low Hg accumulation in plant cells. Collectively, the present findings reveal that GSH is a potent molecule capable of conferring Hg tolerance by inhibiting Hg accumulation in plants.

  1. Enhanced photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury by TiO2 in a high temperature environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huazhen; Ie, Iau-Ren; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Hung, Chung-Hsuang; Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Luo, Jinjing; Jen, Yi-Hsiu

    2015-05-30

    The photo-oxidation of Hg(0) in a lab-scale reactor by titanium dioxide (TiO2) coated on the surface of glass beads was investigated at high temperatures. TiO2 was calcinated at four different temperatures of 300 °C, 400 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C (noted as Ti300, Ti400, Ti500 and Ti600) and characterized for its physicochemical properties. The calcinated TiO2 coating on the glass beads was then tested to compare the photo-oxidation efficiencies of Hg(0) with an incident light of 365 nm. The results showed that the oxidation efficiencies of Hg(0) for Ti400 and Ti500 were higher than those of Ti300 and Ti600. To enhance the photo-oxidation efficiency of Hg(0), Ti400 was selected to examine the wave lengths (λ) of 254 nm, 365 nm and visible light with various influent Hg(0) concentrations. The effects of irradiation strength and the presence of oxygen on the photo-oxidation efficiency of Hg(0) were further investigated, respectively. This study revealed that the wave length (λ) of 254 nm could promote the photo-oxidation efficiency of Hg(0) at 140 and 160 °C, while increasing the influent Hg(0) concentration and could enhance the photo-oxidation rate of Hg(0). However, the influence of 5% O2 present in the flue gas for the enhancement of Hg(0) oxidation was limited. Moreover, the intensity of the incident wave length of 365 nm and visible light were demonstrated to boost the photo-oxidation efficiency of Hg(0) effectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Distribution of mercury and other trace metals in the sediments of Cochin estuary (a Ramsar site), Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipu, S; Kumar, Anju A

    2013-08-01

    Sediment quality data provide essential information for evaluating ambient environmental quality conditions. Sediments are important carriers of trace metals in the environment and reflect the current quality of the system. In the present study, distribution of mercury, lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, chromium and manganese in Cochin estuary were studied. The distribution of oxides of metals and textural quality were also studied in detail. It was found that the concentration of metals in the sediments near the industrial belt was extremely high. Correlation of different metals and metal oxides were analysed. It was found that all the alloys were correlated significantly (α < 0.01) but in case of metals, correlation was only among certain metals.

  3. Combustion synthesis of cadmium sulphide nanomaterials for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anion-doped cadmium sulphide nanomaterials have been synthesized by using combustionmethod at normal atmospheric conditions. Oxidant/fuel ratios have been optimized in order to obtain CdS with best characteristics. Formation of CdS and size of crystallite were identified by X-ray diffraction and confirmed by ...

  4. Interactive effects of cadmium and Microcystis aeruginosa (cyanobacterium) on the growth, antioxidative responses and accumulation of cadmium and microcystins in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xiaolin; Gu, Ji-Dong; Tie, BaiQing; Yao, Bangsong; Shao, Jihai

    2016-10-01

    Cadmium pollution and harmful cyanobacterial blooms are two prominent environmental problems. The interactive effects of cadmium(II) and harmful cyanobacteria on rice seedlings remain unknown. In order to elucidate this issue, the interactive effects of cadmium(II) and Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB905 on the growth and antioxidant responses of rice seedling were investigated in this study, as well as the accumulation of cadmium(II) and microcystins. The results showed that the growth of rice seedlings was inhibited by cadmium(II) stress but promoted by inoculation of M. aeruginosa FACHB905. cadmium(II) stress induced oxidative damage on rice seedlings. Inoculation of M. aeruginosa FACHB905 alleviated the toxicity of cadmium(II) on rice seedlings. The accumulation of cadmium(II) in rice seedlings was decreased by M. aeruginosa FACHB905, but the translocation of cadmium(II) from root to shoot was increased by this cyanobacterium. The accumulation of microcystins in rice seedlings was decreased by cadmium(II). Results presented in this study indicated that cadmium(II) and M. aeruginosa had antagonistic toxicity on rice seedlings. The findings of this study throw new light on evaluation of ecological- and public health-risks for the co-contamination of cadmium(II) and harmful cyanobacteria.

