WorldWideScience

Sample records for cadavers

  1. Soul Anatomy: A virtual cadaver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaz Bambi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the traditional science of medicine and medical education, teaching human anatomy in the class has always been done using human cadavers. Not only does this violate human sanctity, but according to our research, it is not adequate to provide students with the alleged educational value that it is supposed to deliver. It is very cumbersome to organise all the aspects of cadaver care. Cadavers are also very limited when it comes to controlling their structures and any benefit is almost completely altered the first time the cadaver is used (dissected, and ironically, it is very weak at delivering actual real-life scenarios of a human body to students. Virtual anatomy has been a promising solution that many are counting on. But even today, we have not found a complete solution that combines all the benefits of using human cadavers and those introduced by its technical counterparts. "Soul Anatomy" aims to do just that. It brings the best of all worlds, from a natural intuitive control system, life-like feel of organs, precise accuracy in moving and controlling bodily structures, to the smallest details of being able to show medical information overlays from various medical databases connected to the internet; thus making use of technology in teaching human anatomy by providing a modern learning experience.

  2. [History of collecting cadavers in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Toyoko

    2007-03-01

    This study investigated how and from where medical students had acquired cadavers for research throughout Japanese history. At the beginning of dissection in the mid Edo era, they cut up executed prisoners granted by the Tokugawa Shyogunate to study internal body parts. After the Meiji Restoration, the social mechanism of delivering cadavers underwent a complete transformation and they began to utilize 1) dead bodies of inpatients who had received free medical treatment and 2) unclaimed bodies mainly from homes for the aged and prisons. It was quite recently that "kentai", voluntary body donation, became common practice of collecting cadavers. Consequently the history of cadavers submitted to dissection faithfully reflects the relation between medical science and society.

  3. Transformation of a Cadaver Population: Analysis of a South African Cadaver Program, 1921-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Beverley; Hutchinson, Erin F.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy has served as a cornerstone in the training of various allied and clinical disciplines and has traditionally been based on dissection of the human body. Thus, to pursue this method of teaching and learning, access to cadavers is of continuing importance. Over a significant period of time unclaimed cadavers have performed an essential role…

  4. Uterus retrieval in cadaver: technical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, M Erman; Ozkan, O; Ozekinci, M; Sindel, M; Yildirim, F; Oguz, N

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe uterus retrieval in cadavers. Uterine retrieval with its vasculature could be successfully achieved in four of the presented cases. Special attention was given to dissection of bilateral ureters and hypogastric vasculature. Uterine retrieval with its vasculature and supporting sacrouterine,vesicouterine peritoneal folds is an anatomically feasible procedure in preparation for uterus transplantation.

  5. Analysis of ureteral length in adult cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. F. Novaes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In some occasions, correlations between human structures can help planning surgical intra-abdominal interventions. The previous determination of ureteral length helps pre-operatory planning of surgeries, reduces costs of auxiliary exams, the correct choice of double-J catheter with low morbidity and fewer symptoms, and an adequate adhesion to treatment. Objective To evaluate ureteral length in adult cadavers and to analyze its correlation with anthropometric measures. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to January 2012 we determined ureteral length of adult cadavers submitted to necropsy and obtained the following measures: height, distance from shoulder to wrist, elbow-wrist, xiphoid appendix-umbilicus, umbilicus-pubis, xiphoid appendix-pubis and between iliac spines. We analyzed the correlations between ureteral length and those anthropometric measures. Results We dissected 115 ureters from 115 adult corpses from April 2009 to January 2012. Median ureteral length didn't vary between sexes or according to height. It was observed no correlation among ureteral length and all considered anthropometric measures in all analyzed subgroups and in general population. There were no significant differences between right and left ureteral measures. Conclusions There is no difference of ureteral length in relation to height or gender (male or female. There is no significant correlation among ureteral length and the considered anthropometric measures.

  6. Benefits and Pitfalls of Cadavers as Learning Tool for Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Chhavi; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Ray, Bikash Ranjan; Sinha, Sumit; Kumar, Abhyuday

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA), like other basic skills, should be learnt in a simulation laboratory before performing on the patient. Cadavers provide an ideal tool for learning sonoanatomy and skills required for performing UGRA. On the basis of preservation technique used, the cadavers can be formalin embalmed cadavers, Thiel cadavers (soft cadavers), and fresh frozen cadavers. We compared three types of cadavers for performing ultrasound-guided upper and lower limb blocks. We observed that fresh frozen and Thiel cadavers were less smelling and had more realistic appearance as compared to formalin embalmed cadavers. It was seen that Thiel cadavers were more flexible and hence, rotation of neck, shoulder and knee was easier. Although images seen in most cadavers were comparable with live subjects but, Thiel cadavers provided more realistic model.

  7. Posterior cervical foraminotomy: anatomic study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luizio Augusto Arantes Júnior

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to use different segments of the cervical spine in cadavers to determine how much lateral mass should be resected for adequate foraminal decompression. METHODS: Six cadavers were used. The region of the cervical spine from C1 to the C7-T1 transition was dissected and exposed. The lateral mass of each vertebra was measured bilaterally before the foraminotomy in the following segments: C2-C3, C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6 and C6-C7. The procedure was performed with a high-speed drill and through surgical microscopy. Three foraminotomies were performed (F1, F2, F3 in each level. Lateral masses were measured after foraminotomy procedures and compared to the initial measurement, creating a percentage of lateral mass needed for decompression.. The value of the entire surface was defined as 100%. RESULTS: There was a statistical difference between the amounts of the resected lateral mass through each foraminotomy (F1, F2, F3 at the same level. However, there was no statistical significant difference among the different levels. The average percentage of resection of the lateral masses in F2 were 27.7% at C2-C3, 24.8% at C3-C4, 24.4% at C4-C5 and 23.8% and 31.2% at C5-C6 and C6-C7, respectively. In F3, the level that needed greater resection of the lateral masses was C6-C7 level, where the average resection ranged between 41.2% and 47.9%. CONCLUSION: In all segments studied, the removal of approximately 24 to 32% of the facet joint allowed adequate exposure of the foraminal segment, with visualization of the dural sac and the exit of the cervical root.

  8. ATTITUDE AND EMOTIONAL REACTIONS OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS CADAVER DISSECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaraman; Bharathi Prabakaran; Ismail; Thirumalaikolundu Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    : INTRODUCTION: Cadaver dissection is mandatory for medical education. The cadaver dissection develops the knowledge and skill of the students regarding human anatomy to understand and fulfill the requirement of medical education. AIM: This study was conducted with objective of observing attitude and emotional reactions of first year Medical students to the dissecting cadavers. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The attitude and view of students on cadaver dissection was assessed by a ...

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: A New Embalming Fluid for Preserving Cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Natekar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dissection laboratory is the only place where the three dimensional structure of the human body is reinforced by visual, auditory and tactile pathways. Cadavers are main teaching tools in Anatomy and are handled by the staff and students routinely. Very often the cadavers enbalmed by various chemicals are not effective in inhibiting growth of fungi, bacteria, maggots etc. To date limited studies have been carried out to overcome this problem hence this study was undertaken to find out safe and effective enbalming fluid. Aims and Objectives: The main object of the present study is to provide a composition of body-preservation fluid which is effective in preventing decomposition of cadavers, maintaining a desired life-like appearance of the body which is non hazardous for dissection and environmentally safe. It was observed that chemical composition of the embalming fluid was very effective in prevention of growth of bacteria, fungus and also decay and discoloration. Results: This study was carried out in the department of Anatomy, Goa Medical College, Bambolim Goa (India from the year 2006 to 2011. Total 100 cadavers were embalmed with the following composition of the embalming fluid. It was observed that the solution in tanks where intact bodies were preserved was clear without any fungus form a period of 5 years whereas the dissected cadavers were kept separately also containing 10 percent formalin showed minimal growth of fungus after 12 months and the solution was replaced after 12 months. Conclusions: In our present study the tank containing undissected cadavers has not shown any growth of fungus for a period of 5 years. Routine dissected parts showed fungal growth only after 12 months, whereupon the scum was removed and the tank solution replaced. The arterial fluid was red in colour and could be differentiated from cavity fluid. The cadavers were free from growth of fungus and maggots during their entire first MBBS course. Not

  10. Microsurgical anatomy of the anterior cerebral artery in Indian cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Kedia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The microanatomy features of cerebral arteries may be variable and may be different in different ethnic groups. Aim: To study the anterior cerebral artery (ACA anatomy in North-West Indian cadavers. Materials and Methods: Microanatomy features of the ACA were studied in 15 formalin fixed human cadaveric brains under microscope. The outer diameter, length, and number of perforating branches with respective anomalies were measured for each of the following vessels: ACA (proximal A1 segment to distal A2 segment, anterior communicating artery (ACoA, Recurrent artery of Heubner (RAH, and callosomarginal artery and photographed for documentation. Results: The mean length and external diameter of right and left A1 segment was 12.09 mm and 12.0 mm and 2.32 mm and 2.36 mm respectively. Narrowing, duplication, and median ACA were seen in 6.6%, 3.3% and 6.6% of the vessels respectively. Complex ACoA type was seen in 40% cadavers. RAH originated at an average point of 0.2 mm distal to ACoA, but in one cadaver it arose 5 mm proximal to ACoA. Double RAH was found in 26.6%. The course of RAH in relation to A1 was superiorly in 60%, in anteriorly 30% and posteriorly in 10% of cadavers. The orbitofrontal artery (OFA and frontopolar artery (FPA arose from A2 in 83.3% to 40% respectively. The mean distance of OFA and FPA from ACoA was 4.17 mm and 8.5 mm respectively. After giving rise to central, callosal and cortical branches, pericallosal artery terminated near the splenium of the corpus callosum or on the precuneus as the inferomedial parietal artery. Conclusion: Knowledge of the microvascular anatomy is indispensable and it is mandatory to be aware of the possible variations in the anomalies to minimize morbidity.

  11. Prevalence of pituitary incidentaloma in the Iranian cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Aghakhani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Although one-fourth of the pituitary tumors are inactive and silent, increased total volume of the pituitary gland exerts pressure on sella turcica and corrodes the clinoid processes, resulting in several problems. Therefore, determination of the prevalence of the concealed pituitary tumors is of major concern among clinical practitioners. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of these tumors in cadavers referred to the Iranian Legal Medicine Organization (Kahrizak, Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed between June 2007 and February 2008. A total of 485 cadavers were selected by simple random sampling method. Pituitary glands were removed and then horizontally cut and four slides were prepared from each of them, stained by hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated by a light microscope. For statistical analysis, SPSS software (version 16, Mann-Whitney U test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov nonparametric test (K-S test, and Chi-square test were used. Results: Of the 485 investigated cadavers, 365 (75.3% were males with an average age of 42 ± 20.5 years and 120 (24.7% were females with an average age of 44 ± 22 years. A total of 61 (12.6% had concealed pituitary masses. No statistically significant difference was found between the mean age, sex, and body mass index (BMI of the cadavers with and without concealed tumors (P=0.380 P=0.450, and P=0.884, respectively. Conclusions: In the present study, the prevalence of the concealed pituitary adenomas was 12.6%. There was no correlation between age, sex, and BMI and the prevalence of the concealed masses.

  12. Living and cadaver donor transplant programs in the maghreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Hachicha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Maghreb, organ failure constitutes a major public health problem, especially given the increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure and the high cost of care. In this study, we attempted to seek the recommendations, through a questionnaire, of various officials related to organ transplantation as well as leaders of ethics committees and religious groups in different countries of the Maghreb. The objective was to improve the rate of organ donation and transplantation. We received 36 replies (62% within the prescribed time limit. In our survey, 83% of the respondents felt that living donor transplantation should be promoted initially, followed gradually by measures to increase cadaver donor transplantation to achieve a target of about 30 transplants with cadaver kidney donors per million inhabitants. To expand the donor pool, 83% of the respondents proposed to expand the family circle to include the spouse and inlaws. To improve the cadaver donation activity, one should improve the organizational aspects to ensure at least 50 renal transplantations per year (100% and provide material motivation to the treatment team proportional to the activity of organ donation and transplantation. Finally, 93% of the respondents suggested suitable moral motivation of the donors.

  13. EVALUATION OF TECHNIQUES FOR CLEANING EMBALMED CADAVER BONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawani Shankar Modi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was conducted to find new technique for development of bone specimens from cadavers. Material and methods: Long bones, skull and other bones from embalmed cadaver were taken and cleansed by various methods. Four methods were employed for preparing specimens. In 1st method bones were boiled in tap water for 7-8 hours on gas stove. In 2nd method bones were immersed in water with addition of detergent at constant temperature. In 3rd method bones were kept at constant temperature in water without addition of detergent. In 4th method bones were buried for one month under superficial surface of soil during rainy season after boiling the bones for 7-8 hours Observations: Use of detergent in warm water (65o C was good for cleaning long bones while best result for long bones as well as skull was seen with boiling followed by burial of embalmed specimens. Results were found as expected. Time consumed in the present study was less than old classical methods. Bones specimens formed were of high quality. Conclusions: Preparation of bone specimen by embalmed cadaver can be of immense value and time saver for many research institutes to get their self-prepared specimens. There are many more ways which has to be modified or rediscovered in this area of research, which has been neglected so far.

  14. ATTITUDE AND EMOTIONAL REACTIONS OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS CADAVER DISSECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Cadaver dissection is mandatory for medical education. The cadaver dissection develops the knowledge and skill of the students regarding human anatomy to understand and fulfill the requirement of medical education. AIM: This study was conducted with objective of observing attitude and emotional reactions of first year Medical students to the dissecting cadavers. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The attitude and view of students on cadaver dissection was assessed by a modified structured pretested Questionnaire. Also the emotional reactions at the time of doing dissection were assessed by a standard questionnaire ALE (Appraisal of Life Events scale. RESULTS: Of the 141 participants, 49% were female and 51% were Male. The attitude and emotional status of students varied in cadaver dissection and even among sex. Altogether 83.68% had experienced the excitement, 85.82% sympathized for the cadaver. However, 92.90% expressed confidence over cadaver dissection and 98.57 % answered cadaver dissection was the best method for Medical Education to understand human anatomy. CONCLUSION: Majority of Medical students viewed Cadaver dissection was the best method for medical education to understand Human anatomy. They do not report their first exposure to cadaver dissection as an aversive experience. Instead, as per ALE (Appraisal of Life Events scale, they found it to be a positive and a challenging life event.

  15. Still Human: A Call for Increased Focus on Ethical Standards in Cadaver Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Michelle C

    2016-12-01

    Research on human cadavers is an important mechanism of scientific progress and comprises a large industry in the United States. However, despite its importance and influence, there is little ethical or regulatory oversight of cadaver-based research. This lack of transparency raises important ethical questions. Thus, this paper serves as a call for ethicists and regulators to pay increased attention to cadaver research. I argue that cadaver research ought to be considered a subset of human subjects research and held accountable to higher ethical standards. After describing current practices, I argue that oversight of cadaver research as a form of human subjects research is appropriate because cadaver research is similar to other types of human research, participants in cadaver research incur risks of harm, and a current lack of oversight has allowed the cadaver industry to entice research participation through ethically questionable practices. This paper urges greater dialogue among human subjects research ethicists and regulators about what constitutes appropriate protections for participants in cadaver research.

  16. Surface Projection of Interosseous Foramen of the Leg: Cadaver Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Arguello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was conducted to identify the surface projection of the interosseous foramen and associated structures of the proximal leg using the average clinician’s thumb width as a quick measurement to assist in differential diagnosis and treatment. Methods. Twelve cadavers (5 males and 7 females, age range = 51–91 years, and mean age = 76.9 were dissected for analysis. Location and size of interosseous foramen, location of anterior tibial artery, location of deep fibular nerve, and corresponding arterial branches were measured and converted into thumb widths. Results. Mean thumb width measured among the cadavers was 17.94±3.9 mm. The interosseous foramen measured was approximately 1 thumb width vertically (18.47±3.0 mm and 1/2 thumb width horizontally (7.32±2.1 mm and was located approximately 1 thumb width distally to the tibial tuberosity (20.81±6.8 mm and 2 thumb widths (37.47±4.7 mm lateral to the tibial ridge. The anterior tibial artery and deep fibular nerve converged approximately 4 thumb widths (74.31±14.8 mm inferior to the tibial tuberosity and 2 thumb widths (33.46±4.9 mm lateral to the tibial ridge. Conclusion. Clinicians may identify anatomical structures of the proximal leg with palpation using the thumb width for measurement.

  17. Cadaver as an experimental model to study abdominal wall tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahas Fábio Xerfan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cadaver as an experimental model to evaluate tension of the abdominal wall after aponeurotic incisions and muscular undermining is described on this article. The tension required to pull the anterior and the posterior rectus sheaths towards the midline was studied in fresh cadavers at two levels: 3 cm above and 2 cm below the umbilicus. Traction measurement was assessed with a dynamometer attached to suture loops on the anterior and posterior recti sheaths, close to the midline, above and below the umbilicus. The quotient of the force used to mobilize the aponeurotic site to the midline and its resulting displacement was called the traction index. These indices were compared in three situations: 1 prior to any aponeurotic undermining; 2 after the incision of the anterior rectus sheath and the undermining of the rectus muscle from its posterior sheath; and 3 after additionally releasing and undermining of the external oblique muscle. The experimental model described showed to be feasible to demonstrate the effects on tension of the abdominal wall after incisions and undermining of its muscles and aponeurosis.

  18. Measurement repeatability of tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove offset distance in red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cadavers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Jensen, Bente Rona; Kirpensteijn, Jolle

    2013-01-01

    . Animals-12 red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cadavers. Procedures-CT images of each hind limb in intact cadavers were obtained; at 1-week intervals, 3 reconstructions were performed that were based on 1 plane passing through the centers of the femoral head and medial condyle and parallel to the caudal femoral...

  19. Medical students' reactions to anatomic dissection and the phenomenon of cadaver naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Austin D; Greenwald, Emily E; Soricelli, Rhonda L; DePace, Dennis M

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of gross anatomy has, for centuries, relied on the dissection of human cadavers, and this formative experience is known to evoke strong emotional responses. The authors hypothesized that the phenomenon of cadaver naming is a coping mechanism used by medical students and that it correlates with other attitudes about dissection and body donation. The authors developed a 33-question electronic survey to which 1,156 medical students at 12 medical schools in the United States voluntarily responded (November 2011-March 2012). They also surveyed course directors from each institution regarding their curricula and their observations of students' coping mechanisms. The majority of students (574, 67.8%) named their cadaver. Students most commonly cited the cadaver's age as the reason they chose a particular name for the cadaver. A minority of the students who did not name the cadaver reported finding the practice of naming disrespectful. Almost all students indicated that they would have liked to know more about their donor, particularly his or her medical history. Finally, students who knew the birth name of the donor used it less frequently than predicted. The authors found that the practice of naming cadavers is extremely prevalent among medical students and that inventive naming serves as a beneficial coping mechanism. The authors suggest that developing a method of providing students with more information about their cadaver while protecting the anonymity of the donor and family would be useful.

  20. The Wider Importance of Cadavers: Educational and Research Diversity from a Body Bequest Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Jon; Stringer, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The debate surrounding the use of cadavers in teaching anatomy has focused almost exclusively on the pedagogic role of cadaver dissection in medical education. The aim of this study was to explore the wider aspects of a body bequest program for teaching and research into gross anatomy in a University setting. A retrospective audit was undertaken…

  1. Medical Students' Reactions to Anatomic Dissection and the Phenomenon of Cadaver Naming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Austin D.; Greenwald, Emily E.; Soricelli, Rhonda L.; DePace, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of gross anatomy has, for centuries, relied on the dissection of human cadavers, and this formative experience is known to evoke strong emotional responses. The authors hypothesized that the phenomenon of cadaver naming is a coping mechanism used by medical students and that it correlates with other attitudes about dissection and body…

  2. An Economical Approach to Teaching Cadaver Anatomy: A 10-Year Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jeff S.

    2014-01-01

    Because of shrinking budgets and computerized virtual dissection programs, many large and small institutions are closing the door on traditional and expensive cadaver dissection classes. However, many health-care educators would argue there is still a place for cadaver dissection in higher education, so the continuing challenge is to provide the…

  3. Progression of thanatophagy in cadaver brain and heart tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnaz T. Javan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process for maintaining cellular homeostasis during both normal and stress conditions. Metabolic reprogramming in tissues of dead bodies is inevitable due to chronic ischemia and nutrient deprivation, which are well-known features that stimulate autophagy. Currently, it is not fully elucidated whether postmortem autophagy, also known as thanatophagy, occurs in dead bodies is a function of the time of death. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that thanatophagy would increase in proportion to time elapsed since death for tissues collected from cadavers. Brain and heart tissue from corpses at different time intervals after death were analyzed by Western blot. Densitometry analysis demonstrated that thanatophagy occurred in a manner that was dependent on the time of death. The autophagy-associated proteins, LC3 II, p62, Beclin-1 and Atg7, increased in a time-dependent manner in heart tissues. A potent inducer of autophagy, BNIP3, decreased in the heart tissues as time of death increased, whereas the protein levels increased in brain tissues. However, there was no expression of BNIP3 at extended postmortem intervals in both brain and heart samples. Collectively, the present study demonstrates for the first time that thanatophagy occurs in brain and heart tissues of cadavers in a time-dependent manner. Further, our data suggest that cerebral thanatophagy may occur in a Beclin-1- independent manner. This unprecedented study provides potential insight into thanatophagy as a novel method for the estimation of the time of death in criminal investigationsAbstract: Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process for maintaining cellular homeostasis during both normal and stress conditions. Metabolic reprogramming in tissues of dead bodies is inevitable due to chronic ischemia and nutrient deprivation, which are well-known features that stimulate autophagy. Currently, it is not fully

  4. Cadaver renal transplant outcome in recipients with autolymphocytotoxic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenger, R B; Jordan, S C; Fine, R N

    1983-05-01

    The major impact of autolymphocytotoxic antibodies (ALCA) on renal transplantation has been in the interpretation of the pretransplant crossmatch as a cause of false-positive results. Less attention has been paid to the direct affects of ALCA on renal allografts. We have examined the sera of 38 recipients of 41 cadaver renal allografts for the presence of ALCA. There were 9 patients with ALCA who received 10 allografts. In these allografts with ALCA, actuarial graft survival was significantly improved (P less than 0.05) over that of 31 transplants without ALCA. In recipients with ALCA, graft survival was 90% at six months and 60% at one and two years; in recipients without ALCA, graft survival was 48% at six months, 35% at one year and 24% at two years. ALCA may be exerting graft-enhancing properties by means of an autoregulatory effect upon the recipient's immunologic system.

  5. How reliable is apparent age at death on cadavers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadasi, Alberto; Merusi, Nicolò; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    The assessment of age at death for identification purposes is a frequent and tough challenge for forensic pathologists and anthropologists. Too frequently, visual assessment of age is performed on well-preserved corpses, a method considered subjective and full of pitfalls, but whose level of inadequacy no one has yet tested or proven. This study consisted in the visual estimation of the age of 100 cadavers performed by a total of 37 observers among those usually attending the dissection room. Cadavers were of Caucasian ethnicity, well preserved, belonging to individuals who died of natural death. All the evaluations were performed prior to autopsy. Observers assessed the age with ranges of 5 and 10 years, indicating also the body part they mainly observed for each case. Globally, the 5-year range had an accuracy of 35%, increasing to 69% with the 10-year range. The highest accuracy was in the 31-60 age category (74.7% with the 10-year range), and the skin seemed to be the most reliable age parameter (71.5% of accuracy when observed), while the face was considered most frequently, in 92.4% of cases. A simple formula with the general "mean of averages" in the range given by the observers and related standard deviations was then developed; the average values with standard deviations of 4.62 lead to age estimation with ranges of some 20 years that seem to be fairly reliable and suitable, sometimes in alignment with classic anthropological methods, in the age estimation of well-preserved corpses.

  6. Death, cadavers and post-mortem biomedical research: a point of view from a Christian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Philippe; Joly, Alain; Champagnat, Julie; Brun, Luc; de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy Lorin; Hervé, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Facing modern developments of medicine and biomedical researches, religious communities are a strong source of ethics principles and orientations. Human dignity does not disappear after life, in a context of biomedical research on cadavers. Moral, political, social and scientific aspects of research on human cadavers (mainly autopsies) have been widely discussed in biomedical publications, whereas the religious ones (which could be predominant for some) have rarely been analyzed and presented. This article will present the results of a survey carried out a French Benedictine Abbey (relative to death, cadaver's status and biomedical research) and subsequent Christian background according to canonic texts and practical cases from anthropological, historical, archeological and biomedical origin.

  7. Flies (Calliphoridae, Muscidae and Beetles (Silphidae from Human Cadavers in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto Mauricio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult specimens of Cochliomyia macellaria, Chrysomya megacephala, Ch. rufifacies, Lucilia sp. (Calliphoridae, Musca domestica (Muscidae, Oxelytrum discicolle (Silphidae and Sarcophagidae were recovered from 12 human cadavers in Cali, Valle, Colombia. Information regarding these findings is presented.

  8. Panceratic Complications of Mustard Gas Exposure: A Study on Cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Farshid Fayyaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulfur mustard is one of the chemical warfare gases that has been known as a vesicant or blistering agents. It is a chemical alkylating compound agent that can be frequently absorbed through skin, respiratory system, genital tract, and ocular system. This study was done to pathologically analyze the microscopic pancreatic lesions in cadavers. Methods: This case series study was performed during 2007 to 2012 in Legal Medicine Organization. Exposure was confirmed by the written reports of the field hospitals, based on acute presentation of eye, skin and pulmonary symptoms of the exposure. Results: Pancreatic autopsy findings were chronic inflammation, fibrosis and duct ectasia; acinar atrophy was also seen in 4 cases. All 4 cases had chronic pancreatic disease with abdominal pain, steatorrhea and weight loss that was confirmed by sonography. CT scan and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP have also demonstrated the chronic pancreatitis. Conclusion: According to the chronic progressive lesions caused by mustard gas exposure such as pulmonary lesions and also its high mortality rate, suitable programming for protection of the mustard gas exposed people in chemical factories is necessary.

  9. Colonoscopy tutorial software made with a cadaver's sectioned images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Chung, Min Suk; Park, Hyung Seon; Shin, Byeong-Seok; Kwon, Koojoo

    2016-11-01

    Novice doctors may watch tutorial videos in training for actual or computed tomographic (CT) colonoscopy. The conventional learning videos can be complemented by virtual colonoscopy software made with a cadaver's sectioned images (SIs). The objective of this study was to assist colonoscopy trainees with the new interactive software. Submucosal segmentation on the SIs was carried out through the whole length of the large intestine. With the SIs and segmented images, a three dimensional model was reconstructed. Six-hundred seventy-one proximal colonoscopic views (conventional views) and corresponding distal colonoscopic views (simulating the retroflexion of a colonoscope) were produced. Not only navigation views showing the current location of the colonoscope tip and its course, but also, supplementary description views were elaborated. The four corresponding views were put into convenient browsing software to be downloaded free from the homepage (anatomy.co.kr). The SI colonoscopy software with the realistic images and supportive tools was available to anybody. Users could readily notice the position and direction of the virtual colonoscope tip and recognize meaningful structures in colonoscopic views. The software is expected to be an auxiliary learning tool to improve technique and related knowledge in actual and CT colonoscopies. Hopefully, the software will be updated using raw images from the Visible Korean project.

  10. The anatomy of the iliolumbar vein. A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasani, Vinay; Jaffray, David

    2002-09-01

    We carried out a cadaver study of 16 iliolumbar veins in order to define the surgical anatomy. Two variants were found; a single vein at a mean distance of 3.74 cm from the inferior vena cava (11 of 16) and two separate draining veins at a mean distance from the vena cava of 2.98 cm for the proximal and 6.24 cm for the distal stem (5 of 16). Consistently, the proximal vein tore on attempted medial retraction of the great vessels. The mean length of the vein was 1.6 cm and its mean width 1.07 cm. Three stems were shorter than 0.5 cm. Two or more tributaries usually drained the iliacus and psoas muscles, and the fifth lumbar vertebral body. The obturator nerve crossed all veins superficially at a mean of 2.76 cm lateral to the mouth. In four of these, this distance was less than 1.5 cm. Usually, the lumbosacral trunk crossed deep, at a mean distance of 2.5 cm lateral to the mouth, but in three veins, this distance was 1 cm or less. Our findings emphasise the need for proper dissection of the iliolumbar vein before ligature during exposure of the anterior lumbar spine.

  11. Permeation Studies of Captopril Transdermal Films Through Human Cadaver Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajesh Sreedharan; Nair, Sujith

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rate due to heart diseases increases dramatically with age. Captopril is an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE) used effectively for the management of hypertension. Due to short elimination half-life of captopril the oral dose is very high. Captopril is prone to oxidation and it has been reported that the oxidation rate of captopril in skin tissues is considerably low when compared to intestinal tissues. All these factors make captopril an ideal drug candidate for transdermal delivery. In this research work an effort was made to formulate transdermal films of captopril by utilizing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as film formers and polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) as a plasticizer. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and dimethylformamide (DMF) were used as permeation enhancers. Physicochemical parameters of the films such as appearance, thickness, weight variation and drug content were evaluated. The invitro permeation studies were carried out through excised human cadaver skin using Franz diffusion cells. The in-vitro permeation studies demonstrated that the film (P4) having the polymer ratio (PVP:PVA = 80:20) with DMSO (10%) resulted a promising drug release of 79.58% at 24 hours with a flux of 70.0 µg/cm(2)/hr. No signs of erythema or oedema were observed on the rabbit skin as a result of skin irritation study by Draize test. Based on the stability report it was confirmed that the films were physically and chemically stable, hence the prepared films are very well suited for transdermal application.

  12. Interpretation of postmortem change in cadavers in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, José L; Magaña, Concepción; Ubelaker, Douglas H

    2004-09-01

    Estimating time since death is especially difficult in the examination of poorly preserved cadavers and depends on the experience of the examiner and comparison with previously documented cases showing similar characteristics. The present study reports on information obtained over the past ten years through the work of the Laboratorio de Antropología y Odontología Forense (LAF) of the Instituto Anatómico Forense de Madrid, Spain, in particular evaluating how the type of fracture influences postmortem change. From the original 225 forensic cases examined between 1992 and 2002 in the LAF, a sample of 29 cases were selected from various regions of the Spanish mainland. A data collection protocol was established to reflect factors which the existing specialized literature, documenting the relation existing in the sample analyzed between time since death and the extent of postmortem change, which in the environments examined are distributed into the following phases: Phase 1 (putrefaction): one week to one month on the surface and two months in water. Phase 2 (initial skeletonization): two months on the surface and five to six months in water. Phase 3 (advanced skeltonization): six months to 1.5 years on the surface and 2.5 years buried. Phase 4 (complete skeletonization): about one year on the surface and three years buried. This paper also provide useful information on the impact of carrion insect activity, location, climate, seasonality, and predator.

  13. The myofascial compartments of the foot: a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Z X; Kumar, V P

    2008-08-01

    Compartment syndrome of the foot requires urgent surgical treatment. Currently, there is still no agreement on the number and location of the myofascial compartments of the foot. The aim of this cadaver study was to provide an anatomical basis for surgical decompression in the event of compartment syndrome. We found that there were three tough vertical fascial septae that extended from the hindfoot to the midfoot on the plantar aspect of the foot. These septae separated the posterior half of the foot into three compartments. The medial compartment containing the abductor hallucis was surrounded medially by skin and subcutaneous fat and laterally by the medial septum. The intermediate compartment, containing the flexor digitorum brevis and the quadratus plantae more deeply, was surrounded by the medial septum medially, the intermediate septum laterally and the main plantar aponeurosis on its plantar aspect. The lateral compartment containing the abductor digiti minimi was surrounded medially by the intermediate septum, laterally by the lateral septum and on its plantar aspect by the lateral band of the main plantar aponeurosis. No distinct myofascial compartments exist in the forefoot. Based on our findings, in theory, fasciotomy of the hindfoot compartments through a modified medial incision would be sufficient to decompress the foot.

  14. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, A.C.; Zheng, W.; Haacke, E.M.; Webb, S.; Nichol, H.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  15. Comparison of Nitinol Stapes Pistons with Conventional Stapes Pistons: A Cadaver Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of Nitinol Stapes Pistons with Conventional Stapes Pistons: A Cadaver Study Samuel A. Spear1 and James V. Crawford2 1 48th Medical Group, ENT...cited. Objective. To visually compare the Nitinol “smart” stapes prosthesis to conventional manual crimping stapes pistons in temporal bone cadaver...answer questions about each stapes piston. The answers to the survey were then recorded for analysis. Results. 8 of 9 Nitinol pistons were described as

  16. "Detached concern" of medical students in a cadaver dissection course: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Lin, Ya-Ping

    2016-05-01

    The cadaver dissection course remains a time-honored tradition in medical education, partly because of its importance in cultivating professional attitudes in students. This study aims to investigate students' attitudes-specifically characterized as "detached concern"-in a cadaver dissection course. An interpretative phenomenological analysis was performed with semi-structured, focus group interviews among 12 third-year medical students from a Taiwanese medical school to reveal their perceptions and learning experiences regarding human cadaver dissection. Based on these interviews, four relevant categories of perspectives were delineated: (1) initial emotional impact, (2) human referents, (3) coping strategies, and (4) ways of perceiving cadavers. Students were divided into two groups based on these categories. Students in Group 1 developed mechanisms described as "detachment" to cope with their initial emotional reactions to cadaveric dissection, which was noted to have disruptive effects on their learning. They considered human referents to be learning obstacles and avoided contact with or thinking about the human referents while performing dissections. Some of them faced a conflict between perceiving the cadaver as a learning tool versus as a human being. This impasse could be resolved if they latently adopted a "perspective switch" between the concept of a learning tool (rational aspect) and a human being (sensitive aspect). The students in Group 2 had no obvious initial emotional reaction. For them, the human referents functioned as learning supports, and the cadavers were consistently perceived as humans. These students held the notion that "cadaver dissection is an act of love"; therefore, they did not experience any need to detach themselves from their feelings during dissection. This alternative attitude revealed that detached concern alone is not sufficient to describe the entire range of medical students' attitudes toward cadaver dissection. Anat Sci

  17. Ethical issues surrounding the use of images from donated cadavers in the anatomical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Jon; Callahan, David; Wee, Richman

    2016-01-01

    Body donor programs rely on the generosity and trust of the public to facilitate the provision of cadaver resources for anatomical education and research. The uptake and adoption of emerging technologies, including those allowing the acquisition and distribution of images, are becoming more widespread, including within anatomical science education. Images of cadavers are useful for research and education, and their supply and distribution have commercial potential for textbooks and online education. It is unclear whether the utilization of images of donated cadavers are congruent with donor expectations, societal norms and boundaries of established public understanding. Presently, no global "best practices" or standards exist, nor is there a common model requiring specific image-related consent from body donors. As ongoing success of body donation programs relies upon the ethical and institutional governance of body utilization to maintain trust and a positive relationship with potential donors and the community, discussions considering the potential impact of image misuse are important. This paper discusses the subject of images of donated cadavers, commenting on images in non-specific use, education, research, and commercial applications. It explores the role and significance of such images in the context of anatomical science and society, and discusses how misuse - including unconsented use - of images has the potential to affect donor program success, suggesting that informed consent is currently necessary for all images arising from donated cadavers. Its purpose is to encourage discussion to guide responsible utilization of cadaver images, while protecting the interests of body donors and the public.

  18. MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF MEDIAL CIRCUMFLEX FEMORAL ARTERY IN HUMAN CADAVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh R. Aghera

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medial circumflex femoral artery is an important branch of Profunda femoris artery. It is an important artery in supplying blood to the head and neck of the femur, the adductor muscles and form anastomosis around head of femur. So study of variation of medial circumflex femoral artery great value for surgeon and orthopaedic surgeries. Materials and Methods: The present study includes 102 lower limbs of adult formalin fixed human cadavers used for the routine dissection procedure for under graduate and post graduate students in the department of Anatomy, M.R. Medical College, KBN Medical college and H K E Homeopathic College, Gulbarga (India during 2011-2014.The study was done by dissection method as per Cunningham’s manual of practical Anatomy. Result: In present study, we found that 25 extremities (25.49% medial circumflex femoral artery was originated directly from femoral artery. In 10 extremities (9.80% a common trunk was observed form medial circumflex femoral with femoral artery. Normal study was observed in 66 extremities (64.70%. Conclusion: In present study and other past studies we conclude that knowledge of variation in this artery is very important to preventing injury to vessels during surgical procedures around hip joint and also has important value in plastic surgery operations as the vascular pedicle of grafts such as the transverse upper gracilis (TUG flap, medial thigh flap and medial circumflex femoral (gracilis perforator free flap. During case of selective arteriography in ischaemic necrosis of the femoral head to know the arterial supply of the femoral head it is used.

  19. Laparoscopic training model using fresh human cadavers without the establishment of penumoperitoneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Sasaki Imakuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopy is a well-established alternative to open surgery for treating many diseases. Although laparoscopy has many advantages, it is also associated with disadvantages, such as slow learning curves and prolonged operation time. Fresh frozen cadavers may be an interesting resource for laparoscopic training, and many institutions have access to cadavers. One of the main obstacles for the use of cadavers as a training model is the difficulty in introducing a sufficient pneumoperitoneum to distend the abdominal wall and provide a proper working space. The purpose of this study was to describe a fresh human cadaver model for laparoscopic training without requiring a pneumoperitoneum. Materials and Methods and Results: A fake abdominal wall device was developed to allow for laparoscopic training without requiring a pneumoperitoneum in cadavers. The device consists of a table-mounted retractor, two rail clamps, two independent frame arms, two adjustable handle and rotating features, and two frames of the abdominal wall. A handycam is fixed over a frame arm, positioned and connected through a USB connection to a television and dissector; scissors and other laparoscopic materials are positioned inside trocars. The laparoscopic procedure is thus simulated. Conclusion: Cadavers offer a very promising and useful model for laparoscopic training. We developed a fake abdominal wall device that solves the limitation of space when performing surgery on cadavers and removes the need to acquire more costly laparoscopic equipment. This model is easily accessible at institutions in developing countries, making it one of the most promising tools for teaching laparoscopy.

  20. Extracorporeal support with a cadaver liver as a bridge to transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristoe, L W; Merrill, J H; Kangas, J A; Vogel, J E; Stammers, A H; Langnas, A N; Fox, I J; Shaw, B W

    1993-01-01

    Extracorporeal liver perfusion (ECLP) has been used for detoxifying blood in patients in class IV hepatic encephalopathy. Palliation of the moribund patient utilizing extracorporeal devices with cross-circulation of a cadaver liver has been documented for over three decades. Common problems associated with this procedure which appear in the literature include cadaver liver distention, increased resistance to blood flow, and limited time of extracorporeal support due to cadaver liver failure. This report summarizes the experiences of the perfusion team in utilizing an extracorporeal circuit with an otherwise nontransplantable cadaveric liver, to support the decompensating hepatic patient as a bridge to transplantation. Between January and July 1992, three patients were supported for hepatic failure with ECLP. Two patients were placed on ECLP with a modified circuit containing two positive displacement pumps and one centrifugal pump. The third patient was placed on ECLP with a circuit that contained two centrifugal pumps and one positive displacement pump. Patient age ranged from 6 to 38 years and length of support ranged from 24 to 72 hours. In all three patients, a centrifugal pump was placed in the suprahepatic inferior vena cava line to facilitate cadaver liver drainage and decompression. Intensive monitoring of both patient and cadaver liver hemodynamics, hepatic function, and hematological status was performed. All three patients were successfully weaned from ECLP. Two patients received successful orthotopic liver transplantation. The third died of complications unrelated to ECLP after support was discontinued.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Neuroanatomy and cadaver dissection in Italy: History, medicolegal issues, and neurosurgical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati, Paola; Frati, Alessandro; Salvati, Maurizio; Marinozzi, Silvia; Frati, Riccardo; Angeletti, Luciana Rita; Piccirilli, Manolo; Gaudio, Eugenio; Delfini, Roberto

    2006-11-01

    Despite the significant Italian tradition of important anatomical studies, an outdated law historically influenced by the Catholic church restricts the use of cadavers for teaching and scientific purposes. The object of the present paper was to trace the historical evolution of the Italian anatomical tradition, particularly neuroanatomical studies, in relation to the juridical regulations on the use of cadavers today. Special attention was paid to the opportunities offered to neurosurgery by using cadavers and to the scientific and social issues in neurosurgical training in the twenty-first century. Considering the new Common European Constitution, the authors advocate a political solution from the European community to improve the quality of training in the disciplines with a social impact such as neurosurgery.

  2. Practical guidelines for setting up neurosurgery skills training cadaver laboratory in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Suri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though the necessity of cadaver dissection is felt by the medical fraternity, and described as early as 600 BC, in India, there are no practical guidelines available in the world literature for setting up a basic cadaver dissection laboratory for neurosurgery skills training. Hands-on dissection practice on microscopic and endoscopic procedures is essential in technologically demanding modern neurosurgery training where ethical issues, cost constraints, medico-legal pitfalls, and resident duty time restrictions have resulted in lesser opportunities to learn. Collaboration of anatomy, forensic medicine, and neurosurgery is essential for development of a workflow of cadaver procurement, preservation, storage, dissection, and disposal along with setting up the guidelines for ethical and legal concerns.

  3. Optimizing the use of cadavers by integrating pathology during anatomy dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldenhuys, Elsje-Márie; Burger, Elsie Helena; van Helden, Paul David; Mole, Calvin Gerald; Kotzé, Sanet Henriët

    2016-11-01

    An accurate knowledge of anatomy, especially natural variation within individuals, is of vital clinical importance. Cadaver dissection during anatomical training may be a valuable introduction to pathology for undergraduate students, which can contribute greatly to a successful medical career. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent and type of pathology lesions in a cadaver population (n = 127) used for medical dissection. This was done to gauge whether sufficient pathology lesions representative of all the organ systems were present in the cadaver population to warrant the use of cadavers as an additional pathology learning resource. This study demonstrated a wide variety of pathology lesions in different organ systems. The respiratory system was most affected with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) lesions being the most common finding (seen in 76% of cadavers) followed by bronchopneumonia and emphysema. Other common pathology findings included atherosclerosis, colonic diverticula, and chronic pyelonephritis. Skeletal fractures and degenerative joint disease were also noted. This study shows that cadaveric dissection offers a chance to alert and expose students to a wide variety of gross pathology and histopathology. It has been suggested that most medical students will practice in primary health care and as such more attention should be given to the pathology of commonly encountered diseases. This is particularly true for developing countries, where diseases such as TB are commonly encountered. The integration of pathology into the dissection hall may therefore be beneficial to student learning while simultaneously optimizing the use of cadaver material. Anat Sci Educ 9: 575-582. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. [The forensic expertise of cadavers of females suspected to be victims of sexually motivated homicide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, O A

    2004-01-01

    According to the author's independent observations, the criminal, as a rule, strangles his victim in sex-related murders. In cases of suspected sex-related murders of women, the female urogenital system needs to be examined as an anatomically whole preparation. It was proven that the spermatozoid structure (in the cadaveric vagina, whose condition was optimal) began to change from week 2 with almost all their heads being destroyed by the end of week 6. When cadavers are found in 1.5-2 months after the event, there is no reason to give up examinations of the sperm from cadaver.

  5. Human Cadavers vs. Multimedia Simulation: A Study of Student Learning in Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltarelli, Andrew J.; Roseth, Cary J.; Saltarelli, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Multimedia and simulation programs are increasingly being used for anatomy instruction, yet it remains unclear how learning with these technologies compares with learning with actual human cadavers. Using a multilevel, quasi-experimental-control design, this study compared the effects of "Anatomy and Physiology Revealed" (APR) multimedia…

  6. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.; Ettema, A.M.; Berglund, L.J.; An, K.N.; Amadio, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding r

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of gallstone disease in an Iranian population:a study on cadavers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Esmaail Farzaneh; Hassan Toifghi Zavvareh; Jaber Gharadaghi; Mehrdad Sheikhvatan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The prevalence of gallstones is low in Asians. In Iran, many factors inlfuence the prevalence of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of gallbladder stones and their chemical characteristics in a population by the study of cadavers. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, autopsies were performed on 253 cadavers of more than 13 years old. The cadavers were studied to determine the number, location of stone formation, chemical composition, dry weight, and mean diameter of stones in the gallbladder and common bile duct. RESULTS:The prevalence of gallstone disease in these cadavers was 6.3% (men 4.7%, women 8.6%, not signiifcantly different, P=0.216). There was a positive relationship between the age and prevalence of gallstone disease (P=0.033). The most common stone compositions were cholesterol and oxalate. The mean diameter (P=0.0058) and dry weight (P CONCLUSIONS:The prevalence of gallstones differed among age groups. Diameter and dry weight of gallstones were dependent on location of stone formation and chemical composition.

  8. A Technique to Perfuse Cadavers that Extends the Useful Life of Fresh Tissues: The Duke Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Caroline; Kellogg, Ryan T.; Zhang, Yixin; Baiak, Andresa; Leiweke, Clinton; Marcus, Jeffrey R.; Levin, L. Scott; Zenn, Michael R.; Erdmann, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    The demand for laboratory-based teaching and training is increasing worldwide as medical training and education confront the pressures of shorter training time and rising costs. This article presents a cost-effective perfusion technique that extends the useful life of fresh tissue. Refrigerated cadavers are preserved in their natural state for up…

  9. In vitro study of foot kinematics using a dynamic walking cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nester, C J; Liu, A M; Ward, E; Howard, D; Cocheba, J; Derrick, T; Patterson, P

    2007-01-01

    There is a dearth of information on navicular, cuboid, cuneiform and metatarsal kinematics during walking and our objective was to study the kinematic contributions these bones might make to foot function. A dynamic cadaver model of walking was used to apply forces to cadaver feet and mobilise them in a manner similar to in vivo. Kinematic data were recorded from 13 cadaver feet. Given limitations to the simulation, the data describe what the cadaver feet were capable of in response to the forces applied, rather than exactly how they performed in vivo. The talonavicular joint was more mobile than the calcaneocuboid joint. The range of motion between cuneiforms and navicular was similar to that between talus and navicular. Metatarsals four and five were more mobile relative to the cuboid than metatarsals one, two and three relative to the cuneiforms. This work has confirmed the complexity of rear, mid and forefoot kinematics. The data demonstrate the potential for often-ignored foot joints to contribute significantly to the overall kinematic function of the foot. Previous emphasis on the ankle and sub talar joints as the principal articulating components of the foot has neglected more distal articulations. The results also demonstrate the extent to which the rigid segment assumptions of previous foot kinematics research have over simplified the foot.

  10. The Use of Specially Designed Tasks to Enhance Student Interest in the Cadaver Dissection Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok Hoon; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Hwang, Young-il

    2012-01-01

    Cadaver dissection is a key component of anatomy education. Unfortunately, students sometimes regard the process of dissection as uninteresting or stressful. To make laboratory time more interesting and to encourage discussion and collaborative learning among medical students, specially designed tasks were assigned to students throughout…

  11. Mechanized Packing and Delivery System for Entomopathogenic Nematodes in Infected Mealworm Cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes a mechanized system to pack mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) cadavers infected with entomopathogenic nematodes between two sheets of masking tape. The document is also an operation manual for the machine and provides all the machine specifications, and wiring and pneumatic diagram...

