WorldWideScience

Sample records for cadet multi-centre randomised

  1. Developing, delivering and documenting rehabilitation in a multi-centre randomised controlled surgical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Handoll, H. H. G.; Goodchild, L; Brealey, S. D.; Hanchard, N. C. A.; Jefferson, L.; Keding, A; Rangan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A rigorous approach to developing, delivering and documenting rehabilitation within randomised controlled trials of surgical interventions is required to underpin the generation of reliable and usable evidence. This article describes the key processes used to ensure provision of good quality and comparable rehabilitation to all participants of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial comparing surgery with conservative treatment of proximal humeral fractures in adults. Methods Th...

  2. A pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of fluid loading and level of dependency in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery: trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Norrie John; Vale Luke; Stott Stephen A; Campbell Marion K; Cuthbertson Brian H; Kinsella John; Cook Jonathan; Brittenden Julie; Grant Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients undergoing major elective or urgent surgery are at high risk of death or significant morbidity. Measures to reduce this morbidity and mortality include pre-operative optimisation and use of higher levels of dependency care after surgery. We propose a pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of level of dependency and pre-operative fluid therapy in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery. Methods/Design A multi-centre randomised cont...

  3. Acupuncture for persistent allergic rhinitis: a multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Kyung-Won

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common health complaints worldwide. Complementary and alternative medical approaches have been employed to relieve allergic rhinitis symptoms and to avoid the side effects of conventional medication. Acupuncture has been widely used to treat patients with allergic rhinitis, but the available evidence of its effectiveness is insufficient. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in patients in Korea and China with persistent allergic rhinitis compared to sham acupuncture treatment or waitlist control. Methods This study consists of a multi-centre (two centres in Korea and two centres in China, randomised, controlled trial with three parallel arms (active acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and waitlist group. The active acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups will receive real or sham acupuncture treatment, respectively, three times per week for a total of 12 sessions over four weeks. Post-treatment follow-up will be performed a month later to complement these 12 acupuncture sessions. Participants in the waitlist group will not receive real or sham acupuncture treatments during this period but will only be required to keep recording their symptoms in a daily diary. After four weeks, the same treatment given to the active acupuncture group will be provided to the waitlist group. Discussion This trial will provide evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for persistent allergic rhinitis. The primary outcome between groups is a change in the self-reported total nasal symptom score (i.e., nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and itching from baseline at the fourth week. Secondary outcome measures include the Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire score and total non-nasal symptom score (i.e., headache, itching, pain, eye-dropping. The quantity of conventional relief medication used during the follow-up period is another secondary outcome measure. Trial

  4. Assessment of data quality in an international multi-centre randomised trial of coronary artery surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bochenek Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ART is a multi-centre randomised trial of cardiac surgery which provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the data from a large number of centres from a variety of countries. We attempted to assess data quality, including recruitment rates, timeliness and completeness of the data obtained from the centres in different socio-economic strata. Methods The analysis was based on the 2-page CRF completed at the 6 week follow-up. CRF pages were categorised into "clean" (no edit query and "dirty" (any incomplete, inconsistent or illegible data. The timelines were assessed on the basis of the time interval from the visit and receipt of complete CRF. Data quality was defined as the number of data queries (in percent and time delay (in days between visit and receipt of correct data. Analyses were stratified according to the World Bank definitions into: "Developing" countries (Poland, Brazil and India and "Developed" (Italy, UK, Austria and Australia. Results There were 18 centres in the "Developed" and 10 centres in the "Developing" countries. The rate of enrolment did not differ significantly by economic level ("Developing":4.1 persons/month, "Developed":3.7 persons/month. The time interval for the receipt of data was longer for "Developing" countries (median:37 days compared to "Developed" ones (median:11 days (p Conclusions In this study we showed that data quality was comparable between centres from "Developed" and "Developing" countries. Data was received in a less timely fashion from Developing countries and appropriate systems should be instigated to minimize any delays. Close attention should be paid to the training of centres and to the central management of data quality. Trial registration ISRCTN46552265

  5. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic pain caused by gonarthrosis: A study protocol of an ongoing multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN27450856

    OpenAIRE

    Krämer Jürgen; Knauer Christine; Mansmann Ulrich; Witte Steffen; Streitberger Konrad; Scharf Hanns-Peter; Victor Norbert

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Controlled clinical trials produced contradictory results with respect to a specific analgesic effect of acupuncture. There is a lack of large multi-centre acupuncture trials. The German Acupuncture Trial represents the largest multi-centre study of acupuncture in the treatment of chronic pain caused by gonarthrosis up to now. Methods 900 patients will be randomised to three treatment arms. One group receives verum acupuncture, the second sham acupuncture, and the third co...

  6. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation aimed at improving outdoor mobility for people after stroke: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Logan Pip A; Leighton Mat P; Walker Marion F; Armstrong Sarah; Gladman John R F; Sach Tracey H; Smith Shirley; Newell Ossie; Avery Tony; Williams Hywel; Scott James; O’Neil Kathleen; McCluskey Annie; Leach Simon; Barer David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Up to 42% of all stroke patients do not get out of the house as much as they would like. This can impede a person’s quality of life. This study is testing the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a new outdoor mobility rehabilitation intervention by comparing it to usual care. Methods/design This is a multi-centre parallel group individually randomised, controlled trial. At least 506 participants will be recruited through 15 primary and secondary care settings ...

  7. Advance care planning - a multi-centre cluster randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rietjens, Judith A C; Korfage, Ida J; Dunleavy, Lesley;

    2016-01-01

    , and improve their quality of life. METHODS/DESIGN: We will study the effects of the ACP program Respecting Choices on the quality of life of patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer. In a phase III multicenter cluster randomised controlled trial, 22 hospitals in 6 countries will be randomised...... of their disease trajectory, is an important next step in an era of increased focus on patient centered healthcare and shared decision-making. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: ISRCTN63110516 . Date of registration: 10/3/2014....

  8. A multi-centre randomised controlled study of pre-IVF outpatient hysteroscopy in women with recurrent IVF implantation failure: Trial of Outpatient Hysteroscopy - [TROPHY] in IVF

    OpenAIRE

    Khalaf Yacoub; Sunkara Sesh; Campo Rudi; El-Toukhy Tarek; Coomarasamy Arri

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The success rate of IVF treatment is low. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis found that the outcome of IVF treatment could be improved in patients who have experienced recurrent implantation failure if an outpatient hysteroscopy (OH) is performed before starting the new treatment cycle. However, the trials were of variable quality, leading to a call for a large and high-quality randomised trial. This protocol describes a multi-centre randomised controlled trial t...

  9. Putting telemedicine to the test: design and performance of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of joint tele-consultations

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, P.; Haines, A.; Harrison, R; Barber, J; Thompson, S; Roberts, J.; Jacklin, P.; Lewis, L; Wainwright, P.; , ForTheVirtualOutreachProjectGroup

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appropriate information flow is crucial to the care of patients, particularly at the interface between primary and secondary care. Communication problems can result from inadequate organisation and training, There is a major expectation that information and communication technologies may offer solutions, but little reliable evidence. This paper reports the design and performance of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT), unparalleled in telemedicine research in either sc...

  10. Design and performance of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of joint tele-consultations [ISRCTN54264250

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson Simon; Barber Julie A; Harrison Robert; Haines Andrew; Wallace Paul; Roberts Jennifer; Jacklin Paul B; Lewis Leo; Wainwright Paul

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Appropriate information flow is crucial to the care of patients, particularly at the interface between primary and secondary care. Communication problems can result from inadequate organisation and training, There is a major expectation that information and communication technologies may offer solutions, but little reliable evidence. This paper reports the design and performance of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT), unparalleled in telemedicine research in e...

  11. A multi-centre randomised phase III trial of Dexamethasone vs Dexamethasone and diethylstilbestrol in castration-resistant prostate cancer: immediate vs deferred Diethylstilbestrol

    OpenAIRE

    Shamash, J; Powles, T; Sarker, S J; Protheroe, A; Mithal, N; Mills, R.; Beard, R; Wilson, P; Tranter, N.; O'Brien, N; McFaul, S; Oliver, T

    2011-01-01

    Background: The role of further hormone therapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains unclear. We performed a multi-centre randomised phase III study comparing the use of Dexamethasone, Aspirin, and immediate addition of Diethylstilbestrol (DAiS) vs Dexamethasone, Aspirin, and deferred (until disease progression) addition of Diethylstilbestrol (DAdS). Methods: From 2001 to 2008, 270 men with chemotherapy-naive CRPC were randomly assigned, in a 1 : 1 ratio, to receive either D...

  12. The Scandinavian Propaten(®) trial - 1-year patency of PTFE vascular prostheses with heparin-bonded luminal surfaces compared to ordinary pure PTFE vascular prostheses - a randomised clinical controlled multi-centre trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J S; Gottschalksen, B; Johannesen, N; Dueholm, D; Ravn, H; Christensen, E D; Viddal, B; Flørenes, T; Pedersen, G; Rasmussen, M; Carstensen, M; Grøndal, N; Fasting, H

    2011-01-01

    To compare 1-year potencies' of heparin-bonded PTFE [(Hb-PTFE) (Propaten(®))] grafts with those of ordinary polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) grafts in a blinded, randomised, clinically controlled, multi-centre study.......To compare 1-year potencies' of heparin-bonded PTFE [(Hb-PTFE) (Propaten(®))] grafts with those of ordinary polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) grafts in a blinded, randomised, clinically controlled, multi-centre study....

  13. Effectiveness of a hospital-based work support intervention for female cancer patients - a multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sietske J Tamminga

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: One key aspect of cancer survivorship is return-to-work. Unfortunately, many cancer survivors face problems upon their return-to-work. For that reason, we developed a hospital-based work support intervention aimed at enhancing return-to-work. We studied effectiveness of the intervention compared to usual care for female cancer patients in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. METHODS: Breast and gynaecological cancer patients who were treated with curative intent and had paid work were randomised to the intervention group (n = 65 or control group (n = 68. The intervention involved patient education and support at the hospital and improvement of communication between treating and occupational physicians. In addition, we asked patient's occupational physician to organise a meeting with the patient and the supervisor to make a concrete gradual return-to-work plan. Outcomes at 12 months of follow-up included rate and time until return-to-work (full or partial, quality of life, work ability, work functioning, and lost productivity costs. Time until return-to-work was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. RESULTS: Return-to-work rates were 86% and 83% (p = 0.6 for the intervention group and control group when excluding 8 patients who died or with a life expectancy of months at follow-up. Median time from initial sick leave to partial return-to-work was 194 days (range 14-435 versus 192 days (range 82-465 (p = 0.90 with a hazard ratio of 1.03 (95% CI 0.64-1.6. Quality of life and work ability improved statistically over time but did not differ statistically between groups. Work functioning and costs did not differ statistically between groups. CONCLUSION: The intervention was easily implemented into usual psycho-oncological care and showed high return-to-work rates. We failed to show any differences between groups on return-to-work outcomes and quality of life scores. Further research is needed to study which

  14. Pilates based core stability training in ambulant individuals with multiple sclerosis: protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Multiple Sclerosis (MS frequently experience balance and mobility impairments, including reduced trunk stability. Pilates-based core stability training, which is aimed at improving control of the body's stabilising muscles, is popular as a form of exercise with people with MS and therapists. A replicated single case series study facilitated by the Therapists in MS Group in the United Kingdom (UK provides preliminary evidence that this approach can improve balance and mobility in ambulant people with MS; further evidence is needed to substantiate these findings to ensure that limited time, energy, finances and resources are used to best effect. This study builds upon the pilot work undertaken in the case series study by implementing a powered randomised controlled study, with the aims of: 1 Establishing the effectiveness of core stability training 2 Comparing core stability training with standardised physiotherapy exercise 3 Exploring underlying mechanisms of change associated with this intervention Methods This is a multi-centre, double blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Eligible participants will be recruited from 4 UK centres. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of three groups: Pilates based core stability training, standardised physiotherapy exercise or contract-relax relaxation sessions (placebo control. All will receive face to face training sessions over a 12 week period; together with a 15 minute daily home programme. All will be assessed by a blinded assessor before training, at the end of the 12 week programme and at 4 week follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the 10 metre timed walk. Secondary outcome measures are the MS walking Scale (MSWS-12, the Functional Reach (forwards and lateral, a 10 point Numerical Rating Scale to determine "Difficulty in carrying a drink when walking", and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC Scale. In addition, ultrasound imaging of the

  15. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic pain caused by gonarthrosis: A study protocol of an ongoing multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN27450856

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krämer Jürgen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlled clinical trials produced contradictory results with respect to a specific analgesic effect of acupuncture. There is a lack of large multi-centre acupuncture trials. The German Acupuncture Trial represents the largest multi-centre study of acupuncture in the treatment of chronic pain caused by gonarthrosis up to now. Methods 900 patients will be randomised to three treatment arms. One group receives verum acupuncture, the second sham acupuncture, and the third conservative standard therapy. The trial protocol is described with eligibility criteria, detailed information on the treatment definition, blinding, endpoints, safety evaluation, statistical methods, sample size determination, monitoring, legal aspects, and the current status of the trial. Discussion A critical discussion is given regarding the considerations about standardisation of the acupuncture treatment, the choice of the control group, and the blinding of patients and observers.

  16. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation aimed at improving outdoor mobility for people after stroke: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Pip A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 42% of all stroke patients do not get out of the house as much as they would like. This can impede a person’s quality of life. This study is testing the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a new outdoor mobility rehabilitation intervention by comparing it to usual care. Methods/design This is a multi-centre parallel group individually randomised, controlled trial. At least 506 participants will be recruited through 15 primary and secondary care settings and will be eligible if they are over 18 years of age, have had a stroke and wish to get out of the house more often. Participants are being randomly allocated to either the intervention group or the control group. Intervention group participants receive up to 12 rehabilitation outdoor mobility sessions over up to four months. The main component of the intervention is repeated practice of outdoor mobility with a therapist. Control group participants are receiving the usual intervention for outdoor mobility limitations: verbal advice and provision of leaflets provided over one session. Outcome measures are being collected using postal questionnaires, travel calendars and by independent assessors. The primary outcome measure is the Social Function domain of the SF36v2 quality of life assessment six months after recruitment. The secondary outcome measures include: functional ability, mobility, the number of journeys (monthly travel diaries, satisfaction with outdoor mobility, mood, health-related quality of life, resource use of health and social care. Carer mood information is also being collected. The mean Social Function score of the SF-36v2 will be compared between treatment arms using a multiple membership form of mixed effects multiple regression analysis adjusting for centre (as a fixed effect, age and baseline Social Function score as covariates and therapist as a multiple membership random effect. Regression coefficients and 95% confidence

  17. The group-based social skills training SOSTA-FRA in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder - study protocol of the randomised, multi-centre controlled SOSTA - net trial

    OpenAIRE

    Freitag Christine M; Cholemkery Hannah; Elsuni Leyla; Kroeger Anne K; Bender Stephan; Kunz Cornelia Ursula; Kieser Meinhard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Group-based social skills training (SST) has repeatedly been recommended as treatment of choice in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). To date, no sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial has been performed to establish efficacy and safety of SST in children and adolescents with HFASD. In this randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with 220 children and adolescents with HFASD it is hypothesized, that add-on group-based SST using the 12 weeks manu...

  18. A pragmatic multi-centred randomised controlled trial of yoga for chronic low back pain: Trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Helen; Tilbrook, Helen; Aplin, John; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Hewitt, Catherine; Jayakody, Shalmini; Semlyen, Anna; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David; Trewhela, Alison; Watt, Ian; Worthy, Gill

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is...

  19. Design and performance of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of joint tele-consultations [ISRCTN54264250

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Simon

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriate information flow is crucial to the care of patients, particularly at the interface between primary and secondary care. Communication problems can result from inadequate organisation and training, There is a major expectation that information and communication technologies may offer solutions, but little reliable evidence. This paper reports the design and performance of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT, unparalleled in telemedicine research in either scale or range of outcomes. The study investigated the effectiveness and cost implications in rural and inner-city settings of using videoconferencing to perform joint tele-consultations as an alternative to general practitioner referral to the hospital specialist in the outpatient clinic. Methods Joint tele-consultation services were established in both the Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust in inner London, and the Royal Shrewsbury Hospitals Trust, in Shropshire. All the patients who gave consent to participate were randomised either to joint tele-consultation or to a routine outpatients appointment. The principal outcome measures included the frequency of decision by the specialist to offer a follow-up outpatient appointment, patient satisfaction (Ware Specific Questionnaire, wellbeing (SF12 and enablement (PEI, numbers of tests, investigations, procedures and treatments. Results A total of 134 general practitioners operating from 29 practices participated in the trial, referring a total of 3170 patients to 20 specialists in ENT medicine, general medicine (including endocrinology, and rheumatology, gastroenterology, orthopaedics, neurology and urology. Of these, 2094 patients consented to participate in the study and were correctly randomised. There was a 91% response rate to the initial assessment questionnaires, and analysis showed equivalence for all key characteristics between the treatment and control groups. Conclusion We have designed and

  20. Tele-guidance of chronic heart failure patients enhances knowledge about the disease. A multi-centre, randomised controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, A.H.; Davidse, W.; Dommelen, P. van; Klaassen, E.; Caliskan, K.; Burgh, P. van der; Leenders, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: New strategies are required to optimize care in increasing numbers of chronic heart failure patients. The aim of this randomised trial was to evaluate a remote guidance system. Methods: Intervention group patients received a home TV-channel providing educational materials. Tele-guidance

  1. Prospective multi-centre randomised trial comparing induction of labour with a double-balloon catheter versus dinoprostone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Lundstrøm, M; Kjær, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    randomised to double-balloon or vaginal dinoprostone (3 mg) groups. There was a significantly higher failure rate for labour induction in the balloon group (relative risk: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.49). Median induction time was 27.3 h in the balloon group and 29.8 h in the dinoprostone...

  2. Design of Lamifuse: a randomised, multi-centre controlled trial comparing laminectomy without or with dorsal fusion for cervical myeloradiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotenhuis J André

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background laminectomy is a valuable surgical treatment for some patients with a cervical radiculomyelopathy due to cervical spinal stenosis. More recently attention has been given to motion of the spinal cord over spondylotic spurs as a cause of myelopathic changes. Immobilisation by fusion could have a positive effect on the recovery of myelopathic signs or changes. This has never been investigated in a prospective, randomised trial. Lamifuse is an acronyme for laminectomy and fusion. Methods/Design Lamifuse is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing laminectomy with and without fusion in patients with a symptomatic cervical canal stenosis. The study population will be enrolled from patients that are 60 years or older with myelopathic signs and/or symptoms due to a cervical canal stenosis. A kyphotis shape of the cervical spine is an exclusion criterium. Each treatment arm needs 30 patients. Discussion This study will contribute to the discussion whether additional fusion after a cervical laminectomy results in a better clinical outcome. ISRCT number ISRCTN72800446

  3. Feasibility, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, multi-centre trial of hand-held NB-UVB phototherapy for the treatment of vitiligo at home (HI-Light trial: Home Intervention of Light therapy)

    OpenAIRE

    Eleftheriadou, Viktoria; Thomas, Kim; Ravenscroft, Jane; Whitton, Maxine; Batchelor, Jonathan; Williams, Hywel

    2014-01-01

    Background Hand-held NB-UVB units are lightweight devices that may overcome the need to treat vitiligo in hospital-based phototherapy cabinets, allowing early treatment at home that may enhance the likelihood of successful repigmentation. The pilot Hi-Light trial examined the feasibility of conducting a large multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) on the use of such devices by exploring recruitment, adherence, acceptability, and patient education. Methods This was a feasibility, doubl...

  4. Induction of labour versus expectant management for nulliparous women over 35 years of age: a multi-centre prospective, randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Kate F

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background British women are increasingly delaying childbirth. The proportion giving birth over the age of 35 rose from 12% in 1996 to 20% in 2006. Women over this age are at a higher risk of perinatal death, and antepartum stillbirth accounts for 61% of all such deaths. Women over 40 years old have a similar stillbirth risk at 39 weeks as women who are between 25 and 29 years old have at 41 weeks. Many obstetricians respond to this by suggesting labour induction at term to forestall some of the risk. In a national survey of obstetricians 37% already induce women aged 40–44 years. A substantial minority of parents support such a policy, but others do not on the grounds that it might increase the risk of Caesarean section. However trials of induction in other high-risk scenarios have not shown any increase in Caesarean sections, rather the reverse. If induction for women over 35 did not increase Caesareans, or even reduced them, it would plausibly improve perinatal outcome and be an acceptable intervention. We therefore plan to perform a trial to test the effect of such an induction policy on Caesarean section rates. This trial is funded by the NHS Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB Programme. Design The 35/39 trial is a multi-centre, prospective, randomised controlled trial. It is being run in twenty UK centres and we aim to recruit 630 nulliparous women (315 per group aged over 35 years of age, over two years. Women will be randomly allocated to one of two groups: Induction of labour between 390/7 and 396/7 weeks gestation. Expectant management i.e. awaiting spontaneous onset of labour unless a situation develops necessitating either induction of labour or Caesarean Section. The primary purpose of this trial is to establish what effect a policy of induction of labour at 39 weeks for nulliparous women of advanced maternal age has on the rate of Caesarean section deliveries. The secondary aim is to act as a pilot study for a trial to

  5. Financial considerations in the conduct of multi-centre randomised controlled trials: evidence from a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Adrian M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Securing and managing finances for multicentre randomised controlled trials is a highly complex activity which is rarely considered in the research literature. This paper describes the process of financial negotiation and the impact of financial considerations in four UK multicentre trials. These trials had met, or were on schedule to meet, recruitment targets agreed with their public-sector funders. The trials were considered within a larger study examining factors which might be associated with trial recruitment (STEPS. Methods In-depth semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted in 2003–04 with 45 individuals with various responsibilities to one of the four trials. Interviewees were recruited through purposive and then snowball sampling. Interview transcripts were analysed with the assistance of the qualitative package Atlas-ti. Results The data suggest that the UK system of dividing funds into research, treatment and NHS support costs brought the trial teams into complicated negotiations with multiple funders. The divisions were somewhat malleable and the funding system was used differently in each trial. The fact that all funders had the potential to influence and shape the trials considered here was an important issue as the perspectives of applicants and funders could diverge. The extent and range of industry involvement in non-industry-led trials was striking. Three broad periods of financial work (foundation, maintenance, and resourcing completion were identified. From development to completion of a trial, the trialists had to be resourceful and flexible, adapting to changing internal and external circumstances. In each period, trialists and collaborators could face changing costs and challenges. Each trial extended the recruitment period; three required funding extensions from MRC or HTA. Conclusion This study highlights complex financial aspects of planning and conducting trials, especially where multiple

  6. The effect of TCM acupuncture on hot flushes among menopausal women (ACUFLASH study: A study protocol of an ongoing multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borud Einar K

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After menopause, 10–20% of all women have nearly intolerable hot flushes. Long term use of hormone replacement therapy involves a health risk, and many women seek alternative strategies to relieve climacteric complaints. Acupuncture is one of the most frequently used complementary therapies in Norway. We designed a study to evaluate whether Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture-care together with self-care is more effective than self-care alone to relieve climacteric complaints. Methods/Design The study is a multi-centre pragmatic randomised controlled trial with two parallel arms. Participants are postmenopausal women who document ≥7 flushes/24 hours and who are not using hormone replacement therapy or other medication that may influence flushes. According to power calculations 200 women are needed to detect a 50% reduction in flushes, and altogether 286 women will be recruited to allow for a 30% dropout rate. The treatment group receives 10 sessions of Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture-care and self-care; the control group will engage in self-care only. A team of experienced Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncturists give acupuncture treatments. Discussion The study tests acupuncture as a complete treatment package including the therapeutic relationship and expectation. The intervention period lasts for 12 weeks, with follow up at 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint is change in daily hot flush frequency in the two groups from baseline to 12 weeks; secondary endpoint is health related quality of life, assessed by the Women's Health Questionnaire. We also collect data on Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnoses, and we examine treatment experiences using a qualitative approach. Finally we measure biological variables, to examine potential mechanisms for the effect of acupuncture. The study is funded by The Research Council of Norway.

  7. Virtual patients design and its effect on clinical reasoning and student experience: a protocol for a randomised factorial multi-centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman James

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtual Patients (VPs are web-based representations of realistic clinical cases. They are proposed as being an optimal method for teaching clinical reasoning skills. International standards exist which define precisely what constitutes a VP. There are multiple design possibilities for VPs, however there is little formal evidence to support individual design features. The purpose of this trial is to explore the effect of two different potentially important design features on clinical reasoning skills and the student experience. These are the branching case pathways (present or absent and structured clinical reasoning feedback (present or absent. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre randomised 2x2 factorial design study evaluating two independent variables of VP design, branching (present or absent, and structured clinical reasoning feedback (present or absent.The study will be carried out in medical student volunteers in one year group from three university medical schools in the United Kingdom, Warwick, Keele and Birmingham. There are four core musculoskeletal topics. Each case can be designed in four different ways, equating to 16 VPs required for the research. Students will be randomised to four groups, completing the four VP topics in the same order, but with each group exposed to a different VP design sequentially. All students will be exposed to the four designs. Primary outcomes are performance for each case design in a standardized fifteen item clinical reasoning assessment, integrated into each VP, which is identical for each topic. Additionally a 15-item self-reported evaluation is completed for each VP, based on a widely used EViP tool. Student patterns of use of the VPs will be recorded. In one centre, formative clinical and examination performance will be recorded, along with a self reported pre and post-intervention reasoning score, the DTI. Our power calculations indicate a sample size of 112 is required for

  8. REMCARE: Pragmatic Multi-Centre Randomised Trial of Reminiscence Groups for People with Dementia and their Family Carers: Effectiveness and Economic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrell, Martin; Bruce, Errollyn; Edwards, Rhiannon T.; Hounsome, Barry; Keady, John; Orgeta, Vasiliki; Rees, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Background Joint reminiscence groups, involving people with dementia and family carers together, are popular, but the evidence-base is limited. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups as compared to usual care. Methods This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial had two parallel arms: intervention group and usual-care control group. A restricted dynamic method of randomisation was used, with an overall allocation ratio of 1:1, restricted to ensure viable sized intervention groups. Assessments, blind to treatment allocation, were carried out at baseline, three months and ten months (primary end-point), usually in the person's home. Participants were recruited in eight centres, mainly through NHS Memory Clinics and NHS community mental health teams. Included participants were community resident people with mild to moderate dementia (DSM-IV), who had a relative or other care-giver in regular contact, to act as informant and willing and able to participate in intervention. 71% carers were spouses. 488 people with dementia (mean age 77.5)were randomised: 268 intervention, 220 control; 350 dyads completed the study (206 intervention, 144 control). The intervention evaluated was joint reminiscence groups (with up to 12 dyads) weekly for twelve weeks; monthly maintenance sessions for further seven months. Sessions followed a published treatment manual and were held in a variety of community settings. Two trained facilitators in each centre were supported by volunteers. Primary outcome measures were self-reported quality of life for the person with dementia (QoL-AD), psychological distress for the carer (General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-28). Secondary outcome measures included: autobiographical memory and activities of daily living for the person with dementia; carer stress for the carer; mood, relationship quality and service use and costs for both. Results The intention to treat analysis (ANCOVA

  9. Protocol for the ProFHER (PROximal Fracture of the Humerus: Evaluation by Randomisation trial: a pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of surgical versus non-surgical treatment for proximal fracture of the humerus in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maffulli Nicola

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proximal humeral fractures, which occur mainly in older adults, account for approximately 4 to 5% of all fractures. Approximately 40% of these fractures are displaced fractures involving the surgical neck. Management of this group of fractures is often challenging and the outcome is frequently unsatisfactory. In particular it is not clear whether surgery gives better outcomes than non-surgical management. Currently there is much variation in the use of surgery and a lack of good quality evidence to inform this decision. Methods/Design We aim to undertake a pragmatic UK-based multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of surgical versus standard non-surgical treatment for adults with an acute closed displaced fracture of the proximal humerus with involvement of the surgical neck. The choice of surgical intervention is left to the surgeon, who must use techniques that they are fully experienced with. This will avoid 'learning curve' problems. We will promote good standards of non-surgical care, similarly insisting on care-provider competence, and emphasize the need for comparable provision of rehabilitation for both groups of patients. We aim to recruit 250 patients from a minimum of 18 NHS trauma centres throughout the UK. These patients will be followed-up for 2 years. The primary outcome is the Oxford Shoulder Score, which will be collected via questionnaires completed by the trial participants at 6, 12 and 24 months. This is a 12-item condition-specific questionnaire providing a total score based on the person's subjective assessment of pain and activities of daily living impairment. We will also collect data for other outcomes, including general health measures and complications, and for an economic evaluation. Additionally, we plan a systematic collection of reasons for non-inclusion of eligible patients who were not recruited into the trial, and their baseline

  10. The group-based social skills training SOSTA-FRA in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder - study protocol of the randomised, multi-centre controlled SOSTA - net trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitag Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group-based social skills training (SST has repeatedly been recommended as treatment of choice in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD. To date, no sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial has been performed to establish efficacy and safety of SST in children and adolescents with HFASD. In this randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with 220 children and adolescents with HFASD it is hypothesized, that add-on group-based SST using the 12 weeks manualised SOSTA–FRA program will result in improved social responsiveness (measured by the parent rated social responsiveness scale, SRS compared to treatment as usual (TAU. It is further expected, that parent and self reported anxiety and depressive symptoms will decline and pro-social behaviour will increase in the treatment group. A neurophysiological study in the Frankfurt HFASD subgroup will be performed pre- and post treatment to assess changes in neural function induced by SST versus TAU. Methods/design The SOSTA – net trial is designed as a prospective, randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with two parallel groups. The primary outcome is change in SRS score directly after the intervention and at 3 months follow-up. Several secondary outcome measures are also obtained. The target sample consists of 220 individuals with ASD, included at the six study centres. Discussion This study is currently one of the largest trials on SST in children and adolescents with HFASD worldwide. Compared to recent randomised controlled studies, our study shows several advantages with regard to in- and exclusion criteria, study methods, and the therapeutic approach chosen, which can be easily implemented in non-university-based clinical settings. Trial registration ISRCTN94863788 – SOSTA – net: Group-based social skills training in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder.

  11. Effect of osteosynthesis, primary hemiarthroplasty, and non-surgical management for displaced four-part fractures of the proximal humerus in elderly: a multi-centre, randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorson, Stig; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Frich, Lars Henrik; Jensen, Steen Lund; Johannsen, Hans Viggo; Sørensen, Anne Kathrine; Hrobjartsson, Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    Background Fractures of the proximal humerus are common injuries and account for 4–5 percent of all fractures, second only to hip and wrist fractures. The incidence is positively correlated with age and osteoporosis, and is likely to increase. Displaced four-part fractures are among the most severe injuries, accounting for 2–10 percent of proximal humeral fractures. The optimal intervention is disputed. Two previous randomised trials were very small and involved a noticeable risk of bias, and systematic reviews consequently conclude that there is inadequate basis for evidence-based treatment decisions. We aim to compare the effect of osteosynthesis with angle-stable plate with non-surgical management, and the effect of primary hemiarthroplasty with both osteosynthesis and non-surgical management. Methods/Design We will conduct a randomised, multi-centre, clinical trial including patients from ten national shoulder units within a two-year period. We plan to include 162 patients. A central randomisation unit will allocate patients. All patients will receive a standardised three-month rehabilitation program of supervised physiotherapy regardless of treatment allocation. Patients will be followed at least one year. The primary outcomes will be the overall score on the Constant Disability Scale, and its pain subscale, measured at 12 months. A blinded physiotherapist will carry out the assessments. Other secondary outcomes are Oxford Shoulder Score, and general health status (Short Form-36). PMID:19586546

  12. Effect of osteosynthesis, primary hemiarthroplasty, and non-surgical management for displaced four-part fractures of the proximal humerus in elderly: a multi-centre, randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannsen Hans

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractures of the proximal humerus are common injuries and account for 4–5 percent of all fractures, second only to hip and wrist fractures. The incidence is positively correlated with age and osteoporosis, and is likely to increase. Displaced four-part fractures are among the most severe injuries, accounting for 2–10 percent of proximal humeral fractures. The optimal intervention is disputed. Two previous randomised trials were very small and involved a noticeable risk of bias, and systematic reviews consequently conclude that there is inadequate basis for evidence-based treatment decisions. We aim to compare the effect of osteosynthesis with angle-stable plate with non-surgical management, and the effect of primary hemiarthroplasty with both osteosynthesis and non-surgical management. Methods/Design We will conduct a randomised, multi-centre, clinical trial including patients from ten national shoulder units within a two-year period. We plan to include 162 patients. A central randomisation unit will allocate patients. All patients will receive a standardised three-month rehabilitation program of supervised physiotherapy regardless of treatment allocation. Patients will be followed at least one year. The primary outcomes will be the overall score on the Constant Disability Scale, and its pain subscale, measured at 12 months. A blinded physiotherapist will carry out the assessments. Other secondary outcomes are Oxford Shoulder Score, and general health status (Short Form-36.

  13. The LIPPSMAck POP (Lung Infection Prevention Post Surgery - Major Abdominal - with Pre-Operative Physiotherapy) trial: study protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Boden, Ianthe; Browning, Laura; Skinner, Elizabeth H.; Reeve, Julie; El-Ansary, Doa; Robertson, Iain K; Denehy, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative pulmonary complications are a significant problem following open upper abdominal surgery. Preliminary evidence suggests that a single pre-operative physiotherapy education and preparatory lung expansion training session alone may prevent respiratory complications more effectively than supervised post-operative breathing and coughing exercises. However, the evidence is inconclusive due to methodological limitations. No well-designed, adequately powered, randomised con...

  14. Feasibility study to inform the design of a UK multi-centre randomised controlled trial of prophylactic antibiotics for the prevention of recurrent cellulitis of the leg

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, K.S.; Cox, N H; Savelyich, B S P; Shipley, D.; Meredith, S; A. Nunn; Reynolds, N.; Williams, H.C.; Angus, J; Bell, H.; Bourke, J.; Burge, S.; Ferguson, A.; Finlay, A.; Fulton, R

    2007-01-01

    Background: This paper describes the results of a feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial (RCT). Methods: Twenty-nine members of the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UK DCTN) expressed an interest in recruiting for this study. Of these, 17 obtained full ethics and Research & Development (R&D) approval, and 15 successfully recruited patients into the study. A total of 70 participants with a diagnosis of cellulitis of the leg were enrolled over a 5-month period. These partici...

  15. Feasibility study to inform the design of a UK multi-centre randomised controlled trial of prophylactic antibiotics for the prevention of recurrent cellulitis of the leg

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Kim S.; Cox, Neil H; Savelyich, Boki SP; Shipley, Debbie; Meredith, Sarah; Nunn, Andrew; Williams, Hywel C.; Reynolds, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Background: This paper describes the results of a feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial (RCT). Methods: Twenty-nine members of the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UK DCTN) expressed an interest in recruiting for this study. Of these, 17 obtained full ethics and Research & Development (R&D) approval, and 15 successfully recruited patients into the study. A total of 70 participants with a diagnosis of cellulitis of the leg were enrolled over a 5-month period. T...

  16. Feasibility study to inform the design of a UK multi-centre randomised controlled trial of prophylactic antibiotics for the prevention of recurrent cellulitis of the leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the results of a feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial (RCT. Methods Twenty-nine members of the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UK DCTN expressed an interest in recruiting for this study. Of these, 17 obtained full ethics and Research & Development (R&D approval, and 15 successfully recruited patients into the study. A total of 70 participants with a diagnosis of cellulitis of the leg were enrolled over a 5-month period. These participants were largely recruited from medical admissions wards, although some were identified from dermatology, orthopaedic, geriatric and general surgery wards. Data were collected on patient demographics, clinical features and willingness to take part in a future RCT. Results Despite being a relatively common condition, cellulitis patients were difficult to locate through our network of UK DCTN clinicians. This was largely because patients were rarely seen by dermatologists, and admissions were not co-ordinated centrally. In addition, the impact of the proposed exclusion criteria was high; only 26 (37% of those enrolled in the study fulfilled all of the inclusion criteria for the subsequent RCT, and were willing to be randomised to treatment. Of the 70 participants identified during the study as having cellulitis of the leg (as confirmed by a dermatologist, only 59 (84% had all 3 of the defining features of: i erythema, ii oedema, and iii warmth with acute pain/tenderness upon examination. Twenty-two (32% patients experienced a previous episode of cellulitis within the last 3 years. The median time to recurrence (estimated as the time since the most recent previous attack was 205 days (95% CI 102 to 308. Service users were generally supportive of the trial, although several expressed concerns about taking antibiotics for lengthy periods, and felt that multiple morbidity/old age would limit entry into a 3-year study. Conclusion This pilot study has been

  17. Vitrectomy with or without encircling band for pseudophakic retinal detachment: a multi-centre, three-arm, randomised clinical trial. VIPER Study Report No. 1—design and enrolment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazinani, B; Baumgarten, S; Schiller, P; Agostini, H; Helbig, H; Limburg, E; Hellmich, M; Walter, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Scleral buckling is currently used in addition to vitrectomy for the treatment of pseudophakic retinal detachment (PRD) to better support the vitreous base and better visualisation of the periphery. Aims The aims of this study are to evaluate (1) whether the combination of 20 G vitrectomy and scleral buckling is superior to 20 G vitrectomy alone (control) (confirmatory), and (2) whether transconjunctival 23/25 G vitrectomy is non-inferior to 20 G vitrectomy (both without scleral buckling) regarding operation success (exploratory). Methods The VIPER (Vitrectomy Plus Encircling Band Vs. Vitrectomy Alone For The Treatment Of Pseudophakic Retinal Detachment) study is an unmasked, multi-centre, three-arm randomised trial. Patients with PRD were eligible, excluding complicated retinal detachment or otherwise severe ophthalmologic impairment. Patients were randomised to one of three interventions: 20 G vitrectomy alone (control C), combination of 20 G vitrectomy and circumferential scleral buckling (experimental treatment E1) or 23/25 G vitrectomy alone (experimental treatment E2). The primary endpoint is the absence of any indication for a retina re-attaching procedure during 6 months of follow-up. Secondary endpoints include best corrected visual acuity, retina re-attaching procedures, complications and adverse events. Results From June 2011 to August 2013, 257 patients were enrolled in the study. The internet randomisation service assigned 100 patients each to the treatment arms C and E1, and 57 patients to treatment E2. The imbalance is due to the fact that several retinal surgeons did not qualify for performing E2. The random assignment was stratified and balanced (ie, 1:1 or 1:1:1 ratio) by surgeon. Conclusions The described study represents a methodologically rigorous protocol evaluating the benefits of three different vitrectomy approaches to PRD. The projected results will help to establish their overall efficacy and will permit

  18. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of body psychotherapy in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia – a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priebe Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative symptoms of schizophrenia are frequently associated with poor long term outcomes. Established interventions have little, if any, positive effects on negative symptoms. Arts Therapies such as Body Psychotherapy (BPT have been suggested to reduce negative symptoms, but the existing evidence is limited. In a small exploratory trial a manualised form of group BPT led to significantly lower negative symptom levels both at the end of treatment and at 4 months follow-up as compared to supportive counseling. We designed a large multi-site trial to assess the effectiveness of a manualised BPT intervention in reducing negative symptoms, compared to an active control. Methods/Design In a randomised controlled trial, 256 schizophrenic outpatients with negative symptoms will be randomly allocated either to BPT or Pilates groups. In both conditions, patients will be offered two 90 minutes sessions per week in groups of about 8 patients over a period of 10 weeks. Outcomes are assessed at the end of treatment and at six months follow-up. The primary outcome is severity of negative symptoms, as measured by the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS, whilst a range of secondary outcome measures include general psychopathology, social contacts, and quality of life. We will also assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Discussion The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a promising form of group therapy which may help alleviate negative symptoms that are associated with unfavourable long-term outcomes and have so far been difficult to treat. If the trial is successful, it will add a new and effective option in the treatment of negative symptoms. Group BPT is manualised, might be attractive to many patients because of its unusual approach, and could potentially be rolled out to services at relatively little additional cost. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN84216587

  19. The Effect of Using Assessment Instruments on Substance-abuse Outpatients' Adherence to Treatment: a Multi-centre Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broekaert Eric

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drop-out is an important problem in the treatment of substance use disorder. The focus of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of within treatment assessment with feedback directly to patients with multiple substance use disorder on outpatient individual treatment adherence. Feedback consisted of personal resources' and readiness to change status and progress that facilitate or hinder change, thereby using graphical representation. Methods Informed consent was obtained from both the control and experimental groups to be involved in research and follow-up. Following Zelen's single consent design, baseline participants (n = 280 were randomised (sample-size-estimation: 80%power, p=.05, 2-sided and treatment consent was obtained from those allocated to the experiment (n = 142. In both groups, equal numbers of patients did not attend sessions after allocation. So, 227 persons were analyzed according to intention-to-treat analysis (ITT: experiment n = 116;control n = 111. Excluding refusals 211 participants remained for per-protocol analysis (PP: experiment n = 100; control n = 111, The study was conducted in five outpatient treatment-centres of a large network (De Sleutel in Belgium. Participants were people with multiple substance use disorder -abuse and dependence- who had asked for treatment and who had been advised to start individual treatment after a standardised admission assessment with the European Addiction Severity Index. The experimental condition consisted of informing the patient about the intervention and of subsequent assessments plus feedback following a protocol within the first seven sessions. Assessments were made with the Readiness to Change Questionnaire and the Personal Resources Diagnostic System. The control group received the usual treatment without within treatment assessment with feedback. The most important outcome measure in this analysis of the study was the level of adherence to treatment

  20. Study Protocol. IDUS -- Instrumental delivery & ultrasound. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of ultrasound assessment of the fetal head position versus standard care as an approach to prevent morbidity at instrumental delivery

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-09-13

    AbstractBackgroundInstrumental deliveries are commonly performed in the United Kingdom and Ireland, with rates of 12 – 17% in most centres. Knowing the exact position of the fetal head is a pre-requisite for safe instrumental delivery. Traditionally, diagnosis of the fetal head position is made on transvaginal digital examination by delineating the suture lines of the fetal skull and the fontanelles. However, the accuracy of transvaginal digital examination can be unreliable and varies between 20% and 75%. Failure to identify the correct fetal head position increases the likelihood of failed instrumental delivery with the additional morbidity of sequential use of instruments or second stage caesarean section. The use of ultrasound in determining the position of the fetal head has been explored but is not part of routine clinical practice.Methods\\/DesignA multi-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. The study will take place in two large maternity units in Ireland with a combined annual birth rate of 13,500 deliveries. It will involve 450 nulliparous women undergoing instrumental delivery after 37 weeks gestation. The main outcome measure will be incorrect diagnosis of the fetal head position. A study involving 450 women will have 80% power to detect a 10% difference in the incidence of inaccurate diagnosis of the fetal head position with two-sided 5% alpha.DiscussionIt is both important and timely to evaluate the use of ultrasound to diagnose the fetal head position prior to instrumental delivery before routine use can be advocated. The overall aim is to reduce the incidence of incorrect diagnosis of the fetal head position prior to instrumental delivery and improve the safety of instrumental deliveries.Trial registrationCurrent Controlled Trials ISRCTN72230496

  1. Effect of osteosynthesis, primary hemiarthroplasty, and non-surgical management for displaced four-part fractures of the proximal humerus in elderly: a multi-centre, randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Johannsen Hans; Jensen Steen; Frich Lars; Olsen Bo; Brorson Stig; Sørensen Anne; Hrobjartsson Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Fractures of the proximal humerus are common injuries and account for 4–5 percent of all fractures, second only to hip and wrist fractures. The incidence is positively correlated with age and osteoporosis, and is likely to increase. Displaced four-part fractures are among the most severe injuries, accounting for 2–10 percent of proximal humeral fractures. The optimal intervention is disputed. Two previous randomised trials were very small and involved a noticeable risk of ...

  2. How to improve walking, balance and social participation following stroke: a comparison of the long term effects of two walking aids--canes and an orthosis TheraTogs--on the recovery of gait following acute stroke. A study protocol for a multi-centre, single blind, randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguire Clare

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annually, some 9000 people in Switzerland suffer a first time stroke. Of these 60% are left with moderate to severe walking disability. Evidence shows that rehabilitation techniques which emphasise activity of the hemiplegic side increase ipsilesional cortical plasticity and improve functional outcomes. Canes are commonly used in gait rehabilitation although they significantly reduce hemiplegic muscle activity. We have shown that an orthosis "TheraTogs" (a corset with elasticated strapping significantly increases hemiplegic muscle activity during gait. The aim of the present study is to investigate the long term effects on the recovery of gait, balance and social participation of gait rehabilitation with TheraTogs compared to gait rehabilitation with a cane following first time acute stroke. Methods/Design Multi-centre, single blind, randomised trial with 120 patients after first stroke. When subjects have reached Functional Ambulation Category 3 they will be randomly allocated into TheraTogs or cane group. TheraTogs will be applied to support hip extensor and abductor musculature according to a standardised procedure. Cane walking held at the level of the radial styloid of the sound wrist. Subjects will walk throughout the day with only the assigned walking aid. Standard therapy treatments and usual care will remain unchanged and documented. The intervention will continue for five weeks or until patients have reached Functional Ambulation category 5. Outcome measures will be assessed the day before begin of intervention, the day after completion, 3 months, 6 months and 2 years. Primary outcome: Timed "up and go" test, secondary outcomes: peak surface EMG of gluteus maximus and gluteus medius, activation patterns of hemiplegic leg musculature, temporo-spatial gait parameters, hemiplegic hip kinematics in the frontal and sagittal planes, dynamic balance, daily activity measured by accelerometry, Stroke Impact Scale

  3. Study protocol. ECSSIT - Elective Caesarean Section Syntocinon Infusion Trial. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of oxytocin (Syntocinon) 5 IU bolus and placebo infusion versus oxytocin 5 IU bolus and 40 IU infusion for the control of blood loss at elective caesarean section.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Caesarean section is one of the most commonly performed major operations in women throughout the world. Rates are escalating, with studies from the United States of America, the United Kingdom, China and the Republic of Ireland reporting rates between 20% and 25%. Operative morbidity includes haemorrhage, anaemia, blood transfusion and in severe cases, maternal death. The value of routine oxytocics in the third stage of vaginal birth has been well established and it has been assumed that these benefits apply to caesarean delivery as well. A slow bolus dose of oxytocin is recommended following delivery of the baby at caesarean section. Some clinicians use an additional infusion of oxytocin for a further period following the procedure. Intravenous oxytocin has a very short half-life (4-10 minutes) therefore the potential advantage of an oxytocin infusion is that it maintains uterine contractility throughout the surgical procedure and immediate postpartum period, when most primary haemorrhages occur. The few trials to date addressing the optimal approach to preventing haemorrhage at caesarean section have been under-powered to evaluate clinically important outcomes. There has been no trial to date comparing the use of an intravenous slow bolus of oxytocin versus an oxytocin bolus and infusion. METHODS AND DESIGN: A multi-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. The study will take place in five large maternity units in Ireland with collaboration between academics and clinicians in the disciplines of obstetrics and anaesthetics. It will involve 2000 women undergoing elective caesarean section after 36 weeks gestation. The main outcome measure will be major haemorrhage (blood loss >1000 ml). A study involving 2000 women will have 80% power to detect a 36% relative change in the risk of major haemorrhage with two-sided 5% alpha. DISCUSSION: It is both important and timely that we evaluate the optimal approach to the management of the third stage at

  4. Study protocol. ECSSIT - Elective Caesarean Section Syntocinon Infusion Trial. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of oxytocin (Syntocinon) 5 IU bolus and placebo infusion versus oxytocin 5 IU bolus and 40 IU infusion for the control of blood loss at elective caesarean section.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caesarean section is one of the most commonly performed major operations in women throughout the world. Rates are escalating, with studies from the United States of America, the United Kingdom, China and the Republic of Ireland reporting rates between 20% and 25%. Operative morbidity includes haemorrhage, anaemia, blood transfusion and in severe cases, maternal death. The value of routine oxytocics in the third stage of vaginal birth has been well established and it has been assumed that these benefits apply to caesarean delivery as well. A slow bolus dose of oxytocin is recommended following delivery of the baby at caesarean section. Some clinicians use an additional infusion of oxytocin for a further period following the procedure. Intravenous oxytocin has a very short half-life (4-10 minutes) therefore the potential advantage of an oxytocin infusion is that it maintains uterine contractility throughout the surgical procedure and immediate postpartum period, when most primary haemorrhages occur. The few trials to date addressing the optimal approach to preventing haemorrhage at caesarean section have been under-powered to evaluate clinically important outcomes. There has been no trial to date comparing the use of an intravenous slow bolus of oxytocin versus an oxytocin bolus and infusion. METHODS AND DESIGN: A multi-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. The study will take place in five large maternity units in Ireland with collaboration between academics and clinicians in the disciplines of obstetrics and anaesthetics. It will involve 2000 women undergoing elective caesarean section after 36 weeks gestation. The main outcome measure will be major haemorrhage (blood loss >1000 ml). A study involving 2000 women will have 80% power to detect a 36% relative change in the risk of major haemorrhage with two-sided 5% alpha. DISCUSSION: It is both important and timely that we evaluate the optimal approach to the management of the third stage at

  5. Cadet lawyers applied professional training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey B. Mednikov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article studies balance of successive protective actions against armed criminals relative to general physical fitness, emotional stability and will activity, experimentally justifies possibility of protective actions effectiveness improvement by means of cadet lawyers volitional qualities development.

  6. Dosimetry audit for a multi-centre IMRT head and neck trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: PARSPORT was a multi-centre randomised trial in the UK which compared Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for patients with head and neck cancer. The dosimetry audit goals were to verify the plan delivery in participating centres, ascertain what tolerances were suitable for head and neck IMRT trials and develop an IMRT credentialing program. Materials and methods: Centres enrolling patients underwent rigorous quality assurance before joining the trial. Following this each centre was visited for a dosimetry audit, which consisted of treatment planning system tests, fluence verification films, combined field films and dose point measurements. Results: Mean dose point measurements were made at six centres. For the primary planning target volume (PTV) the differences with the planned values for the IMRT and CRT arms were -0.6% (1.8% to -2.4%) and 0.7% (2.0% to -0.9%), respectively. Ninety-four percent of the IMRT fluence films for individual fields passed gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm and 75% of the films for combined fields passed gamma criterion 4%/3 mm (no significant difference between dynamic delivery and step and shoot delivery). Conclusions: This audit suggests that a 3% tolerance could be applied for PTV point doses. For dose distributions tolerances of 3%/3 mm on individual fields and 4%/3 mm for combined fields are proposed for multi-centre head and neck IMRT trials.

  7. Authorship issues in multi-centre clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Vinther, Siri

    2015-01-01

    Discussions about authorship often arise in multi-centre clinical trials. Such trials may involve up to hundreds of contributors of whom some will eventually co-author the final publication. It is, however, often impossible to involve all contributors in the manuscript process sufficiently for them...... to qualify for authorship as defined by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Therefore, rules for authorship in multi-centre trials are strongly recommended. We propose two contracts to prevent conflicts regarding authorship; both are freely available for use without pay but with...

  8. SURF1 deficiency: a multi-centre natural history study

    OpenAIRE

    Wedatilake, Y; Brown, R; Mcfarland, R.; Yaplito-Lee, J.; Morris, A.A.; Champion, M; Jardine, P E; Clarke, A.; Thorburn, D R; Taylor, R. W.; Land, J M; Forrest, K.; Dobbie, A.; Simmons, L; Aasheim, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background SURF1 deficiency, a monogenic mitochondrial disorder, is the most frequent cause of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient Leigh syndrome (LS). We report the first natural history study of SURF1 deficiency. Methods We conducted a multi-centre case notes review of 44 SURF1-deficient patients from ten different UK centres and two Australian centres. Survival data for LRPPRC-deficient LS and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS patients were obtained from previous publications. The su...

  9. Does it matter if clinicians recruiting for a trial don't understand what the trial is really about? Qualitative study of surgeons' experiences of participation in a pragmatic multi-centre RCT

    OpenAIRE

    Snowdon Claire; Featherstone Katie; Ziebland Sue; Barker Karen; Frost Helen; Fairbank Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Qualitative methods are increasingly used to study the process of clinical trials and patients understanding of the rationale for trials, randomisation and reasons for taking part or refusing. Patients' understandings are inevitably influenced by the recruiting clinician's understanding of the trial, yet relatively little qualitative work has explored clinicians' perceptions and understandings of trials. This study interviewed surgeons shortly after the multi-centre, pragm...

  10. Acupuncture for persistent allergic rhinitis: a multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Kyung-Won; Shin Mi-Suk; Kim Ae-Ran; Zhao Jiping; Zhao Hong; Ko Jeong-Min; Lee Sanghoon; Choi Jun-Yong; Jung So-Young; Lee Myeong Soo; Kim Jong-In; Jung Hee-Jung; Kim Tae-Hun; Liu Baoyan; Choi Sun-Mi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common health complaints worldwide. Complementary and alternative medical approaches have been employed to relieve allergic rhinitis symptoms and to avoid the side effects of conventional medication. Acupuncture has been widely used to treat patients with allergic rhinitis, but the available evidence of its effectiveness is insufficient. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in patients in Korea and China with pe...

  11. Proposal for the standardisation of multi-centre trials in nuclear medicine imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickson, John Caddell; Tossici-Bolt, Livia; Sera, Terez;

    2012-01-01

    Multi-centre trials are an important part of proving the efficacy of procedures, drugs and interventions. Imaging components in such trials are becoming increasingly common; however, without sufficient control measures the usefulness of these data can be compromised. This paper describes a...... framework for performing high-quality multi-centre trials with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), using a pan-European initiative to acquire a normal control dopamine transporter brain scan database as an example....

  12. Sleep and predicted cognitive performance of new Cadets during Cadet Basic Training at the United States Military Academy

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Daniel B.

    2005-01-01

    The amount of sleep per day among new Cadets at West Point during Cadet Basic Training (CBT) was investigated. Sleep was measured using actigraphy. The results indicated that new Cadets slept an average of approximately 340 minutes or 5 hours, 40 minutes per night. The results were compared with survey data to determine whether or not reported sleep prior to arrival at West Point matched measured sleep at CBT. The findings indicate that the study population is sleep-deprived during CBT. ...

  13. Lisfranc Injury in a West Point Cadet

    OpenAIRE

    Diebal, Angela R.; Westrick, Richard B.; Alitz, Curtis; Gerber, J. Parry

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lisfranc joint injuries are fairly uncommon; however, few injuries hold such an elevated potential for devastating chronic secondary pain and disability. It is imperative when evaluating an injury to the ankle or foot to have a high clinical index of suspicion for Lisfranc injury, as physical examination findings are often subtle. Case Description: An 18-year-old military cadet reported to a direct-access sports physical therapy clinic with foot pain. Despite negative radiographic...

  14. Proposal for a prospective multi-centre audit of chronic subdural haematoma management in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Ian C; Kolias, Angelos G; Marcus, Hani J; Ahmed, Aminul I; Alli, Saira; Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Borg, Anouk; Cowie, Christopher J A; Hill, Ciaran S; Joannides, Alexis J; Jones, Timothy L; Kailaya-Vasan, Ahilan; Livermore, James L; Narayanamurthy, Harsha; Ngoga, Desire; Shapey, Jonathan; Tarnaris, Andrew; Gregson, Barbara A; Gray, William P; Nelson, Richard J; Hutchinson, Peter J; Brennan, Paul M

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND. Chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is a common condition that increases in incidence with rising age. Evacuation of a CSDH is one of the commonest neurosurgical procedures; however the optimal peri-operative management, surgical technique, post-operative care and the role of adjuvant therapies remain controversial. AIM. We propose a prospective multi-centre audit in order to establish current practices, outcomes and national benchmarks for future studies. METHODS. Neurosurgical units (NSU) in the United Kingdom and Ireland will be invited to enrol patients to this audit. All adult patients aged 16 years and over with a primary or recurrent CSDH will be eligible for inclusion. OUTCOME MEASURES AND ANALYSIS. The proposed outcome measures are (1) clinical recurrence requiring re-operation within 60 days; (2) modified Rankin scale (mRS) score at discharge from NSU; (3) morbidity and mortality in the NSU; (4) destination at discharge from NSU and (5) length of stay in the NSU. Audit standards have been derived from published systematic reviews and a recent randomised trial. The proposed standards are clinical recurrence rate Ireland. It will inform national guidelines, clinical practice and future studies in order to improve the outcome of patients with CSDH. PMID:24053314

  15. WHEDA study: Effectiveness of occupational therapy at home for older people with dementia and their caregivers - the design of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial evaluating a Dutch programme in seven German centres

    OpenAIRE

    Vernooij-Dassen Myrra; Schornstein Katrin; Leonhart Rainer; Graff Maud; Voigt-Radloff Sebastian; Olde-Rikkert Marcel; Huell Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A recent Dutch mono-centre randomised controlled trial has shown that occupational therapy improves daily functioning in dementia. The aim of this present study is to compare the effects of the Dutch community occupational therapy programme with a community occupational therapy consultation on daily functioning in older people with mild or moderate dementia and their primary caregivers in a German multi-centre context. Methods/Design A multi-centre single blind randomised ...

  16. Cadets and nursing students: same destination - different route

    OpenAIRE

    Draper, Janet; Watson, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Background. In response to the policy initiatives in England to secure recruitment and retention in the nursing and midwifery professions, strategies to improve and extend access to preregistration education and training in England have been developed. The relatively recent development of modern cadet schemes is an example of such a strategy. Despite the increasing interest in and proliferation of cadet schemes, there is as yet little evidence for their effectiveness. Reporting on an evaluati...