  5. Optimizing Low-Concentration Mercury Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Reduced Graphene Oxide-Supported Fe₃O₄ Composites with the Aid of an Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rensheng; Fan, Mingyi; Hu, Jiwei; Ruan, Wenqian; Xiong, Kangning; Wei, Xionghui

    2017-11-07

    Reduced graphene oxide-supported Fe₃O₄ (Fe₃O₄/rGO) composites were applied in this study to remove low-concentration mercury from aqueous solutions with the aid of an artificial neural network (ANN) modeling and genetic algorithm (GA) optimization. The Fe₃O₄/rGO composites were prepared by the solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), N₂-sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and superconduction quantum interference device (SQUID). Response surface methodology (RSM) and ANN were employed to model the effects of different operating conditions (temperature, initial pH, initial Hg ion concentration and contact time) on the removal of the low-concentration mercury from aqueous solutions by the Fe₃O₄/rGO composites. The ANN-GA model results (with a prediction error below 5%) show better agreement with the experimental data than the RSM model results (with a prediction error below 10%). The removal process of the low-concentration mercury obeyed the Freudlich isotherm and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. In addition, a regeneration experiment of the Fe₃O₄/rGO composites demonstrated that these composites can be reused for the removal of low-concentration mercury from aqueous solutions.

  6. Multi-model study of mercury dispersion in the atmosphere: vertical and interhemispheric distribution of mercury species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieser, Johannes; Slemr, Franz; Ambrose, Jesse; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Brooks, Steve; Dastoor, Ashu; DeSimone, Francesco; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Gencarelli, Christian N.; Geyer, Beate; Gratz, Lynne E.; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Jaffe, Daniel; Kelley, Paul; Lin, Che-Jen; Jaegle, Lyatt; Matthias, Volker; Ryjkov, Andrei; Selin, Noelle E.; Song, Shaojie; Travnikov, Oleg; Weigelt, Andreas; Luke, Winston; Ren, Xinrong; Zahn, Andreas; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Yun; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric chemistry and transport of mercury play a key role in the global mercury cycle. However, there are still considerable knowledge gaps concerning the fate of mercury in the atmosphere. This is the second part of a model intercomparison study investigating the impact of atmospheric chemistry and emissions on mercury in the atmosphere. While the first study focused on ground-based observations of mercury concentration and deposition, here we investigate the vertical and interhemispheric distribution and speciation of mercury from the planetary boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. So far, there have been few model studies investigating the vertical distribution of mercury, mostly focusing on single aircraft campaigns. Here, we present a first comprehensive analysis based on various aircraft observations in Europe, North America, and on intercontinental flights. The investigated models proved to be able to reproduce the distribution of total and elemental mercury concentrations in the troposphere including interhemispheric trends. One key aspect of the study is the investigation of mercury oxidation in the troposphere. We found that different chemistry schemes were better at reproducing observed oxidized mercury patterns depending on altitude. High concentrations of oxidized mercury in the upper troposphere could be reproduced with oxidation by bromine while elevated concentrations in the lower troposphere were better reproduced by OH and ozone chemistry. However, the results were not always conclusive as the physical and chemical parameterizations in the chemistry transport models also proved to have a substantial impact on model results.