  12. Puncture Reduction in Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy with HE's Lumbar LOcation (HELLO System: A Cadaver Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxin Fan

    Full Text Available Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED usually requires numerous punctures under X-ray fluoroscopy. Repeated puncture will lead to more radiation exposure and reduce the beginners' confidence.This cadaver study aimed to investigate the efficacy of HE's Lumbar Location (HELLO system in puncture reduction of PTED.Cadaver study.Comparative groups.HELLO system consists of self-made surface locator and puncture locator. One senior surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the left side of 20 cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with the assistance of HELLO system (Group A. Additionally, the senior surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the right side of the cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with traditional methods (Group B. On the other hand, an inexperienced surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the left side of the cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with the assistance of our HELLO system (Group C.At L4/L5 level, there was significant difference in puncture times between Group A and Group B (P0.05. There was no difference in location time between Group A and Group B or Group A and Group C either at L4/L5 level or L5/S1 level (P>0.05.Small-sample preclinical study.HELLO system was effective in reducing puncture times, fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure, as well as the difficulty of learning PTED. (2015-RES-127.

  13. Fish as aquatic “sniffer dogs”: Olfactory-mediated behaviors and conditioning of common carps to cadaver odors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Wade Jamandre

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Even with the aide of modern technology, the search for cadaver or human remains underwater is still assisted by sniffer dogs mainly because of their superior sense of olfaction. However, dogs rely on volatile organic compounds in the air and that this may constraint their ability when searching for submerged cadavers. On the other hand, it has long been recognized that fishes use olfaction to sample odors from their surroundings to accomplish a task and are capable of acquiring new skills through training or conditioning. Despite decades of experimental and observational studies of the olfactory sensitivities of fishes, its potential application to forensic sciences has never been truly explored. In this pioneering research, we explore the possibility of using fish olfaction in detecting cadaver odors (porcine origin, using common carps Cyprinus carpio as model species in a series of experiments under laboratory conditions. We first observed the innate behavior of carps towards cadaver odors. Afterwards, the carps were trained in two-choice chamber experimental tanks by appetitive olfactory conditioning and odor masking methods. We also experimented on the effects of cadaver odors by early exposure using eggs and larval impregnation techniques, and observing the behaviors when they develop to early juveniles. In general, we found out that common carps are naturally repelled to cadaver odors. However using our devised conditioning protocol, results show that the conditioned carps were able to learn to be attracted to cadaver odors despite their innate aversion. The development of fish for cadaver detection is a simple but innovative idea and that it may present a cost-effective and reliable solution for the shortcomings of the existing methods in underwater cadaver search. We anticipate that this research will open up a variety of different studies in pursuit of developing fishes as biosensors and its application to forensic sciences.

  14. Modelo de donante cadavérico con criterio neurológico de muerte en la rata de laboratorio

    OpenAIRE

    Zalazar, Gustavo; Stringa, Pablo; Lausada, Natalia Raquel; Cicora, F.; Vásquez, Daniela N.; Raimondi, J. Clemente

    2010-01-01

    El modelo experimental de trasplante de órganos y tejidos en la rata, se ha llevado a cabo tradicionalmente con donante vivo. La complejidad de lograr un donante cadavérico en roedores de laboratorio, ha restringido su utilización. Esta situación limita la extrapolación de los resultados a la realidad clínica, donde mayoritariamente se utilizan órganos extraídos de donantes cadavéricos. La necesidad de poseer resultados experimentales, tanto en donante vivo como cadavérico, nos ha llevado a o...

  15. A radiologic and anatomic assessment of injectate spread following transmuscular quadratus lumborum block in cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, S D; El-Boghdadly, K; Nasralah, Z; Sarwani, N; Nixon, A M; Chin, K J

    2017-01-01

    We performed bilateral transmuscular quadratus lumborum blocks in six cadavers using iodinated contrast and methylene blue. Computed tomography imaging was performed in four cadavers and anatomical dissection was completed in five. This demonstrated spread to the lumbar paravertebral space in 63% of specimens, laterally to the transversus abdominis muscle in 50% and caudally to the anterior superior iliac spine in 63% of specimens. There was no radiographic evidence of spread to the thoracic paravertebral space. Anatomical dissection revealed dye staining of the upper branches of the lumbar plexus and the psoas major muscle in 70% of specimens. Further clinical studies are required to confirm if the quadratus lumborum block might be a suitable alternative to lumbar plexus block.

  16. [Organization and results of cadaver kidney transplantation from 1969 to 1973 (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnier, J

    1975-01-01

    France transplant was founded in order to organize rationally the cadaver kidneys transport and transplantation with is omogenous compatibility tests. 2143 hemodialysis patients have been presently (1-9-72) treated in 82 dialysis center in France; 964 of them are in the France Transplant waiting list. According with recent laws, nervous function cessation is synonimous of death. That made possible, by good resuscitation techniques, to maintain a good level of circulation and oxigenation of organs. Family permit is required for this purpose. 17 medical transporttion staffs are at work in 12 France towns and cooperate with 12 typing laboratoires working with the same techniques and reagents. One permanent secretariat in Paris is always telex connected with all staffs and mantains a continuous up to date patients waiting list. 415 cadaver kidneys were transplanted, 255 in the same town and 160 trabsported from a town another. A significative rise in cold ischemia times happened recently because of the increasing number of transported kidneys.

  17. Eustachian Tube Dilation via a Transtympanic Approach in 6 Cadaver Heads: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Marc; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Poe, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic transtympanic balloon dilation of the cartilaginous eustachian tube. To accomplish this, transtympanic balloon dilation of the cartilaginous eustachian tube was performed on 11 eustachian tubes (6 cadaver heads). The balloon catheter was introduced and passed through the protympanic orifice of the eustachian tube transtympanically under endoscopic view and cannulated without incident in all cadavers. Computed tomography was then performed postprocedure to evaluate for inadvertent dilation of the bony eustachian tube, adverse placement of the balloon, or any bony fractures. The balloon was seen to be successfully inflated in the cartilaginous portion without damage to surrounding structures in all cases. This demonstrates that under endoscopic guidance, the protympanic orifice of the eustachian tube can be feasibly cannulated and reliably traversed, allowing for targeted dilation of the cartilaginous eustachian tube from a transtympanic approach.

  18. How legitimate is the use of human cadavers in modern-day anatomy?

    OpenAIRE

    Winkelmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Anatomists use human bodies for research, teaching and advanced medical training. Despite a long tradition and the more recent legal regulation of 'body donation', this practise is nevertheless burdened with legal and ethical uncertainties. Therefore, modern-day anatomy still needs a well-founded legitimation of cadaver use. The educational research presented here demonstrates that, on methodological grounds, it remains difficult to produce a 'final' judgement on the effectiveness of anato...

  19. Variations in the anatomy of the thyroid gland: clinical implications of a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash; Rajini, Thimmiah; Ramachandran, Archana; Savalgi, Geethanjali Basavraj; Venkata, Sivacharan Panchagnula; Mokhasi, Varsha

    2012-03-01

    Surgical removal of the thyroid gland is associated with risk of damage to the parathyroid glands, external branch of superior laryngeal nerves, inferior laryngeal nerves, and haematoma due to vascular damage and the chance of residual thyroid tissue being left in case of cancer and Graves' disease. The present study was designed to report the prevalence of anatomical variations and developmental anomalies of the thyroid gland that will hopefully help to minimise the aforementioned complications related to thyroid surgery. A total of 52 male and 18 female properly embalmed cadavers were dissected. The thyroid gland was examined for the presence of the pyramidal lobe, levator glandulae thyroideae and partial or complete absence of isthmus. Length, greatest transverse and anteroposterior extent of both the right and left lobe of the gland was recorded. A pyramidal lobe was present in 43.9% male and 22.2% female cadavers and was more prevalent on the left side of the median plane. Levator glandulae thyroideae was present in 34.6% male and 27.8% female cadavers. Isthmus was absent in 9.6% male and 5.6% female cadavers. The average length, greatest transverse and anteroposterior extent of right lobe was 4.43, 2.54 and 1.69 cm, respectively, whereas for the left lobe it was 4.21, 2.63 and 1.7 cm, respectively. The nature of the specimens studied, and the region where the study is carried out, affect the different goitre zones, age, sex, and race of population studied, all of which can contribute to the anatomical variations of the thyroid gland found in different reports by various authors.

  20. Confirming Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission from a cadaver to an embalmer using molecular epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janelle A; Meissner, Jeanne Sullivan; Ahuja, Shama Desai; Shashkina, Elena; O'Flaherty, Tholief; Proops, Douglas C

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping results and epidemiologic investigation were used to confirm tuberculosis transmission from a cadaver to an embalmer. This investigation highlights the utility of genotyping in identifying unsuspected epidemiologic links and unusual transmission settings. In addition, the investigation provides additional evidence for the occupational risk of tuberculosis among funeral service workers and indicates a need for education about tuberculosis risk and the importance of adhering to appropriate infection control measures among funeral service workers.

  1. Trans-sphenoidal Approach to the Supraclinoid Internal Carotid Artery for Endovascular Access in a Cadaver

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Andrew Kelly; Holt, Hunter Kegan; Serici, Anthony Joseph; Moftakhar, Roham

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Sometimes, intracranial pathology in the distal vasculature cannot be accessed by standard endovascular techniques because of occlusion or insurmountable tortuosity of theinternal carotid artery (ICA). A trans-sphenoidal surgical approach can follow a similar trajectory to the course of the supraclinoid ICA. This study evaluates the feasibility of a trans-sphenoidal approach to the supraclinoid ICA for endovascular access. Materials and Methods In a fresh cadaver head, the sphenoid si...

  2. Disease in the Society: Infectious Cadavers Result in Collapse of Ant Sub-Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, Raquel G.; Hughes, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of experimental studies on mechanisms of social immunity in ant societies, little is known about how social behavior relates to disease progression within the nests of ants. In fact, when empirically studying disease in ant societies, it is common to remove dead ants from experiments to confirm infection by the studied parasite. This unfortunately does not allow disease to progress within the nest as it may be assumed would happen under natural conditions. Therefore, the approach taken so far has resulted in a limited knowledge of diseases dynamics within the nest environment. Here we introduced a single infectious cadaver killed by the fungus Beauveria bassiana into small nests of the ant Camponotus castaneus. We then observed the natural progression of the disease by not removing the corpses of the ants that died following the first entry of the disease. Because some behaviors such as social isolation of sick individuals or the removal of cadavers by nestmates are considered social immune functions and thus adaptations at the colony level that reduce disease spread, we also experimentally confined some sub-colonies to one or two chamber nests to prevent the expression of such behaviors. Based on 51 small nests and survival studies in 1,003 ants we found that a single introduced infectious cadaver was able to transmit within the nest, and social immunity did not prevent the collapse of the small sub-colonies here tested. This was true whether ants did or did not have the option to remove the infectious cadaver. Therefore, we found no evidence that the typically studied social immunity behaviors can reduce disease spread in the conditions here tested. PMID:27529548

  3. Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon Tension during Finger Manipulation: A Study in Human Cadaver Hands

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Tatsuro; Amadio, Peter C.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E.; An, Kai-Nan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the tension in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon in zone II and the digit angle during joint manipulations that replicate rehabilitation protocols. Eight FDP tendons from eight human cadavers were used in this study. The dynamic tension in zone II of the tendon and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint angle were measured in various wrist and digit positions. Tension in the FDP tendon increased with MCP joint extension. There was no tension with th...

  4. In Vivo and Cadaver Studies of the Canalicular/Lacrimal Sac Mucosal Folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng You

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The study aimed to investigate canalicular/lacrimal sac mucosal folds (CLS-MFs in vivo and in cadavers in order to explore their functional roles in the lacrimal drainage system. Method. The observations of CLS-MFs in vivo were performed on 16 patients with chronic dacryocystitis after undergoing an endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EE-DCR. The lacrimal sacs and common canaliculi of 19 adult cadavers were dissected. The opening/closing of an orifice and mucosal fold was recorded. All of the specimens were subjected to a histological examination. Results. The upper and lower lacrimal canaliculi in all of the samples united to form a common canaliculus that opened to the lacrimal sac. CLS-MFs were observed in 10 of the 16 patients (62.5% and 9 of the 19 cadavers (47.4%. The orifices or mucosal folds could be opened or closed when related muscles contracted or relaxed. Histological sections showed a mucosal fold at one side of an orifice. Conclusion. Common canaliculus is the most common type that the canaliculus opens to lacrimal sac. CLS-MFs exist in a certain ratio that can be opened/closed with the movement of the orifices. They may be involved in the drainage of tears or the pathogenesis of acute dacryocystitis or lacrimal sac mucocele.

  5. Integrating gross pathology into teaching of undergraduate medical science students using human cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Vinod; Dissabandara, Lakal; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Forwood, Mark R; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2016-09-01

    Human cadavers offer a great opportunity for histopathology students for the learning and teaching of tissue pathology. In this study, we aimed to implement an integrated learning approach by using cadavers to enhance students' knowledge and to develop their skills in gross tissue identification, handling and dissection techniques. A total of 35 students enrolled in the undergraduate medical science program participated in this study. A 3-hour laboratory session was conducted that included an active exploration of cadaveric specimens to identify normal and pathological tissues as well as tissue dissection. The majority of the students strongly agreed that the integration of normal and morbid anatomy improved their understanding of tissue pathology. All the students either agreed or strongly agreed that this laboratory session was useful to improve their tissue dissection and instrument handling skills. Furthermore, students from both cohorts rated the session as very relevant to their learning and recommended that this approach be added to the existing histopathology curriculum. To conclude, an integrated cadaver-based practical session can be used effectively to enhance the learning experience of histopathology science students, as well as improving their manual skills of tissue treatment, instrument handling and dissection.

  6. The sciatic nerve in human cadavers - high division or low formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A A; Asari, M A; Pasha, M A

    2016-01-01

    Variations of the sciatic nerve have been extensively studied in the past including its relationship with the piriformis muscle and associated clinical conditions like piriformis syndrome and sciatica. In the present study we noticed some interesting variations of the sciatic nerve, which were slightly different from the cases described earlier. In the previous studies most of the authors described the higher division of sciatic nerve and none of them discussed its formation. In this study we tried to look its formation from the sacral plexus and its divisions in the thigh. We noticed that in one cadaver the two components of the sciatic nerve originated directly from the sacral plexus and coursed down without merging in the thigh. Should this be called a higher division or non formation of the sciatic nerve? On the other hand in two other cadavers, the two divisions after emerging separately from the sacral plexus, united in the gluteal region and in the thigh respectively. Should we call this as higher division or low formation of the sciatic nerve? In two other cadavers the sciatic nerve emerged from the greater sciatic foramen below the piriformis and divided in the gluteal region itself. Ideally this should be called as higher division of sciatic nerve.

  7. Measurement of the tendon of the biceps brachii after tenotomy: study on cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Cunha Machado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of elbow and forearm range of motion on the distal excursion of the long head of the biceps (LHB. METHODS: The distal excursion of the LHB after tenotomy of the shoulders of eight cadavers was ascertained by measuring the distance between a point marked out on the LHB, 3 cm from the anterolateral border of the acromion, and its position at different degrees of elbow flexion, using a digital pachymeter. The measurements at elbow flexion of 135°, 90°, 45° and 0° were noted: these angles were established using a goniometer. The measurements were made with the forearm in neutral, supination and pronation positions. RESULTS: Differences between the mean measurements of the distal excursion of the LHB (total sample were observed between the degrees of elbow flexion ( p< 0.01. However, no statistical differences were observed between the different forearm positions, between the sides, genders and ages of the cadavers studied. CONCLUSION: Progressive extension of the elbow caused progressive distal excursion of the LHB, but without interference in the forearm position, gender, side or age of the cadavers studied.

  8. Mapping the lateral extent of human cadaver decomposition with soil chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitkenhead-Peterson, J A; Owings, C G; Alexander, M B; Larison, N; Bytheway, J A

    2012-03-10

    Soil below decomposing cadavers may have a different lateral spatial extent depending upon whether scavengers have access to the human cadaver or not. We examined the lateral spatial extent of decomposition products to a depth of 7cm of soils beneath two decomposing corpses, one in which the subject was autopsied, unclothed and placed under a wire cage to restrict scavenger access and one in which the subject was not autopsied, unclothed and exposed to scavengers. The two bodies had accumulated degree days (ADD) of 5799 and 5469 and post mortem interval (PMI) of 288 and 248d, respectively. The spatial extent for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and organic nitrogen (DON) for both bodies was large but similar suggesting some movement off site for both compounds. Mean DOC was 1087±727 and 1484±1236μgg(-1) dry soil under the two corpses relative to 150±68μgg(-1) in upslope control soils. Sulfate tended to have 'hot spots' of lower values relative to the control soils indicative of anaerobic respiration. pH was lower and electrical conductivity was higher in the soil under both decomposing cadavers relative to control soils. Some of the nutrients examined downslope of the human remains were significantly higher than control soils upslope suggesting movement of decomposition products off-site which could be an important factor when using human remains detector dogs.

  9. Gastric femoral hernia in a male cadaver with gastroptosis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsis, K; Apostolidis, S; Papadopoulou, A L; Vlasis, K; Totlis, T; Skandalakis, P

    2008-04-01

    The shape and the position of the stomach and its anatomic relations to the round viscera vary from individual to individual, but they also vary in the same subject depending on many factors. The downward displacement of the stomach is called gastroptosis. In the literature, there are only five case reports where the stomach constituted the content of a femoral hernia. The current study presents a case of a gastric femoral hernia in a cadaver along with a review of the relevant literature. During routine dissection of a 67-year-old male cadaver with a very large stomach and gastroptosis, a femoral hernia containing a part of the great curvature of the stomach was found. The length of the hernia sac was 5 cm, and its width was 3.5 cm. There was a disposition of the intestinal coils to the posterior wall and the lesser pelvis. The cadaver's former medical history and skin observation before dissection excluded any previous abdominal surgery. This is the second case of stomach herniation through the femoral ring in a male subject ever reported. The symptoms in this pathology vary from complete absence to symptoms due to high stenosis of the digestive tract, stomach strangulation and stomach wall necrosis.

  10. Inception of cadaver dissection and its relevance in present day scenario of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Gayatri; Garg, Krishna

    2006-06-01

    The concept of dissection for acquiring knowledge about the structure of human body was started in 15th century and barber--surgeons used to demonstrate various structures at the professors command. Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) was the first medical student to dissect the cadaver and also continued with it even as a professor. Slowly and steadily its importance was realised. Once autopsy was accepted as a ideal parameter to establish the causes of death, the importance of dissection got enhanced. Cadavers were obtained earlier from the grave robbings and mortuaries, which was followed by, an Anatomy Act of 1832, by which unclaimed bodies were provided to the anatomy department. For last two decades, many persons started donating their bodies to the department of anatomy. In India, mostly unclaimed bodies are handed over to anatomy department for teaching and research purpose. Cadavers teach students during 1st professional course, autopsy teaches again in IInd and IIIrd professional courses and even later on throughout the career. Dissection helps in developing a spatial and tactile appreciation for the fabric of the human body that cannot be achieved by prosection or computerised learning aids alone.

  11. Maintaining the anonymity of cadavers in medical education: Historic relic or educational and ethical necessity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D Gareth; King, Mike R

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the modern history of anatomical dissection by medical and other health science students, cadavers have been anonymized. This has meant that students have been provided with limited, if any, information on the identities or medical histories of those they are dissecting. While there was little way around this when the bodies were unclaimed, this need not be the case when the bodies have been donated. However, with a few exceptions, no efforts have been made to change this model. Recent attempts to move anatomy teaching in a more humanistic direction, by emphasizing the cadaver as the students' first patient and with the growth of commemoration services following the dissecting process, raise the question of whether cadavers should continue to be anonymized. In laying a basis for discussion of this matter, we outline what appear to be the virtues of anonymity, and the form that alternatives to anonymity might take. The options identified are nonidentification, low information; nonidentification, moderate information; and identification, full information. The virtues and drawbacks of each of these possibilities are assessed by analyzing their value for students, and also for donors and their families. Policy issues raised by alternatives are also considered. This article provides a basis for continued discussion and suggestions for further research in this area. Anat Sci Educ 10: 87-97. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. Self-Reported Emergency Medicine Residency Applicant Attitudes Towards a Procedural Cadaver Laboratory Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman, Lance

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Residency applicants consider a variety of factors when ranking emergency medicine (EM programs for their NRMP match list. A human cadaver emergency procedure lab curriculum is uncommon. We hypothesized that the presence this curriculum would positively impact the ranking of an EM residency program.METHODS: The EM residency at Nebraska Medical Center is an urban, university-based program with a PGY I-III format. Residency applicants during the interview for a position in the PGY I class of 2006 were surveyed by three weekly electronic mailings. The survey was distributed in March 2006 after the final NRMP match results were released. The survey explored learner preferences and methodological commonality of models of emergency procedural training, as well as the impact of a procedural cadaver lab curriculum on residency ranking. ANOVA of ranks was used to compare responses to ranking questions.RESULTS: Of the 73 potential subjects, 54 (74% completed the survey. Respondents ranked methods of procedural instruction from 1 (most preferred or most common technique to 4 (least preferred or least common technique. Response averages and 95% confidence intervals for the preferred means of learning a new procedure are as follows: textbook (3.69; 3.51-3.87, mannequin (2.83; 2.64-3.02, human cadaver (1.93; 1.72-2.14, and living patient (1.56; 1.33-1.79. Response averages for the commonality of means used to teach a new procedure are as follows: human cadaver (3.63; 3.46-3.80, mannequin (2.70; 2.50-2.90, living patient (2.09; 1.85-2.33, and textbook (1.57; 1.32-1.82. When asked if the University of Nebraska Medical Center residency ranked higher in the individual's match list because of its procedural cadaver lab, 14.8% strongly disagreed, 14.8% disagreed, 40.7% were neutral, 14.8% agreed, and 14.8% strongly agreed.CONCLUSION: We conclude that, although cadaveric procedural training is viewed by senior medical student learners as a desirable means

  13. Functional and Structural Succession of Soil Microbial Communities below Decomposing Human Cadavers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Cobaugh

    Full Text Available The ecological succession of microbes during cadaver decomposition has garnered interest in both basic and applied research contexts (e.g. community assembly and dynamics; forensic indicator of time since death. Yet current understanding of microbial ecology during decomposition is almost entirely based on plant litter. We know very little about microbes recycling carcass-derived organic matter despite the unique decomposition processes. Our objective was to quantify the taxonomic and functional succession of microbial populations in soils below decomposing cadavers, testing the hypotheses that a periods of increased activity during decomposition are associated with particular taxa; and b human-associated taxa are introduced to soils, but do not persist outside their host. We collected soils from beneath four cadavers throughout decomposition, and analyzed soil chemistry, microbial activity and bacterial community structure. As expected, decomposition resulted in pulses of soil C and nutrients (particularly ammonia and stimulated microbial activity. There was no change in total bacterial abundances, however we observed distinct changes in both function and community composition. During active decay (7 - 12 days postmortem, respiration and biomass production rates were high: the community was dominated by Proteobacteria (increased from 15.0 to 26.1% relative abundance and Firmicutes (increased from 1.0 to 29.0%, with reduced Acidobacteria abundances (decreased from 30.4 to 9.8%. Once decay rates slowed (10 - 23 d postmortem, respiration was elevated, but biomass production rates dropped dramatically; this community with low growth efficiency was dominated by Firmicutes (increased to 50.9% and other anaerobic taxa. Human-associated bacteria, including the obligately anaerobic Bacteroides, were detected at high concentrations in soil throughout decomposition, up to 198 d postmortem. Our results revealed the pattern of functional and compositional

  14. Self-guided clinical cases for medical students based on postmortem CT scans of cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Michael; Francois, Webster; Gest, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    In the summer of 2009, we began full body computed tomography (CT) scanning of the pre-embalmed cadavers in the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) dissection lab. We theorized that implementing web-based, self-guided clinical cases based on postmortem CT (PMCT) scans would result in increased student appreciation for the clinical relevance of anatomy, increased knowledge of cross-sectional anatomy, and increased ability to identify common pathologies on CT scans. The PMCT scan of each cadaver was produced as a DICOM dataset, and then converted into a Quicktime movie file using Osirix software. Clinical cases were researched and written by the authors, and consist of at least one Quicktime movie of a PMCT scan surrounded by a novel navigation interface. To assess the value of these clinical cases we surveyed medical students at UMMS who are currently using the clinical cases in their coursework. Students felt the clinical cases increased the clinical relevance of anatomy (mean response 7.77/10), increased their confidence finding anatomical structures on CT (7.00/10), and increased their confidence recognizing common pathologies on CT (6.17/10). Students also felt these clinical cases helped them synthesize material from numerous courses into an overall picture of a given disease process (7.01/10). These results support the conclusion that our clinical cases help to show students why the anatomy they are learning is foundational to their other coursework. We would recommend the use of similar clinical cases to any medical school utilizing cadaver dissection as a primary teaching method in anatomy education.

  15. Finite element model of the Jefferson fracture: comparison with a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkus, H; Karakas, A; Hanci, M; Uzan, M; Bozdag, E; Sarioglu, A C

    2001-06-01

    This study tries to explain the reason why the Jefferson fracture is a burst fracture, using two different biomechanical models: a finite element model (FEM) and a cadaver model used to determine strain distribution in C1 during axial static compressive loading. For the FEM model, a three-dimensional model of C1 was obtained from a 29-year-old healthy human, using axial CT scans with intervals of 1.0 mm. The mesh model was composed of 8200 four-noded isoparametric tetrahedrons and 37,400 solid elements. The material properties of the cortical bone of the vertebra were assessed according to the previous literature and were assumed to be linear isotropic and homogeneous for all elements. Axial static compressive loads were applied at between 200 and 1200 N. The strain and stress (maximum shear and von Mises) analyses were determined on the clinically relevant fracture lines of anterior and posterior arches. The results of the FEM were compared with a cadaver model. The latter comprised the C1 bone of a cadaver placed in a methylmethacrylate foam. Axial static compressive loads between 200 and 1200 N were applied by an electrohydraulic testing machine. Strain values were measured using strain gauges, which were cemented to the bone where the clinically relevant fracture lines of the anterior and posterior arches were located. As a result, compressive strain was observed on the outer surface of the anterior arch and inferior surface of the posterior arch. In addition, there was tensile strain on the inner surface of the anterior arch and superior surface of the posterior arch. The strain values obtained from the two experimental models showed similar trends. The FEM analysis revealed that maximum strain changes occurred where the maximum shear and von Mises stresses were concentrated. The changes in the C1 strain and stress values during static axial loading biomechanically prove that the Jefferson fracture is a burst fracture.

  16. Assessing the extent of colon lengthening due to splenic flexure mobilization techniques: a cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Eduardo Alonso Araujo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Failure of a colorectal anastomosis represents a life-threatening complication of colorectal surgery. Splenic flexure mobilization may contribute to reduce the occurrence of anastomotic complications due to technical flaws. There are no published reports measuring the impact of splenic flexure mobilization on the length of mobilized colon viable to construct a safe colorectal anastomosis. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of two techniques for splenic flexure mobilization on colon lengthening during open left-sided colon surgery using a cadaver model. DESIGN: Anatomical dissections for left colectomy and colorectal anastomosis at the sacral promontory level were conducted in 20 fresh cadavers by the same team of four surgeons. The effect of partial and full splenic flexure mobilization on the extent of mobilized left colon segment was determined. SETTING: University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. Tertiary medical institution and university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: A team of four surgeons operated on 20 fresh cadavers. RESULTS: The length of resected left colon enabling a tension-free colorectal anastomosis at the level of sacral promontory achieved without mobilizing the splenic flexure was 46.3 (35-81 cm. After partial mobilization of the splenic flexure, an additionally mobilized colon segment measuring 10.7 (2-30 cm was obtained. After full mobilization of the distal transverse colon, a mean 28.3 (10-65 cm segment was achieved. CONCLUSION: Splenic flexure mobilization techniques are associated to effective left colon lengthening for colorectal anastomosis. This result may contribute to decision-making during rectal surgery and low colorectal and coloanal anastomosis.

  17. Repellent effect of some household products on fly attraction to cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charabidze, Damien; Bourel, Benoit; Hedouin, Valery; Gosset, Didier

    2009-08-10

    The most common task of a forensic entomologist is to determine an accurate minimum post-mortem interval (PMI) using necrophagous fly larvae found on carrion. More often, blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are the first insects to detect the cadaver and, if the circumstances are favourable, to leave eggs on the body. However, several studies reveal that products such as gas or paint found on the cadaver induce a delay in the colonisation of the body, leading to an under-estimate of the PMI. Six common household products (gas, mosquito citronella repellent, perfume, bleach, hydrochloric acid and soda) were added to dead rats (Rattus norvegicus) in a field (Lille Forensic Institute, France). The presence of necrophagous flies was checked at regular intervals during 1 month. This experiment was repeated at the same period for four consecutive years. Results clearly showed the repellent effect of three of the six tested substances: gas (petroleum spirit), perfume and mosquito citronella repellent, which resulted in a mean delay of several days in the appearance of the first Dipteran species. Experiments were then carried out in controlled conditions in order to confirm previous observations. An olfactometer was specially designed to observe the behaviour of female Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in response to mice (Mus musculus) cadaver odour stimuli combined with household products. Dead mouse odour was a strong attractive stimulus for most of the tested individuals. Furthermore, it was noticed that the presence of mosquito citronella repellent, perfume, hydrochloric acid and paradichlorobenzene produced a significant repellent effect on female flies. All these results together confirm the repellent effect of some household products on flies and the necessity for forensic entomologists to consider this hypothesis when estimating the PMI.

  18. Functional and Structural Succession of Soil Microbial Communities below Decomposing Human Cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobaugh, Kelly L.; Schaeffer, Sean M.; DeBruyn, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    The ecological succession of microbes during cadaver decomposition has garnered interest in both basic and applied research contexts (e.g. community assembly and dynamics; forensic indicator of time since death). Yet current understanding of microbial ecology during decomposition is almost entirely based on plant litter. We know very little about microbes recycling carcass-derived organic matter despite the unique decomposition processes. Our objective was to quantify the taxonomic and functional succession of microbial populations in soils below decomposing cadavers, testing the hypotheses that a) periods of increased activity during decomposition are associated with particular taxa; and b) human-associated taxa are introduced to soils, but do not persist outside their host. We collected soils from beneath four cadavers throughout decomposition, and analyzed soil chemistry, microbial activity and bacterial community structure. As expected, decomposition resulted in pulses of soil C and nutrients (particularly ammonia) and stimulated microbial activity. There was no change in total bacterial abundances, however we observed distinct changes in both function and community composition. During active decay (7 - 12 days postmortem), respiration and biomass production rates were high: the community was dominated by Proteobacteria (increased from 15.0 to 26.1% relative abundance) and Firmicutes (increased from 1.0 to 29.0%), with reduced Acidobacteria abundances (decreased from 30.4 to 9.8%). Once decay rates slowed (10 - 23 d postmortem), respiration was elevated, but biomass production rates dropped dramatically; this community with low growth efficiency was dominated by Firmicutes (increased to 50.9%) and other anaerobic taxa. Human-associated bacteria, including the obligately anaerobic Bacteroides, were detected at high concentrations in soil throughout decomposition, up to 198 d postmortem. Our results revealed the pattern of functional and compositional succession

  19. Finite element model of the Jefferson fracture: comparison with a cadaver model

    OpenAIRE

    Bozkus, Hakan; Karakas, Askin; Hancı, Murat; Uzan, Mustafa; Bozdag, Ergun; Sarıoglu, Ali

    2001-01-01

    This study tries to explain the reason why the Jefferson fracture is a burst fracture, using two different biomechanical models: a finite element model (FEM) and a cadaver model used to determine strain distribution in C1 during axial static compressive loading. For the FEM model, a three-dimensional model of C1 was obtained from a 29-year-old healthy human, using axial CT scans with intervals of 1.0 mm. The mesh model was composed of 8200 four-noded isoparametric tetrahedrons and 37,400 soli...

  20. Rare anatomic variation of left gastric artery and right hepatic artery in a female cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupis, Theodore; Chatzikokolis, Stamatis; Zachariadis, Michael; Troupis, George; Anagnostopoulou, Sofia; Skandalakis, Panayiotis

    2008-05-01

    The present report describes a rare case in which the left gastric artery arises directly from the abdominal aorta and the right hepatic artery from the superior mesenteric artery, as observed during the dissection of a female cadaver. The left gastric artery usually rises as one of the three branches of the celiac trunk, which was originally described by Haller in 1756, whereas the right hepatic artery usually originates from the proper hepatic artery. The knowledge of the typical anatomy of the abdominal arteries, and their variations, is especially important due to the numerous interventions performed in the abdominal area.

  1. Bilateral Tensor Fasciae Suralis Muscles in a Cadaver with Unilateral Accessory Flexor Digitorum Longus Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan S. W. Bale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle variants are routinely encountered in the dissection laboratory and in clinical practice and therefore anatomists and clinicians need to be aware of their existence. Here we describe two different accessory muscles identified while performing educational dissection of a 51-year-old male cadaver. Tensor fasciae suralis, a rare muscle variant, was identified bilaterally and accessory flexor digitorum longus, a more common muscle variant, was present unilaterally. Tensor fasciae suralis and accessory flexor digitorum longus are clinically relevant muscle variants. To our knowledge, the coexistence of tensor fasciae suralis and accessory flexor digitorum longus in the same individual has not been reported in either cadaveric or imaging studies.

  2. Femtosecond laser subsurface scleral treatment in cadaver human sclera and evaluation using two-photon and confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Yan, Ying; Lian, Fuqiang; Kurtz, Ron; Juhasz, Tibor

    2016-03-01

    Glaucoma is the second-leading cause of blindness worldwide and is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Partial-thickness drainage channels can be created with femtosecond laser in the translucent sclera for the potential treatment of glaucoma. We demonstrate the creation of partial-thickness subsurface drainage channels with the femtosecond laser in the cadaver human eyeballs and describe the application of two-photon microscopy and confocal microscopy for noninvasive imaging of the femtosecond laser created partial-thickness scleral channels in cadaver human eyes. A femtosecond laser operating at a wavelength of 1700 nm was scanned along a rectangular raster pattern to create the partial thickness subsurface drainage channels in the sclera of cadaver human eyes. Analysis of the dimensions and location of these channels is important in understanding their effects. We describe the application of two-photon microscopy and confocal microscopy for noninvasive imaging of the femtosecond laser created partial-thickness scleral channels in cadaver human eyes. High-resolution images, hundreds of microns deep in the sclera, were obtained to allow determination of the shape and dimension of such partial thickness subsurface scleral channels. Our studies suggest that the confocal and two-photon microscopy can be used to investigate femtosecond-laser created partial-thickness drainage channels in the sclera of cadaver human eyes.

  3. Liver displacement during ventilation in Thiel embalmed human cadavers - a possible model for research and training in minimally invasive therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisma, Roos; Gueorguieva, Mariana; Immel, Erwin; Toomey, Rachel; McLeod, Graeme; Soames, Roger; Melzer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Respiration-related movement of organs is a complication in a range of diagnostic and interventional procedures. The development and validation of techniques to compensate for such movement requires appropriate models. Human cadavers embalmed with the Thiel method remain flexible and could provide a suitable model. In this study liver displacement during ventilation was assessed in eight Thiel embalmed cadavers, all of which showed thoracic and abdominal motion. Four cadavers displayed realistic lung behaviour, one showed some signs of pneumothorax after prolonged ventilation, one had limited filling of the lungs, and two displayed significant leakage of air into the thorax. A coronal slice containing the largest section through the liver was imaged with a real-time Fast Gradient Echo (FGR) MRI sequence: Craniocaudal displacement of the liver was then determined from a time-series of slices. The maximum liver displacement observed in the cadavers ranged from 7 to 35 mm. The ventilation applied was comparable to tidal breathing at rest and the results found for liver displacement are similar to values in the literature for respiratory motion of the liver under similar conditions. This indicates that Thiel embalmed cadavers have potential as a model for research and training in minimally invasive procedures.

  4. A pilot study to assess adductor canal catheter tip migration in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Jody C; Harrison, T Kyle; Miller, Brett; Howard, Steven K; Conroy, Myles; Udani, Ankeet; Shum, Cynthia; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-04-01

    An adductor canal catheter may facilitate early ambulation after total knee arthroplasty, but there is concern over preoperative placement since intraoperative migration of catheters may occur from surgical manipulation and result in ineffective analgesia. We hypothesized that catheter type and subcutaneous tunneling may influence tip migration for preoperatively inserted adductor canal catheters. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 20 catheter insertion trials were divided randomly into one of four groups: flexible epidural catheter either tunneled or not tunneled; or rigid stimulating catheter either tunneled or not tunneled. Intraoperative patient manipulation was simulated by five range-of-motion exercises of the knee. Distance and length measurements were performed by a blinded regional anesthesiologist. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.225) and length of catheter within the adductor canal (p = 0.467) were not different between the four groups. Two of five non-tunneled stimulating catheters (40 %) were dislodged compared to 0/5 in all other groups (p = 0.187). A cadaver model may be useful for assessing migration of regional anesthesia catheters; catheter type and subcutaneous tunneling may not affect migration of adductor canal catheters based on this preliminary study. However, future studies involving a larger sample size, actual patients, and other catheter types are warranted.

  5. A radiological evaluation of allografts (ethylene oxide sterilized cadaver bone and autografts in anterior cervical fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban J

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Serial roentgenograms of 40 patients who had 70 cervical intervertebral spaces grafted with ethylene oxide sterilized cadaver bone and 28 patients who received 44 iliac crest auto grafts for anterior cervical spine fusion, were studied. The radiological evaluation was made on the basis of settlement of intervertebral spaces, fusion rate, delayed union, non-union, graft collapse and extrusion of the graft. Indigenous methodologies were designed for the assessment of settlement of grafted intervertebral spaces in percentage. Disc space settlement was more common in autografts (93% cases than in allografts (80% cases. The average percentage of settlement of intervertebral disc space (S% was 22 in autografts and 28 in allografts during the first four months. By the end of eight months, allograft disc spaces settle more. No significant difference was noted in fusion rate at the end of one year viz. allografts (90% cases and autografts (93% cases. Autograft and allograft (ethylene oxide sterilized cadaver bone are equally useful in anterior cervical spine fusions.

  6. Comparison of reliability of five patellar position indices at various stifle joint angles in pelvic limbs obtained from cadavers of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James E; Nielsen, Dorte H; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2012-01-01

    To compare 5 patellar position indices at various stifle joint angles in cadavers of red foxes, determine measurement reliability, and assess the suitability of these indices for clinical use.......To compare 5 patellar position indices at various stifle joint angles in cadavers of red foxes, determine measurement reliability, and assess the suitability of these indices for clinical use....

  7. Insects (Diptera) associated with cadavers at the Institute of Legal Medicine in Pernambuco, Brazil: implications for forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tatiana Costa; Vasconcelos, Simao Dias

    2010-05-20

    Increasing rates of unsolved homicides in Brazil prompt the need for applied entomological data to be used as a complementary tool by criminal investigators. In that context, we analyzed the occurrence of forensically important insect species (Order Diptera) on 14 cadavers taken into the Institute of Legal Medicine (ILM), in Pernambuco, Brazil, according to the conditions of the body and the pattern of colonisation by insects. Simultaneously, we surveyed the diversity of insects in the surrounding environment using bait traps. Five species were present on cadavers: Chrysomya albiceps, Chrysomya megacephala and Cochliomyia macellaria (Calliphoridae), Oxysarcodexia riograndensis and Ravinia belforti (Sarcophagidae). A total of 4689 adult insects belonging to 24 species of seven dipteran families (Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, Phoridae, Anthomyiidae and Stratiomyidae) was collected at the ILM premises. C. albiceps was the most frequent species on the corpses and the most abundant in the traps. Species referred to as of forensic importance, such as Lucilia eximia, Chrysomya putoria, Oxysarcodexia modesta and Ophyra chalcogaster were collected on traps, but not on cadavers. There seems to be a limited colonisation of cadavers at the scene of the death, despite the ubiquity of necrophagous species in the area. The results contribute to differentiate between species that are involved in decomposition and those found in and around the mortuary installations of the ILM, thus providing potential clues about the locality of death and the post-mortem interval.

  8. Assessment of a Human Cadaver Model for Training Emergency Medicine Residents in the Ultrasound Diagnosis of Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikar Adhikari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess a human cadaver model for training emergency medicine residents in the ultrasound diagnosis of pneumothorax. Methods. Single-blinded observational study using a human cadaveric model at an academic medical center. Three lightly embalmed cadavers were used to create three “normal lungs” and three lungs modeling a “pneumothorax.” The residents were blinded to the side and number of pneumothoraces, as well as to each other’s findings. Each resident performed an ultrasound examination on all six lung models during ventilation of cadavers. They were evaluated on their ability to identify the presence or absence of the sliding-lung sign and seashore sign. Results. A total of 84 ultrasound examinations (42-“normal lung,” 42-“pneumothorax” were performed. A sliding-lung sign was accurately identified in 39 scans, and the seashore sign was accurately identified in 34 scans. The sensitivity and specificity for the sliding-lung sign were 93% (95% CI, 85–100% and 90% (95% CI, 81–99%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for the seashore sign were 80% (95% CI, 68–92% and 83% (95% CI, 72–94%, respectively. Conclusions. Lightly embalmed human cadavers may provide an excellent model for mimicking the sonographic appearance of pneumothorax.

  9. A Qualitative Assessment of Human Cadavers Embalmed by Thiel's Method Used in Laparoscopic Training for Renal Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Tang, Benjie; Eisma, Roos; Soames, Roger W.; Wen, Haitao; Nabi, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    Human cadaveric tissue is the fundamental substrate for basic anatomic and surgical skills training. A qualitative assessment of the use of human cadavers preserved by Thiel's method for a British Association of Urological Surgeons--approved, advanced laparoscopic renal resection skills training course is described in the present study. Four…

  10. Alignment of the femoral component in a mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty : A study in 10 cadaver femora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, N. P.; van Raay, J. J. A. M.; Thomassen, B. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Use of an intramedullary rod is advised for the alignment of the femoral component of an Oxford phase-III prosthesis. There are users moving toward extramedullary alignment, which is merely an indicator of frustration with accuracy of intramedullary alignment. The results of our study with 10 cadave

  11. How does a cadaver model work for testing ultrasound diagnostic capability for rheumatic-like tendon damage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janta, Iustina; Morán, Julio; Naredo, Esperanza;

    2016-01-01

    To establish whether a cadaver model can serve as an effective surrogate for the detection of tendon damage characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, we evaluated intraobserver and interobserver agreement in the grading of RA-like tendon tears shown by US, as well as the concordan...

  12. Examining High School Anatomy and Physiology Teacher Experience in a Cadaver Dissection Laboratory and Impacts on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheis, Allison; Ingram, Debra; Jensen, Murray S.; Jackson, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study that investigated the experiences of a group of high school anatomy and physiology teachers who participated in a cadaver dissection laboratory workshop organized through a university-school partnership. Teacher feedback was collected before, during, and after the workshop through pre-arrival surveys,…

  13. Foundations for a Lifetime: A Qualitative Inquiry into the Recollection, Reconstruction and Meaning-Making Process of Cadaver Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Michelle D.

    2013-01-01

    Cadaver dissection has been a central part of the education of medical professionals for centuries. Throughout that time, anatomists have claimed that dissection is a learning experience rich with life lessons encompassing more than simply gross anatomy. Yet, no published empirical data exist of the long-term impact that dissection has on medical…

  14. Hamstring tendon harvesting--Effect of harvester on tendon characteristics and soft tissue disruption; cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, C P; Alvi, F; Phaltankar, P; Gagey, O

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the type of hamstring tendon harvester used can influence harvested tendon characteristics and soft tissue disruption. We compared two different types of tendon harvesters with regard to the length of tendon obtained and soft tissue disruption during hamstring tendon harvesting. Thirty six semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were harvested using either a closed stripper or a blade harvester in 18 paired knees from nine human fresh cadavers. Use of the blade harvester gave longer lengths of usable tendon whilst minimising the stripping of muscle and of any non-usable tendon. Our results suggest that the type of harvester per se can influence the length of tendon harvested as well as soft tissue disruption. Requesting such data from the industry prior to deciding which harvester to use seems desirable.

  15. Unexpected motor axons in the distal superficial radial and posterior interosseous nerves: a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwueze, Martina I; Cardwell, Nancy L; Wolfort, Sean L; Nanney, Lillian B

    2007-10-01

    The prevalence of motor variations in the nerves supplying muscles of the first web space was evaluated by a visual dissection and immunohistochemical analysis from 56 cadaver hands. By microscopic visualization, 30% of the superficial radial nerves (SRNs) sent branches into muscles of the first web space. Since these unexpected penetrating branches were expected to be sensory or proprioceptive, markers of sensory and motor axons were used for confirmation. Positive identifications of motor axons (as identified by positive immunostaining for choline acetyltransferase) were made in 30% of SRNs and in 28.5% of posterior interosseous nerves. Classical teachings that the SRNs and PINs are exclusively sensory have been brought into question. Our data are in agreement with the rare clinical finding that motor function occasionally persists following devastating injury to both the ulnar and median nerves. Anatomic prevalence for this variation appears much higher than previous descriptions have indicated.

  16. Advertising cadavers in the republic of letters: anatomical publications in the early modern Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margócsy, Dániel

    2009-06-01

    This paper sketches how late seventeenth-century Dutch anatomists used printed publications to advertise their anatomical preparations, inventions and instructional technologies to an international clientele. It focuses on anatomists Frederik Ruysch (1638-1732) and Lodewijk de Bils (1624-69), inventors of two separate anatomical preparation methods for preserving cadavers and body parts in a lifelike state for decades or centuries. Ruysch's and de Bils's publications functioned as an 'advertisement' for their preparations. These printed volumes informed potential customers that anatomical preparations were aesthetically pleasing and scientifically important but did not divulge the trade secrets of the method of production. Thanks to this strategy of non-disclosure and advertisement, de Bils and Ruysch could create a well-working monopoly market of anatomical preparations. The 'advertising' rhetorics of anatomical publications highlight the potential dangers of equating the growth of print culture with the development of an open system of knowledge exchange.