  17. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY) A PILOT MULTICENTRE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghert, M.; Bhandari, M.; Deheshi, B.; Guyatt, G.; Holt, G.; O'Shea, T.; Randall, R. L.; Thabane, L.; Wunder, J.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Turcotte, R.; Madden, K.; Scott, T.; Sprague, S.; Simunovic, N.; Swinton, M.; Racano, A.; Heels-Ansdell, D.; Buckingham, L.; Rose, P.; Brigman, B.; Pullenayegum, E.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; Mckay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Biljan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; St Yves, H.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, K.; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Chai, Y.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Bil-Jan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; Yves, H. St.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, Kristine; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Tran, N.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Geller, D.; Hoang, B.; Tingling, J.; Solorzano, C.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Puloski, S.; Monument, M.; Carcary, K.; Cameron, C.; Aboulafia, A.; Loo-Mis, M.; Bosley, J.; Bonvegna, R.; Kassa, M.; Damron, T.; Craig, T.; Reale, M.; Goodman, H. J.; Culbertson, M. Deza; Caruso, P.; Garling, E.; Schwab, J.; Fiore, A.; Phukan, R.; Park, C.; Joshi, L.; Aboulafia, A.; Wallace, M.; Flack, J.; Vaughan, K.; Avergas, A.; Brady, M.; Brown, S.; Schadie, N.; Battersby, R.; Weiss, K.; Goodman, M.; Heyl, A.; Yeschke, C. A.; Sumic, P.; Dudgeon, M.; Prosser, R.; Korenoski, C.; DiCaprio, M.; Palmer, B.; Cioppa, E.; Schaeffer, T. M.; Paul, P.; Toreson, J.; Cummings, J.; Schwartz, L.; Zahner, B.; Morris, C.; Laljani, V.; Mesko, N.; Joyce, M.; Lietman, S.; Wustrack, R.; O'Donnell, R.; Stevenson, C.; Carmody, E.; Tyler, W.; McIntyre, A.; Spiguel, A.; Scarborough, M.; Gibbs, C. P.; Steshyn, J.; Nunn, B.; Rosenthal, H.; Haynes, K.; Leddy, L.; Walton, Z.; Doung, Y-C.; Hayden, J.; Velez, R.; Aguirre, M.; Perez, M.; Barrera, S.; Garca Lopez, A.; Grimer, R.; Dunn, K.; Virdee, H.; Rankin, K.; Beckingsale, T.; Gerrand, C.; Campbell, I.; Allen, M.; Khan, S. Alam; Bakshi, S.; Rastogi, S.; Poudel, R.; Kumar, V. Sampath; Rai, A.; Baptista, A. M.; de Camargo, O. P.; Marais, L.; Rodseth, R.; Ferreira, N.; Rajah, C.; Gumede, S.; Gortzak, Y.; Sternheim, A.; Bickels, J.; Kolander, Y.; Lev, S.; Hettwer, W.; Petersen, M. M.; Grum-Schwensen, T.; Jutte, P.; Ploegmakers, J. J. W.; Stevens, M.; Mahendra, A.; Gupta, S.; Bergovec, M.; Leithner, A.; Funovics, P.; Dijkstra, P. D. S.; Van De Sande, M.; Hoogenstraaten, A.; Leijerzapf, N.; Steadman, P.; Steadman, P.; Boffano, M.; Piana, R.; Marone, S.; Albertini, U.; Boux, E.; Maiello, A.; Repsa, L.; Zile, S.; Aston, W.; Pollock, R.; Cool, P.; Gibbons, M.; Whit-Well, D.; Cosker, T.; Hemingway, J.; Porter, D.; Patton, S.; Navia, J.; Betancur, A. F.; Laitenen, M.; Pakarinen, K.; Nieminen, J.; Yla-Mononen, S.; Rautiainen, S.; Fiorenza, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies of patients with bone sarcomas have been challenged by insufficient numbers at individual centres to draw valid conclusions. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a definitive multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine whether a five-da

  18. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME) therapy following stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes Emma; Cusack Tara; Galvin Rose

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patient...

  19. Obstetric risk indicators for labour dystocia in nulliparous women: a multi-centre cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, H.; Olsen, J.; Ottesen, Bent Smedegaard;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In nulliparous women dystocia is the most common obstetric problem and its etiology is largely unknown. The frequency of augmentation and cesarean delivery related to dystocia is high although it is not clear if a slow progress justifies the interventions. Studies of risk factors for...... dystocia often do not provide diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to identify obstetric and clinical risk indicators of dystocia defined by strict and explicit criteria. METHODS: A multi-centre population based cohort study with prospectively collected data from 2810...

  20. Harmonization process and reliability assessment of anthropometric measurements in the elderly EXERNET multi-centre study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Gómez-Cabello

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elderly EXERNET multi-centre study aims to collect normative anthropometric data for old functionally independent adults living in Spain. PURPOSE: To describe the standardization process and reliability of the anthropometric measurements carried out in the pilot study and during the final workshop, examining both intra- and inter-rater errors for measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 98 elderly from five different regions participated in the intra-rater error assessment, and 10 different seniors living in the city of Toledo (Spain participated in the inter-rater assessment. We examined both intra- and inter-rater errors for heights and circumferences. RESULTS: For height, intra-rater technical errors of measurement (TEMs were smaller than 0.25 cm. For circumferences and knee height, TEMs were smaller than 1 cm, except for waist circumference in the city of Cáceres. Reliability for heights and circumferences was greater than 98% in all cases. Inter-rater TEMs were 0.61 cm for height, 0.75 cm for knee-height and ranged between 2.70 and 3.09 cm for the circumferences measured. Inter-rater reliabilities for anthropometric measurements were always higher than 90%. CONCLUSION: The harmonization process, including the workshop and pilot study, guarantee the quality of the anthropometric measurements in the elderly EXERNET multi-centre study. High reliability and low TEM may be expected when assessing anthropometry in elderly population.

  1. Design of Lamifuse : a randomised, multi-centre controlled trial comparing laminectomy without or with dorsal fusion for cervical myeloradiculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: laminectomy is a valuable surgical treatment for some patients with a cervical radiculomyelopathy due to cervical spinal stenosis. More recently attention has been given to motion of the spinal cord over spondylotic spurs as a cause of myelopathic changes. Immobilisation by fusion could

  2. Open randomised prospective comparative multi-centre intervention study of patients with cystic fibrosis and early diagnosed diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Ballmann, Manfred; Hubert, Dominique; Assael, Barouk M; Kronfeld, Kai; Honer, Marguerite; Holl, Reinhard W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus may be present in patients with cystic fibrosis starting in the second decade of life. The prevalence increases rapidly with increasing age. As life-expectancy increases in cystic fibrosis, cystic fibrosis related diabetes will be diagnosed more frequently in the future. Up to date, no data are available to answer the question if cystic fibrosis related diabetes should always initially be treated by insulin therapy. Missing data regarding oral antidiabetic treatme...

  3. Advance care planning – a multi-centre cluster randomised clinical trial: the research protocol of the ACTION study

    OpenAIRE

    Rietjens, Judith; Dunleavy, Lesley Jane; Preston, Nancy Jean; Payne, Sheila Alison

    2016-01-01

    Background Awareness of preferences regarding medical care should be a central component of the care of patients with advanced cancer. Open communication can facilitate this but can occur in an ad hoc or variable manner. Advance care planning (ACP) is a formalized process of communication between patients, relatives and professional caregivers about patients’ values and care preferences. It raises awareness of the need to anticipate possible future deterioration of health. ACP has the potenti...

  4. Advance care planning - a multi-centre cluster randomised clinical trial: the research protocol of the ACTION study

    OpenAIRE

    Rietjens, Judith AC; Korfage, Ida J.; Dunleavy, Lesley; Preston, Nancy J.; Jabbarian, Lea J.; Christensen, Caroline Arnfeldt; de Brito, Maja; Bulli, Francesco; Caswell, Glenys; Červ, Branka; Delden, Johannes; Deliens, Luc; Gorini, Giuseppe; Groenvold, Mogens; Houttekier, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awareness of preferences regarding medical care should be a central component of the care of patients with advanced cancer. Open communication can facilitate this but can occur in an ad hoc or variable manner. Advance care planning (ACP) is a formalized process of communication between patients, relatives and professional caregivers about patients' values and care preferences. It raises awareness of the need to anticipate possible future deterioration of health. ACP has the potent...

  5. Cadets' Perceptions of Gymnastics Instruction for Officer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Jeffrey D.; Fielitz, Lynn R.

    2006-01-01

    The United States Military Academy has offered gymnastics instruction since 1838. Gymnastics continues to be an integral component of the physical education curriculum. The purpose of this study was to investigate cadets' perceptions of their experiences in a required gymnastics course using the critical incident technique. Students described…

  6. Maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST for dementia: A single-blind, multi-centre, randomized controlled trial of Maintenance CST vs. CST for dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Robert T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological treatments for dementia are widely used in the UK and internationally, but only rarely have they been standardised, adequately evaluated or systematically implemented. There is increasing recognition that psychosocial interventions may have similar levels of effectiveness to medication, and both can be used in combination. Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST is a 7-week cognitive-based approach for dementia that has been shown to be beneficial for cognition and quality of life and is cost-effective, but there is less conclusive evidence for the effects of CST over an extended period. Methods/Design This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Maintenance CST groups for dementia compares a intervention group who receive CST for 7 weeks followed by the Maintenance CST programme once a week for 24 weeks with the control group who receive CST for 7 weeks, followed by treatment as usual for 24 weeks. The primary outcome measures are quality of life of people with dementia assessed by the QoL-AD and cognition assessed by the ADAS-Cog. Secondary outcomes include the person with dementia's mood, behaviour, activities of daily living, ability to communicate and costs; as well as caregiver health-related quality of life. Using a 5% significance level, comparison of 230 participants will yield 80% power to detect a standardised difference of 0.39 on the ADAS-Cog between the groups. The trial includes a cost-effectiveness analysis from a public sector perspective. Discussion A pilot study of longer-term Maintenance CST, offering 16 weekly sessions of maintenance following the initial CST programme, previously found a significant improvement in cognitive function (MMSE for those on the intervention group. The study identified the need for a large-scale, multi-centre RCT to define the potential longer-term benefits of continuing the therapy. This study aims

  7. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its non-invasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective ''CORE-64'' trial (''Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors''). This multi-centre trial was unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. (orig.)

  8. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Julie M.; Vavere, Andrea L.; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Bush, David E.; Lardo, Albert C.; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Lima, Joao A.C. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet und Freie Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin, PO Box 10098 (Germany); Rochitte, Carlos E.; Lemos, Pedro A. [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Heart Institute (InCor), Sao Paulo (Brazil); Niinuma, Hiroyuki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Morioka (Japan); Paul, Narinder [Toronto General Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Hoe, John [Medi-Rad Associates Ltd, CT Centre, Mt Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore (Singapore); Roos, Albert de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Yoshioka, Kunihiro [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Morioka (Japan); Cox, Christopher [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Clouse, Melvin E. [Harvard University, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its non-invasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective ''CORE-64'' trial (''Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors''). This multi-centre trial was unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. (orig.)

  9. EXAMINATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SELF-COMPASSION AND AWARENESS IN INTERPERSONAL RELATION OF POLICE CADETS

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhi YİĞİT

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Main objective of this study is to reveal relationship between levels of awareness of police cadets in terms of interpersonal relations and their self-compassion .Research data has been obtained by using self-insight scale and scale of awareness in interpersonal relations. Research has been made in accordance with general scanning model. Research group consists of police cadets studying in police vocational high school located in Ereğli town of Konya.249 police cadets chosen by ...

  10. Obstetric risk indicators for labour dystocia in nulliparous women: A multi-centre cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottesen Bent

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nulliparous women dystocia is the most common obstetric problem and its etiology is largely unknown. The frequency of augmentation and cesarean delivery related to dystocia is high although it is not clear if a slow progress justifies the interventions. Studies of risk factors for dystocia often do not provide diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to identify obstetric and clinical risk indicators of dystocia defined by strict and explicit criteria. Methods A multi-centre population based cohort study with prospectively collected data from 2810 nulliparous women in term spontaneous labour with a singleton infant in cephalic presentation. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires and clinical data-records. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate adjusted Odds Ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI are given. Results The following characteristics, present at admission to hospital, were associated with dystocia during labour (OR, 95% CI: dilatation of cervix Conclusion Vaginal examinations at admission provide useful information on risk indicators for dystocia. The strongest risk indicator was use of epidural analgesia and if part of that is causal, it is of concern.

  11. INA-RESPOND: a multi-centre clinical research network in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyana, Muhammad; Kosasih, Herman; Samaan, Gina; Tjitra, Emiliana; Aman, Abu Tholib; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Fatmawati; Gasem, M Hussein; Arif, Mansyur; Sudarmono, Pratiwi; Suharto; Merati, Tuti P; Lane, Clifford; Siswanto; Siddiqui, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Nationally representative observational and translational research is needed to address the public health challenges in Indonesia due to the geographic disparity, recently decentralized health system, and diverse infectious disease priorities. To accomplish this, the Indonesian Ministry of Health in collaboration with the US National Institute of Health has established INA-RESPOND (Indonesia Research Partnership on Infectious Disease) - a clinical research network comprising 9 referral hospitals, 7 medical faculties, and 2 research centres across Indonesia. The network provides a forum to conduct research at a national scale and to address scientific questions that would be difficult to address in smaller research settings. Further, it is currently conducting multi-centre research on the etiologies of fever, sepsis, and tuberculosis. There are opportunities to leverage existing network resources for other public health research needs. INA-RESPOND is an Indonesian-led network in a country with diverse population groups and public health needs which is poised to collaborate with researchers, universities, donors, and industry worldwide. This paper describes the network and its goals and values, as well as the management structure, process for collaboration, and future vision. PMID:26219280

  12. Reappraisal of known malaria resistance loci in a large multi-centre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Kirk A.; Clarke, Geraldine M.; Fitzpatrick, Kathryn; Hubbart, Christina; Jeffreys, Anna E.; Rowlands, Kate; Craik, Rachel; Jallow, Muminatou; Conway, David J.; Bojang, Kalifa A.; Pinder, Margaret; Usen, Stanley; Sisay-Joof, Fatoumatta; Sirugo, Giorgio; Toure, Ousmane; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Konate, Salimata; Sissoko, Sibiry; Niangaly, Amadou; Poudiougou, Belco; Mangano, Valentina D.; Bougouma, Edith C.; Sirima, Sodiomon B.; Modiano, David; Amenga-Etego, Lucas N.; Ghansah, Anita; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Wilson, Michael D.; Enimil, Anthony; Evans, Jennifer; Amodu, Olukemi; Olaniyan, Subulade; Apinjoh, Tobias; Mugri, Regina; Ndi, Andre; Ndila, Carolyne M.; Uyoga, Sophie; Macharia, Alexander; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Riley, Eleanor; Drakeley, Chris; Reyburn, Hugh; Nyirongo, Vysaul; Kachala, David; Molyneux, Malcolm; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Ngoc Quyen, Nguyen Thi; Thai, Cao Quang; Hien, Tran Tinh; Manning, Laurens; Laman, Moses; Siba, Peter; Karunajeewa, Harin; Allen, Steve; Allen, Angela; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Michon, Pascal; Mueller, Ivo; Green, Angie; Molloy, Sile; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Kerasidou, Angeliki; Cornelius, Victoria; Hart, Lee; Vanderwal, Aaron; SanJoaquin, Miguel; Band, Gavin; Le, Si Quang; Pirinen, Matti; Sepúlveda, Nuno; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Clark, Taane G.; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Achidi, Eric; Doumbo, Ogobara; Farrar, Jeremy; Marsh, Kevin; Taylor, Terrie; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2015-01-01

    Many human genetic associations with resistance to malaria have been reported but few have been reliably replicated. We collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum and 17,441 controls from 12 locations in Africa, Asia and Oceania. There was strong evidence of association with the HBB, ABO, ATP2B4, G6PD and CD40LG loci but previously reported associations at 22 other loci did not replicate in the multi-centre analysis. The large sample size made it possible to identify authentic genetic effects that are heterogeneous across populations or phenotypes, a striking example being the main African form of G6PD deficiency, which reduced the risk of cerebral malaria but increased the risk of severe malarial anaemia. The finding that G6PD deficiency has opposing effects on different fatal complications of P. falciparum infection indicates that the evolutionary origins of this common human genetic disorder are more complex than previously supposed. PMID:25261933

  13. Current management of intracerebral haemorrhage in China: a national, multi-centre, hospital register study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeley Emma L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to examine current practice of the management and secondary prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH in China where the disease is more common than in Western populations. Methods Data on baseline characteristics, management in-hospital and post-stroke, and outcome of ICH patients are from the ChinaQUEST (QUality Evaluation of Stroke Care and Treatment study, a multi-centre, prospective, 62 hospital registry in China during 2006-07. Results Nearly all ICH patients (n = 1572 received an intravenous haemodiluting agent such as mannitol (96% or a neuroprotectant (72%, and there was high use of intravenous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM (42%. Neurosurgery was undertaken in 137 (9% patients; being overweight, having a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score on admission, and Total Anterior Circulation Syndrome (TACS clinical pattern on admission, were the only baseline factors associated with this intervention in multivariate analyses. Neurosurgery was associated with nearly three times higher risk of death/disability at 3 months post-stroke (odd ratio [OR] 2.60, p Conclusions The management of ICH in China is characterised by high rates of use of intravenous haemodiluting agents, neuroprotectants, and TCM, and of antihypertensives for secondary prevention. The controversial efficacy of these therapies, coupled with the current lack of treatments of proven benefit, is a call for action for more outcomes based research in ICH.

  14. QA of conformal radiotherapy for multi-centre radiotherapy trials in Australasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precision available in dose delivery in radiotherapy allows patient doses to be prescribed and delivered very accurately. Increasingly, the dose prescription is based on data extracted from multi-centre clinical trials. The optimal prescription extracted from trial data will be blurred by any inconsistencies in treatment delivery across all patients across all treating centres participating in the trial. These inconsistencies, together with treatment errors, will reduce the dose effect being observed in the clinical trial. Inconsistencies in treatment delivery in a multi-centre trial can arise from a variety of sources including errors in protocol interpretation, protocol violations, variation in radiographic, treatment planning and irradiation techniques, treatment delivery errors and variations in the reporting of dose delivery. One way to overcome and/or quantify inconsistencies in a radiotherapy clinical trial is to undertake quality assurance (QA) procedures aimed at identifying errors. Programmes for undertaking such QA have been developed by international collaborative trials dosimetry groups, e.g. EQUAL (Europe) and RPC (USA). A method of quantifying treatment inconsistencies in Australasia using an anthropomorphic phantom was trialed for specific rectal and prostate radiotherapy trials, with design of the phantom and study protocol based on a set of recommendations from a previous study. Treatment of this phantom at multiple Australasian sites was undertaken, involving collection of digital and physical dosimetric information for evaluation of multiple steps of the treatment process. Specifically, the study involved determining the variation across participating centres of: Absolute linear accelerator output; Quality of radiography for treatment planning; Treatment planning techniques including outlining of structures; Treatment delivery strategies; Calculation of dose-volume parameters; Assessment of patient setup at treatment; Final treatment

  15. Gender Differences in Neuropsychological Performance across Psychotic Disorders – a Multi-Centre Population Based Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zanelli, Jolanta; Morgan, Kevin; Dazzan, Paola; Morgan, Craig; Russo, Manuela; Pilecka, Izabela; Fearon, Paul; Demjaha, Arsime; Doody, Gill A.; Jones, Peter B.; Murray, Robin M; Reichenberg, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with schizophrenia and other psychoses exhibit a wide range of neuropsychological deficits. An unresolved question concerns whether there are gender differences in cognitive performance. Methods Data were derived from a multi-centre population based case-control study of patients with first-episode psychosis. A neuropsychological test battery was administered to patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (N=70, 36% females), bipolar/mania (N=34,...

  16. Multi-centre evaluation of the speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay for differentiation of Mycobacterium spp. in clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann-Thiel Sabine; Turaev Laziz; Alnour Tarig; Drath Lore; Müllerova Maria; Hoffmann Harald

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background A new DNA line probe assay (Speed-oligo Mycobacteria, Vircell) has been launched for rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium spp. from cultures. Compared to other line-probe assays, Speed-oligo Mycobacteria covers a relatively limited spectrum of species but uses a simpler and faster dip-stick technique. The present multi-centre, multi-country study aimed at evaluating the utility and usability of Speed-oligo Mycobacteria in routine mycobacteriology diagnostics. Results fro...

  17. Development of a Multi-Centre Clinical Trial Data Archiving and Analysis Platform for Functional Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide clinicians and researchers participating in multi-centre clinical trials with a central repository for large volume dynamic imaging data as well as a set of tools for providing end-to-end testing and image analysis standards of practice. Methods: There are three main pieces to the data archiving and analysis system; the PACS server, the data analysis computer(s) and the high-speed networks that connect them. Each clinical trial is anonymized using a customizable anonymizer and is stored on a PACS only accessible by AE title access control. The remote analysis station consists of a single virtual machine per trial running on a powerful PC supporting multiple simultaneous instances. Imaging data management and analysis is performed within ClearCanvas Workstation® using custom designed plug-ins for kinetic modelling (The DCE-Tool®), quality assurance (The DCE-QA Tool) and RECIST. Results: A framework has been set up currently serving seven clinical trials spanning five hospitals with three more trials to be added over the next six months. After initial rapid image transfer (+ 2 MB/s), all data analysis is done server side making it robust and rapid. This has provided the ability to perform computationally expensive operations such as voxel-wise kinetic modelling on very large data archives (+20 GB/50k images/patient) remotely with minimal end-user hardware. Conclusions: This system is currently in its proof of concept stage but has been used successfully to send and analyze data from remote hospitals. Next steps will involve scaling up the system with a more powerful PACS and multiple high powered analysis machines as well as adding real-time review capabilities.

  18. Erythropoietin in traumatic brain injury: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nichol, Alistair

    2015-02-08

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Laboratory and clinical studies demonstrate a possible beneficial effect of erythropoietin in improving outcomes in the traumatic brain injury cohort. However, there are concerns regarding the association of erythropoietin and thrombosis in the critically ill. A large-scale, multi-centre, blinded, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, randomised trial is currently underway to address this hypothesis.

  19. Evaluating Cadet Leadership Positions at the U.S. Air Force Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force relies on effective leadership to complete its mission. The U.S. Air Force Academy exists to develop leaders of character for the Air Force through a four-year program. Part of this program involves cadets participating in leadership positions. By exploring nine types of cadet leadership positions, this dissertation aims to…

  20. The Impact of a Visual Imagery Intervention on Army ROTC Cadets' Marksmanship Performance and Flow Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakes, Edward Lee

    2012-01-01

    This investigation used an experimental design to examine how a visual imagery intervention and two levels of challenge would affect the flow experiences and performance of cadets engaged in Army ROTC marksmanship training. I employed MANCOVA analyses, with gender and prior marksmanship training experience as covariates, to assess cadets' (n =…

  1. 46 CFR 12.25-25 - Members of Merchant Marine Cadet Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Members of Merchant Marine Cadet Corps. 12.25-25 Section 12.25-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN... Member of the Engine Department § 12.25-25 Members of Merchant Marine Cadet Corps. No ratings other...

  2. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Greg Baker named Miami game Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Capt. Greg Baker, U.S. Army, who earned a degree in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences and a minor in leadership studies from the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Rice Center for Leader Development in 2004 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus University of Miami game.

  3. Deployed Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumni named Chick-fil-a Bowl game Hokie Heroes

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumni Capt. Gary Grassi, United States Army, who earned a degree in biology from the College of Science and the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets' minor in leadership studies in 2004 and Capt. Andrew Shadley, United States Army, who earned degrees in history and classical studies from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences and the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets' minor in leadership studies in 2006 have been selected as the Hokie Heroes for the Virginia Tech v...

  4. Commercial weight loss diets meet nutrient requirements in free living adults over 8 weeks: A randomised controlled weight loss trial

    OpenAIRE

    Macdonald Ian; Robson Paula J; Baic Susan; Fox Kenneth R; deLooy Anne; Stanley Manana; Herriot Anne M; Hiscutt Rebecca; Truby Helen; Taylor Moira A; Ware Robert; Logan Catherine; Livingstone MBE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate the effect of commercial weight loss programmes on macronutrient composition and micronutrient adequacy over a 2 month period. Design Adults were randomly allocated to follow the Slim Fast Plan, Weight Watchers Pure Points Programme, Dr Atkins' New Diet Revolution, or Rosemary Conley's "Eat Yourself Slim" Diet & Fitness Plan. Setting A multi-centre randomised controlled trial. Subjects 293 adults, mean age 40.3 years and a mean BMI 31.7 (range 27–38) were all...

  5. Cost-effectiveness of adherence therapy versus health education for people with schizophrenia: randomised controlled trial in four European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Anita; McCRONE, PAUL; Leese, Morven; Amaddeo, Francesco; Tansella, Michele; Kilian, Reinhold; Angermeyer, Matthias; Kikkert, Martijn; SCHENE, AART; Knapp, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to anti-psychotics is common, expensive and affects recovery. We therefore examine the cost-effectiveness of adherence therapy for people with schizophrenia by multi-centre randomised trial in Amsterdam, London, Leipzig and Verona. Methods Participants received 8 sessions of adherence therapy or health education. We measured lost productivity and use of health/social care, criminal justice system and informal care at baseline and one year to estimate and compare mean ...

  6. Cardiac phantom measurement validating the methodology for a cardiac multi-centre trial with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Maes, Alex [Nuclear Medicine, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van de Werf, Frans [Cardiology, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Djian, Jacques [Wyeth Research, Paris la Defense Cedex (France); Sambuceti, Gianmario [Instituto di Fisiologia Clinica CNR, Pisa (Italy); Schwaiger, Marcus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, TU Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Touboul, Paul [Hopital Cardio-Vasculaire et Pneumologique, Lyon (France)

    2002-12-01

    In an ongoing international multi-centre trial, positron emission tomography (PET) is being used to evaluate the effect of a new P-selectin antagonist on the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated with thrombolysis. Although it is possible to correct for site-dependent factors, it is desirable to reduce these factors to a minimum. Therefore, acquisition and reconstruction protocols have been defined that can be closely followed by all participating centres. The resulting reconstructed images are transferred to the core centre for central processing with semi-automatic software. This paper reports on the multi-centre phantom experiment that was carried out to assess the inter-centre reproducibility of defect size determination with this protocol. Also, the spatial resolution of the short axis slices was examined. In addition, the analysis procedure was applied to normal PET studies to evaluate the specificity of perfusion defect detection. The transmural cold defect in the phantom occupied 14.8% of the left ventricular area. The automated analysis was applied to the phantom measurements from the 14 participating PET cameras. It yielded an accurate estimate of 15.1% with a standard deviation of 0.6%, indicating excellent reproducibility. The spatial resolution in the short axis slices was similar for all PET systems: 9.6{+-}0.8 mm. The same procedure produced a defect size of zero in the studies of normal volunteers. This study indicates that cardiac studies from multiple PET systems can be pooled for statistical analysis. (orig.)

  7. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Timothy Dillera named Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Corps of Cadets alumnus Capt. Timothy Dillera, United States Air Force, who received a degree in chemistry from the College of Science in 2003 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus Boston College football game.

  8. To the Issue on the History of the Cadet Corps in Tiflis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamuka Gogitidze

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the issue of organizing in Tiflis the cadet corps. The Tiflis cadet corps was founded in 1882 year on the basis of the military school that existed in Tbilisi since 1875 year. In 1827, the officers and officials who served in the Caucasus, presented a petition to Nicholas I on the establishment in the city of Tiflis cadet corps in 150 children. The authors note that a serious problem to a certain extent, affect the quality of teaching cadets, the housing problem. Housing in Tiflis at that time very little was built. It was very difficult to find an apartment in the city on the take-out money for these purposes. The only solution to this problem was to increase salaries to pay for housing. This was done by Layminga recommendations.

  9. CHANGES IN PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CADET WRESTLERS FOLLOWING A 4-WEEK GENERAL PREPARATION PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Mirzaei

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in physiological parameters in cadet wrestlers following a 4-week general preparation phase of training. The physiological parameters included cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance, speed, agility, flexibility, anaerobic power and body composition. In experiment took part 15 cadet wrestles at the age of 15 years. The testing was conducted twice, before and after the 4-week training period.

  10. Validity of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis to Estimation Fat-Free Mass in the Army Cadets

    OpenAIRE

    Langer, Raquel D.; Borges, Juliano H.; Pascoa, Mauro A.; Cirolini, Vagner X.; Gil Guerra-Júnior; Ezequiel M. Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) is a fast, practical, non-invasive, and frequently used method for fat-free mass (FFM) estimation. The aims of this study were to validate predictive equations of BIA to FFM estimation in Army cadets and to develop and validate a specific BIA equation for this population. Methods: A total of 396 males, Brazilian Army cadets, aged 17–24 years were included. The study used eight published predictive BIA equations, a specific equation in FFM est...

  11. Changes of general fitness and muscle properties following police cadet training

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Hallbourg, Keith W.; Collins, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine the relationship between physical performance and muscle properties during police cadet training. The study’s hypothesis was that improved physical performance brought about by training, would in turn cause a reduction in muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-nine police cadets were included in this study. Standard fitness tests and quantitative assessments of muscular biomechanical properties were conducted before, during and after the...

  12. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Matthew Van Arsdale named Virginia game Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus 2nd Lt. Matthew Van Arsdale, U.S. Army, who earned a degree in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences and a minor in leadership studies from the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets Rice Center for Leader Development in 2009 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus University of Virginia game.

  13. Mass sports of students and cadets which server military contract in positions of officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Bondar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: study of features of organization of mass sports of students and cadets which server military contract in positions of officers. Material and Methods: analysis of literary sources and documents, analysis of the systems, questioning (questionnaire, methods of the mathematical processing of data. In a questionnaire 97 respondents – 29 cadets of a 5 course and 68 students of 4 courses of military-legal faculty of the Yaroslav Mudryi National law university. Results: 69% cadets and only 35% students are engaged in the different types of motive activity in free time, here 48% cadets and 43% students elect the playing types of sport (football, volley-ball, basket-ball, 65,5% cadets and 48,5% students go in for sports for self-perfection and self-realization, here 45% cadets and 32% students plan necessarily to prolong to be engaged in the select type of sport upon termination of studies in higher educational establishment. Conclusions: the Study 4th Year Students And Students Of The 5th Year Of Military Faculty Of Law Has Shown That The Students Serious About Their Chosen Profession And Understand The Importance Of Physical Fitness In A Future Service, They Are Able To Objectively Assess The Level Of Their Physical Readiness And Are Ready For Further Self-Improvement

  14. ZOOM or Non-ZOOM? Assessing Spinal Cord Diffusion Tensor Imaging Protocols for Multi-Centre Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Rebecca S.; Lévy, Simon; Schneider, Torben; Smith, Alex K.; Smith, Seth A.; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate two spinal cord (SC) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) protocols, implemented at multiple sites (using scanners from two different manufacturers), one available on any clinical scanner, and one using more advanced options currently available in the research setting, and to use an automated processing method for unbiased quantification. DTI parameters are sensitive to changes in the diseased SC. However, imaging the cord can be technically challenging due to various factors including its small size, patient-related and physiological motion, and field inhomogeneities. Rapid acquisition sequences such as Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) are desirable but may suffer from image distortions. We present a multi-centre comparison of two acquisition protocols implemented on scanners from two different vendors (Siemens and Philips), one using a reduced field-of-view (rFOV) EPI sequence, and one only using options available on standard clinical scanners such as outer volume suppression (OVS). Automatic analysis was performed with the Spinal Cord Toolbox for unbiased and reproducible quantification of DTI metrics in the white matter. Images acquired using the rFOV sequence appear less distorted than those acquired using OVS alone. SC DTI parameter values obtained using both sequences at all sites were consistent with previous measurements made at 3T. For the same scanner manufacturer, DTI parameter inter-site SDs were smaller for the rFOV sequence compared to the OVS sequence. The higher inter-site reproducibility (for the same manufacturer and acquisition details, i.e. ZOOM data acquired at the two Philips sites) of rFOV compared to the OVS sequence supports the idea that making research options such as rFOV more widely available would improve accuracy of measurements obtained in multi-centre clinical trials. Future multi-centre studies should also aim to match the rFOV technique and signal-to-noise ratios in all sequences from

  15. Does it matter if clinicians recruiting for a trial don't understand what the trial is really about? Qualitative study of surgeons' experiences of participation in a pragmatic multi-centre RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snowdon Claire

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Qualitative methods are increasingly used to study the process of clinical trials and patients understanding of the rationale for trials, randomisation and reasons for taking part or refusing. Patients' understandings are inevitably influenced by the recruiting clinician's understanding of the trial, yet relatively little qualitative work has explored clinicians' perceptions and understandings of trials. This study interviewed surgeons shortly after the multi-centre, pragmatic RCT in which they had participated had been completed. Methods We used in-depth interviews with surgeons who participated in the Spine Stabilisation Trial (a pragmatic RCT to explore their understanding of the trial purpose and how this understanding had influenced their recruitment procedures and interpretation of the results. A purposive sample of eleven participating surgeons was chosen from 8 of the 15 UK trial centres. Results Although the surgeons thought that the trial was addressing an important question there was little agreement about what this question was: although it was a trial of 'equivalent' treatments, some thought that it was a trial of surgery, others a trial of rehabilitation and others that it was exploring what to do with patients in whom all other treatment options had been unsuccessful. The surgeons we interviewed were not aware of the rationale for the pragmatic inclusion criteria and nearly all were completely baffled about the meaning of 'equipoise'. Misunderstandings about the entry criteria were an important source of confusion about the results and led to reluctance to apply the results to their own practice. Conclusion The study suggests several lessons for the conduct of future multi-centre trials. Recruiting surgeons (and other clinicians may not be familiar with the rationale for pragmatic designs and may need to be regularly reminded about the purpose during the study. Reassurance may be necessary that a pragmatic

  16. The Department of Health's research governance framework remains an impediment to multi-centre studies:findings from a national descriptive study

    OpenAIRE

    Kielmann, Tara; Tierney, Alison; Porteous, Rosemary; Huby, Guro; Sheikh, Aziz; Pinnock, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    Objective We describe our experience of using the standard application form, designed to streamline applications for multi-centre research, to seek approval from all primary care organizations (PCOs) in England and Wales to undertake a single telephone interview with a health service manager.

  17. Changes of general fitness and muscle properties following police cadet training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Hallbourg, Keith W; Collins, Sean M

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine the relationship between physical performance and muscle properties during police cadet training. The study's hypothesis was that improved physical performance brought about by training, would in turn cause a reduction in muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-nine police cadets were included in this study. Standard fitness tests and quantitative assessments of muscular biomechanical properties were conducted before, during and after the 20-week cadet training. [Results] General fitness had improved at the end of the police cadet training. There was no significant decrease in muscle flexibility as measured by the Sit-and-Reach test. However, muscle compliance of the non-dominant leg measured by the relaxation coefficient had decreased at the end of the police cadet training. [Conclusion] The increased sit-and-reach distance could be due in part to strengthening of the abdominal muscles. On the other hand, the biomechanical test, which was specific to muscle extensibility, showed a reduction in the relaxation coefficient of the non-dominant leg. Our data suggests that changes in muscle compliance as a result of lower extremity training should be considered. This data may be useful in the design of a training protocol that prevents the potential injuries caused by reduced muscle flexibility. PMID:26504293

  18. Smart Warriors: A Rationale for Educating Air Force Academy Cadets in the History of Science, Technology, and Warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astore, William J.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies enhancing the judgments of cadets through education at a military institution like the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) as a crucial pedagogical issue facing instructors of History of Science and Technology (HST). Discusses the experience of helping cadets to meet such challenges in learning HST in the context of professional…

  19. Effectiveness of a nurse-led case management home care model in Primary Health Care. A quasi-experimental, controlled, multi-centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morilla-Herrera JC

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demand for home care services has increased considerably, along with the growing complexity of cases and variability among resources and providers. Designing services that guarantee co-ordination and integration for providers and levels of care is of paramount importance. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a new case-management based, home care delivery model which has been implemented in Andalusia (Spain. Methods Quasi-experimental, controlled, non-randomised, multi-centre study on the population receiving home care services comparing the outcomes of the new model, which included nurse-led case management, versus the conventional one. Primary endpoints: functional status, satisfaction and use of healthcare resources. Secondary endpoints: recruitment and caregiver burden, mortality, institutionalisation, quality of life and family function. Analyses were performed at base-line, and at two, six and twelve months. A bivariate analysis was conducted with the Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney's U, and the chi squared test. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests were performed to compare survival and institutionalisation. A multivariate analysis was performed to pinpoint factors that impact on improvement of functional ability. Results Base-line differences in functional capacity – significantly lower in the intervention group (RR: 1.52 95%CI: 1.05–2.21; p = 0.0016 – disappeared at six months (RR: 1.31 95%CI: 0.87–1.98; p = 0.178. At six months, caregiver burden showed a slight reduction in the intervention group, whereas it increased notably in the control group (base-line Zarit Test: 57.06 95%CI: 54.77–59.34 vs. 60.50 95%CI: 53.63–67.37; p = 0.264, (Zarit Test at six months: 53.79 95%CI: 49.67–57.92 vs. 66.26 95%CI: 60.66–71.86 p = 0.002. Patients in the intervention group received more physiotherapy (7.92 CI95%: 5.22–10.62 vs. 3.24 95%CI: 1.37–5.310; p = 0.0001 and, on average, required fewer

  20. Effectiveness of a nurse-led case management home care model in Primary Health Care. A quasi-experimental, controlled, multi-centre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Asencio, JM; Gonzalo-Jiménez, E; Martin-Santos, FJ; Morilla-Herrera, JC; Celdráan-Mañas, M; Carrasco, A Millán; García-Arrabal, JJ; Toral-López, I

    2008-01-01

    Background Demand for home care services has increased considerably, along with the growing complexity of cases and variability among resources and providers. Designing services that guarantee co-ordination and integration for providers and levels of care is of paramount importance. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a new case-management based, home care delivery model which has been implemented in Andalusia (Spain). Methods Quasi-experimental, controlled, non-randomised, multi-centre study on the population receiving home care services comparing the outcomes of the new model, which included nurse-led case management, versus the conventional one. Primary endpoints: functional status, satisfaction and use of healthcare resources. Secondary endpoints: recruitment and caregiver burden, mortality, institutionalisation, quality of life and family function. Analyses were performed at base-line, and at two, six and twelve months. A bivariate analysis was conducted with the Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney's U, and the chi squared test. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests were performed to compare survival and institutionalisation. A multivariate analysis was performed to pinpoint factors that impact on improvement of functional ability. Results Base-line differences in functional capacity – significantly lower in the intervention group (RR: 1.52 95%CI: 1.05–2.21; p = 0.0016) – disappeared at six months (RR: 1.31 95%CI: 0.87–1.98; p = 0.178). At six months, caregiver burden showed a slight reduction in the intervention group, whereas it increased notably in the control group (base-line Zarit Test: 57.06 95%CI: 54.77–59.34 vs. 60.50 95%CI: 53.63–67.37; p = 0.264), (Zarit Test at six months: 53.79 95%CI: 49.67–57.92 vs. 66.26 95%CI: 60.66–71.86 p = 0.002). Patients in the intervention group received more physiotherapy (7.92 CI95%: 5.22–10.62 vs. 3.24 95%CI: 1.37–5.310; p = 0.0001) and, on average, required fewer home care visits (9

  1. A multi-centre, randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of PDSAFE to prevent falls among people with Parkinson's: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Victoria A; Pickering, Ruth; Ballinger, Claire; Roberts, Helen; McIntosh, Emma; Lamb, Sarah; Nieuwboer, Alice; Rochester, Lynn; Ashburn, Ann; PDSAFE Protocol Development Group

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls amongst people with Parkinson’s (PwP) result in significant disability and reduced quality of life. There is emerging evidence that exercise-based and physiotherapeutic interventions are of benefit for improving fall risk factors, such as balance. However, the benefit, in terms of preventing falls, is mixed. The development of effective interventions has been identified as the highest research priority for this population. The aim of this trial is to establish the effectivene...

  2. A multi-centre, randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of PDSAFE to prevent falls among people with Parkinson's: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, V A; Pickering, R; Ballinger, C; Roberts, H.; McIntosh, E; Lamb, S; Nieuwboer, A.; Rochester, L.; Ashburn, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: falls amongst people with Parkinson’s (PwP) result in significant disability and reduced quality of life. There is emerging evidence that exercise-based and physiotherapeutic interventions are of benefit for improving fall risk factors, such as balance. However, the benefit, in terms of preventing falls, is mixed. The development of effective interventions has been identified as the highest research priority for this population. The aim of this trial is to establish the effect...

  3. Benefits and costs of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - a multi-centre randomised controlled equivalence trial

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Anne E; Mahal, Ajay; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Moore, Rosemary; Nicolson, Caroline; O’Halloran, Paul; Cox, Narelle S.; Lahham, Aroub; Ndongo, Rebecca; Bell, Emily; McDonald, Christine F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation is widely advocated for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to improve exercise capacity, symptoms and quality of life, however only a minority of individuals with COPD are able to participate. Travel and transport are frequently cited as barriers to uptake of centre-based programs. Other models of pulmonary rehabilitation, including home-based programs, have been proposed in order to improve access to this important treatment. Previous...

  4. Program of rehabilitative exercise and education to avert vascular events after non-disabling stroke or transient ischemic attack (PREVENT Trial): a multi-centred, randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson Kara; Marsters David; Wightman Howard; Giacomantonio Nicholas; Gubitz Gordon; MacKay-Lyons Marilyn; Blanchard Chris; Eskes Gail; Thornton Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite lack of outward signs, most individuals after non-disabling stroke (NDS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) have significant cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and are at high risk of a major stroke, hospitalization for other vascular events, or death. Most have multiple modifiable risk factors (e.g., hypertension, physical inactivity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, tobacco consumption, psychological stress). In addition, accelerated rates of depression, cogni...

  5. A Randomised Multi-centre Study to Compare the Long-term Performance of the Future Hip to 3 Other Implants in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis; Perthes Disease

  6. Program of rehabilitative exercise and education to avert vascular events after non-disabling stroke or transient ischemic attack (PREVENT Trial: a multi-centred, randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Kara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite lack of outward signs, most individuals after non-disabling stroke (NDS and transient ischemic attack (TIA have significant cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and are at high risk of a major stroke, hospitalization for other vascular events, or death. Most have multiple modifiable risk factors (e.g., hypertension, physical inactivity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, tobacco consumption, psychological stress. In addition, accelerated rates of depression, cognitive decline, and poor quality of sleep have been reported following TIA, which correlate with poor functional outcomes and reduced quality of life. Thus, NSD and TIA are important warning signs that should not be overlooked. The challenge is not unlike that facing other 'silent' conditions - to identify a model of care that is effective in changing people's current behaviors in order to avert further morbidity. Methods/Design A single blind, randomized controlled trial will be conducted at two sites to compare the effectiveness of a program of rehabilitative exercise and education versus usual care in modifying vascular risk factors in adults after NDS/TIA. 250 adults within 90 days of being diagnosed with NDS/TIA will be randomly allocated to a 12-week program of exercise and education (PREVENT or to an outpatient clinic assessment and discussion of secondary prevention recommendations with return clinic visits as indicated (USUAL CARE. Primary outcome measures will include blood pressure, waist circumference, 12-hour fasting lipid profile, and 12-hour fasting glucose/hemoglobin A1c. Secondary measures will include exercise capacity, walking endurance, physical activity, cognitive function, depression, goal attainment and health-related quality of life. Outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention, and 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Direct health care costs incurred over one year by PREVENT versus USUAL CARE participants will also be compared. Ethical approval for the trial has been obtained from the relevant Human Research Ethics Boards. Discussion Whether timely delivery of an adapted cardiac rehabilitation model is effective in attaining and maintaining vascular risk reduction targets in adults after NDS/TIA is not yet known. We anticipate that the findings of this trial will make a meaningful contribution to the knowledge base regarding secondary stroke prevention. Trial registration This trial is registered with the Clinical Trials.gov Registry (NCT00885456.

  7. Preoperative short-course radiotherapy versus combined radiochemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: a multi-centre prospectively randomised study of the Berlin Cancer Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loy Volker

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The additional use of radiotherapy has changed the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC dramatically. But a major achievement has been the development of total mesorectal excision (TME as a surgical standard and the recognition that the surgeon is the predominant prognostic factor. The benefit of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy (SCRT; five fractions each of 5 Gy, initially established by the Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial, has been demonstrated in conjunction with TME by the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group. The concept of combined neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (conventional radiation of about 50 Gy with chemotherapy has not been compared over surgery alone with TME. However, the German Rectal Cancer Study Group recently demonstrated that preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT was better than postoperative radiochemotherapy in terms of local control. Methods and design Patients with histological proven rectal cancer staged T2N+ or T3 are randomized to receive either SCRT (25 Gy in five fractions of 5 Gy plus TME-surgery within 5 days or RCT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil plus TME-surgery 4–6 weeks later. All patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy (12 weeks continuous infusional 5-FU and are followed up for 5 years. TME-quality is independently documented by the surgeon and the pathologist. Hypothesis of the study is that RCT is superior to SCRT in terms of local recurrence after five years. Secondary endpoints are overall survival, disease-free survival, complete resection rate (R0 resection, rate of sphincter saving resection, acute and late toxicity (radiation related side effects, and quality of life (including long term bowel function. Discussion Similar long-term survival, local control and late morbidity have been reported for both concepts of preoperative therapy in non-comparative studies. In addition to other ongoing (and recently published comparative trials we include a larger number of patients for adequate power, apply quality-controlled TME and try to avoid the adjuvant treatment bias by mandatory adjuvant chemotherapy in both groups. Further more, stratification of the initially planned surgical procedure and sphincter-preservation will generate valid evidence whether RCT will allow a less aggressive (sphincter saving surgical approach.

  8. Competency-based simulation assessment of resuscitation skills in emergency medicine postgraduate trainees – a Canadian multi-centred study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnone, J. Damon; Hall, Andrew K.; Sebok-Syer, Stefanie; Klinger, Don; Woolfrey, Karen; Davison, Colleen; Ross, John; McNeil, Gordon; Moore, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of high-fidelity simulation is emerging as a desirable method for competency-based assessment in postgraduate medical education. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility and validity of a multi-centre simulation-based Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) of resuscitation competence with Canadian Emergency Medicine (EM) trainees. Method EM postgraduate trainees (n=98) from five Canadian academic centres participated in a high fidelity, 3-station simulation-based OSCE. Expert panels of three emergency physicians evaluated trainee performances at each centre using the Queen’s Simulation Assessment Tool (QSAT). Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to measure the inter-rater reliability, and analysis of variance was used to measure the discriminatory validity of each scenario. A fully crossed generalizability study was also conducted for each examination centre. Results Inter-rater reliability in four of the five centres was strong with a median absolute intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) across centres and scenarios of 0.89 [0.65–0.97]. Discriminatory validity was also strong (p competence in post-graduate Emergency Medicine trainees. PMID:27103954

  9. Creating probabilistic maps of the face network in the adolescent brain: A multi-centre functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale magnetic resonance (MR) studies of the human brain offer unique opportunities for identifying genetic and environmental factors shaping the human brain. Here, we describe a dataset collected in the context of a multi-centre study of the adolescent brain, namely the IMAGEN Study. We focus on one of the functional paradigms included in the project to probe the brain network underlying processing of ambiguous and angry faces. Using functional MR (fMRI) data collected in 1,110 adolescents, we constructed probabilistic maps of the neural network engaged consistently while viewing the ambiguous or angry faces; 21 brain regions responding to faces with high probability were identified. We were also able to address several methodological issues, including the minimal sample size yielding a stable location of a test region, namely the fusiform face area (FFA), as well as the effect of acquisition site (eight sites) and scanner (four manufacturers) on the location and magnitude of the fMRI response to faces in the FFA. Finally, we provided a comparison between male and female adolescents in terms of the effect sizes of sex differences in brain response to the ambiguous and angry faces in the 21 regions of interest. Overall, we found a stronger neural response to the ambiguous faces in several cortical regions, including the fusiform face area, in female (vs. male) adolescents, and a slightly stronger response to the angry faces in the amygdala of male (vs. female) adolescents. (authors)

  10. Use of platelet rich plasma to treat plantar fasciitis: design of a multi centre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peerbooms Joost C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If conservative treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis fails, often a corticosteroid injection is given. Corticosteroid injection gives temporarily pain reduction, but no healing. Blood platelets initiate the natural healing rate. GPS® gives an eightfold concentrate platelets of patients own blood. Injection of these platelets in the attachment of the fascia to the os calcis might induce a healing rate. Methods and design A randomized controlled multi centre trial will be performed. The study population consists of 120 patients of 18 years and older. Patients with chronic plantar fasciitis will be allocated randomly to have a steroid injection or an autologous platelet concentrate injections. Data will be collected before the procedure, 4,8,12,26 weeks and 1 year after the procedure. The main outcome measures of this study are pain and function measured with questionnaires. Conclusion Recent literature show positive effects for the treatment of tendinosis with autologous platelet injections. The forthcoming trial will compare treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis with a steroid injection versus an autologous platelet injection. Our results will be published as soon as they become available. Trial Registration Trial registration number: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00758641.

  11. Diferencias fisiológicas entre futbolistas de categoría cadete y juvenil

    OpenAIRE

    Quintela Eguiluz, Kerman

    2014-01-01

    Los objetivos de este estudio fueron analizar las diferencias en las características antropométricas, resistencia aeróbica, temperatura corporal y percepción subjetiva del esfuerzo en futbolistas de distintas categorías (cadete y juvenil), y examinar la relación existente entre las distintas variables analizadas. Para ello participaron 37 jóvenes futbolistas, 20 de ellos cadetes (15,12 ± 0,69 años) y 17 juveniles (16,94 ± 0,89 años). A los futbolistas se les midió la talla y la masa corporal...

  12. RAF Wings Over Florida: Memories of World War II British Air Cadets

    OpenAIRE

    Largent, Willard

    2000-01-01

    In the early 1940s, prior to the United States' entry into World War II, through the joint efforts of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill, British soldiers were sent to the United States for flight training. This collection gives first-person accounts of the men who learned the art of flying in a place far from their homeland, Florida. The stories provide a wonderful contrast between the two cultures and are told in the voices of British cadets, American cadet...

  13. Methods of data collection and analysis for the economic evaluation alongside a national, multi-centre trial in the UK: Conventional ventilation or ECMO for Severe Adult Respiratory Failure (CESAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbourne Diana R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO is a technology used in treatment of patients with severe but potentially reversible respiratory failure. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial (CESAR was funded in the UK to compare care including ECMO with conventional intensive care management. The protocol and funding for the CESAR trial included plans for economic data collection and analysis. Given the high cost of treatment, ECMO is considered an expensive technology for many funding systems. However, conventional treatment for severe respiratory failure is also one of the more costly forms of care in any health system. Methods/Design The objectives of the economic evaluation are to compare the costs of a policy of referral for ECMO with those of conventional treatment; to assess cost-effectiveness and the cost-utility at 6 months follow-up; and to assess the cost-utility over a predicted lifetime. Resources used by patients in the trial are identified. Resource use data are collected from clinical report forms and through follow up interviews with patients. Unit costs of hospital intensive care resources are based on parallel research on cost functions in UK NHS intensive care units. Other unit costs are based on published NHS tariffs. Cost effectiveness analysis uses the outcome: survival without severe disability. Cost utility analysis is based on quality adjusted life years gained based on the Euroqol EQ-5D at 6 months. Sensitivity analysis is planned to vary assumptions about transport costs and method of costing intensive care. Uncertainty will also be expressed in analysis of individual patient data. Probabilities of cost effectiveness given different funding thresholds will be estimated. Discussion In our view it is important to record our methods in detail and present them before publication of the results of the trial so that a record of detail not normally found in the final trial reports can be made available

  14. A multi-centre prospective development study evaluating focal therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound for localised prostate cancer: The INDEX study.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, L.; Ahmed, H. U.; Kirkham, A; Allen, C.; Freeman, A; Barber, J; Hindley, R; Leslie, T.; Ogden, C.; Persad, R; Winkler, M.H.; Emberton, M; on behalf of the INDEX Study Group

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Focal therapy offers the possibility of cancer control, without the side effect profile of radical therapies. Early single centre prospective development studies using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have demonstrated encouraging genitourinary functional preservation and short-term cancer control. Large multi-centre trials are required to evaluate medium-term cancer control and reproduce functional recovery. We describe the study design of an investigator-led UK multi-ce...

  15. The impact of study design and diagnostic approach in a large multi-centre ADHD study. Part 1: ADHD symptom patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Roeyers Herbert; Oades Robert D; Miranda Ana; Manor Iris; Gill Michael; Eisenberg Jaques; Ebstein Richard P; Buitelaar Jan K; Banaschewski Tobias; Asherson Philip; Müller Ueli C; Rothenberger Aribert; Sergeant Joseph A; Sonuga-Barke Edmund JS; Thompson Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) project with 11 participating centres from 7 European countries and Israel has collected a large behavioural and genetic database for present and future research. Behavioural data were collected from 1068 probands with the combined type of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD-CT) and 1446 'unselected' siblings. The aim was to analyse the IMAGE sample with respect to demographic features (gender, age, family sta...

  16. Is there a case for establishing a multi-Centre Masters Programme in Public Health across Kent, Surrey and Sussex? A feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Cornish, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    This study, which was commissioned by the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Workforce Development Confederation, assesses the feasibility of establishing a multi-centred modular masters programme in public health. The purpose of such a programme, would be to support the development of the public health workforce within the South East of the Region, to ensure that it is ‘fit for purpose’ in terms of delivering the current public health agenda.

  17. Splinting after contracture release for Dupuytren's contracture (SCoRD: protocol of a pragmatic, multi-centre, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chojnowski Adrian J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Splinting as part of the overall post-surgical management of patients after release of Dupuytren's contracture has been widely reported, though there is variation in practice and criteria for using it. The evidence on its effectiveness is sparse, of poor quality and contradictory with studies reporting negative and positive effects. Methods/Design A multi-centre, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial is being conducted to evaluate the effect of static night splinting for six months on hand function, range of movement, patient satisfaction and recurrence at 1 year after fasciectomy or dermofasciectomy. Using a centrally administered computer randomization system consented patients will be allocated to one of two groups: i splint group who will be given a static splint at approximately 10 to 14 days after surgery to be worn for 6 months at night time only as well as hand therapy; ii non-splint group, who will receive hand therapy only. The primary outcome measure is the patient-reported Disabilities of the Arm, Hand and Shoulder Questionnaire (DASH. Secondary outcomes are total active flexion and extension of fingers, patient satisfaction and recurrence of contracture. Outcome measures will be collected prior to surgery, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Using the DASH as the primary outcome measure, where a difference of 15 points is considered to be a clinically important difference a total of 51 patients will be needed in each group for a power of 90%. An intention-to-treat analysis will be used. Discussion This pragmatic randomized controlled trial will provide much needed evidence on the clinical effectiveness of post-operative night splinting in patients who have undergone fasciectomy or dermofasciectomy for Dupuytren's contracture of the hand. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 57079614

  18. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Tom Roberts named Boston College game Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus retired Col. James Tom Roberts, U.S. Army, who earned a degree in business administration from the Pamplin College of Business in 1962 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus Boston College game.

  19. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumni Tim Fong, Mike Martinez named Hokie Heroes

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumni Capt. Tim Fong, United States Army, who received a degree in economics from the College of Science in 2005 and Capt. Mike Martinez, United States Army, who received a degree in chemistry from the College of Science in 2004, have been selected as the Hokie Heroes for the Virginia Tech versus Duke football game.

  20. Incidence and Characteristics of Traumatic Shoulder Instability in Japanese Military Cadets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Masatoshi; Sasao, Hiroshi; Matsuhashi, Yusuke; Yato, Yoshiyuki; Yoshihara, Yasuo; Arino, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yutaka; Nemoto, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Little is known regarding the incidence of the shoulder instability in Japan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of traumatic shoulder instability among Japanese military cadets. A prospective cohort study was performed to capture all traumatic shoulder instability events between 2009 and 2012 among cadets in a military educational academy of the Japan Self Defense Forces. The total number of cadets in the cohort was 5,402 (average age 20.6 years). The incidence of instability events, including dislocation or subluxation, was calculated. Chronicity, demographics of participants, mechanism of injury, and athletic events were also evaluated. The incidence of traumatic dislocation was 4.1/1,000 person-years and that of subluxation was 6.1/1,000 person-years. The incidence of primary dislocation or subluxation was 5.4/1,000 person-years and that of recurrent dislocation or subluxation was 4.7/1,000 person-years. Of first dislocations or subluxations, 92% occurred during sports activities, including after-school sports activities, military training, and gym classes. In conclusion, the overall incidence of shoulder instability events among Japanese military cadets was 10.3/1,000 person-years, and was extremely high. Most shoulder instability events occurred during sports activities, and a program to prevent such injuries during sports activities is necessary for young participants. PMID:27244069

  1. 5 CFR 831.304 - Service with the Cadet Nurse Corps during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service with the Cadet Nurse Corps during World War II. 831.304 Section 831.304 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... Nurse Corps during World War II. (a) Definitions and special usages. In this section— (1) Basic pay...