  7. Multi-model study of mercury dispersion in the atmosphere: vertical and interhemispheric distribution of mercury species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bieser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemistry and transport of mercury play a key role in the global mercury cycle. However, there are still considerable knowledge gaps concerning the fate of mercury in the atmosphere. This is the second part of a model intercomparison study investigating the impact of atmospheric chemistry and emissions on mercury in the atmosphere. While the first study focused on ground-based observations of mercury concentration and deposition, here we investigate the vertical and interhemispheric distribution and speciation of mercury from the planetary boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. So far, there have been few model studies investigating the vertical distribution of mercury, mostly focusing on single aircraft campaigns. Here, we present a first comprehensive analysis based on various aircraft observations in Europe, North America, and on intercontinental flights. The investigated models proved to be able to reproduce the distribution of total and elemental mercury concentrations in the troposphere including interhemispheric trends. One key aspect of the study is the investigation of mercury oxidation in the troposphere. We found that different chemistry schemes were better at reproducing observed oxidized mercury patterns depending on altitude. High concentrations of oxidized mercury in the upper troposphere could be reproduced with oxidation by bromine while elevated concentrations in the lower troposphere were better reproduced by OH and ozone chemistry. However, the results were not always conclusive as the physical and chemical parameterizations in the chemistry transport models also proved to have a substantial impact on model results.

  8. Mercury emission, control and measurement from coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei-Ping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering; Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Cao, Yan [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Zhang, Kai [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Coal-fired electric power generation accounts for 65% of U.S. emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), 22% of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and 37% of mercury (Hg). The proposed Clear Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) will attempt to regulate these emissions using a cap-and-trade program to replace a number of existing regulatory requirements that will impact this industry over the next decade. Mercury emissions remain the largest source that has not yet been efficiently controlled, in part because this is one of the most expensive to control. Mercury is a toxic, persistent pollutant that accumulates in the food chain. During the coal combustion process, when both sampling and accurate measurements are challenging, we know that mercury is present in three species: elemental, oxidized and particulate. There are three basic types of mercury measurement methods: Ontario Hydro Method, mercury continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) and sorbent-based monitoring. Particulate mercury is best captured by electrostatic precipitators (ESP). Oxidized mercury is best captured in wet scrubbers. Elemental mercury is the most difficult to capture, but selective catalytic reduction units (SCRs) are able to convert elemental mercury to oxidized mercury allowing it to be captured by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This works well for eastern coals with high chlorine contents, but this does not work well on the Wyoming Powder River Basin (PRB) coals. However, no good explanation for its mechanism, correlations of chlorine content in coal with SCR performance, and impacts of higher chlorine content in coal on FGD re-emission are available. The combination of SCR and FGD affords more than an 80% reduction in mercury emissions in the case of high chlorine content coals. The mercury emission results from different coal ranks, boilers, and the air pollution control device (APCD) in power plant will be discussed. Based on this UAEPA new regulation, most power plants

  9. Mercury and autism: accelerating evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Joachim; Naumann, Johannes; Schneider, Rainer; Walach, Harald; Haley, Boyd

    2005-10-01

    The causes of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders are unknown. Genetic and environmental risk factors seem to be involved. Because of an observed increase in autism in the last decades, which parallels cumulative mercury exposure, it was proposed that autism may be in part caused by mercury. We review the evidence for this proposal. Several epidemiological studies failed to find a correlation between mercury exposure through thimerosal, a preservative used in vaccines, and the risk of autism. Recently, it was found that autistic children had a higher mercury exposure during pregnancy due to maternal dental amalgam and thimerosal-containing immunoglobulin shots. It was hypothesized that children with autism have a decreased detoxification capacity due to genetic polymorphism. In vitro, mercury and thimerosal in levels found several days after vaccination inhibit methionine synthetase (MS) by 50%. Normal function of MS is crucial in biochemical steps necessary for brain development, attention and production of glutathione, an important antioxidative and detoxifying agent. Repetitive doses of thimerosal leads to neurobehavioral deteriorations in autoimmune susceptible mice, increased oxidative stress and decreased intracellular levels of glutathione in vitro. Subsequently, autistic children have significantly decreased level of reduced glutathione. Promising treatments of autism involve detoxification of mercury, and supplementation of deficient metabolites.

  10. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Sather

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m2h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m2h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area.