  17. Researching the effect of the practical applications performed with cadaver dissection and anatomical models on anatomy education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Sabancıoğulları

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most important element in providing good quality of healthcare is well training of healthcare staff, particularly doctors. The way of being a good and successful healthcare staff is to learn the human anatomy accurately and permanently. Practical applications as well as theoretical courses are also highly important in learning human anatomy. In classical anatomy education, using cadaver is accepted to be indispensable. However, along with the new medical faculties, there has been an increase in the shortage of cadaver, and anatomy practices have mainly begun to be carried out on models or mock-ups. Therefore, we aimed to study with anatomic models in practical applications and to research the effect of cadaver dissection on learning anatomy. Method: In this study including 120-second grade students that their achievement levels are close together and participating in the theoretical courses of anatomy in medical faculty during 2015 – 2016 academic year. To realize this, students were divided into four groups (1st group were include students only listening to theoretical course, 2nd group theoretical course and performing application with anatomic models, 3rd group theoretical course and performing application with cadaver dissection, and 4th group theoretical course and performing application with anatomic models and cadaver dissection of 30 people. Degree of students’ understanding the subject was detected with written and practical exams consists of 10 questions after the theoretical and practical courses on each committee. The resulting data are loaded to SPSS 22.0 software and statistical evaluation One-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, chi-square test was used. Results: The average of students who practice on both models and cadavers were statistically significant (p 0.05. Conclusions: The results obtained from our study indicate that anatomy practical training is carried out with the dissection of cadavers that made it easier to

  18. Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy with central neck dissection:experimental studies on human cadavers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Peiyi; Tang Zhiping; Ding Zihai; Chu Guoliang; Yao Huosheng; Pan Tao; Wang Huaqiao

    2014-01-01

    Background With the development of natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery,studies on transoral video-assisted thymidectomy in preclinical experiments (e.g.,human anatomy and animal trials) were progressing gradually.From 2009 to 2011,embalmed human cadavers were dissected to define the anatomical location,surgical planes,and related neural and vascular structures to create a safe transoral access to the front cervical spaces.Recently,experimental transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy was performed to verify the feasibility of this approach on 15 fresh specimens.Methods Fifteen specimens were placed in the supine position with slight neck extension.Endoscopic incision was made on the midline between the Wharton's duct papillae and two other incisions were made on mandibular first premolar buccal mucosa.Sublingual combined bilateral vestibular tunnels were created from oral cavity to the cervical region.The neck subplatysmal working space was insufflated with CO2 at 6-8 mmHg.The bilateral thyroid lobes and central lymph nodes were dissected under craniocaudal view.Results Three incisions were made in the oral cavity without any incisions on the body surfaces.The distance from the oral cavity to front neck region was the shortest.Bilateral thyroid lobes and central neck region were fully resected via transoral approach.This approach provided a craniocaudal view,in which retrosternal thyroid gland and lymph nodes were easily accessible.The recurrent laryngeal nerve could be identified safely on the inferior cornu of the thyroid cartilage.The only structure at risk was the mental nerve.Camera motion was somewhat limited by the maxillary dentition.The volume of harvested thyroid nodule through sublingual tunnel in the fifteen human cadavers was (40±15) cm3.Conclusion The transoral procedure is progressive and innovative which not only gives the best cosmetic result and minimal access trauma but also provides a craniocaudal view.

  19. Validation of alternate light sources for detection of bruises in non-embalmed and embalmed cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Kelly; Byard, Roger W; Winskog, Calle; Langlois, Neil E I

    2017-03-01

    Bruising is frequently documented in cases of violence for use as forensic evidence. However, bruises can be overlooked if they are not visible to the naked eye. Alternate light sources such as ultraviolet, narrow band, and infrared have been used in an attempt to reveal the presence of bruising that is not otherwise apparent. However, there is a significant gap in knowledge surrounding this technique as it has not been validated against histology to confirm that bruising is genuinely being enhanced. A recent study evaluated the ability of alternate light sources to enhance visibility of bruises using a pigskin model. However, histological confirmation of bruising in humans using these light sources has not yet been performed. In this study, embalmed and non-embalmed human cadavers were used. Bodies were surveyed with alternate light sources, and enhanced regions that were unapparent under white light were photographed with the alternate light sources and sampled for histological assessment. Immunohistochemical staining for the red blood cell surface protein glycophorin was used determine if the enhanced area was a bruise (defined by the presence of extravasated erythrocytes). Photographs of areas confirmed to be bruises were analyzed using the program Fiji to measure enhancement, which was defined as an increase in the measured transverse diameter. In the non-embalmed and the embalmed cadavers violet alternate light produced the greatest enhancement of histologically confirmed bruises, followed by blue (both p light sources may not be specific. This suggests that the use of light sources to enhance the visibility of bruising should be undertaken with caution and further studies are required.

  20. Effect of histologic processing on dimensions of skin samples obtained from cat cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, Sakthila; Smith, Annette N; Schleis, Stephanie E; Cattley, Russell C; Tillson, D Michael; Henderson, Ralph A

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine changes in dimensions of feline skin samples as a result of histologic processing and to identify factors that contributed to changes in dimensions of skin samples after sample collection. SAMPLE Cadavers of 12 clinically normal cats. PROCEDURES Skin samples were obtained bilaterally from 3 locations (neck, thorax, and tibia) of each cadaver; half of the thoracic samples included underlying muscle. Length, width, and depth were measured at 5 time points (before excision, after excision, after application of ink to mark tissue margins, after fixation in neutral-buffered 10% formalin for 36 hours, and after completion of histologic processing and staining with H&E stain). Measurements obtained after sample collection were compared with measurements obtained before excision. RESULTS At the final time point, tissue samples had decreased in length (mean decrease, 32.40%) and width (mean decrease, 34.21%) and increased in depth (mean increase, 54.95%). Tissue from the tibia had the most shrinkage in length and width and that from the neck had the least shrinkage. Inclusion of underlying muscle on thoracic skin samples did not affect the degree of change in dimensions. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, each step during processing from excision to formalin fixation and histologic processing induced changes in tissue dimensions, which were manifested principally as shrinkage in length and width and increase in depth. Most of the changes occured during histologic processing. Inclusion of muscle did not affect thoracic skin shrinkage. Shrinkage should be a consideration when interpreting surgical margins in clinical cases. 945).

  1. Cardiac mortality is associated with low levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the heart of cadavers with a history of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattipakorn, Nipon; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Petsophonsakul, Petnoi; Suwannahoi, Padiphat; Mahakranukrauh, Pasuk; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2009-10-01

    The benefits of omega-3 (ie, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) and omega-6 (ie, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid [AA]) fatty acids on reducing cardiac mortality are still debated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues are associated with low cardiac mortality in Thai cadavers. One hundred fresh cadavers were examined in this study. The cause of death, history of coronary heart disease (CHD), and fish consumption habits were obtained from death certificates, cadaver medical record profiles, and a questionnaire to a person who lived with the subject before death. In each cadaver, biopsies of cardiac tissues were taken from the interventricular septum for measurement of fatty acid. Of the 100 cadavers (average age, 69 +/- 13 years), 60 were men. The frequency of fish consumption was directly associated with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in heart tissues (P fatty acids. However, in cadavers with a history of CHD, high levels of omega-3 and omega-6, particularly DHA and AA, were associated with low cardiac mortality (P fatty acids in heart tissues. Although omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are not associated with cardiac mortality in the overall studied population, their low levels (especially DHA and AA) in heart tissues are associated with high cardiac mortality in cadavers with a history of CHD.

  2. The attraction of virgin female hide beetles (Dermestes maculatus to cadavers by a combination of decomposition odour and male sex pheromones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Hoermann Christian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The hide beetle Dermestes maculatus (Coleoptera: Dermestidae feeds as an adult and larva on decomposing animal remains and can also be found on human corpses. Therefore, forensic entomological questions with regard to when and how the first receptive females appear on carcasses are important, as the developmental stages of their larvae can be used to calculate the post-mortem interval. To date, we know that freshly emerged males respond to the cadaver odour of post-bloated carcasses (approximately 9 days after death at Tmean = 27°C, being attracted by benzyl butyrate. This component occurs at its highest concentration at this stage of decay. The aim of our study was to determine the principle of attraction of virgin females to the feeding and breeding substrate. For this purpose, we tested the response of these females to headspace samples of piglet cadavers and male sex pheromones [(Z9-unsaturated fatty acid isopropyl esters] in a Y-olfactometer. Because we expected that such an odour combination is of importance for virgin female attraction, we tested the following two questions: 1 Are virgin female hide beetles attracted by a combination of cadaver odour and male sex pheromones? 2 During which decomposition stage do the first virgin females respond to cadaver odour when combined with male sex pheromones? Results We found that young virgin females were attracted to the cadaver by a combination of cadaver odour and male sex pheromones. Neither cadaver odour alone nor male sex pheromones alone was significantly more attractive than a solvent control. Our results also gave a weak indication that the first young virgin females respond as early as the post-bloating stage to its associated decomposition odour when combined with male sex pheromones. Conclusions Our results indicate that freshly emerged males possibly respond to cadaver odour and visit carcasses before virgin females. Being attracted to cadavers when male sex

  3. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% − 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling

  4. Biportal neuroendoscopic microsurgical approaches to the subarachnoid cisterns. A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, G; Reisch, R

    1996-12-01

    A preclinical cadaver study was performed to develop the technique of biportal neuroendoscopic dissection in the subarachnoid space of the basal cisterns and to test the feasibility, utility, and safety of this new technique. In 23 fresh post-mortem adult human cadavers and 2 formalin-fixed adult human head specimen a total of 33 biportal endomicrosurgical dissections into and within the basal cisterns were carried out. Following suction of cerebrospinal fluid from the subarachnoid space 0 degree-, 30 degrees-, and 70 degrees-lens-scopes (Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany) with outer diameters of 4.2 mm and trochars with outer diameters of 5 to 6.5 mm were introduced into the surgical field. 6 different endoscopic routes to the basal cisterns and a total of 10 different combinations of these approaches for biportal endoneurosurgery could be described, but it was found that not all of them were useful and safe. The transventricular approach to the prepontine cisterns through the foramen of Monro and the floor of the third ventricle, biportally combined with a subfrontal or a subtemporal approach, turned out to be not safe enough as it was accompanied by traumatization of the fornix at the interventricular foramen and of the hypothalamus at the level of the tuber cinereum due to relaxation and caudal shift of the brain following suction of cerebrospinal fluid to clear the basal cisterns for the subfrontal or subtemporal approaches. Useful and safe endomicrosurgical approaches to the basal cisterns were: 1st subfrontal, either epidural or intradural, 2nd subtemporal, either anterior or posterior, and 3rd frontal interhemispheric. Various biportal combinations of these approaches are estimated to be feasible, useful, and safe enough to be performed during microsurgical procedures in the operating room. The biportal endomicrosurgical strategy allows for effective and safe dissections within the subarachnoid spaces of the basal cisterns. The tip of the microinstruments as

  5. Effects of human hair on trans-cranial focused ultrasound efficacy in an ex-vivo cadaver model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hananel, Arik; Snell, John W.; Kassell, Neal F.; Eames, Matthew D. C.

    2012-11-01

    Current practice before a trans-cranial MR guided Focused ultrasound procedure is shaving the patient head on treatment day. Here we present an initial attempt to evaluate the feasibility of trans-cranial FUS, in an unshaved, ex-vivo cadaver skull. We have sonicated using 220kHz and 710kHz head transducers, a cadaver skull filled with tissue mimicking phantom and covered with a wig made of human hair to evaluate feasibility of acoustic energy transfer in a full size model. Heating at focal point was measured using MR proton resonance shift thermometry. Results showed negligible effect of hair in 220kHz, and an 18% drop in temperature elevation when using 710kHz.

  6. Facilitating appreciation of anatomical variation and development of teamwork skills in the gross anatomy laboratory using a cadaver reassignment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprunger, Leslie K

    2008-01-01

    Developing a mental map of the body in three dimensions incorporating normal anatomical variations is a challenge for students of gross anatomy. Acquisition of this ability is facilitated by frequently reassigning students to work on different specimens in gross anatomy laboratories, a significant departure from traditional teaching strategies. This article analyzes student and faculty experiences with a reassignment system over a six-year period, including effects on early professional development and students' attitudes toward the cadavers. Students were strongly supportive of the method, noting that specimen reassignments facilitated learning, encouraged dissection skill building, and fostered collaborative interactions. Students' perception of the value of the contribution of each cadaver to their education was preserved and, for many, enhanced. Frequent specimen reassignments offer an opportunity to model public accountability for work and some aspects of the relationships between multiple health care teams caring for a patient.

  7. Tendons in the plantar aspect of the foot: MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Rodrigo [University of California San Diego, Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Fleury Medical Center, Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, Rodrigo; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this anatomic imaging study was to illustrate the normal complex anatomy of tendons of the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with anatomic correlation in cadavers. Seven fresh cadaveric feet (obtained and used according to institutional guidelines, with informed consent from relatives of the deceased) were studied with intermediate-weighted fast-spin-echo MR imaging. For anatomic analysis, cadaveric specimens were sectioned in 3-mm-thick slices in the coronal and axial planes that approximated the sections acquired at MR imaging. The entire courses of the tendons into the plantar aspect of the foot were analyzed. The tibialis posterior tendon has a complex distal insertion. The insertions in the navicular, second, and third cuneiforms bones were identify in all cases using axial and coronal planes. A tendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons was identified in five of our specimens (71%). The coronal plane provided the best evaluation. The peroneus longus tendon changes its direction at three points then obliquely crosses the sole and inserts in the base of the first metatarsal bone and the plantar aspect of the first cuneiform. MR imaging provides detailed information about the anatomy of tendons in the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot. It allows analysis of their insertions and the intertendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons. (orig.)

  8. An anatomically shaped lower body model for CT scanning of cadaver femurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanck, Esther; Deenen, J C W; Verdonschot, Nico [Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Huisman, Henk Jan [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kooloos, Jan G [Department of Anatomy, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Huizenga, Henk [Department of Radiotherapy, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: e.tanck@orthop.umcn.nl

    2010-01-21

    Bone specific, CT-based finite element (FE) analyses have great potential to accurately predict the fracture risk of deteriorated bones. However, it has been shown that differences exist between FE-models of femora scanned in a water basin or scanned in situ within the human body, as caused by differences in measured bone mineral densities (BMD). In this study we hypothesized that these differences can be reduced by re-creating the patient CT-conditions by using an anatomically shaped physical model of the lower body. BMD distributions were obtained from four different femora that were scanned under three conditions: (1) in situ within the cadaver body, (2) in a water basin and (3) in the body model. The BMD of the three scanning protocols were compared at two locations: proximally, in the trabecular bone of the femoral head, and in the cortical bone of the femoral shaft. Proximally, no significant differences in BMD were found between the in situ scans and the scans in the body model, whereas the densities from the water basin scans were on average 10.8% lower than in situ. In the femoral shaft the differences between the three scanning protocols were insignificant. In conclusion, the body model better approached the in situ situation than a water basin. Future studies can use this body model to mimic patient situations and to develop protocols to improve the performance of the FE-models in actual patients. (note)

  9. Structure and per-rectal ultrasonography of prostatic disease using cadaver specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D R; Griffiths, G J; Parkinson, M C; Evans, K T; Roberts, E E; Davies, R L; Harrison, T J; Peeling, W B

    1989-12-01

    One hundred cadaver prostates were examined by per-rectal ultrasound and the findings correlated with the microradiographic and histopathological features of whole sections taken at the levels of scanning. The normal gland consists of both periurethral muscle and glands. The periurethral muscle has little structure on microradiography and is therefore hypoechoic (low amplitude echoes) on ultrasound scanning. The gland itself, both central and peripheral zones, has a lattice appearance on microradiography (reticular structure) and therefore produces mid-range amplitude echoes on ultrasound. Benign hypertrophy develops at the edge of the periurethral muscle and is microadenomatous in structure. This produces mid-range amplitude echoes which are coarser than in the normal gland. Associated calcification has a characteristic distribution around the adenomas. Cancer produces an amorphous structure resulting in loss of ultrasonic echoes (hypoechoic). In a few cancers irregular calcification is present, resulting in high echoes in the ultrasound scan (hyperechoic) which are not in the typical benign distribution. The internal structure of the prostate was therefore demonstrated in its histopathological states by the technique of microradiography and seen to relate to its representation by ultrasound.

  10. Dynamic tensile failure mechanics of the musculoskeletal neck using a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yliniemi, Eno M; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Doczy, Erica J; Nuckley, David J; Perry, Chris E; Ching, Randal P

    2009-05-01

    Although the catapult phase of pilot ejections has been well characterized in terms of human response to compressive forces, the effect of the forces on the human body during the ensuing ejection phases (including windblast and parachute opening shock) has not been thoroughly investigated. Both windblast and parachute opening shock have been shown to induce dynamic tensile forces in the human cervical spine. However, the human tolerance to such loading is not well known. Therefore, the main objective of this research project was to measure human tensile neck failure mechanics to provide data for computational modeling, anthropometric test device development, and improved tensile injury criteria. Twelve human cadaver specimens, including four females and eight males with a mean age of 50.1+/-9 years, were subjected to dynamic tensile loading through the musculoskeletal neck until failure occurred. Failure load, failure strain, and tensile stiffness were measured and correlated with injury type and location. The mean failure load for the 12 specimens was 3100+/-645 N, mean failure strain was 16.7+/-5.4%, and mean tensile stiffness was 172+/-54.5 N/mm. The majority of injuries (8) occurred in the upper cervical spine (Oc-C3), and none took place in the midcervical region (C3-C5). The results of this study assist in filling the existing void in dynamic tensile injury data and will aid in developing improved neck injury prevention strategies.

  11. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de Gusmão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. CONCLUSIONS: The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency.

  12. BILATERAL PRESENTATION OF TENSOR FASCIA SURALIS MUSCLE IN A MALE CADAVER: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum Rajendra Gandhi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tensor fascia suralis muscle is an anomalous muscle located in popliteal fossa. The muscle may arise from any of the hamstring muscles and is inserted into the crural fascia or tendoclacaneus. We found tensor fascia suralis muscle in a male cadaver taking origin from medial side of tendon of biceps femoris muscle. The tendinous origin was then transformed into a well defined fusiform belly in the roof of popliteal fossa. After traversing downwards and medially the muscle again became tendinous to get inserted into deep fascia of leg. Bilateral presentation of the anomalous muscle is not yet documented in literature. The anatomical relation of the muscle explains its great clinical importance. The tendinous origin was anteriorly related to sciatic nerve and the muscle belly to the tibial nerve. Sural nerve and short saphenous vein were in lateral relation to the muscle. Contraction of muscle in the roof of popliteal fossa may lead to sciatic, tibial or sural nerve neuropathy. The muscle can confuse the physician of a soft tissue mass or an aberrant vessel. Hence, the bilateral presence of tensor fascia suralis muscle is documented for further references. Clinical Significance: The precise knowledge of anatomy of popliteal region is mandatory for the surgeons to perform safe and uncomplicated surgery in and around popliteal fossa and also for radiologist for correct radiographic interpretations.

  13. Soil fungal community shift evaluation as a potential cadaver decomposition indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimutsa, Monica; Olakanye, Ayodeji O; Thompson, Tim J U; Ralebitso-Senior, T Komang

    2015-12-01

    Fungi metabolise organic matter in situ and so alter both the bio-/physico-chemical properties and microbial community structure of the ecosystem. In particular, they are responsible reportedly for specific stages of decomposition. Therefore, this study aimed to extend previous bacteria-based forensic ecogenomics research by investigating soil fungal community and cadaver decomposition interactions in microcosms with garden soil (20 kg, fresh weight) and domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) carcass (5 kg, leg). Soil samples were collected at depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-30 cm on days 3, 28 and 77 in the absence (control -Pg) and presence (experimental +Pg) of Sus scrofa domesticus and used for total DNA extraction and nested polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) profiling of the 18S rRNA gene. The Shannon-Wiener (H') community diversity indices were 1.25±0.21 and 1.49±0.30 for the control and experimental microcosms, respectively, while comparable Simpson species dominance (S) values were 0.65±0.109 and 0.75±0.015. Generally, and in contrast to parallel studies of the bacterial 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA profiles, statistical analysis (t-test) of the 18S dynamics showed no mathematically significant shifts in fungal community diversity (H'; p=0.142) and dominance (S; p=0.392) during carcass decomposition, necessitating further investigations.

  14. Alfuzosin hydrochloride transdermal films: evaluation of physicochemical, in vitro human cadaver skin permeation and thermodynamic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanarayan Pattnaik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of the investigation was to develop a transdermal therapeutic system for alfuzosin hydrochloride and to study the effects of polymeric system and loading dose on the in vitro skin permeation pattern. Materials and methods: Principles of experimental design have been exploited to develop the dosage form. Ratio of ethyl cellulose (EC and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP and loading dose were selected as independent variables and their influence on the cumulative amount of alfuzosin hydrochloride permeated per cm2 of human cadaver skin at 24 h (Q24, permeation flux (J and steady state permeability coefficient (P SS were studied using experimental design. Various physicochemical parameters of the transdermal films were also evaluated. Activation energy for in vitro transdermal permeation has been estimated. Results: Ratio of EC and PVP was found to be the main influential factor for all the dependent variables studied. Drug loading dose was also found to influence the dependent variables but to a lesser extent. Physicochemical parameters of the prepared films were evaluated and found satisfactory. Activation energy for alfuzosin permeation has also been estimated and reported. Conclusion: The therapeutic system was found to be dermatologically non-irritant and hence, a therapeutically effective amount of alfuzosin hydrochloride can be delivered via a transdermal route.

  15. Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by means of tibial tunnel: anatomical study on cadavers for tunnel positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Altenor Bessa de Queiroz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To determine the reference points for the exit of the tibial guidewire in relation to the posterior cortical bone of the tibia.Methods:Sixteen knees from fresh cadavers were used for this study. Using a viewing device and a guide marked out in millimeters, three guidewires were passed through the tibia at 0, 10 and 15 mm distally in relation to the posterior crest of the tibia. Dissections were performed and the region of the center of the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL was determined in each knee. The distances between the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL and the posterior tibial border (CB and between the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL and wires 1, 2 and 3 (CW1, CW2 and CW3 were measured.Results:In the dissected knees, we found the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL at 1.09 ± 0.06 cm from the posterior tibial border. The distances between the wires 1, 2 and 3 and the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL were respectively 1.01 ± 0.08, 0.09 ± 0.05 and 0.5 ± 0.05 cm.Conclusion:The guidewire exit point 10 mm distal in relation to the posterior crest of the tibia was the best position for attempting to reproduce the anatomical center of the PCL.

  16. Ultrasound-guided surgical treatment for ulnar nerve entrapment: a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poujade, T; Hanouz, N; Lecoq, B; Hulet, C; Collon, S

    2014-09-01

    Several open and endoscopic techniques for the surgical treatment of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow (cubital tunnel syndrome) have been described that provide decompression with or without anterior transposition. Based on our experience with US-guided decompression for carpal tunnel syndrome in our department, we developed a similar surgical technique for the decompression of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. Using sixteen cadaver upper limbs, we performed decompression of all the structures possibly responsible for ulnar nerve compression at the elbow. The structures involved were Struthers' arcade, the cubital tunnel retinaculum, Osborne's fascia and Amadio-Beckenbaugh's arcade. The procedure was followed by anatomical dissection to confirm complete sectioning of the compressive structures, absence of iatrogenic vascular or nervous injuries and absence of nerve dislocation or instability. There were no remaining compressive structures after the release procedure. There was no iatrogenic damage to the nerves and no nerve dislocation was observed during elbow flexion or extension. In 3.4% cases, a thin superficial layer of one or more of the identified structures remained but these did not appear to compress the nerve based on US imaging. Using ultrasonographic visualization of the nerve and compressive structures is easy. Each procedure can be tailored according to the nerve compression sites. Our cadaveric study shows the feasibility of an US-guided percutaneous surgical release for ulnar nerve entrapment.

  17. A CASE REPORT OF MULTIPLE ARTERIAL ANOMALIES IN A CADAVE R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbumani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During routine dissection in our department, multiple arterial variations were observed in a cadaver. The following arterial variations are present. They are, superficial brachioulnar artery, which originated at the level of junction of upper and middle th ird of arm. It runs a superficial course anterior to median nerve in the arm and terminates in the formation of superficial palmar arch. The brachial artery terminated as radial and common interosseous artery. Subscapular artery and circumflex humeral arte ry arose as a common trunk from the third part of axillary artery. The circumflex humeral artery later divides into anterior circumflex humeral and posterior circumflex humeral arteries. The right common carotid artery bifurcated into internal carotid arte ry anteromedially and external carotid artery posterolaterally at the level of upper lamin a of th yroid cartilage. A proper knowledge of variations in the arterial pattern is a must for a good treatment outcome, especially in the fields like vascular surge ry, reconstructive surgery, cardiac surgery, angiogram, arterial cannulation, arterio - venous fistula for renal dialysis. etc.

  18. Precise and feasible measurements of lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies by radiostereometric analysis in cadaver feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinkevich, P.; Rahbek, O.; Møller-Madsen, B.; Søballe, K.; Stilling, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lengthening osteotomies of the calcaneus in children are in general grafted with bone from the iliac crest. Artificial bone grafts have been introduced, however, their structural and clinical durability has not been documented. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) is a very accurate and precise method for measurements of rigid body movements including the evaluation of joint implant and fracture stability, however, RSA has not previously been used in clinical studies of calcaneal osteotomies. We assessed the precision of RSA as a measurement tool in a lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomy (LCLO). Methods LCLO was performed in six fixed adult cadaver feet. Tantalum markers were inserted on each side of the osteotomy and in the cuboideum. Lengthening was done with a plexiglas wedge. A total of 24 radiological double examinations were obtained. Two feet were excluded due to loose and poorly dispersed markers. Precision was assessed as systematic bias and 95% repeatability limits. Results Systematic bias was generally below 0.10 mm for translations. Precision of migration measurements was below 0.2 mm for translations in the osteotomy. Conclusion RSA is a precise tool for the evaluation of stability in LCLO. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:78–83. PMID:25957380

  19. da Vinci robot-assisted keyhole neurosurgery: a cadaver study on feasibility and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this cadaver study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of da Vinci robot-assisted keyhole neurosurgery. Several keyhole craniotomies were fashioned including supraorbital subfrontal, retrosigmoid and supracerebellar infratentorial. In each case, a simple durotomy was performed, and the flap was retracted. The da Vinci surgical system was then used to perform arachnoid dissection towards the deep-seated intracranial cisterns. It was not possible to simultaneously pass the 12-mm endoscope and instruments through the keyhole craniotomy in any of the approaches performed, limiting visualization. The articulated instruments provided greater dexterity than existing tools, but the instrument arms could not be placed in parallel through the keyhole craniotomy and, therefore, could not be advanced to the deep cisterns without significant clashing. The da Vinci console offered considerable ergonomic advantages over the existing operating room arrangement, allowing the operating surgeon to remain non-sterile and seated comfortably throughout the procedure. However, the lack of haptic feedback was a notable limitation. In conclusion, while robotic platforms have the potential to greatly enhance the performance of transcranial approaches, there is strong justification for research into next-generation robots, better suited to keyhole neurosurgery.

  20. Penetration profile and human cadaver skin distribution of finasteride from vesicular nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zheng, Feiyue; Liang, Xingguang; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Jin; Lu, Xiaoyang

    2015-12-01

    The skin accumulation of therapeutic agents affects the efficiency of topical drug delivery. In this study, in vitro distribution of finasteride of ethosomes and liposomes in human cadaver skin after percutaneous delivery were investigated. Experiments were performed using modified Franz diffusion cells. Finasteride ethosomes, liposomes or hydroethanolic solutions were used as donor medium. Drug distribution at different skin layers and depths were studied by hotplate separation and frozen horizontal slicing technique. The result showed that the accumulation of finasteride in skin ranged from 9.7-24.3 μg/cm(2) at 12 or 24 hours. The ethosomes demonstrated better enhancing ability to deliver finasteride into the dermis layer than liposomes did. The finasteride concentration in the dermis layer from ethosomes was more than sevenfold higher than from liposomes. The finasteride accumulation in ethosomes group showed a distinctive reversed distribution profile. This distinctive reversed distribution profile is meaningful for exerting a favorable pharmacological effect for finasteride. The drug distribution profile in skin layers showed no significant difference between 12 and 24 hours application (p > 0.05). The study demonstrated that finasteride can be accumulated at target site more effectively and maintained at higher level through the application of novel ethosomal carriers.

  1. Bilateral femoral hernia in a male cadaver with vascular variations: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsis, K; Totlis, T; Papadopoulou, A L; Apostolidis, S; Skandalakis, P

    2006-08-01

    Femoral hernia, which is a less common occurrence than inguinal hernia, is not congenital in most cases and is uncommon in young males. It is considered to be more common in females than in males due to an enlarged femoral ring in the former. A case of bilateral femoral hernia in a 64-year-old male cadaver is described within the framework of an anatomical approach. On the right side, the protrusion of the viscus appeared as a small intestine coil, whereas on the left side the protruded viscus appeared as a pelvic colon's appendix appiplocae. On both sides, the protruded viscus was located in front of an aberrant obturator artery, which oriented from the external iliac artery and not from the internal iliac artery as should be the case. The puberal branch of the inferior epigastric artery was absent. The cadaver's medical history and his skin examination excluded an abdominal surgery. In the literature, case reports of bilateral femoral hernia appear only seldom, especially those of male patients who had not undergone inguinal hernia repair surgery. In femoral hernias more often than in other types of hernia, the protruded viscus is strangulated and undergoes a tissue necrosis. Morbidity and mortality for complicated femoral hernia is high. Knowledge of vascular variation such as presented by the cadaver under study is extremely useful to the surgeon because any iatrogenic injury of the aberrant obturator artery during a laparoscopic repair may result in dangerous hemorrhage.

  2. Subaxial cervical pedicle screw insertion with newly defined entry point and trajectory: accuracy evaluation in cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiujun; Chaudhari, Rahul; Wu, Chunhui; Mehbod, Amir A; Transfeldt, Ensor E

    2010-01-01

    Successful placement of cervical pedicle screws requires accurate identification of both entry point and trajectory. However, literature has not provided consistent recommendations regarding the direction of pedicle screw insertion and entry point location. The objective of this study was to define a guideline regarding the optimal entry point and trajectory in placing subaxial cervical pedicle screws and to evaluate the screw accuracy in cadaver cervical spines. The guideline for entry point and trajectory for each vertebra was established based on the recently published morphometric data. Six fresh frozen cervical spines (C3-C7) were used. There were two men and four women. After posterior exposure, the entry point was determined and the cortical bone of the entry point was removed using a 2-mm burr. Pilot holes were created with a cervical probe based on the guideline using fluoroscopy. After tapping, 3.5-mm screws with appropriate length were inserted. After screw insertion, every vertebra was dissected and inspected for pedicle breach. The pedicle width, height, pedicle transverse angulation and actual screw insertion angle were measured. A total of 60 pedicle screws were inserted. No statistical difference in pedicle width and height was found between the left and right sides for each level. The overall accuracy of pedicle screws was 83.3%. The remaining 13.3% screws had noncritical breach, and 3.3% had critical breach. The critical breach was not caused by the guideline. There was no statistical difference between the pedicle transverse angulation and the actual screw trajectory created using the guideline. There was statistical difference in pedicle width between the breach and non-breach screws. In conclusion, high success rate of subaxial cervical pedicle screw placement can be achieved using the recently proposed operative guideline and oblique views of fluoroscopy. However, careful preoperative planning and good surgical skills are still required to

  3. Anatomic variations of superficial peroneal nerve: clinical implications of a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash; Bhardwaj, Ajay Kumar; Singh, Deepak Kumar; Rajini, T; Jayanthi, V; Singh, Gajendra

    2010-01-01

    Superficial peroneal nerve and its branches are frequently at risk for iatrogenic damage. Although different studies on anatomical variations of superficial peroneal nerve are available in the medical literature, such reports are rare from India. Hence the present study was undertaken on Indian population. A total of 60 specimens of inferior extremities from 30 properly embalmed and formalin fixed cadavers were dissected and examined for the location and course of the superficial peroneal nerve including number, level, course and distributions of branches. The superficial peroneal nerve in 28.3% specimens was located in the anterior compartment of the leg. In 8.3% specimens the superficial peroneal nerve branched before piercing between the peroneus longus and extensor digitorum longus muscle whereas in 11.7% specimens it branched after piercing the aforementioned muscles and before piercing the deep fascia. In 41 out of 60 specimens the sensory division of superficial peroneal nerve branched into the medial dorsal cutaneous nerve and intermediate dorsal cutaneous nerve distal to its emergence from the deep fascia and proximal to its relation to the extensor retinaculum. In 20 out of 60 specimens the accessory deep peroneal nerve, an additional branch from the sensory division of superficial peroneal nerve, through its course in the anterior compartment of the leg passed deep to the extensor retinaculum and supplied the ankle and the dorsum of foot. Hopefully the present study will help in minimizing iatrogenic damage to the superficial peroneal nerve and its branches while performing arthroscopy, local anesthetic block, surgical approach to the fibula, open reduction and internal fixation of lateral malleolar fractures, application of external fixators, elevation of a fasciocutaneous or fibular flaps for grafting, surgical decompression of neurovascular structures, or miscellaneous surgery on leg, foot and ankle.

  4. Feasibility of arthroscopic placement of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis grafts in the cadaver hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Thorey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An assortment of clinical trials have been done presenting the effectiveness of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC for the regeneration of chondral leasions. The purpose of the study was to underline the accessability of the acetabulum and the femoral head through the known portals and prove i the feasibility of placing the AMIC in the different zones of the hip joint and ii check for dislocation after joint movement. Six human cadavers underwent hip arthroscopy on both hips. Two chondral lesions were set on each femoral head and two in the acetabulum to evaluate a total of 48 defects. After microfracturing an autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis graft was placed on these lesions arthroscopically. After repeated joint movement the dislocation of the graft was checked. It was possible to place the AMIC graft in all 48 chondral lesions. The time needed for placing the graft was 8±2.9 minutes. A trend of time reduction could be detected throughout this study as the surgeon gained more experience. For the femoral head, after twenty cycles of joint movement 18/24 spots showed no displacement, 4/24 showed minor displacement (<3 mm and 2/24 showed major displacement (>3 mm. None showed total displacement. For the acetabulum 22/24 spots showed no displacement and 2/24 showed minor displacement. A combined microfracturing and placing of an AMIC graft of focal chondral lesions of the hip joint can be done arthroscopically. Prospective randomized in vivo studies should compare the results of arthroscopilally placed AMIC grafts with microfracturing and microfracturing alone.

  5. STUDY OF PROFUNDA FEMORIS ARTERY OF HUMAN CADAVERS IN RAJKOT CITY, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip R. Chauhan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profunda femoris artery is the major branch of the femoral artery. It is at critical place in relation to femoral artery for various interventions. Aim: To study the origin of profunda femoris artery. And to compare the cross sectional area of profunda femoris artery between right and left limbs. Material and methods: In this cross sectional study, 51 human femoral triangles from 26 (18 male and 08 female human cadavers in P.D.U. Government Medical College, Rajkot were dissected and studied during regular dissection classes. Site of origin of profunda femoris artery was noted in relation to femoral artery. The distance of origin of profunda femoris artery from the midpoint of inguinal point was measured and noted. Circumference of profunda femoris artery at the level of origin was measured. The cross sectional area was calculated. Collected data was analyzed by standard statistical formulas with the help of Microsoft excel 2007 and Epi info TM 7 software. Result: Most common (52.95% cases site of origin was posterolateral from femoral artery. The mean distance of origin of profunda femoris artery from the midpoint of inguinal ligament was 30.17 mm. There was no significant difference in cross sectional area of right and left profunda femoris artery (at 95% confidence interval Conclusion: Profunda femoris artery is used for angiography, ultrasonography and cardiac catheterization also. It is the major blood supply of the thigh. Its relations with femoral artery, femoral vein and femoral nerve makes it important structure for clinicians. Variations in origin of profunda femoris artery must be considered to avoid complication like aneurism and faulty passage of the catheter. High origin of profunda femoris artery is more prone to damage while accessing femoral artery.

  6. The Dimensions of the Orbital Cavity Based on High-Resolution Computed Tomography of Human Cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felding, Ulrik Ascanius; Bloch, Sune Land; Buchwald, Christian von

    2016-06-01

    Blow-out fractures affect the volume and surface area of the orbital cavity. Estimation of these values after the trauma may help in deciding whether or not a patient is a candidate for surgery. Recent studies have provided estimates of orbital volume and area of bone defect, and correlated them with the degree of enophthalmos. However, a large degree of biological variation between individuals may preclude such absolute values from being successful indicators for surgery.Stereological methods have been used to estimate orbital cavity volume in a few studies, but to date these have not been used for surface area. To authors' knowledge, this study is the first to have measured the entire surface area of the orbital cavity.The volume and surface area of the orbital cavity were estimated in computed tomography scans of 11 human cadavers using unbiased stereological sampling techniques. The mean (± SD) total volume and total surface area of the orbital cavities was 24.27 ± 3.88 cm and 32.47 ± 2.96 cm, respectively. There was no significant difference in volume (P = 0.315) or surface area (P = 0.566) between the 2 orbital cavities.The stereological technique proved to be a robust and unbiased method that may be used as a gold standard for comparison with automated computer software. Future imaging studies in blow-out fracture patients may be based on individual and relative calculation involving both herniated volume and fractured surface area in relation to the total volume and surface area of the uninjured orbital cavity.

  7. Involvement of larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) on human cadavers: a review of 81 forensic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charabidze, Damien; Colard, Thomas; Vincent, Benoit; Pasquerault, Thierry; Hedouin, Valery

    2014-11-01

    From 1994 to 2013, French forensic entomology laboratories investigated 1,093 cases. Larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) were observed in 81 (7.5%) of these cases. To describe and analyze these 81 cases, eight parameters were used: city, location (indoor or outdoor), decay stage (fresh, decay, or dry), dermestid species and instar (adults and/or larvae), presence of living calliphorid larvae, presence of calliphorid pupae or adults, and presence of other necrophagous species. Eight Dermestidae species were observed: Dermestes frischii (42% of cases), Dermestes undulatus (35.8%), Dermestes peruvianus (12.3%), Dermestes lardarius (9.9%), Dermestes haemorrhoidalis (8.6%), Dermestes maculatus (7.4%), Dermestes bicolor (3.7%), and Dermestes ater (1.2%). Larder beetles primarily developed on human cadavers in outdoor locations in areas with a dry climate and were never reported in oceanic areas (which are characterized by frequent rainfall and high ambient humidity). The number of dermestid species on a single corpse never exceeded three. Typically, one species was found per corpse. Species differed between indoor and outdoor cases, with D. frischii and D. undulatus dominant in outdoor cases, while D. peruvianus dominant in indoor cases. Calliphoridae was found in 88% of the cases, while Hydrotaea and Piophilidae were observed 40% of the time. Regarding Coleoptera, Necrobia spp. (Coleoptera: Cleridae) was observed in 46% of the cases. Lastly, we observed a typical decomposition pattern, with preferential feeding areas on the face, hands, and feet (i.e., the extremities). Pupation chambers on or inside the bones were not observed.

  8. Complex distal insertions of the tibialis posterior tendon: detailed anatomic and MR imaging investigation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, Daniel; Cerri, Giovanni G. [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); VA Medical Center, University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Dirim, Berna; Wangwinyuvirat, Mani; Belentani, Clarissa L.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald L. [VA Medical Center, University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [VA Medical Center, University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); VA Medical Center, University of California, Department of Histology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this report was to demonstrate the normal complex insertional anatomy of the tibialis posterior tendon (TPT) in cadavers using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with anatomic and histologic correlation. Ten cadaveric ankles were used according to institutional guidelines. MR T1-weighted spin echo imaging was performed to demonstrate aspects of the complex anatomic distal insertions of the TPT in cadaveric specimens. Findings on MR imaging were correlated with those derived from anatomic and histologic study. Generally, the TPT revealed a low signal in all MR images, except near the level of the medial malleolus, where the TPT suddenly changed direction and ''magic angle'' artifact could be observed. In five out of ten specimens (50%), a type I accessory navicular bone was found in the TPT. In all cases with a type I accessory navicular bone, the TPT had an altered signal in this area. Axial and coronal planes on MR imaging were the best in identifying the distal insertions of the TPT. A normal division of the TPT was observed just proximal to the insertion into the navicular bone in five specimens (100%) occurring at a maximum proximal distance from its attachment to the navicular bone of approximately 1.5 to 2 cm. In the other five specimens, in which a type I accessory navicular bone was present, the TPT directly inserted into the accessory bone and a slip less than 1.5 mm in thickness could be observed attaching to the medial aspect of the navicular bone (100%). Anatomic inspection confirmed the sites of the distal insertions of the components of the TPT. MR imaging enabled detailed analysis of the complex distal insertions of the TPT as well as a better understanding of those features of its insertion that can simulate a lesion. (orig.)

  9. Percutaneous Release of the First Dorsal Extensor Compartment: A Cadaver Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güleç, Ali; Türkmen, Faik; Toker, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the efficiency of the percutaneous 18-G needle technique in releasing the fibro-osseous sheath over the first dorsal extensor compartment of the hand. Methods: Using anatomic landmarks, percutaneous release was performed with an 18-G needle on 48 wrists of 24 cadavers. The specimens were then dissected and examined for the completeness of the first dorsal extensor compartment release and any tendon or neurovascular injuries. The tunnel length, number of abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons, presence of an intertendinous septum, and the effects of these parameters on percutaneous release were evaluated. Results: Percutaneous release was performed on all of the wrists, and the evaluation of the adequacy of release revealed 25 complete releases, 21 partial releases, and 2 missed releases. There were 19 cases of tendon complications. No neurovascular injuries were noted. The mean tunnel length was 2.66 ± 30 cm, and the mean number of tendons was 2.75 ± 0.86. A septum was present in 33.3% of cases. Tunnel length and tendon number had no statistically significant effect on release, whereas the presence of a septum was significantly associated with inadequate tunnel release and the development of tendon complications. Conclusions: Percutaneous release of the first dorsal extensor compartment using an 18-G needle was associated with high rates of incomplete release and tendon damage in the presence of an intertendinous septum. Further study is required under ultrasound guidance to determine the usefulness of percutaneous release in the first dorsal extensor compartment. Clinical Relevance: Release with a percutaneous needle tip in De Quervain’s syndrome may provide the advantages of better cosmetic results with less scar formation and an early return to work. PMID:27826460

  10. Some anatomical variation of paranasal sinuses using sinus endoscopic approach on "cadaver" in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezamoddin Berjis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the anatomical variations of the paranasal sinuses and its great importance in sinus surgery, as this area is in very close proximity to vital structures including the optic nerve, carotid artery, and skull base, anatomical knowledge of this area is of high importance. The purpose of this study is defining a full and clear impression of paranasal sinus anatomy and its variations as a model for the human population of the country. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 45 cadavers in Isfahan forensic Medicine center during 2010 to 2011. Nasal and paranasal sinuses endoscopic dissection was done with (zero and 30 o lenses (Olympus. The methods of performed dissection were via the Stamberger technique. Results: This study showed that 88.9% (40 cases of middle turbinates were in a typical form, while 6.7% (3 cases were in medial and only 4.4% (2 cases were in the lateral form. We also observed 88.9% (40 cases with Agger nasi cells, 37.8% (17 cases with Onodi cells, 28.9% cases with accessory Ostia of maxillary sinus (13 cases, and 15.6% of the cases (7 cases with concha bullosa. The position of the maxillary sinus ostium was as follows. The inferior 1/3 of hiatus semilunaris in 38 (84.5%, superior 1/3 of hiatus semilunaris in 4 (4.4%, middle 1/3 of hiatus semilunaris in 5 (11.1%. The sphenoid ostia in 53.3% (24 cases were slit shape, 28.9% (13 cases oval, and 17.8% (18 cases were round shape. Conclusion : Our survey showed that the distance between anterior nasal spine and anterior wall of the sphenoid sinus was within 7.6 ± 0.2 cm SD.

  11. Effectiveness and Complications of Percutaneous Needle Tenotomy with a Large Needle for Muscle Contractures: A Cadaver Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Chesnel

    Full Text Available Twenty-two percent of institutionalised elderly persons have muscle contractures. Contractures have important functional consequences, rendering hygiene and positioning in bed or in a chair difficult. Medical treatment (such as botulinum toxin injections, physiotherapy or positioning is not very effective and surgery may be required. Surgery is carried out in the operating theatre, under local or general anaesthesia but is often not possible in fragile patients. Mini-invasive tenotomy could be a useful alternative as it can be carried out in ambulatory care, under local anaesthesia.To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous needle tenotomy and the risks of damage to adjacent structures in cadavers.Thirty two doctors who had never practiced the technique (physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, geriatricians and orthopaedic surgeons carried out 401 tenotomies on the upper and lower limbs of 8 fresh cadavers. A 16G needle was used percutaneous following location of the tendons. After each tenotomy, a neuro-orthopaedic surgeon and an anatomist dissected the area in order to evaluate the success of the tenotomy and any adjacent lesions which had occurred.Of the 401 tenotomies, 72% were complete, 24.9% partial and 2.7% failed. Eight adjacent lesions occurred (2%: 4 (1% in tendons or muscles, 3 (0.7% in nerves and 1 (0.2% in a vessel.This percutaneous needle technique effectively ruptured the desired tendons, with few injuries to adjacent structures. Although this study was carried out on cadavers, the results suggest it is safe to carry out on patients.

  12. Accuracy of Ultrasound-Guided and Non-ultrasound-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection Into Cadaver Salivary Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of ultrasound (US)-guided and non-US-guided botulinum toxin (BTX) injection into the salivary glands (parotid and submandibular glands) of cadavers. Methods Two rehabilitation physician injected dye into three sites in the salivary glands (two sites in the parotid gland and one site in the submandibular gland) on one side of each cadaver (one was injected on the right side, while the other was injected on the left side), using either a non-US-guided injection procedure based on superficial landmarks or a US-guided procedure. Orange dye was used for the US-guided procedure, and green dye was used for the blind procedure. Two physicians uninvolved with the injection procedures and who were blinded to the method of injection dissected the cadavers to identify whether the dye was accurately injected into each target site. Results The accuracies of the blind and US-guided injections into the parotid gland were 79.17% and 95.83%, respectively. In the submandibular gland, the accuracies of the blind and US-guided injections were 50.00% and 91.67%, respectively. The difference in accuracy between the two procedures was statistically significant only in the submandibular gland (p=0.025). There were no significant differences in the accuracy of US-guided and non-US-guided injections between the two physicians for the two sites in the parotid gland (p=0.278 and p=0.146, respectively). Conclusion US-guided BTX injection into the submandibular gland offers significantly greater accuracy over blind injection. For the treatment of drooling by injecting BTX into the submandibular gland, clinicians should consider using US guidance for improved accuracy. PMID:28289635

  13. 3D deformation and dynamics of the human cadaver abdomen under seatbelt loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamielle, Sophie; Vezin, Philippe; Verriest, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Philippe; Trosseille, Xavier; Vallancien, Guy

    2008-11-01

    According to accident analysis, submarining is responsible for most of the frontal car crash AIS 3+ abdominal injuries sustained by restrained occupants. Submarining is characterized by an initial position of the lap belt on the iliac spine. During the crash, the pelvis slips under the lap belt which loads the abdomen. The order of magnitude of the abdominal deflection rate was reported by Uriot to be approximately 4 m/s. In addition, the use of active restraint devices such as pretensioners in recent cars lead to the need for the investigation of Out-Of-Position injuries. OOP is defined by an initial position of the lap belt on the abdomen instead of the pelvis resulting in a direct loading of the abdomen during pretensioning and the crash. In that case, the penetration speed of the belt into the abdomen was reported by Trosseille to be approximately 8 to 12 m/s. The aim of this study was to characterize the response of the human abdomen in submarining and OOP. A total of 8 PMHS abdomens were loaded using a lap belt. In order to investigate the injury mechanisms, the abdominal deflection rate and the compression were imposed such that they were not correlated. The specimens were seated upright in a fixed back configuration. The lap belt was placed at the level of the mid-umbilicus, between the iliac crest and the 12th rib. The belt was pulled horizontally along the sides of the specimens causing a symmetrical loading of the abdomen. In addition to the local parameters such as the belt and back forces or the belt displacements, the 3D external deformation of the abdomen was recorded. The forces measured between the back of the cadaver and the seat showed that a mass effect should be taken into account in the abdominal behaviour in addition to viscosity. The back force was greater than the belt force in low speed (submarining like) tests while it was lower for high-speed (OOP like) tests. A lumped parameter model was developed to confirm the experimental results and

  14. Variations of Weight of Thyroid Gland in Different Age and Sex Groups of Bangladeshi Cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, R; Khan, M K; Mannan, S; Asaduzzaman, S M; Sultana, M; Sultana, J; Farzana, T; Epsi, E Z; Wahed, F; Sultana, S

    2015-07-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study was designed to find out the difference in weight of the thyroid gland of Bangladeshi people in relation to age and sex. The present study was performed on 70 post mortem human thyroid gland (35 of male and 35 of female) collected from the morgue in the Department of Forensic Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh by purposive sampling technique. The specimens were collected from Bangladeshi cadavers of age ranging from 10 years to 85 years. All the specimens were grouped into three categories Group A (upto 20 years), Group B (21 to 50 years) and Group C (>50 years) according to age. Dissection was performed according to standard autopsy techniques. The weight of the thyroid glands were measured and recorded. The mean weight of the thyroid gland was 6.94 ± 5.20 gm in Group A, 7.91 ± 5.89 gm in Group B and 10.42 ± 6.27 gm in Group C. The mean weight of the thyroid gland in male was 7.0 ± 5.77 gm in Group A, 9.94 ± 7.63 gm in Group B and 11.89 ± 5.73 gm in Group C and in female was 6.88 ± 4.88 gm in Group A, 5.88 ± 2.15 gm in Group B and 9.10 ± 6.74 gm in Group C. Variance analysis shows that there was no significant difference in mean weight between the Age Group A & B, B & C and C & A. There was significant difference of weight of thyroid gland between sex in age Group B but in Group A and Group C were statistically insignificant. The weight of the thyroid gland was found to increases with age. In statistical analysis, differences between age groups were analyzed by using one way ANOVA test. The present study will help to increase the information pool on the weight of thyroid gland of Bangladeshi people.