  2. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Patrick Hogeboom named Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Maj. Patrick Hogeboom, United States Army, who received a degree in civil engineering from the College of Engineering in 1994 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus Georgia Tech football game.

  3. An investigation of the English Language Needs, Motivations, and Attitudes of Saudi Police Cadets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nasser Alhuqbani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the English language needs, motivations and attitudes of a random sample of 223 police cadets studying at King Fahd Security College in Saudi Arabia. The analysis of the questionnaire results showed that only cadets with degrees in humanities received English instructions. The cadets selected speaking and listening as the most important skills and studying English for security purposes. As regards their motivations, the significant correlation between almost all the instrumental and integrative variables provided evidence to the integration of the two types of motivations which substantiates the importance of both types in English learning.  Statements describing negative attitudes toward the English culture did not statistically correlate with the other statements that constitute the cadets’ positive attitudes toward English learning, which confirmed their positive attitudes toward both English learning and its culture. The significant correlations between the cadets’ English perceived needs and their instrumental motivations supported the argument that ESP learners study English for utilitarian purposes.   Keywords: ESP, needs analysis, attitudes, motivation, Saudi police cadets

  4. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Shane Morton named North Carolina game Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Cmdr. Shane Morton, U.S. Navy, who earned a degree in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences in 1995 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus University of North Carolina game.

  5. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Thomas Lenz named Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus 2nd Lt. Thomas Lenz, United States Army, who earned a degree in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences in 2008 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus North Carolina State football game

  6. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Jordan Martinelli named Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus 1st Lt. Jordan Martinelli, United States Army, who received a degree in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences in 2007 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus Maryland football game.

  7. Virginia Tech's Corps of Cadets alumnus Brian Alberts named Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus 2nd Lt. Brian Alberts, United States Army, who earned a degree in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences in 2008 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus East Carolina University football game.

  8. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Steven Carter named James Madison game Hokie Hero

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumnus Lt. Col. Steven Carter, U.S. Army, who earned a degree in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences in 1989 has been selected as the Hokie Hero for the Virginia Tech versus James Madison game.

  9. Predictores Para la Selección de Cadetes en Instituciones Militares Predictors for the Selection of Cadets in Military Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Castro Solano

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available En el marco de una investigación más amplia sobre predictores de éxito en el entrenamiento de cadetes militares argentinos, se presentan dos estudios. El primero analiza seis cohortes de egresados de una institución militar (1997-2003, atendiendo a la variabilidad en el rendimiento en su educación superior, relacionándolo con variables sociodemográficas (educación y ocupación parentales y estatus de pariente de militar. Los resultados indican que los promedios generales de carrera observan una tendencia descendente en el tiempo. El rendimiento militar muestra menor variabilidad, en tanto que los rendimientos académico y militar aparecen ligados al nivel educativo parental. En el segundo estudio se analiza la cohorte de ingresantes 2003, incluyéndose predictores tales como datos biográficos, valores, rasgos de personalidad y motivación. Cinco de las categorías consideradas discriminaban entre los grupos de cadetes con alto y bajo rendimiento: factores cognitivos relacionados con el rendimiento previo, la orientación vocacional y ciertos rasgos de liderazgo. Por otra parte, quienes obtenían calificaciones bajas en su primer año de estudios militares exhibían mayor motivación extrínseca, menor motivación intrínseca, estaban menos orientados al logro y su valor hegemónico era el poder.In the frame of a larger research on predictors of success in trainig of Argentinian military cadets, two studies are introduced. The first one analyzes six cohorts of graduates from a military educative institution (1997-2003, taking into account the variability in the achievement exhibited during their higher education, relating it to demographics variables (parental education and occupation and the status of being a military's relative. Results show academic averages are descending in a period of six years. Military achievement shows less variability, while both academic and military achievement seem to be associated to parental education. The

  10. Multi-centre evaluation of the speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay for differentiation of Mycobacterium spp. in clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann-Thiel Sabine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new DNA line probe assay (Speed-oligo Mycobacteria, Vircell has been launched for rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium spp. from cultures. Compared to other line-probe assays, Speed-oligo Mycobacteria covers a relatively limited spectrum of species but uses a simpler and faster dip-stick technique. The present multi-centre, multi-country study aimed at evaluating the utility and usability of Speed-oligo Mycobacteria in routine mycobacteriology diagnostics. Results from Speed-oligo Myobacteria were compared to those from Genotype CM (HAIN lifescience, Nehren, Germany, another line-probe assay. Methods Speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay was performed in three main steps: 1 DNA extraction from cultured material 2 PCR amplification of the target gene and an internal control and 3 hybridization of the PCR products to specific probes by means of a dip-stick. Results Two hundred forty-two clinical isolates were recovered from consecutive positive mycobacterial cultures at two German (IML Gauting, Bioscientia Ingelheim, one Czech (KLINLAB Prague, and at a Sudanese (Khartoum laboratory. All Mycobacterium species covered by the assay were reliably recognized. The rate of false positive results was 1.2% and concerned only the species M. marinum and M. peregrinum. The identification rate, i.e. the proportion of isolates which was correctly differentiated to the level of species or complex by the assay, differed significantly among laboratories being 94.9%, 90.7%, and 75.0% at the study sites IML Gauting, KLINLAB Prague and Bioscientia Ingelheim, respectively. This difference was caused by different spectra of NTM species encountered by the laboratory centres in daily routine diagnostics. Conclusions Speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay was proved a rapid and easy-to-perform alternative to conventional line-probe assays. The assay showed excellent sensitivity with regard to identification of genus Mycobacterium and species/complexes covered by

  11. SU-C-BRD-01: Multi-Centre Collaborative Quality Assurance Program for IMRT Planning and Delivery: Year 3 Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A multi-centre quality assurance program was developed to enable quality improvement by coupling measurement of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning and delivery performance for site-specific planning exercises with diagnostic testing. The third year of the program specifically assessed the quality of spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) planning and delivery amongst the participating centres. Methods: A spine SBRT planning exercise (24 Gy in 2 fractions) was created and completed by participants prior to an on-site visit. The delivery portion of the on-site visit included spine SBRT plan delivery and diagnostic testing, which included portal image acquisition for quantification of phantom positioning error and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) calibration accuracy. The measured dose was compared to that calculated in the treatment planning system (TPS) using 3%/2mm composite analysis and 3%/3mm gamma analysis. Results: Fourteen institutions participated, creating 17 spine SBRT plans (15 VMAT and 2 IMRT). Three different TPS, two beam energies (6 MV and 6 MV FFF), and four MLC designs from two linac vendors were tested. Large variation in total monitor units (MU) per plan (2494–6462 MU) and dose-volume parameters was observed. The maximum point dose in the plans ranged from 116–149% and was dependent upon the TPS used. Pass rates for measured to planned dose comparison ranged from 89.4–100% and 97.3–100% for 3%/2mm and 3%/3mm criteria respectively. The largest measured MLC error did Result in one of the poorer pass rates. No direct correlation between phantom positioning error and pass rates overall. Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in the planning exercise for some plan and dose-volume parameters based on the TPS used. Standard evaluation criteria showed good agreement between planned and measured dose for all participants, however on an individual plan basis, diagnostic tests were able to identify contributing

  12. SU-C-BRD-01: Multi-Centre Collaborative Quality Assurance Program for IMRT Planning and Delivery: Year 3 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNiven, A; Jaffray, D; Letourneau, D [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A multi-centre quality assurance program was developed to enable quality improvement by coupling measurement of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning and delivery performance for site-specific planning exercises with diagnostic testing. The third year of the program specifically assessed the quality of spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) planning and delivery amongst the participating centres. Methods: A spine SBRT planning exercise (24 Gy in 2 fractions) was created and completed by participants prior to an on-site visit. The delivery portion of the on-site visit included spine SBRT plan delivery and diagnostic testing, which included portal image acquisition for quantification of phantom positioning error and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) calibration accuracy. The measured dose was compared to that calculated in the treatment planning system (TPS) using 3%/2mm composite analysis and 3%/3mm gamma analysis. Results: Fourteen institutions participated, creating 17 spine SBRT plans (15 VMAT and 2 IMRT). Three different TPS, two beam energies (6 MV and 6 MV FFF), and four MLC designs from two linac vendors were tested. Large variation in total monitor units (MU) per plan (2494–6462 MU) and dose-volume parameters was observed. The maximum point dose in the plans ranged from 116–149% and was dependent upon the TPS used. Pass rates for measured to planned dose comparison ranged from 89.4–100% and 97.3–100% for 3%/2mm and 3%/3mm criteria respectively. The largest measured MLC error did Result in one of the poorer pass rates. No direct correlation between phantom positioning error and pass rates overall. Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in the planning exercise for some plan and dose-volume parameters based on the TPS used. Standard evaluation criteria showed good agreement between planned and measured dose for all participants, however on an individual plan basis, diagnostic tests were able to identify contributing

  13. The impact of a visual imagery intervention on Army ROTC cadetsâ marksmanship performance and flow experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Rakes, Edward Lee

    2012-01-01

    This investigation used an experimental design to examine how a visual imagery intervention and two levels of challenge would affect the flow experiences and performance of cadets engaged in Army ROTC marksmanship training. I employed MANCOVA analyses, with gender and prior marksmanship training experience as covariates, to assess cadetsâ (n = 127) marksmanship performance and flow experiences. Findings revealed that the use of visual imagery did not positively enhance flow and improve perf...

  14. Physical Fitness of Police Academy Cadets: Baseline Characteristics and Changes During a 16-Week Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Ross A.; Crawley, William R.; Cosio-Lima, Ludmila M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Crawley, AA, Sherman, RA, Crawley, WR, and Cosio-Lima, LM. Physical fitness of police academy cadets: baseline characteristics and changes during a 16-week academy. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1416–1424, 2016—Police academies traditionally emphasize the importance of being physically fit. The purpose of this research was to determine cadet baseline physical fitness characteristics and assess effectiveness of a 16-week training program. Sixty-eight cadets (61 men, 7 women) volunteered to have baseline physical fitness characteristics assessed, and 55 cadets (49 men, 6 women) completed further testing at weeks 8 and 16. The testing comprised hand grip (strength), arm crank (upper-body power), 30 seconds Wingate (lower body power), sum of skinfolds and percentage body fat (body composition), 40-yard dash (sprint speed), 1 repetition maximum bench press (strength), T-test (agility), and sit-and-reach (flexibility). In addition, cadets completed standardized state testing (push-ups, sit-ups, vertical jump, and half-mile shuttle run). The training program consisted of 1 hour sessions, 3 d·wk−1, including aerobic, plyometrics, body weight, and resistance exercise. Significant changes were found in agility (p < 0.01), upper-body and lower-body peak power (p ≤ 0.05), sit-ups (p < 0.01), push-ups (p ≤ 0.05) across the first 8 weeks, and in agility (p ≤ 0.05), lower-body peak power (p ≤ 0.05), sit-ups (p < 0.01), push-ups (p ≤ 0.05), half-mile shuttle run (p < 0.01) across the full 16 weeks. However, none of the variables showed significant change across the second half of the program (weeks 8–16). A number of individual parameters of physical fitness showed evidence of improvement in the first 8 weeks, whereas none of the variables showed significant improvement in the second 8 weeks. This suggests modifications could be made to increase overall effectiveness of cadet physical training specifically after the 8-week mark. PMID:26466133

  15. Physical Fitness of Police Academy Cadets: Baseline Characteristics and Changes During a 16-Week Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, Amy A; Sherman, Ross A; Crawley, William R; Cosio-Lima, Ludmila M

    2016-05-01

    Crawley, AA, Sherman, RA, Crawley, WR, and Cosio-Lima, LM. Physical fitness of police academy cadets: baseline characteristics and changes during a 16-week academy. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1416-1424, 2016-Police academies traditionally emphasize the importance of being physically fit. The purpose of this research was to determine cadet baseline physical fitness characteristics and assess effectiveness of a 16-week training program. Sixty-eight cadets (61 men, 7 women) volunteered to have baseline physical fitness characteristics assessed, and 55 cadets (49 men, 6 women) completed further testing at weeks 8 and 16. The testing comprised hand grip (strength), arm crank (upper-body power), 30 seconds Wingate (lower body power), sum of skinfolds and percentage body fat (body composition), 40-yard dash (sprint speed), 1 repetition maximum bench press (strength), T-test (agility), and sit-and-reach (flexibility). In addition, cadets completed standardized state testing (push-ups, sit-ups, vertical jump, and half-mile shuttle run). The training program consisted of 1 hour sessions, 3 d·wk, including aerobic, plyometrics, body weight, and resistance exercise. Significant changes were found in agility (p < 0.01), upper-body and lower-body peak power (p ≤ 0.05), sit-ups (p < 0.01), push-ups (p ≤ 0.05) across the first 8 weeks, and in agility (p ≤ 0.05), lower-body peak power (p ≤ 0.05), sit-ups (p < 0.01), push-ups (p ≤ 0.05), half-mile shuttle run (p < 0.01) across the full 16 weeks. However, none of the variables showed significant change across the second half of the program (weeks 8-16). A number of individual parameters of physical fitness showed evidence of improvement in the first 8 weeks, whereas none of the variables showed significant improvement in the second 8 weeks. This suggests modifications could be made to increase overall effectiveness of cadet physical training specifically after the 8-week mark. PMID:26466133

  16. Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumni Deanna Fisher, George Mallory named Hokie Heroes

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets alumni Lt. Deanna Fisher, United States Navy, who earned degrees in history from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences and psychology from the College of Science in 2005; and Capt. George Mallory, United States Army, who earned a degree in interdisciplinary studies from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences in 2005 have been selected as the Hokie Heroes for the Virginia Tech versus Virginia football game. Fisher and Mallory are at times located ...

  17. The effectiveness of physical education of the military academy cadets during a 4-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Lela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main role of physical education is health and educational practices of cadets and all-round personality development. Instruction executing is successful only when the set requirements are realized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of physical education in order to rise physical capabilities of the Military Academy cadets during a 4-year education. Methods. The study was conducted in the Military Academy, Belgrade. A total of 120 cadets who at the beginning of the study were 19 years ± 6 months and at the end 23 years ± 6 months were included in this study. The study used the following tests for verification and assessment of physical fitness: pull-ups, lifting the trunk from the ground, standing long jump seats, running at 1,600 m and overcoming the infantry obstacles. The data were analyzed using statistical programs to calculate the central and dispersion parameters. The difference in the achieved results in the individual variables were evaluated by the univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA, while the differences in the system variables by region were identified by the multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and discriminant analysis. The group membership was determined using profile analysis. Results. There were statistically significant differences in all the tests to evaluate the effectiveness of physical education during a 4-year study, except in the standing long jump test. The best average results in motor capabilities tests, were achieved after two years of study, while in the endurance tests showed the best results achieved at the end of a 4-years studying. Conclusion. The results of overcoming specific tests for the physical abilities of the Military Academy cadets show that the physical education curriculum only slightly improves the development of physical skills of cadets during a 4-year study. The existing program shows the best results in the pull-ups test of the ground troops, and

  18. Protocol for the ProFHER (PROximal Fracture of the Humerus: Evaluation by Randomisation) trial: a pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of surgical versus non-surgical treatment for proximal fracture of the humerus in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Maffulli Nicola; Madhok Rajan; Hewitt Catherine; Hamilton Sharon; Goodchild Lorna; Gardner Sarah; Dumville Jo; Cross Ben; Chuang Ling-Hsiang; Armstrong Alison; Dennis Laura; Torgerson David; Rangan Amar; Brealey Stephen; Handoll Helen

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Proximal humeral fractures, which occur mainly in older adults, account for approximately 4 to 5% of all fractures. Approximately 40% of these fractures are displaced fractures involving the surgical neck. Management of this group of fractures is often challenging and the outcome is frequently unsatisfactory. In particular it is not clear whether surgery gives better outcomes than non-surgical management. Currently there is much variation in the use of surgery and a lack o...

  19. Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Spiral Computed Tomography: Results of a Multi-Centre Study at Eight Radiological Institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate radiation dose (expressed as PCTDI or DAVE) in correlation to image quality, seven clinical protocols were measured in eight radiological departments provided with six different types of high-end spiral CT scanners of the latest generation. Central and surface PCTDI for seven clinically applied protocols and one standardised liver protocol were determined with a dedicated phantom and ionisation chamber. For low contrast measurements, a cylindrical 3D phantom (different sized spheres of defined contrast) was used. Image noise was measured with a cylindrical water phantom, high contrast resolution with a Perspex hole phantom. Images were randomised, made anonymous and read by eight radiologists (one from each institution). Radiation output (PCTDI per 100 mA.s) for six different scanners varied by a factor between 1.7 (central PCTDI) and 2.0 (surface PCTDI) for the standardised protocol and by a factor of 4.3 for the 1 mm inner ear protocol. For seven clinically applied protocols of six radiological departments doses (expressed as DAVE/pitch) varied by factors between 1.7 (head protocol) and 8.3 (abdomen paediatric protocol). Low contrast detectability correlated closely with dose. An improvement in detection from 8 mm to 4 mm sized spheres needed approximately a tenfold increase in dose. Differences of modern CT scanner technology seem to be of minor importance for radiation exposure compared with selection of protocol parameters in different radiological institutes. Future discussion on guidelines, e.g. reference doses, should consider optimisation of tube current according to the individual patient and the clinical indication. (author)

  20. The impact of study design and diagnostic approach in a large multi-centre ADHD study: Part 2: Dimensional measures of psychopathology and intelligence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Muller, Ueli C

    2011-04-07

    Abstract Background The International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) project with 11 participating centres from 7 European countries and Israel has collected a large behavioural and genetic database for present and future research. Behavioural data were collected from 1068 probands with ADHD and 1446 unselected siblings. The aim was to describe and analyse questionnaire data and IQ measures from all probands and siblings. In particular, to investigate the influence of age, gender, family status (proband vs. sibling), informant, and centres on sample homogeneity in psychopathological measures. Methods Conners\\' Questionnaires, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires, and Wechsler Intelligence Scores were used to describe the phenotype of the sample. Data were analysed by use of robust statistical multi-way procedures. Results Besides main effects of age, gender, informant, and centre, there were considerable interaction effects on questionnaire data. The larger differences between probands and siblings at home than at school may reflect contrast effects in the parents. Furthermore, there were marked gender by status effects on the ADHD symptom ratings with girls scoring one standard deviation higher than boys in the proband sample but lower than boys in the siblings sample. The multi-centre design is another important source of heterogeneity, particularly in the interaction with the family status. To a large extent the centres differed from each other with regard to differences between proband and sibling scores. Conclusions When ADHD probands are diagnosed by use of fixed symptom counts, the severity of the disorder in the proband sample may markedly differ between boys and girls and across age, particularly in samples with a large age range. A multi-centre design carries the risk of considerable phenotypic differences between centres and, consequently, of additional heterogeneity of the sample even if standardized diagnostic procedures are used. These

  1. A large multi-centre European study validates high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) as a clinical biomarker for the diagnosis of diabetes subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanabalasingham, G.; Shah, N.; Vaxillaire, M.; Hansen, T.; Tuomi, T.; Gasperikova, D.; Szopa, M.; Tjora, E.; James, T. J.; Kokko, P.; Loiseleur, F.; Andersson, E.; Gaget, S.; Isomaa, B.; Nowak, N.; Raeder, H.; Stanik, J.; Njolstad, P. R.; Malecki, M. T.; Klimes, I.; Groop, L.; Pedersen, O.; Froguel, P.; McCarthy, M. I.; Gloyn, A. L.; Owen, K. R.

    2011-01-01

    An accurate molecular diagnosis of diabetes subtype confers clinical benefits; however, many individuals with monogenic diabetes remain undiagnosed. Biomarkers could help to prioritise patients for genetic investigation. We recently demonstrated that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP......) levels are lower in UK patients with hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1A)-MODY than in other diabetes subtypes. In this large multi-centre study we aimed to assess the clinical validity of hsCRP as a diagnostic biomarker, examine the genotype-phenotype relationship and compare different hsCRP assays....... High-sensitivity CRP levels were analysed in individuals with HNF1A-MODY (n = 457), glucokinase (GCK)-MODY (n = 404), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A)-MODY (n = 54) and type 2 diabetes (n = 582) from seven European centres. Three common assays for hsCRP analysis were evaluated. We excluded 121...

  2. MILITARY PATRIOTIC EDUCATION OF CADETS IN A MARITIME UNIVERSITY: THE ESSENCE AND THE DEFINITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorofeev A. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of the political, the military and the economic power of the Russian Federation is impossible without development of patriotism and without stirring up the most important part of military-patriotic education of youth, including, of course, cadets of maritime colleges. Nowadays, the patriotism is demanded by society as a state ideology, as a most important condition and the way of spiritual and economic revival of Russia; it’s demanded as a way to unite and consolidate the entire population of Russia and as the answer to provocation from western countries seeking to weakening of Russia and finally to the collapse of the Russian world. Patriotism can be understood as a moral-political principle, social feeling, that consist of love and devotion to Fatherland, pride for it’s past and present, tendency to protect the interests of Homeland. Patriotism is expressed in love and devotion to its own Homeland, native land and its own nation, its history and culture. In present conditions, the most important direction and formation of patriotic qualities among maritime cadets can and is to be military-patriotic education, carried out on a base of regulatory documents, heroic history or Fatherland, military traditions of army and navy. Loyalty to the Fatherland, sincere love to the own country, moral-psychological and military-professional alacrity to armed protection of the Fatherland in the armed forces of the Russian Federation- it is quintessence of military – patriotic education and so it differs from patriotic education of Russian citizens. In the article it is considered the core of the military-patriotical education, based on analysis of local scientists’ views; we have formulated the goal, the tasks and the pedagogic conditions of military-patriotic education of maritime cadets; we have made an attempt to give author’s definition the term of “maritime college military-patriotic education of cadets”

  3. The outcome of a multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer TROG 10.01 BOLART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess whether online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is feasible across multiple Radiation Oncology departments using different imaging, delivery and recording technology. Materials and methods: A multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy, using a choice of three “plan of the day”, was conducted at 12 departments. Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Departments were activated if part of the pilot study or after a site-credentialing visit. There was real time review of the first two cases from each department. Results: 54 patients were recruited, with 50 proceeding to radiotherapy. There were 43 males and 7 females with a mean age of 78 years. The tumour stages treated included T1 (1 patient), T2 (35), T3 (10) and T4 (4). One patient died of an unrelated cause during radiotherapy. The three adaptive plans were created before the 10th fraction in all cases. In 8 (16%) of the patients, a conventional plan using a ‘standard’ CTV to PTV margin of 1.5 cm was used for one or more fractions where the pre-treatment bladder CTV was larger than any of the three adaptive plans. The bladder CTV extended beyond the PTV on post treatment imaging in 9 (18%) of the 49 patients. Conclusions: From a technical perspective an online adaptive radiotherapy technique can be instituted in a multi-centre setting. However, without further bladder filling control or imaging, a CTV to PTV margin of 7 mm is insufficient

  4. Planning the annual cycle in groups of cadet combat sports perfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananchenko Konstantin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Within a large training cycle in conditions of high general level of stress the authors recommend optimal implementation of planning undulating dynamics of cadets’ combat exercise stress. The article proves the efficiency of one-cycle construction of training highly- qualified single-combat cadets at the stage of maximal realization of sporting possibilities, which includes both features of traditional cycles (preparatory, competitional, transitional and module-sectional composition of training. It scientifically substantiates, that the choice of those or other types of microcycles which present the structure of mesocycles is determined by a few basic factors which must be necessarily taken into account while planning the training process of sportsmen of different qualification. It is suggested to use certain varieties of microcycles in the practice of preparation of single combat cadets. It is substantiated that accounting in planning the annual cycle in groups of sporting perfection of students of the educed types of microcycles for every type of single combats is an actual task of further scientific research.

  5. Validity of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis to Estimation Fat-Free Mass in the Army Cadets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel D. Langer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA is a fast, practical, non-invasive, and frequently used method for fat-free mass (FFM estimation. The aims of this study were to validate predictive equations of BIA to FFM estimation in Army cadets and to develop and validate a specific BIA equation for this population. Methods: A total of 396 males, Brazilian Army cadets, aged 17–24 years were included. The study used eight published predictive BIA equations, a specific equation in FFM estimation, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA as a reference method. Student’s t-test (for paired sample, linear regression analysis, and Bland–Altman method were used to test the validity of the BIA equations. Results: Predictive BIA equations showed significant differences in FFM compared to DXA (p < 0.05 and large limits of agreement by Bland–Altman. Predictive BIA equations explained 68% to 88% of FFM variance. Specific BIA equations showed no significant differences in FFM, compared to DXA values. Conclusion: Published BIA predictive equations showed poor accuracy in this sample. The specific BIA equations, developed in this study, demonstrated validity for this sample, although should be used with caution in samples with a large range of FFM.

  6. Validity of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis to Estimation Fat-Free Mass in the Army Cadets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Raquel D.; Borges, Juliano H.; Pascoa, Mauro A.; Cirolini, Vagner X.; Guerra-Júnior, Gil; Gonçalves, Ezequiel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) is a fast, practical, non-invasive, and frequently used method for fat-free mass (FFM) estimation. The aims of this study were to validate predictive equations of BIA to FFM estimation in Army cadets and to develop and validate a specific BIA equation for this population. Methods: A total of 396 males, Brazilian Army cadets, aged 17–24 years were included. The study used eight published predictive BIA equations, a specific equation in FFM estimation, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as a reference method. Student’s t-test (for paired sample), linear regression analysis, and Bland–Altman method were used to test the validity of the BIA equations. Results: Predictive BIA equations showed significant differences in FFM compared to DXA (p < 0.05) and large limits of agreement by Bland–Altman. Predictive BIA equations explained 68% to 88% of FFM variance. Specific BIA equations showed no significant differences in FFM, compared to DXA values. Conclusion: Published BIA predictive equations showed poor accuracy in this sample. The specific BIA equations, developed in this study, demonstrated validity for this sample, although should be used with caution in samples with a large range of FFM. PMID:26978397

  7. Tyrosine improves cognitive performance and reduces blood pressure in cadets after one week of combat training course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deijen, J.B.; Wientjes, C.J.E.; Vullinghs, H.F.M.; Cloin, P.A.; Langeveld, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the amino acid tyrosine on cognitive task performance were studied on a group of 21 cadets during a demanding military combat training course. In addition, the effects on mood, blood pressure and the norepinephrine metabolite MHPG were determined. Ten subjects received five daily doses

  8. Patch: platelet transfusion in cerebral haemorrhage: study protocol for a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from intracerebral haemorrhage have a poor prognosis, especially if they are using antiplatelet therapy. Currently, no effective acute treatment option for intracerebral haemorrhage exists. Limiting the early growth of intracerebral haemorrhage volume which continues the first hours after admission seems a promising strategy. Because intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet therapy have been shown to be particularly at risk of early haematoma growth, platelet transfusion may have a beneficial effect. Methods/Design The primary objective is to investigate whether platelet transfusion improves outcome in intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet treatment. The PATCH study is a prospective, randomised, multi-centre study with open treatment and blind endpoint evaluation. Patients will be randomised to receive platelet transfusion within six hours or standard care. The primary endpoint is functional health after three months. The main secondary endpoints are safety of platelet transfusion and the occurrence of haematoma growth. To detect an absolute poor outcome reduction of 20%, a total of 190 patients will be included. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial of platelet transfusion for an acute haemorrhagic disease. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR1303

  9. The impact of study design and diagnostic approach in a large multi-centre ADHD study. Part 1: ADHD symptom patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeyers Herbert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE project with 11 participating centres from 7 European countries and Israel has collected a large behavioural and genetic database for present and future research. Behavioural data were collected from 1068 probands with the combined type of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD-CT and 1446 'unselected' siblings. The aim was to analyse the IMAGE sample with respect to demographic features (gender, age, family status, and recruiting centres and psychopathological characteristics (diagnostic subtype, symptom frequencies, age at symptom detection, and comorbidities. A particular focus was on the effects of the study design and the diagnostic procedure on the homogeneity of the sample in terms of symptom-based behavioural data, and potential consequences for further analyses based on these data. Methods Diagnosis was based on the Parental Account of Childhood Symptoms (PACS interview and the DSM-IV items of the Conners' teacher questionnaire. Demographics of the full sample and the homogeneity of a subsample (all probands were analysed by using robust statistical procedures which were adjusted for unequal sample sizes and skewed distributions. These procedures included multi-way analyses based on trimmed means and winsorised variances as well as bootstrapping. Results Age and proband/sibling ratios differed between participating centres. There was no significant difference in the distribution of gender between centres. There was a significant interaction between age and centre for number of inattentive, but not number of hyperactive symptoms. Higher ADHD symptom frequencies were reported by parents than teachers. The diagnostic symptoms differed from each other in their frequencies. The face-to-face interview was more sensitive than the questionnaire. The differentiation between ADHD-CT probands and unaffected siblings was mainly due to differences in hyperactive

  10. The impact of study design and diagnostic approach in a large multi-centre ADHD study. Part 1: ADHD symptom patterns.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Muller, Ueli C

    2011-04-07

    Abstract Background The International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) project with 11 participating centres from 7 European countries and Israel has collected a large behavioural and genetic database for present and future research. Behavioural data were collected from 1068 probands with the combined type of attention deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD-CT) and 1446 \\'unselected\\' siblings. The aim was to analyse the IMAGE sample with respect to demographic features (gender, age, family status, and recruiting centres) and psychopathological characteristics (diagnostic subtype, symptom frequencies, age at symptom detection, and comorbidities). A particular focus was on the effects of the study design and the diagnostic procedure on the homogeneity of the sample in terms of symptom-based behavioural data, and potential consequences for further analyses based on these data. Methods Diagnosis was based on the Parental Account of Childhood Symptoms (PACS) interview and the DSM-IV items of the Conners\\' teacher questionnaire. Demographics of the full sample and the homogeneity of a subsample (all probands) were analysed by using robust statistical procedures which were adjusted for unequal sample sizes and skewed distributions. These procedures included multi-way analyses based on trimmed means and winsorised variances as well as bootstrapping. Results Age and proband\\/sibling ratios differed between participating centres. There was no significant difference in the distribution of gender between centres. There was a significant interaction between age and centre for number of inattentive, but not number of hyperactive symptoms. Higher ADHD symptom frequencies were reported by parents than teachers. The diagnostic symptoms differed from each other in their frequencies. The face-to-face interview was more sensitive than the questionnaire. The differentiation between ADHD-CT probands and unaffected siblings was mainly due to differences in hyperactive

  11. A concept for trial institutions focussing on randomised controlled trials in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büchler Markus W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although considered the reference standard for generating valid scientific evidence of a treatment's benefits and harms, the number of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCT comparing surgical techniques remains low. Much effort has been made in order to overcome methodological issues and improve quality of RCTs in surgery. To the present there has been, however, only little emphasis on development and maintenance of institutions for implementation of adequately designed and conducted surgical RCTs. Mehods/Design Description of the developments in surgical RCT infrastructure in Germany between 2001 and 2006. Cross sectional evaluation of completed and ongoing surgical RCTs within the German Surgical Society and the Clinical Study Centre, Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg. Results Foundation of a national Clinical Trial Centre (CTC for the organisation of multi-centre RCTs in the surgical setting (Study Center of the German Surgical Society, SDGC. Establishment of a network of CTCs with affiliated Clinical Sites (CSs to enhance patient recruitment and shorten the duration of RCTs. Since its foundation four surgical RCTs with a total sample size of 1650 patients (1006 of these randomised have been supervised by the SDGC with 35 CSs involved in patient recruitment. Five further CTCs were set up in 2006. Together with their affiliated CSs a network has been organised providing improved conditions for the conduction of surgical RCTs. Conclusion Improvement of infrastructure substantially facilitates integration of RCTs into routine surgical practice. A network of collaborating CTCs and CSs can provide an adequate infrastructure for the conduction of multi-centre RCTs.

  12. The analysis of the physical statement of cadets of the 1st course of the military Institute on the starting stage of studying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovcharuk I.S.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The physical state of the youth which fulfills the rows of military forces of Ukraine has no tendency to improve according to the health and physical preparation. The physical state of cadets of the 1st course is analyzed. 69 cadets took part in research. It improves from the first month of being in educational establishment. Studying curriculum of this educational establishment must provide the fulfillment of all the tasks of physical preparation of military forces of Ukraine.

  13. Gadobutrol-enhanced moving-table magnetic resonance angiography in patients with peripheral vascular disease: a prospective, multi-centre blinded comparison with digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentsch, Annette [Schering AG, Berlin (Germany); Aschauer, Manuela A.; Ebner, Franz [Department of Magnetic Resonance, University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Balzer, Joern O.; Davis, Kirsten [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Brossmann, Joachim; Schaefer, Fritz K.W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Busch, Hans P. [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Brueder, Trier (Germany); Douek, Philippe [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Lyon (France); Engelshoven, Jos M.A. van; Leiner, Tim [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gregor, Michaela; Reimer, Peter [Department of Radiology, Staedtisches Klinikum, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kersting, Christian [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Knuesel, Patrick R. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, MRI Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Leen, Edward [Department of X-ray, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Loewe, Christian; Thurnher, Siegfried A. [Section of Angiography and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology' ' University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); McPherson, Simon [Department of Radiology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Taupitz, Matthias [Department of Radiology, Humboldt University of Berlin (Charite), Berlin (Germany); Tombach, Bernd; Wegener, Robin; Weishaupt, Dominik; Meaney, James F.M.

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare moving-table three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE MRA), using 1.0-mol gadobutrol, with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (i.a. DSA) for evaluation of pelvic and peripheral arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. A total of 203 patients were examined in a prospective, multi-centre study at 1.0/1.5 T. Ten vessel segments of one leg were evaluated on-site and by three independent blinded reviewers off-site. One hundred eighty-two patients were evaluable in blinded reading. For pelvis and thigh, there was statistically significant diagnostic agreement between CE MRA and i.a. DSA on-site (94%) and off-site (86-88%). Overall, for detection of clinically significant stenoses, 93% sensitivity and 90% specificity were achieved in on-site evaluation, with 71-76 and 87-93% off-site; for detection of occlusion, sensitivity and specificity on-site were 91 and 97%, with 75-82 and 94-98% off-site. Evaluation was more sensitive on-site than off-site for detection of stenoses and occlusion, whereas specificity was similar. The CE MRA with 1.0-mol gadobutrol gave results comparable to those of i.a. DSA for the larger arteries of pelvis and thigh. Results for calf arteries were compromised by spatial resolution and technical limitations. (orig.)

  14. Gadobutrol-enhanced moving-table magnetic resonance angiography in patients with peripheral vascular disease: a prospective, multi-centre blinded comparison with digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare moving-table three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE MRA), using 1.0-mol gadobutrol, with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (i.a. DSA) for evaluation of pelvic and peripheral arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. A total of 203 patients were examined in a prospective, multi-centre study at 1.0/1.5 T. Ten vessel segments of one leg were evaluated on-site and by three independent blinded reviewers off-site. One hundred eighty-two patients were evaluable in blinded reading. For pelvis and thigh, there was statistically significant diagnostic agreement between CE MRA and i.a. DSA on-site (94%) and off-site (86-88%). Overall, for detection of clinically significant stenoses, 93% sensitivity and 90% specificity were achieved in on-site evaluation, with 71-76 and 87-93% off-site; for detection of occlusion, sensitivity and specificity on-site were 91 and 97%, with 75-82 and 94-98% off-site. Evaluation was more sensitive on-site than off-site for detection of stenoses and occlusion, whereas specificity was similar. The CE MRA with 1.0-mol gadobutrol gave results comparable to those of i.a. DSA for the larger arteries of pelvis and thigh. Results for calf arteries were compromised by spatial resolution and technical limitations. (orig.)

  15. A multi-centre phase 3 study comparing efficacy and safety of Bemfola® versus Gonal-f® in women undergoing ovarian stimulation for IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rettenbacher, M; Andersen, A N; Garcia-Velasco, J A;

    2015-01-01

    Bemfola (follitropin alfa) (Finox AG, Switzerland), a new recombinant FSH, has a comparable pharmacological profile to that of Gonal-f (Merck Serono, Germany), the current standard for ovarian stimulation. A randomized, multi-centre, Phase 3 study in women undergoing IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm...... injection (n = 372) showed Bemfola yielding similar efficacy and safety profiles to Gonal-f. Women aged 20-38 years of age were randomized 2:1 to receive a single, daily, subcutaneous 150 IU dose of either Bemfola or Gonal-f. This study tested equivalence in the number of retrieved oocytes using a pre......-determined clinical equivalence margin of ±2.9 oocytes. Compared with Gonal-f, Bemfola treatment resulted in a statistically equivalent number of retrieved oocytes (Bemfola 10.8 ± 5.11 versus Gonal-f 10.6 ± 6.06, mean difference: 0.27 oocytes, 95% confidence interval: -1.34, 1.32) as well as a similar clinical...

  16. The influence of sample volume applied to the Makler sperm counting chamber upon the measured concentration of latex beads:A multi-centre study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melanie Walls; Cherise Mooy; Patrick Mohan; Sally Catt; Matthew Wiltshire; Hassan W Bakos; Mary Whyte; Phillip Matson; Emily Zuvela; Cheryl Ayres; Deborah Sherrin; Asma Chhotani; Liz Butler; Kelli Peirce; Jenny Krapez; Renae Parker

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To undertake a multi-centre study to maximize the number ofMakler chambers used.Methods:A total of15 laboratories participated with31Makler chambers.A suspension of latex beads was prepared to a concentration of20 millions per milliliter, and0.5 mL aliquots distributed to each participating laboratory.They measured the concentration on theirMakler chamber(s) used for routine semen analysis by adding3,4,5,7 and10µL volumes of bead suspension to the chamber.Results:There was no difference in within-chamber analysis of the bead concentration according to the volume of bead suspension applied within the range of 3-10µL(F4,14=2.634,P=0.056).However, the between-chamber effects were significantly different (F30,124=4.937,P=0.000), and24/31(77.5%) chambers tested had an average bias>10% compared to the target bead concentration.Conclusions:A volume of3-10µL added toMakler counting chambers does not influence the concentration measured of latex beads, but the between-chamber variability and positive bias seen would suggest that other sources of error are present which are yet to be identified.

  17. Prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey as a useful tool for CT dose optimisation: report of Gunma radiation dose study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness for the dose optimisation of setting a diagnostic reference level (DRL) based on the results of a prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey and providing data feedback. All hospitals/clinics in the authors' prefecture with computed tomography (CT) scanners were requested to report data. The first survey was done in July 2011, and the results of dose-length products (DLPs) for each CT scanner were fed back to all hospitals/clinics, with DRL set from all the data. One year later, a second survey was done in the same manner. The medians of DLP in the upper abdomen, whole body and coronary CT in 2012 were significantly smaller than those of the 2011 survey. The inter-quartile ranges of DLP in the head, chest, pelvis and coronary CT were also smaller in 2012. Radiation dose survey with data feedback may be helpful for CT dose optimisation. (authors)

  18. A multi-centre, prospective, clinical in-market evaluation to assess the performance of Opsite? Post-Op Visible dressings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Gillian

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of Opsite™ Post-Op Visible as a post-surgical dressing in a typical clinical setting. In this multi-centre clinical evaluation, patients who underwent clean surgery were treated with Opsite Post-Op Visible dressing. Duration of dressing wear, visibility through the dressing and ability to handle exudate were assessed and the product was rated in comparison with those normally used. A total of 64 patients were recruited. Mean wear time was 4·5 days. Exudate management was rated very good or good at 96% of assessments. Visibility of the incision site was rated as very good or good at 72%, and as acceptable at 24%, of assessments. Patient comfort was rated very comfortable (63%) or comfortable (37%) at all assessments. Dressings were generally rated as satisfactory or exceeding expectations with clinicians stating that the Opsite Post-Op Visible dressing was better than the dressing they routinely used for 92% of patients. Opsite Post-Op Visible dressing is an innovative dressing combining good visibility with exudate management and patient comfort. It was found to have adequate wear time, visibility and exudate management properties making it suitable for use on a variety of surgical incision sites.

  19. Quetiapine versus aripiprazole in children and adolescents with psychosis--protocol for the randomised, blinded clinical Tolerability and Efficacy of Antipsychotics (TEA) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Jeppesen, Pia; Klauber, Dea Gowers;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The evidence for choices between antipsychotics for children and adolescents with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders is limited. The main objective of the Tolerability and Efficacy of Antipsychotics (TEA) trial is to compare the benefits and harms of quetiapine versus...... aripiprazole in children and adolescents with psychosis in order to inform rational, effective and safe treatment selections. METHODS/DESIGN: The TEA trial is a Danish investigator-initiated, independently funded, multi-centre, randomised, blinded clinical trial. Based on sample size estimation, 112 patients...... aged 12-17 years with psychosis, antipsychotic-naïve or treated for a limited period are, 1:1 randomised to a 12- week, double-blind intervention with quetiapine versus aripiprazole. Effects on psychopathology, cognition, health-related quality of life, and adverse events are assessed 2, 4, and 12...

  20. Some Thoughts on Cadet Leadership Cultivation%对军校学员领导力培养问题的若干思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范冉冉

    2012-01-01

    军校学员的领导力,在未来战场上就是战斗力。加强军校学员领导力的培养,是中国特色军事变革对军校教育提出的新要求。分析了军校学员领导力的内涵及构成要素,在考察美军培养经验的基础上,针对我军院校当前现状,对推进我军学员领导力培养的有效途径进行了初步探索。%Cadet Leadership is a battle force in the future battlefield. Strengthening the Cadet Leadership cultivation is the new requirements of the revolution in military affairs with Chinese characteristics on the military education. This paper ana- lyzes the connotation and elements of the cadet leadership, and studies the US cadet leadership cultivation on the basis of experience. In view of the current cultivation deficiencies in the PLA cadet leadership,it undertakes initial exploration on how to accelerate cadet leadership cultivation.

  1. Post-exercise proteinuria in the cadets trained on Special Aerial Gymnastics Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Wochyński

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Assessment of the effect of training on Special Aerial Gymnastics Instruments (SAGI on the urine β-2- microglobulin (β-2M, albumin (ALB, total protein (TP, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase EC.3.2.1.30 (NAG, expressed as creatinine (Cr and on the physical fitness of the examined cadets in comparison with the control group. Material and Methods: The study involved 55 cadets aged 20, divided into group A (N = 41 trained on SAGI, and group B (N = 14 – a control group. The urine was collected twice: before the training (BT and after the training (AT at the start (training I, during (training II, and after completion of the training program (training III. Urine proteins were assayed with commercially available kits. Results: In group A, results obtained in trainings I, II and III showed a statistically significant increase in β-2M/Cr, NAG/Cr, TP/Cr, ALB/Cr indices in AT compared with the baseline BT values. Similarly in group B, a statistically significant increase in β-2M/Cr, NAG/Cr (trainings I, II, TP/Cr, AT compared with the baseline BT values in trainings I, II, and III was noted. Comparison of both groups showed a higher value of the post-exercise proteinuria in group B than in group A. In group A, a significant correlation between TP/Cr vs. ALB/Cr, NAG/Cr vs. TP/Cr, β-2M/Cr vs. TP/Cr, i.e., r = 0.62 at p < 0.001; r = 0.33 at p = 0.03; r = 0.60 at p < 0.001, and r = 0.52 at p < 0.001, respectively, was observed in group A, training III, AT. Conclusions: Assayed urine proteins depend on the intensity of physical exercise, the type of exercise, and the level of physical fitness.

  2. A randomised controlled trial of oxytocin 5IU and placebo infusion versus oxytocin 5IU and 30IU infusion for the control of blood loss at elective caesarean section--pilot study. ISRCTN 40302163.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the blood loss at elective lower segment caesarean section with administration of oxytocin 5IU bolus versus oxytocin 5IU bolus and oxytocin 30IU infusion and to establish whether a large multi-centre trial is feasible. STUDY DESIGN: Women booked for an elective caesarean section were recruited to a pilot randomised controlled trial and randomised to either oxytocin 5IU bolus and placebo infusion or oxytocin 5IU bolus and oxytocin 30IU infusion. We wished to establish whether the study design was feasible and acceptable and to establish sample size estimates for a definitive multi-centre trial. The outcome measures were total estimated blood loss at caesarean section and in the immediate postpartum period and the need for an additional uterotonic agent. RESULTS: A total of 115 women were randomised and 110 were suitable for analysis (5 protocol violations). Despite strict exclusion criteria 84% of the target population were considered eligible for study participation and of those approached only 15% declined to participate and 11% delivered prior to the planned date. The total mean estimated blood loss was lower in the oxytocin infusion arm compared to placebo (567 ml versus 624 ml) and fewer women had a major haemorrhage (>1000 ml, 14% versus 17%) or required an additional uterotonic agent (5% versus 11%). A sample size of 1500 in each arm would be required to demonstrate a 3% absolute reduction in major haemorrhage (from baseline 10%) with >80% power. CONCLUSION: An additional oxytocin infusion at elective caesarean section may reduce blood loss and warrants evaluation in a large multi-centre trial.

  3. Cognitive behaviour therapy plus aerobic exercise training to increase activity in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared to usual care (OPTIMISTIC): study protocol for randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Engelen, B. G.; Groot, Perry

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a rare, inherited chronic progressive disease as well as an autosomal dominant multi-systemic disorder. It is probably one of the most common adult forms of muscular dystrophy, with a prevalence of approximately 10 per 100,000 people affected. With 733 million people in Europe, we estimate that 75,000 people in Europe are affected with DM1. METHODS/DESIGN: OPTIMISTIC is a multi-centre, randomised trial designed to compare an intervention comprisi...

  4. Multi-centre evaluation of the Determine HIV Combo assay when used for point of care testing in a high risk clinic-based population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian P Conway

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Determine HIV Combo (DHC is the first point of care assay designed to increase sensitivity in early infection by detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. We conducted a large multi-centre evaluation of DHC performance in Sydney sexual health clinics. METHODS: We compared DHC performance (overall, by test component and in early infection with conventional laboratory HIV serology (fourth generation screening immunoassay, supplementary HIV antibody, p24 antigen and Western blot tests when testing gay and bisexual men attending four clinic sites. Early infection was defined as either acute or recent HIV infection acquired within the last six months. RESULTS: Of 3,190 evaluation specimens, 39 were confirmed as HIV-positive (12 with early infection and 3,133 were HIV-negative by reference testing. DHC sensitivity was 87.2% overall and 94.4% and 0% for the antibody and antigen components, respectively. Sensitivity in early infection was 66.7% (all DHC antibody reactive and the DHC antigen component detected none of nine HIV p24 antigen positive specimens. Median HIV RNA was higher in false negative than true positive cases (238,025 vs. 37,591 copies/ml; p = 0.022. Specificity overall was 99.4% with the antigen component contributing to 33% of false positives. CONCLUSIONS: The DHC antibody component detected two thirds of those with early infection, while the DHC antigen component did not enhance performance during point of care HIV testing in a high risk clinic-based population.

  5. Multi-Centre Evaluation of the Determine HIV Combo Assay when Used for Point of Care Testing in a High Risk Clinic-Based Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Damian P.; Holt, Martin; McNulty, Anna; Couldwell, Deborah L.; Smith, Don E.; Davies, Stephen C.; Cunningham, Philip; Keen, Phillip; Guy, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Background Determine HIV Combo (DHC) is the first point of care assay designed to increase sensitivity in early infection by detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. We conducted a large multi-centre evaluation of DHC performance in Sydney sexual health clinics. Methods We compared DHC performance (overall, by test component and in early infection) with conventional laboratory HIV serology (fourth generation screening immunoassay, supplementary HIV antibody, p24 antigen and Western blot tests) when testing gay and bisexual men attending four clinic sites. Early infection was defined as either acute or recent HIV infection acquired within the last six months. Results Of 3,190 evaluation specimens, 39 were confirmed as HIV-positive (12 with early infection) and 3,133 were HIV-negative by reference testing. DHC sensitivity was 87.2% overall and 94.4% and 0% for the antibody and antigen components, respectively. Sensitivity in early infection was 66.7% (all DHC antibody reactive) and the DHC antigen component detected none of nine HIV p24 antigen positive specimens. Median HIV RNA was higher in false negative than true positive cases (238,025 vs. 37,591 copies/ml; p = 0.022). Specificity overall was 99.4% with the antigen component contributing to 33% of false positives. Conclusions The DHC antibody component detected two thirds of those with early infection, while the DHC antigen component did not enhance performance during point of care HIV testing in a high risk clinic-based population. PMID:24714441

  6. IMPLEMENTING SELF-ORGANIZED LEARNING FOR THE CADETS OF GRADUATE MILITARY SCHOOLS (The subject Foreign Language Learning taken for instance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. PENNO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered the issues of putting into practice a self-organized learning for the cadets in learning foreign languages at the graduate military school. The requirement to get knowledge with ease that the contemporary society sets and social awareness of the channels to get knowledge by specialists has urged consideration of the above issue, in particular, for the domain of aviation, with emphasis put on learning selves along with career‟ development. The paper specified the teacher‟s task for this case that is creating the favorable environment for the efficient self-organized learning, in particular, with application of multimedia training facilities (CAL = computerassisted learning ones into the training and upgrading procedures. The survey gave consideration to the Tmaker set of tests describing the ways the cadets at the Air Force Academy shall apply the test‟ assignments for the purpose of improving self-scheduled learning skills and testing selves. In addition, the paper specified several characteristics of arranging the self-scheduled learning at the Graduate Military School. To complete the author submitted the data to confirm shaping of an affirmative attitude in the cadets to self-organized learning while a recurrent use of the mentioned set of tests.

  7. Cadet Education in the Imperial Russia: Genesis, Dialectics and the Role in Social Structure of the Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Abramov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article, using historic and sociological material, presents genesis, dialectics and the role of cadet education of the imperial Russia in the social structure of the society, its weak and strong aspects, determines major stratified features of its graduates. The author notes that the realization of the practice of professional socialization in cadet corps in certain historical period is determined by the social conditions and the factors of the development of the society, its structure and environment, reproducing the modal personality of the future officer. The professional environment of the cadet education in the imperial Russia is defined as closed, line, self-organizing system. Such environment provided the graduates with high social status and prestige in different fields, defined by generic characteristics (affiliation to nobility. Along with high educational and cultural level, modal personality of the graduate is characterized by aloofness from the juniors and subordinates, individualism and careerism, certain closedness towards one’s nation and other social groups.

  8. Bem-Estar Subjetivo e Burnout em Cadetes Militares: O Papel Mediador da Autoeficácia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Albuquerque Sá Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ResumoEste trabalho tem por objetivo testar a hipótese de que a autoeficácia atua como mediador entre o bem-estar subjetivo e o burnout. Participaram 228 cadetes, com idade média de 24 anos (DP = 0,85, sendo 148 policiais e 80 bombeiros. As análises de regressão demonstram que as variáveis do bem-estar subjetivo, principalmente a vitalidade subjetiva e os afetos negativos, predizem significativamente o burnout e suas subdimensões. As análises de mediação feitas provêm evidências empíricas satisfatórias para o papel mediador desempenhado pela autoeficácia. Esses resultados poderão apoiar o planejamento de intervenções que visem o fortalecimento da autoeficácia em cadetes. A academia deve fornecer aos cadetes não apenas as técnicas e conhecimentos imprescindíveis para a atuação profissional, mas também proporcionar o desenvolvimento de mecanismos de autorregulação que possibilitem um senso maior de autoeficácia, além de condições educacionais e laborais adequadas.

  9. Recommendations for implementing stereotactic radiotherapy in peripheral stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: report from the Quality Assurance Working Party of the randomised phase III ROSEL study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phase III multi-centre randomised trial (ROSEL) has been initiated to establish the role of stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with operable stage IA lung cancer. Due to rapid changes in radiotherapy technology and evolving techniques for image-guided delivery, guidelines had to be developed in order to ensure uniformity in implementation of stereotactic radiotherapy in this multi-centre study. A Quality Assurance Working Party was formed by radiation oncologists and clinical physicists from both academic as well as non-academic hospitals that had already implemented stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer. A literature survey was conducted and consensus meetings were held in which both the knowledge from the literature and clinical experience were pooled. In addition, a planning study was performed in 26 stage I patients, of which 22 were stage 1A, in order to develop and evaluate the planning guidelines. Plans were optimised according to parameters adopted from RTOG trials using both an algorithm with a simple homogeneity correction (Type A) and a more advanced algorithm (Type B). Dose conformity requirements were then formulated based on these results. Based on current literature and expert experience, guidelines were formulated for this phase III study of stereotactic radiotherapy versus surgery. These guidelines can serve to facilitate the design of future multi-centre clinical trials of stereotactic radiotherapy in other patient groups and aid a more uniform implementation of this technique outside clinical trials

  10. Randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, C; Lødrup, A B; Smith, G;

    2016-01-01

    of an alginate (Gaviscon Advance, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) on reflux symptoms in patients with persistent symptoms despite once daily PPI. METHODS: This was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-day double-blind trial preceded by a 7-day run-in period. Reflux symptoms were assessed using...