  11. Highly Selective Mercury Detection at Partially Oxidized Graphene/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):Poly(styrenesulfonate) Nanocomposite Film Modified Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasri, Nael; Sundramoorthy, Ashok; Chang, Woo-Jin; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Partially oxidized graphene flakes (po-Gr) were obtained from graphite electrode by an electrochemical exfoliation method. As-produced po-Gr flakes were dispersed in water with the assistance of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The po-Gr flakes and the po-Gr/PEDOT:PSS nanocomposite (po-Gr/PEDOT:PSS) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, we demonstrated the potential use of po-Gr/PEDOT:PSS electrode in electrochemical detection of mercury ions (Hg2+) in water samples. The presence of po-Gr sheets in PEDOT:PSS film greatly enhanced the electrochemical response for Hg2+. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed a well-defined Hg2+ redox peaks with a cathodic peak at 0.23 V, and an anodic peak at 0.42 V. Using differential pulse stripping voltammetry, detection of Hg2+ was achieved in the range of 0.2 to 14 µM (R2 = 0.991), with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.19 µM for Hg2+. The electrode performed satisfactorily for sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ in real samples, and the po-Gr/PEDOT:PSS film remains stable on the electrode surface for repeated use. Therefore, our method is potentially suitable for routine Hg2+ sensing in environmental water samples.

  12. Association between serum mercury concentration and leukocyte differential count in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Hong; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Hong, Seong-Chul; Lee, Hye-Sook; Lee, Jaechun; Kang, Ju Wan

    2015-03-01

    There have been a number of animal studies on the immunological effects of mercury. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the effects of mercury in children. We investigated the association between serum mercury and leukocyte differential count in Korean children. The relationship between mercury and leukocyte differential count (segment, lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil, and eosinophil counts) was analyzed by multivariate linear analysis adjusted for sex, BMI, parental smoking, lead, cadmium, and allergic sensitization in 311 children. Mercury showed a positive correlation with lymphocyte count (coefficient 113.8, 95% confidence interval 26.7-200.9). However, mercury was not associated with total leukocyte, segment, monocyte, basophil, or eosinophil count. Mercury was associated with the increased of lymphocyte count in Korean children. Further studies will be required to ascertain the clinical significance of this association.

  13. Mercury Report-Children's exposure to elemental mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov . Mercury Background Mercury Report Additional Resources Mercury Report - Children's Exposure to Elemental Mercury Recommend on Facebook ... I limit exposure to mercury? Why was the report written? Children attending a daycare in New Jersey ...

  14. Functional characterization of Gram-negative bacteria from different genera as multiplex cadmium biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara; Aracic, Sanja; Kannan, Ruban; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley E

    2017-08-15

    Widespread presence of cadmium in soil and water systems is a consequence of industrial and agricultural processes. Subsequent accumulation of cadmium in food and drinking water can result in accidental consumption of dangerous concentrations. As such, cadmium environmental contamination poses a significant threat to human health. Development of microbial biosensors, as a novel alternative method for in situ cadmium detection, may reduce human exposure by complementing traditional analytical methods. In this study, a multiplex cadmium biosensing construct was assembled by cloning a single-output cadmium biosensor element, cadRgfp, and a constitutively expressed mrfp1 onto a broad-host range vector. Incorporation of the duplex fluorescent output [green and red fluorescence proteins] allowed measurement of biosensor functionality and viability. The biosensor construct was tested in several Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Enterobacter. The multiplex cadmium biosensors were responsive to cadmium concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 10µgml -1 , as well as several other heavy metals, including arsenic, mercury and lead at similar concentrations. The biosensors were also responsive within 20-40min following exposure to 3µgml -1 cadmium. This study highlights the importance of testing biosensor constructs, developed using synthetic biology principles, in different bacterial genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mercury in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldwater, L.J.