  15. Infection of Tribolium castaneum with Bacillus thuringiensis: Quantification of Bacterial Replication within Cadavers, Transmission via Cannibalism, and Inhibition of Spore Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Höfling, Christina; Futo, Momir; Scharsack, Jörn P.

    2015-01-01

    Reproduction within a host and transmission to the next host are crucial for the virulence and fitness of pathogens. Nevertheless, basic knowledge about such parameters is often missing from the literature, even for well-studied bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, an endospore-forming insect pathogen, which infects its hosts via the oral route. To characterize bacterial replication success, we made use of an experimental oral infection system for the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and developed a flow cytometric assay for the quantification of both spore ingestion by the individual beetle larvae and the resulting spore load after bacterial replication and resporulation within cadavers. On average, spore numbers increased 460-fold, showing that Bacillus thuringiensis grows and replicates successfully in insect cadavers. By inoculating cadaver-derived spores and spores from bacterial stock cultures into nutrient medium, we next investigated outgrowth characteristics of vegetative cells and found that cadaver-derived bacteria showed reduced growth compared to bacteria from the stock cultures. Interestingly, this reduced growth was a consequence of inhibited spore germination, probably originating from the host and resulting in reduced host mortality in subsequent infections by cadaver-derived spores. Nevertheless, we further showed that Bacillus thuringiensis transmission was possible via larval cannibalism when no other food was offered. These results contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Bacillus thuringiensis as an insect pathogen. PMID:26386058

  16. Infection of Tribolium castaneum with Bacillus thuringiensis: quantification of bacterial replication within cadavers, transmission via cannibalism, and inhibition of spore germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Höfling, Christina; Futo, Momir; Scharsack, Jörn P; Kurtz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Reproduction within a host and transmission to the next host are crucial for the virulence and fitness of pathogens. Nevertheless, basic knowledge about such parameters is often missing from the literature, even for well-studied bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, an endospore-forming insect pathogen, which infects its hosts via the oral route. To characterize bacterial replication success, we made use of an experimental oral infection system for the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and developed a flow cytometric assay for the quantification of both spore ingestion by the individual beetle larvae and the resulting spore load after bacterial replication and resporulation within cadavers. On average, spore numbers increased 460-fold, showing that Bacillus thuringiensis grows and replicates successfully in insect cadavers. By inoculating cadaver-derived spores and spores from bacterial stock cultures into nutrient medium, we next investigated outgrowth characteristics of vegetative cells and found that cadaver-derived bacteria showed reduced growth compared to bacteria from the stock cultures. Interestingly, this reduced growth was a consequence of inhibited spore germination, probably originating from the host and resulting in reduced host mortality in subsequent infections by cadaver-derived spores. Nevertheless, we further showed that Bacillus thuringiensis transmission was possible via larval cannibalism when no other food was offered. These results contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Bacillus thuringiensis as an insect pathogen.

  17. "They increase in beauty and elegance": transforming cadavers and the epistemology of dissection in early nineteenth-century American medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Rachel N

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the origins of the practice of dissection in American medical education in order to both understand the function of dissection in medical education and challenge conventional wisdom about that function. In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, American medical schools increasingly made human dissection a crucial part of their curricula, privileging use of the human cadaver over any other anatomical model. In this paper, I break apart the claims that American physicians made at that time regarding the unique pedagogic usefulness of the cadaver, and I juxtapose those claims against the realities of the dissection process. In doing so, I show how the realities of dissection differed sharply from the depictions given by physicians. In the conclusion, I argue that the cadaver still remained epistemologically and ontologically useful to the medical profession, although not necessarily for the reasons physicians explicitly stated.

  18. A methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission signals to identify fracture timing from human cadaver spine impact tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Mike W J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    While studies have used acoustic sensors to determine fracture initiation time in biomechanical studies, a systematic procedure is not established to process acoustic signals. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission data using signal processing techniques to identify fracture initiation time. The methodology was developed from testing a human cadaver lumbar spine column. Acoustic sensors were glued to all vertebrae, high-rate impact loading was applied, load-time histories were recorded (load cell), and fracture was documented using CT. Compression fracture occurred to L1 while other vertebrae were intact. FFT of raw voltage-time traces were used to determine an optimum frequency range associated with high decibel levels. Signals were bandpass filtered in this range. Bursting pattern was found in the fractured vertebra while signals from other vertebrae were silent. Bursting time was associated with time of fracture initiation. Force at fracture was determined using this time and force-time data. The methodology is independent of selecting parameters a priori such as fixing a voltage level(s), bandpass frequency and/or using force-time signal, and allows determination of force based on time identified during signal processing. The methodology can be used for different body regions in cadaver experiments.

  19. Primer registro de artropodofauna cadavérica en sustratos humanos y animales en San Juan, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando H. ABALLAY

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se estudiaron los artrópodos carroñeros que acudieron a cadáveres de vertebrados al aire libre en la provincia de San Juan, Argentina. El objetivo fue inventariar la composición específica de la artropodofauna cadavérica, asociada a diferentes sustratos de vertebrados en descomposición. Se colectaron muestras de artrópodos sobre restos animales y humanos en condiciones de campo y sobre cadáveres de cerdos domésticos colocados al aire libre bajo condiciones controladas. Se registraron, por primera vez para la provincia de San Juan, 40 especies de artropodofauna tanatológica incluidas en cuatro órdenes y 15 familias. Se incorpora, como primera cita para la fauna forense argentina, un necrófago: Megelenophorus americanus Lacordaire (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae, y tres necrófilas: Polybia ruficeps Schrottky (Hymenoptera: Vespidae, Pheidole bergi Mayr (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Myrmicinae y Ectatomma brunneum Smith (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Ponerinae. Se citan 18 especies necrófagas, 18 necrófilas, una omnívora y seis oportunistas sobre siete diferentes sustratos cadavéricos de vertebrados. Se brindan nuevos registros de distribución de 18 especies de insectos. Se confirma la estacionalidad invernal de Callíphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae.

  20. Morphological observation of the horseshoe kidney with special reference to the vascular system in 2 Japanese cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoichi; Yi, Shuang-Qin; Iimura, Akira; Terayama, Hayato; Naito, Munekazu; Itoh, Masahiro

    2005-11-01

    Two cases of the horseshoe kidney in Japanese cadaver were reported in this paper. The kidneys and their associated vessels in the retroperitoneal cavity were carefully examined, and the histological examination of the isthmus was performed. In Case 1, four arteries arose from the abdominal aorta. One right and two left renal arteries were distributed to the apical, upper, middle and posterior regions of the kidney, respectively, and the artery of isthmus entered the lower segments and the isthmus. In Case 2, six arteries arose from the abdominal aorta. Among three arteries arose from the inferior end of the aorta and entered the lower segments and the isthmus. Histological study revealed that the isthmuses consisted of collecting tubes, glomeruli and urinary tubules and fibrous connective tissue. The incidence of the horseshoe kidney during the dissecting practice at Tokyo Medical University in a period of 24 years from 1980 to 2003 was estimated to be 0.16% (2 out of the 1,219 cadavers). The anatomical and embryological significance of this anomaly and its associated vascular system were discussed. And the histology of the parenchymal structure of the isthmus in the horseshoe kidney containing either fibrous connective tissue or renal parenchyma was also analyzed in this report.

  1. The living dead: bacterial community structure of a cadaver at the onset and end of the bloat stage of decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embriette R Hyde

    Full Text Available Human decomposition is a mosaic system with an intimate association between biotic and abiotic factors. Despite the integral role of bacteria in the decomposition process, few studies have catalogued bacterial biodiversity for terrestrial scenarios. To explore the microbiome of decomposition, two cadavers were placed at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science facility and allowed to decompose under natural conditions. The bloat stage of decomposition, a stage easily identified in taphonomy and readily attributed to microbial physiology, was targeted. Each cadaver was sampled at two time points, at the onset and end of the bloat stage, from various body sites including internal locations. Bacterial samples were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Our data show a shift from aerobic bacteria to anaerobic bacteria in all body sites sampled and demonstrate variation in community structure between bodies, between sample sites within a body, and between initial and end points of the bloat stage within a sample site. These data are best not viewed as points of comparison but rather additive data sets. While some species recovered are the same as those observed in culture-based studies, many are novel. Our results are preliminary and add to a larger emerging data set; a more comprehensive study is needed to further dissect the role of bacteria in human decomposition.

  2. Stress examination of flexor tendon pulley rupture in the crimp grip position: a 1.5-Tesla MRI cadaver study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Thomas; Janka, Rolf [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Fries, Simon [Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Orthopaedic Department, Wolhusen (Switzerland); Schweizer, Andreas [University of Zurich, Department of Orthopaedics, Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Schoeffl, Isabelle [Klinikum Bamberg, Department of Pediatrics, Bamberg (Germany); Bongartz, Georg [University Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    The objectives of this study were the evaluation of flexor tendon pulley rupture of the fingers in the crimp grip position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the comparison of the results with MRI in the neutral position in a cadaver study. MRI in the crimp grip position and in the neutral position was performed in 21 cadaver fingers with artificially created flexor tendon pulley tears (combined pulley rupture, n = 14; single pulley rupture, n = 7). Measurement of the distance between the tendon and bone was performed. Images were evaluated by two readers, first independently and in cases of discrepancy in consensus. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting combined pulley ruptures were calculated. Tendon bone distances were significantly higher in the crimp grip position than in the neutral position. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting combined pulley rupture were 92.86 % and 100 % respectively in the crimp grip position and 78.57 % and 85.71 % respectively in the neutral position. Kappa values for interobserver reliability were 0.87 in the crimp grip position and 0.59 in the neutral position. MRI examination in the crimp grip position results in higher tendon bone distances by subjecting the pulleys to a higher strain, which facilitates image evaluation with higher interobserver reliability, higher sensitivity, and higher specificity for combined pulley rupture compared with examination in the neutral position. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of finger A3 pulley rupture in the crimp grip position - a magnetic resonance imaging cadaver study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Thomas; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Adler, Werner [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Biometry and Epidemiology, Erlangen (Germany); Schweizer, Andreas [Balgrist, University of Zurich, Department of Orthopaedics, Zurich (Switzerland); Schoeffl, Isabelle [Klinikum Bamberg, Department of Pediatrics, Bamberg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The correct diagnosis of an A3 pulley rupture is challenging for musculoskeletal radiologists. An A3 pulley rupture should in theory influence the shape of the proximal interphalangeal joint volar plate (VP) and the amount of bowstringing at level of the VP during finger flexion. The purpose of this study was to perform MRI with metric analysis of the VP configuration and VP bowstringing in cadaver fingers in the crimp grip position and to determine cut points for A3 pulley rupture. MRI in the crimp grip position was performed in 21 cadaver fingers with artificially created flexor tendon pulley tears (fingers with A3 pulley rupture n = 16, fingers without A3 pulley rupture n = 5). The distances of the translation of the VP relative to the middle phalanx base, the distances between the flexor tendons and the VP body, and the distances between the flexor tendon and bone (TB) were measured. Statistical analysis showed significantly lower VP translation distances and significantly higher VP tendon distances if the A3 pulley was ruptured. A2 TB and A4 TB distances did not differ significantly in specimens with and without A3 pulley rupture. The optimal cut points for A3 pulley rupture were a VP translation distance <2.8 mm and a VP tendon distance >1.4 mm. Reduction of the VP translation distance and augmentation of the VP tendon distance are suitable indirect signs of A3 pulley rupture. (orig.)

  4. Effects of a novel entomopathogenic nematode-infected host formulation on cadaver integrity, nematode yield, and suppression of Diaprepes abbreviatus and Aethina tumida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Morales-Ramos, Juan A; Rojas, Maria G; Tedders, Walker L

    2010-02-01

    An alternative approach to applying entomopathogenic nematodes entails the distribution of nematodes in their infected insect hosts. Protection of the infected host from rupturing, and improving ease of handling, may be necessary to facilitate application. In this study our objective was to test the potential of a new method of formulating the infected hosts, i.e., enclosing the infected host in masking tape. Tenebrio molitor L. cadavers infected with Heterorhabditis indica Poinar, Karunakar and David or Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) were wrapped in tape using an automatic packaging machine; the machine was developed to reduce labor and to standardize the final product. The effects of the tape formulation on the ability to protect the cadavers from mechanical damage, nematode yield, and pest control efficacy were tested. After exposure to mechanical agitation at 7-d-post-infection, S. carpocapsae cadavers in tape were more resistant to rupture than cadavers without tape, yet H. indica cadavers 7-d-post-infection were not affected by mechanical agitation (with or without tape), nor was either nematode affected when 4-d-old cadavers were tested. Experiments indicated that infective juvenile yield was not affected by the tape formulation. Laboratory experiments were conducted measuring survival of the root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.), or the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray, after the application of two H. indica-infected hosts with or without tape per 15 cm pot (filled with soil). A greenhouse experiment was also conducted in a similar manner measuring survival of D. abbreviatus. In all experiments, both the tape and no-tape treatments caused significant reductions in insect survival relative to the control, and no differences were detected between the nematode treatments. Fifteen days post-application, the infected host treatments caused up to 78% control in A. tumida, 91% control in D. abbreviatus in the lab, and 75% in the greenhouse. These

  5. Significance of differential metal loads in normal versus cancerous cadaver tissues - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Trimble, Quannesha; Ndebele, Kenneth; Mawson, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The bodys elemental/ metal loads are known to exert essential influence in maintaining normal and abnormal metabolism leading to eventual pathology of some forms of cancer phenotypes. Accumulation of potentially toxic or nonessential trace metals has been observed but not highly noted as an active factor in toxicogenesis and in the development of many diseases including cancers. The compositional balance and distribution of trace metals in various body tissues are essential key players in homeostasis in life. To this end the etiology of diseases including cancer has been linked with the accumulation of potentially toxic or nonessential trace metals. However, scarce literature / experimental evidence exist as a scientific proof that metal concentrations play important role in the etiology and development of cancer phenotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the differential relationship of metal concentrations and profiles in cancer and normal tissues from cadavers of humans. The originated hypothesis was that elemental / metal concentrations and profiles seen in post mortem will show significant differences between normal and cancer-derived tissues as well as between various tissue types in humans. This study also establishes critical elemental /metal profiles that may be relevant in providing correlations with the development of three major cancers. Normal human and tumor tissues of cadaverous lung, breast and liver tissues used in this study were obtained from US Biomax Company. Tissue samples were prepared using standardized digestion procedures necessary for use with the Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). This equipment was utilized to determine the concentrations and profiles of 21 elements including Ag, Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn. Twelve major elements of Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Na, Pb, Se, Sr, and Zn were found to be significantly different in term of their

  6. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, T.G. van; Buma, P.; Scholten, J.G.; Kampen, A. van; Veth, R.P.H.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furth

  7. Coupled Physical and Digital Cadaver Dissection Followed by a Visual Test Protocol Provides Insights into the Nature of Anatomical Knowledge and Its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisley, Kenneth C.; Anderson, Larry D.; Smith, Stacy E.; Kavic, Stephen M.; Tracy, J. Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    This research effort compared and contrasted two conceptually different methods for the exploration of human anatomy in the first-year dissection laboratory by accomplished students: "physical" dissection using an embalmed cadaver and "digital" dissection using three-dimensional volume modeling of whole-body CT and MRI image sets acquired using…

  8. A comparative study of the Osstell™ versus the Osstell Mentor™ to evaluate implant stability in human cadaver mandibles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, R S; van Wijk, A J; Lindeboom, J A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the primary stability of dental implants by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) using the Osstell™ and Osstell Mentor™ devices and to investigate the reproducibility and comparability of the results obtained with these devices. Twenty-four Straumann implants (Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) were placed in the anterior mandible of 12 fresh edentulous human cadaver mandibles. The implant stability quotients (ISQs) were measured with the Osstell™ and Osstell Mentor™ when implants were inserted at 50% of their length and following their complete insertion. The Osstell™ device measured lower scores compared with the Osstell Mentor™. This was significant for the full position (mean difference = 9·9), t (11) = 7·4, P < 0·001 and for the halfway position (mean difference = 5·9), t (11) = 2·41, P = 0·03. In conclusion, the Osstell™ produced relatively lower ISQ scores than the Osstell Mentor™.

  9. Changes in elongation of falx cerebri during craniosacral therapy techniques applied on the skull of an embalmed cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulos, D C; Keramidas, G

    1992-01-01

    Craniosacral therapy supports that light forces applied to the skull may be transmitted to the dura membrane having a therapeutic effect to the cranial system. This study examines the changes in elongation of falx cerebri during the application of some of the craniosacral therapy techniques to the skull of an embalmed cadaver. The study demonstrates that the relative elongation of the falx cerebri changes as follows: for the frontal lift, 1.44 mm; for the parietal lift, 1.08 mm; for the sphenobasilar compression, -0.33 mm; for the sphenobasilar decompression, 0.28 mm; and for the ear pull, inconclusive results. The present study offers validation for the scientific basis of craniosacral therapy and the contention for cranial suture mobility.

  10. El trasplante cadavérico de riñón en herradura. Reporte de dos casos

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Martínez-Mier; Stephen C Rayhill; Daniel A. Katz

    2005-01-01

    El número de pacientes en espera de un trasplante renal es elevado. La escasez de órganos demanda la exploración de fuentes alternativas como los riñones con anomalías anatómicas congénitas. Los riñones en herradura son la anomalía anatómica renal más común. Éstos pueden ser trasplantados en bloque o en forma separada posterior a su procuración cadavérica. La decisión de dividir un riñón en herradura depende de varios factores; los principales son el número, la posición de los vasos renales y...

  11. Spectrophotometric Determination of Trimethylamine-nitrogen in Cadaver Tissues for the Estimation of Late Postmortem Interval: A Pilot Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian LIU; Xiangyang CAI; Yan LIU; Lan ZHOU; Shaohua YI; Liang LIU

    2008-01-01

    To study the relationship between the late postmortem interval (PMI) and trimethylamine-nitrogen (TMA-N) in postmortem tissues of cadaver, TMA-N in muscles, livers and kidneys of rats was measured at different postmortem intervals (PMD by using a modified spectrophotometric method. The results indicated that the detection sensitivity of TMA-N was 1 mg/L, and there was a good linear correlation between the value of absorbance (A value) and TMA-N at the concentration of 1-10 mg/L (R2 =0.9991). Although TMA variation in muscles was different from that in inner organs during the time since death, TMA-N changes in cadaver tissues was positively correlated with PMI. During 2 to 7 d since death, the best correlation between PMI and TMA-N concentration was found in muscles.With PMI as an independent variable, the cubic polynomial regression equation was y= --0.457x3+6.519x2-24.574x+27.207 (R2=0.969). During 3 to 8 days since death, PMI was best correlated with TMA-N concentration in inner organs. With PMI as the independent variable, the cubic polynomial regression equation was y=0.509x3-9.153x2+55.727x-95.819 (R2=0.953). It was concluded that TMA-N in tissues could be used as a new estimator for late PMI. The method used in this study offered advantages such as accuracy, sensitivity, little samples required and wide PMI estimation.

  12. Heating produced by therapeutic ultrasound in the presence of a metal plate in the femur of canine cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Andrades

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the heat generated by a therapeutic ultrasound (TUS in a metal bone plate and adjacent structures after fixation to the femur of canine cadavers. Ten pairs of hind limbs were used, and they were equally distributed between groups that were subjected to 1- and 3-MHz frequencies, with each frequency testing 1- and 2-W/cm² intensities. The right hind limb was defined as the control group (absence of the metal plate, and the left hind limb was the test group (presence of the metal plate. Therefore, the control groups (CG were denominated CGI, using TUS with 1-MHz frequency and 1-W/cm² intensity; CGII, using 1-MHz frequency and 2-W/cm² intensity; CGIII, using 3-MHz frequency and 1-W/cm² intensity; and CGIV, using 3-MHz frequency and 2-W/cm² intensity. For each control group, its respective test group (TG was denominated TGI, TGII, TGIII and TGIV. The TUS was applied to the lateral aspect of the thigh using the continuous mode and a 3.5-cm² transducer in a 6.25-cm² area for 2 minutes. Sensors were coupled to digital thermometers that measured the temperature in different sites before (t0 and after (t1 of the TUS application. The temperatures in t1 were higher in all tested groups. The intramuscular temperature was significantly higher (P<0.05 in the groups used to test the 3-MHz frequency in the presence of the metal plate. The therapeutic ultrasound in the continuous mode using frequencies of 1 and 3 MHz and intensities of 1 and 2 W/cm2 for 2 minutes caused heating of the metal plate and adjacent structures after fixation to the femur of canine cadavers.

  13. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  14. August Hirt and "extraordinary opportunities for cadaver delivery" to anatomical institutes in National Socialism: a murderous change in paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hans-Joachim

    2013-10-01

    German anatomical institutes always had problems obtaining sufficient cadavers for research and training. In the National Socialist (NS) period this changed. Universities could count on "extraordinary opportunities for cadaver delivery." Most frequently tacitly, many bodies were those of victims of NS crimes. Scientists increasingly exploited the exceptional political situation to systematically supplement their institutional collections. Their endeavors to fill the, in their terms, "lamentable gaps" in their collections took on truly bizarre forms. In Austria, Jewish cemeteries were plundered for racial-political expansion of anatomical collections. A change in paradigm was merely the next step: intentional murder for the benefit of NS-oriented science. In December of 1942, anatomists meeting in Tübingen discussed plans for "material acquisition." August Hirt, director of the anatomical institute at the Reichsuniversität in Strasbourg, was to develop guidelines. There was express reference to "Auftrag Beger," which had already been conceived although not yet realized: at the behest of Hirt and the SS-scientific organization, "Ahnenerbe," the anthropologists Bruno Beger and Hans Fleischhacker selected 86 Jewish prisoners in Auschwitz in June of 1943 and deported them to the concentration camp at Struthof near Natzweiler, where they were murdered. The bodies were delivered to the anatomy department in Strasbourg for preparation and used as anatomical specimens. The Reichsuniversität Strasbourg was considered a center of excellence for Nazi ideology. For modern scientists, the elucidation of these criminal acts is not exhausted in the search for an answer to the questions of perpetrator, place, modus operandi or motive. A suitable memorial to the victims must go beyond mere quantification.

  15. A New Electromagnetic Navigation System for Pedicle Screws Placement: A Human Cadaver Study at the Lumbar Spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hahn

    Full Text Available Technical developments for improving the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw placement play an increasingly important role in spine surgery. In addition to the standard techniques of free-hand placement and fluoroscopic navigation, the rate of complications is reduced by 3D fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, intraoperative CT/MRI, and various other navigation techniques. Another important aspect that should be emphasized is the reduction of intraoperative radiation exposure for personnel and patient. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of a new navigation system for the spine based on an electromagnetic field.Twenty pedicle screws were placed in the lumbar spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation. Navigation was based on data from a preoperative thin-slice CT scan. The cadavers were positioned on a special field generator and the system was matched using a patient tracker on the spinous process. Navigation was conducted using especially developed instruments that can be tracked in the electromagnetic field. Another thin-slice CT scan was made postoperatively to assess the result. The evaluation included the position of the screws in the direction of trajectory and any injury to the surrounding cortical bone. The results were classified in 5 groups: grade 1: ideal screw position in the center of the pedicle with no cortical bone injury; grade 2: acceptable screw position, cortical bone injury with cortical penetration ≤ 2 mm; grade 3: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 2,1-4 mm, grad 4: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 4,1-6 mm, grade 5: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration >6 mm.The initial evaluation of the system showed good accuracy for the lumbar spine (65% grade 1, 20% grade 2, 15% grade 3, 0% grade 4, 0% grade 5. A comparison of the initial results with other navigation techniques in literature (CT navigation, 2D fluoroscopic navigation shows that the accuracy of this system is

  16. Four Forensic Entomology Case Studies: Records and Behavioral Observations on Seldom Reported Cadaver Fauna With Notes on Relevant Previous Occurrences and Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Natalie K; Sisson, Melissa S; Archambeault, Alan D; Rahlwes, Brent C; Willett, James R; Bucheli, Sibyl R

    2015-03-01

    A yearlong survey of insect taxa associated with human decomposition was conducted at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science (STAFS) facility located in the Center for Biological Field Studies of Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, TX. During this study, four insect-cadaver interactions were observed that represent previously poorly documented yet forensically significant interactions: Syrphidae maggots colonized a corpse in an aquatic situation; Psychodidae adults mated and oviposited on an algal film that was present on a corpse that had been recently removed from water; several Panorpidae were the first insects to feed upon a freshly placed corpse in the autumn; and a noctuid caterpillar was found chewing and ingesting dried human skin. Baseline knowledge of insect-cadaver interactions is the foundation of forensic entomology, and unique observations have the potential to expand our understanding of decomposition ecology.

  17. Medical Student Dissection of CadaversImproves Performance on Practical Exams, but not Dissection-Relevant Questions in the NBME Gross Anatomy and Embryology Final Exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Sargent Jones

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available We have examined whether cadaver dissection by first year medical students (MIs affected their performance in two test measures: the NBME Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Exam (dissection-relevant questions only, and practical exams given at the end of each major section within the course. The dissections for the entire course were divided into 18 regional dissection units and each student was assigned to dissect one third of the regional units; the other two-thirds of the material was learned from the partner-prosected cadavers. Performance for each student on the exams was then assessed as a function of the regions those students actually dissected. While the results indicated a small performance advantage for MIs answering questions on material they had dissected on the NBME Subject Exam questions relevant to dissection (78-88% of total exam, the results were not statistically significant. However, a similar, small performance advantage on the course practical exams was highly significant.

  18. Automatic radiographic quantification of hand osteoarthritis; accuracy and sensitivity to change in joint space width in a phantom and cadaver study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetink, Kasper; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Klooster, Ronald van' t; Reiber, Johan H.C.; Stoel, Berend C. [Leiden University Medical Center, Division of Image Processing, Leiden (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kaptein, Bart L.; Nelissen, Rob G.H.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15

    To validate a newly developed quantification method that automatically detects and quantifies the joint space width (JSW) in hand radiographs. Repeatability, accuracy and sensitivity to changes in JSW were determined. The influence of joint location and joint shape on the measurements was tested. A mechanical micrometer set-up was developed to define and adjust the true JSW in an acrylic phantom joint and in human cadaver-derived phalangeal joints. Radiographic measurements of the JSW were compared to the true JSW. Repeatability, systematic error (accuracy) and sensitivity (defined as the smallest detectable difference (SDD)) were determined. The influence of joint position on the JSW measurement was assessed by varying the location of the acrylic phantom on the X-ray detector with respect to the X-ray beam and the influence of joint shape was determined by using morphologically different human cadaver joints. The mean systematic error was 0.052 mm in the phantom joint and 0.210 mm in the cadaver experiment. In the phantom experiments, the repeatability was high (SDD=0.028 mm), but differed slightly between joint locations (p=0.046), and a change in JSW of 0.037 mm could be detected. Dependent of the joint shape in the cadaver hand, a change in JSW between 0.018 and 0.047 mm could be detected. The automatic quantification method is sensitive to small changes in JSW. Considering the published data of JSW decline in the normal and osteoarthritic population, the first signs of OA progression with this method can be detected within 1 or 2 years. (orig.)

  19. Navigation of Pedicle Screws in the Thoracic Spine with a New Electromagnetic Navigation System: A Human Cadaver Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Posterior stabilization of the spine is a standard procedure in spinal surgery. In addition to the standard techniques, several new techniques have been developed. The objective of this cadaveric study was to examine the accuracy of a new electromagnetic navigation system for instrumentation of pedicle screws in the spine. Material and Method. Forty-eight pedicle screws were inserted in the thoracic spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation and instruments developed especially for electromagnetic navigation. The screw position was assessed postoperatively by a CT scan. Results. The screws were classified into 3 groups: grade 1 = ideal position; grade 2 = cortical penetration <2 mm; grade 3 = cortical penetration ≥2 mm. The initial evaluation of the system showed satisfied positioning for the thoracic spine; 37 of 48 screws (77.1%, 95% confidence interval [62.7%, 88%] were classified as group 1 or 2. Discussion. The screw placement was satisfactory. The initial results show that there is room for improvement with some changes needed. The ease of use and short setup times should be pointed out. Instrumentation is achieved without restricting the operator’s mobility during navigation. Conclusion. The results indicate a good placement technique for pedicle screws. Big advantages are the easy handling of the system.

  20. Intrathecal Spread of Injectate Following an Ultrasound-Guided Selective C5 Nerve Root Injection in a Human Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falyar, Christian R; Abercrombie, Caroline; Becker, Robert; Biddle, Chuck

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root blocks have been described in several case reports as a safe and effective means to anesthetize the distal clavicle while maintaining innervation of the upper extremity and preserving diaphragmatic function. In this study, cadavers were injected with 5 mL of 0.5% methylene blue dye under ultrasound guidance to investigate possible proximal and distal spread of injectate along the brachial plexus, if any. Following the injections, the specimens were dissected and examined to determine the distribution of dye and the structures affected. One injection revealed dye extended proximally into the epidural space, which penetrated the dura mater and was present on the spinal cord and brainstem. Dye was noted distally to the divisions in 3 injections. The anterior scalene muscle and phrenic nerve were stained in all 4 injections. It appears unlikely that local anesthetic spread is limited to the nerve root following an ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root injection. Under certain conditions, intrathecal spread also appears possible, which has major patient safety implications. Additional safety measures, such as injection pressure monitoring, should be incorporated into this block, or approaches that are more distal should be considered for the acute pain management of distal clavicle fractures.

  1. Study of the Artroscopic Anatomy of the Knee in Canine Cadavers Using 2.4 Mm Diameter Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Oswaldo Alonso Cuéllar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mainly by a limited access to new techniques and technologies, veterinary medicine in developing countries, has been far behind from the human medicine. One of the causes is the limited access to technology and specific techniques. Moreover, it is clear that many new technologies have proven their benefits in the two disciplines, making necessary and almost mandatory their massive implementation in humans and animals. The possibility to use human elements for veterinary techniques would improve the technology access and veterinarians training, at lower costs. The purpose of this study is to verify the feasibility to perform a knee arthroscopy in dogs with small human joints arthroscopic lenses. Under protocols established in veterinary 12 knee arthroscopies were performed in canine cadaver, using a wrist and ankle arthroscope human of 2.4 mm in diameter and 30° of angulation. All the structures reported in the literature were possible to visualize using a 2.4 mm arthroscope. In this sense, it is possible to develop training activities and subsequent implementation of endoscopic techniques in canine femorotibiopatellar joint, using a lens of small joints of human medicine.

  2. Intra-op measurement of the mechanical axis deviation: an evaluation study on 19 human cadaver legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lejing; Fallavollita, Pascal; Brand, Alexander; Erat, Okan; Weidert, Simon; Thaller, Peter-Helmut; Euler, Ekkehard; Navab, Nassir

    2012-01-01

    The alignment of the lower limb in high tibial osteotomy (HTO) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) must be determined intraoperatively. One way to do so is to deform the mechanical axis deviation (MAD), for which a tolerance measurement of 10 mm is widely accepted. Many techniques are proposed in clinical practice such as visual inspection, cable method, grid with lead impregnated reference lines, or more recently, navigation systems. Each has their disadvantages including reliability of the MAD measurement, excess radiation, prolonged operation time, complicated setup and high cost. To alleviate such shortcomings, we propose a novel clinical protocol that allows quick and accurate intraoperative calculation of MAD. This is achieved by an X-ray stitching method requiring only three X-ray images placed into a panoramic image frame during the entire procedure. The method has been systematically analyzed in a simulation framework in order to investigate its accuracy and robustness. Furthermore, we validated our protocol via a preclinical study comprising 19 human cadaver legs. Four surgeons determined MAD measurements using our X-ray panorama and compared these values to a gold-standard CT-based technique. The maximum average MAD error was 3.5mm which shows great potential for the technique.

  3. Effects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of buried human remains using pig cadavers as human body analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotsmans, Eline M J; Denton, John; Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Ivaneanu, Tatiana; Leentjes, Sarah; Janaway, Rob C; Wilson, Andrew S

    2012-04-10

    Recent casework in Belgium involving the search for human remains buried with lime, demonstrated the need for more detailed understanding of the effect of different types of lime on cadaver decomposition and its micro-environment. Six pigs (Sus scrofa) were used as body analogues in field experiments. They were buried without lime, with hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)) and with quicklime (CaO) in shallow graves in sandy loam soil in Belgium and recovered after 6 months of burial. Observations from these field recoveries informed additional laboratory experiments that were undertaken at the University of Bradford, UK. The combined results of these studies demonstrate that despite conflicting evidence in the literature, hydrated lime and quicklime both delay the decay of the carcass during the first 6 months. This study has implications for the investigation of clandestine burials and for a better understanding of archaeological plaster burials. Knowledge of the effects of lime on decomposition processes also has bearing on practices involving burial of animal carcasses and potentially the management of mass graves and mass disasters by humanitarian organisations and DVI teams.

  4. Ligament strain on the iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments in cadaver specimens: biomechanical measurement and anatomical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Egi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Izumi, Tomoki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2014-10-01

    The iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments are major structures that stabilize the hip joint. We have sought evidence on which to base more effective hip stretching positions. The purpose of this study was to measure strains on these ligaments and to observe them. Eight fresh/frozen translumbar cadaver specimens were used. Clinically available stretching positions for these ligaments were adopted. Strain on each ligament was measured by a displacement sensor during passive torque to the hip joint. Hip motion was measured using an electromagnetic tracking device. The strained ligaments were captured on clear photographs. Significantly, high strains were imposed on the superior iliofemoral ligament by external rotation of the hip (3.48%); on the inferior iliofemoral ligament by maximal extension and 10° or 20° of external rotation with maximal extension (1.86%, 1.46%, 1.25%); on the pubofemoral ligament by maximal abduction and 10°, 20°, or 30° of external rotation with maximal abduction (3.18%, 3.28%, 3.11%, 2.99%); and on the ischiofemoral ligament by 10° or 20° of abduction with maximal internal rotation (7.11%, 7.83%). Fiber direction in each ligament was clearly identified. Significantly, high strains on hip ligaments corresponded with the anatomical direction of the ligament fibers. Positions were identified for each ligament that imposed maximal increase in strain on it.

  5. A glimpse into the process of gaining permission for the educational dissection of human cadavers in the Ottoman Empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkin, Salih Murat; Dinc, Gulten

    2014-10-01

    Dissection of the human body for educational purposes became officially permitted in the Ottoman Empire only after a long, difficult process. In the West, studies based on the findings of Galen had been taboo during a long period in which dissection of human bodies had been prohibited. Although the first dissection studies since ancient times began to appear in the Western literature in the late 13th and early 14th centuries, the post-Galen taboo against dissection was broken only in the 16th century by the studies of Vesalius. However, in the Eastern World, it was only fairly recently that the idea of the "sanctity of the human body" could be challenged. In the medieval Islamic world, as during the Middle Ages in the West, prohibitions against the dissection of human cadavers continued for social and religious reasons, although the Koran does not specifically ban such dissection. This prohibition also continued through the Ottoman era, which began in the 14th century. The first efforts to end the prohibition on dissection in the Ottoman Empire were made at the beginning of the 19th century during the reign of Sultan Selim III but official permission for dissection was given only in 1841 during the reign of Sultan Abdulmecid. Educational dissections in the Ottoman Empire officially began at the Istanbul Medical School following the granting of this permission. This article will discuss the attempts to end the prohibition of dissection in Ottomans within the scope of the history of anatomical study in Turkey.

  6. The Anatomy to Genomics (ATG Start Genetics medical school initiative: incorporating exome sequencing data from cadavers used for Anatomy instruction into the first year curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn S. Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing use of next generation DNA sequencing in clinical medicine is exposing the need for more genetics education in physician training. We piloted an initiative to determine the feasibility of incorporating exome sequencing data generated from DNA obtained from cadavers used for teaching Anatomy into a first year medical student integrated block-style course. Methods We optimized the procedure to obtain DNA for exome sequencing by comparing the quality and quantity of DNA isolated from several tissues by two different extraction methods. DNA was sequenced using exome capture and analyzed using standard methods. Single nucleotide variants (SNVs, as well as small insertions/deletions, with potential functional impact were selected by faculty for student teams to independently investigate and prepare presentations on their findings. Results A total of seven cadaver DNAs were sequenced yielding high quality results. SNVs were identified that were associated, with known physical traits and disease susceptibility, as well as pharmacogenomic phenotypes. Students presented findings based on correlation with known clinical information about the cadavers’ diseases and traits. Conclusion Exome sequencing of cadaver DNA is a useful tool to integrate Anatomy with Genetics and Biochemistry into a first year medical student core curriculum.

  7. 浅谈遗体、器官捐献理论的建立%Theory Establishment of Cadaver and Organ Donation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    银勇

    2011-01-01

    Autopsy is the basis of medical sciences, and organ transplantation is an important way to save lives or restore patient's labor capacity. In China, the imperfect cadaver and organ donation system and poor awareness of public donations lead to the shortage of cadaver and organ source, and restricts the development of related disciplines for a long time. Therefore, it is an important and urgent issue to strengthen the work of cadaver and organ donation. Cadaver and organ donation theory focuses on ideological and theoretical problems about this issue, tries to establish a set of theoretical system to gradually change the traditional concept on cadaver donation suited for Chinese national conditions via summarizing the experiences from past and present , at home and abroad. The theory is composed of establishing a scientific view of life and death, life value by carrying out death education, and strengthening the education of selfless dedication and benevolence spirit.%尸体解剖是医学科学研究发展的基础,器官移植是拯救生命、恢复健康的重要方法.在我国,因相关体制不健全和民众捐献意识淡薄,遗体和器官来源匮乏,长期制约着相关学科的发展.如何加强遗体、器官捐献工作成为亟待解决的重要问题.遗体、器官捐献理论系统科学地阐述民众在该项工作中的思想理论、意识形态所存在的问题,通过对古今、中外相关理论的总结研究,建立一套适合国情、深入浅出的理论体系,利用科学理论逐步改变传统观念对人们思想的束缚.该理论主要包括开展死亡教育,建立科学生死现、生命价值观.

  8. Harmonic scalpel versus flexible CO2 laser for tongue resection: A histopathological analysis of thermal damage in human cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Tamir

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monopolar cautery is the most commonly used surgical cutting and hemostatic tool for head and neck surgery. There are newer technologies that are being utilized with the goal of precise cutting, decreasing blood loss, reducing thermal damage, and allowing faster wound healing. Our study compares thermal damage caused by Harmonic scalpel and CO2 laser to cadaveric tongue. Methods Two fresh human cadaver heads were enrolled for the study. Oral tongue was exposed and incisions were made in the tongue akin to a tongue tumor resection using the harmonic scalpel and flexible C02 laser fiber at various settings recommended for surgery. The margins of resection were sampled, labeled, and sent for pathological analysis to assess depth of thermal damage calculated in millimeters. The pathologist was blinded to the surgical tool used. Control tongue tissue was also sent for comparison as a baseline for comparison. Results Three tongue samples were studied to assess depth of thermal damage by harmonic scalpel. The mean depth of thermal damage was 0.69 (range, 0.51 - 0.82. Five tongue samples were studied to assess depth of thermal damage by CO2 laser. The mean depth of thermal damage was 0.3 (range, 0.22 to 0.43. As expected, control samples showed 0 mm of thermal damage. There was a statistically significant difference between the depth of thermal injury to tongue resection margins by harmonic scalpel as compared to CO2 laser, (p = 0.003. Conclusion In a cadaveric model, flexible CO2 laser fiber causes less depth of thermal damage when compared with harmonic scalpel at settings utilized in our study. However, the relevance of this information in terms of wound healing, hemostasis, safety, cost-effectiveness, and surgical outcomes needs to be further studied in clinical settings.

  9. Evaluation of Karl Storz CMAC TipTM Device Versus Traditional Airway Suction in a Cadaver Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demis N. Lipe

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We compared the efficacy of Karl Storz CMAC TipTM with inline suction to CMAC with traditional suction device in cadaveric models simulating difficult airways, using media mimicking pulmonary edema and vomit. Methods: This was a prospective, cohort study in which we invited emergency medicine faculty and residents to participate. Each participant intubated 2 cadavers (one with simulated pulmonary edema and one with simulated vomit, using CMAC with inline suction and CMAC with traditional suction. Thirty emergency medicine providers performed 4 total intubations each in a crossover trial comparing the CMAC with inline suction and CMAC with traditional suction. Two intubations were performed with simulated vomit and two with simulated pulmonary edema. The primary outcome was time to successful intubation; and the secondary outcome was proportion of successful intubation. Results: The median time to successful intubation using the CMAC with inline suction versus traditional suction in the pulmonary edema group was 29s and 30s respectively (p=0.54. In the vomit simulation, the median time to successful intubation was 40s using the CMAC with inline suction and 41s using the CMAC with traditional suction (p=0.70. There were no significant differences in time to successful intubation between the 2 devices. Similarly, the proportions of successful intubation were also not statistically significant between the 2 devices. The proportions of successful intubations using the inline suction were 96.7% and 73.3%, for the pulmonary edema and vomit groups, respectively. Additionally using the handheld suction device, the proportions for the pulmonary edema and vomit group were 100% and 66.7%, respectively. Conclusion: CMAC with inline suction was no different than CMAC with traditional suction and was associated with no statistically significant differences in median time to intubation or proportion of successful intubations. [West J Emerg Med

  10. Septic arthritis of the knee: Presentation of a novel irrigation-suction system tested in a cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weise Kuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The established treatment for bacterial arthritis of the knee joint is arthroscopic surgery with irrigation and debridement. The aim of this article is to summarize the relevant data in treating bacterial arthritis of the knee joint, and based on these findings to present a novel irrigation suction system, tested in a cadaver study, as an additional tool in the postoperative treatment phase of arthroscopic surgery for knee joint infections. Method The novel automated irrigation-suction system presented here was compared to conventional continuous suction irrigation in a total of six knee joints. All knee joints were filled with 80 ml methylene blue stain and rinsed by two different methods. Fluid specimens were taken after ten and twenty minutes to be compared by photometric extinction measurement at a wave length of 500 nm. Results After ten minutes, the average extinction was e1C = 0.8 for the continuous suction irrigation and e1N = 0.4 for the novel irrigation-suction system. After twenty minutes, we recorded an average extinction of e2C = 0.3 for continuous suction irrigation and e2N = 0.001 for the novel irrigation-suction system. The students t-test revealed superior results after ten and twenty minutes of washing out the knee joints with a p Conclusion A novel irrigation-suction system may be an effective tool for postoperative knee joint irrigation in arthroscopic therapy for bacterial arthritis of the knee. Further animal studies are needed to verify the effects in vivo.

  11. Humphrey Ridley (1653-1708): 17th century evolution in neuroanatomy and selective cerebrovascular injections for cadaver dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Jai Deep; Sonig, Ashish; Chittiboina, Prashant; Khan, Imad Saeed; Wadhwa, Rishi; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Humphrey Ridley, M.D. (1653-1708), is a relatively unknown historical figure, belonging to the postmedieval era of neuroanatomical discovery. He was born in the market town of Mansfield, 14 miles from the county of Nottinghamshire, England. After studying at Merton College, Oxford, he pursued medicine at Leiden University in the Netherlands. In 1688, he was incorporated as an M.D. at Cambridge. Ridley authored the first original treatise in English language on neuroanatomy, The Anatomy of the Brain Containing its Mechanisms and Physiology: Together with Some New Discoveries and Corrections of Ancient and Modern Authors upon that Subject. Ridley described the venous anatomy of the eponymous circular sinus in connection with the parasellar compartment. His methods were novel, unique, and effective. To appreciate the venous anatomy, he preferred to perform his anatomical dissections on recently executed criminals who had been hanged. These cadavers had considerable venous engorgement, which made the skull base venous anatomy clearer. To enhance the appearance of the cerebral vasculature further, he used tinged wax and quicksilver in the injections. He set up experimental models to answer questions definitively, in proving that the arachnoid mater is a separate meningeal layer. The first description of the subarachnoid cisterns, blood-brain barrier, and the fifth cranial nerve ganglion with its branches are also attributed to Ridley. This historical vignette revisits Ridley's life and academic work that influenced neuroscience and neurosurgical understanding in its infancy. It is unfortunate that most of his novel contributions have gone unnoticed and uncited. The authors hope that this article will inform the neurosurgical community of Ridley's contributions to the field of neurosurgery.