  11. The PneuCarriage Project: A Multi-Centre Comparative Study to Identify the Best Serotyping Methods for Examining Pneumococcal Carriage in Vaccine Evaluation Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Satzke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The pneumococcus is a diverse pathogen whose primary niche is the nasopharynx. Over 90 different serotypes exist, and nasopharyngeal carriage of multiple serotypes is common. Understanding pneumococcal carriage is essential for evaluating the impact of pneumococcal vaccines. Traditional serotyping methods are cumbersome and insufficient for detecting multiple serotype carriage, and there are few data comparing the new methods that have been developed over the past decade. We established the PneuCarriage project, a large, international multi-centre study dedicated to the identification of the best pneumococcal serotyping methods for carriage studies.Reference sample sets were distributed to 15 research groups for blinded testing. Twenty pneumococcal serotyping methods were used to test 81 laboratory-prepared (spiked samples. The five top-performing methods were used to test 260 nasopharyngeal (field samples collected from children in six high-burden countries. Sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV were determined for the test methods and the reference method (traditional serotyping of >100 colonies from each sample. For the alternate serotyping methods, the overall sensitivity ranged from 1% to 99% (reference method 98%, and PPV from 8% to 100% (reference method 100%, when testing the spiked samples. Fifteen methods had ≥70% sensitivity to detect the dominant (major serotype, whilst only eight methods had ≥70% sensitivity to detect minor serotypes. For the field samples, the overall sensitivity ranged from 74.2% to 95.8% (reference method 93.8%, and PPV from 82.2% to 96.4% (reference method 99.6%. The microarray had the highest sensitivity (95.8% and high PPV (93.7%. The major limitation of this study is that not all of the available alternative serotyping methods were included.Most methods were able to detect the dominant serotype in a sample, but many performed poorly in detecting the minor serotype populations. Microarray with a

  12. Efficacy and safety of artemisinin-naphthoquine versus dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in adult patients with uncomplicated malaria: a multi-centre study in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjitra Emiliana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A practical and simple regimen for all malaria species is needed towards malaria elimination in Indonesia. It is worth to compare the efficacy and safety of a single dose of artemisinin-naphthoquine (AN with a three-day regimen of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHP, the existing programme drug, in adults with uncomplicated symptomatic malaria. Methods This is a phase III, randomized, open label using sealed envelopes, multi-centre, comparative study between a single dose of AN and a three-day dose of DHP in Jayapura and Maumere. The modified WHO inclusion and exclusion criteria for efficacy study were used in this trial. A total of 401 eligible adult malaria subjects were hospitalized for three days and randomly treated with AN four tablets single dose on day 0 or DHP three to four tablets single daily dose for three days, and followed for 42 days for physical examination, thick and thin smears microscopy, and other necessary tests. The efficacy of drug was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR uncorrected and corrected. Results There were 153 Plasmodium falciparum, 158 Plasmodium vivax and 90 P. falciparum/P. vivax malaria. Mean of fever clearance times were similar, 13.0 ± 10.3 hours in AN and 11.3 ± 7.3 hours in DHP groups. The mean of parasite clearance times were longer in AN compared with DHP (28.0 ± 11.7 hours vs 25.5 ± 12.2 hours, p = 0.04. There were only 12 PCR-corrected P. falciparum late treatment failures: seven in AN and five in DHP groups. The PCR uncorrected and corrected on day −42 of adequate clinical and parasitological responses for treatment of any malaria were 93.7% (95% Cl: 90.3–97.2 and 96.3% (95% Cl: 93.6–99.0 in AN, 96.3% (95% Cl: 93.5–99.0 and 97.3% (95% Cl: 95.0–99.6 in DHP groups. Few and mild adverse events were reported. All the abnormal haematology and blood chemistry values had no clinical abnormality. Conclusion AN and DHP are confirmed very effective

  13. Implementation of preventive strength training in residential geriatric care: a multi-centre study protocol with one year of interventions on multiple levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieder Ulrike

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is scientific evidence that preventive physical exercise is effective even in high age. In contrast, there are few opportunities of preventive exercise for highly aged people endangered by or actually in need of care. For example, they would not be able to easily go to training facilities; standard exercises may be too intensive and therefore be harmful to them; orientation disorders like dementia would exacerbate individuals and groups in following instructions and keeping exercises going. In order to develop appropriate interventions, these and other issues were assigned to different levels: the individual-social level (ISL, the organisational-institutional level (OIL and the political-cultural level (PCL. Consequently, this conceptional framework was utilised for development, implementation and evaluation of a new strength and balance exercise programme for old people endangered by or actually in need of daily care. The present paper contains the development of this programme labeled "fit for 100", and a study protocol of an interventional single-arm multi-centre trial. Methods The intervention consisted of (a two group training sessions every week over one year, mainly resistance exercises, accompanied by sensorimotor and communicative group exercises and games (ISL, (b a sustainable implementation concept, starting new groups by instructors belonging to the project, followed by training and supervision of local staff, who stepwise take over the group (OIL, (c informing and convincing activities in professional, administrative and governmental contexts, public relation activities, and establishing an advisory council with renowned experts and public figures (PCL. Participating institutions of geriatric care were selected through several steps of quality criteria assessment. Primary outcome measures were continuous documentation of individual participation (ISL, number of groups continued without external financial

  14. Nine-Months Clinical Outcome of Biodegradable Polymer Coated Sirolimus-eluting Stent System: A Multi-Centre “Real-World” Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Jayesh; Raheem, Asif; Thakkar, Kamlesh; Kothari, Shivani; Thakkar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background The main culprit in first-generation drug eluting stents is ‘durable’ polymer, whose continuous presence may impair arterial healing and ultimately have a negative impact on late outcomes. The main enigma behind the biodegradable polymer usage is its degradation after elution of drug. This reduces adverse events in unselected patients with complex coronary artery lesions treated with biodegradable polymer coated sirolimus-eluting stents. Aim The aim of the INDOLIMUS-G Registry was to evaluate safety and efficacy of the Indolimus (Sahajanand Medical Technologies Pvt. Ltd., Surat, India) sirolimus-eluting stents in large cohorts of unselected patients with complex coronary artery lesions. Materials and Methods It is a multi-centre, non-randomized retrospective registry with a clear aim of evaluating safety and efficacy of the Indolimus sirolimus-eluting stents in consecutive patients enrolled between April 2012 and May 2014. The primary end-point of the study was major adverse cardiac events (MACE), which is a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), target lesion revascularization (TLR), target vessel revascularization (TVR) and stent thrombosis (ST) at the end of follow-up. Clinical follow-up were scheduled at the end of 30-days, 6-months, and 9-months period. Results The mean age of enrolled patients was 52.6 ± 11.0 years. A total of 1137 lesions were intervened successfully with 1242 stents (1.09 ± 0.30 stent per lesion). The average stent length and diameter was 27.42 ± 9.01 mm and 3.12 ± 0.36 mm respectively. There were 740 (73.40%) male patients, indicating their high prevalence. Diabetes, hypertension and totally occluded lesions were found in 372 (36.90%), 408 (40.47%) and 170 (16.86%) patients, respectively. This showed that study also included high risk complex lesions and not ideal recruited lesions. The incidence of MACE at 30-days, 6-months and 9-months were 3 (0.30%), 18 (1.80%) and 22 (2.20%) respectively. At 9-months

  15. Increasing walking in patients with intermittent claudication: Protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Carroll Ronan E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with intermittent claudication are at increased risk of death from heart attack and stroke compared to matched controls. Surgery for intermittent claudication is for symptom management and does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Increasing physical activity can reduce claudication symptoms and may improve cardiovascular health. This paper presents the pilot study protocol for a randomised controlled trial to test whether a brief psychological intervention leads to increased physical activity, improvement in quality of life, and a reduction in the demand for surgery, for patients with intermittent claudication. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 patients newly diagnosed with intermittent claudication, who will be randomised into two groups. The control group will receive usual care, and the treatment group will receive usual care and a brief 2-session psychological intervention to modify illness and walking beliefs and develop a walking action plan. The primary outcome will be walking, measured by pedometer. Secondary outcomes will include quality of life and uptake of surgery for symptom management. Participants will be followed up after (a 4 months, (b 1 year and (c 2 years. Discussion This study will assess the acceptability and efficacy of a brief psychological intervention to increase walking in patients with intermittent claudication, both in terms of the initiation, and maintenance of behaviour change. This is a pilot study, and the results will inform the design of a larger multi-centre trial. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN28051878

  16. Multiple types of motives don't multiply the motivation of West Point cadets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesniewski, Amy; Schwartz, Barry; Cong, Xiangyu; Kane, Michael; Omar, Audrey; Kolditz, Thomas

    2014-07-29

    Although people often assume that multiple motives for doing something will be more powerful and effective than a single motive, research suggests that different types of motives for the same action sometimes compete. More specifically, research suggests that instrumental motives, which are extrinsic to the activities at hand, can weaken internal motives, which are intrinsic to the activities at hand. We tested whether holding both instrumental and internal motives yields negative outcomes in a field context in which various motives occur naturally and long-term educational and career outcomes are at stake. We assessed the impact of the motives of over 10,000 West Point cadets over the period of a decade on whether they would become commissioned officers, extend their officer service beyond the minimum required period, and be selected for early career promotions. For each outcome, motivation internal to military service itself predicted positive outcomes; a relationship that was negatively affected when instrumental motives were also in evidence. These results suggest that holding multiple motives damages persistence and performance in educational and occupational contexts over long periods of time. PMID:24982165

  17. Performance indicators total control exercises on a single obstacle cadets during their initial training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan Anatskyi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the level of the results of the exercise "obstacle course" students of the National Academy of the National Guard of Ukraine, identify common mistakes. Material and Methods: the study involved 46 students of the first year, which took basic training. We used the following methods: theoretical analysis and synthesis of scientific and instructional materials, teacher observation, testing, peer review, methods of mathematical statistics. Results: it was noted that the classes with students to overcome the single obstacle course aimed at the development and improvement of skills in overcoming the artificial and natural obstacles, throwing grenades and performing special moves and actions, development of speed and speed strength endurance, improving skills for collective action on the background strenuous exercise, nurturing self-confidence, courage and determination. The study revealed that the students specialty "Management of the actions of special forces" demonstrate better endurance than the students specialty "Automobiles and automobile industry." Compared with the regulations given in the Manual of physical training and sports of Interior Troops of Ukraine, the data correspond to the evaluation "below satisfactory". With the help of teacher observations and peer review were identified common mistakes that allow the cadets during the passage of the obstacle. Conclusions: the characteristics of the obstacle course: the time, the number of hitting the target and typical errors will improve the physical fitness of students in subsequent studies.

  18. Effect of osteosynthesis, primary hemiarthroplasty, and non-surgical management for displaced four-part fractures of the proximal humerus in elderly: a multi-centre, randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Frich, Lars Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    will be followed at least one year. The primary outcomes will be the overall score on the Constant Disability Scale, and its pain subscale, measured at 12 months. A blinded physiotherapist will carry out the assessments. Other secondary outcomes are Oxford Shoulder Score, and general health status (Short Form-36)....

  19. Cognitive training plus a comprehensive psychosocial programme (OPUS versus the comprehensive psychosocial programme alone for patients with first-episode schizophrenia (the NEUROCOM trial: A study protocol for a centrally randomised, observer-blinded multi-centre clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melau Marianne

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 85% of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate cognitive dysfunction in at least one domain. Cognitive dysfunction plays a major role in functional outcome. It is hypothesized that addition of cognitive training to a comprehensive psychosocial programme (OPUS enhances both cognitive and everyday functional capacity of patients more than the comprehensive psychosocial programme alone. Methods The NEUROCOM trial examines the effect on cognitive functioning and everyday functional capacity of patients with schizophrenia of a 16-week manualised programme of individual cognitive training integrated in a comprehensive psychosocial programme versus the comprehensive psychosocial programme alone. The cognitive training consists of four modules focusing on attention, executive functioning, learning, and memory. Cognitive training involves computer-assisted training tasks as well as practical everyday tasks and calendar training. It takes place twice a week, and every other week the patient and trainer engage in a dialogue on the patient's cognitive difficulties, motivational goals, and progress in competence level. Cognitive training relies on errorless learning principles, scaffolding, and verbalisation in its effort to improve cognitive abilities and teach patients how to apply compensation strategies as well as structured problem solving techniques. At 16-week post-training and at ten-months follow-up, assessments are conducted to investigate immediate outcome and possible long-term effects of cognitive training. We conduct blinded assessments of cognition, everyday functional capacity and associations with the labour market, symptom severity, and self-esteem. Discussion Results from four-month and ten-month follow-ups have the potential of reliably providing documentation of the long-term effect of CT for patients with schizophrenia. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00472862.

  20. Study protocol. IDUS - Instrumental delivery & ultrasound: a multi-centre randomised controlled trial of ultrasound assessment of the fetal head position versus standard care as an approach to prevent morbidity at instrumental delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-01-01

    Instrumental deliveries are commonly performed in the United Kingdom and Ireland, with rates of 12 - 17% in most centres. Knowing the exact position of the fetal head is a pre-requisite for safe instrumental delivery. Traditionally, diagnosis of the fetal head position is made on transvaginal digital examination by delineating the suture lines of the fetal skull and the fontanelles. However, the accuracy of transvaginal digital examination can be unreliable and varies between 20% and 75%. Failure to identify the correct fetal head position increases the likelihood of failed instrumental delivery with the additional morbidity of sequential use of instruments or second stage caesarean section. The use of ultrasound in determining the position of the fetal head has been explored but is not part of routine clinical practice.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of an integrated 'fast track' rehabilitation service for multi-trauma patients involving dedicated early rehabilitation intervention programs: design of a prospective, multi-centre, non-randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmen Bena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In conventional multi-trauma care service (CTCS, patients are admitted to hospital via the accident & emergency room. After surgery they are transferred to the IC-unit followed by the general surgery ward. Ensuing treatment takes place in a hospital's outpatient clinic, a rehabilitation centre, a nursing home or the community. Typically, each of the CTCS partners may have its own more or less autonomous treatment perspective. Clinical evidence, however, suggests that an integrated multi-trauma rehabilitation approach ('Supported Fast-track multi-Trauma Rehabilitation Service': SFTRS, featuring: 1 earlier transfer to a specialised trauma rehabilitation unit; 2 earlier start of 'non-weight-bearing' training and multidisciplinary treatment; 3 well-documented treatment protocols; 4 early individual goal-setting; 5 co-ordination of treatment between trauma surgeon and physiatrist, and 6 shorter lengths-of-stay, may be more (cost-effective. This paper describes the design of a prospective cohort study evaluating the (cost- effectiveness of SFTRS relative to CTCS. Methods/design The study population includes multi-trauma patients, admitted to one of the participating hospitals, with an Injury Severity Scale score > = 16, complex multiple injuries in several extremities or complex pelvic and/or acetabulum fractures. In a prospective cohort study CTCS and SFTRS will be contrasted. The inclusion period is 19 months. The duration of follow-up is 12 months, with measurements taken at baseline, and at 3,6,9 and 12 months post-injury. Primary outcome measures are 'quality of life' (SF-36 and 'functional health status' (Functional Independence Measure. Secondary outcome measures are the Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale, the Mini-Mental State Examination as an indicator of cognitive functioning, and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure measuring the extent to which individual ADL treatment goals are met. Costs will be assessed using the PROductivity and DISease Questionnaire and a cost questionnaire. Discussion The study will yield results on the efficiency of an adapted care service for multi-trauma patients (SFTRS featuring earlier (and condensed involvement of specialised rehabilitation treatment. Results will show whether improved SFTRS logistics, combined with shorter stays in hospital and rehabilitation clinic and specialised early rehabilitation training modules are more (cost- effective, relative to CTCS. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials register (ISRCTN68246661 and Netherlands Trial Register (NTR139.

  2. Standing up in multiple sclerosis (SUMS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of a home-based self-management standing frame programme in people with progressive multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, J. A.; Hendrie, W.; Creanor, S.; Jarrett, L.; Barton, A; Green, C.; Marsden, J.; Rogers, E.; Zajicek, J

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable, unpredictable but typically progressive neurological condition. It is the most common cause of neurological disability in young adults. Within 15 years of diagnosis, approximately 50 % of affected people are unable to walk unaided, and over time an estimated 25 % depend on a wheelchair. Typically, people with such limited mobility are excluded from clinical trials. Severely impaired people with MS spend much of their day sitting, often with ...

  3. Análisis de las acciones técnicas de los judokas cadetes participantes en el campeonato de España. (Analysis of technical actions of the judoist cadets participating in the judo championship of Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Carratalá Deval

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl entrenamiento del judoka dada su amplia estructura técnica, su dimensión táctica, su estructuración por categorías de peso y la incertidumbre creada por el adversario, muestra diversos y complejos aspectos a considerar, que deben ser analizados en situación real de competición. Desde esta perspectiva, la presente investigación tiene como objetivos identificar las características técnicas y tácticas de los judokas cadetes masculinos de nivel nacional, en cada una de las categorías de peso, a través del análisis de las acciones técnicas más utilizadas por los participantes en el campeonato de España de judo cadete. La muestra está formada por 128 judokas cadetes masculinos, de los que se analizaron 121 combates. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo con el análisis de las siguientes variables: las diferentes categorías de peso, las técnicas más utilizadas para la consecución de las ventajas técnicas y el minuto del combate en el que se produce la ventaja y las sanciones arbitrales. De los resultados se extrae que los judokas se caracterizan por utilizar en mayor medida las técnicas de te-waza, con un alto porcentaje de aplicación de seoi-nage y kata-guruma, seguidas por las técnicas de sutemi-waza y las técnicas de ashi-waza. Se obtienen un elevado número de ventajas técnicas mediante sanciones arbitrales por pasividad y falso ataque. En función del tiempo, es durante el primer y segundo minuto donde se producen el mayor número de ventajas técnicas, con predominio de las técnicas de tewaza y el sutemi-waza, acentuándose las ventajas por sanción arbitral en el segundo minuto. Abstract The training of the judoka, given its wide technical structure, its tactical dimension, its division into weight categories and the uncertainty created by the adversary, shows diverse and complex aspects to be considered and analyzed in real competitive situations. From this perspective, the objective of the present research

  4. Effects of High Intensity and Sprint Interval Training Frequency on 1.5 Mile Run Times in Air Force ROTC Cadets

    OpenAIRE

    Dahle, Jared Hill

    2016-01-01

    The effects of varying high intensity interval training (HIIT) and sprint interval training (SIT) frequency on 1.5 mile (2.4km) run performance in Air Force ROTC cadets were studied. Twenty-seven cadets (21.6 ± 2.8 years) were stratified then randomly assigned to 3 groups: a high frequency group (HF) that performed HIIT/SIT 3x week, a low frequency group (LF) that performed HIIT/SIT 2x week, and a continuous training group (CG) that performed moderate intensity training 3x week. HIIT workou...

  5. MUSCLE STRENGTH AND QUALITATIVE JUMP-LANDING DIFFERENCES IN MALE AND FEMALE MILITARY CADETS: THE JUMP-ACL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry P. Boden

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have focused on gender differences in movement patterns as risk factors for ACL injury. Understanding intrinsic and extrinsic factors which contribute to movement patterns is critical to ACL injury prevention efforts. Isometric lower- extremity muscular strength, anthropometrics, and jump-landing technique were analyzed for 2,753 cadets (1,046 female, 1,707 male from the U.S. Air Force, Military and Naval Academies. Jump- landings were evaluated using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS, a valid qualitative movement screening tool. We hypothesized that distinct anthropometric factors (Q-angle, navicular drop, bodyweight and muscle strength would predict poor jump-landing technique in males versus females, and that female cadets would have higher scores (more errors on a qualitative movement screen (LESS than males. Mean LESS scores were significantly higher in female (5.34 ± 1.51 versus male (4.65 ± 1.69 cadets (p < 0.001. Qualitative movement scores were analyzed using factor analyses, yielding five factors, or "patterns", contributing to poor landing technique. Females were significantly more likely to have poor technique due to landing with less hip and knee flexion at initial contact (p < 0.001, more knee valgus with wider landing stance (p < 0. 001, and less flexion displacement over the entire landing (p < 0.001. Males were more likely to have poor technique due to landing toe-out (p < 0.001, with heels first, and with an asymmetric foot landing (p < 0.001. Many of the identified factor patterns have been previously proposed to contribute to ACL injury risk. However, univariate and multivariate analyses of muscular strength and anthropometric factors did not strongly predict LESS scores for either gender, suggesting that changing an athlete's alignment, BMI, or muscle strength may not directly improve his or her movement patterns

  6. Perfil cognitivo y emocional de los jugadores del Campeonato de España de Voleibol Infantil y Cadete 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Arroyo, M. Perla; Claver Rabaz, Fernando; Gil Arias, A.; Moreno Domínguez, Alberto; Jiménez Castuera, R.

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo del estudio fue identificar el perfil cognitivo y emocional que caracteriza a los jugadores del Campeonato de España de voleibol de selecciones autonómicas de categorías infantil y cadete. La muestra de estudio estuvo compuesta por 503 participantes (208 chicos y 295 chicas) con edades comprendidas entre los 12 y los 16 años (M: 14.68; DT: 1.09). Para el acceso a las variables motivación, necesidades psicológicas básicas, ansiedad, percepción de habilidad, experiencia autotélica, ...

  7. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME therapy following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes Emma

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744

  8. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME) therapy following stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Rose; Cusack, Tara; Stokes, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s) assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744) PMID:18570643

  9. PECULIARITIES OF TRAINING AND EDUCATION OF CADETS OF MARITIME UNIVERSITIES IN THE FORMER SOVIET REPUBLICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomilina S. N.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the analysis of documents, publications of scientists and periodical materials we considered particular training and education of cadets and students of maritime educational institutions in the post-Soviet republics. The acquisition of independence by the former Soviet republics demanded the creation and strengthening of their own statehood. The most important task for the newly independent states was the establishment of an effective system of higher professional education (HPE, for the purpose of training national personnel for its own economy. One of the components of HPE for each republic is marine colleges. Establishment of Maritime Universities in those young states has been performed, in a rather short period. The most characteristic of them is a reorientation of the teaching factor of educational activities in the international and European standards. Now the system of training in marine universities meet the requirements of the International Convection on Training and Certification and Watch keeping for Seafarers, as amended, and other international conventions, which gives graduates the right to work on all types of vessels of domestic and foreign shipping companies. Nevertheless, for the process of educating and education of future naval professionals some problems are peculiar related to the lacks of the special and educational literature on national languages, by the shortage of the prepared teachers with experience of swimming on the courts of marine transport, sufficient financing. In educator work with students of marine institutions of higher education, a course is taken on forming patriotism for them, tolerance, volunteering, nationally spiritual values. Practically for every former soviet republic in patriotic education of students it is peculiar to have a specific system, features, but at the same time there are general lines: system, orientation on national traditions, close connection with a defensive

  10. A multi-centre clinical follow-up database as a systematic approach to the evaluation of mid- and long-term health consequences in Chernobyl acute radiation syndrome patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes scope, design and first results of a multi-centre follow-up database that has been established for the evaluation of mid- and long-term health consequences of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) survivors. After the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986, 237 cases with suspected acute radiation syndrome have been reported. For 134 of these cases the diagnosis of ARS was confirmed in a consensus conference three years after the accident. Nearly all survivors underwent regular follow-up examinations in two specialized centres in Kiev and in Moscow. In collaboration with these centres we established a multi-centre clinical follow-up database that records the results of the follow-up examinations in a standardized schema. This database is an integral part of a five step approach to patient evaluation and aims at a comprehensive base for scientific analysis of the mid- and long-term consequences of accidental ionizing radiation. It will allow for a dynamic view on the development of the health status of individuals and groups of patients as well as the identification of critical organ systems that need early support, and an improvement of acute and follow-up treatment protocols for radiation accident victims

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of H1/IC31®, an adjuvanted TB subunit vaccine, in HIV-infected adults with CD4+ lymphocyte counts greater than 350 cells/mm3: a phase II, multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reither

    Full Text Available Novel tuberculosis vaccines should be safe, immunogenic, and effective in various population groups, including HIV-infected individuals. In this phase II multi-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, the safety and immunogenicity of the novel H1/IC31 vaccine, a fusion protein of Ag85B-ESAT-6 (H1 formulated with the adjuvant IC31, was evaluated in HIV-infected adults.HIV-infected adults with CD4+ T cell counts >350/mm3 and without evidence of active tuberculosis were enrolled and followed until day 182. H1/IC31 vaccine or placebo was randomly allocated in a 5:1 ratio. The vaccine was administered intramuscularly at day 0 and 56. Safety assessment was based on medical history, clinical examinations, and blood and urine testing. Immunogenicity was determined by a short-term whole blood intracellular cytokine staining assay.47 of the 48 randomised participants completed both vaccinations. In total, 459 mild or moderate and 2 severe adverse events were reported. There were three serious adverse events in two vaccinees classified as not related to the investigational product. Local injection site reactions were more common in H1/IC31 versus placebo recipients (65.0% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.015. Solicited systemic and unsolicited adverse events were similar by study arm. The baseline CD4+ T cell count and HIV viral load were similar by study arm and remained constant over time. The H1/IC31 vaccine induced a persistent Th1-immune response with predominately TNF-α and IL-2 co-expressing CD4+ T cells, as well as polyfunctional IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 expressing CD4+ T cells.H1/IC31 was well tolerated and safe in HIV-infected adults with a CD4+ Lymphocyte count greater than 350 cells/mm3. The vaccine did not have an effect on CD4+ T cell count or HIV-1 viral load. H1/IC31 induced a specific and durable Th1 immune response.Pan African Clinical Trials Registry (PACTR PACTR201105000289276.

  12. Protocol for the Arterial Revascularisation Trial (ART. A randomised trial to compare survival following bilateral versus single internal mammary grafting in coronary revascularisation [ISRCTN46552265

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flather Marcus

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard coronary artery bypass graft surgery uses a single internal mammary artery and supplemental vein or radial artery grafts. Several observational studies have suggested a survival benefit with two internal mammary artery grafts compared to a single internal mammary artery graft, but this has not been tested in a randomised trial. The Arterial Revascularisation Trial is a Medical Research Council and British Heart Foundation funded, multi-centre international trial comparing single internal mammary artery grafting versus bilateral internal mammary artery grafting. Methods/Design Twenty centres in the UK, Australia, Poland and Brazil are planning to randomise 3000 coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients to single or bilateral internal mammary artery grafting. Supplemental grafts may be either saphenous vein or radial artery. Coronary artery bypass grafting can be performed as an on-pump or off-pump procedure. The primary outcome is survival at 10 years and secondary end-points include clinical events, quality of life and cost effectiveness. The effect of age, left ventricular function, diabetes, number of grafts, vein grafts and off-pump surgery are pre-specified subgroups. Discussion The Arterial Revascularisation Trial is one of the first randomised trials to evaluate the effects on survival and other clinical outcomes of single internal mammary artery grafting versus bilateral internal mammary artery grafting, and will help to establish the best approach for patients requiring coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

  13. Study protocol: SPARCLE – a multi-centre European study of the relationship of environment to participation and quality of life in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colver Allan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SPARCLE is a nine-centre European epidemiological research study examining the relationship of participation and quality of life to impairment and environment (physical, social and attitudinal in 8–12 year old children with cerebral palsy. Concepts are adopted from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health which bridges the medical and social models of disability. Methods/Design A cross sectional study of children with cerebral palsy sampled from total population databases in 9 European regions. Children were visited by research associates in each country who had been trained together. The main instruments used were KIDSCREEN, Life-H, Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire, Parenting Stress Index. A measure of environment was developed within the study. All instruments were translated according to international guidelines. The potential for bias due to non response and missing data will be examined. After initial analysis using multivariate regression of how the data captured by each instrument relate to impairment and socio-economic characteristics, relationships between the latent traits captured by the instruments will then be analysed using structural equation modelling. Discussion This study is original in its methods by directly engaging children themselves, ensuring those with learning or communication difficulty are not excluded, and by studying in quantitative terms the crucial outcomes of participation and quality of life. Specification and publication of this protocol prior to analysis, which is not common in epidemiology but well established for randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews, should avoid the pitfalls of data dredging and post hoc analyses.

  14. TIPIT: A randomised controlled trial of thyroxine in preterm infants under 28 weeks gestation: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Angiography protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sze M., Ng,; Mark A., Turner; Carrol, Gamble,; Mohammed, Didi,; Victor, Suresh,; Christina, Malamateniou,; Laura M., Parkes,; Tietze, Anna; Lloyd, Gregory,; Vanessa, Sluming,; Laurence, Abernethy,; Alan M., Weindling,

    2008-01-01

    Background Infants born at extreme prematurity are at high risk of developmental disability. A major risk factor for disability is having a low level of thyroid hormone described as hypothyroxinaemia, which is recognised to be a frequent phenomenon in these infants. Derangements of critical thyroid...... function during the sensitive window in prematurity when early development occurs, may have a range of long term effects for brain development. Further research in preterm infants using neuroimaging techniques will increase our understanding of the specificity of the effects of hypothyroxinaemia on the......-pituitary-adrenal axis. Methods The study is a multi-centred double blinded randomised controlled trial of thyroid hormone supplementation in babies born below 28 weeks' gestation. All infants will receive either levothyroxine or placebo until 32 weeks corrected gestational age. The primary outcomes will be width of the...

  15. Commercial weight loss diets meet nutrient requirements in free living adults over 8 weeks: A randomised controlled weight loss trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macdonald Ian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate the effect of commercial weight loss programmes on macronutrient composition and micronutrient adequacy over a 2 month period. Design Adults were randomly allocated to follow the Slim Fast Plan, Weight Watchers Pure Points Programme, Dr Atkins' New Diet Revolution, or Rosemary Conley's "Eat Yourself Slim" Diet & Fitness Plan. Setting A multi-centre randomised controlled trial. Subjects 293 adults, mean age 40.3 years and a mean BMI 31.7 (range 27–38 were allocated to follow one of the four diets or control group. Subjects completed a 7-day food and activity diary at baseline (prior to randomisation and after 2 months. Diet records were analysed for nutrient composition using WinDiets (research version. Results A significant shift in the macronutrient composition of the diet with concurrent alteration of the micronutrient profile was apparent with all diets. There was no evidence to suggest micronutrient deficiency in subjects on any of the dietary regimens. However, those sub-groups with higher needs for specific micronutrients, such as folate, iron or calcium may benefit from tailored dietary advice. Conclusion The diets tested all resulted in considerable macronutrient change and resulted in an energy deficit indicating dietary compliance. Health professionals and those working in community and public health should be reassured of the nutritional adequacy of the diets tested. Trial Registration Number NCT00327821

  16. Preventing mood and anxiety disorders in youth: a multi-centre RCT in the high risk offspring of depressed and anxious patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauta Maaike H

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety and mood disorders are highly prevalent and pose a huge burden on patients. Their offspring is at increased risk of developing these disorders as well, indicating a clear need for prevention of psychopathology in this group. Given high comorbidity and non-specificity of intergenerational transmission of disorders, prevention programs should target both anxiety and depression. Further, while the indication for preventive interventions is often elevated symptoms, offspring with other high risk profiles may also benefit from resilience-based prevention programs. Method/design The current STERK-study (Screening and Training: Enhancing Resilience in Kids is a randomized controlled clinical trial combining selected and indicated prevention: it is targeted at both high risk individuals without symptoms and at those with subsyndromal symptoms. Individuals without symptoms meet two of three criteria of the High Risk Index (HRI; female gender, both parents affected, history of a parental suicide (attempt. This index was developed in an earlier study and corresponds with elevated risk in offspring of depressed patients. Children aged 8–17 years (n = 204 with subthreshold symptoms or meeting the criteria on the HRI are randomised to one of two treatment conditions, namely (a 10 weekly individual child CBT sessions and 2 parent sessions or (b minimal information. Assessments are held at pre-test, post-test and at 12 and 24 months follow-up. Primary outcome is the time to onset of a mood or anxiety disorder in the offspring. Secondary outcome measures include number of days with depression or anxiety, child and parent symptom levels, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. Based on models of aetiology of mood and anxiety disorders as well as mechanisms of change during interventions, we selected potential mediators and moderators of treatment outcome, namely coping, parent–child interaction, self-associations, optimism

  17. The nutrition-based comprehensive intervention study on childhood obesity in China (NISCOC: a randomised cluster controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Guifa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity and its related metabolic and psychological abnormalities are becoming serious health problems in China. Effective, feasible and practical interventions should be developed in order to prevent the childhood obesity and its related early onset of clinical cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a multi-centred random controlled school-based clinical intervention for childhood obesity in China. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of the comprehensive intervention strategy with two other interventions, one only focuses on nutrition education, the other only focuses on physical activity. Methods/Design The study is designed as a multi-centred randomised controlled trial, which included 6 centres located in Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing, Shandong province, Heilongjiang province and Guangdong province. Both nutrition education (special developed carton style nutrition education handbook and physical activity intervention (Happy 10 program will be applied in all intervention schools of 5 cities except Beijing. In Beijing, nutrition education intervention will be applied in 3 schools and physical activity intervention among another 3 schools. A total of 9750 primary students (grade 1 to grade 5, aged 7-13 years will participate in baseline and intervention measurements, including weight, height, waist circumference, body composition (bioelectrical impendence device, physical fitness, 3 days dietary record, physical activity questionnaire, blood pressure, plasma glucose and plasma lipid profiles. Data concerning investments will be collected in our study, including costs in staff training, intervention materials, teachers and school input and supervising related expenditure. Discussion Present study is the first and biggest multi-center comprehensive childhood obesity intervention study in China. Should the study produce comprehensive results, the

  18. Effect of exercise on Special Aviation Gymnastics Instruments on blood serum levels of selected biochemical indices in cadets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Wochyński

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aim of this study was the training effect evaluation on the Special Aviation Gymnastics Instruments (SAGI on blood metallothionein (MT, zinc (Zn, copper (Cu, protein, neuron-specific enolase (NSE, and physical fitness in the examined cadets. Material and methods. The study comprised 55 cadets, aged 20, divided into two groups: examined group A (N=41 and control group B (N=14. In both groups, blood material was collected twice, i.e. before (baseline and after training (series I, during (series II, and after completion of training on the SAGI (Series III. Blood serum MT, Zn, Cu, protein, and NSE were assayed with commercially available kits. Physical fitness was assessed with commonly used fitness tests. Results. A significant decrease in serum MT was noted in both groups in all three series of assays after training, except group B in series II. NSE significantly increased in group A in series II after training. NSE activity increased significantly in group B in series I and III. In both groups, a significant decrease in blood serum Zn was noted after training in series I and II. Serum Cu significantly decreased in group A in all three series of assays. Blood serum protein significantly decreased in group A in series III. In series II, blood serum protein increased significantly in both groups. The remaining values were not changed significantly. Conclusions. Training intensity on SAGI lowered serum MT levels after training in comparison with the control group. This might be associated with Zn, Cu, and protein metabolism.

  19. GENetic and clinical Predictors Of treatment response in Depression: the GenPod randomised trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donovan Michael

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most effective pharmacological treatments for depression inhibit the transporters that reuptake serotonin (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors – SSRIs and noradrenaline (Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors – NaRIs into the presynaptic terminal. There is evidence to suggest that noradrenaline and serotonin enhancing drugs work through separate mechanisms to produce their clinical antidepressant action. Although most of the current evidence suggests there is little difference in overall efficacy between SSRIs and NaRIs, there are patients who respond to one class of compounds and not another. This suggests that treatment response could be predicted by genetic and/or clinical characteristics. Firstly, this study aims to investigate the influence of a polymorphism (SLC6A4 in the 5HT transporter in altering response to SSRI medication. Secondly, the study will investigate whether those with more severe depression have a better response to NaRIs than SSRIs. Methods/design The GenPod trial is a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. GPs referred patients aged between 18–74 years presenting with a new episode of depression, who did not have any medical contraindications to antidepressant medication and who had no history of psychosis or alcohol/substance abuse. Patients were interviewed to ascertain their suitability for the study. Eligible participants (with a primary diagnosis of depression according to ICD10 criteria and a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score > 14 were randomised to receive one of two antidepressant treatments, either the SSRI Citalopram or the NaRI Reboxetine, stratified according to severity. The final number randomised to the trial was 601. Follow-up assessments took place at 2, 6 and 12 weeks following randomisation. Primary outcome was measured at 6 weeks by the BDI. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis and will use multiple regression models to compare treatments

  20. Fotogrametria na identificação de assimetrias posturais em cadetes e pilotos da academia da força aérea brasileira Photogrammetry on the identification of postural asymmetries in cadets and pilots of the Brazilian air force academy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo V. Figueiredo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar se a atividade de treino de voo pode desencadear alterações posturais em cadetes e pilotos da Academia da Força Aérea Brasileira (AFA. MÉTODOS: Os sujeitos foram avaliados por meio de registro fotográfico em vista anterior e lateral direita, tendo como casuística 80 cadetes da AFA, divididos em quatro grupos, 20 em cada, e 15 pilotos do Esquadrão de Demonstração Aérea (EDA, formando o quinto grupo. As fotos foram transferidas para o Software de Avaliação Postural (SAPO, sendo traçados ângulos relacionados ao alinhamento vertical da cabeça (AVC, alinhamento horizontal da cabeça (AHC, alinhamento horizontal dos acrômios (AHA e alinhamento horizontal das espinhas ilíacas ântero-superiores (AHE. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram que, após comparação das médias das assimetrias posturais entre os grupos, não houve diferença estatisticamente significante em relação aos ângulos AVC, AHC e AHA. No entanto, na variável AHE, observou-se que o grupo de pilotos apresentou valores significativamente menores que os dos cadetes, sugerindo maior estabilidade postural em relação a essa variável. CONCLUSÃO: O AHE foi a única medida que apresentou diferença estatisticamente significate na comparação entre os pilotos e cadetes dos diferentes anos. Quanto aos demais alinhamentos, não houve diferença, podendo atribuir esse fato aos critérios exigentes de ingresso dos cadetes na AFA e a eficiência do treinamento físico realizado periodicamente.OBJECTIVE: To identify whether flight training activities cause postural changes in cadets and pilots of the Brazilian Air Force Academy (AFA. METHODS: Eighty subjects were assessed through photographic images in anterior and right side views. Four groups of cadets (n=20 per group divided according to the year since enlistment and a fifth group of fifteen pilots from the Air Demonstration Squadron (ADS were included. Pictures were analyzed using the Postural

  1. The Influence of Somatotype Components and Personality Traits on the Playing Position and the Quality of Top Croatian Female Cadet Handball Players

    OpenAIRE

    Čavala, Marijana; Trninić, Viktorija; Jašić, Dajana; Tomljanović, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The research was conducted with the aim to establish the structure and the differences of morphological features and personality traits between different age groups of female cadet handball players grouped by their playing quality and playing positions. Further on, the research was done on 70 handball players aged 15, 31 on average, who were grouped according to their positions on goalkeepers, outside players, wings and pivots. Furthermore, according to the quality of playing, they were divid...

  2. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of opportunistic screening and stepped care interventions for older hazardous alcohol users in primary care (AESOPS – A randomised control trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Veronica

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a wealth of evidence regarding the detrimental impact of excessive alcohol consumption. In older populations excessive alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke and a range of cancers. Alcohol consumption is also associated with an increased risk of falls, early onset of dementia and other cognitive deficits. Physiological changes that occur as part of the ageing process mean that older people experience alcohol related problems at lower consumption levels. There is a strong evidence base for the effectiveness of brief psychosocial interventions in reducing alcohol consumption in populations identified opportunistically in primary care settings. Stepped care interventions involve the delivery of more intensive interventions only to those in the population who fail to respond to less intensive interventions and provide a potentially resource efficient means of meeting the needs of this population. Methods/design The study design is a pragmatic prospective multi-centre two arm randomised controlled trial. The primary hypothesis is that stepped care interventions for older hazardous alcohol users reduce alcohol consumption compared with a minimal intervention at 12 months post randomisation. Potential participants are identified using the AUDIT questionnaire. Eligible and consenting participants are randomised with equal probability to either a minimal intervention or a three step treatment approach. The step treatment approach incorporates as step 1 behavioural change counselling, step 2 three sessions of motivational enhancement therapy and step 3 referral to specialist services. The primary outcome is measured using average standard drinks per day and secondary outcome measures include the Drinking Problems Index, health related quality of life and health utility. The study incorporates a comprehensive economic analysis to assess the relative cost

  3. The effects of centralised and specialised combined pharmacological and psychological intervention compared with decentralised and non-specialised treatment in the early course of severe unipolar and bipolar affective disorders - design of two randomised clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gluud Christian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In unipolar, and bipolar affective disorders, there is a high risk of relapse that increases as the number of episodes increases. Naturalistic follow-up studies suggest that the progressive development of the diseases is not prevented with the present treatment modalities. It is not known whether centralised and specialised secondary care intervention initiated early after the onset of the diseases can prevent the progression and thereby improve the prognosis. Methods Two randomised clinical multi-centre trials comparing a centralised and specialised outpatient intervention program consisting of combined pharmacological and psychological intervention with standard decentralised psychiatric treatment. Patients discharged from their first, second, or third hospitalisation due to a manic episode or bipolar disorder (trial 1 or to a single depressive episode or recurrent depressive disorder (trial 2 were randomised. Central randomisations for both trials were stratified for the number of hospitalisations and treatment centre. The primary outcome measure for the two trials is time to re-hospitalisation with an affective episode. Discussion These trials are the first to evaluate the effect of a centralised and specialised intervention in patients with early severe affective disorders. The trials used a pragmatic design comparing a specialised mood disorder clinic intervention with decentralised, non-specialised standard psychiatric treatment. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00253071

  4. DALI: Defining Antibiotic Levels in Intensive care unit patients: a multi-centre point of prevalence study to determine whether contemporary antibiotic dosing for critically ill patients is therapeutic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Jason A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical effects of varying pharmacokinetic exposures of antibiotics (antibacterials and antifungals on outcome in infected critically ill patients are poorly described. A large-scale multi-centre study (DALI Study is currently underway describing the clinical outcomes of patients achieving pre-defined antibiotic exposures. This report describes the protocol. Methods DALI will recruit over 500 patients administered a wide range of either beta-lactam or glycopeptide antibiotics or triazole or echinocandin antifungals in a pharmacokinetic point-prevalence study. It is anticipated that over 60 European intensive care units (ICUs will participate. The primary aim will be to determine whether contemporary antibiotic dosing for critically ill patients achieves plasma concentrations associated with maximal activity. Secondary aims will compare antibiotic pharmacokinetic exposures with patient outcome and will describe the population pharmacokinetics of the antibiotics included. Various subgroup analyses will be conducted to determine patient groups that may be at risk of very low or very high concentrations of antibiotics. Discussion The DALI study should inform clinicians of the potential clinical advantages of achieving certain antibiotic pharmacokinetic exposures in infected critically ill patients.

  5. Physical activity as a treatment for depression: the TREAD randomised trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawlor Debbie A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is one of the most common reasons for consulting a General Practitioner (GP within the UK. Whilst antidepressants have been shown to be clinically effective, many patients and healthcare professionals would like to access other forms of treatment as an alternative or adjunct to drug therapy for depression. A recent systematic review presented some evidence that physical activity could offer one such option, although further investigation is needed to test its effectiveness within the context of the National Health Service. The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a randomised, controlled trial (RCT designed to evaluate an intervention developed to increase physical activity as a treatment for depression within primary care. Methods/design The TREAD study is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm RCT which targets patients presenting with a new episode of depression. Patients were approached if they were aged 18-69, had recently consulted their GP for depression and, where appropriate, had been taking antidepressants for less than one month. Only those patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a depressive episode as assessed by the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R, a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score of at least 14 and informed written consent were included in the study. Eligible patients were individually randomised to one of two treatment groups; usual GP care or usual GP care plus facilitated physical activity. The primary outcome of the trial is clinical symptoms of depression assessed using the BDI four months after randomisation. A number of secondary outcomes are also measured at the 4-, 8- and 12-month follow-up points including quality of life, attitude to and involvement in physical activity and antidepressant use/adherence. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT basis and will use linear and logistic regression models to compare treatments. Discussion The results of

  6. A randomised, feasibility trial of a tele-health intervention for Acute Coronary Syndrome patients with depression ('MoodCare': Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hare David L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease (CHD and depression are leading causes of disease burden globally and the two often co-exist. Depression is common after Myocardial Infarction (MI and it has been estimated that 15-35% of patients experience depressive symptoms. Co-morbid depression can impair health related quality of life (HRQOL, decrease medication adherence and appropriate utilisation of health services, lead to increased morbidity and suicide risk, and is associated with poorer CHD risk factor profiles and reduced survival. We aim to determine the feasibility of conducting a randomised, multi-centre trial designed to compare a tele-health program (MoodCare for depression and CHD secondary prevention, with Usual Care (UC. Methods Over 1600 patients admitted after index admission for Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS are being screened for depression at six metropolitan hospitals in the Australian states of Victoria and Queensland. Consenting participants are then contacted at two weeks post-discharge for baseline assessment. One hundred eligible participants are to be randomised to an intervention or a usual medical care control group (50 per group. The intervention consists of up to 10 × 30-40 minute structured telephone sessions, delivered by registered psychologists, commencing within two weeks of baseline screening. The intervention focuses on depression management, lifestyle factors (physical activity, healthy eating, smoking cessation, alcohol intake, medication adherence and managing co-morbidities. Data collection occurs at baseline (Time 1, 6 months (post-intervention (Time 2, 12 months (Time 3 and 24 months follow-up for longer term effects (Time 4. We are comparing depression (Cardiac Depression Scale [CDS] and HRQOL (Short Form-12 [SF-12] scores between treatment and UC groups, assessing the feasibility of the program through patient acceptability and exploring long term maintenance effects. A cost-effectiveness analysis of

  7. Current Evidence to Justify, and the Methodological Considerations for a Randomised Controlled Trial Testing the Hypothesis that Statins Prevent the Malignant Progression of Barrett's Oesophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Thurtle; Leo Alexandre; Yoon K Loke; Ed Cheong; Andrew Hart

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is the predominant risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma, a cancer whose incidence is increasing and which has a poor prognosis. This article reviews the latest experimental and epidemiological evidence justifying the development of a randomised controlled trial investigating the hypothesis that statins prevent the malignant progression of Barrett's oesophagus, and explores the methodological considerations for such a trial. The experimental evidence suggests anti-carcinogenic properties of statins on oesophageal cancer cell lines, based on the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway and the production of pro-apoptotic proteins. The epidemiological evidence reports inverse associations between statin use and the incidence of oesophageal carcinoma in both general population and Barrett's oesophagus cohorts. Such a randomised controlled trial would be a large multi-centre trial, probably investigating simvastatin, given the wide clinical experience with this drug, relatively low side-effect profile and low ifnancial cost. As with any clinical trial, high adherence is important, which could be increased with therapy, patient, doctor and system-focussed interventions. We would suggest there is now sufifcient evidence to justify a full clinical trial that attempts to prevent this aggressive cancer in a high-risk population.

  8. The third Symptom Management Research Trial in Oncology (SMaRT Oncology-3: a randomised trial to determine the efficacy of adding a complex intervention for major depressive disorder (Depression Care for People with Lung Cancer to usual care, compared to usual care alone in patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Michael

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression Care for People with Lung Cancer is a complex intervention delivered by specially trained cancer nurses, under the supervision of a psychiatrist. It is given as a supplement to the usual care for depression, which patients receive from their general practitioner and cancer service. The third Symptom Management Research Trial in Oncology (SMaRT Oncology-3 Trial will test its efficacy when compared to usual care alone. Design A two arm parallel group multi-centre randomised controlled trial. 200 patients will be recruited through established systematic Symptom Monitoring Services, which screen patients for depression. Patients will have: a diagnosis of lung cancer; an estimated life expectancy of three months or more and a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder. Patients will be randomised to usual care or usual care plus Depression Care for People with Lung Cancer. Randomisation will be carried out by telephoning a secure computerised central randomisation system or by using a secure web interface. The primary outcome measure is average depression severity. This will be assessed using scores on the 20-item Symptom Hopkins Checklist (SCL-20D, collected every four weeks over 32 weeks. Secondary outcomes include severity of anxiety, pain and fatigue; self-rated improvement of depression; quality of life and satisfaction with depression care. Trial Registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN75905964

  9. El mantenimiento de la potencia mecánica en tenistas de categoría cadete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Sarabia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    El objetivo de este estudio fue comprobar la eficiencia de un entrenamiento de fuerza para el tren inferior y superior, basado en el mantenimiento de la potencia mecánica en jugadores cadetes de tenis. 18 tenistas (10 en el grupo experimental y 8 en el grupo control participaron en el estudio. Se realizó un periodo de adaptación anatómica (cinco semanas de duración previo al periodo de intervención en el grupo experimental. El periodo de intervención tuvo una duración de seis semanas donde se trabajó con los ejercicios de bench-press con peso libre y semi-squat en maquina Smith, con una carga estable del 60% de la fuerza dinámica máxima. Se evaluaron previa y posteriormente al periodo de intervención la potencia desarrollada en el tren superior como inferior con diferentes tests, tanto directos como indirectos. Los resultados parecen indicar que la metodología de entrenamiento basada en el mantenimiento de la potencia mecánica es eficiente para la mejora de la potencia máxima, permitiendo una optimización de las sesiones y minimizando el trabajo residual.
    Palabras clave: Fuerza, sobrecarga, fallo mecánico

  10. Neonatal ECMO Study of Temperature (NEST - a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juszczak Edmund

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing evidence indicates that once mature neonates with severe cardio-respiratory failure become eligible for Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO their chances of intact survival are doubled if they actually receive ECMO. However, significant numbers survive with disability. NEST is a multi-centre randomised controlled trial designed to test whether, in neonates requiring ECMO, cooling to 34°C for the first 48 to 72 hours of their ECMO course leads to improved later health status. Infants allocated to the control group will receive ECMO at 37°C throughout their course, which is currently standard practice around the world. Health status of both groups will be assessed formally at 2 years corrected age. Methods/Design All infants recruited to the study will be cared for in one of the four United Kingdom (UK ECMO centres. Babies who are thought to be eligible will be assessed by the treating clinician who will confirm eligibility, ensure that consent has been obtained and then randomise the baby using a web based system, based at the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU Clinical Trials Unit. Trial registration. Babies allocated ECMO without cooling will receive ECMO at 37°C ± 0.2°C. Babies allocated ECMO with cooling will be managed at 34°C ± 0.2°C for up to 72 hours from the start of their ECMO run. The minimum duration of cooling will be 48 hours. Rewarming (to 37°C will occur at a rate of no more than 0.5°C per hour. All other aspects of ECMO management will be identical. Primary outcome: Cognitive score from the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition (Bayley-III at age of 2 years (24 - 27 months. Discussion For the primary analysis, children will be analysed in the groups to which they are assigned, comparing the outcome of all babies allocated to "ECMO with cooling" with all those allocated to "ECMO" alone, regardless of deviation from the protocol or treatment received. For

  11. Brief Intervention in Type 1 diabetes – Education for Self-efficacy (BITES: Protocol for a randomised control trial to assess biophysical and psychological effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dromgoole Paul

    2007-09-01

    attend unblinded assessments at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months, in addition to their usual care. After the intervention, usual care would be provided. Ethics approval: York Research Ethics Committee (Ref: 01/08/016 approved the study protocol. Discussion We hope the trial will demonstrate feasibility of a pragmatic randomised trial of BITES and help quantify therapeutic effect. A follow up multi-centre trial powered to detect this effect could provide further evidence. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN75807800

  12. Getting the Balance Right: A randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy and Exercise Interventions for ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larkin Aidan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Multiple Sclerosis have a life long need for physiotherapy and exercise interventions due to the progressive nature of the disease and their greater risk of the complications of inactivity. The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Ireland run physiotherapy, yoga and exercise classes for their members, however there is little evidence to suggest which form of physical activity optimises outcome for people with the many and varied impairments associated with MS. Methods and design This is a multi-centre, single blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Participants will be recruited via the ten regional offices of MS Ireland. Telephone screening will establish eligibility and stratification according to the mobility section of the Guys Neurological Disability Scale. Once a block of people of the same strand in the same geographical region have given consent, participants will be randomised. Strand A will concern individuals with MS who walk independently or use one stick to walk outside. Participants will be randomised to yoga, physiotherapy led exercise class, fitness instructor led exercise class or to a control group who don't change their exercise habits. Strand B will concern individuals with MS who walk with bilateral support or a rollator, they may use a wheelchair for longer distance outdoors. Participants will be randomised to 1:1 Physiotherapist led intervention, group intervention led by Physiotherapist, group yoga intervention or a control group who don't change their exercise habits. Participants will be assessed by physiotherapist who is blind to the group allocation at week 1, week 12 (following 10 weeks intervention or control, and at 12 week follow up. The primary outcome measure for both strands is the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Secondary outcomes are Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, 6 Minute Walk test, and muscle strength measured with hand held dynamometry. Strand B will also use Berg Balance Test

  13. Getting the balance right: a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy and Exercise Interventions for ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coote, Susan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People with Multiple Sclerosis have a life long need for physiotherapy and exercise interventions due to the progressive nature of the disease and their greater risk of the complications of inactivity. The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Ireland run physiotherapy, yoga and exercise classes for their members, however there is little evidence to suggest which form of physical activity optimises outcome for people with the many and varied impairments associated with MS. METHODS AND DESIGN: This is a multi-centre, single blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Participants will be recruited via the ten regional offices of MS Ireland. Telephone screening will establish eligibility and stratification according to the mobility section of the Guys Neurological Disability Scale. Once a block of people of the same strand in the same geographical region have given consent, participants will be randomised. Strand A will concern individuals with MS who walk independently or use one stick to walk outside. Participants will be randomised to yoga, physiotherapy led exercise class, fitness instructor led exercise class or to a control group who don\\'t change their exercise habits.Strand B will concern individuals with MS who walk with bilateral support or a rollator, they may use a wheelchair for longer distance outdoors. Participants will be randomised to 1:1 Physiotherapist led intervention, group intervention led by Physiotherapist, group yoga intervention or a control group who don\\'t change their exercise habits. Participants will be assessed by physiotherapist who is blind to the group allocation at week 1, week 12 (following 10 weeks intervention or control), and at 12 week follow up. The primary outcome measure for both strands is the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Secondary outcomes are Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, 6 Minute Walk test, and muscle strength measured with hand held dynamometry. Strand B will also use Berg Balance Test and the Modified

  14. Identificação das variáveis preditoras académicas no desenvolvimento de competências de Liderança do cadete aluno de Infantaria

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraz, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Este trabalho de investigação, intitulado com o tema “ Identificação das variáveis preditoras académicas no desenvolvimento de competências de liderança do Cadete Aluno de Infantaria”, tem como finalidade identificar quais as áreas científicas/pilares tradicionais da Academia Militar que mais contribuem para o desenvolvimento de competências de liderança no Cadete e Aspirante Aluno a fim de colmatar falhas existente na formação dos futuros oficiais do Qu...

  15. THEORETICAL-METHODOLOGICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF THE PROCESS OF FORMATION OF CIVIL POSITION OF CADETS OF EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OF RUSSIAN FEDERAL PENITENTIARY SERVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. KUZHEKOV

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the moral and legal education of cadets of educational institutions of the Federal Penitentiary Service of Russia as the main tool for shaping their sustainable citizenship. The author touches upon the historical aspects of the problem, it is concluded that the traditional means of education suppressed personality, being based on the authoritarian nature of the pedagogical relationship. It is stated  that the timely realization of studying the essence of the unity of the content of morality and law, what is happening on the emotional and rational levels, contributes to the disparate mix of individual knowledge and understanding of the complex moral and legal convictions. The author notes that the effectiveness of the process of formation of civil position effectively revealed through strategic (compliance with the rules of interaction of teachers, students, parents on the humanization of life educational organization, ensuring their joint moral and legal activities, the practical organization of students of life and especially tactical objectives (performance cadets duties at the university and outside it, the protection of their rights and freedoms, the practical organization of joint activities in the dyad "teacher-student", their interaction analysis in the organization of events on legal education, compliance with the established rules and standards in the development of university traditions, ways to overcome the stereotype of no confidence moral and legal education of cadets. The author concludes that the presented theoretical and methodological structure of the study will provide the necessary empirical basis of research and will be a guarantee of its effectiveness and usefulness. 

  16. The influence of somatotype components and personality traits on the playing position and the quality of top Croatian female cadet handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavala, Marijana; Trninić, Viktorija; Jasić, Dajana; Tomljanović, Mario

    2013-05-01

    The research was conducted with the aim to establish the structure and the differences of morphological features and personality traits between different age groups of female cadet handball players grouped by their playing quality and playing positions. Further on, the research was done on 70 handball players aged 15, 31 on average, who were grouped according to their positions on goalkeepers, outside players, wings and pivots. Furthermore, according to the quality of playing, they were divided in two quality groups of players, those from the wider cadet national team, thus characterised as top female players in Croatia, and those who had never been invited into the cadet national team and thus can be referred to as low-quality, i.e. average female handball players. The structure of predictor variables has indicated the existence of general morphological factor assessing the players' constitution and two personality features factors - neuroticism and extraversion. The variance analysis showed no statistically significant differences of somatotype variables with relation to quality and playing position. By observing basic personality traits, a statistically significant difference was confirmed only in introversion-extraversion with a lower score in goalkeepers than in other positions, which indicates a higher level of introversion in this playing position. Such result was expected since this particular position abounds in specific tasks and demands in the game in relation to all other playing positions. Further on, it has been concluded that the selection of players must not be based only on the stated physical and psychological characteristics, but on relevant anthropological complexes determining performance and sport achievement. PMID:23914494

  17. Field efficacy of a new mosaic long-lasting mosquito net (PermaNet® 3.0 against pyrethroid-resistant malaria vectors: a multi centre study in Western and Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigeon Olivier

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the spread of pyrethroid-resistance in malaria vectors in Africa, new strategies and tools are urgently needed to better control malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performances of a new mosaic long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN, i.e. PermaNet® 3.0, against wild pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. in West and Central Africa. Methods A multi centre experimental hut trial was conducted in Malanville (Benin, Vallée du Kou (Burkina Faso and Pitoa (Cameroon to investigate the exophily, blood feeding inhibition and mortality induced by PermaNet® 3.0 (i.e. a mosaic net containing piperonyl butoxide and deltamethrin on the roof comparatively to the WHO recommended PermaNet® 2.0 (unwashed and washed 20-times and a conventionally deltamethrin-treated net (CTN. Results The personal protection and insecticidal activity of PermaNet 3.0 and PermaNet® 2.0 were excellent (>80% in the "pyrethroid-tolerant" area of Malanville. In the pyrethroid-resistance areas of Pitoa (metabolic resistance and Vallée du Kou (presence of the L1014F kdr mutation, PermaNet® 3.0 showed equal or better performances than PermaNet® 2.0. It should be noted however that the deltamethrin content on PermaNet® 3.0 was up to twice higher than that of PermaNet® 2.0. Significant reduction of efficacy of both LLIN was noted after 20 washes although PermaNet® 3.0 still fulfilled the WHO requirement for LLIN. Conclusion The use of combination nets for malaria control offers promising prospects. However, further investigations are needed to demonstrate the benefits of using PermaNet® 3.0 for the control of pyrethroid resistant mosquito populations in Africa.

  18. Development of a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire for adult patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (HAE-QoL: Spanish multi-centre research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prior Nieves

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for a disease-specific instrument for assessing health-related quality of life in adults with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency, a rare, disabling and life-threatening disease. In this paper we report the protocol for the development and validation of a specific questionnaire, with details on the results of the process of item generation, domain selection, and the expert and patient rating phase. Methods/Design Semi-structured interviews were completed by 45 patients with hereditary angioedema and 8 experts from 8 regions in Spain. A qualitative content analysis of the responses was carried out. Issues raised by respondents were grouped into categories. Content analysis identified 240 different responses, which were grouped into 10 conceptual domains. Sixty- four items were generated. A total of 8 experts and 16 patients assessed the items for clarity, relevance to the disease, and correct dimension assignment. The preliminary version of the specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for hereditary angioedema (HAE-QoL v 1.1 contained 44 items grouped into 9 domains. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multi-centre research project that aims to develop a specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for adult patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency. A preliminary version of the specific HAE-QoL questionnaire was obtained. The qualitative analysis of interviews together with the expert and patient rating phase helped to ensure content validity. A pilot study will be performed to assess the psychometric properties of the questionnaire and to decide on the final version.