    1971-05-01

    The global mercury cycle is diagrammed, and the movement of mercury in aquatic food chains is discussed. The methylation mechanisms in aquatic systems are diagrammed and discussed. The mercury flow in US society is diagrammed; the diagram shows the percentage contribution of various sources to the environment. Atmospheric levels of mercury are graphed, and the concentration of mercury in foodstuffs from various parts of the world are tabulated. The possibility of chromosome damage caused by mercury is briefly treated. 7 figures, 1 table.

  16. Mercury speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography atomic fluorescence spectrometry using an integrated microwave/UV interface. Optimization of a single step procedure for the simultaneous photo-oxidation of mercury species and photo-generation of Hg0

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quadros, Daiane P. C.; Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Bramanti, Emilia; Borges, Daniel L. G.; D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    We described the hyphenation of photo-induced chemical vapor generation with high performance liquid chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-AFS) for the quantification of inorganic mercury, methylmercury (MeHg) and ethylmercury (EtHg). In the developed procedure, formic acid in mobile phase was used for the photodecomposition of organomercury compounds and reduction of Hg2 + to mercury vapor under microwave/ultraviolet (MW/UV) irradiation. We optimized the proposed method studying the influence of several operating parameters, including the type of organic acid and its concentration, MW power, composition of HPLC mobile phase and catalytic action of TiO2 nanoparticles. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were 0.15, 0.15 and 0.35 μg L- 1 for inorganic mercury, MeHg and EtHg, respectively. The developed method was validated by determination of the main analytical figures of merit and applied to the analysis of three certified reference materials. The online interfacing of liquid chromatography with photochemical-vapor generation-atomic fluorescence for mercury determination is simple, environmentally friendly, and represents an attractive alternative to the conventional tetrahydroborate (THB) system.

  17. Focus on CSIR research in pollution waste: South African mercury assessment (SAMA) programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leaner, J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mercury pollution is a world-wide problem requiring attention at global, regional and national levels. Various anthropogenic activities release mercury into the atmosphere. It can occur as both elemental and oxidized forms, and is removed from...

  18. Evaluation of mercury speciation and removal through air pollution control devices of a 190 MW boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengli; Cao, Yan; Dong, Zhongbing; Cheng, Chinmin; Li, Hanxu; Pan, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution control devices (APCDs) are installed at coal-fired power plants for air pollutant regulation. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have the co-benefits of air pollutant and mercury removal. Configuration and operational conditions of APCDs and mercury speciation affect mercury removal efficiently at coal-fired utilities. The Ontario Hydro Method (OHM) recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was used to determine mercury speciation simultaneously at five sampling locations through SCR-ESP-FGD at a 190 MW unit. Chlorine in coal had been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas; and low-chlorine coal was purported to produce less oxidized mercury (Hg2+) and more elemental mercury (Hg0) at the SCR inlet compared to higher chlorine coal. SCR could oxidize elemental mercury into oxidized mercury when SCR was in service, and oxidation efficiency reached 71.0%. Therefore, oxidized mercury removal efficiency was enhanced through a wet FGD system. In the non-ozone season, about 89.5%-96.8% of oxidized mercury was controlled, but only 54.9%-68.8% of the total mercury was captured through wet FGD. Oxidized mercury removal efficiency was 95.9%-98.0%, and there was a big difference in the total mercury removal efficiencies from 78.0% to 90.2% in the ozone season. Mercury mass balance was evaluated to validate reliability of OHM testing data, and the ratio of mercury input in the coal to mercury output at the stack was from 0.84 to 1.08.

  19. Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.; Livengood, C. D.; Martin, K.; Mendelsohn, M. H.; Zhou, C. Q.

    1999-05-19

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is emitted into the environment by both natural and human activities. Acute and chronic exposure to mercury and methyl mercury in humans results in central nervous system damage, kidney damage, and even death. Although some Hg emission sources have been regulated, coal-fired utilities have not been. In anticipation of federal regulations on mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has designed a flue gas simulation system to study the removal of elemental mercury. The simulated flue gas enters the system and combines with the inlet mercury vapor (from a calibrated permeation tube), carried