  12. Anterior subaxial cervical spine fixation using a plate with single screw per vertebral body: A simple and efficient construct - Clinical series and a cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vannemreddy Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report our experience with a novel construct for traumatic and nontraumatic cervical spine lesions that was validated by biomechanical studies of cadaver cervical spine. Study Design: Consecutive cases of anterior cervical spine fixation performed over six years reviewed for stability offered by a construct comprising of a plate fixed by a single screw to each vertebral body. Setting: A university hospital and a biomechanical lab. Materials and Methods: Data were coded and entered into a statistical worksheet for multivariate analysis. Cadaver spine models applied for biomechanical study of stability. Results: Total of 103 cases reviewed; 86 with single-level disease; traumatic in 66 (64% cases and degenerative in 33 (32% cases, including hard disks, OPLL, and spondylitis (4% with other causes. Fixation was with diskectomy in 59 and with corpectomy in 40. A bone graft was utilized for fusion in 87 and a bone-filled titanium spacer in 13. A single screw was placed in each vertebral body with a locking plate (having linear arrangement of holes. This construct remained strong in 95% of cases at the end of 6-24 months. Five cases failed requiring reoperation. Five patients with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI died. On statistical analysis, construct was stronger with diskectomy compared with corpectomy. Construct used on cadavers confirmed the biomechanical stability in short segment fixation (C5-6. Conclusion: A conservative construct utilizing a single screw per vertebral body and a one-holed plate system appears to be strong enough to afford stability in both traumatic and nontraumatic lesions of subaxial cervical spine, comparable to others.

  13. Cementless anatomical prosthesis for the treatment of 3-part and 4-part proximal humerus fractures: cadaver study and prospective clinical study with minimum 2 years followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obert Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcomes of a cementless, trauma-specific locked stem for 3- and 4-part proximal humeral fractures. Materials and methods: This study consisted of two parts: a cadaver study with 22 shoulders and a multicenter prospective clinical study of 23 fracture patients evaluated at least 2 years after treatment. In the cadaver study, the locked stem (HumelockTM, FX Solutions and its instrumentation were evaluated. In the clinical study, five senior surgeons at four different hospitals performed the surgical procedures. An independent surgeon evaluated the patients using clinical (Constant score, QuickDASH and radiological (X-rays, CT scans outcome measures. Results: The cadaver study allowed us to validate the height landmarks relative to the pectoralis major tendon. In the clinical study, at the review, abduction was 95° (60–160, forward flexion was 108° (70–160, external rotation (elbow at body was 34° (0–55, the QuickDASH was 31 (4.5–59, the overall Constant score was 54 (27–75, and the weighted Constant score was 76 (31.5–109. Discussion: This preliminary study of hemiarthroplasty (HA with a locked stem found results that were at least equivalent to published series. As all patients had at least a 2-year follow-up, integration of the locked stem did not cause any specific complications. These results suggest that it is possible to avoid using cement when hemiarthroplasty is performed for the humeral stem. This implant makes height adjustment and transosseous suturing of the tuberosities more reproducible.

  14. Computational modeling to predict mechanical function of joints: application to the lower leg with simulation of two cadaver studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liacouras, Peter C; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2007-12-01

    Computational models of musculoskeletal joints and limbs can provide useful information about joint mechanics. Validated models can be used as predictive devices for understanding joint function and serve as clinical tools for predicting the outcome of surgical procedures. A new computational modeling approach was developed for simulating joint kinematics that are dictated by bone/joint anatomy, ligamentous constraints, and applied loading. Three-dimensional computational models of the lower leg were created to illustrate the application of this new approach. Model development began with generating three-dimensional surfaces of each bone from CT images and then importing into the three-dimensional solid modeling software SOLIDWORKS and motion simulation package COSMOSMOTION. Through SOLIDWORKS and COSMOSMOTION, each bone surface file was filled to create a solid object and positioned necessary components added, and simulations executed. Three-dimensional contacts were added to inhibit intersection of the bones during motion. Ligaments were represented as linear springs. Model predictions were then validated by comparison to two different cadaver studies, syndesmotic injury and repair and ankle inversion following ligament transection. The syndesmotic injury model was able to predict tibial rotation, fibular rotation, and anterior/posterior displacement. In the inversion simulation, calcaneofibular ligament extension and angles of inversion compared well. Some experimental data proved harder to simulate accurately, due to certain software limitations and lack of complete experimental data. Other parameters that could not be easily obtained experimentally can be predicted and analyzed by the computational simulations. In the syndesmotic injury study, the force generated in the tibionavicular and calcaneofibular ligaments reduced with the insertion of the staple, indicating how this repair technique changes joint function. After transection of the calcaneofibular

  15. Morphometry of the lumbar zygapophyseal facet capsule and cartilage with special reference to degenerative osteoarthritic changes: an anatomical study using fresh cadavers of elderly Japanese and Korean subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Iwao; Murakami, Gen; Oguma, Hiroshi; Sato, Shu-Ichi; Lee, U-Young; Han, Seung-Ho; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2004-01-01

    Morphometric data were obtained from fresh cadaver dissections, and observations of degenerative changes in the joint cartilage (DCs) were analyzed to determine whether the morphometric parameters of the lumbar zygapophyseal joint capsule varied according to the presence and severity of DCs. There have been no previous morphometric studies of the facet capsule that describe age-related DCs. Using 23 fresh osteoligamentous lumbar spines from donated cadavers, we performed morphometric investigations of the surface areas of the joints and their capsules and measured the capsular thickness. We hypothesized that the ratio of the inner capsular area to the joint surface area for each facet (the capsule/facet index) could serve as an index showing a functional aspect of a large or small capsule. Our results showed that the joint surface area increased significantly with increasing severity of DCs, according to Grogan's classification. Facets with advanced DCs tended to have a small inner capsular surface. The capsule/facet index generally correlated positively with capsular thickness, especially the dorsal portion; however, this was not true for the ventral portion. The index also correlated negatively with DC progression. Thus, lumbar facet DCs were strongly linked to reconstructive alterations in capsular size, thickness, and looseness. The occurrence and progression of DCs narrowed the joint capsule, especially the dorsal portion, and this seemed to decrease the potential looseness of the joint. Conversely, these capsular alterations seemed to accelerate DC progression. A negative adaptation cycle seemed to occur.

  16. Chiasma crurale: intersection of the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons above the ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging-anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Zurich (Switzerland); Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Pathology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    To determine the precise anatomy and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of the chiasma crurale in cadavers, paying special attention to degenerative changes Twelve fresh human ankles were harvested from 11 nonembalmed cadavers (mean age at death 77 years) and used according to institutional guidelines. MR imaging and MR tenography were used to investigate the anatomy of the chiasma crurale using proton density-weighted sequences. The gross anatomy of the chiasma crurale was evaluated and compared to the MR imaging findings. Histology was used to elucidate further the structure of the chiasma crurale. Above the chiasma, five specimens had a small amount of fat tissue between the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendon. In all specimens both tendons had a sheath below the chiasma but not above it. At the central portion of the chiasma there was no soft tissue between the tendons, except in two specimens that showed an anatomic variant consisting of a thick septum connecting the tibial periosteum and the deep transverse fascia of the leg. In MR images, eight specimens showed what were believed to be degenerative changes in the tendons at the level of the chiasma. However, during gross inspection and histologic analysis of the specimens, there was no tendon degeneration visible. At the central portion of the chiasma, there is no tissue between the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons unless there is an anatomic variant. At the chiasma crurale, areas with irregular tendon surfaces are normal findings and are not associated with tendon degeneration (fraying). (orig.)

  17. Short-term effects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of human remains using pig cadavers as human body analogues: Laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotsmans, Eline M J; Denton, John; Fletcher, Jonathan N; Janaway, Robert C; Wilson, Andrew S

    2014-05-01

    Contradictions and misconceptions regarding the effect of lime on the decay of human remains have demonstrated the need for more research into the effect of different types of lime on cadaver decomposition. This study follows previous research by the authors who have investigated the effect of lime on the decomposition of human remains in burial environments. A further three pig carcasses (Sus scrofa), used as human body analogues, were observed and monitored for 78 days without lime, with hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) and with quicklime (CaO) in the taphonomy laboratory at the University of Bradford. The results showed that in the early stages of decay, the unlimed and hydrated lime cadavers follow a similar pattern of changes. In contrast, the application of quicklime instigated an initial acceleration of decay. Microbial investigation demonstrated that the presence of lime does not eliminate all aerobic bacteria. The experiment also suggested that lime functions as a sink, buffering the carbon dioxide evolution. This study complements the field observations. It has implications for the investigation of time since death of limed remains. Knowledge of the effects of lime on decomposition processes is of interest to forensic pathologists, archaeologists, humanitarian organisations and those concerned with disposal of animal carcasses or human remains in mass disasters.

  18. Evaluación de técnicas de procesamiento y almacenamiento de piel cadavérica para bancos de tejidos

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se reproducen y analizan algunas de las técnicas más comunes a nivel internacional para el manejo de piel cadavérica para bancos de tejidos. Para ello, se llevó a cabo la ablación, el procesamiento, la desinfección y el almacenamiento de piel utilizando un modelo animal (cerdo, Sus scrofa domesticus). Para verificar la calidad microbiológica del tejido se compararon dos diferentes métodos de desinfección (antibióticos y desinfección química con cloro). Además, se evaluó...

  19. Methods to learn human anatomy: perceptions of medical students in paraclinical and clinical phases regarding cadaver dissection and other learning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitreyee Mutalik

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Perception of knowledge by an individual student is different based on the individual primary mental abilities. Therefore, some individuals may show better learning by particular methods. Hence a blend of different methodologies to teach a subject is helpful for majority of the students. In the teaching of human gross anatomy too, a combination of different methods has been in use. However, in the era of decrease in course duration, high and ldquo;student:cadaver ratio and rdquo;, and easy availability of newer technologies, there is a need to review the priorities and preferences of the methods or to find out different ways to use the existing methods to increase their effectiveness. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 2536-2541

  20. Primer estudio de artropodofauna cadavérica sobre modelos experimentales porcinos en el noreste de la provincia del Chubut, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P. ARMANI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estudió el proceso de descomposición y la composición de insectos presentes en biomodelos porcinos, en el NE de la provincia del Chubut. El objetivo fue determinar la composición específica, abundancia y riqueza de la artropodofauna carroñera en el ambiente de estepa. Se realizaron muestreos estacionales durante tres años consecutivos utilizándose tres cerdos domésticos para cada muestreo, colocados dentro de jaulas de madera cubiertas de alambre tejido. Diariamente se colectaron los artrópodos en el cuerpo, debajo y alrededor de este. Se registraron 36.157 individuos pertenecientes a 78 especies de 18 familias distribuidas entre los órdenes Diptera, Coleoptera e Hymenoptera. Se citan por primera vez de la provincia de Chubut tres especies de Calliphoridae: Paralucilia pseudolyrcea Mello, Paralucilia fulvinota Bigot y Chrysomya albiceps Wiedemann; y una especie de Muscidae: Arthurella choelensis Patitucci & Mariluis. Se incorpora como primera cita para la fauna cadavérica argentina a Sarcophaga (Lipoptilocnema margaretae Lahille (Sarcophagidae. Se trata del primer estudio sobre entomología forense realizado en Patagonia que permite conocer los procesos de descomposición cadavérica y la fauna de insectos carroñeros presentes en esta zona. Por lo tanto, aporta información relevante que puede utilizarse en la resolución de casos forenses humanos en la región.

  1. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienen, T G; Buma, P; Scholten, J G F; van Kampen, A; Veth, R P H; Verdonschot, N

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the influence of tibial torque on the meniscal displacement during knee-joint flexion. Three tantalum beads were inserted in the medial meniscus of six human-cadaver joints. The knee joints were placed and loaded in a loading apparatus, and the movements of the beads were determined by means of RSA during knee-joint flexion and extension with and without internal tibial (IT) and external tibial (ET) torque. During flexion without tibial torque, all menisci moved in posterior and lateral direction. The anterior horn showed significantly greater excursions than the posterior horn in both posterior and lateral direction. Internal tibial torque caused an anterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau. External tibial torque caused a posterior displacement of the pathway. External tibial torque restricted the meniscal displacement during the first 30 degrees of knee-joint flexion. The displacements of the meniscus in this experiment were similar to the displacements described in the in vivo MRI studies. Furthermore, the application of tibial torque confirmed the relative immobility of the posterior horn of the meniscus. During external tibial torque, the posterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau during the first 30 degrees of flexion might be restricted by the attached knee-joint capsule or the femoral condyle. This model revealed representative meniscal displacements during simple knee-joint flexion and also during the outer limits of passive knee-joint motion.

  2. Efficacy of radial styloid targeting screws in volar plate fixation of intra-articular distal radial fractures: a biomechanical study in a cadaver fracture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Toshihiko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The locking screws target the radial styloid, theoretically provide greater stability against radial styloid fragment. However, it is unknown whether the radial styloid locking screws increased the stability of the volar plating system fixation along the entire distal radius or not. In this study, we evaluated the stability of the volar plating system fixation with or without the radial styloid screws using a biomechanical study in a cadaver fracture model. Methods Six matched pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaver wrists complete from the proximal forearm to the metacarpal bones were prepared to simulate standardized 3-part intra-articular and severe comminuted fractures. Specimens were fixed using the volar plating system with or without 2 radial styloid screws. Each specimen was loaded at a constant rate of 20 mm/min to failure. Load data was recorded and, ultimate strength and change in gap between distal and proximal fragments were measured. Data for ultimate strength and screw failure after failure loading were compared between the 2 groups. Results The average ultimate strength at failure of the volar plate fixation with radial styloid screws (913.5 ± 157.1 N was significantly higher than that without them (682.2 ± 118.6 N. After failure loading, the average change in gap between the ulnar and proximal fragment was greater than that between the radial and proximal fragment. The number of bent or broken screws in ulnar fragment was higher than that in radial fragment. The number of specimens with bent or broken screws in cases with radial styloid screws was fewer than that in the fixation without radial styloid screws group. Conclusion The ulnar fragment is more intensively stressed than the radial fragment under axial loading of distal radius at full wrist extension. The radial styloid screws were effective in stable volar plate fixation of distal radial fractures.

  3. Determination of clozapine in hair and nail: the role of keratinous biological materials in the identification of a bloated cadaver case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hang; Xiang, Ping; Shen, Min

    2014-02-01

    Keratinous biological materials, such as hair and nails, offer a substantially longer retrospective window of detection compared to other body fluids. Little research on drug analysis in nails is currently being conducted. In this study, the hair and nails from a bloated cadaver was analyzed. The study showed that the forensic toxicology results of keratinous biological materials could provide valuable clues for solving cases. In this study, a method was developed for the extraction and analysis of clozapine from hair and nails. The keratinous bio-samples were washed and then pulverized using a freeze mill. After ultrasonic bath extraction, the supernatants were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS/MS). The method presented in this study proved to be reliable, specific, selective and sensitive with high precision and accuracy. Clozapine was found in both hair and nails from a long term user's remains, even after serious decomposition. The mean concentration of clozapine in the hair was 322.9 pg/mg and 138.3 pg/mg in the nails. Toxicological results helped police narrow the scope of the investigation and improved the efficiency of the breaking of the case. The findings of the present study demonstrated that the method can be used in forensic investigation. Toxicological results increased the efficiency of cadaver identification and the solving of the case. The study demonstrated that hair and nail analysis could provide vital clues for solving cases and showed the value of keratinous biological materials in the forensics field.

  4. Cat dissection and human cadaver prosection versus sculpting human structures from clay: A comparison of alternate approaches to human anatomy laboratory education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, John R.

    Dissection and vivisection are traditional approaches to biology laboratory education. In the case of human anatomy teaching laboratories, there is a long tradition of using human and animal cadaver specimens in the classroom. In a review of the literature comparing traditional dissection and vivisection lessons to alternative lessons designed to reduce the time spent dissecting or the numbers of animals used, we conclude that it is difficult to come to any conclusion regarding the efficacy of different approaches. An analysis of the literature is confounded because many studies have very low statistical power or other methodological weaknesses, and investigators rely on a wide variety of testing instruments to measure an equally varied number of course objectives. Additional well designed studies are necessary before educators can reach any informed conclusions about the efficacy of traditional versus alternative approaches to laboratory education. In our experiments, we compared a traditional cat dissection based undergraduate human anatomy lesson to an alternative where students sculpted human muscles onto plastic human skeletons. Students in the alternative treatment performed significantly better than their peers in the traditional treatment when answering both lower and higher order human anatomy questions. In a subsequent experiment with a similar design, we concluded that the superior performance of the students in the alternative treatment on anatomy exams was likely due to the similarity between the human anatomy representation studied in lab, and the human anatomy questions asked on the exams. When the anatomy questions were presented in the context of a cat specimen, students in the traditional cat dissection treatment outperformed their peers in the alternative treatment. In a final experiment where student performance on a human anatomy exam was compared between a traditional prosected human cadaver treatment and the alternative clay sculpting

  5. Intubation biomechanics: laryngoscope force and cervical spine motion during intubation in cadavers-effect of severe distractive-flexion injury on C3-4 motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley J; Fontes, Ricardo B; From, Robert P; Traynelis, Vincent C; Todd, Michael M; Puttlitz, Christian M; Santoni, Brandon G

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE With application of the forces of intubation, injured (unstable) cervical segments may move more than they normally do, which can result in spinal cord injury. The authors tested whether, during endotracheal intubation, intervertebral motion of an injured C3-4 cervical segment 1) is greater than that in the intact (stable) state and 2) differs when a high- or low-force laryngoscope is used. METHODS Fourteen cadavers underwent 3 intubations using force-sensing laryngoscopes while simultaneous cervical spine motion was recorded with lateral fluoroscopy. The first intubation was performed with an intact cervical spine and a conventional high-force line-of-sight Macintosh laryngoscope. After creation of a severe C3-4 distractive-flexion injury, 2 additional intubations were performed, one with the Macintosh laryngoscope and the other with a low-force indirect video laryngoscope (Airtraq), used in random order. RESULTS During Macintosh intubations, between the intact and the injured conditions, C3-4 extension (0.3° ± 3.0° vs 0.4° ± 2.7°, respectively; p = 0.9515) and anterior-posterior subluxation (-0.1 ± 0.4 mm vs -0.3 ± 0.6 mm, respectively; p = 0.2754) did not differ. During Macintosh and Airtraq intubations with an injured C3-4 segment, despite a large difference in applied force between the 2 laryngoscopes, segmental extension (0.4° ± 2.7° vs 0.3° ± 3.3°, respectively; p = 0.8077) and anterior-posterior subluxation (0.3 ± 0.6 mm vs 0.0 ± 0.7 mm, respectively; p = 0.3203) did not differ. CONCLUSIONS The authors' hypotheses regarding the relationship between laryngoscope force and the motion of an injured cervical segment were not confirmed. Motion-force relationships (biomechanics) of injured cervical intervertebral segments during endotracheal intubation in cadavers are not predicted by the in vitro biomechanical behavior of isolated cervical segments. With the limitations inherent to cadaveric studies, the results of this study suggest

  6. Estudo anatomotopográfico do canal arterial em fetos natimortos dirigido para sua abordagem por videotoracoscopia Anatomotopographic study of ductus arteriosus in newborn cadavers directed for its videotoracoscopic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué Viana de Castro Neto

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetiva realizar um estudo anatomotopográfico do Canal Arterial em fetos natimortos enfatizando o seu comprimento e seu diâmetro de acordo com o tamanho de cada feto. Além de que, descrevemos as distâncias entre este e pontos de reparo importantes para sua abordagem por videotoracoscopia. Estudamos dezesseis fetos natimortos, sendo que oito eram do sexo masculino. O tamanho do feto e os perímetros torácico e cefálico variaram de 42-57, 26-35 e 29-35,5 cm, respectivamente. A média de comprimento e diâmetro foram 11,06 e 5,56 cm. Distâncias entre o Canal e as seguintes estruturas: clavícula-22,13mm, segunda costela-20,75mm, esterno-33,88mm e a.subclávia esquerda-5,30mm. Acreditamos que as medidas apresentadas podem facilitar a abordagem do canal por videotoracoscopia.The purpose of this work is to realize an anatomic and topographic study of the ductus arteriosus in newborn cadavers emphasizing its lenght and diameter according to each size of the newborn cadaver. We also describe distances between the ductus and important structures for thoracoscopic approach. We study sixteen newborn cadavers. Eight were male. Size of the cadavers, thoracic and cephalic perimeters ranged from 42-47,26-35 and 29-35,5 cm, respectively. Median lenght and diameter were 11,06 and 5,56 mm. Distances between ductus arteriosus and follow structures were: collarbone-22,13mm, second rib-20,75mm, sternum-33,88mm and left subclavian artery-5,30mm. We belived that these distances described can facilitate thoracoscopic surgical approach to the ductus arteriosus.

  7. Increased signal intensity at the proximal patellar tendon: correlation between MR imaging and histology in eight cadavers and clinical MR imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Seong Jong; Jin, Wook; Yoon, So Hee; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong-Koo [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gou Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Eun; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    We set out to investigate the cause of persistently increased signal intensity (SI) in the posterior portion of the proximal patellar tendon (pPT) on T1-weighted images (T1WI). MR imaging was performed in eight cadavers, followed by gross histological examination. In addition, 84 patients without trauma history or anterior knee pain were included to compare the SI of the PTs. The patients were divided according to their age, sex, and Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grades. The length and thickness of the increased SI portion in the pPT and whole PT (wPT) on T1WI were recorded. Histological specimens demonstrated that the adipose tissue, vessels, and perivascular connective tissue invaginated into the posterior portion of the pPT. This histological anatomy corresponded to the pPT signal change on MR imaging. There was linear and interdigitating increased SI of the pPT in all of the 84 patients (100 %). There were no differences in the lengths and thicknesses of the increased SI portion of pPTs and wPTs according to age, sex, and KL grade (all p > 0.05). The increased SI of the pPT on T1WI and fluid-sensitive MR images results from invaginating fat, vessels, and perivascular connective tissue. It is not pathological, but a normal and common finding. (orig.)

  8. HDRK-Man: a whole-body voxel model based on high-resolution color slice images of a Korean adult male cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan Hyeong; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Lee, Choonsik; Chung, Min Suk

    2008-08-07

    A Korean voxel model, named 'High-Definition Reference Korean-Man (HDRK-Man)', was constructed using high-resolution color photographic images that were obtained by serially sectioning the cadaver of a 33-year-old Korean adult male. The body height and weight, the skeletal mass and the dimensions of the individual organs and tissues were adjusted to the reference Korean data. The resulting model was then implemented into a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNPX, to calculate the dose conversion coefficients for the internal organs and tissues. The calculated values, overall, were reasonable in comparison with the values from other adult voxel models. HDRK-Man showed higher dose conversion coefficients than other models, due to the facts that HDRK-Man has a smaller torso and that the arms of HDRK-Man are shifted backward. The developed model is believed to adequately represent average Korean radiation workers and thus can be used for more accurate calculation of dose conversion coefficients for Korean radiation workers in the future.

  9. A comparison of sonography and radiography student scores in a cadaver anatomy class before and after the implementation of synchronous distance education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Jennifer Elaine; Randall, K; Anderson, M P

    2015-02-01

    Distance education is a solution to expand medical imaging education to students who might not otherwise be able to obtain the education. It can be a mechanism to reduce the health care worker shortage in underserved areas. In some cases, distance education may be a disruptive technology, and might lower student performance. This study compares student scores in a cadaver anatomy course in the four cohorts preceding the implementation of distance education to the first three cohorts that took the course using a multiple campus design. The means and medians of the lecture exam average, the laboratory component score, and the final course score of the nondistance education cohorts were compared with those of the distance education cohorts using nonparametric statistical analysis. Scores in an anatomy course were compared by campus placement among the distance education cohorts, and the independent effect of distance education on the laboratory component, lecture examination average, and final course scores, while controlling for cumulative grade point average and site (originating/distant), was assessed. Students receiving the course in a nondistance education environment scored higher in the anatomy course than the students who took the course in a distance education environment. Students on the distant campus scored lower than students on the originating site. Distance education technology creates new opportunities for learning, but can be a disruptive technology. Programs seeking to implement distance education into their curriculum should do so with knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages.

  10. Long-term effects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of human remains using pig cadavers as human body analogues: Field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotsmans, Eline M J; Fletcher, Jonathan N; Denton, John; Janaway, Robert C; Wilson, Andrew S

    2014-05-01

    An increased number of police enquiries involving human remains buried with lime have demonstrated the need for more research into the effect of different types of lime on cadaver decomposition and its micro-environment. This study follows previous studies by the authors who have investigated the effects of lime on the decay of human remains in laboratory conditions and 6 months of field experiments. Six pig carcasses (Sus scrofa), used as human body analogues, were buried without lime with hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2) and quicklime (CaO) in shallow graves in sandy-loam soil in Belgium and recovered after 17 and 42 months of burial. Analysis of the soil, lime and carcasses included entomology, pH, moisture content, microbial activity, histology and lime carbonation. The results of this study demonstrate that despite conflicting evidence in the literature, the extent of decomposition is slowed down by burial with both hydrated lime and quicklime. The more advanced the decay process, the more similar the degree of liquefaction between the limed and unlimed remains. The end result for each mode of burial will ultimately result in skeletonisation. This study has implications for the investigation of clandestine burials, for a better understanding of archaeological plaster burials and potentially for the interpretation of mass graves and management of mass disasters by humanitarian organisation and DVI teams.

  11. Jamming of fingers: an experimental study to determine force and deflection in participants and human cadaver specimens for development of a new bionic test device for validation of power-operated motor vehicle side door windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohendorff, Bernd; Weidermann, Christian; Pollinger, Philipp; Burkhart, Klaus J; Müller, Lars Peter

    2013-02-01

    The deformability of human fingers is central to addressing the real-life hazard of finger jamming between the window and seal entry of a power-operated motor vehicle side door window. The index and little fingers of the left hand of 109 participants and of 20 cadaver specimens were placed in a measurement setup. Participants progressively jammed their fingers at five different dorsal-palmar jam positions up to the maximum tolerable pain threshold, whereas the cadaver specimens were jammed up to the maximum possible deflection. Force-deflection curves were calculated corresponding to increasing deflection of the compressed tissue layers of the fingers. The average maximum force applied by the participants was 42 N to the index finger and 35 N to the little finger. In the cadaver fingers, the average of the maximum force applied was 1886 N for the index finger and 1833 N for the little finger. In 200 jam positions, 25 fractures were observed on radiographs; fractures occurred at an average force of 1485 N. These data assisted the development of a prototype of a bionic test device for more realistic validation of power-operated motor vehicle windows.

  12. Estudo anatômico do ligamento patelofemoral lateral em joelho de cadáveres Anatomical study of the lateral patellofemoral ligament in cadaver knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schmidt Navarro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Descrever o ligamento patelofemoral lateral (LPFL por meio de dissecação anatômica de joelhos de cadáveres frescos. Na literatura existe particular interesse pelo LPFL. Essa especial atenção é dada pela sua importância anatômica, biomecânica e pela necessidade da sua reconstrução nos casos de instabilidade medial da patela. MÉTODOS: O LPFL foi estudado em 20 joelhos de 20 cadáveres frescos por meio de dissecações anatômicas. As dissecações foram padronizadas e os dados anotados enviados para análise estatística. RESULTADOS: O LPFL apresentou em média 16,05mm de largura (desvio-padrão: 2,48, 42,10mm de comprimento (desvio-padrão: 8,84. Sua inserção femoral mostrou-se no epicôndilo femoral lateral e com expansão em forma de leque das suas fibras, predominantemente na região posterior e proximal ao epicôndilo lateral. Na patela a inserção encontrada foi na região súpero-lateral (na metade do terço superior no plano coronal, também com expansão das fibras, mas com menor intensidade. No plano sagital, o ligamento situava-se na metade posterior da borda da patela. O LPFL foi isolado na segunda camada retinacular lateral, o retináculo transverso profundo. CONCLUSÃO: O LPFL situa-se na camada retinacular transversa profunda, com a presença de uma expansão das suas fibras em forma de leque, tanto na inserção femoral quanto na patelar. No epicôndilo femoral a inserção encontra-se mais posterior e proximalmente e na patela está na metade posterior da borda patelar (plano sagital e no aspecto súpero-lateral.OBJECTIVES: To describe the lateral patellofemoral ligament (LPFL after anatomical dissection of fresh cadaver knees. The literature shows a particular interest for the LPFL. Such special attention is due to its anatomical and biomechanical importance, and also due to the need to reconstruct the ligament in the cases of medial patellar instability. METHODS: The LPFL was studied in 20 knees of 20

  13. Arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the inferior thyroid artery in human fetal cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgüner, G; Sulak, O

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the arterial supply to the thyroid gland and the relationship between the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in fetal cadavers using anatomical dissection. The anterior necks of 200 fetuses were dissected. The origins of the superior thyroid artery (STA) and the ITA and location of the ITA in relation to the entrance of the thyroid lobe were examined. The relationship between the ITA and the RLN was determined. The origins of the STA were classified as: external carotid artery, common carotid artery (CCA), and the thyrolingual trunk. The origins of the ITA were the thyrocervical trunk and the CCA. The ITA was absent on the left side in two cases. The relationship of the RLN to the ITA fell into seven different types. Type 1: the RLN lay posterior to the artery; right (42.5%), left (65%). Type 2: the RLN lay anterior to the artery; right (40.5%), left (22.5%). Type 3: the RLN lay parallel to the artery; right (11.5%), left (7%). Type 4: the RLN lay between the two branches of the artery; right (1%), left (3.5%). Type 5: The extralaryngeal branch of the RLN was detected before it crossed the ITA; right (4.5%), left (0%). Type 6: the ITA lay between the two branches of the RLN; right (0%), left (0.5%). Type 7: the branches of the RLN lay among the branches of the ITA; right (0%), left (0.5%). The results from this study would be useful in future thyroid surgeries.

  14. Evaluación de técnicas de procesamiento y almacenamiento de piel cadavérica para bancos de tejidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Calvo-Castro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se reproducen y analizan algunas de las técnicas más comunes a nivel internacional para el manejo de piel cadavérica para bancos de tejidos. Para ello, se llevó a cabo la ablación, el procesamiento, la desinfección y el almacenamiento de piel utilizando un modelo animal (cerdo, Sus scrofa domesticus. Para verificar la calidad microbiológica del tejido se compararon dos diferentes métodos de desinfección (antibióticos y desinfección química con cloro. Además, se evaluó el efecto de dos tratamientos para el almacenamiento y conservación de la piel: inmersión en glicerol a bajas temperaturas (4 °C y criopreservación (-70 °C. Finalmente, se analizó un método de esterilización utilizando irradiación con haz de electrones (25 kGy. La estructura general del tejido se analizó mediante tinciones histológicas. Los resultados demostraron la esterilización completa de las muestras, tanto de los tejidos irradiados como en la piel glicerolada desinfectada químicamente (solución de Dakins. Por otro lado, la comparación histológica de las muestras reveló que el tejido glicerolado fue el que mostró la mejor calidad en términos estructurales.

  15. Differences between radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist in the study of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments: magnetic resonance imaging and gross anatomic inspection in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheno, Ramon; Buck, Florian M.; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    To demonstrate how radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist can affect the visualization of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography and gross anatomic inspection in cadavers. The detectability of the intrinsic intercarpal ligaments of ten fresh human wrists was analyzed in coronal, axial and sagittal images in the neutral position and in radial and ulnar deviation with MR imaging and MR arthrography. The findings were then correlated with gross anatomic inspection. Additionally, quantitative measurements including the radiocarpal distances and capitate angles were performed. Differences were noted in the visual conspicuity of only the intercarpal ligaments of the proximal carpal row with different techniques and wrist positions. The average width of the radiocarpal joint was 0.62 mm, 1.55 mm and 2.0 mm (radial side) and 3.78 mm, 2.25 mm and 1.16 mm (ulnar side) in radial deviation, neutral position, and ulnar deviation of the wrist, respectively. Statistically, these maneuvers produced significant opening in the ulnar side during radial deviation (Student's t-test; P = 0.0005) and in the radial side in ulnar deviation (P = 0.007). Significant differences in the width of the radiocarpal joint were observed during radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist, influencing the visualization of the intrinsic ligaments, mainly the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments. The use of MR arthrography with radial and/or ulnar deviation has the potential to improve diagnosis in clinical cases in which injury to one or both of these ligaments is suggested. (orig.)

  16. Comparação entre o custo do transplante hepático cadavérico e o intervivos Cost comparison of cadaveric liver transplantation with living-donor transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cezar Uili Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o custo do transplante hepático cadavérico com o transplante intervivos em adultos. MÉTODOS: O custo total de 25 transplantes hepáticos cadavéricos e 22 transplantes intervivos de adultos foi considerado do dia da internação hospitalar até o dia da alta hospitalar. Os custos das complicações pós-transplante e de seguimento do doador não foram incluídos. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença na duração da internação hospitalar entre os receptores de transplante cadavérico (13,2± 4,1 dias e os de transplante intervivos (15,4± 4,5 dias. O custo com a retirada do fígado para o transplante intervivos (US$ 4.975,08± 565,34 foi mais elevado do que para o transplante cadavérico (US$ 3.081,73± 305,57 (pOBJECTIVE: To compare the cost of cadaveric liver transplantation with adult-adult right hepatic lobe living-donor transplantation. METHOD: Total cost of 25 cadaveric liver transplantations and 22 adult-adult right hepatic lobe living-donor transplantations was considered from the day of hospital admission until the day of discharge. Professional fees and expenses due to postransplant complications and donor follow-up were not included. RESULTS: There was no difference in hospital stay between recipients of cadaveric transplantation (13.2± 4.1 days and those of living-donor transplantation (15.4± 4.5 days. Costs of living-donor organ acquisition (US$ 4,975.08± 565.34 were higher than those of cadaveric organ donation (US$ 3,081.73± 305.57 (p<0.001. Implantation costs were similar for cadaveric and living-donor transplantation. Operating room and material costs were higher for living-donor transplantation and medications, exams and blood components costs were higher for cadaveric transplantation. The most expensive component of both cadaveric and living-donor liver transplantation was the cost of medications. Total cost was higher for living-donor transplantation (US$ 22,986.60± 1,477.09 than for cadaveric

  17. No statistically significant kinematic difference found between a cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilised Triathlon knee arthroplasty: a laboratory study involving eight cadavers examining soft-tissue laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, N C; Ghosh, K M; Blain, A P; Rushton, S P; Longstaff, L M; Deehan, D J

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the maximum laxity conferred by the cruciate-retaining (CR) and posterior-stabilised (PS) Triathlon single-radius total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for anterior drawer, varus-valgus opening and rotation in eight cadaver knees through a defined arc of flexion (0º to 110º). The null hypothesis was that the limits of laxity of CR- and PS-TKAs are not significantly different. The investigation was undertaken in eight loaded cadaver knees undergoing subjective stress testing using a measurement rig. Firstly the native knee was tested prior to preparation for CR-TKA and subsequently for PS-TKA implantation. Surgical navigation was used to track maximal displacements/rotations at 0º, 30º, 60º, 90º and 110° of flexion. Mixed-effects modelling was used to define the behaviour of the TKAs. The laxity measured for the CR- and PS-TKAs revealed no statistically significant differences over the studied flexion arc for the two versions of TKA. Compared with the native knee both TKAs exhibited slightly increased anterior drawer and decreased varus-valgus and internal-external roational laxities. We believe further study is required to define the clinical states for which the additional constraint offered by a PS-TKA implant may be beneficial.

  18. Reconstrucción del ligamento cruzado anterior desde el portal anteromedial; evaluación de la fijación femoral en un modelo cadavérico

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Claramunt, Raúl; Cáceres i Palou, Enric

    2011-01-01

    Objectiu. Valorar el risc de lesió de les estructures posterolaterals del genoll realitzant una reconstrucció del Lligament Encreuat Anterior (LEA) mitjançant plàstia d'isquiotibials i fixació femoral am sistema Cross-Pin. Material. 10 genolls cadavèrics frescs. Reconstrucció artroscòpica del LEA mitjançant túnel anatòmic des del portal anteromedial. Dissecció anatòmica del genoll mesurant distàncies del Cross-Pin al Lligament Col·lateral Lateral (LCL), tendó popliti, nervi peroneo i tendó ga...

  19. Nuevo simulador híbrido cadavérico/sintético para la enseñanza de técnicas intervencionistas para tratamiento del dolor refractario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Flores

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un nuevo simulador para el entrenamiento y evaluación de técnicas intervencionistas bajo visión fluoroscópica en medicina del dolor que permite realizar los procedimientos más utilizados a nivel de cabeza y cuello, tronco, región lumbosacra y pelvis. En el trabajo se desarrolló una inclusión de material óseo cadavérico en material sintético versión no transparente color piel y transparente para entrenamiento en bloqueos bajo visión ecográfica y fluoroscópica combinados. El Nuevo Simulador Híbrido se basó en la inclusión artesanal de material óseo cadavérico dentro de un tejido de material sintético emulando, con elevado realismo, el modelo humano. En la experiencia de los educandos que realizaron los talleres durante el año 2014 expresaron alta satisfacción comparando a pacientes reales, cadáveres frescos y simuladores sintéticos. Este desarrollo permite, como características principales: a repetir cada procedimiento las veces necesarias para que cada educando alcance un estándar mínimo exigible y disminuya el número y tipo de errores posibles propios de cada técnica; b entrenar adecuadamente para los procesos de certificación; c facilitar evaluar la eficacia de entrenar con estos modelos frente al entrenamiento en pacientes reales u otras formas de entrenamiento (simuladores o cadáveres frescos; d mejorar la accesibilidad por su bajo costo evitando la complejidad de la preservación de tejidos, y e permitir, en opinión del autor, reducir la curva de aprendizaje en un medio seguro para paciente, educando, docente y el sistema de salud y universitario.

  20. Estudo anatômico das válvulas do tronco gastrocnêmio em cadáveres humanos Anatomical study of valves in the gastrocnemius trunk in human cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aderval Aragão

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: As válvulas são estruturas características das veias, importantes na orientação do fluxo sangüíneo. Sua presença no sistema venoso superficial dos membros inferiores tem sido bastante estudada. No entanto, nas veias profundas, como a veia gastrocnêmia, a literatura é escassa. OBJETIVO: Realizar um estudo anatômico das válvulas do tronco gastrocnêmio principal em cadáveres humanos adultos. MÉTODOS: Foram dissecados os troncos gastrocnêmios principais de 80 cabeças de músculos gastrocnêmios de 20 cadáveres adultos do sexo masculino, com idade entre 40 e 68 anos, após fixados e mantidos em solução de formol a 10%. Os troncos e tipos de redes foram classificados de acordo com o proposto por Aragão et al. As válvulas foram estudadas quanto ao número, distribuição, localização e tipo com relação ao tronco, perna, cabeça do músculo e tipo de rede gastrocnêmia. RESULTADO: Em 80 cabeças de músculos gastrocnêmios, foram encontrados 95 troncos gastrocnêmios principais, sendo que 17 deles eram duplicados. Foram encontradas 65 válvulas em 60 troncos gastrocnêmios principais, todas elas do tipo bicúspide, sendo 35 na rede tipo I, 23 na do tipo II e sete na rede tipo III. Em 74% dos casos, as válvulas estavam localizadas no terço proximal do tronco gastrocnêmio principal. CONCLUSÃO: As válvulas foram encontradas em todos os tipos de redes que possuíam tronco gastrocnêmio principal, eram todas do tipo bicúspide e se localizaram predominantemente no terço proximal dos troncos gastrocnêmios principais.BACKGROUND: Valves are characteristic structures of veins and are important to guide blood flow. Their presence in the superficial venous system of lower limbs has been well studied. However, there is a lack of published literature on deep veins, such as the gastrocnemius vein. OBJECTIVE: To carry out an anatomical study of the veins in the main gastrocnemius trunk in adult human cadavers. METHODS: The

  1. INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS OF MICROORGANISMS CARRIED BY THE IMPORTANT PARTS OF CADAVERS%遗体表面重要部位携带的微生物构成情况调查与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雪媚; 李玉光; 杨德慧; 刘国军; 姜思朋; 王永阔; 曾寒柳

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] In order to investigate the microorganism contamination and raicroflora of important parts of cadavers in funeral service industry, to enhance management for contagious disease control and prevention in funeral home. [Methods] The samples from the mouths and the noses of eight cadavers in funeral parlors were collected. Bacteriological identification and statistic analysis were subsequently carried out. [Results] After cultivation, 136 molds and S 264 bacteria were isolated. In 2 906 gram-positive (G+) bacteria, the most was staphylococcus. In the next 2 358 gram-negative (G-) bacteria, sphingonomonas headed the list with acinetobacter in the next place. Among them, 1 698 pathogenic and opportunistic pathogen bacteria were isolated, which composed of 32.26%. [Conclusion] A large number of microorganisms are identified from the mouths and the noses of remains, and considerable pathogenic and opportunistic pathogen bacteria are isolated among them. The high isolated ratio of pathogenic and opportunistic pathogen bacteria indict that funeral employees should pay more attention to biological safety protection and disinfection when handling the remains.%[目的]了解殡仪场所遗体表面重要部位的菌群构成情况,以加强殡仪场所传染性疾病感染的管理,控制 殡仪场所传染性疾病的发生.[方法]共对殡仪馆内8具遗体的口、鼻部位进行微生物采样,采样结果进行细菌学检测鉴定.[结果]共分离霉菌136株,细菌5 264株,其中革兰阳性菌为2 906株,以葡萄球菌属为主;革兰阴性菌为2 358株,以鞘氨醇单胞菌属为主,其次是不动杆菌属.共检出的致病菌(包括机会致病菌)1 698株,致病菌的分离率为32.26%.[结论]从遗体口和鼻部携带分离了大量的微生物,其中致病菌(包括机会致病菌)检出率非常高,因此,殡仪职工在处理遗体的过程中应注意生物安全防护和消毒问题.

  2. Effects of genomic HLA-DR compatibility on long-term survival in first-cadaver kidney transplants%HLA-DR基因相容对肾移植长期存活的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭建明; 唐孝达

    2000-01-01

    目的 研究人类白细胞Ⅱ类抗原(HLA-DR)基因相容对肾移植长期存活的影响.方法 采用基因分型技术,回顾性分析518例首次肾移植HLA-DR基因相容情况.结果 单个移植中心达到基因水平DR相配的受者超过10%,半数以上可达1个DR相配.HLA-DR相容的受者急性排斥反应显著减少、早期肾功能恢复顺利,1~5年人存活率提高10%~21.7%(P<0.05)、肾存活率提高17%~37.7%(P<0.01),差舁有显著性.Cox模型独立分析表明,DR错配是影响移植肾长期存活的主要因素之一.结论 选择基因水平HLA-DR相容具有临床可行性、对首次尸肾移植长期存活具有显著影响.%Objective To study the effect of genomic HLA-DR compatibility on long-term survival in renal transplantation.Methods A retrospective study was performed on 518 first-cadaver renal transplants by using genotyping technique.Results More than 10%recipients shared HLA-DR matching at DNA level.half of 1 DR mismatches.The recipients with HLA-DR matched transplants showed a significant decrease of acute rejection episodes and a smooth recovery of early renal function as compared with those of DR mismatching kidneys.The 1 to 5 year-person survival rate was increased by 17%to 37.7% (P<0.01)respectively.Multivariate analysis of 10 variables by Cox regression model revealed that DR mismatching was the most important factors influencing the long-term graft survival.Conclusion Genomic HLA-DR compatibility had a significant impact on long-term survival of first-cadaver kidney transplantation.

  3. 青年人眼晶状体的显微研究及其临床意义%Study on micro-anatomy of the lens of the normal adult cadaver eyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁皓; 谭少健; 黄明汉; 区显宁

    2001-01-01

    目的 通过对正常成人尸眼晶状体的显微解剖研究,推动白内障摘出及人工晶状体(IOL)植入术的改进。方法 测量53人共102只成年尸眼(年龄19~41a)的晶状体直径(LD)及无韧带区直径(ZFZ)等有关正常值。结果 正常成年人LD平均为9.61mm,ZFZ为7.73mm,ZFZ与LD呈直线正相关关系;晶状体核直径(ND)平均为7.68mm,核厚度(NT)为2.9mm,同一人的LD、ND、NT呈直线正相关关系;晶状体囊袋直径(CBD)平均为10.15mm,与LD比较有显著差异。结论 成年人白内障摘出术中连续环形撕前囊应在5~6mm之间。%Objective To study the micro-anatomy of the lens of the normaladult cadaver eyes in order to complement the lens micro-anatomical theory and improve the cataract extraction and the intraocular lens (IOL) implantation.Methods The mean values of the lens diameter (LD) and the zonular-free zone diameter (ZFZ) in 102 eyes of 53 cadavers were measured. Results The mean LD and ZFZ were 9.61mm,7.73mm respectively. The larger the LD,the larger the ZFZ. The diameter of the lens nucleus (ND) was 7.68mm, the lens nucleus thickness (NT) was 2.9mm. There is a linear positive correlation between the right eye and the left eye of a man. The mean capsular bag diameter (CBD) was 10.15mm,larger than LD.Conclusion It is recommended that the capsular opening diameter be from 5 to 6mm in adult cataract extraction.

  4. Cadaver as an experimental model to study the effect of muscle advancement on the waistline Cadáver como modelo experimental para avaliar o efeito do avanço muscular na cintura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Xerfan Nahas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of cadaver as an experimental model to evaluate the waistline after correction of rectus diastasis and the advancement of the external oblique muscles in cadavers were described on this article. Two parameters were used: the measurement of the abdominal circumference and the overlap of the two skin flaps formed by a xypho-pubic incision. With a previously marked area of undermining of the aponeurotic layer, measurements of the overlapped flaps were made in the following stages of dissection: 1 with the myo-aponeurotic layer intact; 2 after the correction of rectus diastasis; and 3 after the advancement of the external oblique muscle. The experimental model described showed to be feasible to demonstrate the effects of the correction of rectus diastasis and of the advancement of external oblique muscles on the waistline.O uso de cadáver como modelo experimental para avaliar a cintura após a correção da diástase de retos e o avanço dos músculos oblíquo externos é descrito neste estudo. Dois parâmetros foram utilizados: a medida da circunferência abdominal e a sobreposição de dois retalhos dermogordurosos formados por uma incisão xifo-púbica. Após a definição da área de descolamento supra-aponeurótico, a medida da sobreposição dos retalhos foi realizada nas seguintes fases de dissecção: 1 com o plano mio-aponeurótico íntegro; 2 após a correção da diástase de retos; e 3 após o avanço dos músculos oblíquos externos. O modelo experimental descrito mostrou-se viável para demonstrar os efeitos da correção da diástase de retos e no avanço dos músculos oblíquo externos na cintura.

  5. Hoffa's fat pad injuries and their relationship with anterior cruciate ligament tears: new observations based on MR imaging in patients and MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States); Chung, Christine B.; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States); Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    To determine the normal anatomic relationships of Hoffa's fat pad with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and with the frequency of Hoffa's fat pad abnormalities in ACL-deficient knees. Retrospective clinical study on patients and observational anatomic study on cadavers. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. MR imaging studies of the knees of 100 patients (21-48 years old) with or without arthroscopically proven tears of the ACL, performed at a single institution, were reviewed by two readers for abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad. Ten cadaveric knee specimens were studied with MR imaging and Faxitron radiographs, and by inspection of sections and histology. Alterations in Hoffa's fat pad on MR imaging were present in 64% (32/50) of patients with torn ACLs, and in 24% (12/50) of patients without a tear of the ACL (P < 0.05). Hoffa's fat pad inserted into the intercondylar notch in 50% (5/10) of cadaveric specimens, four in conjunction with the ligamentum mucosum and in one in an isolated fashion. Histological study demonstrated the composition of the ligamentum mucosum and Hoffa's fat pad and their course and insertion sites in the intercondylar notch. Abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad, such as focal and diffuse edema, tears, scars and synovial proliferation, are more common in knees with torn ACLs than in knees with intact ACLs. (orig.)