  19. A randomised trial of preoperative radiotherapy for stage T3 adenocarcinoma of rectum (TROG 01.04): a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To provide a progress report of the conduct of the randomised trial TROG 01.04. This is a randomised Australian and New Zealand multi-centre trial of preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer currently being conducted under the auspices of Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group, Colorectal Surgical Society of Australasia, and Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. The trial comprises two studies, each with its own main objective. These objectives are, in patients with T3 clinically resectable carcinoma of the rectum, to demonstrate that (Study 1) the local recurrence rate in patients treated with a long course (LC) of pre-operative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-FU is lower than that in patients treated with a short course (SC) of pre-operative radiotherapy with early surgery; and (Study 2) the local recurrence rate in patients given pre-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is lower than that in patients treated with initial surgery. Over 150 patients have been accrued from 21 centres in the first 21 months. All patients were enrolled on Study 1, SC versus LC pre-operative radiotherapy. Study 2 has enrolled no patients in 15 months and has been discontinued. There was no obvious difference in rates of serious adverse events of SC and LC. An Independent Data Monitoring Committee is monitoring these and other aspects of the trial. The trial of SC versus LC is progressing well: such a trial is clearly feasible in Australia and New Zealand. It is however not feasible to compare initial surgery with preoperative radiotherapy

  20. A prospective randomised trial comparing nasogastric with intravenous hydration in children with bronchiolitis (protocol The comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis study (CRIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borland Meredith

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for admission of infants to hospital in developed countries. Fluid replacement therapy is required in about 30% of children admitted with bronchiolitis. There are currently two techniques of fluid replacement therapy that are used with the same frequency-intravenous (IV or nasogastric (NG. The evidence to determine the optimum route of hydration therapy for infants with bronchiolitis is inadequate. This randomised trial will be the first to provide good quality evidence of whether nasogastric rehydration (NGR offers benefits over intravenous rehydration (IVR using the clinically relevant continuous outcome measure of duration of hospital admission. Methods/Design A prospective randomised multi-centre trial in Australia and New Zealand where children between 2 and 12 months of age with bronchiolitis, needing non oral fluid replacement, are randomised to receive either intravenous (IV or nasogastric (NG rehydration. 750 patients admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited, and will be followed daily during the admission and by telephone 1 week after discharge. Patients with chronic respiratory, cardiac, or neurological disease; choanal atresia; needing IV fluid resuscitation; needing an IV for other reasons, and those requiring CPAP or ventilation are excluded. The primary endpoint is duration of hospital admission. Secondary outcomes are complications, need for ICU admission, parental satisfaction, and an economic evaluation. Results will be analysed using t-test for continuous data, and chi squared for categorical data. Non parametric data will be log transformed. Discussion This trial will define the role of NGR and IVR in bronchiolitis Trail registration The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12605000033640

  1. The DAMASK trial protocol: a pragmatic randomised trial to evaluate whether GPs should have direct access to MRI for patients with suspected internal derangement of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orchard Jo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though new technologies like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI may be accurate, they often diffuse into practice before thorough assessment of their value in diagnosis and management, and of their effects on patient outcome and costs. MRI of the knee is a common investigation despite concern that it is not always appropriate. There is wide variation in general practitioners (GPs access to, and use of MRI, and in the associated costs. The objective of this study was to resolve uncertainty whether GPs should refer patients with suspected internal derangement of the knee for MRI or to an orthopaedic specialist in secondary care. Methods/Design The design consisted of a pragmatic multi-centre randomised trial with two parallel groups and concomitant economic evaluation. Patients presenting in general practice with suspected internal derangement of the knee and for whom their GP was considering referral to an orthopaedic specialist in secondary care were eligible for inclusion. Within practices, GPs or practice nurses randomised eligible and consenting participants to the local radiology department for an MRI examination, or for consultation with an orthopaedic specialist. To ensure that the waiting time from GP consultation to orthopaedic appointment was similar for both trial arms, GPs made a provisional referral to orthopaedics when requesting the MRI examination. Thus we evaluated the more appropriate sequence of events independent of variations in waiting times. Follow up of participants was by postal questionnaires at six, twelve and 24 months after randomisation. This was to ensure that the evaluation covered all events up to and including arthroscopy. Discussion The DAMASK trial should make a major contribution to the development of evidence-based partnerships between primary and secondary care professionals and inform the debate when MRI should enter the diagnostic pathway.

  2. TIPIT: A randomised controlled trial of thyroxine in preterm infants under 28 weeks' gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Suresh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infants born at extreme prematurity (below 28 weeks' gestation are at high risk of developmental disability. A major risk factor for disability is having a low level of thyroid hormone which is recognised to be a frequent phenomenon in these infants. At present it is unclear whether low levels of thyroid hormone are a cause of disability, or a consequence of concurrent adversity. Methods We propose an explanatory multi-centre double blind randomised controlled trial of thyroid hormone supplementation in babies born below 28 weeks' gestation. All infants will receive either levothyroxine or placebo until 32 weeks' corrected gestational age. The primary outcome will be brain growth. This will be assessed by the width of the sub-arachnoid space measured using cranial ultrasound and head circumference at 36 weeks' corrected gestational. The secondary outcomes will be (a thyroid hormone concentrations measured at increasing postnatal age, (b status of the hypothalamic pituitary axis, (c auxological data between birth and 36 weeks' corrected gestational age, (d thyroid gland volume, (e volumes of brain structures (measured by magnetic resonance imaging, (f determination of the extent of myelination and white matter integrity (measured by diffusion weighted MRI and brain vessel morphology (measured by magnetic resonance angiography at expected date of delivery and (g markers of morbidity including duration of mechanical ventilation and chronic lung disease. We will also examine how activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis modulates the effects of thyroid supplementation. This will contribute to decisions about which confounding variables to assess in large-scale studies. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89493983

  3. Self-Concept and Achievement Motivation of Cadets in the Russian Interio Ministry Troops According to the Deviance Disposition: Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Dorfman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The demand for the moral psychological training in military higher schools is enforced by the changing situation both in our country and globally. The potential officers should posses such qualities as fortitude, stability, self-regulation, self-direction, and ability to restrain the undesirable emotions. The paper deals with the psychological investigation of motivational profile of junior cadets at the Military Higher School of the Russian Interior Ministry Troops. The author undertakes the comparative analysis of the cadets’ psychological resistance to adverse situations according to the deviance disposition level. The research methodology combines the psychometrical approach, meta-individual world concept and plural self theory. The research objectives include: studying the self-concept and poly-modal achievement motives of cadets; and comparative analysis of their personal traits with regard to their deviance disposition level – explicit or implicit. The research findings can be applied by psychologists and personnel officers in military higher schools of the Russian Interior Ministry for diagnosing the deviance disposition and its prevention. The materials can be implied in further investigation of personal motivational profiles of potential officers. 

  4. Application Analysis of Cadet Self-management Strategies%军校学员自我管理策略应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴文婕

    2011-01-01

    Self-management refers to the student first set and clear objectives,establishing a variety of steps;then,students observe their work,record their own behavior and evaluate their own performance;finally be able to select and implement enhanced.This paper puts forward the significance of self-management of cadets,which explains how to achieve the self-management strategies in the process of learning,takes emphasis on the problems cadets should pay attention to in achieving self-management.%自我管理是指学员首先要设置和明确目标,确立各种步骤;然后,学员观察自己的工作、记录自己的行为和评价自己的成绩;最后能够选择和执行强化。本文提出了军校学员自我管理的意义,其中阐述了如何在学习过程中实现军校学员自我管理策略,着重强调了实现军校学员自我管理应注意的问题。

  5. The determination of efficiency of a special obstacle course for training of cadets and rescuers of Public Service of Ukraine on emergency situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olexandr Baybak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine directions of the improvement of the educational and training process of cadets and retraining of rescuers of Public Service of Ukraine on emergency situations (PSES for carrying out the search-rescue works in highlands. Material & Methods: the contingent – cadets (25, rescuers (25 and officers (25 of Public Services of Ukraine on emergency situations took part in the research. The following methods are used for the solution of objectives: the theoretical analysis and generalization of scientific and methodical literature, pedagogical methods of research (poll and questioning. Results: the main requirements to a special obstacle course were defined on the basis of studying and analysis of biographical particulars with the purpose of the improvement of rescuers of PSES for carrying out the search-rescue works (SRW during the emergency situations (ES of a natural character. Conclusions: the need of modeling of weather conditions on a special obstacle course is defined for the purpose of the improvement of the level of preparedness of staff of the search-rescue groups in highlands.

  6. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS, BODY COMPOSITION AND EXPLOSIVE POWER IN CADET WRESTLERS [Sootnosheniia mezhdu antropometricheskimi parametrami, sostavom tela i vzryvnoj siloj iunykh borcov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Mirzaei Mirzaei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between anthropometric parameters, body composition and explosive power in cadet wrestlers. Methods: Seventeen male cadet wrestlers (age = 15.6 +/- 0.73 yrs from the Kurdistan province wrestling clubs participated in this study. Body composition (percent body fat, anthropometric parameters (height, sitting height, arm-span, upper arm length, leg length, upper leg length, arm circumference, middle thigh and calf circumference, explosive power (standing long jump and Medicine ball throw tests were measured. Results: Explosive power of upper body was significantly correlated with sitting height arm-span, upper arm length, arm circumference, weight and %BF. Explosive power of lower body was significantly correlated with sitting height, arm-span and weight. No significant correlation was found between explosive power of lower body and leg length, upper leg length, middle thigh circumference and maximum calf circumference Explosive power of upper body was also significantly correlated with explosive power of lower body. Conclusion: Explosive power is an important parameter in wrestling. Having a high level of power along with an appropriate arm-span helps to the wrestler for performing techniques successfully in competition. Our study suggested that height isn't the only parameter affecting talent identification and other parameters such as arm span and sitting height should be seriously considered when criteria for the selection of a wrestler are set.

  7. Recruitment and retention in a multicentre randomised controlled trial in Bell's palsy: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Fergus

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is notoriously difficult to recruit patients to randomised controlled trials in primary care. This is particularly true when the disease process under investigation occurs relatively infrequently and must be investigated during a brief time window. Bell's palsy, an acute unilateral paralysis of the facial nerve is just such a relatively rare condition. In this case study we describe the organisational issues presented in setting up a large randomised controlled trial of the management of Bell's palsy across primary and secondary care in Scotland and how we managed to successfully recruit and retain patients presenting in the community. Methods Where possible we used existing evidence on recruitment strategies to maximise recruitment and retention. We consider that the key issues in the success of this study were; the fact that the research was seen as clinically important by the clinicians who had initial responsibility for recruitment; employing an experienced trial co-ordinator and dedicated researchers willing to recruit participants seven days per week and to visit them at home at a time convenient to them, hence reducing missed patients and ensuring they were retained in the study; national visibility and repeated publicity at a local level delivered by locally based principal investigators well known to their primary care community; encouraging recruitment by payment to practices and reducing the workload of the referring doctors by providing immediate access to specialist care; good collaboration between primary and secondary care and basing local investigators in the otolarnygology trial centres Results Although the recruitment rate did not meet our initial expectations, enhanced retention meant that we exceeded our planned target of recruiting 550 patients within the planned time-scale. Conclusion While difficult, recruitment to and retention within multi-centre trials from primary care can be successfully

  8. Anger management for people with mild to moderate learning disabilities: Study protocol for a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a manualized intervention delivered by day-service staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttall Jacqueline

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT is the treatment of choice for common mental health problems, but this approach has only recently been adapted for people with learning disabilities, and there is a limited evidence base for the use of CBT with this client group. Anger treatment is the one area where there exists a reasonable number of small controlled trials. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a manualized 12-week CBT intervention for anger. The intervention will be delivered by staff working in the day services that the participants attend, following training to act as 'lay therapists' by a Clinical Psychologist, who will also provide supervision. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a group intervention versus a 'support as usual' waiting-list control group, with randomization at the level of the group. Outcomes will be assessed at the end of the intervention and again 6-months later. After completion of the 6-month follow-up assessments, the intervention will also be delivered to the waiting-list groups. The study will include a range of anger/aggression and mental health measures, some of which will be completed by service users and also by their day service key-workers and by home carers. Qualitative data will be collected to assess the impact of the intervention on participants, lay therapists, and services, and the study will also include a service-utilization cost and consequences analysis. Discussion This will be the first trial to investigate formally how effectively staff working in services providing day activities for people with learning disabilities are able to use a therapy manual to deliver a CBT based anger management intervention, following brief training by a Clinical Psychologist. The demonstration that service staff can successfully deliver anger management to people with learning disabilities, by widening the pool of potential therapists, would have

  9. Is computer aided detection (CAD cost effective in screening mammography? A model based on the CADET II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallis Matthew G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single reading with computer aided detection (CAD is an alternative to double reading for detecting cancer in screening mammograms. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the use of a single reader with CAD is more cost-effective than double reading. Methods Based on data from the CADET II study, the cost-effectiveness of single reading with CAD versus double reading was measured in terms of cost per cancer detected. Cost (Pound (£, year 2007/08 of single reading with CAD versus double reading was estimated assuming a health and social service perspective and a 7 year time horizon. As the equipment cost varies according to the unit size a separate analysis was conducted for high, average and low volume screening units. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed by varying the reading time, equipment and assessment cost, recall rate and reader qualification. Results CAD is cost increasing for all sizes of screening unit. The introduction of CAD is cost-increasing compared to double reading because the cost of CAD equipment, staff training and the higher assessment cost associated with CAD are greater than the saving in reading costs. The introduction of single reading with CAD, in place of double reading, would produce an additional cost of £227 and £253 per 1,000 women screened in high and average volume units respectively. In low volume screening units, the high cost of purchasing the equipment will results in an additional cost of £590 per 1,000 women screened. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the factors having the greatest effect on the cost-effectiveness of CAD with single reading compared with double reading were the reading time and the reader's professional qualification (radiologist versus advanced practitioner. Conclusions Without improvements in CAD effectiveness (e.g. a decrease in the recall rate CAD is unlikely to be a cost effective alternative to double reading for mammography screening

  10. Study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial in general practice investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture against migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbrera-Iboleón Justo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a chronic neurologic disease that can severely affect the patient's quality of life. Although in recent years many randomised studies have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for migraine, it remains a controversial issue. Our aim is to determine whether acupuncture, applied under real conditions of clinical practice in the area of primary healthcare, is more effective than conventional treatment. Methods/Design The design consists of a pragmatic multi-centre, three-armed randomised controlled trial, complemented with an economic evaluation of the results achieved, comparing the effectiveness of verum acupuncture with sham acupuncture, and with a control group receiving normal care only. Patients eligible for inclusion will be those presenting in general practice with migraine and for whom their General Practitioner (GP is considering referral for acupuncture. Sampling will be by consecutive selection, and by randomised allocation to the three branches of the study, in a centralised way following a 1:1:1 distribution (verum acupuncture; sham acupuncture; conventional treatment. Secondly, one patient in three will be randomly selected from each of the acupuncture (verum or sham groups for a brain perfusion study (by single photon emission tomography. The treatment with verum acupuncture will consist of 8 treatment sessions, once a week, at points selected individually by the acupuncturist. The sham acupuncture group will receive 8 sessions, one per week, with treatment being applied at non-acupuncture points in the dorsal and lumbar regions, using the minimal puncture technique. The control group will be given conventional treatment, as will the other two groups. Discussion This trial will contribute to available evidence on acupuncture for the treatment of migraine. The primary endpoint is the difference in the number of days with migraine among the three groups, between

  11. Whole brain radiotherapy after local treatment of brain metastases in melanoma patients - a randomised phase III trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral metastases are a common cause of death in patients with melanoma. Systemic drug treatment of these metastases is rarely effective, and where possible surgical resection and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are the preferred treatment options. Treatment with adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) following neurosurgery and/or SRS is controversial. Proponents of WBRT report prolongation of intracranial control with reduced neurological events and better palliation. Opponents state melanoma is radioresistant; that WBRT yields no survival benefit and may impair neurocognitive function. These opinions are based largely on studies in other tumour types in which assessment of neurocognitive function has been incomplete. This trial is an international, prospective multi-centre, open-label, phase III randomised controlled trial comparing WBRT to observation following local treatment of intracranial melanoma metastases with surgery and/or SRS. Patients aged 18 years or older with 1-3 brain metastases excised and/or stereotactically irradiated and an ECOG status of 0-2 are eligible. Patients with leptomeningeal disease, or who have had previous WBRT or localised treatment for brain metastases are ineligible. WBRT prescription is at least 30 Gy in 10 fractions commenced within 8 weeks of surgery and/or SRS. Randomisation is stratified by the number of cerebral metastases, presence or absence of extracranial disease, treatment centre, sex, radiotherapy dose and patient age. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients with distant intracranial failure as determined by MRI assessment at 12 months. Secondary end points include: survival, quality of life, performance status and neurocognitive function. Accrual to previous trials for patients with brain metastases has been difficult, mainly due to referral bias for or against WBRT. This trial should provide the evidence that is currently lacking in treatment decision-making for patients with melanoma brain

  12. WHEDA study: Effectiveness of occupational therapy at home for older people with dementia and their caregivers - the design of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial evaluating a Dutch programme in seven German centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernooij-Dassen Myrra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent Dutch mono-centre randomised controlled trial has shown that occupational therapy improves daily functioning in dementia. The aim of this present study is to compare the effects of the Dutch community occupational therapy programme with a community occupational therapy consultation on daily functioning in older people with mild or moderate dementia and their primary caregivers in a German multi-centre context. Methods/Design A multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial design is being used in seven health care centres (neurological, psychiatric and for older people in urban regions. Patients are 1:1 randomised to treatment or control group. Assessors are blind to group assignment and perform measurements on both groups at baseline, directly after intervention at 6 weeks and at 16, 26 and 52 weeks follow-up. A sample of 140 community dwelling older people (aged >65 years with mild or moderate dementia and their primary caregivers is planned. The experimental intervention consists of an evidence-based community occupational therapy programme including 10 sessions occupational therapy at home. The control intervention consists of one community occupational therapy consultation based on information material of the Alzheimer Society. Providers of both interventions are occupational therapists experienced in treatment of cognitively impaired older people and trained in both programmes. 'Community' indicates that occupational therapy intervention occurs in the person's own home. The primary outcome is patients' daily functioning assessed with the performance scale of the Interview for Deterioration in Daily Living Activities in Dementia and video tapes of daily activities rated by external raters blind to group assignment using the Perceive, Recall, Plan and Perform System of Task Analysis. Secondary outcomes are patients' and caregivers' quality of life, mood and satisfaction with treatment; the caregiver

  13. Strategies to improve retention in randomised trials

    OpenAIRE

    Brueton, V. C.; Tierney, J.; Stenning, S; Harding, S; Meredith, S.; Nazareth, I; Rait, G

    2013-01-01

    Background Loss to follow-up from randomised trials can introduce bias and reduce study power, affecting the generalisability, validity and reliability of results. Many strategies are used to reduce loss to follow-up and improve retention but few have been formally evaluated. Objectives To quantify the effect of strategies to improve retention on the proportion of participants retained in randomised trials and to investigate if the effect varied by trial strategy and trial setting. Search met...

  14. Randomised trial of biofeedback training for encopresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Plas, R. N.; Benninga, M.A.; Redekop, W. K.; Taminiau, J A; Büller, H A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate biofeedback training in children with encopresis and the effect on psychosocial function. DESIGN: Prospective controlled randomised study. PATIENT INTERVENTIONS: A multimodal treatment of six weeks. Children were randomised into two groups. Each group received dietary and toilet advice, enemas, oral laxatives, and anorectal manometry. One group also received five biofeedback training sessions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Successful treatment was defined as less than two episodes ...

  15. Generation of allocation sequences in randomised trials: chance, not choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kenneth F; Grimes, David A

    2002-02-01

    The randomised controlled trial sets the gold standard of clinical research. However, randomisation persists as perhaps the least-understood aspect of a trial. Moreover, anything short of proper randomisation courts selection and confounding biases. Researchers should spurn all systematic, non-random methods of allocation. Trial participants should be assigned to comparison groups based on a random process. Simple (unrestricted) randomisation, analogous to repeated fair coin-tossing, is the most basic of sequence generation approaches. Furthermore, no other approach, irrespective of its complexity and sophistication, surpasses simple randomisation for prevention of bias. Investigators should, therefore, use this method more often than they do, and readers should expect and accept disparities in group sizes. Several other complicated restricted randomisation procedures limit the likelihood of undesirable sample size imbalances in the intervention groups. The most frequently used restricted sequence generation procedure is blocked randomisation. If this method is used, investigators should randomly vary the block sizes and use larger block sizes, particularly in an unblinded trial. Other restricted procedures, such as urn randomisation, combine beneficial attributes of simple and restricted randomisation by preserving most of the unpredictability while achieving some balance. The effectiveness of stratified randomisation depends on use of a restricted randomisation approach to balance the allocation sequences for each stratum. Generation of a proper randomisation sequence takes little time and effort but affords big rewards in scientific accuracy and credibility. Investigators should devote appropriate resources to the generation of properly randomised trials and reporting their methods clearly. PMID:11853818

  16. A national multi-centre study of accuracy of hand hygiene of health care workers in ICUs%全国多中心ICU医务人员手卫生正确性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐丹慧; 吴安华; 胡必杰; 徐英春; 张秀月; 侯铁英; 宗志勇; 李卫光; 杨怀

    2015-01-01

    目的 了解我国ICU医务人员手卫生的正确性 ,为进一步改善手卫生正确性提供科学依据.方法 2013年10月-2014年9月采用多中心研究的方式 ,选取全国47所医院共66个ICU ,使用统一的调查表 ,依据《医务人员手卫生规范》进行判定 ,每月对医务人员手卫生正确性进行调查 ;所有数据录入 EXCEL表格 ,应用SPSS 17 .0进行统计分析.结果 47所医院医务人员手卫生正确率为83 .48% ;其中华东地区的手卫生正确率最高89 .08% ;内科ICU医务人员手卫生正确率最高89 .05% ,其他ICU最低为67 .34% ;2013年第四季度医务人员手卫生正确率最低52 .83% ,2014年手卫生正确率提升较多且较稳定.结论 我国在不同地区、不同ICU类型、不同季度的医务人员手卫生正确率存在差异 ,医务人员手卫生正确性水平仍有可提升的空间 ,需在重点科室、重点环节加强手卫生管理.%OBJECTIVE To investigate the accuracy of hand hygiene of the health care workers in ICUs so as to pro-vide scientific basis for further improvement of accuracy of hand hygiene .METHODS A multi-centre study was con-ducted from Oct 2013 to Sep 2014 ,totally 66 ICUs from 47 hospitals were included in the study ,the uniform questionnaire was adopted ,and the accuracy of hand hygiene of the health care workers was investigated every month according to the Medical Personnel Hand Hygiene Norms .All of the data were input into the EXCEL ta-ble ,and the statistical analysis was performed with the use of SPSS 17 .0 software .RESULTS The rate of correct hand hygiene of the health care workers from 47 hospitals was 83 .48% ,and the rate of correct hand hygiene of the health care workers from the hospitals in eastern China was highest (89 .08% );the rate of correct hand hygiene was highest (89 .05% ) among the health care workers from the ICUs of internal medicine departments and was lowest (67 .34% ) among the health care workers from the ICUs of

  17. Association between arterial elasticity, C-reactive protein and maximal oxygen consumption in well-trained cadets during three days extreme physical load: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regular aerobic training has beneficial effects on inflammatory pathways and on arterial elasticity, which are both important cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of extreme physical load on arterial elasticity and inflammatory markers in well-trained healthy men who participated in a high-ranking combat course. Seven well-trained male cadets were examined during an international military combat course of 3.5 days duration. Small (C2) and large (C1) artery elasticity was assessed using diastolic pulse wave analysis. Inflammatory markers and arterial elasticity measurement were performed before and after the competition. The extreme prolonged physical load caused individually different responses in arterial elasticity, C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase in individual cadets. Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max kg−1) correlated significantly with the change (Δ-difference between baseline and 24 h recovery period) of creatine kinase (r = −0.78; p = 0.04) and ΔC2 (r = 0.78; p = 0.04) and ΔC1 (r = 0.82; p = 0.02). In multivariate analysis (R2 = 0.89, p = 0.01) the ΔC2 correlated strongly with VO2 max kg−1 (p = 0.005) and with the ΔCRP (p = 0.03), whereas the ΔC1 correlated only with VO2 max kg−1 and did not correlate significantly with the ΔCRP. Changes in small arterial elasticity induced by extreme physical load were significantly related to VO2 max kg−1 and ΔCRP, whereas the change of large artery elasticity was only associated with VO2 max kg−1. Our preliminary results indicate that acute exercise-induced inflammation may affect small artery elasticity. However, further, more extensive studies are needed in this area

  18. SCOPE1: a randomised phase II/III multicentre clinical trial of definitive chemoradiation, with or without cetuximab, in carcinoma of the oesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffurth John N

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for patients with oesophageal cancer unsuitable for surgery due to the presence of co-morbidity or extent of disease, and is a standard treatment option for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus. Modern regimens of chemoradiotherapy can lead to significant long-term survival. However the majority of patients will die of their disease, most commonly with local progression/recurrence of their tumours. Cetuximab may overcome one of the principal mechanisms of tumour radio-resistance, namely tumour repopulation, in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of this research is first to determine whether the addition of cetuximab to definitive chemoradiotherapy for treatment of patients with non-metastatic carcinoma of the oesophagus is active (in terms of failure-free rate, safe, and feasible within the context of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial in the UK. If the first stage is successful then the trial will continue to accrue sufficient patients to establish whether the addition of cetuximab to the standard treatment improves overall survival. Methods/Design SCOPE1 is a two arm, open, randomised multicentre Phase II/III trial. Eligible patients will have histologically confirmed carcinoma of the oesophagus and have been chosen to receive definitive chemoradiotherapy by an accredited multidisciplinary team including a specialist Upper GI surgeon. 420 patients will be randomised to receive definitive chemoradiotherapy with or without cetuximab using a 1:1 allocation ratio. During Phase II of the study, the trial will assess safety (toxicity, activity (failure-free rate and feasibility (recruitment rate and protocol dose modifications/delays in 90 patients in the experimental arm. If the experimental arm is found to be active, safe, and feasible by the Independent Data Monitoring Committee then recruitment will continue into Phase III. This second

  19. Protocol for SAMS (Support and Advice for Medication Study: A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to support patients with type 2 diabetes with adherence to medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton Stephen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although some interventions have been shown to improve adherence to medication for diabetes, results are not consistent. We have developed a theory-based intervention which we will evaluate in a well characterised population to test efficacy and guide future intervention development and trial design. Methods and Design The SAMS (Supported Adherence to Medication Study trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial among 200 patients with type 2 diabetes and an HbA1c of 7.5% or above. It is designed to evaluate the efficacy of a two-component motivational intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and volitional action planning to support medication adherence compared with standard care. The intervention is delivered by practice nurses. Nurses were trained using a workshop approach with role play and supervised using assessment of tape-recorded consultations. The trial has a two parallel groups design with an unbalanced three-to-two individual randomisation eight weeks after recruitment with twelve week follow-up. The primary outcome is medication adherence measured using an electronic medication monitor over 12 weeks and expressed as the difference between intervention and control in mean percentage of days on which the correct number of medication doses is taken. Subgroup analyses will explore impact of number of medications taken, age, HbA1c, and self-reported adherence at baseline on outcomes. The study also measures the effect of dispensing medication to trial participants packaged in the electronic medication-monitoring device compared with conventional medication packaging. This will be achieved through one-to-one randomisation at recruitment to these conditions with assessment of the difference between groups in self-report of medication adherence and change in mean HbA1c from baseline to eight weeks. Anonymised demographic data are collected on non-respondents. Central randomisation

  20. SCOPE1: a randomised phase II/III multicentre clinical trial of definitive chemoradiation, with or without cetuximab, in carcinoma of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for patients with oesophageal cancer unsuitable for surgery due to the presence of co-morbidity or extent of disease, and is a standard treatment option for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus. Modern regimens of chemoradiotherapy can lead to significant long-term survival. However the majority of patients will die of their disease, most commonly with local progression/recurrence of their tumours. Cetuximab may overcome one of the principal mechanisms of tumour radio-resistance, namely tumour repopulation, in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of this research is first to determine whether the addition of cetuximab to definitive chemoradiotherapy for treatment of patients with non-metastatic carcinoma of the oesophagus is active (in terms of failure-free rate), safe, and feasible within the context of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial in the UK. If the first stage is successful then the trial will continue to accrue sufficient patients to establish whether the addition of cetuximab to the standard treatment improves overall survival. SCOPE1 is a two arm, open, randomised multicentre Phase II/III trial. Eligible patients will have histologically confirmed carcinoma of the oesophagus and have been chosen to receive definitive chemoradiotherapy by an accredited multidisciplinary team including a specialist Upper GI surgeon. 420 patients will be randomised to receive definitive chemoradiotherapy with or without cetuximab using a 1:1 allocation ratio. During Phase II of the study, the trial will assess safety (toxicity), activity (failure-free rate) and feasibility (recruitment rate and protocol dose modifications/delays) in 90 patients in the experimental arm. If the experimental arm is found to be active, safe, and feasible by the Independent Data Monitoring Committee then recruitment will continue into Phase III. This second stage will recruit a further 120 patients into each arm

  1. A randomised controlled trial of early insulin therapy in very low birth weight infants, "NIRTURE" (neonatal insulin replacement therapy in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornette Luc

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in adult intensive care have highlighted the importance of insulin and improved glucose control on survival, with 32% reduction in mortality, 22% reduction in intensive care stay and halving of the incidence of bacteraemia. Very low birth weight infants requiring intensive care also have relative insulin deficiency often leading to hyperglycaemia during the first week of life. The physiological influences on insulin secretion and sensitivity, and the potential importance of glucose control at this time are not well established. However there is increasing evidence that the early postnatal period is critical for pancreatic development. At this time a complex set of signals appears to influence pancreatic development and β cell survival. This has implications both in terms of acute glucose control but also relative insulin deficiency is likely to play a role in poor postnatal growth, which has been associated with later motor and cognitive impairment, and fewer β cells are linked to risk of type 2 diabetes later in life. Methods A multi-centre, randomised controlled trial of early insulin replacement in very low birth weight babies (VLBW, birth weight Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN78428828. EUDRACT Number 2004-002170-34

  2. TIPIT: A randomised controlled trial of thyroxine in preterm infants under 28 weeks gestation: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Angiography protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tietze Anna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infants born at extreme prematurity are at high risk of developmental disability. A major risk factor for disability is having a low level of thyroid hormone described as hypothyroxinaemia, which is recognised to be a frequent phenomenon in these infants. Derangements of critical thyroid function during the sensitive window in prematurity when early development occurs, may have a range of long term effects for brain development. Further research in preterm infants using neuroimaging techniques will increase our understanding of the specificity of the effects of hypothyroxinaemia on the developing foetal brain. This is an explanatory double blinded randomised controlled trial which is aimed to assess the effect of thyroid hormone supplementation on brain size, key brain structures, extent of myelination, white matter integrity and vessel morphology, somatic growth and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Methods The study is a multi-centred double blinded randomised controlled trial of thyroid hormone supplementation in babies born below 28 weeks' gestation. All infants will receive either levothyroxine or placebo until 32 weeks corrected gestational age. The primary outcomes will be width of the sub-arachnoid space measured using cranial ultrasound and head circumference at 36 weeks corrected gestational age. The secondary outcomes will be thyroid hormone concentrations, the hypothalamic pituitary axis status and auxological data between birth and expected date of delivery; thyroid gland volume, brain size, volumes of key brain structures, extent of myelination and brain vessel morphology at expected date of delivery and markers of morbidity which include duration of mechanical ventilation and/or oxygen requirement and chronic lung disease. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89493983

  3. Panax ginseng C.A Meyer root extract for moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Story David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD impairs quality of life and leads to premature mortality. COPD sufferers experience progressive deterioration of lung function and decreased ability to undertake day-to-day activities. Ginseng has been used for thousands of years in Chinese medicine for respiratory symptoms. Several controlled clinical trials using ginseng for COPD have shown promising clinical effect, however these studies were generally small and with some potential bias, prompting the need for rigorously designed studies. Aim The objective of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic value and safety profile of a standardised root extract of Panax ginseng C.A Meyer (ginseng for symptomatic relief, with a focus on quality of life (QoL improvements in individuals with moderate (Stage II COPD FEV1/FVC 1 50% - 80% predicted. Methods This paper describes the design of a randomised, multi-centre, double-blind, placebo controlled, two-armed parallel clinical trial. Two trial sites in Melbourne Australia will proportionately randomise a total of 168 participants to receive either ginseng capsule (100 mg or matching placebo twice daily for 24 weeks. The primary outcomes will be based on three validated QoL questionnaires, St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and the COPD Assessment Test (CAT. Secondary outcomes are based on lung function testing, relief medication usage and exacerbation frequency and severity. Safety endpoints include blood tests and adverse event reporting. Intention-to-treat will be applied to all data analyses. Discussion Findings from this study may lead to new therapeutic development for chronic respiratory diseases, particularly COPD. This protocol may also guide other investigators to develop quality herbal medicine clinical trials in the future. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12610000768099

  4. The SINS trial: A randomised controlled trial of excisional surgery versus imiquimod 5% cream for nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong Sarah J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basal cell carcinoma is the commonest human cancer. Despite increasing incidence it remains poorly researched. While not life threatening it can cause significant cosmetic disfigurement. Imiquimod, a cream which enhances the body's immune response, may help deal with the number of cases that occur in low-risk sites, especially when good cosmetic results and home use without surgery are needed. This study aims 1. To compare excisional surgery with imiquimod cream for nodular or superficial basal cell carcinoma in low risk sites, with respect to 3 year clinical clearance, cost-effectiveness and cosmetic results. 2. To ascertain if certain phenotypic features and gene polymorphisms predict tumour responsiveness to treatment. Methods/Design Five hundred participants with low risk nodular or superficial basal cell carcinoma will be recruited from hospitals to this multi-centre, randomised, parallel group, controlled phase III trial. Treatment in the imiquimod group is for 6 weeks for superficial basal cell carcinoma and 12 weeks for nodular basal cell carcinoma. Both treatment groups are followed up in clinic for 3 years. Primary outcome variable: the proportion of participants with clinical evidence of success (no recurrence at 3 years. The primary outcome will be compared between the two treatment groups. Secondary outcomes include: i clinical success at 1, 2 and 5 years, ii time to first recurrence, iii cosmetic appearance of lesion site after treatment, iv level of pain, and v cost-effectiveness. Safety and tolerability data will also be reported. Discussion This study protocol describes a pragmatic randomised controlled trial which it is hoped will address the above uncertainties. Three-year results will be available towards the end of 2010. Trial registration Meta-register: NCT00066872, Eudract No. 2004-004506-24, ISRCTN48755084.

  5. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with multi-catheter brachytherapy: Local control, side effects and cosmetic outcome for 274 patients. Results of the German-Austrian multi-centre trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with multi-catheter brachytherapy. Patients and methods: Between 11/2000 and 04/2005, 274 patients participated. Patients were eligible for APBI if they had histologically confirmed breast cancer, a tumour diameter ≤3 cm, complete resection with clear margins ≥2 mm, negative axillary lymph nodes or singular nodal micro-metastasis, no distant metastases, hormone receptor-positive tumours, and were ≥35 years. Patients were excluded if mammographically they showed a multicentric invasive growth pattern, poorly differentiated tumours, residual diffuse micro-calcifications, extensive intraductal component, or vessel invasion. Median follow-up was 32 months (range; 8-68). Results: The local control rate was 99.3% (272/274), the 3 year-local-recurrence-free survival probability, 99.6%. Peri-operative complications occurred in 5.5% (15/274): 9 (3.3%) experienced implant infection and 6 (2.2%) hematoma. Acute toxicity (Grade 1/2 radio-dermatitis) was seen in 6.6% (18/274). Late side effects ≥ Grade 3 (fibrosis, telangiectasia) occurred in 1.8% (4/274). Cosmetic results were excellent/good in 94% (253/274). Conclusions: This analysis underlined the safety and effectiveness of APBI in a carefully selected subgroup with favourable disease characteristics. Of course, longer follow-up and randomised trials are necessary to conclusively assess the potential of APBI

  6. Estudio multicéntrico de prevalencia de infección tuberculosa latente en los internados en prisiones españolas Multi-centre study of the prevalance of latent tuberculosis infection amongst inmates in spanish prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Guerrero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudiar la prevalencia de infección tuberculosa latente (ITL entre los presos internados en las prisiones españolas. Material y Método: Estudio multicéntrico, observacional y transversal; muestreo por conglomerado bietápico. Se recogieron variables sociodemográficas, penitenciarias y clínico-serológicas. Se realizó análisis univariante, bivariante y multivariante mediante regresión logística con las variables que mostraron significación estadística. Se calculó la odds ratio con intervalo de confianza del 95%. Resultados: 378 pacientes. Se dispuso de intradermorreacción de Mantoux (IDRM valorable en el 90,2%. 91,2% hombres, 37,8% extranjeros con edad media de 35,9±10,3 años. Mediana de estancia en prisión: 2 años y el 28,7% había estado > 5 años en prisión. El 49,6% ingresó en prisión en 2006 o antes. El 24,5% tenía antecedentes de uso de drogas intravenosas (UDI. El 50,4% presentaba ITL que se asoció a: edad > 40 años (63,2 vs 43,8%; IC: 1,39-3,49; OR: 2,20; p=0,001; haber estado > 5 años en prisión (71,2 vs 41,3%; IC: 2,13-5,75; OR: 3,50; p 40 años (OR:1,76; IC: 1,08-2,87; p=0,024; y b estancia > 5 años en prisión (OR: 2,50; IC: 1,41-4,43; p=0,002. Conclusiones: La prevalencia de ITL en prisión es muy alta, sobre todo en los mayores de 40 años y los que están más de cinco años en prisión. Para evitar el riesgo de progresión a tuberculosis, se recomienda tratar a los infectados que lo precisen y mantener los programas de control de esta patología.Aims: To study the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI amongst inmates in Spanish prisons. Materials and Methods: Multi-centre, cross-sectional study; two stage sampling. Socio-demographic, prison and clinical variables were gathered. A univariate, bivariate and multivariate analysis was carried out using logistic regression with the variables that showed statistical significance. The odds ratio was calculated with a confidence interval

  7. Feasibility and results of a randomised pilot-study of pre-discharge occupational therapy home visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chung-Wei

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-discharge home visits aim to maximise independence in the community. These visits involve assessment of a person in their own home prior to discharge from hospital, typically by an occupational therapist. The therapist may provide equipment, adapt the home environment and/or provide education. The aims of this study were to investigate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial in a clinical setting and the effect of pre-discharge home visits on functional performance in older people undergoing rehabilitation. Methods Ten patients participating in an inpatient rehabilitation program were randomly assigned to receive either a pre-discharge home visit (intervention, or standard practice in-hospital assessment and education (control, both conducted by an occupational therapist. The pre-discharge home visit involved assessment of the older person's function and environment, and education, and took an average of 1.5 hours. The hospital-based interview took an average of 40 minutes. Outcome data were collected by a blinded assessor at 0, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Outcomes included performance of activities of daily living, reintegration to community living, quality of life, readmission and fall rates. Results Recruitment of 10 participants was slow and took three months. Observed performance of functional abilities did not differ between groups due to the small sample size. Difference in activities of daily living participation, as recorded by the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living scale, was statistically significant but wide confidence intervals and low statistical power limit interpretation of results. Conclusion Evaluation of pre-discharge home visits by occupational therapists in a rehabilitation setting is feasible, but a more effective recruitment strategy for a main study is favored by application of a multi-centre setting.

  8. EXTUBATE: A randomised controlled trial of nasal biphasic positive airway pressure vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure following extubation in infants less than 30 weeks' gestation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Suresh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory distress syndrome remains a significant problem among premature infants. Mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube remains the mainstay of respiratory support but may be associated with lung injury and the development of chronic lung disease of prematurity. Efforts are needed to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation in favour of less invasive forms of respiratory support and to improve rates of successful extubation. Non-invasive respiratory support has been demonstrated to be less injurious to the premature lung. Standard practice is to use nasal continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP following extubation to support the baby's breathing. Many clinicians also use nasal biphasic positive airway pressure (n-BiPAP in efforts to improve rates of successful extubation. However, there is currently no evidence that this confers any advantage over conventional nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Methods We propose an unblinded multi-centre randomised trial comparing n-CPAP with n-BiPAP in babies born before 30 weeks' gestation and less than two weeks old. Babies with congenital abnormalities and severe intra-ventricular haemorrhage will be excluded. 540 babies admitted to neonatal centres in England will be randomised at the time of first extubation attempt. The primary aim of this study is to compare the rate of extubation failure within 48 hours following the first attempt at extubation. The secondary aims are to compare the effect of n-BiPAP and n-CPAP on the following outcomes: 1. Maintenance of successful extubation for 7 days post extubation 2. Oxygen requirement at 28 days of age and at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age 3. Total days on ventilator, n-CPAP/n-BiPAP 4. Number of ventilator days following first extubation attempt 5. pH and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the first post extubation blood gas 6. Duration of hospital stay 7. Rate of abdominal distension requiring

  9. Temporary epicardial cardiac resynchronisation versus conventional right ventricular pacing after cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Stuart J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure patients with stable angina, acute coronary syndromes and valvular heart disease may benefit from revascularisation and/or valve surgery. However, the mortality rate is increased- 5-30%. Biventricular pacing using temporary epicardial wires after surgery is a potential mechanism to improve cardiac function and clinical endpoints. Method/design A multi-centred, prospective, randomised, single-blinded, intervention-control trial of temporary biventricular pacing versus standard pacing. Patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease or both, an ejection fraction ≤ 35% and a conventional indication for cardiac surgery will be recruited from 2 cardiac centres. Baseline investigations will include: an electrocardiogram to confirm sinus rhythm and measure QRS duration; echocardiogram to evaluate left ventricular function and markers of mechanical dyssynchrony; dobutamine echocardiogram for viability and blood tests for renal function and biomarkers of myocardial injury- troponin T and brain naturetic peptide. Blood tests will be repeated at 18, 48 and 72 hours. The principal exclusions will be subjects with permanent atrial arrhythmias, permanent pacemakers, infective endocarditis or end-stage renal disease. After surgery, temporary pacing wires will be attached to the postero-lateral wall of the left ventricle, the right atrium and right ventricle and connected to a triple chamber temporary pacemaker. Subjects will be randomised to receive either temporary biventricular pacing or standard pacing (atrial inhibited pacing or atrial-synchronous right ventricular pacing for 48 hours. The primary endpoint will be the duration of level 3 care. In brief, this is the requirement for invasive ventilation, multi-organ support or more than one inotrope/vasoconstrictor. Haemodynamic studies will be performed at baseline, 6, 18 and 24 hours after surgery using a pulmonary arterial catheter. Measurements will be

  10. The TOBY Study. Whole body hypothermia for the treatment of perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoresen Marianne

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hypoxic-ischaemic insult occurring around the time of birth may result in an encephalopathic state characterised by the need for resuscitation at birth, neurological depression, seizures and electroencephalographic abnormalities. There is an increasing risk of death or neurodevelopmental abnormalities with more severe encephalopathy. Current management consists of maintaining physiological parameters within the normal range and treating seizures with anticonvulsants. Studies in adult and newborn animals have shown that a reduction of body temperature of 3–4°C after cerebral insults is associated with improved histological and behavioural outcome. Pilot studies in infants with encephalopathy of head cooling combined with mild whole body hypothermia and of moderate whole body cooling to 33.5°C have been reported. No complications were noted but the group sizes were too small to evaluate benefit. Methods/Design TOBY is a multi-centre, prospective, randomised study of term infants after perinatal asphyxia comparing those allocated to "intensive care plus total body cooling for 72 hours" with those allocated to "intensive care without cooling". Full-term infants will be randomised within 6 hours of birth to either a control group with the rectal temperature kept at 37 +/- 0.2°C or to whole body cooling, with rectal temperature kept at 33–34°C for 72 hours. Term infants showing signs of moderate or severe encephalopathy +/- seizures have their eligibility confirmed by cerebral function monitoring. Outcomes will be assessed at 18 months of age using neurological and neurodevelopmental testing methods. Sample size At least 236 infants would be needed to demonstrate a 30% reduction in the relative risk of mortality or serious disability at 18 months. Recruitment was ahead of target by seven months and approvals were obtained allowing recruitment to continue to the end of the planned recruitment phase. 325 infants were

  11. Evaluation of a community pharmacy-based intervention for improving patient adherence to antihypertensives: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDowell Jenny

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of patients using antihypertensive medications fail to achieve their recommended target blood pressure. Poor daily adherence with medication regimens and a lack of persistence with medication use are two of the major reasons for failure to reach target blood pressure. There is no single intervention to improve adherence with antihypertensives that is consistently effective. Community pharmacists are in an ideal position to promote adherence to chronic medications. This study aims to test a specific intervention package that could be integrated into the community pharmacy workflow to enable pharmacists to improve patient adherence and/or persistence with antihypertensive medications - Hypertension Adherence Program in Pharmacy (HAPPY. Methods/Design The HAPPY trial is a multi-centre prospective randomised controlled trial. Fifty-six pharmacies have been recruited from three Australian states. To identify potential patients, a software application (MedeMine CVD extracted data from a community pharmacy dispensing software system (FRED Dispense®. The pharmacies have been randomised to either 'Pharmacist Care Group' (PCG or 'Usual Care Group' (UCG. To check for 'Hawthorne effect' in the UCG, a third group of patients 'Hidden Control Group' (HCG will be identified in the UCG pharmacies, which will be made known to the pharmacists at the end of six months. Each study group requires 182 patients. Data will be collected at baseline, three and six months in the PCG and at baseline and six months in the UCG. Changes in patient adherence and persistence at the end of six months will be measured using the self-reported Morisky score, the Tool for Adherence Behaviour Screening and medication refill data. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first research testing a comprehensive package of evidence-based interventions that could be integrated into the community pharmacy workflow to enable pharmacists to improve patient

  12. Community based yoga classes for type 2 diabetes: an exploratory randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drincevic Desanka

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yoga is a popular therapy for diabetes but its efficacy is contested. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of researching community based yoga classes in Type 2 diabetes with a view to informing the design of a definitive, multi-centre trial Methods The study design was an exploratory randomised controlled trial with in-depth process evaluation. The setting was two multi-ethnic boroughs in London, UK; one with average and one with low mean socio-economic deprivation score. Classes were held at a sports centre or GP surgery. Participants were 59 people with Type 2 diabetes not taking insulin, recruited from general practice lists or opportunistically by general practice staff. The intervention group were offered 12 weeks of a twice-weekly 90-minute yoga class; the control group was a waiting list for the yoga classes. Both groups received advice and leaflets on healthy lifestyle and were encouraged to exercise. Primary outcome measure was HbA1c. Secondary outcome measures included attendance, weight, waist circumference, lipid levels, blood pressure, UKPDS cardiovascular risk score, diabetes-related quality of life (ADDQoL, and self-efficacy. Process measures were attendance at yoga sessions, self-reported frequency of practice between taught sessions, and qualitative data (interviews with patients and therapists, ethnographic observation of the yoga classes, and analysis of documents including minutes of meetings, correspondence, and exercise plans. Results Despite broad inclusion criteria, around two-thirds of the patients on GP diabetic registers proved ineligible, and 90% of the remainder declined to participate. Mean age of participants was 60 +/- 10 years. Attendance at yoga classes was around 50%. Nobody did the exercises regularly at home. Yoga teachers felt that most participants were unsuitable for 'standard' yoga exercises because of limited flexibility, lack of basic fitness, co-morbidity, and lack

  13. Functional exercise after total hip replacement (FEATHER a randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaghan Brenda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolonged physical impairments in range of movement, postural stability and walking speed are commonly reported following total hip replacement (THR. It is unclear from the current body of evidence what kind of exercises should be performed to maximize patient function and quality of life. Methods/design This will be a single blind multi centre randomized control trial with two arms. Seventy subjects post primary total hip arthroplasty will be randomized into either an experimental group (n=35, or to a control group (n=35. The experimental group will attend a functional exercise class twice weekly for a six week period from week 12 to week 18 post surgery. The functional exercise group will follow a circuit based functional exercise class supervised by a chartered Physiotherapist. The control group will receive usual care. The principal investigator (BM will perform blinded outcome assessments on all patients using validated measures for pain, stiffness, and function using the Western Ontario and Mc Master Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC. This is the primary outcome measurement tool. Secondary outcome measurements include Quality of life (SF-36, 6 min walk test, Visual Analogue Scale, and the Berg Balance score. The WOMAC score will be collated on day five post surgery and repeated at week twelve and week eighteen. All other measurements will be taken at week 12 and repeated at week eighteen. In addition a blinded radiologist will measure gluteus medius cross sectional area using real time ultrasound for all subjects at week 12 and at week 18 to determine if the functional exercise programme has any effect on muscle size. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will add to the body of evidence on the relationship between muscle size, functional ability, balance, quality of life and time post surgery in patients following total hip arthroplasty. The CONSORT guidelines will be followed to throughout. Ethical

  14. Ankle Injury Management (AIM): design of a pragmatic multi-centre equivalence randomised controlled trial comparing Close Contact Casting (CCC) to Open surgical Reduction and Internal Fixation (ORIF) in the treatment of unstable ankle fractures in patients over 60 years

    OpenAIRE

    Willett, K; Keene, DJ; Morgan, L.; Gray, B.; Handley, R; Chesser, T; Pallister, I; Tutton, E; Knox, C; Lall, R; A. Briggs; Lamb, SE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ankle fractures account for 9% of all fractures with a quarter of these occurring in adults over 60 years. The short term disability and long-term consequences of this injury can be considerable. Current opinion favours open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) over non-operative treatment (fracture manipulation and the application of a standard moulded cast) for older people. Both techniques are associated with complications but the limited published research indicates higher c...

  15. UVB phototherapy in an outpatient setting or at home: a pragmatic randomised single-blind trial designed to settle the discussion. The PLUTO study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Weelden Huib

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home ultraviolet B (UVB treatment is a much-debated treatment, especially with regard to effectiveness, safety and side effects. However, it is increasingly being prescribed, especially in the Netherlands. Despite ongoing discussions, no randomised research has been performed, and only two studies actually compare two groups of patients. Thus, firm evidence to support or discourage the use of home UVB phototherapy has not yet been obtained. This is the goal of the present study, the PLUTO study (Dutch acronym for "national trial on home UVB phototherapy for psoriasis". Methods We designed a pragmatic randomised single-blind multi-centre trial. This trial is designed to evaluate the impact of home UVB treatment versus UVB phototherapy in a hospital outpatient clinic as to effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. In total 196 patients with psoriasis who were clinically eligible for UVB phototherapy were included. Normally 85% of the patients treated with UVB show a relevant clinical response. With a power of 80% and a 0.05 significance level it will be possible to detect a reduction in effectiveness of 15%. Effectiveness will be determined by calculating differences in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI and the Self Administered PASI (SAPASI scores. Quality of life is measured using several validated generic questionnaires and a disease-specific questionnaire. Other outcome measures include costs, side effects, dosimetry, concomitant use of medication and patient satisfaction. Patients are followed throughout the therapy and for 12 months thereafter. The study is no longer recruiting patients, and is expected to report in 2006. Discussion In the field of home UVB phototherapy this trial is the first randomised parallel group study. As such, this trial addresses the weaknesses encountered in previous studies. The pragmatic design ensures that the results can be well generalised to the target population

  16. Exercise and manual auricular acupuncture: a pilot assessor-blind randomised controlled trial. (The acupuncture and personalised exercise programme (APEP Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurley D

    2008-03-01

    the data, conditioning on the baseline value. Discussion The results of this study investigating the adjuvant effects of auricular acupuncture to exercise in managing CLBP will be used to inform the design of a future multi-centre randomised controlled trial. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN94142364.

  17. A randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of Laparoscopic Uterosacral Nerve Ablation (LUNA in the treatment of chronic pelvic pain: The trial protocol [ISRCTN41196151

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition with a major impact on health-related quality of life, work productivity and health care utilisation. The cause of the pain is not always obvious as no pathology is seen in 40–60% of the cases. In the absence of pathology there is no established treatment. The Lee-Frankenhauser sensory nerve plexuses and parasympathetic ganglia in the uterosacral ligaments carry pain from the uterus, cervix and other pelvic structures. Interruption of these nerve trunks by laparoscopic uterosacral nerve ablation (LUNA may alleviate pain. However, the balance of benefits and risks of this intervention have not been reliably assessed. LUNA has, nevertheless, been introduced into practice, although there remains controversy regarding indications for LUNA. Hence, there is an urgent need for a randomised controlled trial to confirm, or refute, any worthwhile effectiveness. The principal hypothesis is that, in women with chronic pelvic pain in whom diagnostic laparoscopy reveals either no pathology or mild endometriosis (AFS score ≤ 5 LUNA alleviates pain and improves life quality at 12 months. Methods/Design The principal objective is to test the hypothesis that in women with chronic pelvic pain in whom diagnostic laparoscopy reveals either no pathology or mild endometriosis (AFS score ≤ 5 LUNA alleviates pain and improves life quality at 12 months. A multi-centre, prospective, randomised-controlled-trial will be carried out with blind assessment of outcomes in eligible consenting patients randomised at diagnostic laparoscopy to LUNA (experimental group or to no pelvic denervation (control group. Postal questionnaires including visual analogue scale for pain (primary outcome, an index of sexual satisfaction and the EuroQoL 5D-EQ instrument (secondary outcomes will be administered at 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary assessment of the effectiveness of LUNA will be from comparison of outcomes at the one

  18. Thoughts on cultivation of sergeant cadets'management ability%士官学员管理能力培养的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏俊杰; 张东霞; 赵欣

    2015-01-01

    士官作为基层部队教育管理的骨干力量,其管理能力直接关系到基层的安全稳定和战斗力的提升.通过分析加强士官学员管理能力培养的必要性,从思想认识、课程设置和实践效果等方面指出士官学校在学员管理能力培养上的不足;在此基础上,提出了搞好顶层设计、完善教学内容、丰富实践环节和营造军营环境等建议.%As the backbone of the grassroots units'educational management, sergeants'management ability is directly related to the promotion of the security and stability, and combat effectiveness of the grassroots. By analyzing the necessity of strengthening the cultivation of sergeants'management ability, this article focuses on the drawback on cultivation of cadets'management ability in sergeant academies, with respect to the ideological understanding, curriculum provision and practice effects, based on which, it is suggested to do a good job in the top-level design, improve the teaching contents, enriching the link of practice and build the barracks'environment.

  19. Randomised controlled trials: important but overrated?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boylan, J F

    2012-02-01

    Practising physicians individualise treatments, hoping to achieve optimal outcomes by tackling relevant patient variables. The randomised controlled trial (RCT) is universally accepted as the best means of comparison. Yet doctors sometimes wonder if particular patients might benefit more from treatments that fared worse in the RCT comparisons. Such clinicians may even feel ostracised by their peers for stepping outside treatments based on RCTs and guidelines. Are RCTs the only acceptable evaluations of how patient care can be assessed and delivered? In this controversy we explore the interpretation of RCT data for practising clinicians facing individualised patient choices. First, critical care anaesthetists John Boylan and Brian Kavanagh emphasise the dangers of bias and show how Bayesian approaches utilise prior probabilities to improve posterior (combined) probability estimates. Secondly, Jane Armitage, of the Clinical Trial Service Unit in Oxford, argues why RCTs remain essential and explores how the quality of randomisation can be improved through systematic reviews and by avoiding selective reporting.

  20. A randomised comparison of cognitive behavioural therapy

    OpenAIRE

    De Roos, Carlijn; Greenwald, Ricky; Hollander-Gijsman, Margien den; Noorthoorn, Eric; van Buuren, Stef; Jongh, Ad De

    2011-01-01

    Background: Building on previous research with disaster-exposed children and adolescents, a randomised clinical trial was performed in the treatment of trauma-related symptoms. In the current study two active treatments were compared among children in a broad age range and from a wide diversity of ethnic populations. Objective: The primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR). Design...

  1. Study design and methods of the BoTULS trial: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical effect and cost effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Laura

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a stroke, 55–75% of patients experience upper limb problems in the longer term. Upper limb spasticity may cause pain, deformity and reduced function, affecting mood and independence. Botulinum toxin is used increasingly to treat focal spasticity, but its impact on upper limb function after stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme in the treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods Trial design : A multi-centre open label parallel group randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. Participants : Adults with upper limb spasticity at the shoulder, elbow, wrist or hand and reduced upper limb function due to stroke more than 1 month previously. Interventions : Botulinum toxin type A plus upper limb therapy (intervention group or upper limb therapy alone (control group. Outcomes : Outcome assessments are undertaken at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome is upper limb function one month after study entry measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT. Secondary outcomes include: spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale; grip strength; dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test; disability (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index; quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, Euroqol EQ-5D and attainment of patient-selected goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Health and social services resource use, adverse events, use of other antispasticity treatments and patient views on the treatment will be compared. Participants are clinically reassessed at 3, 6 and 9 months to determine the need for repeat botulinum toxin type A and/or therapy. Randomisation : A web based central independent randomisation service. Blinding : Outcome assessments are undertaken by an assessor who is blinded to the randomisation group. Sample size : 332 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in treatment

  2. A randomised controlled trial and cost effectiveness study of systematic screening (targeted and total population screening versus routine practice for the detection of atrial fibrillation in the over 65s: (SAFE [ISRCTN19633732

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raftery James

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AF has been recognised as an important independent risk factor for thromboembolic disease, particularly stroke for which it provides a five-fold increase in risk. This study aimed to determine the baseline prevalence and the incidence of AF based on a variety of screening strategies and in doing so to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of different screening strategies, including targeted or whole population screening, compared with routine clinical practice, for detection of AF in people aged 65 and over. The value of clinical assessment and echocardiography as additional methods of risk stratification for thromboembolic disease in patients with AF were also evaluated. Methods The study design was a multi-centre randomised controlled trial with a study population of patients aged 65 and over from 50 General Practices in the West Midlands. These purposefully selected general practices were randomly allocated to 25 intervention practices and 25 control practices. GPs and practice nurses within the intervention practices received education on the importance of AF detection and ECG interpretation. Patients in the intervention practices were randomly allocated to systematic (n = 5000 or opportunistic screening (n = 5000. Prospective identification of pre-existing risk factors for AF within the screened population enabled comparison between high risk targeted screening and total population screening. AF detection rates in systematically screened and opportunistically screened populations in the intervention practices were compared to AF detection rate in 5,000 patients in the control practices.