  6. Lesiones post mortales por fauna cadavérica: La acción de las hormigas sobre el cadáver Post-mortal injuries by cadaveric fauna: The action of the ants on human corpses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Garamendi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Los animales pueden actuar como predadores de los restos humanos y las lesiones postmortales que infligen en los cadáveres pueden dar lugar a errores de interpretación de los hallazgos en las autopsias forenses. Entre la fauna cadavérica, las hormigas constituyen un caso excepcional al ser los únicos insectos que pueden iniciar su actividad predadora antes de instaurarse la putrefacción. Las hormigas suelen producir lesiones que por su asiento y morfología resultan típicas. Se presenta un caso en el que se evidencia la presencia de lesiones de morfología típica por la acción lesiva postmortal de hormigas, pero con una extensión y localización inhabituales.Post-mortem animal predation can lead to errors when interpreting forensic autopsy findings. Ants are the only insects that can attack human corpses after death and before decomposition process starts. Ants produce post mortal injuries in the skin that have a distinct location and morphology. We present a forensic case in which post mortal injuries produced by ants in a human corpse had a typical morphology; however their location and extension were unusual.

  7. Discectomia lombar transforaminal: estudo quantitativo em cadáveres Discectomía lumbar transforaminal: estudio cuantitativo en cadáveres Transforaminal lumbar discectomy: quantitative study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Neves Vialle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a eficácia da discectomia lombar por via transforaminal, de modo quantitativo, em estudo experimental com cadáveres. MÉTODOS: este estudo utilizou cinco cadáveres humanos frescos, submetidos à discectomia pela via de acesso póstero-lateral nos níveis L3-L4 e L4-L5, visando remover a maior quantidade de material discal possível. Uma abordagem anterior complementar, expondo os mesmos discos intervertebrais, permitiu a remoção do material discal remanescente, para posterior comparação. RESULTADOS: em L3-L4, a remoção transforaminal do disco obteve, em média, 48% do volume total, e em L4-L5, cerca de 38%. CONCLUSÃO: apesar de segura e de fácil realização, a via transforaminal não é tão eficaz quanto à via anterior na remoção do disco intervertebral.OBJETIVO: evaluar la eficacia de la discectomía lumbar por vía transforaminal, de modo cuantitativo, en un estudio experimental con cadáveres. MÉTODOS: este estudio utilizó cinco cadáveres humanos frescos, sometidos à discectomía por vía de acceso posterolateral en los niveles L3-L4 y L4-L5, visando remover la mayor cantidad de material discal posible. Un abordaje anterior complementar, exponiendo los mismos discos intervertebrales, permitió la remoción del material discal remanente, para posterior comparación. RESULTADOS: en L3-L4, la remoción transforaminal del disco obtuvo en promedio 48% del volumen total y en L4-L5, cerca del 38%. CONCLUSIÓN: aunque segura y de fácil realización, la vía transforaminal no es tan eficaz como la vía anterior en la remoción del disco intervertebral.OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the quantitative efficacy of transforaminal lumbar discectomy, through a cadaver study. METHODS: this study used five fresh human cadavers, that underwent L3-L4 and L4-L5 posterolateral discectomy, aiming to remove as much disc material as possible. After that, the remaining disc material was removed through an anterior approach, for further

  8. Ponto de entrada para as hastes intramedulares anterógradas do fêmur: estudo em cadáver Entry point for the anterograde femur intramedullary nail: a cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro José Labronici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a saída natural do fio-guia no trocânter maior pela via retrógrada do fêmur, em espécimes de cadáver. Métodos: 100 fêmures foram perfurados entre os côndilos femorais, a 1,2cm da região intercondilar. Um fio-guia reto de 3mm foi introduzido, de forma retrógrada, até alcançar a extremidade proximal do fêmur. Foram avaliados em relação à região posterossuperior e anterossuperior do trocânter maior, fossa piriforme e linha mediana superior entre a cabeça-colo e trocânter maior. RESULTADOS: Em 62% o fio-guia reto saiu na face anterior do trocânter maior. Na fossa piriforme, a distância mediana observada foi de 1,0cm e a amplitude interquartílica, de 0,5cm, expressando inicialmente, em relação à fossa piriforme, melhor precisão. CONCLUSÃO: O eixo central do canal medular, na incidência coronal, projetou melhor precisão na região da fossa piriforme.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the natural exit of the wire guides in major trochanter through retrograde femoral approach, in cadaver specimens. Material and Method: 100 femurs had been perforated between the femoral condyles, at 1.2 cm of the intercondylar region. A 3-mm straight wire guide was introduced, through retrograde approach, until the proximal extremity of femur was reached. Femurs were assessed for posterosuperior and anterosuperior portions of major trochanter, pear-shaped cavity, and upper median line between the head-neck and the major trochanter. RESULTS: in 62%, the straight wire guides exited at the anterior surface of major trochanter. In the pear-shaped cavity, the median distance found was 1.0 cm and the interquartile range was 0.5 cm, initially expressing, in relation to pear-shaped cavity, better accuracy. CONCLUSION: the central axis of the medullar canal, at coronal plane, projected better accuracy in the region of the pear-shaped cavity.

  9. 低频电刺激对中国树鼩死亡后脏器中激素水平影响%Effect of low frequency electrical stimulation on hormone levels in the organs of Chinese tree shrew cadavers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞发荣; 张璟; 郭丽蓉; 俞文; 连秀珍; 谢明仁; 李登楼; 张诗爽

    2015-01-01

    目的:探索低频电刺激对中国树鼩死亡后脏器中激素水平的影响。方法给予中国树鼩低频电刺激,分别于死亡后0、3、6、12、18、24、36 h和72 h取甲状腺、肝、脾,用放射免疫法测定内皮素( endothelin, ET)、心钠素( atrial natriuretic factor, ANF)、血栓素( thromboxane, TX)水平;剥取死后0 h中国树鼩中脑腹侧背盖区( ventral tegmental area,VTA)检测c-fos表达。结果电刺激后,中国树鼩尸体脏器中内皮素、心钠素、血栓素水平比对照组显著升高,其水平随死亡后时间的延长而降低;VTA c-fos表达明显增强。结论低频电刺激能引起中国树鼩脏器中激素的合成、释放和脑组织c-fos表达。%Objective To study the effect of low frequency electrical stimulation on hormone levels in organs of Chinese tree shrews after death.Methods Giving Chinese tree shrews low frequency electrical stimulation.At 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 18 h, 24 h, 36 h and 72 h after death, the thyroid, liver, spleen were taken,and the levels of endothelin (ET), atrial natriuretic factor( ANF) , thromboxane ( TX) were determined by RIA method.At 0 h after death, midbrain ventral tegmental area ( VTA) of Chinese tree shrews was taken to detect the c-fos expression.Results After electrical stimula-tion, ET, ANF, TX levels in the cadaver organs and VTA c-fos expression of Chinese tree shrews were significantly in-creased than in the control group.The contents were decreasing with the time after death.Conclusions Low frequency e-lectrical stimulation can induce the synthesis and release of hormones in organs and c-fos expression in brain tissue of Chi-nese tree shrews.

  10. Bilateral accessory cleidohyoid in a human cadaver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark ME

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available During routine anatomical dissection of the infrahyoid region, a muscle was found bilaterally originating from the sternal end of clavicle and inserting into the hyoid bone. The muscle coursed parallel and lateral to the sternohyoid muscle. The muscle was found in the presence of an intact omohyoid, thus being classified as an accessory cleidohyoid (cleidohyoideus accessorius muscle. While other authors have reported the presence of a unilateral cleidohyoideus accessorius muscle, to our knowledge this is the first case of a bilateral cleidohyoideus accessorius muscle in the medical literature. Anatomical variations of the infrahyoid muscles may have functional, diagnostic, surgical and pathological implications.

  11. Bilateral accessory cleidohyoid in a human cadaver

    OpenAIRE

    Stark ME; Wu B; Bluth BE; Wisco JJ

    2009-01-01

    During routine anatomical dissection of the infrahyoid region, a muscle was found bilaterally originating from the sternal end of clavicle and inserting into the hyoid bone. The muscle coursed parallel and lateral to the sternohyoid muscle. The muscle was found in the presence of an intact omohyoid, thus being classified as an accessory cleidohyoid (cleidohyoideus accessorius) muscle. While other authors have reported the presence of a unilateral cleidohyoideus accessorius muscle, to our know...

  12. [Impression traces from firearms on cadaver skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püschel, K; Koops, E; Kulle, K J

    1996-01-01

    Guns may occasionally leave traces on human skin, for example by compression/impression of the tissue (esp. in the area of livores), by contact-transfer of dirt, oil, and rust, or by forming the pattern of blood-smears. The case of a 31-year-old drug-addict is presented in detail: The man committed suicide by shooting himself (entrance hole under the chin). When the dead body was found there was no weapon at the scene. By careful securing of evidence and analyzing the pattern of metallisations (identified as rust from the old pistol) it was reconstructed that the suicident held the pistol (identified as Russian Tokarew TT33-7.62 mm) in his hand for many hours postmortem until it was removed by an unknown thief.

  13. Validação técnica da drenagem pulmonar como tratamento do enfisema pulmonar avançado: estudo anatômico em cadáveres Technical validation of pulmonary drainage for the treatment of severe pulmonary emphysema: a cadaver-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Mott Ancona Lopez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a técnica operatória da drenagem pulmonar através do estudo anatômico em cadáveres, determinar se o local definido para a drenagem pulmonar é adequado e seguro, e determinar a relação anatômica do tubo de drenagem com a parede torácica, pulmões, grandes vasos e mediastino. MÉTODOS: Foram dissecados 30 cadáveres de ambos os sexos, fornecidos pelo Necrotério do Hospital Central da Santa Casa de São Paulo, em São Paulo (SP no período entre maio e novembro de 2011. Foi inserido um dreno de aço de 7,5 cm com 24 F de diâmetro no segundo espaço intercostal, na linha médio-clavicular, bilateralmente, e foi medida a distância do dreno com as seguintes estruturas: brônquios principais, brônquios dos lobos superiores, vasos subclávios, artérias pulmonares, artérias pulmonares do lobo superior, veia pulmonar superior, veia ázigos e aorta. Foram realizadas medições de peso, altura, diâmetro laterolateral do tórax, diâmetro posteroanterior do tórax e espessura da parede torácica de cada cadáver. RESULTADOS: Dos 30 cadáveres dissecados, 20 e 10 eram do sexo masculino e feminino, respectivamente. A média da extremidade distal do dreno com os brônquios principais direito e esquerdo foi de 7,2 cm. CONCLUSÕES: A utilização de um dreno torácico de tamanho fixo na posição preconizada é factível e segura, independentemente das características antropométricas do paciente.OBJECTIVE: A cadaver-based study was carried out in order to describe the pulmonary drainage surgical technique, to determine whether the site for the insertion of the chest tube is appropriate and safe, and to determine the anatomical relationship of the chest tube with the chest wall, lungs, large blood vessels, and mediastinum. METHODS: Between May and November of 2011, 30 cadavers of both genders were dissected. The cadavers were provided by the Santa Casa de São Paulo Central Hospital Mortuary, located in the city of São Paulo

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of collagen content and types in the rectus abdominis muscle of cadavers of different ages Imunohistoquímica do colágeno no músculo reto do abdome de cadáveres de diferentes grupos etários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliziane Nitz de Carvalho Calvi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the collagen content and types in the rectus abdominis muscle of cadavers of different ages. METHODS: Forty fresh adult male cadavers, at room temperature, were obtained from the Institute of Legal Medicine of Franca and dissected within 24 hours of death. The cadavers were divided into two groups: Group A (n=20, 18 to 30 years of age, and Group B (n=20, 31 to 60 years of age. Bilateral incisions were made in the middle portion of anterior rectus sheath 3 cm superiorly and 2 cm inferiorly to the umbilicus and four fragments of the rectus abdominis muscle were dissected. The samples were fixed in 10% buffered formalin and sent for immunohistochemical analysis to determine collagen content and types. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical results revealed higher amounts of type I and type III collagen in Group A. However, no difference in the amount of type IV collagen was found between the groups. CONCLUSION: The amount of type I and type III collagen was higher in group A.OBJETIVO: Avaliar o colágeno no músculo reto do abdome em cadáveres de diferentes faixas etárias. MÉTODOS: Foram dissecados 40 cadáveres adultos masculinos, não fixados, com tempo de óbito de até 24 horas, em temperatura ambiente, provenientes do Instituto Médico-Legal de Franca (SP - Brasil. Os cadáveres foram distribuídos em dois grupos: GRUPO A (n=20 - 18 a 30 anos e GRUPO B (n=20 -31 a 60 anos. Realizou-se incisão na porção mediana da lâmina anterior da bainha do músculo reto a 3 cm superiormente e 2 cm inferiormente ao umbigo em ambos os lados, sendo retirados quatro fragmentos de músculo reto do abdome. Esse material foi conservado em formalina tamponado a 10% e enviado para imuno-histoquímica para determinação do tipo de colágeno. RESULTADOS: Na Imunihistoquímica os colágenos I e III foram estatisticamente maiores no grupo A, porém não houve diferença entre os grupos em relação ao colágeno IV. CONCLUSÃO: A quantidade de col

  15. Insertion of lower cervical spine anterior pedicle screw in 18 cadavers%下颈椎前路椎弓根螺钉置入的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王远政; 刘洋; 邓忠良

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨下颈椎前路椎弓根螺钉置入技术的可行性.方法 取18具成人尸体正常颈椎标本,剔除其周围软组织至清楚显露椎体前壁.CT扫描后,用Mimics软件重建三维模型,并测量C3~C7个体化置钉参数,包括进钉点(即椎弓根中轴线在椎体前壁投影点)、置钉方向(螺钉在横断面和矢状面上的倾斜角度)以及螺钉长度.严格按照测量结果,直视下置入椎弓根螺钉.术后作CT扫描,评价置钉效果.结果 进针点:C3、C4位于置钉椎弓根对侧,正中矢状面旁2~3 mm,距上终板6~7 mm;C5~ C7与置钉椎弓根同侧,其中C5位于正中矢状面旁1~2 mm,距上终板7.0~7.5 mm,C6、C7则为4~5 mm和7.5 ~8.5 mm.置钉方向:理想角度在C3、C4为外倾角46°~47°,头倾角-11°~-7°;在C5外倾角约48°,头倾角接近0°;C6、C7为36°~40°和8~13°.螺钉长度:可选择28、30、32 mm,其直径为3.5 mm.本组共置钉144枚.术后CT示,全部螺钉均经椎体前方置入椎弓根内抵达侧块.其中,有16枚胀破椎弓根外侧皮质,3枚穿破外侧皮质(均发生在C3、C4节段).结论 下颈椎前路椎弓根螺钉置入技术是可行的.%Objective To study the feasibility of lower cervical spine anterior pedicle screw ( APS) insertion and provide basis for its clinical application according to the preoperative APS related technological parameters. Methods Normal cervical spine specimens of 18 cadavers were carefully dissected to resect the surrounding tissue and to clearly expose the centrum antetheca. Following the CT scans, three dimensional model was reconstructed by Mimics software. The imaging data to measured key parameters of anterior transpedicular screw fixation were also produced by Mimics software. The individual screw insertion parameters including intersection point (projective point of pedicle central axis on the centrum antetheca) , insertion angle (the inclined angle of screws in cross-sectional and sagittal

  16. Análise comparativa das alterações nos fluxos de tensão do joelho nas próteses totais e unicompartimentais cimentadas: estudo experimental em dez cadáveres humanos Comparative analisys of changes in knee strain transfer flow in total and unicompartmental cemented prostheses: a trial in ten human cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Pécora

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Análise comparativa das alterações nos fluxos de tensão do joelho nas próteses totais e unicompartimentais cimentadas. Estudo experimental em dez cadáveres humanos. Os autores comparam as alterações nos fluxos de tensão do fêmur distal e da tíbia proximal provocadas pelas próteses total e unicompartimental cimentadas do joelho, por meio de extensometria elétrica em 10 cadáveres humanos. Utilizam um dispositivo mecânico para adaptação das peças anatômicas à máquina de ensaios mecânicos Kratos 5002. Concluem: 1 A prótese total do joelho mantém o padrão de distribuição das cargas no terço distal do fêmur; 2 A prótese unicompartimental aumenta as tensões de compressão na cortical medial e as tensões de tração na cortical lateral do terço distal do fêmur; 3 Os componentes tibiais (parcial medial e total aumentam, da mesma forma, as tensões de compressão na cortical póstero-medial da tíbia.Load transfer changes on cemented total and unicompartmental knee prosthesis. Experimental study on ten human cadavers. The authors compare the load transfer changes on the distal femur and proximal tibia due to cemented total and unicompartmental knee prosthesis under compressive load-bearing on ten human cadavers employing strain gauges and a Kratos 5002 stress-testing system. The conclusions were: 1 The Total knee prosthesis does not alter the load transfer on the distal femur; 2 The unicompartmental knee prosthesis increases the compression load on the femoral medial cortex and increases the strain tension loads on the femoral lateral cortex; 3 The tibial components (partial medial and total increase the compression strain tension on the postero-medial cortex of the tibia.

  17. Biomecánica de la fijación distal en fracturas extrarticulares de radio: tornillos versus pernos Estudio en modelos cadavéricos. [Biomechanics of distal fixation in distal radius fracture: screws versus smooth pegs. Study in cadaveric models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Muratore

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo Comparar biomecánicamente en modelos cadavéricos tornillos bloqueados versus pernos bloqueados en fracturas extraarticulares de radio distal estabilizadas con placas bloqueadas volares. Materiales y Métodos Se reprodujeron fracturas extraarticulares conminutas (AO-A3 en 12 radios de 6 cadáveres. Se dividieron dos grupos según el empleo de tornillos bloqueados o pernos en la fijación distal. Se realizaron ensayos biomecánicos evaluando cambios en la rigidez del montaje después de realizar una carga axial. Finalmente, se llevó el sistema al fallo. Se efectuaron controles radiológicos en todas las etapas. Resultados Al llevarlos al fallo, el sistema con tornillos presentó una mayor disminución en la altura y ángulo de la osteotomía, con respecto al sistema fijado con pernos, variando en mayor grado hacia dorsal la carilla articular en el perfil. Se observó una separación de la placa en relación al hueso en las placas montadas con pernos. La carga máxima tolerada con tornillos bloqueados fue de 1659N y, en los pernos, de 1905N. Conclusiones Encontramos una transmisión de cargas en dos tiempos en los modelos fijados con pernos. Una primera instancia en el cual la fuerza pasa de la epífisis a la diáfisis a través del material de osteosíntesis (hueso-placa-hueso, puenteando la fractura. En un segundo tiempo, la placa se separa del sistema debido al deslizamiento de los pernos, posibilitando una transmisión directamente del fragmento distal al proximal (hueso-hueso que produce en todos los casos la fractura incompleta y longitudinal de la cortical volar.

  18. Estudo biomecânico em flexão da coluna cervical de cadáveres humanos submetida à corpectomia e estabilização com enxerto de fíbula Cervical spine flexion biomechanical study in cadaver submitted to resection of vertebral body and stabilization with fibular graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Marchetto

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo apresenta e discute os resultados da análise biomecânica, radiográfica e anatômica de 20 peças de coluna cervical de cadáveres humanos, submetidas à corpectomia de C5, discectomia adjacente e estabilização com enxerto de fíbula. Os ensaios em flexão foram realizados em Máquina Universal de Testes. Nenhuma fratura ou extrusão do enxerto foi observada. A falha mecânica ocorreu na interface corpo vertebral-enxerto fibular, caracterizada por fratura dos corpos vertebrais adjacentes em 11 experimentos e afundamento da esponjosa em nove. O ligamento longitudinal posterior e o complexo ligamentar posterior não foram lesados em nenhuma das peças. Concluem que, em estudo experimental, o enxerto de fíbula é resistente e proporciona estabilidade imediata à coluna cervical quando submetido a carga em flexão.The authors present and discuss the results of a biomechanical, radiographic and anatomical analysis of 20 specimens, obtained from human cadaver of cervical spine submitted to C5 corpectomy, adjacent discectomy and stabilization with fibular graft. The flexion tests were carried out in the Test Universal Machine. Fracture or graft extrusion was not observed. Mechanical failure was observed in the vertebral body-fibular graft interface, characterized by fracture of the adjacent vertebral bodies in 11 experiments and depression of the cancellous bone in nine. The posterior longitudinal ligament and the posterior ligamental complex were not injured in any of the specimens. The authors concluded that, in an experimental study, the fibular graft is resistant and provides immediate stability to the cervical spine when submitted to flexion load.

  19. An atypical lateral hernia and concomitant inguinal and umbilical hernias in a patient with polycystic kidney disease and an intracranial aneurysm - a combined approach of clinical and radiological investigation, endoscopic hernia repair, and anatomical cadaver model documentation and a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veréb-Amolini, László; Betschart, Thomas; Kiss, Emilia; Ullrich, Oliver; Wildi, Stefan; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hernias are difficult to diagnose due to their rarity and often unspecific symptoms. In the literature there exist hints to peri-inguinal hernias, i.e. direct lateral hernia, but most of them are forms of Spigelian hernias. Since the majority were described during the first half of the past century or even earlier, only very few cases have been documented using modern diagnostic techniques. We report a unique case of a 51 year old patient presenting with an atypical inguinal hernia with concomitant inguinal and umbilical hernias in combination with cystic kidney disease and intracranial aneurysm. The atypical position of the hernia was assumed from clinical inspection, ultrasound and CT scan and verified during pre-peritoneoscopy. Using an anatomical cadaver dissection approach, we followed the unusual position of the hernia through the abdominal wall below the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. After a thorough literature search, we assume that the present hernia containing a hernial sac has not been documented before, especially not in such a multidisciplinary approach comprising radiological, surgical and anatomical localisation and endoscopic treatment in a patient with a clinical situation being aggravated by large cystic kidneys leading to dialysis-dependency. Rare hernias have been described as being often associated with concomitant inguinal or other hernias, a predisposition for the male gender and a pathogenic mechanism related to other soft tissue defects such as cystic kidney disease or cranial aneurysm. Thus, we consider this a unique case that has not been documented in this constellation previously, which may increase the awareness for these rare hernias.

  20. Estudo das propriedades mecânicas do ligamento cruzado posterior e do ligamento patelar de cadáveres de seres humanos após utilização de radiofreqüência Study of the mechanical properties of the posterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon on fresh human cadavers after radiofrequency shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Fazzolari Dota

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visou estudar os efeitos da radiofreqüência sobre os ligamentos patelares (LP e ligamentos cruzados posteriores (LCP de cadáveres, levando em conta as características de rigidez e deformação máxima. Foram utilizados 11 LCP e 14 LP, sendo feitas as aferições com o aparelho Kratos® K5002 . Foi realizada a termoabrasão das estruturas, com encurtamento obtido entre 15 e 20% do comprimento inicial. Observou-se que essas deformações (encurtamento não se mantiveram no ensaio pós RF. Conclusão: A radiofreqüência permite o encurtamento do LP e LCP. O encurtamento obtido não se mantém completamente quando os ligamentos são submetidos a cargas tensionais padronizadas neste ensaio biomecânico. O uso de radiofrequência causa redução da rigidez do tecido (LP e LCP.This study intended to examine the effects of radiofrequency shrinkage (RF on patellar ligament (PL and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL of fresh human cadavers, measuring stiffness and maximum deformation. Eleven PCLs and 14 PLs were studied with traction tests being performed with the aid of a Kratos® K5002 machine. The structures were reduced by 15-20%, after the shrinkage. However, this reduction was partially lost after the traction test. Conclusion: RF was successful in reducing the length of the structures studied, in spite of the statistically significant stiffness loss. Then, RF was not fully successful in maintaining the reduction of ligament length under the traction forces of the test.

  1. Elongamento do enxerto de tendões do músculo grácial e semitendinoso humanos: estudo realizado em cadáveres de adultos jovens Graft semitendinosus and gracilis human muscle tendons elongation: a study carried out on young adult human cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Rocha Piedade

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Na cirurgia de reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior do joelho, os enxertos de tendões autólogos são a principal opção como substitutos ligamentares. Entretanto, uma das razões da falha da reconstrução ligamentar com tecidos moles é o estiramento ou elongamento do enxerto com o tempo. Neste trabalho, foram ensaiados oito tendões do músculo grácil e oito do músculo semitendinoso humanos, obtidos de quatro cadáveres do sexo masculino, com idade média de 24,5 anos. Cada tendão foi submetido a uma deformação relativa constante de 2,5% durante 600 s, com registro contínuo do relaxamento de força. A seguir, o tendão retornava ao seu comprimento inicial e era mantido num período de repouso de 300 s. Após este intervalo, um segundo ensaio, semelhante ao primeiro, era realizado. A velocidade de carregamento empregada foi de 10% do comprimento inicial do corpo de prova por segundo. Foram obtidos valores de força inicial, com 300 s e 600 s nos dois ensaios. A análise estatística sugere um comportamento mecânico mais uniforme para o tendão do músculo semitendinoso quando comparado ao tendão do músculo grácil.In the anterior cruciate ligament knee surgery reconstruction, autologous tendons graft remains as a main option as substitutive ligaments. However time effect on graft elongation is the main reason of ligament reconstruction failure. Traction tests have been performed on eight gracilis as well as on eight semitendinosus human muscles tendons obtained from four male cadavers at an average of 24.5 years. Each tendon specimen has been submitted to a deformation of 2.5% of its initial length for a time interval of 600 s with continuous recording of the corresponding force relaxation. The tendon specimen was then kept at rest for 300 s as soon as it returned to its initial length. The same specimen was then submitted to a similar test. Deformation rate for both tests was 10% of its initial length per second. Initial

  2. MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF WORMIAN BONES IN CADAVER SKULLS

    OpenAIRE

    Vasanthi; Adinarayana; Pujitha

    2015-01-01

    Wormian bones are accessory bones are not normally present in skull . They may or may not be associated with clinical abnormalities . In the present study a significant number of wormian bones were identified at the Department of Anatomy , Andhra Medical College , Visakhapatnam . Their incidence with other population were done in the presen t study

  3. "Living cadavers" in Bangladesh: bioviolence in the human organ bazaar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Monir

    2012-03-01

    The technology-driven demand for the extraction of human organs--mainly kidneys, but also liver lobes and single corneas--has created an illegal market in body parts. Based on ethnographic fieldwork, in this article I examine the body bazaar in Bangladesh: in particular, the process of selling organs and the experiences of 33 kidney sellers who are victims of this trade. The sellers' narratives reveal how wealthy buyers (both recipients and brokers) tricked Bangladeshi poor into selling their kidneys; in the end, these sellers were brutally deceived and their suffering was extreme. I therefore argue that the current practice of organ commodification is both exploitative and unethical, as organs are removed from the bodies of the poor by inflicting a novel form of bioviolence against them. This bioviolence is deliberately silenced by vested interest groups for their personal gain.

  4. Prehospital Emergency Inguinal Clamp Controls Hemorrhage in Cadaver Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    the CRoC preassembled for quick use. The clamp compresses the casualty’s tissues and is unat- tached to things like a litter. When screwed down, it is...for use on the battlefield to control difficult bleeds in the inguinal area. Study Design The study design was a sequence of experiments of clamp...temperature 4 hours before testing. The torso was rotated onto a wood block to intubate the aorta through a left thoracotomy incision. The thoracic aorta

  5. [Identification and preservation of parathyroid glands in cadaver parts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Catarina; Bernardes, António; Carvalho, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: É indispensável ter um conhecimento profundo da morfologia da glândula tiróide e das estruturas com ela relacionadas no compartimento anterior do pescoço, para minimizar a morbilidade decorrente da cirurgia da tiróide, nomeadamente a lesão das glândulas paratiróides e dos nervos laríngeos. Este estudo pretendeu identificar glândulas paratiróides em peças de cadáver, confirmando-as histologicamente.Material e Métodos: Foram usadas 20 peças de cadáver para simular tiroidectomias. Durante a dissecção, foram isoladas as glândulas tiróides e eventuais glândulas paratiróides, que foram submetidas a estudo histológico.Discussão: Foram dissecadas 20 peças de cadáver (regiões cervicais anteriores), sendo isolados 48 fragmentos que correspondiam a eventuais glândulas paratiróides, dos quais 35 foram confirmados histologicamente como sendo efectivamente paratiróides. Os 20 casos foram, então, divididos em três grupos, de acordo com o número de paratiróides confirmadas histologicamente. No primeiro grupo, constituído por 11 casos, todas as eventuais paratiróides foram confirmadas. No segundo grupo, constituído por seis casos, apenas algumas paratiróides foram confirmadas. No terceiro grupo, constituído por três casos, nenhuma das eventuais paratiróides isoladas era efectivamente paratiróide. Em sete das 20 glândulas tiróides isoladas, foram identificadas oito paratiróides no estudo histológico: quatro sub-capsulares; três extra-capsulares e uma intra-tiróideia. As dimensões das paratiróides não tinham relação estatisticamente significativa.Conclusão: O conhecimento da anatomia das estruturas do compartimento central do pescoço e das suas variações mais frequentes diminui, mas não elimina a morbilidade da cirurgia da tiróide, nomeadamente a excisão iatrogénica das paratiróides, cuja dificuldade de identificação foi evidenciada nas peças dissecadas.

  6. Effects of two different deep digital flexor tenotomy techniques on distal articular angles of equine cadaver forelimbs Efeito de duas técnicas de tenotomia do flexor digital profundo sobre os ângulos articulares distais dos membros anteriores de equinos: estudo post-mortem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cezar de Oliveira Dearo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Deep digital flexor (DDF tenotomy is a technique employed for years to treat selected disorders of the musculoskeletal system in horses. Although two different surgical approaches (i.e. mid-metacarpal and pastern have been described for performing the procedure, in vitro quantitative data regarding the modifications induced by either technique on the distal articular angles is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the study reported here was to investigate the viability of a proposed biomechanical system of induced-traction used to compare the two DDF tenotomy techniques by measuring the distal articular angles of equine cadaver forelimbs. Ten pairs of forelimbs were collected and mounted to a biomechanical system developed to apply traction at the toe level. Dorsal articular angles of the metacarpophalangeal (MP, proximal interphalangeal (PIP and distal interphalangeal (DIP joints were determined by geometric lines on radiographs taken before and after performing each technique. Comparisons between each tenotomy group and its own control, for each joint, and between the two tenotomy groups using as variable the difference between the tenotomy and control groups were tested. Despite the lack of statistical significance, the DDF tenotomy technique at the pastern level produced extension, to a lesser and greater extent, of the PIP and DIP joints, respectively when compared to the mid-metacarpal level. No remarkable differences could be observed for the MP joint. The developed traction-induced biomechanical construct seemed to be effective in producing valuable quantitative estimations of the distal articular angles of equine cadaver forelimbs subjected to different DDF tenotomy techniques.A tenotomia do flexor digital profundo (FDP é uma das técnicas cirúrgicas empregadas para o tratamento de algumas anormalidades osteomusculares, como as deformidades flexurais e a laminite em equinos. Embora diferentes acessos cirúrgicos (i.e. terço médio do

  7. Qual a melhor incidência radiográfica para avaliar o desvio das fraturas tipo die-punch? Estudo em cadáver What is the best radiographic view for "die punch" distal radius fractures? A cadaver model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Figueira Falcochio

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar qual a melhor incidência radiográfica para diagnosticar os desvios da fratura tipo die-punch da extremidade distal do rádio. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se um rádio do Banco de Tecidos Salvador Arena. Após limpeza e retirada de partes moles, realizou-se osteotomia da região dorsoulnar da superfície articular com microsserra, osteótomo e martelo. Fixou-se o fragmento distal com fita adesiva, nos degraus articulares de 1, 2, 3 e 5mm. A peça foi submetida a radiografias nas incidências frente, perfil, oblíqua semipronada, oblíqua semissupinada e tangencial (75º com o plano da mesa. Em uma segunda etapa, avaliou-se o desvio da fratura em cada radiografia, com auxílio do software AutoCAD 2010®. RESULTADOS: A incidência tangencial foi a melhor para identificar os desvios de 1 e 3mm e a segunda melhor nos desvios de 2 e 5mm. No desvio de 2mm a melhor incidência foi a oblíqua semipronada e no de 5mm a oblíqua semissupinada, sendo que não se consegue identificar os desvios de 1 e 2mm na oblíqua semissupinada. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência tangencial foi superior na avaliação do degrau articular de 1mm e 3mm e a segunda melhor quando houve degrau de 2mm e 5mm.OBJECTIVE: the aim of this study is try to show the best view for distal radius fractures so called die-punch fractures. METHODS: There has been used a human cadaver radius bone from the Salvador Arena Tissue Bank. This bone was cleaned up after removing the soft tissues and osteotomies created displaced lunate fossa fractures of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 mm. We have fixed this fragment with adhesive tape. Then the joint deviation were significantly increased with step-offs of 1 mm. Radiographs were then taken into 5 different positions: postero-anterior view, lateral view, oblique views and tangencial view for each of the deviations. The resulting lunate fossa depression in each X-ray film was analyzed by the AutoCAD 2010® software. RESULTS: The tangencial view was the best one

  8. Coordinación y logística del trasplante de tejidos de donantes de cadáver intra y extra-hospitalarios. "Modelo Pamplona": Cadena de actuación 1992-2006 Transplant coordination and logistics of intra and extra-hospital cadaver donor tissue. "The Pamplona Model": Sequence of tasks performed from 1992-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Maraví-Poma

    2006-08-01

    , referred to as tissue donors (TD, who have died from cardiac arrest. Objective. Is this paper it descripte the model for coordination and donation of intra and extra-hospital TD in the Autonomous Community of Navarra. It creats a program for detection, donation and extractions called the Pamplona Model, from 1992-2006. Material and methods. In 1990, a transplant team was created by an Intensive Medicine Physician of HVC, INML and SOS-Navarra. In 1996, VCH Transplant Coordination is defined as a reference centre for the Tissue Transplant Programme in the Autonomous Community of Navarra. Results. Consensus protocols for "intra and extra-hospital detection" of persons having died from cardiac arrest are developed: - Alerts from NHS-O hospitals, SOS-Navarra; judges and INML forensic pathologists. - Criteria for selection, search and contacts with relatives. - Alert serology, extraction and transport teams. - Logistics and distribution of tissue. - Agreed incentives: Economic, administrative and relevant regulations. Conclusions. The Pamplona Model, with the Virgen Del Camino hospital has made important contributions and is unique in the world. Intra and extra-hospital coordination of cadaver donor from a referred hospital, it is a scientific and organizational advance to have in it counts for the creation of extraction and transplant tissues teams.

  9. The origin of the inferior phrenic artery: a study in 32 South Indian cadavers with a review of the literature Origem da artéria frênica inferior: estudo em 32 cadáveres da Índia do Sul com revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejodhar Pulakunta

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Considering the paucity of information presently available concerning inferior phrenic arteries, a more definitive study seemed appropriate and necessary, both for its potential clinical applications and to provide additional data to contemporary anatomical literature. OBJECTIVE: Most anatomical textbooks of gross anatomy offer very little information concerning the anatomy and distribution of the inferior phrenic artery (IPA. For that reason, the origin of the IPA has been studied and the available literature has been reviewed. METHODS: Thirty-two human adult cadavers preserved in formalin obtained from the departments of Anatomy, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal and Mangalore were dissected and the origin of the IPA was studied. RESULTS: The IPA had its usual origin from the abdominal aorta in 28 cases but in the remaining four cases, two were arising from the celiac trunk, one from the left gastric artery and one from the right renal artery. CONCLUSION: The IPA usually originates from the aorta or celiac artery, and less frequently from the renal, hepatic or left gastric arteries. The IPA is a major source of collateral or parasitized arterial supply to hepatocellular carcinoma, second only to the hepatic artery. Literature on the IPA origin and clinical implications of variation in its origin have been reviewed in this article.CONTEXTO: Considerando a escassez de informações atualmente disponíveis sobre artérias frênicas inferiores, umestudo mais definitivo nos pareceu apropriado e necessário, tanto por suas potenciais aplicações clínicas quanto para fornecer dados adicionais à literatura anatômica contemporânea. OBJETIVO: A maioria dos livros-texto de anatomia oferece muito poucas informações referentes à anatomia e distribuição da artéria frênica inferior (AFI. Por este motivo, a origem da AFI foi investigada e a literatura disponível foi revisada. MÉTODOS: Trinta e dois cadáveres humanos adultos

  10. Variações do sistema arterial hepático e sua aplicabilidade na bipartição do fígado: estudo anatômico em cadáveres Hepatic artery system variations correlated to split-liver surgery: anatomic study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz BERTEVELLO

    2002-04-01

    .Background - The liver donor shortage and the higher demand on liver transplantation led to advanced liver surgery techniques in order to better utilization of the cadaveric liver donors. That is why the split-liver technique had been applicated in liver transplantation where the liver after been divided into two lobes would be implanted in two recipients. Aims - This paper has the goal of study both the extra-hepatic arterial distribuition and anatomie of the liver with application on the split-liver transplantation separating the liver in right and left hepatic lobe. Patients and Methods - The authors studied 60 livers from fresh cadaver looking at hepatic artery and its main anatomic variations correlating with split-liver surgery. The liver was split into two portions, right and left lobe. Results - The total liver weight was 1536 ± 361,8 g, right hepatic lobe 890,3 ± 230,9 g and left hepatic lobe 649,3 ± 172,6 g. Common hepatic trunk was found in one (1,6% case and came from superior mesenteric artery and in another one (1,6%, both left hepatic artery and left gastric artery came from the abdominal aorta. The right hepatic artery raised from celiac trunk in 44 (73,3% cases, and in 15 (25% from superior mesenteric artery it was acessory in 11 (18,3% cases and dominant in 4 (6,6%. The left hepatic artery was acessory of left gastric artery in 2 (3,3% cases. Hepatic artery trifurcation was found in 9 (15% cases out of this 6 (10% to segment IV, 2 (3,3% to segment III and 1 (1,6% to segment II. Also we found 2 (3,3% medium hepatic artery to segment IV. Conclusion - Hepatic artery variations allowed liver section into right and left hepatic lobe.

  11. Carcinoma hepatocelular: impacto do tempo em lista e das formas de tratamento pré-operatório na sobrevida do transplante de fígado cadavérico na era pré-MELD em um centro no Brasil Hepatocellular carcinoma: impact of waiting list and pre-operative treatment strategies on survival of cadaveric liver transplantation in pre-MELD era in one center in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de Freitas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Atualmente, o transplante hepático é a principal opção terapêutica para doentes com cirrose hepática associada a carcinoma hepatocelular. OBJETIVOS: Analisar a sobrevida em 3 meses e 1 ano de pacientes com e sem carcinoma hepatocelular submetidos a transplante hepático cadavérico. MÉTODOS: Foram revisados os prontuários dos pacientes submetidos a transplante hepático cadavérico no Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná no período entre 5 de janeiro de 2001 e 17 de fevereiro de 2006. Os pacientes foram divididos em 2 grupos - acometidos e não-acometidos de carcinoma hepatocelular - e analisados em relação à sobrevida em 3 meses e em 1 ano. Também foram comparados em relação ao sexo e à idade do doador e do receptor, a causa da cirrose, a classificação de Child-Pugh e o escore do MELD no momento do transplante, o tempo de isquemia morna e isquemia fria, o número de unidades de concentrado de hemácias transfundidas durante o transplante, o tempo de permanência na UTI e o tempo de internação. RESULTADOS: Foram analisados 146 casos de transplante hepático: 75 foram excluídos devido a dados incompletos no prontuário e 71 foram incluídos no estudo. A sobrevida geral em 3 meses e 1 ano foi de 77,4% e 74,6%, respectivamente. Os acometidos por carcinoma hepatocelular (n = 12 apresentaram sobrevida em 3 meses e 1 ano de 100%, significantemente maior que os não-acometidos (n = 59; 72,8% e 69,49%, respectivamente. O índice médio do MELD, da classificação de Child-Pugh e o número médio de concentrado de hemácias transfundidas foram significantemente maiores nos pacientes não-acometidos. Também foi observada maior percentagem de pacientes classificados como Child-Pugh B e C e de pacientes com diagnóstico de cirrose por outras causas nos pacientes não acometidos pela neoplasia. Nos doentes com carcinoma hepatocelular foi observada maior percentagem de indivíduos classificados como Child

  12. Percutaneous screw fixation in treatment of fractures of acetabular columns using computer-assisted imaging navigation system: experiment with cadaver model%计算机辅助影像导航经皮螺钉内固定治疗髋臼骨折的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军强; 吴伟坚; 邓宁; 赵春鹏; 苏永刚; 吴新宝; 王满宜; 梁国穗

    2008-01-01

    acetabular fracture and to evaluate the safety and effieiency of the procedures.Methods Guide needles were inserted into the bilateral anterior and posterior columns of the acetabula of 4 dry human cadaver pelvic skeletons and 4 plastic pelvic models.Then the pelvis skeletons were fixed to imaging guided surgery mimic operation modules.Dynamic fluoroscopy Was conducted with C-arm X-ray machine vertically on the 4 virtual planes of the acetabulum,inner,outer,anterior,and posterior from multiple angles.The fluoroscopic images clearly showing the guide needles,anterior and posterior columns,and acetabulum were selected as registration images,and the relative space positions between the C-arm X-ray fluoroscope and pelvis and operation table.Guided by the navigation system.totally 16 titanium hollow screws were inserted into bilateral anterior and posterior columns of acetabula of the 4 pelvis skeletons.The screw positions were estimated by visual method.The time needed to position the C-arm so as to obtain the standard registration image,time needed for fluoroscopy,and operation time,including establishment of navigation system,software interface operation,and screw insertion,were recorded.Results All the screws were inserted to the satisfying positions:placed within the desired bony corridor of the column and none of then were inserted into the joint.While inserting the screw into the anterior column fluoroscopy should be conducted with obturated oblique view.obturated inlet view,obturated oblique outlet view,or pelvic AP view.While inserting the screw into the posterior column fluoroscopy should be conducted with iliac-oblique view,obturated oblique view,pelvic inlet view,or obturated oblique outlet view.The total surgical time required for screw insertion was 11.7 min for anterior column,and Was 9.2 min for posterior column.9.5 and 7.3 minutes were needed to position the C-arm X-ray machine so as to obtain the images of the anterior and posterior columns respectively.2.9 and

  13. "… the cadaver can be placed at your disposition here." - Legal, administrative basis of the transfer of cadavers in the Third Reich, its traces in archival sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viebig, Michael

    2012-06-01

    For more than 15 years, the memorial site "Roter Ochse (Red Ox)" in Halle/Saale, Germany, has studied documents of special and military courts in Mitteldeutschland (central Germany). Hundreds of death sentences have been executed during the last years of the war in the former state prison of Halle. The resulting dead bodies were used in biomedical research and teaching. The number of executions was marginal before 1933 but increased steadily after the Nazis seized power. The judiciary delivered an increasing number of death sentences against political opponents and persons who were to be eradicated from the "Volksgemeinschaft" (national community) according to racist ideology. However, the dead bodies were not distributed evenly to each of the anatomical institutes. The distribution depended on factors such as the distance of the institute to an execution place, the court responsible for the sentence, and whether the state or relatives had the right to dispose of the bodies. At the beginning of the year 193/span>9, the Reichsjustizministerium (department of justice) issued a decree that changed the distribution process of dead bodies. As a rule, after the responsible ministry informed the anatomical institute of a pending execution, the institute confirmed the pick-up day of the body. Details of the actual delivery of bodies can be found in execution protocols, reports by execution overseers, receipts of body deliveries, body registers of the institutes, etc. This paper will review the historical progression of ministerial decisions and demonstrate how administrative documents can be used as a point of departure for current research projects.

  14. Histomorphological study of germinal centre of vermiform appendix in Bangladeshi cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Sultana, S Z; Mannan, S; Ara, Z G; Chowdhury, A I; Ara, A; Mukta, T B

    2013-01-01

    The study was done to find out the number of germinal centre in human vermiform appendix of Bangladeshi people to magnify the knowledge regarding the diverse number of germinal centre of human vermiform appendix in our population in the department of Anatomy, Mymensingh Medical College, Bangladesh from July 2006 to June 2007. Total 40 appendices were collected for histological study of different age and sex during postmortem examination in the autopsy laboratory of department of Forensic Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College. This cross sectional study was done by convenient sampling technique. For convenience of differentiating the changes in number of germinal centre of vermiform appendix in relation to age and sex, findings were classified in four groups, Group A up to 20 years, Group B 21-35 years, Group C 36-55 years and Group D 56-70 years. In the present study the number of germinal centre was highest in Group B (52.38%) but in Group D it was nil. Here mean number of germinal centre in male (1.05) were more than in female (0.8).

  15. Measurement repeatability of tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove offset distance in red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cadavers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miles, J.E.; Jensen, B.R.; Kirpensteijn, J.; Svalastoga, E.L.; Eriksen, T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To describe CT image reconstruction criteria for measurement of the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) offset distance, evaluate intra- and inter-reconstruction repeatability, and identify key sources of error in the measurement technique, as determined in vulpine hind li

  16. Why adductor magnus muscle is large: the function based on muscle morphology in cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, M; Suzuki, D; Ito, H; Fujimiya, M; Uchiyama, E

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine anatomical properties of the adductor magnus through a detailed classification, and to hypothesize its function and size to gather enough information about morphology. Ten cadaveric specimens of the adductor magnus were used. The muscle was separated into four portios (AM1-AM4) based on the courses of the corresponding perforating arteries, and its volume, muscle length, muscle fiber length and physiological cross-sectional area were assessed. The architectural characteristics of these four portions of the adductor magnus were then classified with the aid of principal component analysis. The results led us into demarcating the most proximal part of the adductor magnus (AM1) from the remaining parts (AM2, AM3, and AM4). Classification of the adductor magnus in terms of architectural characteristics differed from the more traditional anatomical distinction. The AM2, AM3, and AM4, having longer muscle fiber lengths than the AM1, appear to be designed as displacers for moving the thigh through a large range of motion. The AM1 appears instead to be oriented principally toward stabilizing the hip joint. The large mass of the adductor magnus should thus be regarded as a complex of functionally differentiable muscle portions.

  17. Morphological variations of the lungs: a study conducted on Indian cadavers

    OpenAIRE

    George, Bincy M; Nayak, Satheesha B; Marpalli, Sapna

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of anatomical variations in lungs is essential during segmental or lobar resections of lungs. We studied the variations of fissures, lobes and hilar structures in 65 right and 73 left isolated lungs from the dissection hall. Horizontal fissure was absent in 3.07% and incomplete in 35.38% of right lungs. Four point six one percentage of right lungs had 3 fissures and 4 lobes. Three point zero seven percentage of right lungs had 3 arteries, 67.69% had 2 arteries, and 29.23% had only o...