  3. A randomised evaluation of CollAborative care and active surveillance for Screen-Positive EldeRs with sub-threshold depression (CASPER: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression accounts for the greatest burden of disease among all mental health problems, and is expected to become the second-highest amongst all general health problems by 2020. By the age of 75, 1 in 7 older people meet formal diagnostic criteria for depression. Efforts to ameliorate the burden of illness and personal suffering associated with depression in older people have focussed on those with more severe depressive syndromes. Less attention has been paid to those with mild disorders/sub-threshold depressive syndromes but these patients also suffer impairments in their quality of life and level of functioning. Methods/Design The CASPER study has been designed to assemble an epidemiological cohort of people over 75 years of age (the CASPER cohort, from which we will identify those eligible to participate in a trial of collaborative care for sub-threshold depression (the CASPER trial. We aim to undertake a pragmatic randomised controlled multi-centre trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of collaborative care; a low intensity psychological intervention in addition to usual general practitioner care versus usual general practitioner care alone. General practitioners from practices based in the North of England will be asked to identify potentially eligible patients over the age of 75 years. Patients will be sent a letter inviting them to participate in the study. We aim to recruit approximately 540 participants for the CASPER trial. A diagnostic interview will be carried out to ascertain trial eligibility with the major depressive episode module of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I., eligible participants randomised to either the intervention or usual care. The primary outcome will be measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9 and additional quality of life measures will be collected. Data will be collected at baseline, 4 and 12 months for both trial and cohort

  4. Rationale and design of the Kanyini guidelines adherence with the polypill (Kanyini-GAP study: a randomised controlled trial of a polypill-based strategy amongst Indigenous and non Indigenous people at high cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usherwood Tim

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kanyini Guidelines Adherence with the Polypill (Kanyini-GAP Study aims to examine whether a polypill-based strategy (using a single capsule containing aspirin, a statin and two blood pressure-lowering agents amongst Indigenous and non-Indigenous people at high risk of experiencing a cardiovascular event will improve adherence to guideline-indicated therapies, and lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Methods/Design The study is an open, randomised, controlled, multi-centre trial involving 1000 participants at high risk of cardiovascular events recruited from mainstream general practices and Aboriginal Medical Services, followed for an average of 18 months. The participants will be randomised to one of two versions of the polypill, the version chosen by the treating health professional according to clinical features of the patient, or to usual care. The primary study outcomes will be changes, from baseline measures, in serum cholesterol and systolic blood pressure and self-reported current use of aspirin, a statin and at least two blood pressure lowering agents. Secondary study outcomes include cardiovascular events, renal outcomes, self-reported barriers to indicated therapy, prescription of indicated therapy, occurrence of serious adverse events and changes in quality-of-life. The trial will be supplemented by formal economic and process evaluations. Discussion The Kanyini-GAP trial will provide new evidence as to whether or not a polypill-based strategy improves adherence to effective cardiovascular medications amongst individuals in whom these treatments are indicated. Trial Registration This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN126080005833347.

  5. Observer bias in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida; Tendal, Britta; Hilden, Jørgen; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe; Brorson, Stig

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes.......To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes....

  6. 英语演讲与军校学员能力素质培养%English Public Speaking and its Role on Cultivating the Qualities of Cadets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕念; 黄晓勤

    2014-01-01

    By integrating English public speaking into the English courses of Military Academy, it can help cadets broaden horizons, es-pecially their knowledge in military field, develop their sound psychology, enhance their critical thinking and communicative ability, all of which are the essential elements of being a qualified officer in the information age. Based on relevant bibliography and personal experi-ence in teaching English Public Speaking in Military Academy, detailed course design is given from the aspects of appreciation, imitation, practice and evaluation.%将英语演讲融入军校大学英语课堂可以有效内化学习动机、拓展知识面、培养思辨能力,塑造创新精神,提高交流能力和军官素质,从而有助于培养军队精英人才。引导和组织学员赏析模仿,自主设计,凝练素材,反复加工,激情表演,互相点评,可切实提高英语综合运用能力。结合文献资料,教学经验和参赛经验,阐述了将演讲教学融入英语课堂的欣赏,模仿,演练和评价的教学模式。

  7. Randomised Controlled Trials in Education Research: A Case Study of an Individually Randomised Pragmatic Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgerson, Carole J.

    2009-01-01

    The randomised controlled trial (RCT) is an evaluative method used by social scientists in order to establish whether or not an intervention is effective. This contribution discusses the fundamental aspects of good RCT design. These are illustrated through the use of a recently completed RCT which evaluated an information and communication…

  8. Characteristic and Guiding Strategy of "Post - 90 s" Cadets Self- awareness Development%“90后”军校学员自我意识发展的特点及其引导策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董建平; 黎恋恋; 张峰

    2012-01-01

    健康的自我意识对于培养“90后”军校学员健全的人格、健康的情感和坚强的意志品质具有重要意义。从对自我意识涵义的阐述入手,结合“90后”军校学员的特点,探究其自我意识发展过程中的规律性和存在的问题,并有针对性地提出了引导策略。%The healthy self- awareness has great significance to train the "Post - 90 s"cadets sound personality, healthy e- motion and strong will. From the elaboration of the meaning of self - awareness, the paper combined with the characteristic of the "Post - 90 s"cadets, to explore the regularity of the development process of their self- consciousness and the prob- lems, and put forward some countermeasures to solve it.

  9. A Pragmatic Randomised, Controlled Trial of Intensive Care follow up programmes in improving Longer-term outcomes from critical illness. The PRACTICAL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsey Craig

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of intensive care (ICU patients experience significant problems with physical, psychological, and social functioning for some time after discharge from ICU. These problems have implications not just for patients, but impose a continuing financial burden for the National Health Service. To support recovery, a number of hospitals across the UK have developed Intensive Care follow-up clinics. However, there is a lack of evidence base to support these, and this study aims to test the hypothesis that intensive care follow up programmes are effective and cost-effective at improving physical and psychological quality of life in the year after intensive care discharge. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Patients (n = 270 will be recruited prior to hospital discharge from three intensive care units in the UK, and randomised to one of two groups. The control group will receive standard in-hospital follow-up and the intervention group will participate in an ICU follow-up programme with clinic appointments 2–3 and 9 months after ICU discharge. The primary outcome measure is Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL 12 months after ICU discharge as measured by the Short Form-36. Secondary measures include: HRQoL at six months; Quality-adjusted life years using EQ-5D; posttraumatic psychopathology as measured by Davidson Trauma Scale; and anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at both six and twelve months after ICU discharge. Contacts with health services in the twelve months after ICU discharge will be measured as part of the economic analysis. Discussion The provision of intensive care follow-up clinics within the UK has developed in an ad hoc manner, is inconsistent in both the number of hospitals offering such a service or in the type of service offered. This study provides the opportunity to evaluate such services both in terms of patient benefit and

  10. The ESEP study: Salpingostomy versus salpingectomy for tubal ectopic pregnancy; The impact on future fertility: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mello Norah M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For most tubal ectopic pregnancies (EP surgery is the treatment of first choice. Whether surgical treatment should be performed conservatively (salpingostomy or radically (salpingectomy in women wishing to preserve their reproductive capacity, is subject to debate. Salpingostomy preserves the tube, but bears the risks of both persistent trophoblast and repeat ipsilateral tubal EP. Salpingectomy, avoids these risks, but leaves only one tube for reproductive capacity. This study aims to reveal the trade-off between both surgical options: whether the potential advantage of salpingostomy, i.e. a better fertility prognosis as compared to salpingectomy, outweighs the potential disadvantages, i.e. persistent trophoblast and an increased risk for a repeat EP. Methods/Design International multi centre randomised controlled trial comparing salpingostomy versus salpingectomy in women with a tubal EP without contra lateral tubal pathology. Hemodynamically stable women with a presumptive diagnosis of tubal EP, scheduled for surgery, are eligible for inclusion. Patients pregnant after in vitro fertilisation (IVF and/or known documented tubal pathology are excluded. At surgery, a tubal EP must be confirmed. Only women with a tubal EP amenable to both interventions and a healthy contra lateral tube are included. Salpingostomy and salpingectomy are performed according to standard procedures of participating hospitals. Up to 36 months after surgery, women will be contacted to assess their fertility status at six months intervals starting form the day of the operation. The primary outcome measure is the occurrence of spontaneous viable intra uterine pregnancy. Secondary outcome measures are persistent trophoblast, repeat EP, all pregnancies including those resulting from IVF and financial costs. The analysis will be performed according to the intention to treat principle. A cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed within a decision

  11. Immobilisation versus immediate mobilisation after intrauterine insemination: randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. Custers; P.A. Flierman; P. Maas; T. Cox; T.J.H.M. van Dessel; M.H. Gerards; M.H. Mochtar; C.A.H. Janssen; F. van der Veen; B.W.J. Mol

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of 15 minutes of immobilisation versus immediate mobilisation after intrauterine insemination. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting One academic teaching hospital and six non-academic teaching hospitals. Participants Women having intrauterine inseminati

  12. The impact of a disease management program (COACH on the attainment of better cardiovascular risk control in dyslipidaemic patients at primary care centres (The DISSEMINATE Study: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Francis Jude

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the efficacy of Counselling and Advisory Care for Health (COACH programme in managing dyslipidaemia among primary care practices in Malaysia. This open-label, parallel, randomised controlled trial compared the COACH programme delivered by primary care physicians alone (PCP arm and primary care physicians assisted by nurse educators (PCP-NE arm. Methods This was a multi-centre, open label, randomised trial of a disease management programme (COACH among dyslipidaemic patients in 21 Malaysia primary care practices. The participating centres enrolled 297 treatment naïve subjects who had the primary diagnosis of dyslipidaemia; 149 were randomised to the COACH programme delivered by primary care physicians assisted by nurse educators (PCP-NE and 148 to care provided by primary care physicians (PCP alone. The primary efficacy endpoint was the mean percentage change from baseline LDL-C at week 24 between the 2 study arms. Secondary endpoints included mean percentage change from baseline of lipid profile (TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, TG, TC: HDL ratio, Framingham Cardiovascular Health Risk Score and absolute risk change from baseline in blood pressure parameters at week 24. The study also assessed the sustainability of programme efficacy at week 36. Results Both study arms demonstrated improvement in LDL-C from baseline. The least squares (LS mean change from baseline LDL-C were −30.09% and −27.54% for PCP-NE and PCP respectively. The difference in mean change between groups was 2.55% (p=0.288, with a greater change seen in the PCP-NE arm. Similar observations were made between the study groups in relation to total cholesterol change at week 24. Significant difference in percentage change from baseline of HDL-C were observed between the PCP-NE and PCP groups, 3.01%, 95% CI 0.12-5.90, p=0.041, at week 24. There was no significant difference in lipid outcomes between 2 study groups at week 36 (12 weeks after the programme had

  13. Protocol for the MoleMate™ UK Trial: a randomised controlled trial of the MoleMate system in the management of pigmented skin lesions in primary care [ISRCTN 79932379

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Edward CF

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suspicious pigmented lesions are a common presenting problem in general practice consultations; while the majority are benign a small minority are melanomas. Differentiating melanomas from other pigmented lesions in primary care is challenging: currently, 95% of all lesions referred to a UK specialist are benign. The MoleMate system is a new diagnostic aid, incorporating a hand-held SIAscopy scanner with a primary care diagnostic algorithm. This trial tests the hypothesis that adding the MoleMate system to current best primary care practice will increase the proportion of appropriate referrals of suspicious pigmented lesions to secondary care compared with current best practice alone. Methods/design The MoleMate UK Trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial, with randomisation at patient level using a validated block randomisation method for two age groups (45 years and under; 46 years and over. We aim to recruit adult patients seen in general practice with a pigmented skin lesion that cannot immediately be diagnosed as benign and the patient reassured. The trial has a 'two parallel groups' design, comparing 'best practice' with 'best practice' plus the MoleMate system in the intervention group. The primary outcome is the positive predictive value (PPV of referral defined as the proportion of referred lesions seen by secondary care experts that are considered 'clinically significant' (i.e. biopsied or monitored. Secondary outcomes include: the sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value (NPV of the decision not to refer; clinical outcomes (melanoma thickness, 5 year melanoma incidence and mortality; clinician outcomes (Index of Suspicion, confidence, learning effects; patient outcomes (satisfaction, general and cancer-specific worry, and cost-utility. Discussion The MoleMate UK Trial tests a new technology designed to improve the management of suspicious pigmented lesions in primary care

  14. Induction of labour versus expectant monitoring for gestational hypertension or mild pre-eclampsia between 34 and 37 weeks' gestation (HYPITAT-II: a multicentre, open-label randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sporken Jan M J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gestational hypertension (GH and pre-eclampsia (PE can result in severe complications such as eclampsia, placental abruption, syndrome of Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelets (HELLP and ultimately even neonatal or maternal death. We recently showed that in women with GH or mild PE at term induction of labour reduces both high risk situations for mothers as well as the caesarean section rate. In view of this knowledge, one can raise the question whether women with severe hypertension, pre-eclampsia or deterioration chronic hypertension between 34 and 37 weeks of gestation should be delivered or monitored expectantly. Induction of labour might prevent maternal complications. However, induction of labour in late pre-term pregnancy might increase neonatal morbidity and mortality compared with delivery at term. Methods/Design Pregnant women with severe gestational hypertension, mild pre-eclampsia or deteriorating chronic hypertension at a gestational age between 34+0 and 36+6 weeks will be asked to participate in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. Women will be randomised to either induction of labour or expectant monitoring. In the expectant monitoring arm, women will be induced only when the maternal or fetal condition detoriates or at 37+0 weeks of gestation. The primary outcome measure is a composite endpoint of maternal mortality, severe maternal complications (eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, pulmonary oedema and thromboembolic disease and progression to severe pre-eclampsia. Secondary outcomes measures are respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, neonatal morbidity and mortality, caesarean section and vaginal instrumental delivery rates, maternal quality of life and costs. Analysis will be intention to treat. The power calculation is based on an expectant reduction of the maternal composite endpoint from 5% to 1% for an expected increase in neonatal RDS from 1% at 37 weeks to 10% at 34 weeks. This implies that

  15. Does a 10-valent pneumococcal-Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine prevent respiratory exacerbations in children with recurrent protracted bacterial bronchitis, chronic suppurative lung disease and bronchiectasis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recurrent protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB), chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis are characterised by a chronic wet cough and are important causes of childhood respiratory morbidity globally. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most commonly associated pathogens. As respiratory exacerbations impair quality of life and may be associated with disease progression, we will determine if the novel 10-valent pneumococcal-Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) reduces exacerbations in these children. Methods A multi-centre, parallel group, double-blind, randomised controlled trial in tertiary paediatric centres from three Australian cities is planned. Two hundred six children aged 18 months to 14 years with recurrent PBB, CSLD or bronchiectasis will be randomised to receive either two doses of PHiD-CV or control meningococcal (ACYW135) conjugate vaccine 2 months apart and followed for 12 months after the second vaccine dose. Randomisation will be stratified by site, age (, nasopharyngeal and saliva swabs, and serum will be collected at baseline and at 2, 3, 8 and 14 months post-enrolment. Local and systemic reactions will be recorded on daily diaries for 7 and 30 days, respectively, following each vaccine dose and serious adverse events monitored throughout the trial. Fortnightly, parental contact will help record respiratory exacerbations. The primary outcome is the incidence of respiratory exacerbations in the 12 months following the second vaccine dose. Secondary outcomes include: nasopharyngeal carriage of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae vaccine and vaccine- related serotypes; systemic and mucosal immune responses to H. influenzae proteins and S. pneumoniae vaccine and vaccine-related serotypes; impact upon lung function in children aged ≥6 years; and vaccine safety. Discussion As H. influenzae is the most common bacterial pathogen associated with these chronic respiratory diseases in

  16. Protocol for a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial of lithium carbonate in patients with amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (LiCALS [Eudract number: 2008-006891-31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Joanna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by loss of motor neurons leading to severe weakness and death from respiratory failure within 3-5 years. Riluzole prolongs survival in ALS. A published report has suggested a dramatic effect of lithium carbonate on survival. 44 patients were studied, with 16 randomly selected to take LiCO3 and riluzole and 28 allocated to take riluzole alone. In the group treated with lithium, no patients had died (i.e., 100% survival at the end of the study (15 months from entry, compared to 71% surviving in the riluzole-only group. Although the trial can be criticised on several grounds, there is a substantial rationale from other laboratory studies that lithium is worth investigating therapeutically in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Methods/Design LiCALS is a multi-centre double-blind randomised parallel group controlled trial of the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of lithium carbonate (LiCO3 at doses to achieve stable 'therapeutic' plasma levels (0.4-0.8 mmol/L, plus standard treatment, versus matched placebo plus standard treatment, in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The study will be based in the UK, in partnership with the MND Association and DeNDRoN (the Dementias and Neurodegnerative Diseases Clinical Research Network. 220 patients will be recruited. All patients will be on the standard treatment for ALS of riluzole 100 mg daily. The primary outcome measure will be death from any cause at 18 months defined from the date of randomisation. Secondary outcome measures will be changes in three functional rating scales, the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised, The EuroQOL (EQ-5D, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Eligible patients will have El Escorial Possible, Laboratory-supported Probable, Probable or Definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with disease duration between 6 months and 36 months (inclusive, vital

  17. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S. H.; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S.; Wright, J; S. Brown; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Denta...

  18. Reporting of sample size calculation in randomised controlled trials: review

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Pierre; Giraudeau, Bruno; Dechartres, Agnes; Baron, Gabriel; Ravaud, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess quality of reporting of sample size calculation, ascertain accuracy of calculations, and determine the relevance of assumptions made when calculating sample size in randomised controlled trials. Design Review. Data sources We searched MEDLINE for all primary reports of two arm parallel group randomised controlled trials of superiority with a single primary outcome published in six high impact factor general medical journals between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006. All...

  19. HIV prevention in Mexican schools: prospective randomised evaluation of intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, D.; Gutierrez, JP; TORRES, P.; Bertozzi, SM

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess effects on condom use and other sexual behaviour of an HIV prevention programme at school that promotes the use of condoms with and without emergency contraception. DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 40 public high schools in the state of Morelos, Mexico. PARTICIPANTS: 10 954 first year high school students. INTERVENTION: Schools were randomised to one of three arms: an HIV prevention course that promoted condom use, the same course with emergency contr...

  20. Tyranny of the randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbek, John C

    2016-06-01

    Researchers and clinicians often disagree about what it means to provide the best possible care. This paper's purpose is to propose ways of resolving the disagreements. The first is to have both groups re-examine the three equal components of evidence-based practice, a re-examination that begins with rejection of the randomised clinical trial's tyranny. The second is for researchers to design rehabilitation research based on a biopsychosocial rather than a biomedical model. The third is for both groups to redefine translational research so that it means both translation from the laboratory to the clinic and from the clinic to the laboratory. The fourth is to advocate for a science of dissemination that is as robust as rehabilitation's present science of discovery. Most examples are drawn from the literature on acquired neurologic speech and language disorders. PMID:27124262

  1. The Hawthorne Effect: a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Haselen Robbert

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'Hawthorne Effect' may be an important factor affecting the generalisability of clinical research to routine practice, but has been little studied. Hawthorne Effects have been reported in previous clinical trials in dementia but to our knowledge, no attempt has been made to quantify them. Our aim was to compare minimal follow-up to intensive follow-up in participants in a placebo controlled trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia. Methods Participants in a dementia trial were randomised to intensive follow-up (with comprehensive assessment visits at baseline and two, four and six months post randomisation or minimal follow-up (with an abbreviated assessment at baseline and a full assessment at six months. Our primary outcomes were cognitive functioning (ADAS-Cog and participant and carer-rated quality of life (QOL-AD. Results We recruited 176 participants, mainly through general practices. The main analysis was based on Intention to treat (ITT, with available data. In the ANCOVA model with baseline score as a co-variate, follow-up group had a significant effect on outcome at six months on the ADAS-Cog score (n = 140; mean difference = -2.018; 95%CI -3.914, -0.121; p = 0.037 favouring the intensive follow-up group, and on participant-rated quality of life score (n = 142; mean difference = -1.382; 95%CI -2.642, -0.122; p = 0.032 favouring minimal follow-up group. There was no significant difference on carer quality of life. Conclusion We found that more intensive follow-up of individuals in a placebo-controlled clinical trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia resulted in a better outcome than minimal follow-up, as measured by their cognitive functioning. Trial registration Current controlled trials: ISRCTN45577048

  2. Challenges and Countermeasures for Cadets'Web- based College English Autonomous Learning Ability Cultivation%军校学员英语网络自主学习能力培养的挑战及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽娟; 胡明霞

    2012-01-01

    College English Teaching in the new era has benefits more from multimedia and network technology, which brings about the new mode of combining traditional class teaching with web - based autonomous learning. In the process of establishing such a mode, cadets in military academies both show their distinct advantages and are also troubled with challenges due to the unique identity in the military school. The paper, from a survey of the author~ military academy, in a tentative attitude summarizes the challenges of effective web -based autonomous learning and then prescribes measures accordingly with the aim to promote cadets'web - based English autonomous learning ability and further develop the new teaching mode of College English Teaching in military academies.%摘要:新时期大学英语教学要依托多媒体网络技术手段,采用传统课堂与网络自主学习相结合的教学模式。在建设和推进这一教学模式的过程中,军校学员由于军队院校自身的特殊性,在开展网络自主学习时有其独特的优势,同时也面临着一定的挑战。分析军队院校有效开展网络自主学习面临的困难并提出相应对策,对提高军校学员英语网络自主学习能力、进一步完善军校大学英语教学模式提供参考意见。

  3. Influence of reported study design characteristics on intervention effect estimates from randomised controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savović, J; Jones, He; Altman, Dg;

    2012-01-01

    The design of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) should incorporate characteristics (such as concealment of randomised allocation and blinding of participants and personnel) that avoid biases resulting from lack of comparability of the intervention and control groups. Empirical evidence suggests...

  4. Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media: the 'Get Randomised' campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Isla S; Wei, Li; Rutherford, Daniel; Findlay, Evelyn A; Saywood, Wendy; Campbell, Marion K; Macdonald, Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT * Recruitment is key to the success of clinical trials. * Many clinical trials fail to achieve adequate recruitment. * Public understanding and engagement in clinical research could be improved. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS * 'Get Randomised' is the first campaign of its kind in the UK. * It is possible to improve public awareness of clinical research using the media. * Further work is needed to determine whether improved public awareness leads to increased participation in clinical research in the future. AIM To increase public awareness and understanding of clinical research in Scotland. METHODS A generic media campaign to raise public awareness of clinical research was launched in 2008. The 'Get Randomised' campaign was a Scotland-wide initiative led by the University of Dundee in collaboration with other Scottish universities. Television, radio and newspaper advertising showed leading clinical researchers, general practitioners and patients informing the public about the importance of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). 'Get Randomised' was the central message and interested individuals were directed to the http://www.getrandomised.org website for more information. To assess the impact of the campaign, cross-sectional surveys were conducted in representative samples of 1040 adults in Scotland prior to campaign launch and again 6 months later. RESULTS There was an improvement in public awareness of clinical trials following the campaign; 56.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 51.8, 61.6] of the sample recalled seeing or hearing advertising about RCTs following the campaign compared with 14.8% (10.8, 18.9) prior to the campaign launch (difference = 41.4%; 95% CI for difference 35.6, 48.3; P advertising, 49% felt that the main message was that people should take part more in medical research. However, on whether they would personally take part in a clinical trial if asked, there was little difference in response following the campaign

  5. Sources of Bias in Outcome Assessment in Randomised Controlled Trials: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Hannah; Hewitt, Catherine E.; Higgins, Steve; Wiggins, Andy; Torgerson, David J.; Torgerson, Carole J.

    2015-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) can be at risk of bias. Using data from a RCT, we considered the impact of post-randomisation bias. We compared the trial primary outcome, which was administered blindly, with the secondary outcome, which was not administered blindly. From 44 schools, 522 children were randomised to receive a one-to-one maths…

  6. A randomised comparison of cognitive behavioural therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlijn de Roos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : Building on previous research with disaster-exposed children and adolescents, a randomised clinical trial was performed in the treatment of trauma-related symptoms. In the current study two active treatments were compared among children in a broad age range and from a wide diversity of ethnic populations. Objective : The primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT and Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR. Design : Children (n=52, aged 4–18 were randomly allocated to either CBT (n=26 or EMDR (n=26 in a disaster mental health after-care setting after an explosion of a fireworks factory. All children received up to four individual treatment sessions over a 4–8 week period along with up to four sessions of parent guidance. Blind assessment took place pre- and post-treatment and at 3 months follow-up on a variety of parent-rated and self-report measures of post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology, depression, anxiety, and behaviour problems. Analyses of variance (general linear model repeated measures were conducted on the intention-to-treat sample and the completers. Results : Both treatment approaches produced significant reductions on all measures and results were maintained at follow-up. Treatment gains of EMDR were reached in fewer sessions. Conclusion : Standardised CBT and EMDR interventions can significantly improve functioning of disaster-exposed children.For the abstract in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online

  7. A randomised controlled trial of a probiotic 'functional food' in the management of irritable bowel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, LM; McCahon, D; Holder, R; Wilson, S; Hobbs, FD

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterised by pain, distension and altered bowel habit. Evidence suggests functional foods containing probiotics improve gastrointestinal transit, however, data are limited by short follow-up periods and evaluation in selected populations. METHODS: A multi-centre, randomized, double blind, controlled trial to evaluate the effect of a probiotic vs non-probiotic dairy product on symptoms in IBS with a constipation element (IBS-...

  8. The ANKLE TRIAL (ANKLE treatment after injuries of the ankle ligaments: what is the benefit of external support devices in the functional treatment of acute ankle sprain? : a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witjes Suzanne

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are very common problems in present health care. Still there is no hard evidence about which treatment strategy is superior. Current evidence supports the view that a functional treatment strategy is preferable, but insufficient data are present to prove the benefit of external support devices in these types of treatment. The hypothesis of our study is that external ankle support devices will not result in better outcome in the treatment of acute ankle sprains, compared to a purely functional treatment strategy. Overall objective is to compare the results of three different strategies of functional treatment for acute ankle sprain, especially to determine the advantages of external support devices in addition to functional treatment strategy, based on balance and coordination exercises. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled multi-centre trial with one-year follow-up. Adult and healthy patients (N = 180 with acute, single sided and first inversion trauma of the lateral ankle ligaments will be included. They will all follow the same schedule of balancing exercises and will be divided into 3 treatment groups, 1. pressure bandage and tape, 2. pressure bandage and brace and 3. no external support. Primary outcome measure is the Karlsson scoring scale; secondary outcomes are FAOS (subscales, number of recurrent ankle injuries, Visual Analogue Scales of pain and satisfaction and adverse events. They will be measured after one week, 6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. Discussion The ANKLE TRIAL is a randomized controlled trial in which a purely functional treated control group, without any external support is investigated. Results of this study could lead to other opinions about usefulness of external support devices in the treatment of acute ankle sprain. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2151

  9. Cadetes of the Academia do Polícia Militar do Estado do Rio de Janeiro Correlación entre VO2 max, gordura relativa y perfil lipídico, en cadetes de la Academia de Policía Militar del Estado de Río de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. M. Dantas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to verify the correlation level among the max, the relative fat and the profile lipídico of 51 Cadets (Age = 23.63 3.58 years; Weight = 74.13 ± 10.46 kg; Height = 1.76 ± 0.06 m; IMC = 23.99 2.76 kg/m2, of the masculine gender, of the Academy of the Military police of the State of Rio de Janeiro, of the year of 2007. The subjects were active and participants of the military physical training (TFM accomplished five times a week, with duration of 60 minutes for session. They were appraised: the max for ergoespirometria (I record of progressive effort, with constant inclination of 3% and initial speed of 4,0km/h, the relative fat (% G - I record of three cutaneous folds and the profile lipídico, through the method Enzymatic Calorimétrico in the variables: total cholesterol (CT, triglicérides (TG, lipoproteína of density high-cholesterol (HDL-C and lipoproteína of density low-cholesterol (LDL-C. The test of correlation of Spearman presented correlation significant between max and TG (r = -0,289; p = 0,04,  max and HDL-C (r = 0,277; p = 0,049,% G and TG (r = 0,296; p = 0,035,% G and HDL-C (r = 0,338; p = 0,015. Like this, these discoveries point a discreet relationship between the profile lipídico and the maximum consumption of oxygen corroborating the need to consider other factors as the feeding and the intensity of the exercises in the investigation of this relationship.

    Key Words: training,  VO2 max, relative fat, lipidic profile.

     

    El objetivo del presente estudio es establecer el nivel de correlación entre el  VO2 max, la grasa relativa y el perfil lipídico de 51 cadetes varones (Edad = 23.63 ± 3.58 años; Peso = 74.13 ± 10.46 Kg.; Talla = 1.76  ± 0.06 m; IMC = 23.99 ± 2.76 Kg. /m2 de la Academia de la Policía Militar del Estado de Río de Janeiro, del año de 2007. Los sujetos son f

  10. A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial to evaluate the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness and satisfaction with point of care testing in a general practice setting – rationale, design and baseline characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glastonbury Briony

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Point of care testing (PoCT may be a useful adjunct in the management of chronic conditions in general practice (GP. The provision of pathology test results at the time of the consultation could lead to enhanced clinical management, better health outcomes, greater convenience and satisfaction for patients and general practitioners (GPs, and savings in costs and time. It could also result in inappropriate testing, increased consultations and poor health outcomes resulting from inaccurate results. Currently there are very few randomised controlled trials (RCTs in GP that have investigated these aspects of PoCT. Design/Methods The Point of Care Testing in General Practice Trial (PoCT Trial was an Australian Government funded multi-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness and satisfaction of PoCT in a GP setting. The PoCT Trial covered an 18 month period with the intervention consisting of the use of PoCT for seven tests used in the management of patients with diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and patients on anticoagulant therapy. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients within target range, a measure of therapeutic control. In addition, the PoCT Trial investigated the safety of PoCT, impact of PoCT on patient compliance to medication, stakeholder satisfaction, cost effectiveness of PoCT versus laboratory testing, and influence of geographic location. Discussion The paper provides an overview of the Trial Design, the rationale for the research methodology chosen and how the Trial was implemented in a GP environment. The evaluation protocol and data collection processes took into account the large number of patients, the broad range of practice types distributed over a large geographic area, and the inclusion of pathology test results from multiple pathology laboratories. The evaluation protocol developed reflects the complexity of the Trial setting

  11. Community involvement in dengue vector control: cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vanlerberghe, V; Toledo, M. E.; Rodríguez, M.; Gomez, D.; Baly, A; Benitez, J. R.; Van der Stuyft, P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of an integrated community based environmental management strategy to control Aedes aegypti, the vector of dengue, compared with a routine strategy. DESIGN: Cluster randomised trial. SETTING: Guantanamo, Cuba. PARTICIPANTS: 32 circumscriptions (around 2000 inhabitants each). INTERVENTIONS: The circumscriptions were randomly allocated to control clusters (n=16) comprising routine Aedes control programme (entomological surveillance, source reduction, selec...

  12. Community involvement in dengue vector control: cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vanlerberghe, V; Toledo, M. E.; Rodriguez, M.; Gómez, D.; Baly, D; Baly, A; Benítez, J. R.; Van der Stuyft, P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of an integrated community based environmental management strategy to control Aedes aegypti, the vector of dengue, compared with a routine strategy. Design Cluster randomised trial. Setting Guantanamo, Cuba. Participants 32 circumscriptions (around 2000 inhabitants each). Interventions: The circumscriptions were randomly allocated to control clusters (n=16) comprising routine Aedes control programme (entomological surveillance, sourc...

  13. Yoga in schizophrenia : a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancampfort, D.; Vansteelandt, K.; Scheewe, T.; Probst, M.; Knapen, J.; De Herdt, A.; De Hert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Vancampfort D, Vansteelandt K, Scheewe T, Probst M, Knapen J, De Herdt A, De Hert M. Yoga in schizophrenia: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a complementary treatment on general psychopa

  14. Cluster randomised trials in the medical literature: two bibliometric surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bland J Martin

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several reviews of published cluster randomised trials have reported that about half did not take clustering into account in the analysis, which was thus incorrect and potentially misleading. In this paper I ask whether cluster randomised trials are increasing in both number and quality of reporting. Methods Computer search for papers on cluster randomised trials since 1980, hand search of trial reports published in selected volumes of the British Medical Journal over 20 years. Results There has been a large increase in the numbers of methodological papers and of trial reports using the term 'cluster random' in recent years, with about equal numbers of each type of paper. The British Medical Journal contained more such reports than any other journal. In this journal there was a corresponding increase over time in the number of trials where subjects were randomised in clusters. In 2003 all reports showed awareness of the need to allow for clustering in the analysis. In 1993 and before clustering was ignored in most such trials. Conclusion Cluster trials are becoming more frequent and reporting is of higher quality. Perhaps statistician pressure works.

  15. Outcomes in a Randomised Controlled Trial of Mathematics Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, K. J.; Miller, D.; Murray, P.; Henderson, S.; Fortuna, C.; Conlin, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Large-scale randomised controlled trials (RCT) are relatively rare in education. The present study was an attempt to scale up previous small peer tutoring projects, while investing only modestly in continuing professional development for teachers. Purpose: A two-year RCT of peer tutoring in mathematics was undertaken in one local…

  16. Immobilisation versus immediate mobilisation after intrauterine insemination: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Custers, Inge M; Flierman, Paul A; Maas, Pettie; Cox, Tessa; Van Dessel, Thierry J H M; Gerards, Mariette H; Mochtar, Monique H; Janssen, Catharina A H; van der Veen, Fulco; Ben Willem J. Mol

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of 15 minutes of immobilisation versus immediate mobilisation after intrauterine insemination. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting One academic teaching hospital and six non-academic teaching hospitals. Participants Women having intrauterine insemination for unexplained, cervical factor, or male subfertility. Interventions 15 minutes of immobilisation or immediate mobilisation after insemination. Main outcome measure Ongoing pregnancy per couple...

  17. Brote de histoplasmosis en la Escuela de Cadetes de la Base Aérea de Morón, Provincia de Buenos Aires, República Argentina Histoplasmosis outbreak in Morón, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Negroni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe un brote de histoplasmosis que afectó a 6 cadetes de la Fuerza Aérea Argentina, sin antecedentes patológicos previos. Todos consultaron por problemas respiratorios después de haber limpiado un hangar. En ese recinto se encontraron abundantes deyecciones de animales, presuntamente de palomas y murciélagos. Los pacientes sufrieron fiebre, mialgias, taquipnea y tos no productiva. Las radiografías y tomografías de tórax mostraron imágenes pulmonares micronodulares, engrosamiento de los tabiques interalveolares y adenopatías hiliares. Todos tuvieron una evolución favorable y no requirieron tratamiento antifúngico. Las pruebas de inmunodifusión y contrainmunoelectroforesis con antígenos de Histoplasma capsulatum fueron positivas, al igual que las intradermorreacciones con histoplasmina. Se recogieron 5 muestras de tierra del lugar, las que fueron inoculadas por vía intraperitoneal a 20 hámsteres. De los cultivos de hígado y bazo de dichos animales se consiguió aislar la fase micelial de H. capsulatum. La cepa aislada se comparó con las obtenidas de 12 pacientes argentinos utilizando perfiles genéticos y se observó un clado único con más de 96% de similitud, lo que confirma la homogeneidad de las cepas argentinas. Si bien la histoplasmosis es endémica en la Pampa húmeda, este es el primer brote totalmente documentado al sur del paralelo 34°.An histoplasmosis outbreak affecting 6 previously healthy Air Force cadets is herein presented. The patients suffered from fever and respiratory symptoms after having cleaned an abandoned hangar soiled with pigeons and bat droppings. They all presented fever, myalgia, tachypnea, and nonproductive cough. Chest X-ray and CT scan studies showed disseminated reticulonodular images affecting both lungs. Hiliar adenomegalies were also observed. All patients achieved a favourable outcome without antifungal treatment. Both serologic tests searching for specificic antibodies

  18. Reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family carers: pragmatic eight-centre randomised trial of joint reminiscence and maintenance versus usual treatment: a protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orrell Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing number of people with dementia, and the increasing cost of care, provides a major incentive to develop and test methods of supporting them in the community for longer. Most attention has been given to pharmacological interventions, but there is increasing recognition that psychosocial interventions may be equally effective, even preferable where medication has negative side-effects. Reminiscence groups, run by professionals and volunteers, which use photographs, recordings and other objects to trigger personal memories are probably the most popular therapeutic approach to working with people with dementia, but there is little evidence for their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. The recent inclusion of family carers in groups with people with dementia, notably in our own pilot studies, has generated informal evidence that this joint approach improves relationships between people with dementia and their carers, and benefits both. Design and methods This multi-centre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of joint reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family care-givers has two parallel arms – an intervention group and a control group who receive care as usual. The intervention consists of joint reminiscence groups held weekly for twelve consecutive weeks, followed by monthly maintenance sessions for a further seven months. The primary outcome measures are the quality of life of people with dementia, as assessed by QoL-AD, and their care-givers' mental health as assessed by the GHQ-28. Secondary outcomes include: the autobiographical memories of people with dementia; the quality of the relationship between them and their care-givers; and the levels of depression and anxiety felt by them and their care-giver. Using a 5% significance level, comparison of 200 pairs attending joint reminiscence groups with 200 pairs receiving usual treatment

  19. The use of spatial and randomisation-based methods for analysis of trials with treatments randomised into rows and columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    The effect of restricted randomisations on the validity and efficiency of using spatial model as well as more common analysis of variance methods for analysing field trials was examined by simulating yields in agricultural fields with known spatial variation and analysing those using eight...

  20. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice : A cluster randomised trial a cluster randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim: To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting: A three-arm cluster randomised trial

  1. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon;

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rStO2) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rStO2 can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises....... The treatment guideline is presented to assist neonatologists in making decisions in relation to cerebral oximetry readings in preterm infants within the SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial. The evidence grades were relatively low and the guideline cannot be recommended outside a research setting...... of the literature and assessment of the quality of evidence and the grade of recommendation for each of the interventions. Results and Conclusions: A clinical intervention algorithm based on the main determinants of cerebral perfusion-oxygenation changes during the first hours after birth was generated...

  2. Reported challenges in nurse-led randomised controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang Vedelø, Tina; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    ) nonadherence to research protocols and (iii) economic and organisational obstacles. These three challenges and barriers were inter-related and all were affected by time and timing. Conclusion: Randomised controlled trials are complex, expensive, time-consuming and highly demanding for researchers and the...... clinical nursing staff. Two lessons learned from this integrative review can be highlighted. First, we recommend researchers openly to share their experiences of barriers and challenges. They should describe factors that may have inhibited the desired outcome. Second, efforts to improve the collaboration...... between nurse researchers and clinicians, including education, training and support may increase the success rate and quality of nurse-led studies using the randomised controlled trial....

  3. Thermoregulatory effects of swaddling in Mongolia: a randomised controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Tsogt, Bazarragchaa; Manaseki-Holland, Semira; Pollock, Jon; Blair, Peter S.; Fleming, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate thermal balance of infants in a Mongolian winter, and compare the effects of traditional swaddling with an infant sleeping-bag in apartments or traditional tents (Gers). Design A substudy within a randomised controlled trial. Setting Community in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Subjects A stratified randomly selected sample of 40 swaddled and 40 non-swaddled infants recruited within 48 h of birth. Intervention Sleeping-bags and baby outfits of total thermal resistance equivale...

  4. Psychological rehabilitation after myocardial infarction: multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, D. A.; West, R R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate rehabilitation after myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation in unselected myocardial infarction patients in six centres, baseline data being collected on admission and by structured interview (of patients and spouses) shortly after discharge and outcome being assessed by structured interview at six months and clinical examination at 12 months. SETTING: Six district general hospitals. SUBJECTS: All 2328 eligible patients admitted ove...

  5. Promoting childbirth companions in South Africa: a randomised pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Smith Helen; Nikodem V Cheryl; Hofmeyr G Justus; Brown Heather; Garner Paul

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Most women delivering in South African State Maternity Hospitals do not have a childbirth companion; in addition, the quality of care could be better, and at times women are treated inhumanely. We piloted a multi-faceted intervention to encourage uptake of childbirth companions in state hospitals, and hypothesised that lay carers would improve the behaviour of health professionals. Methods We conducted a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention to promote child...

  6. Ear Acupressure for Smoking Cessation: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Anthony L.; Yuan Ming Di; Christopher Worsnop; Brian H. May; Cliff Da Costa; Xue, Charlie C.L.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and safety of ear acupressure (EAP) as a stand-alone intervention for smoking cessation and the feasibility of this study design. Adult smokers were randomised to receive EAP specific for smoking cessation (SSEAP) or a nonspecific EAP (NSEAP) intervention which is not typically used for smoking cessation. Participants received 8 weekly treatments and were requested to press the five pellets taped to one ear at least three times daily. Participants were fol...

  7. Randomised controlled trial of intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahomed, K.; Nyoni, R.; Mulambo, T.; Kasule, J.; Jacobus, E.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare effectiveness of different methods of monitoring intrapartum fetal heart rate. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Referral maternity hospital, Harare, Zimbabwe. SUBJECTS--1255 women who were 37 weeks or more pregnant with singleton cephalic presentation and normal fetal heart rate before entry into study. INTERVENTIONS--Intermittent monitoring of fetal heart rate by electronic monitoring, Doppler ultrasound, use of Pinard stethoscope by a research ...

  8. Colostomy or ileostomy after colorectal anastomosis?: a randomised trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Khoury, G A; Lewis, M.C.; Meleagros, L; Lewis, A A

    1987-01-01

    Sixty one patients were entered in a randomised trial to compare transverse loop colostomy with loop ileostomy after a colorectal anastomosis thought to be at risk of dehiscence. Radiologically proven breakdown of the colorectal anastomosis occurred in 13% of these selected patients and most frequently in the colostomy group. Ileostomies functioned earlier than colostomies (P less than 0.001) but there was no other significant difference in outcome between the groups. In 52 patients intestina...

  9. Compliance therapy in psychotic patients: randomised controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, R; Hayward, P.; Applewhaite, G.; Everitt, B; David, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether compliance therapy, a cognitive-behavioural intervention, could improve compliance with treatment and hence social adjustment in acutely psychotic inpatients, and if so, whether the effect persisted six months later. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial of compliance therapy and non-specific counselling, each comprising 4-6 sessions lasting 10-60 minutes. SETTING--Acute psychiatric admissions ward serving an inner London catchment area. SUBJECTS--47 patients wit...

  10. Improper analysis of trials randomised using stratified blocks or minimisation

    OpenAIRE

    Kahan, B. C.; Morris, T. P.

    2012-01-01

    Many clinical trials restrict randomisation using stratified blocks or minimisation to balance prognostic factors across treatment groups. It is widely acknowledged in the statistical literature that the subsequent analysis should reflect the design of the study, and any stratification or minimisation variables should be adjusted for in the analysis. However, a review of recent general medical literature showed only 14 of 41 eligible studies reported adjusting their primary analysis for strat...

  11. Randomised controlled trial of aminophylline for severe acute asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yung, M; South, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine whether children with severe acute asthma treated with large doses of inhaled salbutamol, inhaled ipratropium, and intravenous steroids are conferred any further benefits by the addition of aminophylline given intravenously.
STUDY DESIGN—Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of 163 children admitted to hospital with asthma who were unresponsive to nebulised salbutamol.
RESULTS—The placebo and treatment groups of children were similar at b...

  12. Randomised controlled trial of azathioprine withdrawal in ulcerative colitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawthorne, A. B.; Logan, R. F.; Hawkey, C. J.; Foster, P. N.; Axon, A T; Swarbrick, E T; Scott, B B; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether azathioprine can prevent relapse in ulcerative colitis. DESIGN--One year placebo controlled double blind trial of withdrawal or continuation of azathioprine. SETTING--Outpatient clinics of five hospitals. SUBJECTS--79 patients with ulcerative colitis who had been taking azathioprine for six months or more. Patients in full remission for two months or more (67), and patients with chronic low grade or corticosteroid dependent disease (12) were randomised separate...

  13. Multiple imputation methods for bivariate outcomes in cluster randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiazOrdaz, K; Kenward, M G; Gomes, M; Grieve, R

    2016-09-10

    Missing observations are common in cluster randomised trials. The problem is exacerbated when modelling bivariate outcomes jointly, as the proportion of complete cases is often considerably smaller than the proportion having either of the outcomes fully observed. Approaches taken to handling such missing data include the following: complete case analysis, single-level multiple imputation that ignores the clustering, multiple imputation with a fixed effect for each cluster and multilevel multiple imputation. We contrasted the alternative approaches to handling missing data in a cost-effectiveness analysis that uses data from a cluster randomised trial to evaluate an exercise intervention for care home residents. We then conducted a simulation study to assess the performance of these approaches on bivariate continuous outcomes, in terms of confidence interval coverage and empirical bias in the estimated treatment effects. Missing-at-random clustered data scenarios were simulated following a full-factorial design. Across all the missing data mechanisms considered, the multiple imputation methods provided estimators with negligible bias, while complete case analysis resulted in biased treatment effect estimates in scenarios where the randomised treatment arm was associated with missingness. Confidence interval coverage was generally in excess of nominal levels (up to 99.8%) following fixed-effects multiple imputation and too low following single-level multiple imputation. Multilevel multiple imputation led to coverage levels of approximately 95% throughout. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26990655

  14. Reduction of adverse effects from intravenous acetylcysteine treatment for paracetamol poisoning: a randomised controlled trial:a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, D Nicholas; Dear, James W; Thanacoody, H K Ruben; Thomas, Simon H L; Eddleston, Michael; Sandilands, Euan A; Coyle, Judy; Cooper, Jamie G.; Rodriguez, Aryelly; Butcher, Isabella; Lewis, Steff C.; Vliegenthart, A D Bastiaan; Veiraiah, Aravindan; Webb, David J.; Gray, Alasdair

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paracetamol poisoning is common worldwide. It is treated with intravenous acetylcysteine, but the standard regimen is complex and associated with frequent adverse effects related to concentration, which can cause treatment interruption. We aimed to ascertain whether adverse effects could be reduced with either a shorter modified acetylcysteine schedule, antiemetic pretreatment, or both. METHODS: We undertook a double-blind, randomised factorial study at three UK hospitals, between...

  15. Are adaptive randomised trials or non-randomised studies the best way to address the Ebola outbreak in west Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanini, Simone; Zumla, Alimuddin; Ioannidis, John P A; Di Caro, Antonino; Krishna, Sanjeev; Gostin, Lawrence; Girardi, Enrico; Pletschette, Michel; Strada, Gino; Baritussio, Aldo; Portella, Gina; Apolone, Giovanni; Cavuto, Silvio; Satolli, Roberto; Kremsner, Peter; Vairo, Francesco; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    The Ebola outbreak that has devastated parts of west Africa represents an unprecedented challenge for research and ethics. Estimates from the past three decades emphasise that the present effort to contain the epidemic in the three most affected countries (Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone) has been insufficient, with more than 24,900 cases and about 10,300 deaths, as of March 25, 2015. Faced with such an exceptional event and the urgent response it demands, the use of randomised controlled trials (RCT) for Ebola-related research might be both unethical and infeasible and that potential interventions should be assessed in non-randomised studies on the basis of compassionate use. However, non-randomised studies might not yield valid conclusions, leading to large residual uncertainty about how to interpret the results, and can also waste scarce intervention-related resources, making them profoundly unethical. Scientifically sound and rigorous study designs, such as adaptive RCTs, could provide the best way to reduce the time needed to develop new interventions and to obtain valid results on their efficacy and safety while preserving the application of ethical precepts. We present an overview of clinical studies registered at present at the four main international trial registries and provide a simulation on how adaptive RCTs can behave in this context, when mortality varies simultaneously in either the control or the experimental group. PMID:25881871

  16. Is an Intervention Using Computer Software Effective in Literacy Learning? A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, G.; Miles, J. N. V.; Torgerson, C. J.; Torgerson, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Computer software is widely used to support literacy learning. There are few randomised trials to support its effectiveness. Therefore, there is an urgent need to rigorously evaluate computer software that supports literacy learning. Methods: We undertook a pragmatic randomised controlled trial among pupils aged 11-12 within a single…

  17. Feasibility study of an integrated stroke self-management programme : a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Fiona; Gage, Heather; Drummond, Avril; Bhalla, Ajay; Grant, Robert; Lennon, Sheila; McKevitt, Christopher; Riazi, Afsane; Liston, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the feasibility of conducting a controlled trial into the effectiveness of a self-management programme integrated into stroke rehabilitation. DESIGN: A feasibility cluster-randomised design was utilised with stroke rehabilitation teams as units of randomisation. SETTING: Community-based stroke rehabilitation teams in London. PARTICIPANTS: 78 patients with a diagnosis of stroke requiring community based rehabilitation. INTERVENTION: The interv...

  18. Inconsistent reporting of surrogate outcomes in randomised clinical trials: cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Brok, Jesper; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    To assess if authors of randomised clinical trials convey the fact that they have used surrogate outcomes and discussed their validity.......To assess if authors of randomised clinical trials convey the fact that they have used surrogate outcomes and discussed their validity....

  19. Effects of an 18-week exercise programme started early during breast cancer treatment: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Travier, Noémie; Velthuis, Miranda J; Steins Bisschop, Charlotte N.; van den Buijs, Bram; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Backx, Frank; Los, Maartje; Erdkamp, Frans; Bloemendal, Haiko J.; Rodenhuis, Carla; de Roos, Marnix A.J.; Verhaar, Marlies; ten Bokkel Huinink, Daan; van der Wall, Elsken; Peeters, Petra H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise started shortly after breast cancer diagnosis might prevent or diminish fatigue complaints. The Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT) study was designed to primarily examine the effects of an 18-week exercise intervention, offered in the daily clinical practice setting and starting within 6 weeks after diagnosis, on preventing an increase in fatigue. Methods This multi-centre controlled trial randomly assigned 204 breast cancer patients to usual care (n = 102) o...

  20. The nutrition-based comprehensive intervention study on childhood obesity in China (NISCOC): a randomised cluster controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Xu Guifa; Ma Jun; Shang Xianwen; Xu Haiquan; Duan Yifan; Hao Linan; Fang Hongyun; Liu Ailing; Zhang Qian; Hu Xiaoqi; Li Yanping; Du Lin; Li Ying; Guo Hongwei; Li Tingyu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Childhood obesity and its related metabolic and psychological abnormalities are becoming serious health problems in China. Effective, feasible and practical interventions should be developed in order to prevent the childhood obesity and its related early onset of clinical cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a multi-centred random controlled school-based clinical intervention for childhood obesity in China. The secondary objecti...

  1. A randomised controlled trial of a probiotic ‘functional food’ in the management of irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Lesley M; McCahon, Deborah; Holder, Roger; Wilson, Sue; Hobbs, FD Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterised by pain, distension and altered bowel habit. Evidence suggests functional foods containing probiotics improve gastrointestinal transit, however, data are limited by short follow-up periods and evaluation in selected populations. Methods A multi-centre, randomized, double blind, controlled trial to evaluate the effect of a probiotic vs non-probiotic dairy product on symptoms in IBS with a constipation element (IBS – ...

  2. The feasibility of creating a checklist for the assessment of the methodological quality both of randomised and non-randomised studies of health care interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Downs, S. H.; Black, N.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the feasibility of creating a valid and reliable checklist with the following features: appropriate for assessing both randomised and non-randomised studies; provision of both an overall score for study quality and a profile of scores not only for the quality of reporting, internal validity (bias and confounding) and power, but also for external validity. DESIGN: A pilot version was first developed, based on epidemiological principles, reviews, and existing checklists...

  3. Novel Three-Day, Community-Based, Nonpharmacological Group Intervention for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain (COPERS): A Randomised Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie J. C.; Carnes, Dawn; Homer, Kate; Kahan, Brennan C.; Hounsome, Natalia; Eldridge, Sandra; Spencer, Anne; Pincus, Tamar; Underwood, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide. The effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for chronic pain is often limited, and there is growing concern about the adverse effects of these treatments, including opioid dependence. Nonpharmacological approaches to chronic pain may be an attractive alternative or adjunctive treatment. We describe the effectiveness of a novel, theoretically based group pain management support intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods and Findings We conducted a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomised, controlled effectiveness and cost-effectiveness (cost–utility) trial across 27 general practices and community musculoskeletal services in the UK. We recruited 703 adults with musculoskeletal pain of at least 3 mo duration between August 1, 2011, and July 31, 2012, and randomised participants 1.33:1 to intervention (403) or control (300). Intervention participants were offered a participative group intervention (COPERS) delivered over three alternate days with a follow-up session at 2 wk. The intervention introduced cognitive behavioural approaches and was designed to promote self-efficacy to manage chronic pain. Controls received usual care and a relaxation CD. The primary outcome was pain-related disability at 12 mo (Chronic Pain Grade [CPG] disability subscale); secondary outcomes included the CPG disability subscale at 6 mo and the following measured at 6 and 12 mo: anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire), social integration (Health Education Impact Questionnaire social integration and support subscale), pain-related self-efficacy (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire), pain intensity (CPG pain intensity subscale), the census global health question (2011 census for England and Wales), health utility (EQ-5D-3L), and health care resource use. Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle

  4. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Edward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785. The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p Conclusion In this setting, EVS technology used in large group lectures did not offer significant advantages over the more traditional lecture format.

  5. Randomised clinical trials with clinician-preferred treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, E L; Baumrind, S

    1991-01-19

    The standard design for randomised clinical trials may be inappropriate when the clinician believes that one of the treatments being tested is superior for the patient, or when the clinician has a preference for one of the treatments. For such instances the suggestion is that the patient is randomly allocated to treatment only when there is clinical disagreement about treatment of choice for that patient, and then the patient is assigned to a clinician who had thought that the regimen allocated is the one most appropriate for that patient. PMID:1670796

  6. Mendelian Randomisation Study of Childhood BMI and Early Menarche

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah S. Mumby; Elks, Cathy E; Shengxu Li; Sharp, Stephen J.; Kay-Tee Khaw; Luben, Robert N; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Ken K Ong

    2011-01-01

    To infer the causal association between childhood BMI and age at menarche, we performed a mendelian randomisation analysis using twelve established “BMI-increasing” genetic variants as an instrumental variable (IV) for higher BMI. In 8,156 women of European descent from the EPIC-Norfolk cohort, height was measured at age 39–77 years; age at menarche was self-recalled, as was body weight at age 20 years, and BMI at 20 was calculated as a proxy for childhood BMI. DNA was genotyped for twelve BM...

  7. Bach flower remedies: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Edzard

    2010-01-01

    Bach flower remedies continue to be popular and its proponents make a range of medicinal claims for them. The aim of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the evidence for these claims. Five electronic databases were searched without restrictions on time or language. All randomised clinical trials of flower remedies were included. Seven such studies were located. All but one were placebo-controlled. All placebo-controlled trials failed to demonstrate efficacy. It is concluded that the most reliable clinical trials do not show any differences between flower remedies and placebos. PMID:20734279

  8. Randomised controlled trial of nicotine chewing-gum.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, M. J.; Raw, M.; Russell, M A; Feyerabend, C

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of 2 mg nicotine chewing-gum as an aid to stopping smoking was compared with a placebo containing 1 mg nicotine, but unbuffered, in a double-blind randomised trial. Of 58 subjects given the active gum, 27 (47%) were not smoking at one-year follow-up compared with 12 (21%) of the 58 subjects treated with placebo (p less than 0.025). By the most stringent criterion of outcome, 18 (31%) subjects in the active treatment group and eight (14%) in the placebo group had not smoked a...

  9. Randomised controlled trial of colloid infusions in hypotensive preterm infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Emery, E F; Greenough, A; Gamsu, H R

    1992-01-01

    Colloid infusions are often given to treat hypotension in preterm infants. The aim of this work was to assess whether it was the amount of protein or the volume of the colloid infused which accounted for the observed increase in blood pressure. Sixty preterm infants were randomised (20 in each group) to receive 5 ml/kg 20% albumin, 15 ml/kg fresh frozen plasma, or 15 ml/kg 4.5% albumin. All infusions were given at a rate of 5 ml/kg/hour in addition to maintenance fluids. The infants were rand...

  10. Four-week parenteral nutrition using a third generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid)--a double-blind, randomised, multicentre study in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klek, Stanislaw; Chambrier, Cecile; Singer, Pierre;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerance of a soybean/MCT/olive/fish oil emulsion in intestinal failure patients on long-term parenteral nutrition. 73 patients took part in a randomized, double-blind, multi-centre study. The study demonstrates that the lipid emulsion contain...

  11. Alcohol intake and cardiovascular risk factors: A Mendelian randomisation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoonsu; Shin, So-Youn; Won, Sungho; Relton, Caroline L; Davey Smith, George; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Mendelian randomisation studies from Asia suggest detrimental influences of alcohol on cardiovascular risk factors, but such associations are observed mainly in men. The absence of associations of genetic variants (e.g. rs671 in ALDH2) with such risk factors in women - who drank little in these populations - provides evidence that the observations are not due to genetic pleiotropy. Here, we present a Mendelian randomisation study in a South Korean population (3,365 men and 3,787 women) that 1) provides robust evidence that alcohol consumption adversely affects several cardiovascular disease risk factors, including blood pressure, waist to hip ratio, fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels. Alcohol also increases HDL cholesterol and lowers LDL cholesterol. Our study also 2) replicates sex differences in associations which suggests pleiotropy does not underlie the associations, 3) provides further evidence that association is not due to pleiotropy by showing null effects in male non-drinkers, and 4) illustrates a way to measure population-level association where alcohol intake is stratified by sex. In conclusion, population-level instrumental variable estimation (utilizing interaction of rs671 in ALDH2 and sex as an instrument) strengthens causal inference regarding the largely adverse influence of alcohol intake on cardiovascular health in an Asian population. PMID:26687910

  12. Researching Effective Strategies to Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Children and Teenagers - RESIST. A randomised control trial investigating the effects of two different diets on insulin sensitivity in young people with insulin resistance and/or pre-diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sukanya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concomitant with the rise in childhood obesity there has been a significant increase in the number of adolescents with clinical features of insulin resistance and prediabetes. Clinical insulin resistance and prediabetes are likely to progress to type 2 diabetes and early atherosclerosis if not targeted for early intervention. There are no efficacy trials of lifestyle intervention in this group to inform clinical practice. The primary aim of this randomised control trial (RCT is to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of two different structured lifestyle interventions differing in diet composition on insulin sensitivity, in adolescents with clinical insulin resistance and/or prediabetes treated with metformin. Methods/design This study protocol describes the design of an ongoing RCT. We are recruiting 108 (54 each treatment arm 10 to 17 year olds with clinical features of insulin resistance and/or prediabetes, through physician referral, into a multi-centred RCT. All participants are prescribed metformin and participate in a diet and exercise program. The lifestyle program is the same for all participants except for diet composition. The diets are a high carbohydrate, low fat diet and a moderate carbohydrate, increased protein diet. The program commences with an intensive 3 month dietary intervention, implemented by trained dietitians, followed by a 3 month intensive gym and home based exercise program, supervised by certified physical trainers. To measure the longer term effectiveness, after the intensive intervention trial participants are managed by either their usual physician or study physician and followed up by the study dietitians for an additional 6 months. The primary outcome measure, change in insulin sensitivity, is measured at 3, 6 and 12 months. Discussion Clinical insulin resistance and prediabetes in the paediatric population are rapidly emerging clinical problems with serious health outcomes. With

  13. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed

  14. A pragmatic cluster randomised trial evaluating three implementation interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rycroft-Malone Jo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation research is concerned with bridging the gap between evidence and practice through the study of methods to promote the uptake of research into routine practice. Good quality evidence has been summarised into guideline recommendations to show that peri-operative fasting times could be considerably shorter than patients currently experience. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of three strategies for the implementation of recommendations about peri-operative fasting. Methods A pragmatic cluster randomised trial underpinned by the PARIHS framework was conducted during 2006 to 2009 with a national sample of UK hospitals using time series with mixed methods process evaluation and cost analysis. Hospitals were randomised to one of three interventions: standard dissemination (SD of a guideline package, SD plus a web-based resource championed by an opinion leader, and SD plus plan-do-study-act (PDSA. The primary outcome was duration of fluid fast prior to induction of anaesthesia. Secondary outcomes included duration of food fast, patients’ experiences, and stakeholders’ experiences of implementation, including influences. ANOVA was used to test differences over time and interventions. Results Nineteen acute NHS hospitals participated. Across timepoints, 3,505 duration of fasting observations were recorded. No significant effect of the interventions was observed for either fluid or food fasting times. The effect size was 0.33 for the web-based intervention compared to SD alone for the change in fluid fasting and was 0.12 for PDSA compared to SD alone. The process evaluation showed different types of impact, including changes to practices, policies, and attitudes. A rich picture of the implementation challenges emerged, including inter-professional tensions and a lack of clarity for decision-making authority and responsibility. Conclusions This was a large, complex study and one of the first

  15. Deprescribing in Frail Older People: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Potter

    Full Text Available Deprescribing has been proposed as a way to reduce polypharmacy in frail older people. We aimed to reduce the number of medicines consumed by people living in residential aged care facilities (RACF. Secondary objectives were to explore the effect of deprescribing on survival, falls, fractures, hospital admissions, cognitive, physical, and bowel function, quality of life, and sleep.Ninety-five people aged over 65 years living in four RACF in rural mid-west Western Australia were randomised in an open study. The intervention group (n = 47 received a deprescribing intervention, the planned cessation of non-beneficial medicines. The control group (n = 48 received usual care. Participants were monitored for twelve months from randomisation. Primary outcome was change in the mean number of unique regular medicines. All outcomes were assessed at baseline, six, and twelve months.Study participants had a mean age of 84.3 ± 6.9 years and 52% were female. Intervention group participants consumed 9.6 ± 5.0 and control group participants consumed 9.5 ± 3.6 unique regular medicines at baseline. Of the 348 medicines targeted for deprescribing (7.4 ± 3.8 per person, 78% of regular medicines, 207 medicines (4.4 ± 3.4 per person, 59% of targeted medicines were successfully discontinued. The mean change in number of regular medicines at 12 months was -1.9 ± 4.1 in intervention group participants and +0.1 ± 3.5 in control group participants (estimated difference 2.0 ± 0.9, 95%CI 0.08, 3.8, p = 0.04. Twelve intervention participants and 19 control participants died within 12 months of randomisation (26% versus 40% mortality, p = 0.16, HR 0.60, 95%CI 0.30 to 1.22 There were no significant differences between groups in other secondary outcomes. The main limitations of this study were the open design and small participant numbers.Deprescribing reduced the number of regular medicines consumed by frail older people living in residential care with no significant

  16. A randomised trial of lung sealant versus medical therapy for advanced emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Come, Carolyn E.; Kramer, Mordechai R.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Abu-Hijleh, Muhanned; Berkowitz, David; Bezzi, Michela; Bhatt, Surya P; Boyd, Michael B.; Cases, Enrique; Chen, Alexander C.; Christopher B. Cooper; Flandes, Javier; Gildea, Thomas; Gotfried, Mark; Hogarth, D. Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled pilot studies demonstrated promising results of endoscopic lung volume reduction using emphysematous lung sealant (ELS) in patients with advanced, upper lobe predominant emphysema. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ELS in a randomised controlled setting.

  17. CONSORT 2010 Explanation and Elaboration: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials (Chinese version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moher, David; Hopewell, Sally; Schulz, Kenneth F;

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence shows the quality of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal. Without transparent reporting, readers cannot judge the reliability and validity of trial findings nor extract information for systematic reviews. Recent methodological analyses indicate th...

  18. CONSORT 2010 Explanation and Elaboration: Updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moher, David; Hopewell, Sally; Schulz, Kenneth F;

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence shows the quality of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal. Without transparent reporting, readers cannot judge the reliability and validity of trial findings nor extract information for systematic reviews. Recent methodological analyses indicate th...

  19. Second malignancy risk associated with treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma: meta-analysis of the randomised trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, J; Pluetschow, A; Paus, M;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite several investigations, second malignancy risks (SMR) following radiotherapy alone (RT), chemotherapy alone (CT) and combined chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) remain controversial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We sought individual patient data from randomised trial...

  20. Prevention of acute knee injuries in adolescent female football players: cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Walden, Markus; Atroshi, Isam; Magnusson, Henrik; Wagner, Philippe; Hagglund, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of neuromuscular training in reducing the rate of acute knee injury in adolescent female football players. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign Stratified cluster randomised controlled trial with clubs as the unit of randomisation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting 230 Swedish football clubs (121 in the intervention group, 109 in the control group) were followed for one season (2009, seven months). less thanbrgreate...

  1. Effects of food with two oral rehydration therapies: a randomised controlled clinical trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, N H; Ahmed, T.; M. Khatun; Molla, A M

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of food on the efficacy of oral rehydration solution (ORS), a randomised, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 182 adults with cholera. After initial rehydration with an intravenous polyelectrolyte solution for four hours, the patients were randomised to receive one of four rehydration therapies: glucose based ORS and no food for the first 24 hours (group A), glucose based ORS plus food from the beginning of treatment (group B), rice based ORS with no food for the...

  2. Preventing Weight Gain in Women in Rural Communities: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lombard, Catherine; Harrison, Cheryce; Kozica, Samantha; Zoungas, Sophia; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Teede, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions in both developed and developing countries. Even modest weight gain increases the risk for chronic illness, yet evidence-based interventions to prevent weight gain are rare. This trial will determine if a simple low-intensity intervention can prevent weight gain in women compared to general health information. Methods and Findings We conducted a 1-yr pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial in 41 Australian towns (clusters) randomised ...

  3. Findings from a pilot Randomised trial of an Asthma Internet Self-management Intervention (RAISIN)

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, D; Wyke, S; Sauderson, K.; McConnachie, A.; Agur, K.; Chaudhuri, R.; M. Thomas; Thomson, N; Yardley, L; Mair, F S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of a Phase 3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a web-site (Living Well with Asthma) to support self-management. Design and Setting: Phase 2, parallel group, RCT, participants recruited from 20 general practices across Glasgow, UK. Randomisation through automated voice response, after baseline data collection, to website access for minimum 12 weeks or usual care. Participants: Adults (age ? 16rs) with physician diagnosed, symptomatic asthma (a...

  4. Findings from a pilot randomised trial of an asthma internet self-management intervention (RAISIN)

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, D; Wyke, S; Saunderson, K.; McConnachie, A.; Agur, K.; Chaudhuri, R.; M. Thomas; Thomson, N. C.; Yardley, L; Mair, F S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a phase 3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a website (Living Well with Asthma) to support self-management. Design and setting Phase 2, parallel group, RCT, participants recruited from 20 general practices across Glasgow, UK. Randomisation through automated voice response, after baseline data collection, to website access for minimum 12 weeks or usual care. Participants Adults (age≥16 years) with physician diagnosed, sympt...

  5. Home based exercise programme for knee pain and knee osteoarthritis: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, KS; Muir, KR; DOHERTY, M.; Jones, AC; O'Reilly, SC; Bassey, EJ

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a home based exercise programme can improve outcomes in patients with knee pain. Design Pragmatic, factorial randomised controlled trial of two years' duration. Setting Two general practices in Nottingham. Participants 786 men and women aged >45 years with self reported knee pain. Interventions Participants were randomised to four groups to receive exercise therapy, monthly telephone contact, exercise therapy plus telephone contact...

  6. Carbon cost of pragmatic randomised controlled trials: retrospective analysis of sample of trials

    OpenAIRE

    Lyle, Katy; Dent, Louise; Bailey, Sally; Kerridge, Lynn; Roberts, Ian; Milne, Ruairidh

    2009-01-01

    Objective To calculate the global warming potential, in carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent emissions, from a sample of pragmatic randomised controlled trials. Design Retrospective analysis. Data source Internal data held by NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre. Studies included All eligible pragmatic randomised controlled trials funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme during 2002 and 2003. Main outcome measure CO2 equivalents for trial activities calculated w...

  7. Lay support for pregnant women with social risk: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kenyon, Sara; Jolly, Kate; Hemming, Karla; Hope, Lucy; Blissett, Jackie; Dann, Sophie-Anna; Lilford, Richard; MacArthur, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought evidence of effectiveness of lay support to improve maternal and child outcomes in disadvantaged families. Design Prospective, pragmatic, individually randomised controlled trial. Setting 3 Maternity Trusts in West Midlands, UK. Participants Following routine midwife systematic assessment of social risk factors, 1324 nulliparous women were assigned, using telephone randomisation, to standard maternity care, or addition of referral to a Pregnancy Outreach Worker (POW) serv...

  8. Evaluation of benefit to patients of training mental health professionals in suicide guidelines: cluster randomised trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Beurs, D.P. de; Groot, M.H. de; Keijser, J. de; Duijn, E. van; Winter, R.F.P. de; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Randomised studies examining the effect on patients of training professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines are scarce. Aims: To assess whether patients benefited from the training of professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines. Method: In total 45 psychiatric departments were randomised (Dutch trial register: NTR3092). In the intervention condition, all staff in the departments were trained with an e-learning supported train-the-trainer programme. After the intervention...

  9. Stepped care and cognitive–behavioural therapy for bulimia nervosa: randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, James E; Agras, Stewart; Crow, Scott; Halmi, Katherine; Fairburn, Christopher G.; Bryson, Susan; Kraemer, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Background This study compared the best available treatment for bulimia nervosa, cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) augmented by fluoxetine if indicated, with a stepped-care treatment approach in order to enhance treatment effectiveness. Aims To establish the relative effectiveness of these two approaches. Method This was a randomised trial conducted at four clinical centres (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT00733525). A total of 293 participants with bulimia nervosa were randomise...

  10. A 2-year randomised placebo-controlled trial of doxycycline for lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, William Y.C.; Cane, Jennifer L; Kumaran, Maruti; Lewis, Sarah; Tattersfield, Anne E.; Johnson, Simon R

    2014-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterised by lung cysts and airflow obstruction. Matrix metalloproteinases have been implicated in lung destruction in LAM. We performed a randomised, double-blind trial, comparing the matrix metalloproteinases inhibitor doxycycline with placebo on the progression of LAM. 23 females with LAM were randomised to doxycycline 100 mg daily for 3 months followed by 200 mg daily for 21 months, or matched placebo. Lung function, exercise capacity, quality of...

  11. Homoeopathy for delayed onset muscle soreness: a randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, A J; Fisher, P.; Smith, C.; Wyllie, S E; Lewith, G T

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot a model for determining whether a homoeopathic medicine is superior to placebo for delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). DESIGN: Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. SETTING: Physiotherapy department of a homoeopathic hospital. SUBJECTS: Sixty eight healthy volunteers (average age 30; 41% men) undertook a 10 minute period of bench stepping carrying a small weight and were randomised to a homoeopathic medicine or placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean muscle soreness ...

  12. A randomised controlled trial of azithromycin therapy in bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) post lung transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Corris, Paul A; Ryan, Victoria A; Small, Therese; Lordan, James; Fisher, Andrew J.; Meachery, Gerard; Johnson, Gail; Ward, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a placebo-controlled trial of azithromycin therapy in bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) post lung transplantation. Methods We compared azithromycin (250 mg alternate days, 12 weeks) with placebo. Primary outcome was FEV1 change at 12 weeks. Results 48 patients were randomised; (25 azithromycin, 23 placebo). It was established, post randomisation that two did not have BOS. 46 patients were analysed as intention to treat (ITT) with 33 ‘Completers’. ITT analysis inc...

  13. Maximising the impact of qualitative research in feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials: guidance for researchers

    OpenAIRE

    O’Cathain, A.; Hoddinott, P.; Lewin, S; Thomas, K J; Young, B; Adamson, J.; Jansen, J.F.M.; Mills, N; Moore, G.; Donovan, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies are increasingly undertaken in preparation for randomised controlled trials in order to explore uncertainties and enable trialists to optimise the intervention or the conduct of the trial. Qualitative research can be used to examine and address key uncertainties prior to a full trial. We present guidance that researchers, research funders and reviewers may wish to consider when assessing or undertaking qualitative research within feasibility studies for randomised controll...

  14. Randomised comparison of silicone versus Teflon cannulas for peripheral intravenous nutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, J V; Walsh, K; Ruigrok, J; Hyland, J M

    1995-01-01

    The use of peripheral intravenous nutrition using standard Teflon cannulas is limited by a high incidence of thrombophlebitis, with resultant frequent line changes and compromised nutritional therapy. Fine-bore silicone catheters may reduce the incidence of thrombophlebitis; we prospectively compared the silicone catheter with a Teflon cannula in a randomised trial. Seventy-nine surgical patients were randomised to receive peripheral nutrition (10 g nitrogen; 1770 kcal; 650 mOsm/l) either via...

  15. Low glycaemic index diet in pregnancy to prevent macrosomia (ROLO study): randomised control trial

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Jennifer M.; Ciara A. McGowan; Mahony, Rhona; Foley, Michael E.; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if a low glycaemic index diet in pregnancy could reduce the incidence of macrosomia in an at risk group. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Maternity hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Participants 800 women without diabetes, all in their second pregnancy between January 2007 to January 2011, having previously delivered an infant weighing greater than 4 kg. Intervention Women were randomised to receive no dietary intervention or start on a low glycaemic index diet fr...

  16. What can qualitative research do for randomised controlled trials? A systematic mapping review

    OpenAIRE

    O Cathain, A.; Thomas, KJ; Drabble, SJ; Rudolph, A; Hewison, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop an empirically based framework of the aspects of randomised controlled trials addressed by qualitative research. Design Systematic mapping review of qualitative research undertaken with randomised controlled trials and published in peer-reviewed journals. Data sources MEDLINE, PreMEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Health Technology Assessment, PsycINFO, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Social Sciences Citation Index and ASSIA. Eligibility criteria Articles reporting qua...

  17. The gastrointestinal toxicity of aspirin: an overview of randomised controlled trials.

    OpenAIRE

    Roderick, P. J.; Wilkes, H C; Meade, T W

    1993-01-01

    The proven benefit of aspirin in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and its possible value in primary prevention must be weighted against its potential hazards. This paper is an overview of the gastrointestinal toxicity of aspirin, its most serious complication after intracerebral haemorrhage. Information on toxicity has been drawn only from randomised trials, thus avoiding the potential biases of observational studies. All randomised placebo controlled trials listed in the An...

  18. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday...... lives. Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for...

  19. Choosing a control intervention for a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djulbegovic Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical trials are performed to resolve uncertainty concerning comparator interventions. Appropriate acknowledgment of uncertainty enables the concurrent achievement of two goals : the acquisition of valuable scientific knowledge and an optimum treatment choice for the patient-participant. The ethical recruitment of patients requires the presence of clinical equipoise. This involves the appropriate choice of a control intervention, particularly when unapproved drugs or innovative interventions are being evaluated. Discussion We argue that the choice of a control intervention should be supported by a systematic review of the relevant literature and, where necessary, solicitation of the informed beliefs of clinical experts through formal surveys and publication of the proposed trial's protocol. Summary When clinical equipoise is present, physicians may confidently propose trial enrollment to their eligible patients as an act of therapeutic beneficence.

  20. Statistical issues in randomised controlled trials: a narrative synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bolaji; Emmanuel; Egbewale

    2015-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials(RCTs) are gold standard in the evaluation of treatment efficacy in medical investigations, only if well designed and implemented. Till date, distorted views and misapplications of statistical procedures involved in RCTs are still in practice. Hence, clarification of concepts and acceptable practices related to certain statistical issues involved in the design, conduct and reporting of randomised controlled trials is needed. This narrative synthesis aimed at providing succinct but clear information on the concepts and practices of selected statistical issues in RCTs to inform correct applications. The use of tests of significance is no longer acceptable as means to compare baseline similarity between treatment groups and in determining which covariate(s) should be included in the model for adjustment. Distribution of baseline attributes simply presented in tabular form is however, rather preferred. Regarding covariate selection, such approach that makes use of information on the degree of correlation between the covariate(s) and the outcome variable is more in tandem with statistical principle(s) than that based on tests of significance. Stratification and minimisation are not alternatives to covariate adjusted analysis; in fact they establish the need for one. Intention-totreat is the preferred approach for the evaluation of primary outcome measures and researchers have responsibility to report whether or not the procedure was followed. A major use of results from subgroup analysis is to generate hypothesis for future clinical trials. Since RCTs are gold standard in the comparison of medical interventions, researchers cannot afford the practices of distorted allocation or statistical procedures in this all important experimental design method.

  1. Can a self-management programme delivered by a community pharmacist improve asthma control? A randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barbanel, D; Eldridge, S; Griffiths, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: No randomised studies have addressed whether self-management for asthma can be successfully delivered by community pharmacists. Most randomised trials of asthma self-management have recruited participants from secondary care; there is uncertainty regarding its effectiveness in primary care. A randomised controlled study was undertaken to determine whether a community pharmacist could improve asthma control using self-management advice for individuals recruited during attendance at...

  2. SWIM (sickle with ibuprofen and morphine) randomised controlled trial fails to recruit: lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gavin; Anie, Kofi A; Buckton, Jacky; Kiilu, Patricia; Layton, Mark; Alexander, Lydia; Hemmaway, Claire; Sutton, Dorothy; Amos, Claire; Doré, Caroline J; Kahan, Brennan; Meredith, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sickle With Ibuprofen and Morphine (SWIM) trial was designed to assess whether co-administration of ibuprofen (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) resulted in a reduction of opioid consumption delivered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for acute pain in sickle cell disease. Design A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Setting UK multicentre trial in acute hospital setting. Participants Adults with sickle cell disease of any gender and phenotype aged 16 years and over. Interventions Oral ibuprofen at a dose of 800 mg three times daily or placebo in addition to opioids (morphine or diamorphine) administered via PCA pump for up to 4 days. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was opioid consumption over 4 days following randomisation. Results The SWIM trial closed early because it failed to randomise to its target of 316 patients within a reasonable time. Conclusions The key issues identified include the unanticipated length of time between informed consent and randomisation, difficulties in randomisation of patients in busy emergency departments, availability of trained staff at weekends and out of hours, fewer centres than expected using PCA routinely for sickle cell pain treatment, lack of research staff and support for participation, and the trial design. There are implications for future UK trials in sickle cell disease. Trial registration number ISRCTN97241637, NCT00880373; Pre-results. PMID:27288381

  3. Randomised controlled trial of the effect of long-term selenium supplementation on plasma cholesterol in an elderly Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cold, Frederik; Winther, Kristian H; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto;

    2015-01-01

    PRECISE (PREvention of Cancer by Intervention with Selenium) pilot study (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01819649) was a 5-year randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with four groups (allocation ratio 1:1:1:1). Men and women aged 60-74 years (n 491) were randomised to 100 (n 124), 200 (n 122) or...

  4. Cervical occlusion in women with cervical insufficiency: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial with cerclage, with and without cervical occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels Jørgen; MaCormack, CD; Weber, Tom;

    2007-01-01

    , without the membranes being exposed to the vagina. 6. Tertiary cerclage: Short cervix, membranes exposed to the vagina. Observational study: Eligible women who refuse to be randomised will participate in an observational study. 7. Repeat/requested cervical occlusion. METHODS: The women will be randomised...

  5. Discrepancies in sample size calculations and data analyses reported in randomised trials: comparison of publications with protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, A.W.; Hrobjartsson, A.; Jorgensen, K.J.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how often sample size calculations and methods of statistical analysis are pre-specified or changed in randomised trials. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. Data source Protocols and journal publications of published randomised parallel group trials initially approved in 1...

  6. Should desperate volunteers be included in randomised controlled trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmark, P; Mason, S

    2006-09-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) sometimes recruit participants who are desperate to receive the experimental treatment. This paper defends the practice against three arguments that suggest it is unethical first, desperate volunteers are not in equipoise. Second clinicians, entering patients onto trials are disavowing their therapeutic obligation to deliver the best treatment; they are following trial protocols rather than delivering individualised care. Research is not treatment; its ethical justification is different. Consent is crucial. Third, desperate volunteers do not give proper consent: effectively, they are coerced. This paper responds by advocating a notion of equipoise based on expert knowledge and widely shared values. Where such collective, expert equipoise exists there is a prima facie case for an RCT. Next the paper argues that trial entry does not involve clinicians disavowing their therapeutic obligation; individualised care based on insufficient evidence is not in patients best interest. Finally, it argues that where equipoise exists it is acceptable to limit access to experimental agents; desperate volunteers are not coerced because their desperation does not translate into a right to receive what they desire. PMID:16943339

  7. Autotitrating versus standard noninvasive ventilation: a randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaye, J; Chatwin, M; Dayer, M; Morrell, M J; Simonds, A K

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of automatic titration of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional NIV in stable neuromuscular and chest wall disorder patients established on long-term ventilatory support. In total, 20 neuromuscular and chest wall disease patients with nocturnal hypoventilation treated with long-term NIV completed a randomised crossover trial comparing two noninvasive pressure support ventilators: a standard bilevel ventilator (VPAP III) and a novel autotitrating bilevel ventilator (AutoVPAP). Baseline physiological measurements, overnight polysomnography and Holter monitoring were repeated at the end of each 1-month treatment period. Nocturnal oxygenation was comparable between the autotitrating device and standard ventilator, as were sleep efficiency, arousals and heart rate variability. However, there was a small significant increase in mean overnight transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (median (interquartile range) 7.2 (6.7-7.7) versus 6.7 (6.1-7.0) kPa) and a decrease in percentage stage 1 sleep (mean+/-sd 16+/-9 versus 19+/-10%) on autotitrating NIV compared with conventional NIV. Autotitrating noninvasive ventilation using AutoVPAP produced comparable control of nocturnal oxygenation to standard nonivasive ventilation, without compromising sleep quality in stable neuromuscular and chest wall disease patients requiring long-term ventilatory support for nocturnal hypoventilation. PMID:19251798

  8. Comparisons against baseline within randomised groups are often used and can be highly misleading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bland J Martin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In randomised trials, rather than comparing randomised groups directly some researchers carry out a significance test comparing a baseline with a final measurement separately in each group. Methods We give several examples where this has been done. We use simulation to demonstrate that the procedure is invalid and also show this algebraically. Results This approach is biased and invalid, producing conclusions which are, potentially, highly misleading. The actual alpha level of this procedure can be as high as 0.50 for two groups and 0.75 for three. Conclusions Randomised groups should be compared directly by two-sample methods and separate tests against baseline are highly misleading.

  9. Apixaban versus enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after knee replacement (ADVANCE-2): a randomised double-blind trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Raskob, Gary E; Gallus, Alexander;

    2010-01-01

    , patients, statisticians, adjudicators, and steering committee were masked to allocation. Apixaban was started 12-24 h after wound closure and enoxaparin 12 h before surgery; both drugs were continued for 10-14 days, when bilateral ascending venography was scheduled. Primary outcome was the composite of...... receive oral apixaban 2.5 mg twice daily (n=1528) or subcutaneous enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (1529). The randomisation schedule was generated by the Bristol-Myers Squibb randomisation centre and stratified by study site and by unilateral or bilateral surgery with a block size of four. Investigators...

  10. Is vitamin C supplementation beneficial? Lessons learned from randomised controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Poulsen, Henrik E

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the promised 'antioxidant miracle' of the 1980s, several randomised controlled trials have shown no effect of antioxidant supplements on hard endpoints such as morbidity and mortality. The former over-optimistic attitude has clearly called for a more realistic assessment of the...... saturation through their normal diet, there could be a large subpopulation with a potential health problem that remains uninvestigated. The present review discusses the relevance of the available literature on vitamin C supplementation and proposes guidelines for future randomised intervention trials....

  11. Randomised clinical trial of Levonantradol and Chlorpromazine in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucraft, H.H.; Palmer, M.K. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK))

    1982-11-01

    Levonantradol is a cannabis derivative. Cannabinoid anti-emetics are being assessed in cancer chemotherapy but have been little used in radiotherapy to date. A pilot study and randomised trial compared the anti-emetic effect of a standard drug (Chlorpromazine 25 mg) with Levonantradol at two doses (0.5 and 0.75 mg) in patients receiving palliative single fraction radiotherapy to sites likely to cause nausea and vomiting. Most patients were out-patients. Both drugs were well tolerated. The frequency of vomiting was similar in all three groups in both the pilot study and randomised trial.

  12. Randomised clinical trial of Levonantradol and Chlorpromazine in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levonantradol is a cannabis derivative. Cannabinoid anti-emetics are being assessed in cancer chemotherapy but have been little used in radiotherapy to date. A pilot study and randomised trial compared the anti-emetic effect of a standard drug (Chlorpromazine 25 mg) with Levonantradol at two doses (0.5 and 0.75 mg) in patients receiving palliative single fraction radiotherapy to sites likely to cause nausea and vomiting. Most patients were out-patients. Both drugs were well tolerated. The frequency of vomiting was similar in all three groups in both the pilot study and randomised trial. (author)

  13. Randomised comparison of coronary stenting with and without balloon predilatation in selected patients

    OpenAIRE

    Le Breton, H; Boschat, J; Commeau, P; Brunel, P.; Gilard, M; Breut, C; Bar, O.; Geslin, P; Tirouvanziam, A; Maillard, L.; Moquet, B; Barragan, P.; Dupouy, P.; Grollier, G; Berland, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The SWIBAP (stent without balloon predilatation) prospective randomised trial was designed to compare direct coronary stenting with stenting preceded by lesion predilatation with an angioplasty balloon.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the feasibility and safety of direct stenting in non-complex coronary lesions in a prospective study.
PATIENTS AND DESIGN—All patients  3.0 mm, who granted their informed consent, were randomised into the trial. In group I, the stent was placed without balloon...

  14. Experiences from a randomised, controlled trial on cycling to school: does cycling increase cardiorespiratory fitness?

    OpenAIRE

    Børrestad, Line Anita Bjørkelund; Østergaard, Lars; Andersen, Lars Bo; Bere, Elling

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of a 12-week randomised controlled cycling-to-school trial on cardiorespiratory fitness. Methods: A total of 53 10- to 13-year-old children from one public school were included. The children were randomised into either a cycling group or a control group. The cycling group was encouraged to cycle to and from school each day during a period of 12 weeks. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and anthropometrical data (weight and ...

  15. Promoting childbirth companions in South Africa: a randomised pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Helen

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most women delivering in South African State Maternity Hospitals do not have a childbirth companion; in addition, the quality of care could be better, and at times women are treated inhumanely. We piloted a multi-faceted intervention to encourage uptake of childbirth companions in state hospitals, and hypothesised that lay carers would improve the behaviour of health professionals. Methods We conducted a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention to promote childbirth companions in hospital deliveries. We promoted evidence-based information for maternity staff at 10 hospitals through access to the World Health Organization Reproductive Health Library (RHL, computer hardware and training to all ten hospitals. We surveyed 200 women at each site, measuring companionship, and indicators of good obstetric practice and humanity of care. Five hospitals were then randomly allocated to receive an educational intervention to promote childbirth companions, and we surveyed all hospitals again at eight months through a repeat survey of postnatal women. Changes in median values between intervention and control hospitals were examined. Results At baseline, the majority of hospitals did not allow a companion, or access to food or fluids. A third of women were given an episiotomy. Some women were shouted at (17.7%, N = 2085, and a few reported being slapped or struck (4.3%, N = 2080. Despite an initial positive response from staff to the childbirth companion intervention, we detected no difference between intervention and control hospitals in relation to whether a companion was allowed by nursing staff, good obstetric practice or humanity of care. Conclusion The quality and humanity of care in these state hospitals needs to improve. Introducing childbirth companions was more difficult than we anticipated, particularly in under-resourced health care systems with frequent staff changes. We were unable to determine whether the presence

  16. Semiparametric methods for multistate survival models in randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Harold M; Lô, Serigne N; Simes, R John; Tonkin, Andrew M; Heritier, Stephane

    2014-05-10

    Transform methods have proved effective for networks describing a progression of events. In semi-Markov networks, we calculated the transform of time to a terminating event from corresponding transforms of intermediate steps. Saddlepoint inversion then provided survival and hazard functions, which integrated, and fully utilised, the network data. However, the presence of censored data introduces significant difficulties for these methods. Many participants in controlled trials commonly remain event-free at study completion, a consequence of the limited period of follow-up specified in the trial design. Transforms are not estimable using nonparametric methods in states with survival truncated by end-of-study censoring. We propose the use of parametric models specifying residual survival to next event. As a simple approach to extrapolation with competing alternative states, we imposed a proportional incidence (constant relative hazard) assumption beyond the range of study data. No proportional hazards assumptions are necessary for inferences concerning time to endpoint; indeed, estimation of survival and hazard functions can proceed in a single study arm. We demonstrate feasibility and efficiency of transform inversion in a large randomised controlled trial of cholesterol-lowering therapy, the Long-Term Intervention with Pravastatin in Ischaemic Disease study. Transform inversion integrates information available in components of multistate models: estimates of transition probabilities and empirical survival distributions. As a by-product, it provides some ability to forecast survival and hazard functions forward, beyond the time horizon of available follow-up. Functionals of survival and hazard functions provide inference, which proves sharper than that of log-rank and related methods for survival comparisons ignoring intermediate events. PMID:24338893

  17. Acupuncture for dry eye: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ae-Ran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dry eye is usually managed by conventional medical interventions such as artificial tears, anti-inflammatory drugs and surgical treatment. However, since dry eye is one of the most frequent ophthalmologic disorders, safer and more effective methods for its treatment are necessary, especially for vulnerable patients. Acupuncture has been widely used to treat patients with dry eye. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for this condition. Methods/Design A randomised, patient-assessor blinded, sham (non-acupuncture point, shallow acupuncture controlled study was established. Participants allocated to verum acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups will be treated three times weekly for three weeks for a total of nine sessions per participant. Seventeen points (GV23; bilateral BL2, GB4, TE23, Ex1 (Taiyang, ST1 and GB20; and left SP3, LU9, LU10 and HT8 for men, right for women have been selected for the verum acupuncture; for the sham acupuncture, points have been selected that do not coincide with a classical acupuncture point and that are located close to the verum points, except in the case of the rim of the eye. Ocular surface disease index, tear film breakup time, the Schirmer I test, medication quantification scale and general assessment of improvement will be used as outcome variables for evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture. Safety will also be assessed at every visit. Primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed four weeks after screening. All statistical analyses will be performed using analysis of covariance. Discussion The results of this trial will be used as a basis for clarifying the efficacy of acupuncture for dry eye. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00969280.

  18. TREC-SAVE: a randomised trial comparing mechanical restraints with use of seclusion for aggressive or violent seriously mentally ill people: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira Marco AV; Coutinho Evandro SF; Huf Gisele; Ferreira Silvana; Mello Flavia; Adams Clive E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Thousands of people whose aggression is thought due to serious mental illness are secluded or restrained every day. Without fair testing these techniques will continue to be used outside of a rigorous evidence base. With such coercive treatment this leaves all concerned vulnerable to abuse and criticism. This paper presents the protocol for a randomised trial comparing seclusion with restraints for people with serious mental illnesses. Methods/Design Setting-General psychi...

  19. Morning vaccination enhances antibody response over afternoon vaccination: A cluster-randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Joanna E.; Drayson, Mark T; Taylor, Angela E.; Toellner, Kai M.; Lord, Janet M.; Phillips, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • Early small studies provide mixed evidence for effects of time of vaccination on antibody response. • This is the first large scale randomised trial of different times of vaccination. • Morning vaccination enhances the antibody response to the influenza vaccine. • This simple manipulation is cost neutral and may improve protection from influenza in older adults.

  20. Review of Randomised Controlled Trials of Internet Interventions for Mental Disorders and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kathleen M.; Christensen, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Self-help Internet interventions have the potential to enable consumers to play a central role in managing their own health. This paper contains a systematic review of 15 randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-help Internet interventions for mental disorders and related conditions. Conditions addressed by the interventions…

  1. Comparison of Bobath based and movement science based treatment for stroke: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, P M; Lincoln, N.; Foxall, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Bobath based (BB) and movement science based (MSB) physiotherapy interventions are widely used for patients after stroke. There is little evidence to suggest which is most effective. This single-blind randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of these treatments on movement abilities and functional independence.

  2. Cervical collar or physiotherapy versus wait and see policy for recent onset cervical radiculopathy: randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Kuijper; J.T.J. Tans; A. Beelen; F. Nollet; M. de Visser

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with collar or physiotherapy compared with a wait and see policy in recent onset cervical radiculopathy. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Neurology outpatient clinics in three Dutch hospitals. Participants 205 patients with symptoms and

  3. Cervical collar or physiotherapy versus wait and see policy for recent onset cervical radiculopathy: randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Kuijper (Barbara); J.T. Tans; A. Beelen (Anita); F. Nollet (Frans); M. de Visser (Marianne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with collar or physiotherapy compared with a wait and see policy in recent onset cervical radiculopathy. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Neurology outpatient clinics in three Dutch hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: 205 patients w

  4. Comments on: The effects of sitagliptin on gastric emptying in healthy humans - a randomised, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Pigarova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Comments on: Stevens JE, Horowitz M, Deacon CF, Nauck M, Rayner CK, Jones KL. The effects of sitagliptin on gastric emptying in healthy humans - a randomised, controlled study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Jun 28. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2012.05198.x

  5. Skills Training to Avoid Inadvertent Plagiarism: Results from a Randomised Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Fiona J.; Wright, Jill D.; Newton, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to be a concern within academic institutions. The current study utilised a randomised control trial of 137 new entry tertiary students to assess the efficacy of a scalable short training session on paraphrasing, patch writing and plagiarism. The results indicate that the training significantly enhanced students' overall…

  6. Randomised comparison of procedures for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials of treatment for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simes, R J; Tattersall, M H; Coates, A S; Raghavan, D; Solomon, H J; Smartt, H

    1986-10-25

    Methods of obtaining informed consent have evolved differently in Western countries without substantive information on the impact of these different practices on the patients. A randomised study was performed to compare two commonly adopted methods of seeking consent to randomised treatment: an individual approach at the discretion of each doctor and a uniform policy of total disclosure of all relevant information. The impact of both consent procedures on the patient's understanding and anxiety levels and on the doctor-patient relationship was assessed by means of a questionnaire given soon after the consent interview. Fifty seven patients were assigned at random to two groups: to 29 patients an individual approach to seeking consent was adopted and to 28 patients all relevant information was given. Seven patients refused consent to randomised treatment, with slightly more refusals by patients in the total disclosure group (5 v 2, p = 0.25). The main effects of total disclosure of all information compared with an individual approach to seeking consent were: a better understanding of treatment and side effects and of research aspects of the treatments; less willingness to agree to randomised treatment; and increased anxiety. No significant differences were found in patients' perceptions of the doctor-patient relationship. A repeat questionnaire given three to four weeks later no longer showed significant differences between the two groups. PMID:3094776

  7. Community based occupational therapy for patients with dementia and their care givers: randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graff, M.J.L.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Thijssen, M.; Dekker, J.; Hoefnagels, W.H.L.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of community based occupational therapy on daily functioning of patients with dementia and the sense of competence of their care givers. DESIGN: Single blind randomised controlled trial. Assessors were blinded for treatment allocation. SETTING: Memory clinic

  8. Evaluation of benefit to patients of training mental health professionals in suicide guidelines: cluster randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D.P. de; Groot, M.H. de; Keijser, J. de; Duijn, E. van; Winter, R.F.P. de; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Randomised studies examining the effect on patients of training professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines are scarce. Aims: To assess whether patients benefited from the training of professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines. Method: In total 45 psychiatric departments were

  9. Effect of virtual reality training on laparoscopic surgery: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Christian R; Soerensen, Jette L; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Dalsgaard, Torur; Schouenborg, Lars; Ottosen, Christian; Torben V. Schroeder; Ottesen, Bent S

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of virtual reality training on an actual laparoscopic operation. Design Prospective randomised controlled and blinded trial. Setting Seven gynaecological departments in the Zeeland region of Denmark. Participants 24 first and second year registrars specialising in gynaecology and obstetrics. Interventions Proficiency based virtual reality simulator training in laparoscopic salpingectomy and standard clinical education (controls). Main outcome measure The main ou...

  10. Spread spectrum in three-phase inverter by an optimised dual randomised PWM technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjerda, Nasserdine; Boudouda, Aimad; Melit, Mohammed; Nekhoul, Bachir; El Khamlichi Drissi, Khalil; Kerroum, Kamal

    2014-03-01

    Randomised pulse width modulation (RPWM) technique has become a viable alternative to deterministic pulse width modulation (DPWM). By spreading the power spectrum in a continuous noise, this new technique better complies with electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements for conducted electromagnetic interferences (EMI) and allows reducing the emitted acoustic noise in variable speed drives (VSDs). The most popular RPWM schemes are randomised pulse position modulation (RPPM) and randomised carrier frequency modulation (RCFM). The combination (RCFM-RPPM) or dual RPWM (DRPWM) has also been proposed. In this article, we propose an optimised DRPWM (ODRPWM) for the three-phase inverter. First, the modulating principle is proposed, and then, a mathematical model of power spectral density (PSD) of the output voltage is developed and validated for the three schemes, namely RPPM, RCFM and RCFM-RPPM. PSD analysis shows that the proposed scheme is more effective on spreading PSD. Moreover, this analysis reveals optimal parameters of randomisation for a maximum spread of the PSD. The optimisation problem is then modelled and solved using two powerful non-linear methods.

  11. Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hung, Chi-Fa

    2014-07-01

    Obesity has been shown to be associated with depression and it has been suggested that higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of depression and other common mental disorders. However, the causal relationship remains unclear and Mendelian randomisation, a form of instrumental variable analysis, has recently been employed to attempt to resolve this issue.

  12. Randomised controlled trial of topical kanuka honey for the treatment of rosacea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braithwaite, Irene; Hunt, Anna; Riley, Judith; Fingleton, James; Kocks, Janwillem; Corin, Andrew; Helm, Colin; Sheahan, Davitt; Tofield, Christopher; Montgomery, Barney; Holliday, Mark; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of topical 90% medical-grade kanuka honey and 10% glycerine (Honevo) as a treatment for rosacea. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with blinded assessment of primary outcome variable. SETTING: Outpatient primary healthcare population from 5 New Zealand sites.

  13. A prospective randomised controlled clinical trial comparing somatostatin and vasopressin in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Jenkins; Baxter, J. N.; Corbett, W; Devitt, P.; Ware, J; Shields, R

    1985-01-01

    Twenty two patients were entered into a randomised controlled clinical trial comparing the efficacy of somatostatin and vasopressin in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage. Somatostatin was significantly more successful in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage than vasopressin (p = 0.003). Furthermore, no complications were observed during treatment with somatostatin.

  14. Comparative effectiveness of long-acting antipsychotics: issues and challenges from a pragmatic randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostuzzi, G; Barbui, C

    2016-02-01

    Although long-acting antipsychotics are widely used in individuals with psychotic disorders, it is unclear which long-acting preparation should be considered as first-line treatment in clinical practice. In this commentary, the main strengths and weaknesses of a recently published pragmatic randomised study comparing long-acting paliperidone palmitate v. long-acting haloperidol decanoate are briefly analysed. PMID:26515607

  15. C reactive protein and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a Mendelian randomisation approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Dahl, Morten; Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G.

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design. Methods The authors measured high...

  16. Exercise therapy for Stress-related mental disorder, a randomised controlled trial in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quartero, A. Otto; Burger, Huib; Donker, Marieke; de Wit, Niek J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: to investigate whether a structured physical exercise programme (PEP) improves the recovery of general health in patients suffering from Stress-related Mental Disorder (SMD). Method: Study design: randomised open trial in general practice. Patients from two regions in the Netherlands wer

  17. Melatonin for chronic whiplash syndrome with delayed melatonin onset randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringen, S. van; Jansen, T.; Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of melatonin in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and delayed melatonin onset. Design: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. One-week baseline was followed by a 4-week treatment period with either melatonin or placebo. In the ba

  18. Acupressure at acupoint P6 for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting: a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Møller, Ann M

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting causes discomfort in many patients despite both antiemetic prophylactics and improved anaesthetic techniques. Stimulation of acupoint P6 is described as an alternative method for prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting.In a randomised, double-blinded stu...

  19. Functional effects of losartan in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is a lack of disease-modifying treatments in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The aim of this randomised, placebo-controlled study was to assess if losartan could improve or ameliorate deterioration of cardiac function and exercise capacity. METHODS: Echocardiography, exercise...

  20. Low quality of reporting adverse drug reactions in paediatric randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Tjalling W; van Roon, Eric N

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Randomised controlled trials (RCT) offer an opportunity to learn about frequency and character of adverse drug reactions. To improve the quality of reporting adverse effects, the Consort group published recommendations. The authors studied the application of these recommendations in RCTs

  1. Effect of unsupervised home based proprioceptive training on recurrences of ankle sprain: randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hupperets, M.D.W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Mechelen, van W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of an unsupervised proprioceptive training programme on recurrences of ankle sprain after usual care in athletes who had sustained an acute sports related injury to the lateral ankle ligament. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial, with one year follow-up. SETT

  2. Ventilation strategies and outcome in randomised trials of high frequency ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Thome, U; Carlo, W; Pohlandt, F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Randomised controlled trials comparing elective use of high frequency ventilation (HFV) with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in preterm infants have yielded conflicting results. We hypothesised that the variability of results may be explained by differences in study design, ventilation strategies, delay in initiation of HFV, and use of permissive hypercapnia.

  3. The matching quality of experimental and control interventions in blinded pharmacological randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bello, Segun; Wei, Maoling; Hilden, Jørgen;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blinding is a pivotal method to avoid bias in randomised clinical trials. In blinded drug trials, experimental and control interventions are often designed to be matched, i.e. to appear indistinguishable. It is unknown how often matching procedures are inadequate, so we decided to sys...

  4. Outcomes of a multicentre randomised clinical trial of etanercept to treat ankylosing spondylitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calin, A.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Emery, P; Hakala, M; Kalden, J; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Mola, EM; Salvarani, C; Sanmarti, R; Sany, J; Sibilia, J; Sieper, J.; Linden, S. ven der; Veys, E; Appel, AM; Fatenejad, S

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of etanercept to treat adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). METHODS: Adult patients with AS at 14 European sites were randomly assigned to 25 mg injections of etanercept or placebo twice w

  5. Conductive Education as a Method of Stroke Rehabilitation: A Single Blinded Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conductive Education for stroke survivors has shown promise but randomised evidence is unavailable. This study assessed the feasibility of a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate efficacy. Methods. Adult stroke survivors were recruited through local community notices. Those completing the baseline assessment were randomised using an online program and group allocation was independent. Intervention group participants received 10 weekly 1.5-hour sessions of Conductive Education at the National Institute of Conductive Education in Birmingham, UK. The control group participants attended two group meetings. The study evaluated the feasibility of recruitment procedures, delivery of the intervention, retention of participants, and appropriateness of outcome measures and data collection methods. Independent assessments included the Barthel Index, the Stroke Impact Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. Eighty-two patients were enrolled; 77 completed the baseline assessment (46 men, mean age 62.1 yrs. and were randomised. 70 commenced the intervention (n=37 or an equivalent waiting period (n=33. 32/37 completed the 10-week training and 32/33 the waiting period. There were no missing items from completed questionnaires and no adverse events. Discussion. Recruitment, intervention, and assessment methods worked well. Transport issues for intervention and assessment appointments require review. Conclusion. A definitive trial is feasible. This trial is registered with ISRCTN84064492.

  6. Reading and Language Intervention for Children at Risk of Dyslexia: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Fiona J.; Hulme, Charles; Grainger, Katy; Hardwick, Samantha J.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intervention studies for children at risk of dyslexia have typically been delivered preschool, and show short-term effects on letter knowledge and phoneme awareness, with little transfer to literacy. Methods: This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of a reading and language intervention for 6-year-old children…

  7. Randomised Items in Computer-Based Tests: Russian Roulette in Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Anthony M.; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based assessments are becoming more commonplace, perhaps as a necessity for faculty to cope with large class sizes. These tests often occur in large computer testing venues in which test security may be compromised. In an attempt to limit the likelihood of cheating in such venues, randomised presentation of items is automatically…

  8. Moderate alcohol consumption increases insulin sensitivity and ADIPOQ expression in postmenopausal women: A randomised, crossover trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, M.M.; Beulens, J.W.J.; Kersten, S.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: To determine whether 6 weeks of daily, moderate alcohol consumption increases expression of the gene encoding adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and plasma levels of the protein, and improves insulin sensitivity in postmenopausal women. Methods: In a randomised, open-label, crossover trial conduc

  9. The Procalcitonin And Survival Study (PASS – A Randomised multi-center investigator-initiated trial to investigate whether daily measurements biomarker Procalcitonin and pro-active diagnostic and therapeutic responses to abnormal Procalcitonin levels, can improve survival in intensive care unit patients. Calculated sample size (target population: 1000 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fjeldborg Paul

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis and complications to sepsis are major causes of mortality in critically ill patients. Rapid treatment of sepsis is of crucial importance for survival of patients. The infectious status of the critically ill patient is often difficult to assess because symptoms cannot be expressed and signs may present atypically. The established biological markers of inflammation (leucocytes, C-reactive protein may often be influenced by other parameters than infection, and may be unacceptably slowly released after progression of an infection. At the same time, lack of a relevant antimicrobial therapy in an early course of infection may be fatal for the patient. Specific and rapid markers of bacterial infection have been sought for use in these patients. Methods Multi-centre randomized controlled interventional trial. Powered for superiority and non-inferiority on all measured end points. Complies with, "Good Clinical Practice" (ICH-GCP Guideline (CPMP/ICH/135/95, Directive 2001/20/EC. Inclusion: 1 Age ≥ 18 years of age, 2 Admitted to the participating intensive care units, 3 Signed written informed consent. Exclusion: 1 Known hyper-bilirubinaemia. or hypertriglyceridaemia, 2 Likely that safety is compromised by blood sampling, 3 Pregnant or breast feeding. Computerized Randomisation: Two arms (1:1, n = 500 per arm: Arm 1: standard of care. Arm 2: standard of care and Procalcitonin guided diagnostics and treatment of infection. Primary Trial Objective: To address whether daily Procalcitonin measurements and immediate diagnostic and therapeutic response on day-to-day changes in procalcitonin can reduce the mortality of critically ill patients. Discussion For the first time ever, a mortality-endpoint, large scale randomized controlled trial with a biomarker-guided strategy compared to the best standard of care, is conducted in an Intensive care setting. Results will, with a high statistical power answer the question: Can the survival

  10. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease: a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom R; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Whittaker, John C; Smith, George Davey; Dudbridge, Frank; Casas, Juan P; Holmes, Michael V; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease. We then used a conventional Mendelian randomisation approach to investigate the causal relevance using a genetic instrument based on 31 urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To account for potential pleiotropic associations of certain SNPs with risk factors other than urate, we additionally did both a multivariable Mendelian randomisation analysis, in which the genetic associations of SNPs with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were included as covariates, and an Egger Mendelian randomisation (MR-Egger) analysis to estimate a causal effect accounting for unmeasured pleiotropy. Findings In the meta-analysis of 17 prospective observational studies (166 486 individuals; 9784 coronary heart disease events) a 1 SD higher urate concentration was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for coronary heart disease of 1·07 (95% CI 1·04–1·10). The corresponding OR estimates from the conventional, multivariable adjusted, and Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis (58 studies; 198 598 individuals; 65 877 events) were 1·18 (95% CI 1·08–1·29), 1·10 (1·00–1·22), and 1·05 (0·92–1·20), respectively, per 1 SD increment in plasma urate. Interpretation Conventional and multivariate Mendelian randomisation analysis implicates a causal role for urate in the development of coronary heart disease, but these estimates might be inflated by hidden pleiotropy. Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis, which accounts for

  11. DIRECT trial. Diverticulitis recurrences or continuing symptoms: Operative versus conservative Treatment. A MULTICENTER RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Wall Bryan JM

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persisting abdominal complaints are common after an episode of diverticulitis treated conservatively. Furthermore, some patients develop frequent recurrences. These two groups of patients suffer greatly from their disease, as shown by impaired health related quality of life and increased costs due to multiple specialist consultations, pain medication and productivity losses. Both conservative and operative management of patients with persisting abdominal complaints after an episode of diverticulitis and/or frequently recurring diverticulitis are applied. However, direct comparison by a randomised controlled trial is necessary to determine which is superior in relieving symptoms, optimising health related quality of life, minimising costs and preventing diverticulitis recurrences against acceptable morbidity and mortality associated with surgery or the occurrence of a complicated recurrence after conservative management. We, therefore, constructed a randomised clinical trial comparing these two treatment strategies. Methods/design The DIRECT trial is a multicenter randomised clinical trial. Patients (18-75 years presenting themselves with persisting abdominal complaints after an episode of diverticulitis and/or three or more recurrences within 2 years will be included and randomised. Patients randomised for conservative treatment are treated according to the current daily practice (antibiotics, analgetics and/or expectant management. Patients randomised for elective resection will undergo an elective resection of the affected colon segment. Preferably, a laparoscopic approach is used. The primary outcome is health related quality of life measured by the Gastro-intestinal Quality of Life Index, Short-Form 36, EQ-5D and a visual analogue scale for pain quantification. Secondary endpoints are morbidity, mortality and total costs. The total follow-up will be three years. Discussion Considering the high incidence and the

  12. Timing of birth for women with a twin pregnancy at term: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslam Ross R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a well recognized risk of complications for both women and infants of a twin pregnancy, increasing beyond 37 weeks gestation. Preterm birth prior to 37 weeks gestation is a recognized complication of a twin pregnancy, however, up to 50% of twins will be born after this time. The aims of this randomised trial are to assess whether elective birth at 37 weeks gestation compared with standard care in women with a twin pregnancy affects the risk of perinatal death, and serious infant complications. Methods/Design Design: Multicentred randomised trial. Inclusion Criteria: women with a twin pregnancy at 366 weeks or more without contraindication to continuation of pregnancy. Trial Entry & Randomisation: Following written informed consent, eligible women will be randomised from 36+6 weeks gestation. The randomisation schedule uses balanced variable blocks, with stratification for centre of birth and planned mode of birth. Women will be randomised to either elective birth or standard care. Treatment Schedules: Women allocated to the elective birth group will be planned for elective birth from 37 weeks gestation. Where the plan is for vaginal birth, this will involve induction of labour. Where the plan is for caesarean birth, this will involve elective caesarean section. For women allocated to standard care, birth will be planned for 38 weeks gestation or later. Where the plan is for vaginal birth, this will involve either awaiting the spontaneous onset of labour, or induction of labour if required. Where the plan is for caesarean birth, this will involve elective caesarean section (after 38 and as close to 39 weeks as possible. Primary Study Outcome: A composite of perinatal mortality or serious neonatal morbidity. Sample Size: 460 women with a twin pregnancy to show a reduction in the composite outcome from 16.3% to 6.7% with adjustment for the clustering of twin infants within mothers (p = 0.05, 80% power. Discussion This

  13. Atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: systematic review of randomised trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore R Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly used for treatment of mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and considered to have fewer extrapyramidal effects than older antipsychotics. Methods We examined efficacy in randomised trials of bipolar disorder where the presenting episode was either depression, or manic/mixed, comparing atypical antipsychotic with placebo or active comparator, examined withdrawals for any cause, or due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, and combined all phases for adverse event analysis. Studies were found through systematic search (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and data combined for analysis where there was clinical homogeneity, with especial reference to trial duration. Results In five trials (2,206 patients participants presented with a depressive episode, and in 25 trials (6,174 patients the presenting episode was manic or mixed. In 8-week studies presenting with depression, quetiapine and olanzapine produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of 5–6, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH 12. With mania or mixed presentation atypical antipsychotics produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of about 5 up to six weeks, and 4 at 6–12 weeks, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH of about 22 in studies of 6–12 weeks. In comparisons with established treatments, atypical antipsychotics had similar efficacy, but significantly fewer adverse event withdrawals (NNT to prevent one withdrawal about 10. In maintenance trials atypical antipsychotics had significantly fewer relapses to depression or mania than placebo or active comparator. In placebo-controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics were associated with higher rates of weight gain of ≥7% (mainly olanzapine trials, somnolence, and extrapyramidal symptoms. In active controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics

  14. Testing the activitystat hypothesis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomersall Sjaan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activitystat hypothesis proposes that when physical activity or energy expenditure is increased or decreased in one domain, there will be a compensatory change in another domain to maintain an overall, stable level of physical activity or energy expenditure. To date, there has been no experimental study primarily designed to test the activitystat hypothesis in adults. The aim of this trial is to determine the effect of two different imposed exercise loads on total daily energy expenditure and physical activity levels. Methods This study will be a randomised, multi-arm, parallel controlled trial. Insufficiently active adults (as determined by the Active Australia survey aged 18–60 years old will be recruited for this study (n=146. Participants must also satisfy the Sports Medicine Australia Pre-Exercise Screening System and must weigh less than 150 kg. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups using a computer-generated allocation sequence. Participants in the Moderate exercise group will receive an additional 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks, and those in the Extensive exercise group will receive an additional 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks. Exercise targets will be accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions monitored by heart rate telemetry. Control participants will not be given any instructions regarding lifestyle. The primary outcome measures are activity energy expenditure (doubly labeled water and physical activity (accelerometry. Secondary measures will include resting metabolic rate via indirect calorimetry, use of time, maximal oxygen consumption and several anthropometric and physiological measures. Outcome measures will be conducted at baseline (zero weeks, mid- and end-intervention (three and six weeks with three (12 weeks and six month (24 week follow-up. All assessors will be

  15. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) parameters for breast fibrosis: Pooled results from two randomised trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The dose–volume effect of radiation therapy on breast tissue is poorly understood. We estimate NTCP parameters for breast fibrosis after external beam radiotherapy. Materials and methods: We pooled individual patient data of 5856 patients from 2 trials including whole breast irradiation followed with or without a boost. A two-compartment dose volume histogram model was used with boost volume as the first compartment and the remaining breast volume as second compartment. Results from START-pilot trial (n = 1410) were used to test the predicted models. Results: 26.8% patients in the Cambridge trial (5 years) and 20.7% patients in the EORTC trial (10 years) developed moderate-severe breast fibrosis. The best fit NTCP parameters were BEUD3(50) = 136.4 Gy, γ50 = 0.9 and n = 0.011 for the Niemierko model and BEUD3(50) = 132 Gy, m = 0.35 and n = 0.012 for the Lyman Kutcher Burman model. The observed rates of fibrosis in the START-pilot trial agreed well with the predicted rates. Conclusions: This large multi-centre pooled study suggests that the effect of volume parameter is small and the maximum RT dose is the most important parameter to influence breast fibrosis. A small value of volume parameter ‘n’ does not fit with the hypothesis that breast tissue is a parallel organ. However, this may reflect limitations in our current scoring system of fibrosis

  16. Can lay-led walking programmes increase physical activity in middle aged adults? A randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, S.; Bartlett, H; Ashley, A; W. Bird

    2002-01-01

    Design: Randomised controlled trial with one year follow up. Physical activity was measured by questionnaire. Other measures included attitudes to exercise, body mass index, cholesterol, aerobic capacity, and blood pressure.