  18. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: a human cadaver study: part I: endoscopic-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Jansen, J.; Schreurs, R.; Saeed, P.; Beenen, L.; Maal, T.J.J.; Gooris, P.J.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of orbital defects, surgeon errors may lead to incorrect positioning of orbital implants and, consequently, poor clinical outcomes. Endoscopy can provide additional visualization of the orbit through the transantral approach. We aimed to evaluate whether endoscopic guidance during o

  19. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: A human cadaver study. Part II: Navigation-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Schreurs, R.; Jansen, J; Maal, T.J.J.; Essig, H.; Gooris, P.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Preformed orbital reconstruction plates are useful for treating orbital defects. However, intraoperative errors can lead to misplaced implants and poor outcomes. Navigation-assisted surgery may help optimize orbital reconstruction. We aimed to explore whether navigation-assisted surgery is more pred

  20. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: A human cadaver study. Part I: Endoscopic-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Jansen, J; Schreurs, R.; Saeed, P.; Beenen, L.; Maal, T.J.J.; Gooris, P.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of orbital defects, surgeon errors may lead to incorrect positioning of orbital implants and, consequently, poor clinical outcomes. Endoscopy can provide additional visualization of the orbit through the transantral approach. We aimed to evaluate whether endoscopic guidance during o

  1. Predictability in orbital reconstruction: a human cadaver study: part II: navigation-assisted orbital reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, L.; Schreurs, R.; Jansen, J.; Maal, T.J.J.; Essig, H.; Gooris, P.J.J.; Becking, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Preformed orbital reconstruction plates are useful for treating orbital defects. However, intraoperative errors can lead to misplaced implants and poor outcomes. Navigation-assisted surgery may help optimize orbital reconstruction. We aimed to explore whether navigation-assisted surgery is more pred

  2. The Dimensions of the Orbital Cavity Based on High-Resolution Computed Tomography of Human Cadavers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felding, Ulrik Ascanius; Bloch, Sune Land; Buchwald, Christian von

    2016-01-01

    ) total volume and total surface area of the orbital cavities was 24.27 ± 3.88 cm and 32.47 ± 2.96 cm, respectively. There was no significant difference in volume (P = 0.315) or surface area (P = 0.566) between the 2 orbital cavities.The stereological technique proved to be a robust and unbiased method......Blow-out fractures affect the volume and surface area of the orbital cavity. Estimation of these values after the trauma may help in deciding whether or not a patient is a candidate for surgery. Recent studies have provided estimates of orbital volume and area of bone defect, and correlated them...... with the degree of enophthalmos. However, a large degree of biological variation between individuals may preclude such absolute values from being successful indicators for surgery.Stereological methods have been used to estimate orbital cavity volume in a few studies, but to date these have not been used...

  3. Insects feeding on cadavers as an alternative source of human genetic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Skowronek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In some criminal cases, the use of classical sources of human genetic material is difficult or even impossible. One solution may be the use of insects, especially blowfly larvae which feed on corpses. A recent review of case reports and experimental studies available in biomedical databases has shown that insects can be a valuable source of human mitochondrial and genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, allowing for an effective analysis of hypervariable region (HVR sequences and short tandem repeat (STR profiles, respectively. The optimal source of human DNA is the crop (a part of the gut of active third-instar blowfly larvae. Pupae and insect faeces can be also used in forensic genetic practice instead of the contents of the alimentary tract.

  4. Anatomical variation of radial wrist extensor muscles: a study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubhagya Ranjan Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The tendons of the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles are quite useful in tendon transfer, such as in correction of finger clawing and restoration of thumb opposition. Knowledge of additional radial wrist extensor muscle bellies with independent tendons is useful in the above-mentioned surgical procedures. METHODS: The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and antebrachial fascia of 48 (24 on the right side and 24 on left side male upper limb forearms were dissected. The following aspects were then analyzed: (a the presence of additional muscle bellies of radial wrist extensors, (b the origin and insertion of the additional muscle, and (c measurements of the muscle bellies and their tendons. RESULTS: Five out of 48 upper limbs (10.41% had additional radial wrist extensors; this occurred in 3 out of 24 left upper limbs (12.5% and 2 out of 24 right upper limbs (8.3%. In one of the right upper limbs, two additional muscles were found. The length and width of each additional muscle belly and its tendon ranged between 2 - 15cm by 0.35 - 6.4cm and 2.8 - 20.8cm by 0.2 0.5cm, respectively. The additional radial wrist extensor tendons in our study basically originated either from the extensor carpi radialis longus or brevis muscles and were inserted at the base of the 2nd or 3rd metacarpal bone. CONCLUSION: The present study will inform surgeons about the different varieties of additional radial wrist extensors and the frequency of their occurrence.

  5. First donation of human skin obtained from corpse; Primera donacion de piel humana obtenida de cadaver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes F, M.L.; Luna Z, D. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The first donation of human skin coming from a cadaverous donor was obtained in the State of Mexico. The skin was obtained of a 34 year-old multi organic donor, the extraction of the same was carried out in an operating theatre by medical personnel, supported by personal of the Radio sterilized Tissue Bank (BTR) of the ININ. The skin was transported to the BTR for it processing. (Author)

  6. Triceps brachii tendon: anatomic-MR imaging study in cadavers with histologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belentani, Clarissa [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Pastore, Daniel; Wangwinyuvirat, Mani; Dirim, Berna; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, VA Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [University of California, VA Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Histology, San Diego (United States)

    2009-02-15

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to describe the normal MR anatomy of the triceps brachii tendon (TBT) insertion, to correlate the findings with those seen in anatomic sections and histopathologic analysis, and to review triceps tendon injuries. Twelve cadaveric elbows were used according to institution guidelines. T1-weighted spin-echo MR images were acquired in three planes. Findings on MR imaging were correlated with those derived from anatomic and histologic study. On MR images, the TBT had a bipartite appearance as it inserted on olecranon in all specimens. The insertion of the medial head was deeper than that of the long and lateral heads and was mainly muscular at its insertion, with a small amount of the tendon blending with the muscle distally, necessitating histologic analysis to determine if there was tendon blending with the muscle at the site of insertion and if the medial head inserted together with the common tendon or as a single unit. At histopathologic analysis, the three heads of the triceps tendon had a common insertion on the olecranon. The bipartite aspect of the tendon that was identified in the MR images was not seen by histologic study, indicating that there was a union of the medial and common tendons just before they inserted into bone. TBT has a bipartite appearance on MR images and inserts on olecranon as a single unit. (orig.)

  7. Molecular identification of blow flies recovered from human cadavers during crime scene investigations in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, Rajagopal; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad; Tan, Tian Chye; Lee, Han Lim; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat; Azirun, Mohd Sofian

    2012-12-01

    Forensic entomology applies knowledge about insects associated with decedent in crime scene investigation. It is possible to calculate a minimum postmortem interval (PMI) by determining the age and species of the oldest blow fly larvae feeding on decedent. This study was conducted in Malaysia to identify maggot specimens collected during crime scene investigations. The usefulness of the molecular and morphological approach in species identifications was evaluated in 10 morphologically identified blow fly larvae sampled from 10 different crime scenes in Malaysia. The molecular identification method involved the sequencing of a total length of 2.2 kilo base pairs encompassing the 'barcode' fragments of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI), cytochrome oxidase II (COII) and t-RNA leucine genes. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya rufifacies and Chrysomya nigripes. In addition, one unidentified blow fly species was found based on phylogenetic tree analysis.

  8. A review of necrophagous insects colonising human and animal cadavers in south-east Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Julianne F; Whittington, Andrew E; Zalucki, Myron P

    2015-12-01

    A review of insects collected from decomposing human remains in south-east Queensland yielded 32 species in three orders (Diptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera) and 11 families (Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, Phoridae, Sepsidae, Chironomidae, Dermestidae, Cleridae, Histeridae, Staphylinidae, Encyrtidae). There were 15 cases where remains were located indoors and five cases where remains were outdoors, in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Coleoptera were strongly associated with outdoors remains, while dipteran species composition was similar in both indoor and outdoor habitats. Some Diptera were only associated with indoors remains, while others were similarly restricted to remains recovered outdoors. Hymenopteran parasitoids were active in both habitats. Comparative collections were made from other vertebrate remains, including road-kill and farmed animals throughout south-east Queensland (Qld) and northern New South Wales (NSW) during the same period.

  9. A personal computer network system for equitable allocation of cadaver organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, M; Akazawa, K; Moriguchi, S; Odaka, T; Nose, Y

    1991-01-01

    We developed a personal computer network system for the equitable allocation of cadaveric organs. This network consists of a host computer (IBM PS55 model 5570 T) and various kinds of personal computers manufactured by many different computer makers in Japan. The merits of our personal computer network include lower cost and an easy access to the host computer from all the centres participating in this network while using their own favourite personal computers. Among the programs made for allocating cadaveric organs, we present in this paper the program for livers. This program was developed with a modified version of the logic developed by Starzl et al. The grade modification for the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) in the United States was used as the basis for classification of medical urgency. Our program weighed the factors of medical urgency, compatibility of blood group and waiting time. Distance factors were omitted because of the smaller area of the network compared to that of UNOS. This computer network would be linked to other computer networks in creating a national organ procurement and transplant network in Japan, in order to help them to catch up with other advanced transplant countries. Such an equal and objective computer system should allow organ transplantation to become more widely accepted.

  10. Carpal bone cysts: MRI, gross pathology, and histology correlation in cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Chen, Lina; Haghighi, Parviz; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Intraosseous cysts of carpal bones are frequently observed on routine imaging examinations of the wrist. There is controversy regarding the underlying pathogenesis of these cysts. In this study, we aimed to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of intracarpal bone cysts in correlation with histologic analysis, using cadaveric wrists. METHODS Five freshly frozen cadaveric wrist specimens (from three women and two men; mean age at death, 80 years) were studied. Imaging was performed with T1-weighted fast spin-echo, and proton density-weighted fast spin-echo with and without fat-suppression. The existence of cysts was confirmed by comparing MRI and histology findings. Hematoxylin and eosin stain was performed on tissue slices of 3 mm thickness to analyze the structure of cysts and their communication with the joint cavity. RESULTS Ten cysts were observed. In all cases, cysts were eccentrically located either in the subchondral bone or beneath the cortex. On histologic examination, there were regions of fat necrosis without inflammation or increased vascularity, surrounded by fibrous walls. There were no giant cells, cholesterol granules, or a true synovial lining. Mucoid change was rare. Fibrous component of cysts varied from small fibrous septa to well-formed walls. Some cysts communicated with the joint cavity. Two cysts were adjacent to ligamentous attachments. Those cysts with fibrous tissue demonstrated variable hypointensity on T2. CONCLUSION In contrast to previous reports that described a mucoid composition of intracarpal bone cysts with occasional foamy macrophages, our observations support the concept that these lesions reflect a spectrum of fat necrosis and fibrous changes, without inflammation or hypervascularity. These cysts are typically surrounded by fibrous walls without a true synovial lining. PMID:25205027

  11. Measurement of the topography of human cadaver lenses using the PAR corneal topography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Viviana; Manns, Fabrice; Zipper, Stanley; Sandadi, Samith; Hamaoui, Marie; Tahi, Hassan; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    2001-06-01

    To measure the radius of curvature and asphericity of the anterior and posterior surfaces of crystalline lenses of human Eye-Bank eyes using the PAR Corneal Topography System. The measured values will be used in an optical model of the eye for lens refilling procedures.

  12. Facial Nerve in Foetal Cadavers: An Anatomical Study with Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotian SR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Facial nerve paralysis is a major complication of parotid surgery and is widely reported. Little attention is paid to the facial nerve trunk in children. The facial nerve trunk in children and infants can be easily injured since they lie close to the surface. The present study therefore intends to describe the variability in the facial nerve trunk and its branching pattern in foetuses. Methods: The study was done bilaterally in 30 formalin-fixed foetuses (15 females, 15 males, age ranging from 21.0 to 35.5 weeks of gestation. The length of the facial nerve trunk was measured and bifurcation and trifurcation of the trunk was examined. Variability in the branching pattern was also noted. Results: The most common facial nerve trunk branching type was bifurcation (53.33%, followed by trifurcation (33.33%. Multiple branching of the facial nerve was also observed in 13.34% of the cases. Other variations related to the facial nerve were also noted. The mean length of the facial nerve trunk was 7.15 ± 2.12 mm. There was no significant difference between the right and left sides and in case of males and female foetuses. Conclusion: Facial nerve injury during parotid surgery is a main cause of paediatric facial paralysis. The length of the facial nerve trunk therefore must be accurately known in any surgical procedure planned in the area. The main furcation of the facial nerve should also receive special attention.

  13. Effect of a biplanar osteotomy on primary stability following high tibial osteotomy: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Dietrich; Lorbach, Olaf; Schmitz, Christian; Busch, Lüder C; Van Giffen, Nicolien; Seil, Romain; Kohn, Dieter M

    2010-02-01

    Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of varus gonarthrosis in the active patient. The various implants used in HTO differ with regard to its design, the fixation stability and osteotomy technique. It is assumed that the combination of a plate fixator with a biplanar, v-shaped osteotomy supports bone healing. So far, there are no biomechanical studies that quantify the stabilizing effect of a biplanar versus uniplanar osteotomy. We hypothesized that a significant increase in primary stability of bone-implant constructs is achieved when using a biplanar as opposed to a uniplanar osteotomy. Twenty-four fresh-frozen human tibiae were mounted in a metal cylinder, and open-wedge osteotomy (12 mm wedge size) was performed in a standardized fashion. Proximal and distal tibial segments were marked with tantalum markers of 0.8 mm diameter. Two different plates with locking screws were used for fixation: a short spacer plate (group 1, n = 12) and a plate fixator (group 2, n = 12). In six specimens of each group, a biplanar V-shaped osteotomy with a 110 degrees angulated anterior cut behind the tuberosity parallel to the ventral tibial shaft axis was performed. In the remaining six specimens of each group, a simple uniplanar osteotomy was performed in an oblique fashion. Axial compression of the tibiae was performed using a material testing machine under standardized alignment of the loading axis. Load-controlled cyclical staircase loading tests were performed. The specimens were radiographed simultaneously in two planes together with a biplanar calibration cage in front of a film plane with and without load after each subcycle. Radiostereometry allowed for serial quantification of plastic and elastic micromotion at the osteotomy site reflecting the stability provided by the combination of implant and osteotomy technique. No significant additional stabilizing effect of a biplanar osteotomy in craniocaudal and mediolateral plane was found. However, additional stability was achieved in anteroposterior (AP) and all rotational planes in those specimens fixated with a short spacer plate. In this biomechanical set-up with axial load, the additional stabilizing effect of a biplanar osteotomy did not come into effect in the presence of a long and rigid plate fixator. However, biplanar osteotomy increased the fixation stability significantly in AP and rotational planes when a short spacer plate was used. Clinically, the biplanar osteotomy promotes bone healing regardless of the implant used. Biomechanically, biplanar osteotomy is advantageous for shorter plate designs to increase primary stability of the bone-implant construct.

  14. Novel metallic implantation technique for osteochondral defects of the medial talar dome. A cadaver study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.A. van Bergen; M. Zengerink; L. Blankevoort; M.N. van Sterkenburg; J. van Oldenrijk; C.N. van Dijk

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A metallic inlay implant (HemiCAP) with 15 offset sizes has been developed for the treatment of localized osteochondral defects of the medial talar dome. The aim of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) a matching offset size is available for each talus, (2) th

  15. Use of Bratwurst Sausage as a Model Cadaver in Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences Lab Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebottom, David

    2015-01-01

    The general physics course that is taught in most departments as a service course for pre-med or pre-health students is undergoing a large shift in course content to better appeal to this group of learners. This revision also extends to the laboratory component, where more emphasis is being placed on teaching physics through biological examples.…

  16. [Divine cadavers: gender, medical discourse, and anatomical collections in the legend of Pedro González de Velasco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo, Alba

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the public image of Pedro Gonzólez de Velasco (1815-1882), famous for his anatomical collections and his Anthropological Museum, founded in 1875 in Madrid, and the popular legend related to the death, embalming and exhumation of his daughter Concepción. The doctor who is committed to the nation becomes a mad scientist, and his official biography is transformed into an urban legend. Beyond the merely anecdotal, I show how the aesthetics associated with female corpses and artificial women organize cultural imaginaries, bringing together medical discourses and literary and artistic representations.

  17. [Intrafemoral pressure measurement in different cement removal procedures during hip prosthesis replacement operations--experimental study with cadaver femora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsch, M; Schmidt, J; Brimmers, P; Menne, A; Merkle, W

    1998-03-01

    During primary hip arthroplasty an increase in intramedullary pressure (IMP) of up to 1000 mm Hg can be observed. As a result of this increased intrafemoral pressure, intramedullary constituents can pass into the venous circulation creating a risk of fat embolism syndrome (FES). In the present experimental study on 9 femora obtained from human corpses, we investigated the question as to whether various methods of cement removal during total hip revision arthroplasty are also associated with increased intramedullary pressure and a risk of FES. The IMP was recorded with a standardized experimental set-up during removal of cement from the proximal and distal regions, including removal of the cement "tip" and the intramedullary plug. The methods employed for this purpose included the osteotome and mallet, a compressed air powered chisel, and a modified intracorporal lithotripter. All the methods induced fluctuations in the IMP the highest values being recorded for the conventional method using the osteotome and mallet (45 mm Hg) and the lowest values for the intracorporeal lithotripter (7.5 mm Hg). Working on the distal cement caused higher fluctuations in comparison with the proximal region. The study failed to reveal any increase in mean IMP, and all measured values were in the low pressure range (considerably below 150 mm Hg). While there seems to be no apparent risk of an FES developing during removal of cement, careless manipulation of the distal cement plug may result in higher intrafemoral pressures--above 150 mm Hg--thus increasing the risk of a fat embolism syndrome.

  18. The MAVID heart holder: a demonstration device to anchor cadaver hearts for surgical simulation and practical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Idriss, Rachid; Klaus, Kristen E

    2015-12-01

    Performing open heart surgery involves learning challenging techniques and a need for realistic training models to achieve and maintain a high level of surgical skills. The MAVID heart holder is an organ holder primarily designed to hold the heart in its anatomic position for the purpose of surgical simulation and education, thereby closing the gap between surgical performance in the laboratory and in the operating room. The device is simple to use, can be adjusted to organ size, and has the necessary instrumentation to be used with any solid organ. The MAVID heart holder also provides a platform for presentation and assists in advancing the research sphere. The advantage over other existing models is that the MAVID heart holder uses real tissue and does not distort the organ at the attachment sites. Further, it offers superior stability as well as the ability to manipulate the organ during presentation and dissection. Training with the MAVID heart holder has the potential to shorten training time to acquire surgical skills and proficiency before performing these techniques in the operating room and in so doing enhance patient safety.

  19. Incorporating Radiology into Medical Gross Anatomy: Does the Use of Cadaver CT Scans Improve Students' Academic Performance in Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lufler, Rebecca S.; Zumwalt, Ann C.; Romney, Carla A.; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2010-01-01

    Radiological images show anatomical structures in multiple planes and may be effective for teaching anatomical spatial relationships, something that students often find difficult to master. This study tests the hypotheses that (1) the use of cadaveric computed tomography (CT) scans in the anatomy laboratory is positively associated with…

  20. The Translucent Cadaver: A Follow-up Study to Gauge the Efficacy of Implementing Changes Suggested by Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzé, Sanet Henriët; Driescher, Natasha Darné; Mole, Calvin Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In a study conducted in 2011, the use of full body digital X-ray images (Lodox® Statscan®) and drawings were described for surface anatomy education during which suggestions were made by students on how to improve the method. Educational innovations should continuously be adjusted and improved to provide the best possible scenario for student…

  1. Brain-dead patients are not cadavers: the need to revise the definition of death in Muslim communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2013-03-01

    The utilitarian construct of two alternative criteria of human death increases the supply of transplantable organs at the end of life. Neither the neurological criterion (heart-beating donation) nor the circulatory criterion (non-heart-beating donation) is grounded in scientific evidence but based on philosophical reasoning. A utilitarian death definition can have unintended consequences for dying Muslim patients: (1) the expedited process of determining death for retrieval of transplantable organs can lead to diagnostic errors, (2) the equivalence of brain death with human death may be incorrect, and (3) end-of-life religious values and traditional rituals may be sacrificed. Therefore, it is imperative to reevaluate the two different types and criteria of death introduced by the Resolution (Fatwa) of the Council of Islamic Jurisprudence on Resuscitation Apparatus in 1986. Although we recognize that this Fatwa was based on best scientific evidence available at that time, more recent evidence shows that it rests on outdated knowledge and understanding of the phenomenon of human death. We recommend redefining death in Islam to reaffirm the singularity of this biological phenomenon as revealed in the Quran 14 centuries ago.

  2. Evaluation of articular cartilage thickness of the humeral head and the glenoid fossa by MR arthrography: anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, L.R. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Veterans Affairs Medical Center]|[Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Radiology]|[National Yang-Ming Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Radiology; Kwak, S.; Kim, Y.S.; Chou, D.S.W.; Muhle, C.; Skaf, A.; Trudell, D.; Resnik, D. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of MR arthrography in determining the thickness of articular cartilage of the humeral head and glenoid fossa. Results. The correlation coefficients for MR arthrographic measurement versus anatomic measurement of the cartilage thickness were 0.7324 and 0.8757 for humeral head and glenoid fossa, respectively. With regard to the humeral head, there was a tendency to overestimate regions of thin cartilage and underestimate regions of thick cartilage. This tendency was not found in the assessment of glenoid cartilage. The mean of the absolute value of MR-anatomic differences was similar on the glenoid side (0.27 mm) and the humeral side (0.29 mm). The accuracy of measurement was significantly better on the glenoid side (Fisher`s r-to-Z transformation: Z=5.21, P=0.000001). (orig.)

  3. [Realization of an adaptive method of simulating the process of temperature change of a cadaver on a microcomputer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shved, E F; Novikov, P I; Vlasov, A Iu

    1989-01-01

    Programme based on mathematical model of the process of dead body temperature changing was developed for estimation of postmortem interval. Automatic retrieval of problem solution was performed on programmable microcalculators of "Electronica MK-61" type using adaptive approach. Diagnostical accuracy in case of dead body being preserved in permanent cooling conditions is +/- 3%.

  4. USE OF CONTRAST-ENHANCED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY TO STUDY THE CRANIAL MIGRATION OF A LUMBOSACRAL INJECTATE IN CADAVER DOGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalilak, Lukas T; Tucker, Russell L; Greene, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Volumes used in lumbosacral epidural injections for anesthesia have remained unchanged since the 1960s. The goals of this cross-sectional observational study were to characterize the three-dimensional spread of a lumbosacral epidural injection, as well as confirm that the commonly used volume of 0.2 ml/kg injected into the lumbosacral epidural space reaches the thoracolumbar (TL) junction in the majority (≥80%) of dogs. Ten clinically normal, adult, nonpregnant, mixed-breed dogs were obtained within five minutes of euthanasia and 0.2 ml/kg of radiopaque contrast medium was injected into the lumbosacral epidural space. A computed tomography scan of the TL spine was performed immediately following the injection. Migration of contrast reached the TL junction in 8 of 10 (80%) dogs. Contrast was well visualized in all epidural planes with contrast travelling predominantly in the dorsal epidural space in 7 of 10 (70%) dogs. There was no significant difference in the weight of dogs where the epidural injectate reached the TL junction and those where it did not (P = 0.16), or in the weight of dogs where the cranial-most point of the contrast column was in the dorsal versus the ventral epidural space (P = 0.32). This preliminary study supports the use of computed tomography to characterize injectate distribution in the canine thoracolumbar epidural space and provides evidence that a 0.2-ml/kg volume is likely to reache the TL junction in most dogs. Further studies are needed in live dogs to determine if variables affecting human epidural injectate doses have similar effects in the dog.

  5. Asymmetric varus and valgus stability of the anatomic cadaver knee and the load sharing between collateral ligaments and bearing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaonan; Malik, Aamer; Bartel, Donald L; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Wright, Timothy

    2014-08-01

    Knee joint stability is important in maintaining normal joint motion during activities of daily living. Joint instability not only disrupts normal motion but also plays a crucial role in the initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Our goal was to examine knee joint coronal plane stability under varus or valgus loading and to understand the relative contributions of the mechanisms that act to stabilize the knee in response to varus-valgus moments, namely, load distribution between the medial and lateral condyles and the ligaments. A robot testing system was used to determine joint stability in human cadaveric knees as described by the moment versus angular rotation behavior under varus and valgus loads at extension and at 30 deg and 90 deg of flexion. The anatomic knee joint was more stable in response to valgus than varus moments, and stability decreased with flexion angle. The primary mechanism for providing varus-valgus stability was the redistribution of the contact force on the articular surfaces from both condyles to a single condyle. Stretching of the collateral ligaments provided a secondary stabilizing mechanism after the lift-off of a condyle occurred. Compressive loads applied across the knee joint, such as would occur with the application of muscle forces, enhanced the ability of the articular surface to provide varus-valgus moment, and thus, helped stabilize the joint in the coronal plane. Coupled internal/external rotations and anteroposterior and medial-lateral translations were variable and in the case of the rotations were often as large as the varus-valgus rotations created by the applied moment.

  6. High origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: MR arthrography with anatomic and histologic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez Ruiz, Francisco Alejandro [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California and VA healthcare system, San Diego, CA (United States); Hospital Pablo Tobon Uribe, Departamento de Radiologia, Medellin (Colombia); Baranski Kaniak, Beatriz Cristina; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald L. [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [University of California and VA healthcare system, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California San Diego, VA Healthcare System Dan Diego, Department of Pathology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament has been described to arise from the anteroinferior labrum, but we have observed that in some persons its origin is from the anterior or anterosuperior labrum, creating diagnostic difficulties. Ten fresh unembalmed cadaveric shoulders underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using a posterior approach with a 1.5 T GE magnet, with the following sequences: T1-weighted fast spin-echo in axial, coronal and sagittal planes, and T1 fat-suppressed spin-echo in the axial plane (TR/TE 600/20, section thickness 2.5 mm, 0.5 mm interslice space, number of signals acquired, two, field of view 12 x 12 cm, and matrix 512 x 256 pixels). Following imaging, the shoulders were frozen and later sectioned using a band saw into 3-mm sections corresponding to the axial imaging plane. Histological analysis was also performed to determine the origin of the anterior band. Four of the ten shoulders had an origin of the anterior band above or at the 3 o'clock position: one at the 1 o'clock position, two at the 2 o'clock position, and one at the 3 o'clock position. In another shoulder, the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament originated from the middle glenohumeral ligament, and in five other shoulders, the anterior band originated from the anteroinferior labrum as has been described in the literature. This finding is of clinical significance as a high origin of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament leads to MR arthrographic finding that can simulate those of labral tears or detachments. (orig.)

  7. Plantar fasciitis and fascial rupture: MR imaging findings in 26 patients supplemented with anatomic data in cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, D J; Theodorou, S J; Kakitsubata, Y; Lektrakul, N; Gold, G E; Roger, B; Resnick, D

    2000-10-01

    Understanding of the normal anatomy of the plantar aponeurosis (PA) and familiarity with pathologic conditions are required for an accurate evaluation of the patient with subcalcaneal heel pain. In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the PA with close anatomic correlation. Herein, we describe the MR imaging features of plantar fasciitis and fascial rupture in 26 patients. High-spatial-resolution MR imaging was performed in four cadaveric feet, and a prescribed imaging plane was used for depiction of the peroneal component of the PA. MR imaging delineated the anatomy of the PA and perifascial soft tissues. The peroneal component was best visualized in prescribed sagittal oblique images. Perifascial edema was the most common finding of plantar fasciitis, and it was remarkable in those cases with acute fascial rupture. MR imaging reliably delineated the anatomy of the PA and may allow precise localization and definition of the extent of involvement in disease processes.

  8. Accuracy of specimen-specific nonlinear finite element analysis for evaluation of radial diaphysis strength in cadaver material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yusuke; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Takane; Ogawa, Yasufumi; Sukegawa, Koji; Rokkaku, Tomoyuki; Thoreson, Andrew Ryan; An, Kai-Nan; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of a user-specific finite element model for predicting the in situ strength of the radius after implantation of bone plates for open fracture reduction was established. The effect of metal artifact in CT imaging was characterized. The results were verified against biomechanical test data. Fourteen cadaveric radii were divided into two groups: (1) intact radii for evaluating the accuracy of radial diaphysis strength predictions with finite element analysis and (2) radii with a locking plate affixed for evaluating metal artifact. All bones were imaged with CT. In the plated group, radii were first imaged with the plates affixed (for simulating digital plate removal). They were then subsequently imaged with the locking plates and screws removed (actual plate removal). Fracture strength of the radius diaphysis under axial compression was predicted with a three-dimensional, specimen-specific, nonlinear finite element analysis for both the intact and plated bones (bones with and without the plate captured in the scan). Specimens were then loaded to failure using a universal testing machine to verify the actual fracture load. In the intact group, the physical and predicted fracture loads were strongly correlated. For radii with plates affixed, the physical and predicted (simulated plate removal and actual plate removal) fracture loads were strongly correlated. This study demonstrates that our specimen-specific finite element analysis can accurately predict the strength of the radial diaphysis. The metal artifact from CT imaging was shown to produce an overestimate of strength.

  9. Effects of two different deep digital flexor tenotomy techniques on distal articular angles of equine cadaver forelimbs

    OpenAIRE

    Dearo, Antonio Cezar de Oliveira; Rosa,Vitor Bruno Bianconi; Reichmann,Peter; Oliveira,Milton Luis Ribeiro de

    2012-01-01

    Deep digital flexor (DDF) tenotomy is a technique employed for years to treat selected disorders of the musculoskeletal system in horses. Although two different surgical approaches (i.e. mid-metacarpal and pastern) have been described for performing the procedure, in vitro quantitative data regarding the modifications induced by either technique on the distal articular angles is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the study reported here was to investigate the viability of a proposed biomechan...

  10. Avaliação da trajetória dos parafusos bicorticais pela técnica de harms e melcher em relação à artéria carótida interna: estudo experimental em cadáveres Evaluación de la trayectoria de los tornillos bicorticales en la técnica de harms y melcher en relación con la arteria carótida interna: un estudio experimental en cadáveres Evaluation of the trajectory of the bicortical screws in relation to the internal carotid artery, in fixation by the harms and melcher technique: an experimental study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Zanini Rocha

    2011-01-01

    estudios similares en la literatura que hacen hincapié en la necesidad de una evaluación cuidadosa de las imágenes y posición anatómica de la arteria carótida interna, antes del uso de tornillos bicorticales de masa lateral de C1 por acceso posterior.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to study the relationship between bicortical screws and the internal carotid artery, in anatomical body parts, in screw fixation by the Harms and Melcher technique. METHODS: Our sample consisted of five cadavers. RESULTS: The results were as follows: the average shortest distance between the outlet of the screw and the medial edge of the right internal carotid artery was 11.55 mm (range 10.05 to 14.23 mm, while on the left side, the average was 7.50 mm (ranging from 2.75 to 12.42 mm. The average shortest distance between the posterior edge of the internal carotid artery and the anterior cortical C1 lateral mass on the right was 4.24 mm (ranging from 2.08 to 7.48 mm, while the left side, the average was 2.98 mm (ranging from 1.83 to 3.83 mm. CONCLUSION: The results are consistent with similar studies in the literature that emphasize the need for a careful assessment of images of anatomical position of the internal carotid artery prior to the use of bicortical screws in the C1 lateral mass by posterior access.

  11. Understanding how pre-impact posture can affect injury outcome in side impact sled tests using a new tool for visualization of cadaver kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, John Paul; Poulard, David; Lessley, David; Riley, Patrick; Subit, Damien

    2015-02-01

    The effect of posture and subject-specific factors on injury outcome is an active field of research in injury biomechanics, in particular in automotive safety research where post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) are used as surrogates. Current PMHS tests routinely include acquisition of the subjects׳ geometry and kinematics. However, combining these two datasets to better understand the injury mechanism is still a challenge. This study investigated the connection between pre-impact posture and resulting injuries in six previously published side impact sled tests (three with a rigid wall and three with an airbag) by creating three-dimensional kinematic animations (3DKA) of the tests. The 3DKA allow qualitative assessment of parameters related to posture and their possible effect on injury outcome. The orientation of the struck scapula and the lateral leaning of the torso were identified as potentially significant parameters. The ranges of variation in these parameters were quantified and compared to the number of rib fractures for each subject: the data suggested a correlation, but there was insufficient data for a probabilistic analysis. The 3DKA were published with this study and are freely available.

  12. Prediction of torsional failure in 22 cadaver femora with and without simulated subtrochanteric metastatic defects - A CT scan-based finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, Sander; van der Linden, Jacqueline C.; Dijkstra, P. D. Sander; Wiggers, Theo; Oudkerk, Mathijs; Snijders, Chris J.; van Keulen, Fred; Verhaar, Jan A. N.; Weinans, Harrie; Swierstra, Bart A.

    2006-01-01

    Background In metastatic bone disease, prophylactic fixation of impending long bone fracture is preferred over surgical treatment of a manifest fracture. There are no reliable guidelines for prediction of pathological fracture risk, however. We aimed to determine whether finite element (FE) models c

  13. Prediction of torsional failure in 22 cadaver femora with and without simulated subtrochanteric metastatic defects: a CT scan-based finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Spruijt (Sander); J.C. van der Linden (Jacqueline); P.D.S. Dijkstra (Sander); T. Wiggers (Theo); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); C.J. Snijders (Chris); F. van Keulen (Fred); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); B.A. Swierstra (Bart)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In metastatic bone disease, prophylactic fixation of impending long bone fracture is preferred over surgical treatment of a manifest fracture. There are no reliable guidelines for prediction of pathological fracture risk, however. We aimed to determine whether finite element

  14. Investigating the warming and cooling rates of human cadavers by development of a gel-filled model to validate core temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, M J; Rooney, P; Kearney, J N

    2007-01-01

    Tissue Services (within NHS Blood and Transplant) plans to bring deceased donors to its state of the art retrieval suite at its new centre in Speke, Liverpool in air-conditioned transport at circa 20 degrees C but without dedicated active cooling. The aim of this study was to determine how quickly a refrigerated body would warm at different ambient temperatures using a gel-filled model. Two models of a human body were prepared consisting of neoprene wetsuits filled with approximately 7 or 18 l of a viscous solution, which once set has similar properties to ballistics gel. This gel consisted of 47.5% distilled water, 47.5% glycerol and 5% agar. Final "dummy" weights were 7.4 and 18.6 kg respectively, representing "virtual" weights of approximately 40 kg and 70 kg. A K-class thermocouple probe was then inserted into a "rectal" position within each model and the models were cooled to a series of different core temperatures: 5 degrees C, 10 degrees C and 15 degrees C and then were placed in an orbital incubator set at 20 degrees C or 30 degrees C ambient temperature. The rate of temperature increase, in the dummy, was measured, until the model's core temperature was close to the ambient temperature. This was done in triplicate for each size model and ambient temperature. Data indicate that increase in core temperature depends on the size of the model and the initial core temperature. For an equivalent donor weight of 70 kg and background temperature of 20 degrees C, core temperature rises from 5 degrees C to 9.2 degrees C; 10 degrees C to 13.3 degrees C and 15 degrees C to 15.5 degrees C after 2 h. The final core temperatures after 2 h are likely to retard bacterial growth, movement or contamination during transport. Cooling rate data indicated that a 70 kg donor equivalent cooled from 37 degrees C to 15 degrees C within 6 h in a cold room at 4 degrees C. This work has shown that a body can be transported without refrigeration and not cause further tissue deterioration as a result.

  15. Just Say No to NOTA: Why the Prohibition of Compensation for Human Transplant Organs in NOTA Should Be Repealed and a Regulated Market for Cadaver Organs Instituted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristy Lynn; Finley, Marisa; Rohack, J James

    2014-01-01

    The United States faces a shortage of organs for transplantation; thousands of individuals die each year while waiting for organs. The organ donation system relies on altruism because the National Organ Transplantation Act (NOTA) prohibits donors from receiving valuable consideration for organs to be used for transplantation. This paper contains a proposal for a regulated market for cadaveric organs as a mechanism to increase the number of organs available for transplantation. A regulated market for cadaveric organs is appropriate in the United States for the following reasons: (1) it is consistent with the numerous ways in which bodies. are currently treated as commodities; (2) it is unlikely to further disadvantage the poor; (3) it would not expose organ recipients to undue harm; (4) in the current organ transplantation system, everyone except the organ donor, benefits financially; (5) the prohibition in NOTA is inconsistent with laws permitting next of kin to recover for damage to the body of a deceased family member; (6) the protection of the dignitary interests of organs for donation is inconsistent with the current protections of the dignitary interests of human specimens; and (7) permitting a market for organs promotes the American values of autonomy and liberty.

  16. Ultrasonographic evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint: Correlation of findings with gross anatomy and MR arthrography in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M., E-mail: florian.buck@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Nico, Marcelo A.C., E-mail: nico.marcelo@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Gheno, Ramon, E-mail: ramon.gheno@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Trudell, Debra J., E-mail: debtrudell@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Resnick, Donald, E-mail: dresnick@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in the evaluation of degenerative changes in the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Methods and materials: Ten cadaveric specimens were obtained. US evaluation of cartilage degeneration and thickness was performed by two independent and blinded readers (R1 and R2). Gross anatomy and MR arthrography evaluated by two readers in consensus served as the reference standard. The joint surface not accessible to US was measured. Results: US interreader agreement was non-existent for cartilage thickness measurements and moderate for cartilage degeneration grading (weighted kappa = 0.41). Comparing US and MR imaging evaluation, there was no correlation between US R1 and MR imaging (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC] = 0.352) and a moderate correlation between US R2 and MR imaging (PCC = 0.570) concerning cartilage thickness measurements. Concerning cartilage degeneration grading, there was a moderate to strong (R1 Spearman correlation coefficient [SCC] = 0.729)/R2 SCC = 0.767) correlation concerning cartilage degeneration grading. Comparing US and gross anatomic evaluation, there was no correlation for US R1 (PCC = 0.220) and a strong correlation for US R2 (PCC = 0.922) concerning cartilage thickness measurements, and a strong to moderate correlation (R1 SCC = 0.808/R2 SCC = 0.597) concerning cartilage degeneration grading. The mean sector of the articular surface of the ulna head not accessible to US was 13{sup o}. Conclusion: In conclusion the DRUJ is accessible to US except in the central 13{sup o} sector of the joint surface. US was approved to be sufficient in demonstrating advanced stages of cartilage degeneration. Thus, US of the DRUJ is recommended in patients suffering from ulnar-sided wrist pain.

  17. Development of a computational framework to adjust the pre-impact spine posture of a whole-body model based on cadaver tests data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulard, David; Subit, Damien; Donlon, John-Paul; Kent, Richard W

    2015-02-26

    A method was developed to adjust the posture of a human numerical model to match the pre-impact posture of a human subject. The method involves pulling cables to prescribe the position and orientation of the head, spine and pelvis during a simulation. Six postured models matching the pre-impact posture measured on subjects tested in previous studies were created from a human numerical model. Posture scalars were measured on pre- and after applying the method to evaluate its efficiency. The lateral leaning angle θL defined between T1 and the pelvis in the coronal plane was found to be significantly improved after application with an average difference of 0.1±0.1° with the PMHS (4.6±2.7° before application). This method will be applied in further studies to analyze independently the contribution of pre-impact posture on impact response using human numerical models.

  18. The role of the anterolateral ligament in ACL insufficient and reconstructed knees on rotatory stability: A biomechanical study on human cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavlo, M; Eljaja, S; Jensen, J T; Siersma, V D; Krogsgaard, M R

    2016-08-01

    Studies suggest that the anterolateral ligament (ALL) is important for knee stability. The purpose was to clarify ALL's effect on rotatory and anterior-posterior stability in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-insufficient and reconstructed knees and the effect of reconstruction of an insufficient ALL. Eighteen cadaveric knees were included. Stability was tested for intact (+ALL), detached (-ALL) and reconstructed (+ reALL) ALL, with ACL removed (-ACL) and reconstructed (+ACL) in six combinations. All were tested in 0, 30, 60, and 90 °C flexion. Anterior-posterior stability was measured with a rolimeter. Rotation with a torque of 8.85 Nm was measured photographically. The ALL was well defined in 78% of knees. ACL reconstruction had a significant effect on anterior-posterior stability. Detaching the ALL had a significant effect on internal rotatory stability and on anterior-posterior stability in ACL-insufficient knees. Reconstruction of ACL and ALL reestablished knee stability. The appearance of the ALL was not uniform. The ALL was an internal rotational stabilizer. Anatomical ALL reconstruction in combination with ACL reconstruction could reestablish stability. ALL reconstruction might be considered in patients with combined ACL and ALL tears, but the clinical effect should be established in a controlled clinical study.

  19. Can osseous landmarks in the distal medial humerus be used to identify the attachment sites of ligaments and tendons: paleopathologic-anatomic imaging study in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Zoner, Cristiane S.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Randall, Tori D. [San Diego Museum of Man, Physical Anthropology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To describe osseous landmarks that allow identification of the attachments of the ligaments and tendons in the distal medial aspect of the humerus. Reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus were identified in 34 well-preserved specimens from a paleopathologic collection. These osseous landmarks were then sought in magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten cadaveric elbow specimens so that the ease of their visualization and optimal imaging plane could be assessed. To assign these osseous landmarks to specific attachments of the tendons and ligaments in the distal medial humerus, we cut the specimens in slices and photographed and examined them. Subsequently, the prevalence of these osseous landmarks as well as the attachment sites of the tendons and ligaments in this location was determined. We determined ten reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus, their prevalence and ease of identification, and their relationship to the attachments of the tendons and ligaments at the medial distal humerus. It is possible to use osseous landmarks at the distal medial humerus to facilitate identification of the different attachments of tendons and ligaments when MR images of the elbow are assessed. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of stretching position by measurement of strain on the ilio-femoral ligaments: an in vitro simulation using trans-lumbar cadaver specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Egi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Muraki, Takayuki; Izumi, Tomoki; Fujii, Misaki; Miyamoto, Shigenori

    2009-08-01

    The ilio-femoral ligament is known to cause flexion contracture of the hip joint. Stretching positioning is intended to elongate the ilio-femoral ligaments, however, no quantitative analysis to measure the effect of stretching positions on the ligament has yet been performed. Strains on the superior and inferior ilio-femoral ligaments in 8 fresh/frozen trans-lumbar cadaveric hip joints were measured using a displacement sensor, and the range of movement of the hip joints was recorded using a 3Space Magnetic Sensor. Reference length (L(0)) for each ligament was determined to measure strain on the ligaments. Hip positions at 10 degrees adduction with maximal external rotation, 20 degrees adduction with maximal external rotation, and maximal external rotation showed larger strain for the superior ilio-femoral ligament than the value obtained from L(0), and hip positions at 20 degrees external rotation with maximal extension and maximal extension had larger strain for the inferior ilio-femoral ligament than the value obtained from L(0) (pligaments exhibited positive strain values with specific stretching positions. Selective stretching for the ilio-femoral ligaments may contribute to achieve lengthening of the ligaments to treat flexion contracture of the hip joint.

  1. The Translucent Cadaver: An Evaluation of the Use of Full Body Digital X-Ray Images and Drawings in Surface Anatomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotze, Sanet Henriet; Mole, Calvin Gerald; Greyling, Linda Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    It has been noted by staff at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University that medical students neglect the study of surface anatomy during dissection. This study reports on the novel use of Lodox[R] Statscan[R] images in anatomical education, particularly the teaching of surface anatomy. Full body digital X-ray images (Lodox Statscan)…

  2. Insectos asociados a fenómenos de descomposición cadavérica en cerdo blanco ( Sus scrofa en el municipio de Mosquera (Cundinamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ospina Fonseca María Fernanda

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available El estudio tuvo como objeto iniciar la investigación de los insectos asociados a fenómenos dedescomposición en una zona alta, específicamente en el municipio de Mosquera (Cundina-marca. Para lograrlo se usó como biomodelo cerdo blanco (Sus scrofa por su similitud conlos humanos, éste se sacrificó y se dejó al aire libre durante ocho meses. El proceso de des-composición se dividió en cinco fases: fresco (2 días, hinchado (13 días, descomposiciónactiva (15 días, descomposición avanzada (31 días y restos secos (160 días. Durante esteperiodo se recogieron 3.539 individuos, el 86.69% pertenecientes a Diptera y el 8.36% aColeoptera. Las familias más numerosas de Diptera fueron Muscidae (62.08% y Calliphoridae(14.44%, mientras que en Coleoptera fueron Silphidae (68.58% y Staphylinidae (14.86%.Se pudo observar la participación de los géneros Calliphora, Paralucilia y Chloroprocta, estosgéneros no aparecen en zonas bajas y podrían ser propios de zonas altas. No se presentarongrupos exclusivos para cada fase del proceso, aunque la presencia y abundancia de Diptera fuemayor al inicio de la descomposición, mientras que Coleoptera (exceptuando Silphidae fuemás abundante y activo al final del proceso. La lluvia ocasionó una "regresión" en la sucesiónde insectos. El presente trabajo no constituye una herramienta de carácter legal pero es elprimer trabajo sobre entomología forense realizado en la Sabana de Bogotá y es base paratrabajos posteriores en la zona.

  3. 髋臼中心定位器在髋臼标本解剖学测量中的应用及其临床意义%Anatomy analysis of cadaver acetabulum using acetabulum center locator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐陈; 周建生; 程鸿远; 官建中; 王志岩; 吴敏; 张斌斌; 肖玉周

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨应用髋臼中心定位器测量髋臼前后切迹连线中点至髋臼中心的方法,为人工全髋关节置换术中定位髋臼中心及安放髋臼假体提供解剖学依据.方法 选取20具40侧正常成年人骨盆标本进行前瞻性研究,剥离骨盆软组织,显露出髋臼缘、髋臼前后切迹和Harris窝;通过髋臼的垂直径和水平径的交点确定髋臼的中心,并记录髋臼开口平面的垂直径和水平径数值,再利用髋臼中心定位器测量髋臼前后切迹连线中点至髋臼中心的距离(MAC).应用医学统计学软件对测得的实验数据进行分析,论证它们之间的相关性.结果 髋臼开口平面的垂直径和水平径分别为45.50~ 55.60 mm、44.50~52.54 mm,使用髋臼中心定位器测得MAC为26.60~33.82 mm,平均为30.87mm,并观察到髋臼中心均在靠近卵圆窝内头侧接近月状关节软骨处.根据测量的MAC分别与髋臼开口平面的垂直径、水平径以及两者之和数据绘制散点图,提示MAC和髋臼开口平面水平径、垂直径、以及两者之和呈正性相关,Pearson系数r分别为0.89、0.81、0.91,从Pearson线性分析可知相比于MAC和垂直径或水平径,MAC和髋臼水平径与垂直径之和变量的相关系数更接近1,更具有明显的线性正性相关性.结论 MAC和髋臼水平径与垂直径之和呈线性正性相关性,提示可以通过测量髋臼水平径和垂直径的距离来得到MAC的值,从而可应用髋臼中心定位器在人工全髋关节置换术和翻修术中快速准确地确定髋臼中心,为正确安放髋臼假体,恢复髋关节解剖旋转中心提供一种新的方法.%Objective To discuss the measure of distance between the midpoint of acetabular notch line connecting and the centre point of acetabular by using acetabular center locator(ACL).To provide the anatomy basis for the man-made total hip replacement(THR) and to make sure the acetabular prosthesis is on the right place.Methods The specimens of pelvis (40 hips) from 20 normal adults were selected.The soft tissues of pelvis were peeled,and then get the labrum acetabulare,acetabular notch and Harris fossa.The center point of acetabulum was determined according to the intersection point of vertical diameter and horizontal diameter of acetabular bone.The distance between vertical diameter and horizontal diameter was recorded.The ACL was used to measure the distance between the midpoints of line connected with acetabular notches to the acetabular center (MAC).The data were analyzed by using statistic analysis software.Results The vertical line and horizontal line were 45.50-55.60 mm,44.50-52.54 mm.MAC was 26.60-33.82 mm,the average value of MAC was 30.87 mm.The acetabular center near the head round Harris fossa was closed to the acetabular articular surface.The scatter diagram was drawn according to the data of MAC with each of vertical line,horizontal line and the sum of vertical line and horizontal line.There was correlation between MAC and vertical diameter,horizontal diameter and the sum of vertical diameter and horizontal diameter.The Pearson coefficients (r) were 0.89,0.81 and 0.91,respectively.The variables coefficient between MAC and the sum of vertical diameter and horizontal diameter were more close to 1 according to the pearson linear analysis,compare with MAC and vertical diameter,MAC and horizontal diameter.There were more significant linear positive correlation between MAC and the sum of vertical diameter and horizontal diameter.Conclusions The Pearson linear analysis suggest an obvious linear positive correlation between MAC and the sum of acetabular horizontal line and the vertical line,which means the value of the MAC can be obtained by measuring the distance between acetabular horizontal diameter and vertical diameter.Thus the acetabular center locator can be used in THA and revision to get positioning center of acetabular rapidly and accurately.This is a practical method for acetabular component orientation.