  17. Analysis of patient specific dosimetry quality assurance measurements in intensity modulated radiotherapy: A multi centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: IMRT centers are having random and biased (skewed towards over or under dose distribution of the percentage variation in difference between measured and planned doses. The analysis of results of the IMRT pre-treatment dose verification reveals that there are systematic errors in the chain of IMRT treatment process at a few centers. The dosimetry quality audit prior to commissioning of IMRT may play an important role in avoiding such discrepancies.

  18. Diagnostic reference levels in angiography and interventional radiology: A Belgian multi-centre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for common angiographic and interventional procedures in Belgium. Dose Area Product (DAP) measurements were performed on 21 systems, (13 angiography and 4 vascular surgery centres). Type of procedure, total DAP, patient weight and height were collected on a daily basis during 1 y. The 75. percentile of the distribution of DAP values was defined as DRL. Preliminary DRLs were calculated for the three most frequent procedures for the whole population, for a weight class of patients (65-80 kg) and normalised to the standard size patient. Among them, the DRL for angiography of the lower limbs (30% of the procedures) from the whole population was 74.6 and 63.2 Gy cm2 for the size corrected. The mean DAP values of each room was then compared to these DRLs. (authors)

  19. Health status of children with cerebral palsy living in Europe: a multi-centre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E; White-Koning, M; Marcelli, M;

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this report is to describe the health status of 8-12-year-old children with cerebral palsy (CP) of all severities in Europe using the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ). METHOD: A total of 818 children with CP from nine centres in defined geographical areas participated. CP type...

  20. Retrospective exposure assessment and quality control in an international multi-centre case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinnerberg, H; Heikkilä, P; Huici-Montagud, A;

    2003-01-01

    assessors, as Cohen's kappa and as overall proportion of the agreements. The reassessment of the exposures changed the exposure statuses significantly, when compared with the original cohort. Harmonization of the exposure criteria increased the conformity of the assessments. The prevalence of exposure was...... higher among the original assessors (the assessor from the same country as the subject) than the average prevalence assessed by the other four in the quality control round. The original assessors classified more job situations as exposed than the others. Several reasons for this are plausible: real...... country-specific differences, differences in information available to the home assessor and the others and misunderstandings or difficulties in translation of information. To ensure the consistency of exposure assessments in international retrospective case-control studies it is important to have a well...

  1. Understanding Resident Ratings of Teaching in the Workplace: A Multi-Centre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluit, Cornelia R. M. G.; Feskens, Remco; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Grol, Richard; Wensing, Michel; Laan, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Providing clinical teachers with feedback about their teaching skills is a powerful tool to improve teaching. Evaluations are mostly based on questionnaires completed by residents. We investigated to what extent characteristics of residents, clinical teachers, and the clinical environment influenced these evaluations, and the relation between…

  2. A multi-centre analysis of treatment procedures and error components in dynamic tumour tracking radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare procedures for dynamic tumour tracking (DTT) using a gimbal-mounted linac between centres in Japan (KU-IBRI) and Belgium (UZB), to quantify tracking error (TE), and to estimate tumour-fiducial uncertainties and PTV margins. Methods: Twenty-two patients were evaluated. TE was divided into components originating from the patient, fraction, segment, and residuals. Results: KU-IBRI applied DTT to lung cancer, while UZB treated both the lung and liver. Patients from UZB were younger and had a higher body mass index. DTT procedures differed in the use of body fixation, correction for set-up error, type of fiducial markers, and goodness of fit of correlation model. TE was larger at UZB in the intra-fraction components, whereas the tumour-fiducial uncertainties were estimated to be larger at KU-IBRI. These results ultimately led to similar PTV margins at both centres (2.1, 4.2, and 2.6 mm for KU-IBRI; 2.4, 3.6, and 2.0 mm for UZB in LR, AP, and SI, respectively, for 99% coverage of patients). Conclusion: Several differences in procedures and patient characteristics were observed that affected TE and tumour-fiducial uncertainties. This analysis confirmed similar accuracy in DTT delivery and adequate PTV margins in the different centres based on their local specific workflows

  3. Multi-centre retrospective analysis of clinical diagnosis and treatment for chronic cough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ming CHENG

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical characteristics and the present status of diagnosis and treatment of chronic cough.Methods The clinical data of 238 in-patients and out-patients of Departments of Respiratory Diseases from 4 teaching hospitals of Chongqing Municipality were collected from Oct.2008 to Dec.2009,and their clinical characteristics,diagnosis and therapeutic effects were retrospectively analyzed.Results A total of 238 patients were enrolled,most of them complained of dry cough and night cough.Throat symptoms were most common,including itching or foreign body sensation,throat discomfort and gastro-oesophageal reflux.Congestion of pharynx and cobblestone like changes in posterior pharyngeal wall were the most common signs in patients with chronic cough.Among all the supplementary examinations,bronchial provocation test resulted in highest positive rate.Etiological diagnosis was done in a total of 254 case-times for diseases leading to chronic cough,among them upper airway cough syndrome(UACS was suspected in 115 case-times.cough variant asthma(CVA in 42 case-times,and cough due to gastroesophageal reflux(GERC in 53 case-times.After the specific treatment targeting UACS,CVA and GERC,in 152 case-times improvement was found after follow-up,including 56,27 and 21 case-times,respectively,with an effective rate of 68.4%(104/152.The final diagnosis for the other 44 case-times with chronic cough was chronic tonsillitis,chronic bronchitis,eosinophilic bronchitis and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor(ACEI induced cough.A definite diagnosis was finally made in 148 out of a total of 254 casses,with a diagnostic rate of 58.3%(148/254.Conclusion The final diagnostic rate in etiology of chronic cough is still poor nowadays in our country,and empirical treatment is still the main practice for chronic cough.

  4. Multi-centred mixed-methods PEPFAR HIV care & support public health evaluation: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayers Peter

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A public health response is essential to meet the multidimensional needs of patients and families affected by HIV disease in sub-Saharan Africa. In order to appraise curret provision of HIV care and support in East Africa, and to provide evidence-based direction to future care programming, and Public Health Evaluation was commissioned by the PEPFAR programme of the US Government. Methods/Design This paper described the 2-Phase international mixed methods study protocol utilising longitudinal outcome measurement, surveys, patient and family qualitative interviews and focus groups, staff qualitative interviews, health economics and document analysis. Aim 1 To describe the nature and scope of HIV care and support in two African countries, including the types of facilities available, clients seen, and availability of specific components of care [Study Phase 1]. Aim 2 To determine patient health outcomes over time and principle cost drivers [Study Phase 2]. The study objectives are as follows. 1 To undertake a cross-sectional survey of service configuration and activity by sampling 10% of the facilities being funded by PEPFAR to provide HIV care and support in Kenya and Uganda (Phase 1 in order to describe care currently provided, including pharmacy drug reviews to determine availability and supply of essential drugs in HIV management. 2 To conduct patient focus group discussions at each of these (Phase 1 to determine care received. 3 To undertake a longitudinal prospective study of 1200 patients who are newly diagnosed with HIV or patients with HIV who present with a new problem attending PEPFAR care and support services. Data collection includes self-reported quality of life, core palliative outcomes and components of care received (Phase 2. 4 To conduct qualitative interviews with staff, patients and carers in order to explore and understand service issues and care provision in more depth (Phase 2. 5 To undertake document analysis to appraise the clinical care procedures at each facility (Phase 2. 6 To determine principle cost drivers including staff, overhead and laboratory costs (Phase 2. Discussion This novel mixed methods protocol will permit transparent presentation of subsequent dataset results publication, and offers a substantive model of protocol design to measure and integrate key activities and outcomes that underpin a public health approach to disease management in a low-income setting.

  5. Multi-centre Raman spectral mapping of oesophageal cancer tissues: a study to assess system transferability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, M; Dorney, J; Lewis, A; Lloyd, G R; Old, O; Shepherd, N; Rodriguez-Justo, M; Barr, H; Lau, K; Bell, I; Ohrel, S; Thomas, G; Stone, N; Kendall, C

    2016-06-23

    The potential for Raman spectroscopy to provide early and improved diagnosis on a wide range of tissue and biopsy samples in situ is well documented. The standard histopathology diagnostic methods of reviewing H&E and/or immunohistochemical (IHC) stained tissue sections provides valuable clinical information, but requires both logistics (review, analysis and interpretation by an expert) and costly processing and reagents. Vibrational spectroscopy offers a complimentary diagnostic tool providing specific and multiplexed information relating to molecular structure and composition, but is not yet used to a significant extent in a clinical setting. One of the challenges for clinical implementation is that each Raman spectrometer system will have different characteristics and therefore spectra are not readily compatible between systems. This is essential for clinical implementation where classification models are used to compare measured biochemical or tissue spectra against a library training dataset. In this study, we demonstrate the development and validation of a classification model to discriminate between adenocarcinoma (AC) and non-cancerous intraepithelial metaplasia (IM) oesophageal tissue samples, measured on three different Raman instruments across three different locations. Spectra were corrected using system transfer spectral correction algorithms including wavenumber shift (offset) correction, instrument response correction and baseline removal. The results from this study indicate that the combined correction methods do minimize the instrument and sample quality variations within and between the instrument sites. However, more tissue samples of varying pathology states and greater tissue area coverage (per sample) are needed to properly assess the ability of Raman spectroscopy and system transferability algorithms over multiple instrument sites. PMID:27048868

  6. The diagnostic and therapeutic impact of MRI: an observational multi-centre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To provide information about the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the findings across diagnostic groups. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 2017 consecutive referrals for MRI of the head, spine or knee at four imaging centres. Clinicians completed questionnaires before MRI stating initial diagnoses, diagnostic confidence and treatment plans. After imaging, a second questionnaire evaluated clinicians' revised diagnosis and treatment plans in the light of imaging findings. Patients were grouped into nine diagnostic categories for analysis. Comparison between pre- and post-imaging was used to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of MRI. RESULTS: In seven of nine diagnostic groups MRI findings were associated with a diagnostic impact. Diagnoses were revised or discarded following normal MR findings and diagnostic confidence was increased by confirmative MR findings. There was no statistically significant diagnostic impact for suspected pituitary or cerebello-pontine angle lesions. In five of nine diagnostic groups (knee meniscus, knee ligament, multiple sclerosis, lumbar and cervical spine) MRI findings had a clear impact on treatment plans. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that in most diagnostic categories, MRI influences diagnosis and treatment. However, experimental studies are needed to prove that these diagnostic and therapeutic impacts lead to improved health. Hollingworth (2000)

  7. A multi-centre phase IIa clinical study of predictive testing for preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navaratnam, Kate; Alfirevic, Zarko; Baker, Philip N; Gluud, Christian; Grüttner, Berthold; Kublickiene, Karolina; Zeeman, Gerda; Kenny, Louise C

    2013-01-01

    5% of first time pregnancies are complicated by pre-eclampsia, the leading cause of maternal death in Europe. No clinically useful screening test exists; consequentially clinicians are unable to offer targeted surveillance or preventative strategies. IMPROvED Consortium members have pioneered a...... personalised medicine approach to identifying blood-borne biomarkers through recent technological advancements, involving mapping of the blood metabolome and proteome. The key objective is to develop a sensitive, specific, high-throughput and economically viable early pregnancy screening test for pre-eclampsia....

  8. Use of deferred consent for severely ill children in a multi-centre phase III trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boga Mwamvua

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary participation of a subject in research respects a subject's rights, strengthens its ethical conduct, and is formalized by the informed consent process. Clinical trials of life-saving interventions for medical emergencies often necessitate enrolment of patients where prior written individual informed consent is impossible. Although there are regulations and guidelines on protecting subjects in emergency research, these have been criticised for being limited and unnecessarily restrictive. Across Europe and the United States stringent regulations have resulted in a substantial decline of clinical trials involving emergency interventions. Methods We are conducting a trial of fluid resuscitation in children with hypovolaemic shock in six hospitals across three malaria-endemic African countries. The design is pragmatic as children are enrolled on clinical criteria alone and is being conducted in hospitals with facilities typical of many district hospitals across Africa. The trial aims to inform strategy for managing children with febrile illness and features of shock. In order to develop appropriate consent processes for the trial, we conducted a narrative review of current international recommendations for emergency consent. Results Practical or specific guidance was generally sparse or confusing with few examples in the literature to direct our informed consent process. For a sub-group of children who were critically sick or where parents themselves were otherwise too distressed to consider prior written consent, we opted for a modified form of deferred consent. This included verbal assent from guardians at the point of enrolment, with full written consent obtained after stabilising the child. For children who died prior to full written consent, ethical permission was received to waiver full consent. Conclusions In light of the controversy around guidance and regulations in this area we report how and why we have used a modified system of deferred consent in an emergency intervention trial in children. Although approved by all relevant ethics committees and operational in 3 countries in Africa, formal research is now necessary to explore the perceptions and experiences of parents, health workers, researchers and ethics committees of the modified method of deferred consent.

  9. Coerced hospital admission and symptom change--a prospective observational multi-centre study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Kallert

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Coerced admission to psychiatric hospitals, defined by legal status or patient's subjective experience, is common. Evidence on clinical outcomes however is limited. This study aimed to assess symptom change over a three month period following coerced admission and identify patient characteristics associated with outcomes. METHOD: At study sites in 11 European countries consecutive legally involuntary patients and patients with a legally voluntary admission who however felt coerced, were recruited and assessed by independent researchers within the first week after admission. Symptoms were assessed on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Patients were re-assessed after one and three months. RESULTS: The total sample consisted of 2326 legally coerced patients and 764 patients with a legally voluntary admission who felt coerced. Symptom levels significantly improved over time. In a multivariable analysis, higher baseline symptoms, being unemployed, living alone, repeated hospitalisation, being legally a voluntary patient but feeling coerced, and being initially less satisfied with treatment were all associated with less symptom improvement after one month and, other than initial treatment satisfaction, also after three months. The diagnostic group was not linked with outcomes. DISCUSSION: On average patients show significant but limited symptom improvements after coerced hospital admission, possibly reflecting the severity of the underlying illnesses. Social factors, but not the psychiatric diagnosis, appear important predictors of outcomes. Legally voluntary patients who feel coerced may have a poorer prognosis than legally involuntary patients and deserve attention in research and clinical practice.

  10. Adherence to MRI protocol consensus guidelines in multiple sclerosis: an Australian multi-centre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease that causes significant morbidity within a young demographic. Diagnostic guidelines for MS have evolved, and imaging has played an increasingly important role in diagnosis over the last two decades. For imaging to contribute to diagnosis in a meaningful way, it must be reproducible. Consensus guidelines for MRI in MS exist to define correct sequence type and imaging technique, but it is not clear to what extent they are followed. This study reviewed MRI studies performed on Australian individuals presenting with a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (FCD) for adherence to published guidelines and discussed practical implementation of MS guidelines in light of recent updates. The Ausimmune study was a prospective case control study of Australian participants presenting with FCD from 2003 to 2006. Baseline cranial and spinal cord MRI studies of 226 case participants from four separate Australian regions were reviewed. MRI sequences were classified according to anatomical location, slice plane, tissue weighting and use of gadolinium-containing contrast media. Results were compared with the 2003 Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centres MRI protocol for the diagnosis of MS. The composition of core cranial MRI sequences performed varied across the 226 scans. Of the studies, 91% included sagittal fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. Cranial axial T2-weighted, axial FLAIR and axial proton density-weighted sequences were performed in 88%, 60% and 16% (respectively) of scans. Only 25% of the studies included a T1-weighted contrast-enhanced sequence. Concordance with the guidelines in all sequences was very low (2). Only a small number of MRI investigations performed included all of the sequences stipulated by consensus guidelines. This is likely due to poor awareness in the imaging community of the guidelines and the rationale behind certain sequences. Radiologists with a sub-speciality interest in neuroradiology should take ownership of this issue and ensure that recommended imaging guidelines are followed.

  11. Suboptimal management of central nervous system infections in children: a multi-centre retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Christine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective We aimed to audit the regional management of central nervous system (CNS infection in children. Methods The study was undertaken in five district general hospitals and one tertiary paediatric hospital in the Mersey region of the UK. Children admitted to hospital with a suspected CNS infection over a three month period were identified. Children were aged between 4 weeks and 16 years old. Details were recorded from the case notes and electronic records. We measured the appropriateness of management pathways as outlined by national and local guidelines. Results Sixty-five children were identified with a median age of 6 months (range 1 month to 15 years. Ten had a CNS infection: 4 aseptic meningitis, 3 purulent meningitis, 3 encephalitis [2 with herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1]. A lumbar puncture (LP was attempted in 50 (77% cases but only 43 had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF available for analysis. Of these 24 (57% had a complete standard set of tests performed. Fifty eight (89% received a third generation cephalosporin. Seventeen (26% also received aciclovir with no obvious indication in 9 (53%. Only 11 (65% of those receiving aciclovir had CSF herpes virus PCR. Seventeen had cranial imaging and it was the first management step in 14. Treatment lengths of both antibiotics and aciclovir were highly variable: one child with HSV encephalitis was only treated with aciclovir for 7 days. Conclusions The clinical management of children with suspected CNS infections across the Mersey region is heterogeneous and often sub-optimal, particularly for the investigation and treatment of viral encephalitis. National guidelines for the management of viral encephalitis are needed.

  12. Multi-centred mixed-methods PEPFAR HIV care & support public health evaluation: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Fayers Peter; Namisango Eve; Mwangi-Powell Faith; Powell Richard A; Downing Julia; Moreland Scott; McCrone Paul; Penfold Suzanne; Simms Victoria; Harding Richard; Curtis Siân; Higginson Irene J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A public health response is essential to meet the multidimensional needs of patients and families affected by HIV disease in sub-Saharan Africa. In order to appraise curret provision of HIV care and support in East Africa, and to provide evidence-based direction to future care programming, and Public Health Evaluation was commissioned by the PEPFAR programme of the US Government. Methods/Design This paper described the 2-Phase international mixed methods study protocol uti...

  13. Two randomised phase II trials of subcutaneous interleukin-2 and histamine dihydrochloride in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donskov, F; Middleton, M; Fode, K;

    2005-01-01

    Histamine inhibits formation and release of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, and thereby protects natural killer and T cells against oxidative damage. Thus, the addition of histamine may potentially improve the efficacy of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Two randomised phase II trials of IL-2 with...... randomised phase III trial is warranted to clarify the potential role of adding histamine to IL-2 in mRCC....

  14. Pain Levels after Local Anaesthetic with or without Hyaluronidase in Carpal Tunnel Release: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, G.; Gupta, A; Ding, G.; Skerman, H.; Khatun, M.; Melsom, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Hyaluronidase is an enzyme that temporarily liquefies the interstitial barrier, allowing easy dispersal of local anaesthetic through cleavage of tissue planes. This prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study investigates the utility of adding hyaluronidase to local anaesthetic in the setting of carpal tunnel release. Methods. 70 consecutive carpal tunnel release patients were recruited and randomised into a control group only receiving local anaesthetic and a hyaluronidase gro...

  15. A prospective randomised trial of four-layer versus short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    OpenAIRE

    Scriven, J. M.; Taylor, L. E.; Wood, A. J.; Bell, P R; Naylor, A. R.; London, N. J.

    1998-01-01

    This trial was undertaken to examine the safety and efficacy of four-layer compared with short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers within the confines of a prospective, randomised, ethically approved trial. Fifty-three patients were recruited from a dedicated venous ulcer assessment clinic and their individual ulcerated limbs were randomised to receive either a four-layer bandage (FLB)(n = 32) or a short stretch bandage (SSB)(n = 32). The endpoint was a complet...

  16. Effectiveness of an audience response system on orthodontic knowledge retention of undergraduate dental students – a randomised control trial

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Nicholas; Popat, Hashmat; Richmond, Stephen; Farnell, Damian J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective:: To determine the effect of an audience response system (ARS) on knowledge retention of dental students and to gauge student perceptions of using the ARS. Design:: Randomised control study. Setting:: School of Dentistry, Cardiff University. Participants:: Seventy four second-year dental students were stratified by gender and randomised anonymously to one of two groups. Methods:: One group received a lecture on orthodontic terminology and diagnosis in a traditional didactic format a...

  17. Prostate cancer - evidence of exercise and nutrition trial (PrEvENT):Study protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hackshaw-McGeagh, Lucy; Lane, J. Athene; Persad, Raj; Gillatt, David; Holly, Jeff M P; Koupparis, Anthony; Rowe, Edward; Johnston, Lyndsey; Cloete, Jenny; Shiridzinomwa, Constance; Abrams, Paul; Penfold, Chris M; Bahl, Amit; Oxley, Jon; Perks, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A growing body of observational evidence suggests that nutritional and physical activity interventions are associated with beneficial outcomes for men with prostate cancer, including brisk walking, lycopene intake, increased fruit and vegetable intake and reduced dairy consumption. However, randomised controlled trial data are limited. The 'Prostate Cancer: Evidence of Exercise and Nutrition Trial' investigates the feasibility of recruiting and randomising men diagnosed with local...

  18. Inadequate reporting of research ethics review and informed consent in cluster randomised trials: review of random sample of published trials

    OpenAIRE

    Taljaard, Monica; McRae, Andrew D; Weijer, Charles; Bennett, Carol; Dixon, Stephanie; Taleban, Julia; Skea, Zoe; Eccles, Martin P.; Brehaut, Jamie C; Donner, Allan; Saginur, Raphael; Boruch, Robert F; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the extent to which authors of cluster randomised trials adhered to two basic requirements of the World Medical Association’s Declaration of Helsinki and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors’ uniform requirements for manuscripts (namely, reporting of research ethics review and informed consent), to determine whether the adequacy of reporting has improved over time, and to identify characteristics of cluster randomised trials associated with reportin...

  19. Effect on peer review of telling reviewers that their signed reviews might be posted on the web: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Rooyen, Susan; Delamothe, Tony; Evans, Stephen J W

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To see whether telling peer reviewers that their signed reviews of original research papers might be posted on the BMJ’s website would affect the quality of their reviews. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting A large international general medical journal based in the United Kingdom. Participants 541 authors, 471 peer reviewers, and 12 editors. Intervention Consecutive eligible papers were randomised either to have the reviewer’s signed report made available on the BMJ’s webs...

  20. Theory of planned behaviour variables and objective walking behaviour do not show seasonal variation in a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stefanie L; French, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Longitudinal studies have shown that objectively measured walking behaviour is subject to seasonal variation, with people walking more in summer compared to winter. Seasonality therefore may have the potential to bias the results of randomised controlled trials if there are not adequate statistical or design controls. Despite this there are no studies that assess the impact of seasonality on walking behaviour in a randomised controlled trial, to quantify the extent of such bias. Fu...

  1. Effectiveness of quinine versus artemether-lumefantrine for treating uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Ugandan children: randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Achan, J.; Tibenderana, J. K.; Kyabayinze, D.; Mangen, F. W.; Kamya, M. R.; Dorsey, G.; D'Alessandro, U; Rosenthal, P. J.; Talisuna, A O

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of oral quinine with that of artemether-lumefantrine in treating uncomplicated malaria in children. DESIGN: Randomised, open label effectiveness study. SETTING: Outpatient clinic of Uganda's national referral hospital in Kampala. PARTICIPANTS: 175 children aged 6 to 59 months with uncomplicated malaria. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomised to receive oral quinine or artemether-lumefantrine administered by care givers at home. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE...

  2. New non-randomised model to assess the prevalence of discriminating behaviour: a pilot study on mephedrone

    OpenAIRE

    Schaffer Jay; Deshmukh Nawed; Shah Syeda; Taft Helen; Cross Paul; Nepusz Tamás; Petróczi Andrea; Shane Maryann; Adesanwo Christiana; Barker James; Naughton Declan P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background An advantage of randomised response and non-randomised models investigating sensitive issues arises from the characteristic that individual answers about discriminating behaviour cannot be linked to the individuals. This study proposed a new fuzzy response model coined 'Single Sample Count' (SSC) to estimate prevalence of discriminating or embarrassing behaviour in epidemiologic studies. Methods The SSC was tested and compared to the established Forced Response (FR) model ...

  3. The demise of the randomised controlled trial: bibliometric study of the German-language health care literature, 1948 to 2004

    OpenAIRE

    Antes Gerd; Schwarzer Guido; Galandi Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In order to reduce systematic errors (such as language bias) and increase the precision of the summary treatment effect estimate, a comprehensive identification of randomised controlled trials (RCT), irrespective of publication language, is crucial in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We identified trials in the German general health care literature. Methods Eight German language general health care journals were searched for randomised controlled trials and analysed w...

  4. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    De Berardis, Giorgia; Sacco, Michele; Strippoli, Giovanni F.M.; Pellegrini, Fabio; Graziano, Giusi; Tognoni, Gianni; Nicolucci, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the benefits and harms of low dose aspirin in people with diabetes and no cardiovascular disease. Design Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Medline (1966-November 2008), the Cochrane central register of controlled trials (Cochrane Library 2008;issue 4), and reference lists of retrieved articles. Review methods Randomised trials of aspirin compared with placebo or no aspirin in people with diabetes and no pre-existing cardiovascular disease were e...

  5. Pharmacist-led management of chronic pain in primary care:results from a randomised controlled exploratory trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bruhn, Hanne; Christine M. Bond; Elliott, Alison M; Hannaford, Philip C; Amanda J Lee; McNamee, Paul; Smith, Blair H; Watson, Margaret C; Holland, Richard; Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effectiveness of pharmacist medication review, with or without pharmacist prescribing, with standard care, for patients with chronic pain. Design An exploratory randomised controlled trial. Setting Six general practices with prescribing pharmacists in Grampian (3) and East Anglia (3). Participants Patients on repeat prescribed pain medication (4815) were screened by general practitioners (GPs), and mailed invitations (1397). 196 were randomised and 180 (92%) complete...

  6. Insecticide-treated nets for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Gamble

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protection from malaria with insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs during pregnancy is widely advocated, but evidence of benefit has been inconsistent. We undertook a systematic review of randomised trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Three cluster-randomised and two individually randomised trials met the inclusion criteria; four from Africa (n = 6,418 and one from Thailand (n = 223. In Africa, ITNs compared to no nets increased mean birth weight by 55 g (95% confidence interval [CI] 21-88, reduced low birth weight by 23% (relative risk [RR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.98, and reduced miscarriages/stillbirths by 33% (RR 0.67, 0.47-0.97 in the first few pregnancies. Placental parasitaemia was reduced by 23% in all gravidae (RR 0.77, 0.66-0.90. The effects were apparent in the cluster-randomised trials and the one individually randomised trial in Africa. The trial in Thailand, which randomised individuals to ITNs or untreated nets, showed reductions in anaemia and fetal loss in all gravidae, but not reductions in clinical malaria or low birth weight. CONCLUSIONS: ITNs used throughout pregnancy or from mid-pregnancy onwards have a beneficial impact on pregnancy outcome in malaria-endemic Africa in the first few pregnancies. The potential impact of ITNs in pregnant women and their newborns in malaria regions outside Africa requires further research.

  7. Randomised controlled trials may underestimate drug effects: balanced placebo trial design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Lund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is an inherent assumption in randomised controlled trials that the drug effect can be estimated by subtracting the response during placebo from the response during active drug treatment. OBJECTIVE: To test the assumption of additivity. The primary hypothesis was that the total treatment effect is smaller than the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect. The secondary hypothesis was that non-additivity was most pronounced in participants with large placebo effects. METHODS: We used a within-subject randomised blinded balanced placebo design and included 48 healthy volunteers (50% males, mean (SD age 23.4 (6.2 years. Experimental pain was induced by injections of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle. Participants received four injections with hypertonic saline along with lidocaine or matching placebo in randomised order: A: received hypertonic saline/told hypertonic saline; B: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline; C: received hypertonic saline+placebo/told hypertonic saline+pain killer; D: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline+pain killer. The primary outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC, mm(2 of pain intensity during injections. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect (mean AUC 6279 mm(2 (95% CI, 4936-7622 and the total treatment effect (mean AUC 5455 mm(2 (95% CI, 4585-6324 (P = 0.049. This difference was larger for participants with large versus small placebo effects (P = 0.015, and the difference correlated significantly with the size of the placebo effect (r = 0.65, P = 0.006. CONCLUSION: Although this study examined placebo effects and not the whole placebo response as in randomised controlled trials, it does suggest that the additivity assumption may be incorrect, and that the estimated drug effects in randomised controlled trials may be underestimated, particularly in studies

  8. Group mindfulness-based intervention for distressing voices: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Paul; Strauss, Clara; Jones, Anna-Marie; Kingdon, David; Ellett, Lyn; Dannahy, Laura; Hayward, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Group Person-Based Cognitive Therapy (PBCT) integrates cognitive therapy and mindfulness to target distinct sources of distress in psychosis. The present study presents data from the first randomised controlled trial investigating group PBCT in people distressed by hearing voices. One-hundred and eight participants were randomised to receive either group PBCT and Treatment As Usual (TAU) or TAU only. While there was no significant effect on the primary outcome, a measure of general psychological distress, results showed significant between-group post-intervention benefits in voice-related distress, perceived controllability of voices and recovery. Participants in the PBCT group reported significantly lower post-treatment levels of depression, with this effect maintained at six-month follow-up. Findings suggest PBCT delivered over 12weeks effectively impacts key dimensions of the voice hearing experience, supports meaningful behaviour change, and has lasting effects on mood. PMID:27146475

  9. The post hoc use of randomised controlled trials to explore drug associated cancer outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansdottir, Gudrun; Zoungas, Sophia; Chalmers, John;

    2013-01-01

    on public health before proper regulatory action can be taken. This paper aims to discuss challenges of exploring drug-associated cancer outcomes by post-hoc analyses of Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) designed for other purposes. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES TO CONSIDER: We set out to perform a post......INTRODUCTION: Drug-induced cancer risk is of increasing interest. Both observational studies and data from clinical trials have linked several widely used treatments to cancer. When a signal for a potential drug-cancer association is generated, substantiation is required to assess the impact...... challenges must be addressed to enhance the likelihood of reliable conclusions. Advantages of post-hoc analyses of RCTs include quality of data collected and sometimes randomisation to exposure of interest. Limitations include confounding and sample size, which is fixed to suit the purposes of the trial...

  10. Discontinuation of oxytocin in the active phase of labour. A randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bor, Isil Pinar; Boie, Sidsel; Ledertoug, Susanne; Stornes, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether discontinuation of oxytocin infusion increases the duration of the active phase of labour and reduces maternal and neonatal complications. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Regional Hospital of Randers......, Denmark. POPULATION: Women with singleton pregnancy in the vertex position undergoing labour induction or augmentation. METHODS: Two hundred women were randomised when cervical dilation was ≤4 cm to either continue or discontinue oxytocin infusion when cervical dilation reached 5 cm. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES......). The incidence of fetal heart rate abnormalities (51 versus 20%) and uterine hyperstimulation (12 versus 2%) was significantly greater in the continued than the discontinued oxytocin group. The incidence of tachysystole, caesarean deliveries, postpartum haemorrhage, third degree perineal tears and...

  11. Virtual outreach: a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of joint teleconferenced medical consultations

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, P.; Barber, J; Clayton, W.; Currell, R.; Fleming, K.; Garner, P.; Haines, A.; Harrison, R; Jacklin, P.; Jarrett, C.; Jayasuriya, R.; Lewis, L; Parker, S; Roberts, J.; Thompson, S

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To test the hypotheses that virtual outreach would reduce offers of hospital follow-up appointments and reduce numbers of medical interventions and investigations, reduce numbers of contacts with the health care system, have a positive impact on patient satisfaction and enablement, and lead to improvements in patient health status. To perform an economic evaluation of virtual outreach.Design: A randomised controlled trial comparing joint teleconsultations between GPs, specialists ...

  12. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease:a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    OpenAIRE

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A.; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease...

  13. General Practitioner Antimicrobial Stewardship Programme Study (GAPS): protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Avent, Minyon L.; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Gilks, Charles; Del Mar, Chris; Halton, Kate; Sidjabat, Hanna; Hall, Lisa; Dobson, Annette; Paterson, David L.; van Driel, Mieke L.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a strong link between antibiotic consumption and the rate of antibiotic resistance. In Australia, the vast majority of antibiotics are prescribed by general practitioners, and the most common indication is for acute respiratory infections. The aim of this study is to assess if implementing a package of integrated, multifaceted interventions reduces antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections in general practice. Methods/design This is a cluster randomised trial...

  14. Tiotropium in patients with moderate COPD naive to maintenance therapy: a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Troosters, Thierry; Sciurba, Frank C.; Decramer, Marc; Siafakas, Nikos M.; Klioze, Solomon S.; Sutradhar, Santosh C.; Weisman, Idelle M; Yunis, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Background: The benefits of pharmacotherapy with tiotropium HandiHaler 18 μg for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been previously demonstrated. However, few data exist regarding the treatment of moderate disease (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage II). Aims: To determine whether tiotropium improves lung function/patient-reported outcomes in patients with GOLD stage II COPD naive to maintenance therapy. Methods: A randomised 24-we...

  15. Randomised controlled trial comparing oral and intravenous rehydration therapy in children with diarrhoea.

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie, A; Barnes, G.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the effectiveness of oral rehydration in children with moderate dehydration caused by gastroenteritis, and to compare the complications of oral and intravenous treatment. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Emergency department and infectious diseases ward in a large urban teaching hospital. PATIENTS--111 children aged 3-36 months who had been previously healthy, had had diarrhoea for seven days or less, had clinical signs of dehydration, and were not in shoc...

  16. Lessons from a randomised experiment with mixed-mode designs for a household panel survey

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Peter; Uhrig, S.C. Noah; Burton, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a randomised experiment with mixed-mode survey designs in the context of a household panel survey. The experiment was designed to allow comparisons between two alternative mixed-mode designs (telephone interviewing plus face-to-face interviewing) and a unimode design (face-to-face interviewing only) in terms of response rates, sample composition, costs and other key outcomes, as well as to permit assessment of the feasibility of implementing the mixed-mode designs.

  17. Ukrain – a new cancer cure? A systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt K.; Ernst E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Ukrain is an anticancer drug based on the extract of the plant Chelidonium majus L. Numerous pre-clinical and clinical investigations seem to suggest that Ukrain is pharmacologically active and clinically effective. We wanted therefore to critically evaluate the clinical trial data in the form of a systematic review. Methods Seven electronic databases were searched for all relevant randomised clinical trials. Data were extracted and validated by both authors, tabulated and...

  18. Side effects of phenobarbital and carbamazepine in childhood epilepsy: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Banu, S. H.; Jahan, M.; Koli, U. K.; Ferdousi, S.; Khan, N. Z.; Neville, B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the behavioural side effects associated with two commonly used antiepilepsy drugs--phenobarbital and carbamazepine--in children in Bangladesh. Design: Prospective randomised controlled single centre trial. Setting: Specialist children's hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Participants: 108 children aged 2-15 with generalised tonic-clonic (n=51) or partial and secondary generalised seizures (n=57). Main outcome measures: Seizure control and behavioural side effects. Results: 9...

  19. Prevention of respiratory complications after abdominal surgery: a randomised clinical trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, J. C.; Tarala, R. A.; Tapper, J.; Hall, J L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the prevention of respiratory complications after abdominal surgery by a comparison of a global policy of incentive spirometry with a regimen consisting of deep breathing exercises for low risk patients and incentive spirometry plus physiotherapy for high risk patients. DESIGN--Stratified randomised trial. SETTING--General surgical service of an urban teaching hospital. PATIENTS--456 patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Patients less than 60 years of age with an Ameri...

  20. Reporting quality of randomised controlled trials published in prosthodontic and implantology journals

    OpenAIRE

    Kloukos, D.; Papageorgiou, S. N.; Doulis, I.; Petridis, H.; Pandis, N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the reporting quality of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in prosthodontic and implantology journals. Thirty issues of nine journals in prosthodontics and implant dentistry were searched for RCTs, covering the years 2005-2012: The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, The International Journal of Prosthodontics, The International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Cl...

  1. The effect of the synthetic retinoid etretinate on sputum cytology: results from a randomised trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, A.M.; Browman, G.P.; Levine, M. N.; D'Souza, T.; Johnstone, B.; Skingley, P.; Turner-Smith, L.; Cayco, R.; Booker, L.; Newhouse, M

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory studies, and one previous uncontrolled trial, have suggested that retinoids may reverse bronchial atypia, a putatively premalignant condition. Sputum sampling is a simple, non-invasive method of assessing atypia. Smokers with at least a 15 pack-year history were screened for sputum atypia. One hundred and fifty subjects' were randomised to receive the synthetic retinoid etretinate 25 mg orally or identical placebo daily for 6 months. Compliance was measured by performing pill count...

  2. Practical aspects of conducting a pragmatic randomised trial in primary care: patient recruitment and outcome assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conducting a pragmatic randomised trial in primary care is often accompanied by practical problems. Such problems are seldom reported and may constitute useful lessons for researchers planning future trials. AIM: To address the difficulties involved in patient recruitment and to present measures to minimise bias during outcome assessment. METHOD: A recently conducted trial comparing the effects of corticosteroid injections and physiotherapy for painful stiff shoulder was used to i...

  3. Clozapine versus placebo in Huntington's disease: a double blind randomised comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Vugt, J.P.P. van; Siesling, S.; Vergeer, M; van der Velde, E A; R. Roos

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To establish the effect of the atypical neuroleptic clozapine on chorea, voluntary motor performance, and functional disability in patients with Huntington's disease.
METHODS—Thirty three patients with Huntington's disease participated in a double blind randomised trial. A maximum of 150 mg/day clozapine or placebo equivalent was given for a period of 31 days. Assessments were performed in the week before and at the last day of the trial. Chorea was scored usin...

  4. Randomised controlled pilot trial of mindfulness training for stress reduction during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Guardino, CM; Dunkel Schetter, C; Bower, JE; Lu, MC; Smalley, SL

    2014-01-01

    This randomised controlled pilot trial tested a six-week mindfulness-based intervention in a sample of pregnant women experiencing high levels of perceived stress and pregnancy anxiety. Forty-seven women enrolled between 10 and 25 weeks gestation were randomly assigned to either a series of weekly Mindful Awareness Practices classes (n = 24) with home practice or to a reading control condition (n = 23). Hierarchical linear models of between-group differences in change over time demonstrated t...

  5. Specialist treatment versus self-help for bulimia nervosa: a randomised controlled trial in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Durand, Mary Alison; King, Michael

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about general practice management of patients with eating disorders. AIM: To compare the effectiveness of a general practice-based, self-help approach to the treatment of bulimia nervosa with that of specialist outpatient treatment. DESIGN OF STUDY: A prospective, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. SETTING: General practices and specialist eating disorder clinics in London. METHOD: Patients were recruited from general practitioner (GP) referrals to specia...

  6. Parent-focused treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa: a study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Elizabeth K; Le Grange, Daniel; Court, Andrew; Yeo, Michele SM; Campbell, Stephanie; Allan, Erica; Crosby, Ross D.; Loeb, Katharine L.; Sawyer, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Background Family-based treatment is an efficacious outpatient intervention for medically stable adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Previous research suggests family-based treatment may be more effective for some families when parents and adolescents attend separate therapy sessions compared to conjoint sessions. Our service developed a novel separated model of family-based treatment, parent-focused treatment, and is undertaking a randomised controlled trial to compare parent-focused treatmen...

  7. Effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring in pregnant women with diabetes: randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Helen R.; Rayman, Gerry; Lewis, Karen; Kelly, Susan; Johal, Balroop; Duffield, Katherine; Fowler, Duncan; Campbell, Peter J.; Temple, Rosemary C

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring during pregnancy on maternal glycaemic control, infant birth weight, and risk of macrosomia in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Design Prospective, open label randomised controlled trial. Setting Two secondary care multidisciplinary obstetric clinics for diabetes in the United Kingdom. Participants 71 women with type 1 diabetes (n=46) or type 2 diabetes (n=25) allocated to antenatal care plus continuous glucose mon...

  8. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of sildenafil (Viagra) in the treatment of male erectile dysfunction.

    OpenAIRE

    Burls, A.; Gold, L; Clark, W.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sildenafil (Viagra), a new oral drug for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, was licensed for use across Europe in 1998. AIM: To examine the effectiveness and safety of sildenafil as an oral treatment for erectile dysfunction. DESIGN OF STUDY: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SETTING: All published or unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing sildenafil with a placebo or alternative therapies. METHOD: Published studies were sought by computerised searches of electr...

  9. Effectiveness of dementia follow-up care by memory clinics or general practitioners: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of post-diagnosis dementia treatment and coordination of care by memory clinics compared with general practitioners. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine memory clinics and 159 general practitioners in the Netherlands. Participants 175 patients with a new diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia living in the community and their informal caregivers. Interventions Usual care provided by memory clinic or general practitioner. Main out...

  10. The gait and balance of patients with diabetes can be improved: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Allet, L.; Armand, S.; de Bie, R.A.; Golay, A.; Monnin, D.; Aminian, K.; Staal, J.B.; de Bruin, E. D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Gait characteristics and balance are altered in diabetic patients. Little is known about possible treatment strategies. This study evaluates the effect of a specific training programme on gait and balance of diabetic patients. Methods This was a randomised controlled trial (n = 71) with an intervention (n = 35) and control group (n = 36). The intervention consisted of physiotherapeutic group training including gait and balance exercises with function-orientated strengthening (...

  11. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for people with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, D T; Gage, Heather; Owen, C.; Trend, P; Grossmith, C.; Kaye, J

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether a programme of multidisciplinary rehabilitation and group support achieves sustained benefit for people with Parkinson’s disease or their carers. Methods: The study was a randomised controlled crossover trial comparing patients and carers who had received rehabilitation four months before assessment with those who had not. Patients were recruited from a neurology clinic, attended a day hospital from home weekly for six weeks using private car...

  12. Randomised comparison of ondansetron and metoclopramide plus dexamethasone for chemotherapy induced emesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Dick, G S; Meller, S T; Pinkerton, C R

    1995-01-01

    The serotonin (5HT3) antagonist ondansetron was compared in a randomised study with metoclopramide and dexamethasone for the prevention of chemotherapy induced emesis. Thirty children aged 1-15 years with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia received 'intensification modules' according to the MRC United Kingdom acute lymphoblastic leukaemia regimen UKALL XI. This contains the moderately emetogenic drugs daunorubicin, etoposide, and cytarabine. Fifteen children received an intravenous loading dose of...

  13. Randomised controlled trial of the MEND programme: a family-based community intervention for childhood obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Sacher, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Childhood obesity is a serious global public health issue. The number of children affected has increased dramatically in recent years, and despite extensive research in this field, no effective generalisable prevention or treatment interventions have been achieved as yet. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) was to evaluate the efficacy of the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition, Do it (MEND) programme, a multicomponent communitybased childhood obesity intervention. Met...

  14. Evaluation of sit-stand workstations in an office setting: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    E. F. Graves, Lee; C. Murphy, Rebecca; Shepherd, Sam O.; Cabot, Josephine; Hopkins, Nicola D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Excessive sitting time is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity independent of physical activity. This aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a sit-stand workstation on sitting time, and vascular, metabolic and musculoskeletal outcomes in office workers, and to investigate workstation acceptability and feasibility. Methods A two-arm, parallel-group, individually randomised controlled trial was conducted in one organisation. Participants were asym...

  15. Randomised controlled trial of effects of coordinating care for terminally ill cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Addington-Hall, J M; MacDonald, L D; Anderson, H R; Chamberlain, J.; Freeling, P.; Bland, J. M.; Raftery, J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To measure effects on terminally ill cancer patients and their families of coordinating the services available within the NHS and from local authorities and the voluntary sector. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Inner London health district. PATIENTS--Cancer patients were routinely notified from 1987 to 1990. 554 patients expected to survive less than one year entered the trial and were randomly allocated to a coordination or a control group. INTERVENTION--All patient...

  16. Buprenorphine versus dihydrocodeine for opiate detoxification in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Adams Clive E; Tompkins Charlotte NE; Sheard Laura; Wright Nat MJ; Allgar Victoria L; Oldham Nicola S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Many drug users present to primary care requesting detoxification from illicit opiates. There are a number of detoxification agents but no recommended drug of choice. The purpose of this study is to compare buprenorphine with dihydrocodeine for detoxification from illicit opiates in primary care. Methods Open label randomised controlled trial in NHS Primary Care (General Practices), Leeds, UK. Sixty consenting adults using illicit opiates received either daily sublingual b...

  17. Dipyridamole is superior to dobutamine for thallium stress imaging: a randomised crossover study.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, E. B.; Steel, S A; Howey, S; Caplin, J L; Aber, C P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the value of dobutamine over dipyridamole as a pharmacological stressing agent in myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201. DESIGN--Stress and redistribution tomographic images were taken in a group of patients in a randomised crossover study of both agents. The scans were scored to give a value for the stress and redistribution images and a reversibility score (redistribution--stress). All patients had coronary angiography that was also scored. Differences between ...

  18. Weight-loss intervention using implementation intentions and mental imagery: a randomised control trial study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Hattar, Anne; Hagger, Martin S.; Pal, Sebely

    2015-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity are major health problems worldwide. This protocol describes the HEALTHI (Healthy Eating and Active LifesTyle Health Intervention) Program, a 12-week randomised-controlled weight-loss intervention that adopts two theory-based intervention techniques, mental imagery and implementation intentions, a behaviour-change technique based on planning that have been shown to be effective in promoting health-behaviour change in previous research. The effectiveness of go...

  19. Written emotional disclosure for women with ovarian cancer and their partners: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Arden-Close, Emily; Gidron, Yori; Bayne, Louise; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2013-01-01

    Objective: written emotional disclosure for 15–20?min a day over 3 to 4?days improves physical and psychological health and may benefit cancer patients. However, no studies have tested the effectiveness of guided writing in cancer patients and their partners. A randomised controlled trial tested whether writing about the patient's diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer using the Guided Disclosure Protocol (GDP) is effective in reducing perceived stress and improving quality of life (QoL) i...

  20. Randomised trial of safety and efficacy of immediate postoperative enteral feeding in patients undergoing gastrointestinal resection.

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, C S; Ling, K. D.; Boulos, P.; Singer, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether immediate post-operative enteral feeding in patients who have undergone gastrointestinal resection is safe and effective. DESIGN: Randomised trial of immediate post-operative enteral feeding through a nasojejunal tube v conventional postoperative intravenous fluids until the reintroduction of normal diet. SETTING: Teaching hospitals in London. SUBJECTS: 30 patients under the care of the participating consultant surgeon who were undergoing elective laparotomies wi...

  1. MObile Technology for Improved Family Planning Services (MOTIF): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, C.; Vannak, U; Sokhey, L; Ngo, TD; Gold, J; Khut, K; Edwards, P.; Rathavy, T; Free, C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Providing women with contraceptive methods following abortion is important to reduce repeat abortion rates, yet evidence for effective post-abortion family planning interventions are limited. This protocol outlines the evaluation of a mobile phone-based intervention using voice messages to support post-abortion family planning in Cambodia. METHODS/DESIGN A single blind randomised controlled trial of 500 participants. Clients aged 18 or over, attending for abortion at four Mari...

  2. Participation bias in a randomised trial of screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbech, Mie Sara; Siersma, Volkert; Dirksen, Asger;

    2011-01-01

    following socio-demographic aspects: social group, living alone, gender, age and geographical area. DLCST participants reported less negative psychosocial aspects than the comparable population sample. CONCLUSION: The present study has shown substantial socio-demographic and psychosocial participation bias......INTRODUCTION: Participation bias might affect the results and the representability of randomised controlled trials. We investigated the degree of socio-demographic and psychosocial participation bias in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST). METHODS: In DLCST the questionnaire COS...

  3. Acupuncture for treating alopecia areata: a protocol of systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hye Won; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Ju Ah; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acupuncture is frequently used in dermatology for treating a number of skin disorders. There is no critically appraised evidence of the potential benefits and harm of acupuncture for alopecia areata (AA). This review aims to systematically evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for the management of AA in randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Methods and analysis 13 databases will be searched from their inception. These include PubMed, AMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, 6 Korean medi...

  4. Moxibustion for treating knee osteoarthritis: study protocol of a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seunghoon; Kim, Kun Hyung; Kim, Tae-Hun; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Joo-Hee; Kang, Jung Won; Kang, Kyung-Won; Jung, So-Young; Kim, Ae-Ran; Park, Hyo-Ju; Shin, Mi-Suk; Hong, Kwon-Eui; Song, Ho-Sueb; Choi, Jin-Bong; Kim, Hyung-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The treatment of knee osteoarthritis, which is a major cause of disability among the elderly, is typically selected from multidisciplinary options, including complementary and alternative medicine. Moxibustion has been used in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis in Korea to reduce pain and improve physical activity. However, there is no sufficient evidence of its effectiveness, and it cannot therefore be widely recommended for treating knee osteoarthritis. We designed a randomised...

  5. Effect of unsupervised home based proprioceptive training on recurrences of ankle sprain: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hupperets, Maarten D W; Verhagen, Evert A L M; van Mechelen, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an unsupervised proprioceptive training programme on recurrences of ankle sprain after usual care in athletes who had sustained an acute sports related injury to the lateral ankle ligament. Design Randomised controlled trial, with one year follow-up. Setting Primary care. Participants 522 athletes, aged 12-70, who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain up to two months before inclusion; 256 (120 female and 136 male) in the intervention group; 266 (128 ...

  6. Supervised exercises for adults with acute lateral ankle sprain: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rijn, Rogier; Os, Anton; Kleinrensink, Gert Jan; Bernsen, Roos; Verhaar, JAN; Koes, Bart; Bierma-zeinstra, Sita

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: During the recovery period after acute ankle sprain, it is unclear whether conventional treatment should be supported by supervised exercise. AIM: To evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with an acute ankle sprain. DESIGN: Randomised controlled clinical trial. SETTING: A total of 32 Dutch general practices and the hospital emergency department....

  7. Cognitive–behavioural therapy v. structured care for medically unexplained symptoms: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, A.; Siribaddana, S.; Abeysingha, M. R. N.; Silva, P.; Dewey, M; Prince, M.; Mann, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background A pilot trial in Sri Lanka among patients with medically unexplained symptoms revealed that cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) administered by a psychiatrist was efficacious. Aims To evaluate CBT provided by primary care physicians in a comparison with structured care. Method A randomised control trial (n=75 in each arm) offered six 30 min sessions of structured care or therapy. The outcomes of the two interventions were compared at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 12 months. Resu...

  8. Economic evaluation alongside pragmatic randomised trials: developing a standard operating procedure for clinical trials units

    OpenAIRE

    Russell Ian T; Linck Pat; Hounsome Barry; Edwards Rhiannon T

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background There is wide recognition that pragmatic randomised trials are the best vehicle for economic evaluation. This is because trials provide the best chance of ensuring internal validity, not least through the rigorous prospective collection of patient-specific data. Furthermore the marginal cost of collecting economic data alongside clinical data is typically modest. UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) does not require a standard operating procedure (SOP) for economic e...

  9. Cost effectiveness of a community based exercise programme in over 65 year olds: cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Munro, J F; Nicholl, J. P.; Brazier, J E; Davey, R.; Cochrane, T.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost effectiveness of a community based exercise programme as a population wide public health intervention for older adults. DESIGN: Pragmatic, cluster randomised community intervention trial. Setting: 12 general practices in Sheffield; four randomly selected as intervention populations, and eight as control populations. PARTICIPANTS: All those aged 65 and over in the least active four fifths of the population responding to a baseline survey. Ther...

  10. Effects of group prenatal care on psychosocial risk in pregnancy: Results from a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ickovics, Jeannette R.; Reed, Elizabeth; Magriples, Urania; Westdahl, Claire; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Kershaw, Trace S.

    2011-01-01

    Few interventions have succeeded in reducing psychosocial risk among pregnant women. The objective of this study was to determine whether an integrated group prenatal care intervention already shown to improve perinatal and sexual risk outcomes can also improve psychosocial outcomes compared to standard individual care. This randomised controlled trial included pregnant women ages 14–25 from two public hospitals (N = 1047) who were randomly assigned to standard individual care, group prenatal...

  11. Limited benefits of ambulance telemetry in delivering early thrombolysis: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Woollard, M; Pitt, K.; Hayward, A.; Taylor, N.

    2005-01-01

    Methods: This prospective randomised controlled trial recruited patients using the 999 ambulance service in a rural area of the UK with signs or symptoms of coronary heart disease. Subjects were assigned to receive either standard paramedic treatment or transmission of 12 lead ECG, blood pressure, pulse oximetry, and relevant medical history to a general hospital coronary care unit. Cardiology senior house officers then determined each patient's suitability for pre-hospital thrombolysis time,...

  12. Neuromuscular training and the risk of leg injuries in female floorball players: cluster randomised controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Pasanen, Kati; Parkkari, Jari; Pasanen, Matti; Hiilloskorpi, Hannele; Mäkinen, Tanja; Järvinen, Markku; Kannus, Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a neuromuscular training programme is effective in preventing non-contact leg injuries in female floorball players. Design Cluster randomised controlled study. Setting 28 top level female floorball teams in Finland. Participants 457 players (mean age 24 years)—256 (14 teams) in the intervention group and 201 (14 teams) in the control group—followedup for one league season (six months). Intervention A neuromuscular training programme to enhance players’ motor s...

  13. Randomised controlled trial of topical kanuka honey for the treatment of acne

    OpenAIRE

    Semprini, Alex; Braithwaite, Irene; Corin, Andrew; Sheahan, Davitt; Tofield, Christopher; Helm, Colin; Montgomery, Barney; Fingleton, James; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of Honevo, a topical 90% medical-grade kanuka honey, and 10% glycerine (honey product) as a treatment for facial acne. Design Randomised controlled trial with single blind assessment of primary outcome variable. Setting Outpatient primary care from 3 New Zealand localities. Participants Of 136 participants aged between 16 and 40 years with a diagnosis of acne and baseline Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) for acne score of ≥2.68, participants were ra...

  14. Neckties and Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Young Healthy Males: A Pilot Randomised Crossover Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Rafferty; Quinn, Terence J.; Jesse Dawson; Matthew Walters

    2010-01-01

    Background. A necktie may elevate intracranial pressure through compression of venous return. We hypothesised that a tight necktie would deleteriously alter cerebrovascular reactivity. Materials and Methods. A necktie was simulated using bespoke apparatus comprising pneumatic inner-tube with aneroid pressure-gauge. Using a randomised crossover design, cerebrovascular reactivity was measured with the “pseudo-tie” worn inflated or deflated for 5 minutes (simulating tight/loose necktie resp.)....

  15. Limits of teacher delivered sex education: interim behavioural outcomes from randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wight, Daniel; Raab, Gillian M.; Henderson, Marion; Abraham, Charles; Buston, Katie; Hart, Graham; Scott, Sue

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a theoretically based sex education programme for adolescents (SHARE) delivered by teachers reduced unsafe sexual intercourse compared with current practice. DESIGN: Cluster randomised trial with follow up two years after baseline (six months after intervention). A process evaluation investigated the delivery of sex education and broader features of each school. SETTING: Twenty five secondary schools in east Scotland. PARTICIPANTS: 8430 pupils aged 13-15 years;...

  16. Larval therapy for leg ulcers (VenUS II): randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Dumville, Jo C; Worthy, Gill; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky; Dowson, Christopher; Iglesias, Cynthia; Mitchell, Joanne L; Nelson, E Andrea; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of larval therapy with a standard debridement technique (hydrogel) for sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers. Design Pragmatic, three armed randomised controlled trial. Setting Community nurse led services, hospital wards, and hospital outpatient leg ulcer clinics in urban and rural settings, United Kingdom. Participants 267 patients with at least one venous or mixed venous and arterial ulcer with at least 25% coverage of slough or necrotic tissue, and...

  17. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Eldridge, Sandra M.; Lancaster, Gillian A.; Michael J. Campbell; Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Coleman, Claire L.; Bond, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of ...

  18. Atorvastatin as a stable treatment in bronchiectasis: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Pallavi; Chalmers, James D; Graham, Catriona; Harley, Catherine; Sidhu, Manjit K; Doherty, Catherine; Govan, John W; Sethi, Tariq; Davidson, Donald J; Rossi, Adriano G.; Hill, Adam T.

    2014-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is characterised by chronic cough, sputum production, and recurrent chest infections. Pathogenesis is poorly understood, but excess neutrophilic airway inflammation is seen. Accumulating evidence suggests that statins have pleiotropic effects; therefore, these drugs could be a potential anti-inflammatory treatment for patients with bronchiectasis. We did a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial to establish if atorvastatin could reduce cough in patients with bronchiectasi...

  19. The use of glucosamine for chronic low back pain: a systematic review of randomised control trials

    OpenAIRE

    Sodha, Reena; Sivanadarajah, Naveethan; Alam, Mahbub

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain whether the use of oral glucosamine influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) thought to be related to spinal osteoarthritis (OA). Design Systematic review of randomised control trials. Searches were performed up to March 2011 on Medline, AMED, CINHAL, Cochrane and EMBASE with subsequent reference screening of retrieved studies. In addition, the grey literature was searched via opensigle. Included studies were required to i...

  20. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for children with anxiety disorders: A randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vigerland, Sarah; Ljotsson, Brjann; Thulin, Ulrika; Ost, Lars-Goran; Andersson, Gerhard; Serlachius, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for anxiety disorders in children, but few affected seek or receive treatment. Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) could be a way to increase the availability of empirically supported treatments. Aims: A randomised controlled trial was conducted to evaluate ICBT for children with anxiety disorders. Method: Families (N = 93) with a child aged 8-12 years with a principal diagnosis of generalised anxiety disorder...