  4. Evaluación de la fijación femoral en la reconstrucción del ligamento cruzado anterior. Estudio experimental en modelo cadavérico

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Claramunt, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Los estudios de esta tesis analizan la fijación femoral de la plastia de isquiotibiales para la reconstrucción del ligamento cruzado anterior. Hasta ahora el concepto de isometría ha sido predominante a la hora de realizar el túnel femoral, de manera en que se intentaba dar la misma tensión a la plastia en todos los grados de flexión de la rodilla. Por esto, el túnel se realizaba alto y profundo en el cóndilo femoral lateral. En los últimos años, la localización de este túnel ha cambiado busc...

  5. The significance of sutura zygomaticosphenoidalis in malar bone fracture reduction:cadaver study%颧蝶缝在颧骨骨折复位中的作用评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓清; 李文刚; 马建军; 王艳冉; 徐晓楠; 李磊

    2010-01-01

    目的:评价颧蝶缝在颧骨骨折复位中的意义,寻找颧蝶缝的暴露方法.方法:以尸头为研究对象,人为造成颧骨骨折后,先后采用常规复位方法及以颧蝶缝为复位标准方法进行复位同定,比较复位效果.分别采用口内及口外2种方法暴露颧蝶缝.结果:暴露颧蝶缝并直视下复位颧蝶缝再复位其他可见骨折线,能使颧骨骨折达到解剖复位,口内法仅能触摸到不能直视该缝,口外法可直视该缝全部.结论:颧蝶缝可作为颧骨复位的可靠标准,口外法为暴露颧蝶缝的可靠方法.

  6. Descripción anatómica de la irrigación del colgajo sural a pedículo distal en piezas cadavéricas

    OpenAIRE

    Quinteros P,Juan Pablo; Sousa R,Jussara; Rapiman G,Andrea; VALDÉS G,FABIO

    2012-01-01

    El colgajo sural fasciomiocutáneo es ampliamente utilizado en la reparación de defectos profundos de tejidos blandos del miembro inferior distal. Este estudio describe su base anatómica mediante la morfometría de las arterias perforantes en una muestra de nuestra población chilena. Material y Método: Se utilizaron 8 miembros inferiores de amputaciones supracondileas. Previa repleción con látex coloreado vía poplítea, se procedió a disecar los miembros inferiores para así obtener un colgajo fa...

  7. Fatal attraction: Male spider mites prefer females killed by the mite-pathogenic fungus Neozygites floridana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trandem, Nina; Bhattarai, Upendra Raj; Westrum, Karin; Knudsen, Geir Kjølberg; Klingen, Ingeborg

    2015-06-01

    Exploring prospective mates can be risky. Males of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae approach and guard immobile (quiescent) female nymphs to increase their chances of fathering offspring, this being a first-male sperm priority species. We investigated the behaviour of male T. urticae towards females killed by the mite pathogenic fungus Neozygites floridana, letting them choose between a fungal killed and a healthy quiescent female. The dead female (called cadaver) was in one of three stages: (1) non-sporulating; (2) sporulating with primary conidia (non-infective); (3) surrounded/partly covered by secondary capilliconidia (infective). When the cadaver was in stage 1 or 2, males were significantly more often observed near the cadaver than near the healthy female. When the cadaver was in stage 3 (infective capilliconidia), males preferred the vicinity of healthy females. The frequency of two male behaviours, touching and guarding, was also recorded. Touching the cadaver tended to decrease as cadaver developed, whereas touching the healthy females increased. Guarding of non-sporulating cadavers and healthy females was equally common, while guarding of sporulating cadavers was only observed once (stage 2) or not at all (stage 3). To differentiate between the effect of fungal infection and sex, we also let males choose between a non-sporulating cadaver of each sex. Males then preferred to approach the female cadaver. Touching behaviour followed the same pattern, and guarding of male cadavers was not observed. Our results indicate that T. urticae males are more attracted to non-infective female cadavers than to healthy females, only detecting their mistake when very close. Moreover, males approach and explore cadavers surrounded by infective conidia. Whether the results of host manipulation by the pathogen or just sensory constraints in the host, this inability to detect unsuitable and indeed infective mates promotes transmission of the pathogen.

  8. Estudio de la función del rodete acetabular en la biomecánica de la cadera: estudio cadavérico de la repercusión de la lesión y la reparación del rodete acetabular en la cinética articular de la cadera

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Trabajo experimental en espécimen de cadera para valorar la repercusión de la lesión labral, parcial o completa, en la distribución de cargas de la superficie acetabular, así como el papel de la reconstrucción labral por reanclaje al reborde acetabular en la misma. Este trabajo implica el diseño y desarrollo previo de una bancada de prueba, el uso de tecnología de sensores piezoeléctricos para medir la presión intraarticular y la medición dinámica de las mismas en cinco especímenes anatómicos...

  9. Biomechanical Studies of the Safety of the Atlanto-odontoid Joint During Massage Therapy with Oblique-pulling Manipulation of the Cervical Spine on Cadaver Specimens%寰齿关节在颈椎斜扳手法中安全性问题的力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志泉; 严隽陶; 沈国权

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the safety over the atlanto-odontoid joint of the cervical spine during oblique-pulling manipulation.Methods The contact stress of the atlanto-odontoid joint in physiologic unstable conditions with and without pulling-and-extending of seven cadaveric specimans of cervical spine were observed with a biomechanical electric measuring apparatus and oblique-pulling device.Results The ratio of contact stress in pulling-and-extending condition,physiologic condition and pathologic condition is 1∶1.2∶9.4.Under normal physiologic condition,the stress in posterior extension is greater than that in anterior flexion,but less than in neutral position.Conclusion A better option of the manipulation position is to put the patient′s head at a slight flexion when a certain pulling-extending force is applied.In patient with severe degenerative changes of the cervical spine and unstability,the amplitude of rotation and the force of manipulation should be decreased.%目的研究颈椎斜扳法下寰齿关节的安全性。方法运用生物力学中的电测技术,设计了一种斜扳模拟装置,采用7具新鲜尸体颈椎标本,对寰齿关节在不同生理病理状态,拔伸与非拔伸条件下的接触应力进行观察。结果斜扳时局部接触应力在拔伸状态、生理状态和病理失稳状态下之比为1∶1.2∶9.4。正常生理状态下斜扳,后伸位应力大于前屈位而小于自然中立位。结论颈椎斜扳时患者头部以微屈位为最好,同时施加一定拔伸力。对颈椎存在严重退变失稳的患者,应减小旋转的幅度和力量。

  10. The Vesalius Project: Interactive Computers in Anatomical Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Thomas O.; Spurgeon, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    Described is a high-resolution, interactive 3-D atlas of human/animal anatomy that students will use to learn the structure of the body and to understand their own bodies in health and disease. This system can be used to reinforce cadaver study or to serve as a substitute for institutions where it is not practical to use cadavers. (KR)

  11. Preliminary evaluation of the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Svalastoga, Eiliv Lars

    guide surgical treatment. The TTTG measures tibial tuberosity position relative to the axis of the femoral trochlea. A preliminary investigation of TTTG measurement was performed using the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cadavers as a morphologically similar and homogenous substitute for dog cadavers. CT...

  12. Radiographic, ultrasonographic, and anatomic assessment of femoral trochlea morphology in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Westrup, Ulrik; Svalastoga, Eiliv Lars

    2014-01-01

    Objective-To compare repeatability and equivalency of measures of femoral trochlea depth and trochlear angle in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) determined by use of radiography, ultrasonography, and digital photography of cadaver limbs. Sample-24 pelvic limbs from 12 red fox cadavers. Procedures...

  13. Preparing for Emergency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiors, Jacob; Todsen, Tobias; Nilsson, Philip;

    2015-01-01

    on such a model becomes relevant with regard to performance on a high-fidelity model (cadaver). This requires a valid assessment tool for EC performance. STUDY DESIGN: Psychometric study on low-fidelity models and human cadavers. SETTING: University hospital. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: An assessment tool was created...

  14. Insect succession on remains of human and animals in Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Ma, Meng-Yun; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Wang, Jiang-Feng; Li, Liang-Liang; Yin, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Min; Lai, Yue; Tao, Lu-Yang

    2017-02-01

    Most forensic entomological succession studies have been carried out using pig or rabbit carcasses; however, there have been few studies on the differences between insect succession patterns on human cadavers and on animal carcasses. In order to clarify the differences between decomposition and insect succession patterns of human cadavers and animal carcasses, one 49.5kg human cadaver, two large pig carcasses (45 and 48kg), two small pig carcasses (23 and 25kg) and two rabbit carcasses (both 1.75kg) were placed in the same field conditions in Shenzhen, China for a comparative study on August, 2013. The results indicated that: (1) The duration from fresh to skeletonization is in order of human cadaver>large pig carcasses>small pig carcasses>rabbit carcasses; (2) insect assemblages (including developmental stages) are more complex on larger carcasses, in order of human cadaver=large pig carcasses>small pig carcasses>rabbit carcasses; (3) the developmental rates of the same forensically important fly species on all carcasses are consistent; (4) all identified species of Calliphoridae can complete development of one generation on human cadaver, and both large and small pig carcasses, while on rabbit carcasses, only a subset of the Calliphoridae species can finish development of one generation; (5) beetles can generate offspring on human cadaver, and both large and small pig carcasses, while they do not generate offspring on rabbit carcasses. This study provides useful comparative data for decomposition and insect succession pattern of human cadaver with animal carcasses.

  15. Comparative anatomical dimensions of the complete human and porcine spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Iris; Ploegmakers, Joris J. W.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    2010-01-01

    New spinal implants and surgical procedures are often tested pre-clinically on human cadaver spines. However, the availability of fresh frozen human cadaver material is very limited and alternative animal spines are more easily available in all desired age groups, and have more uniform geometrical a

  16. Should We Be “Nudging” for Cadaveric Organ Donations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg

    2012-01-01

    Originaltitel: Getting the purpose of mandated choice wrong - Is Increasing Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs really what we want to nudge?......Originaltitel: Getting the purpose of mandated choice wrong - Is Increasing Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs really what we want to nudge?...

  17. A Human Dissection Training Program at Indiana University School of Medicine-Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Ernest F., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    As human cadavers are widely used in basic sciences, medical education, and other training and research venues, there is a real need for experts trained in anatomy and dissection. This article describes a program that gives individuals interested in clinical and basic sciences practical experience working with cadavers. Participants are selected…

  18. Body Donation in India: Social Awareness, Willingness, and Associated Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokade, Shrikant A.; Gaikawad, Anjana P.

    2012-01-01

    With the attendant rise of the number of medical colleges in India over past few decades, the demand for cadavers used in medical education and research is growing. However, there is an insufficient supply of donated cadavers available for dissection. This study was undertaken to assess the general population's awareness of body donation programs…

  19. Amyand's hernia: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sofia Anagnostopoulou; Dimitrios Dimitroulis; Theodore G Troupis; Maria Allamani; Alexandros Paraschos; Antonios Mazarakis; Nikolaos I Nikiteas; Alkiviadis Kostakis

    2006-01-01

    The presence of vermiform appendix in inguinal hernia is rare and is known as Amyand's hernia. We report an Amyand's hernia, where the appendix was found in a right inguinal hernia in one male cadaver aged ninety two years.

  20. The relation between mechanical impact parameters and most frequent bicycle related head injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monea, A.G.; Perre, G. van der; Baeck, K.; Delye, H.H.; Verschueren, P.; Forausebergher, E.; Lierde, C. van; Verpoest, I.; Sloten, J. van der; Goffin, J.; Depreitere, B.

    2014-01-01

    The most frequent head injuries resulting from bicycle accidents include skull fracture acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), cerebral contusions, and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). This review includes epidemiological studies, cadaver experiments, in vivo imaging, image processing techniques, and computer

  1. A historical perspective: infection from cadaveric dissection from the 18th to 20th centuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Benninger, Brion; Agutter, Paul; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2013-03-01

    Today, the study of human anatomy utilizing the ultimate study guide, the cadaver, is relatively safe. In the past, however, human dissection was dangerous. Prior to the germ theory, antibiotics, and the use of gloves, cadavers were often life threatening to dissectors including both the teacher and the student. Medical students who graduated in the United States before 1880 were unlikely to practice antisepsis in the dissecting room. In the present article, we review human cadaveric dissection in Europe and the United States primarily from the 1700s to the early 1900s in regard to its potential for transmission of infection to the dissector. A brief account of the infectious hazards of human cadavers in general and those of cadavers used for dissection in particular is given.

  2. Ultrasonographic assessment of flexor tendon mobilization: Effect of different protocols on tendon excursion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-W.H. Korstanje (Jan-Wiebe); J. Soeters (Johannes); A.R. Schreuders (Ton); P.C. Amadio (Peter ); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk); R.W. Selles (Ruud)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Different mobilization protocols have been proposed for rehabilitation after hand flexor tendon repair to provide tendon excursion sufficient to prevent adhesions. Several cadaver studies have shown that the position of the neighboring fingers influences tendon excursions of

  3. Design and evaluation of a new synthetic brain simulator for endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breimer, Gerben E.; Bodani, Vivek; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is an effective but technically demanding procedure with significant risk. Current simulators, including human cadavers, animal models, and virtual reality systems, are expensive, relatively inaccessible, and can lack realistic sensory feedback. The purp

  4. Dissektionsundervisning er fortsat vigtig ved indlæring af anatomi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Britt Mejer; Søe, Niels Henrik; Vendel Jensen, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Dissection and prosection require a donation programme of cadavers for education and research. The importance of maintaining the donation programme and the significance of dissection as a teaching method when learning anatomic structures and obtaining surgical skills are evaluated....

  5. [Dissection is still important when learning anatomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Britt Mejer; Søe, Niels H; Jensen, Nina Vendel; Langebæk, Rikke; Dahlin, Lars B

    2013-05-20

    Dissection and prosection require a donation programme of cadavers for education and research. The importance of maintaining the donation programme and the significance of dissection as a teaching method when learning anatomic structures and obtaining surgical skills are evaluated.

  6. Baculovirus-Induced Climbing Behavior Favors Intraspecific Necrophagy and Efficient Disease Transmission in Spodoptera exigua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Rebolledo

    Full Text Available Shortly prior to death, many species of Lepidoptera infected with nucleopolyhedrovirus climb upwards on the host plant. This results in improved dissemination of viral occlusion bodies over plant foliage and an increased probability of transmission to healthy conspecific larvae. Following applications of Spodoptera exigua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus for control of Spodoptera exigua on greenhouse-grown sweet pepper crops, necrophagy was observed by healthy S. exigua larvae that fed on virus-killed conspecifics. We examined whether this risky behavior was induced by olfactory or phagostimulant compounds associated with infected cadavers. Laboratory choice tests and olfactometer studies, involving infected and non-infected cadavers placed on spinach leaf discs, revealed no evidence for greater attraction of healthy larvae to virus-killed over non-infected cadavers. Physical contact or feeding on infected cadavers resulted in a very high incidence of transmission (82-93% lethal disease. Observations on the behavior of S. exigua larvae on pepper plants revealed that infected insects died on the uppermost 10% of foliage and closer to the plant stem than healthy conspecifics of the same stage, which we considered clear evidence of baculovirus-induced climbing behavior. Healthy larvae that subsequently foraged on the plant were more frequently observed closer to the infected than the non-infected cadaver. Healthy larvae also encountered and fed on infected cadavers significantly more frequently and more rapidly than larvae that fed on non-infected cadavers. Intraspecific necrophagy on infected cadavers invariably resulted in virus transmission and death of the necrophagous insect. We conclude that, in addition to improving the dissemination of virus particles over plant foliage, baculovirus-induced climbing behavior increases the incidence of intraspecific necrophagy in S. exigua, which is the most efficient mechanism of transmission of this lethal

  7. High division of sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Shrivastava

    2014-04-01

    Results: In all except two cadavers, the nerve divided at the apex of the popliteal fossa. In two cadavers the sciatic nerve divided bilaterally in the upper part of thigh. Conclusion: The high division presented in this study can make popliteal nerve blocks partially ineffective. The high division of sciatic nerve must always be borne in mind as they have important clinical implications. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 686-688

  8. Experimental evaluation of 3-dimensional kinematic behavior of the cruciate ligaments Avaliação experimental do comportamento cinemático tridimensional dos ligamentos cruzados

    OpenAIRE

    Silvio Antonio Garbelotti Júnior; Osvaldo Pelozo Júnior; Rogério Pedreschi Caldana; Amâncio Ramalho Jr; Ricardo Luiz Smith

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a low-cost and easily reproducible technique for biomechanical studies in cadavers. In this kind of study, the natural effect of loading of the joint and shear forces are not taken into account. The objective is to describe the plastic deformation of the ligaments into 3-dimensional space. METHOD: For 18 intact human cadaver knees, the cruciate ligaments were divided into 3 fiber bundles, the tibial or femoral fixation points were marked, and...

  9. Baculovirus-Induced Climbing Behavior Favors Intraspecific Necrophagy and Efficient Disease Transmission in Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo, Dulce; Lasa, Rodrigo; Guevara, Roger; Murillo, Rosa; Williams, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Shortly prior to death, many species of Lepidoptera infected with nucleopolyhedrovirus climb upwards on the host plant. This results in improved dissemination of viral occlusion bodies over plant foliage and an increased probability of transmission to healthy conspecific larvae. Following applications of Spodoptera exigua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus for control of Spodoptera exigua on greenhouse-grown sweet pepper crops, necrophagy was observed by healthy S. exigua larvae that fed on virus-killed conspecifics. We examined whether this risky behavior was induced by olfactory or phagostimulant compounds associated with infected cadavers. Laboratory choice tests and olfactometer studies, involving infected and non-infected cadavers placed on spinach leaf discs, revealed no evidence for greater attraction of healthy larvae to virus-killed over non-infected cadavers. Physical contact or feeding on infected cadavers resulted in a very high incidence of transmission (82-93% lethal disease). Observations on the behavior of S. exigua larvae on pepper plants revealed that infected insects died on the uppermost 10% of foliage and closer to the plant stem than healthy conspecifics of the same stage, which we considered clear evidence of baculovirus-induced climbing behavior. Healthy larvae that subsequently foraged on the plant were more frequently observed closer to the infected than the non-infected cadaver. Healthy larvae also encountered and fed on infected cadavers significantly more frequently and more rapidly than larvae that fed on non-infected cadavers. Intraspecific necrophagy on infected cadavers invariably resulted in virus transmission and death of the necrophagous insect. We conclude that, in addition to improving the dissemination of virus particles over plant foliage, baculovirus-induced climbing behavior increases the incidence of intraspecific necrophagy in S. exigua, which is the most efficient mechanism of transmission of this lethal pathogen.

  10. Anatomical variation of the origin of the left vertebral artery

    OpenAIRE

    Patasi B; Yeung A; Goodwin S; Jalali A

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents and describes the anatomical variation of the left vertebral artery originating from the arch of aorta as a case report. This variation was found in one of the cadavers at the Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. During routine dissection of a male cadaver, in the superior mediastinum and the neck we observed an atypical origin of the left vertebral artery. Atypical origin was compared to the typical origin of the left ver...

  11. Experimental evaluation of 3-dimensional kinematic behavior of the cruciate ligaments

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a low-cost and easily reproducible technique for biomechanical studies in cadavers. In this kind of study, the natural effect of loading of the joint and shear forces are not taken into account. The objective is to describe the plastic deformation of the ligaments into 3-dimensional space. METHOD: For 18 intact human cadaver knees, the cruciate ligaments were divided into 3 fiber bundles, the tibial or femoral fixation points were marked, and...

  12. Technique of Axillary Use of a Combat Ready Clamp to Stop Junctional Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    and cadaver experiments are limited in their ability to mimic trauma care. Cadaver muscle tone is negligible, and if present, such as in casualties...care in war. A small but growing body of evidence indicates that hemorrhage control can be attained out-of-hospital with mechanical compression, using...Medical Products, Portland, OR; Junctional Emergency Treatment Tool, JETT, North American Rescue Products, Greer, SC; Abdominal Aortic Tourniquet, AAT

  13. Experimental Study on Stress Relaxation and Creep Properties of Human Thoracolumbar Vertebral Bodies and Intervertebral Discs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Underwater shock can produce extremely high accelerations, resulting in severe human injuries on shipboard, and human thoraco lumbar spines are prone to suffer from injuries by ship shock motion. To observe the viscoelasticity of thoracolumbar of young fresh cadavers, and to provide biomechanical parameters for both research and clinical practice. Materials and Methods:5 fresh young male cadavers (aged 22 to 31 years) were provided, and 15 thoracolumbar spinal anatomies of 5 samples were harvested...

  14. Students' perception of anatomy education at a Korean medical college with respect to time and contents

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Min Joon; Hwang, Young-il

    2013-01-01

    Among medical education institutions worldwide, the time allotted for anatomy instruction has decreased without any reasonable time optimization suggestions. In addition, the utility of cadaver dissection has long been debated. Herein, we surveyed students' perceptions of anatomy education with respect to time and hands-on cadaver dissection, at Seoul National University College of Medicine. With the help of a questionnaire, we surveyed third- and fourth-year students at our institute who had...

  15. Attitudes of Australian chiropractic students toward whole body donation: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Michelle; Marten, Mathew; Stewart, Ella; Serafin, Stanley; Štrkalj, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Cadavers play an important role in anatomy education. In Australia, bodies for anatomy education are acquired only through donations. To gain insight into educational dynamics in an anatomy laboratory as well as to facilitate body donation programs and thanksgiving ceremonies, it is important to understand students' attitudes toward body donation. In this cross-sectional study, the attitudes of Macquarie University's first, second, and fifth year chiropractic students toward body donation were investigated. Macquarie University chiropractic students have a four semester long anatomy program, which includes cadaver-based instruction on prosected specimens. A questionnaire was used to record respondents' demographics and attitudes toward body donation: personal, by a relative, and by a stranger. It was found that ethnicity and religion affect attitudes toward body donation, with Australian students being more willing to donate a stranger's body and atheists and agnostics being more willing to donate in general. Furthermore, willingness to donate one's own or a family member's body decreases as year of study increases, suggesting a possible negative impact of exposure to cadavers in the anatomy laboratory. This was only true, however, after controlling for age. Thus, the impact of viewing and handling prosected specimens, which is the norm in anatomy classes in Australia, may not be as strong as dissecting cadavers. It is suggested that anatomists and educators prepare students for cadaver-based instruction as well as exhibit sensitivity to cultural differences in how students approach working with cadavers, when informing different communities about body donation programs and in devising thanksgiving ceremonies.

  16. Pelvic orientation and assessment of hip dysplasia in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Lund, B;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The study was performed to qualify the source material of 4151 pelvic radiographs for the research into the relationship between unrecognised childhood hip disorders and the development of hip osteoarthrosis, and to investigate the effect of varying degrees of pelvic tilt and rotation...... on the measurements of radiographic indices of hip dysplasia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We investigated the effect of varying pelvic orientation on radiographic measurements of acetabular dysplasia using a cadaver model. Results from the cadaver study were used to validate the radiographic assessments of acetabular...... dysplasia in the longitudinal survey cohort of the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS; Osteoarthrosis Sub-study). 1) Cadaver pelvises and proximal femurs from a male and a female donor were mounted anatomically in holding devices allowing independent inclination/reclination and rotation. An AP pelvic...

  17. Clinical implications of the surgical anatomy of the sural nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coert, J H; Dellon, A L

    1994-11-01

    The exact anatomy of the sural nerve remains important for many clinical situations. To better understand this anatomy, 25 embalmed and 10 fresh cadaver pairs were studied. The origin of the common sural nerve in relation to the fibular head and its medial and lateral sural components were investigated. The lateral sural nerve was absent in 4 percent of the embalmed cadavers. The lateral and medial sural nerves united in the popliteal fossa in 12 percent and in the lower third of the leg in 84 percent of the cadavers. A site was identified where the lateral sural and lateral cutaneous nerve of the calf pierced the deep fascia. This site was centered about the fibular head and may be viewed as a potential site of nerve compression. There is application of these findings to nerve grafting, neuroma prevention and treatment, and sural nerve biopsy.

  18. [Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research and commentary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Ide, Chizuka; Higuchi, Norio; Aiso, Sadakazu; Sakai, Tatsuo; Matsumura, George; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kobayashi, Eiji; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Yaginuma, Hiroyuki; Hishikawa, Shuji; Sugimoto, Maki; Izawa, Yoshimitsu; Imanishi, Nobuaki

    2011-07-01

    This article analyses the Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research drawn by the Study Group for Future Training Systems of Surgical Skills and Procedures established by the Fiscal Year 2010 research program of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. The purpose of the Draft of Guidelines is: First, to lay out the required basic guidelines for human cadaver usage to allow medical and dental faculty to conduct clinical education and research in accordance with existing regulations. Second, the guidelines are expected to give physicians a regulatory framework to carry out cadaver training in accordance with the current legal framework. This article explains the Draft of Guidelines in detail, outlines the future of cadaver training, and describes issues which must still be solved.

  19. [Draft of guidelines for human body dissection for clinical anatomy education and research and commentary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Ide, Chizuka; Higuchi, Norio; Aiso, Sadakazu; Sakai, Tatsuo; Matsumura, George; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kobayashi, Eiji; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Yaginuma, Hiroyuki; Hishikawa, Shuji; Sugimoto, Maki; Izawa, Yoshimitsu; Imanishi, Nobuaki

    2011-06-01

    This article analyses the Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research drawn by the Study Group for Future Training Systems of Surgical Skills and Procedures established by the Fiscal Year 2010 research program of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. The purpose of the Draft of Guidelines is: First, to lay out the required basic guidelines for human cadaver usage to allow medical and dental faculty to conduct clinical education and research in accordance with existing regulations. Second, the guidelines are expected to give physicians a regulatory framework to carry out cadaver training in accordance with the current legal framework. This article explains the Draft of Guidelines in detail, outlines the future of cadaver training, and describes issues which must still be solved.

  20. Cultural acceptability and personal willingness of Iranian students toward cadaveric donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi Asl, Jamal; Nikzad, Hossein; Taherian, Aliakbar; Atlasi, Mohammad Ali; Naderian, Homayoun; Mousavi, Gholamabbas; Kashani, Milad Motalebi; Omidi, Abdollah

    2017-03-01

    Cadaver dissection stands as a crucial component in medical curricula around the world, although computer-based multimedia programs have been introduced in order to replace the need for cadaver donations. Due to a decrease in the number of unclaimed bodies and rather few donations, there is an insufficient number of cadavers for anatomical studies in Iran. This study was carried out to evaluate medical students' awareness and willingness regarding body donation in Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. In this study, a questionnaire was designed to focus on the cultural acceptability and personal willingness to donate one's body after death. Students from the university's anatomy classes (n = 331) participated in this study. Seventy-seven percent of the students expressed their agreement toward the idea of utilizing body donation services, though only 25.4% of participants were willing to donate their own bodies. None of the demographic factors were associated with cultural acceptability or personal willingness towards body donation. These findings indicated that besides "payment", other factors were associated with students' willingness to become donors. All factors of awareness except "previous awareness of organization" were associated with cultural acceptability. In this study, students suggested that encouraging people to register for body donation using mass media (25.6%) and teaching students to respect cadavers in the dissection environment (24.8%) were the best solutions for addressing the lack of cadavers. These findings indicated that a lack of awareness about body donation might be the main factor responsible for unwillingness towards body donation; therefore, improving the public's awareness and addressing the willingness of students regarding body donation may help overcome the current lack of donated cadavers. Anat Sci Educ 10: 120-126. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  1. Infection of Psoroptes mites with the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A J; Wall, R

    2001-01-01

    The astigmatid mite, Psoroptes ovis (Hering) (Acari: Psoroptidae), is an obligatory ectoparasite that causes psoroptic mange in a range of domesticated animals, particularly sheep, where the clinical disease is known as sheep scab. A series of laboratory assays were used to assess the use of the fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff) (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) as a biocontrol agent for P. ovis derived from rabbits (syn. P. cuniculi). The immersion of mites in a suspension of conidia of M. anisopliae resulted in the acquisition of fatal infections. The number of mites which developed infections increased significantly with the increasing concentration of the conidial suspension to which they were exposed; 77% of mites developed infections when exposed to the highest concentration used (1 x 10(8) conidia ml(-1)). Controls developed no fungal infections. Mites allowed simply to walk across a surface which had been treated with a suspension of conidia also acquired fungal infections; the number infected was again related to the concentration of conidia present. After contact for 24 h with a surface treated with 1 x 10(8) conidia ml(-1), 73% of the mites became infected. To determine whether dead infected mites could act as sources of infection, infected cadavers were placed in chambers with live uninfected mites. The uninfected mites acquired fatal infections from the cadavers; a higher ratio of infected cadavers to uninfected mites resulted in greater transmission of infection. The time after death of the infected cadaver was also an important factor influencing the number infected, 5-day-old cadavers were the most infective and 18-day-old cadavers the least infective. The results indicate that M. anisopliae is a good candidate control agent for Psoroptes mites.

  2. Does obturator nerve block always occur in 3-1 block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Tekdemir

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the femoral “3-in-1 block”, obturator nerve block is routinely unsuccessful. Anatomical studies are not available to explain why blockade of obturator nerve or lumbar plexus does not occur. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of femoral “3-in-1 block” obturator nerve block on a cadaver model.Materials and methods: Totally, 12 mature adult human cadavers were selected. Methylene blue dye (30 ml was injected under the fascia iliaca in eight cadavers and into the femoral nerve sheath in four cadavers. Careful bilateral dissections were performed following dye injections.Results: It was seen that the dye did not spread to the medial part of the psoas major muscle and the obturator nerve was not stained with the dye in eight cadavers in whom dye was injected laterally into the femoral sheat. In four cadavers in whom dye was injected into the femoral nerve sheat, metylene blue spread through fascial layers in the plane under the psoas muscle and stained the obturator nerve just before emerging medially from the fascia psoas. At this point, the obturator nerve pierced the psoas fascia and extended extrafascially in the medial and deep borders of the psoas muscle. In this area, the upper section of the obturator nerve was found also to be stained with the dye.Conclusion: We concluded that the cause of an unsuccessful obturator nerve block might be the fascial anatomy of this region. The lateral cutaneous femoral nerve and the femoral nerve easily can be blocked in the fascia iliaca compartment, but the obturator nerve block fails because of its being extrafascial in this region. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:149-51

  3. Undetected iatrogenic lesions of the anterior femoral shaft during intramedullary nailing: a cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Lane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of undetected radiographically iatrogenic longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex during intramedullary nailing of the femur has not been well documented. Methods Cadaveric study using nine pairs of fresh-frozen femora from adult cadavers. The nine pairs of femora underwent a standardized antegrade intramedullary nailing and the detection of iatrogenic lesions, if any, was performed macroscopically and by radiographic control. Results Longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex was revealed in 5 of 18 cadaver femora macroscopically. Anterior splitting was not detectable in radiographic control. Conclusion Longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex during intramedullary nailing of the femur cannot be detected radiographically.

  4. HEAVEN: The Frankenstein effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavero, Sergio; Ren, XiaoPing; Kim, C Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The HEAVEN head transplant initiative needs human data concerning the acute restoration of motor transmission after application of fusogens to the severed cord in man. Data from two centuries ago prove that a fresh cadaver, after hanging or decapitation, can be mobilized by electrical stimulation for up to 3 hours. By administering spinal cord stimulation by applied paddles to the cord or transcranial magnetic stimulation to M1 and recording motor evoked potentials, it should be possible to test fusogens in fresh cadavers. Delayed neuronal death might be the neuropathological reason.

  5. HEAVEN: The Frankenstein effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Canavero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The HEAVEN head transplant initiative needs human data concerning the acute restoration of motor transmission after application of fusogens to the severed cord in man. Data from two centuries ago prove that a fresh cadaver, after hanging or decapitation, can be mobilized by electrical stimulation for up to 3 hours. By administering spinal cord stimulation by applied paddles to the cord or transcranial magnetic stimulation to M1 and recording motor evoked potentials, it should be possible to test fusogens in fresh cadavers. Delayed neuronal death might be the neuropathological reason.

  6. Head-Neck Biomechanics in Simulated Rear Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Cusick, Joseph F.; Kleinberger, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The first objective of this study is to present an overview of the human cadaver studies aimed to determine the biomechanics of the head-neck in a simulated rear crash. The need for kinematic studies to better understand the mechanisms of load transfer to the human head-neck complex is emphasized. Based on this need, a methodology is developed to delineate the dynamic kinematics of the human head-neck complex. Intact human cadaver head-neck complexes were subjected to postero-anterior impact ...

  7. Variations in abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the Quervain syndrome: a surgical and anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulthanan, Teerawat; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2007-01-01

    Eighty-two wrists of Thai cadavers and the wrists of 66 patients with de Quervain syndrome were studied, and the variation in the number of tendons and the fibro-osseous tunnel in the first extensor compartment were recorded. The abductor pollicis longus had more than one tendon in 73 of the cadavers (89%) and in 32 of the patients (49%) (p Quervain syndrome (p = 0.01). The results indicate that the number of fibro-osseous tunnels and multiple compartments in the first extensor compartment may be associated with a predisposition to de Quervain syndrome.

  8. Computer-aided forensics: metal object detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelliher, Timothy; Leue, Bill; Lorensen, Bill; Lauric, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    Recently, forensic investigators1 have started using diagnostic radiology devices (MRI, CT) to acquire image data from cadavers. This new technology, called the virtual autopsy, has the potential to provide a low cost, non-invasive alternative or supplement to conventional autopsies. New image processing techniques are being developed to highlight forensically relevant information in the images. One such technique is the detection and characterization of metal objects embedded in the cadaver. Analysis of this information across a population with similar causes of death can lead to developing improved safety and protection devices with a corresponding reduction in deaths.

  9. Unraveling the intraguild competition between Oscheius spp. nematodes and entomopathogenic nematodes: Implications for their natural distribution in Swiss agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Herrera, Raquel; Půža, Vladimir; Jaffuel, Geoffrey; Blanco-Pérez, Rubén; Čepulytė-Rakauskienė, Rasa; Turlings, Ted C J

    2015-11-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) are excellent biological control agents to fight soil-dwelling insect pests. In a previous survey of agricultural soils of Switzerland, we found mixtures of free-living nematodes (FLN) in the genus Oscheius, which appeared to be in intense competition with EPN. As this may have important implications for the long-term persistence of EPN, we studied this intraguild competition in detail. We hypothesized that (i) Oscheius spp. isolates act as scavengers rather than entomopathogens, and (ii) cadavers with relatively small numbers of EPN are highly suitable resources for Oscheius spp. reproduction. To study this, we identified Oscheius spp. isolated from Swiss soils, quantified the outcome of EPN/Oscheius competition in laboratory experiments, developed species-specific primers and probe for quantitative real-time PCR, and evaluated their relative occurrence in the field in the context of the soil food web. Molecular analysis (ITS/D2D3) identified MG-67/MG-69 as Oscheius onirici and MG-68 as O. tipulae (Dolichura-group). Oscheius spp. indeed behaved as scavengers, reproducing in ∼64% of frozen-killed cadavers from controlled experiments. Mixed infection in the laboratory by Oscheius spp. with low (3 IJs) or high (20 IJs) initial EPN numbers revealed simultaneous reproduction in double-exposed cadavers which resulted in a substantial reduction in the number of EPN progeny from the cadaver. This effect depended on the number of EPN in the initial inoculum and differed by EPN species; Heterorhabditis megidis was better at overcoming competition. This study reveals Oscheius spp. as facultative kleptoparasites that compete with EPN for insect cadavers. Using real-time qPCR, we were able to accurately quantify this strong competition between FLN and EPN in cadavers that were recovered after soil baiting (∼86% cadavers with >50% FLN production). The severe competition within the host cadavers and the intense management of the soils in

  10. Mycosis Inhibits Grasshopper Necrophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrophagy is common among the Acrididae and the tettigonid, Anabrus simplex; these behaviors have been proposed as mechanisms for the horizontal transmission of Microsporida and entomopathogenic fungi. After anecdotal observations that Melanoplus sanguinipes and A. simplex did not eat cadavers tha...

  11. Disease dynamics in a specialized parasite of ant societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Breum; Ferrari, Matthew; Evans, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    -offs experienced by Ophiocordyceps parasites manipulating ants into dying in nearby graveyards. We used field data from Brazil and Thailand to parameterize and fit a model for the growth rate of graveyards. We show that parasite pressure is much lower than the abundance of ant cadavers suggests...

  12. Segmentation process significantly influences the accuracy of 3D surface models derived from cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Schepers, Rutger H; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the accuracy of surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver heads were used. There was no conflict of interests in this study. CBCT scans were made of the heads and 3D

  13. The influence of the segmentation process on 3D measurements from cone beam computed tomography-derived surface models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbrecht, Willem P.; Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren, Yijin

    2013-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of linear and angular measurements between cephalometric and anatomic landmarks on surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols was the aim of this study. CBCT scans were made of cadaver heads and 3D surface mod

  14. Constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning in surface anatomy education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman-de Bres, E.M.; Sieben, J.M.; Smailbegovic, I.; Bruin, A. de; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially th

  15. Soft tissue damage after minimally invasive THA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oldenrijk, J.; Hoogland, P.V.J.M.; Tuijthof, G.J.M.; Corveleijn, R.; Noordenbos, T.W.H.; Schafroth, M.U.

    2010-01-01

    Methods 5 surgeons each performed a total hip arthroplasty on 5 fresh frozen cadaver hips, using either a MIS anterior, MIS anterolateral, MIS 2-incision, MIS posterior, or lateral transgluteal approach. Postoperatively, the hips were dissected and muscle damage color-stained. We measured proportion

  16. Accuracy and reliability of facial soft tissue depth measurements using cone beam computer tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    2010-01-01

    It is important to have accurate and reliable measurements of soft tissue thickness for specific landmarks of the face and scalp when producing a facial reconstruction. In the past several methods have been created to measure facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) in cadavers and in the living. The con

  17. The Reliability of the Symax Method of Measuring the Radiographic Femoral Varus Angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allpass, Maja; Miles, James Edward; Schmökel, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    . The FVA was measured using the Symax method on craniocaudal femoral radiographs. CORA principles were used to plan the curved osteotomy. Following osteotomy and planned correction of the FVA to 0º, the femur was stabilized with a 2.4 mm locking plate and screws (cadavers) or 2.0mm SOP plate (patient). FVA...

  18. Teaching Bovine Abdominal Anatomy: Use of a Haptic Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, Tierney; Forrest, Neil David; Frean, Stephen Philip; Baillie, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Traditional methods of teaching anatomy to undergraduate medical and veterinary students are being challenged and need to adapt to modern concerns and requirements. There is a move away from the use of cadavers to new technologies as a way of complementing the traditional approaches and addressing resource and ethical problems. Haptic (touch)…

  19. Twist and its effect on ACL graft forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MP; Blankevoort, L; ten Ham, A; Verdonschot, N; van Kampen, A

    2004-01-01

    Graft tension is a controversial topic in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Evidence suggests a narrow range of graft tensions, which allow the graft to remodel to a stable and mature neoligament. In previous cadaver experiments, we showed that twisting the graft could modulate the graft for

  20. Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative disorder in the United States : Young Caucasian males are at highest risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dharnidharka, VR; Tejani, AH; Ho, PL; Harmon, WE

    2002-01-01

    We have previously documented Caucasian race and cadaver donor source as risk factors for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) development in recipients registered in the North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study (NAPRTCS). We analyzed data from the Scientific Regist

  1. MR imaging and ultrasonographic findings of tensor fasciae suralis muscle: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keun Ho; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Ghi Jai; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The tensor fasciae suralis muscle is a very rare anomalous muscle located in the popliteal region. This anatomic variation has been reported often through cadaver studies. However, there are only a few radiologic reports of this entity. We presented a case of tensor fasciae suralis muscle detected as an incidental finding in magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  2. Impact Response of an Energy Absorbing Earcup,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Evidence of preexisting fractures, marked structural abnormalities, or excessive osteoporosis were grounds for rejec- tion of the cadaver. Anthropometric...Sciences Code 2333 ATTN: Library China Lake, CA 93555 Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234 (1) US Navy Commander Naval Aerospace Medical Institute US Army

  3. An Integrated Teaching Method of Gross Anatomy and Computed Tomography Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tohru; Tajika, Yuki; Ueno, Hitoshi; Awata, Sachiko; Hirasawa, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Maki; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Tsushima, Yoshito; Endo, Keigo; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is essential for medical students to learn and comprehend human anatomy in three dimensions (3D). With this in mind, a new system was designed in order to integrate anatomical dissections with diagnostic computed tomography (CT) radiology. Cadavers were scanned by CT scanners, and students then consulted the postmortem CT images during cadaver…

  4. Cordyceps bassiana and production of stromata in vitro showing Beauveria anamorph in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Cordyceps species was found with Beauveria anamorph state on larval insect cadavers on Obong Mountsin in Gangwon Pronvince, Republic of Korea. Cultures from discharged ascospores formed an anamorph identifiable as Beauveria bassiana. This teleomorph-anamorph connection was also confirmed by the in...

  5. The relationship of hip joint space to self reported hip pain. A survey of 4.151 subjects of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: the Osteoarthritis Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate the effect of pelvic orientation on measurements of hip joint space widths (JSW) in cadaver pelvic radiographs, thereby validating the pelvic radiographs of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: The Osteoarthritis Substudy (CCHS III) cohort of 4.152 subjects, and (2) to inv...

  6. Special Section: New Ways to Detect Colon Cancer 3-D virtual screening now being used

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organ, like the colon—and view it in virtual reality." Later, he and his team used it with anatomically detailed, three-dimensional representations of a cadaver (dead body) from the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human project (www.nlm.nih.gov). By ...

  7. Improvement in organ shortage through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarovich, Felix

    2002-06-15

    Given the persisting shortage of organs for transplantation, it is time to consider whether the message that is sent to society to encourage donation is unsuitable. This message is mainly based on altruism and solidarity, and it has failed. Patients die because of the lack of cadaver organs that society refuses to offer; paradoxically, society is denying itself a chance of life. The reasons for this enigma are (1) lack of awareness that transplantation is a common practice; (2) the persistence of the "cult of dead body integrity;" and (3) the myths surrounding transplantation.A pathway to solving this organ shortage may be education, to make society understand their need of organs for transplantation and its role to resolve this necessity. It should focus on youth but must also reach adults, through their children receiving this education, or from the media or other sources. It should erase the concept of integrity of the cadaver and establish that using cadaver organs means sharing and guaranteeing a source of health for humanity.Similarly, a new message should stress that "using" cadaver organs means "sharing a source of health for humankind." Rather than "a gift of life" we should convey the idea of "sharing a social right and obligation" or that "My decision today assures my and my family health tomorrow."

  8. Anatomical Data for Analyzing Human Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagenhoef, Stanley; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Anatomical data obtained from cadavers and from water displacement studies with living subjects were used to determine the weight, center of gravity, and radius of gyration for 16 body segments. A lead model was used to study movement patterns of the trunk section of the body. (Authors/PP)

  9. Twist and its effect on ACL graft forces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.P.; Blankevoort, L.; Ham, A. ten; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Kampen, A. van

    2004-01-01

    Graft tension is a controversial topic in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Evidence suggests a narrow range of graft tensions, which allow the graft to remodel to a stable and mature neoligament. In previous cadaver experiments, we showed that twisting the graft could modulate the graft for

  10. A novel suture method to place and adjust peripheral nerve catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C.; Steen-Hansen, C.; Madsen, M. H.;

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a peripheral nerve catheter, attached to a needle, which works like an adjustable suture. We used in-plane ultrasound guidance to place 45 catheters close to the femoral, saphenous, sciatic and distal tibial nerves in cadaver legs. We displaced catheters after their initial...

  11. Two-Dimensional Sectioned Images and Three-Dimensional Surface Models for Learning the Anatomy of the Female Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Sun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Hwang, Sung Bae; Har, Dong-Hwan; Moon, Young Lae; Chung, Min Suk

    2013-01-01

    In the Visible Korean project, serially sectioned images of the pelvis were made from a female cadaver. Outlines of significant structures in the sectioned images were drawn and stacked to build surface models. To improve the accessibility and informational content of these data, a five-step process was designed and implemented. First, 154 pelvic…

  12. Biomechanics of human occupants in simulated rear crashes: documentation of neck injuries and comparision of injury criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Yoganandan, N.; Stemper, B.D.; Schlick, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to subject small female and large male cadavers to simulated rear impact, document soft-tissue injuries to the neck, determine the kinematics, forces and moments at the occipital condyles, and evaluate neck injury risks using peak force, peak tension and normalized te

  13. Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as…

  14. Learning of Musculoskeletal Ligament Stress Testing in a Gross Anatomy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, David A.; Youdas, James W.; Hollman, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Human anatomy in physical therapy programs is a basic science course serving as a foundation for subsequent clinical courses. Integration of anatomy with a clinical emphasis throughout a curriculum provides opportunities for reinforcement of previously learned material. Considering the human cadaver laboratory as a fixed cost to our program, we…

  15. Update on Simulation-Based Surgical Training and Assessment in Ophthalmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia S; Subhi, Yousif; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke;

    2015-01-01

    Library, and Web of Science) and was completed on March 1, 2014. Overall, the included trials were divided into animal, cadaver, inanimate, and virtual-reality models. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Validity evidence was evaluated using a modern validity framework...

  16. Arthroscopy of the elbow joint–video analysis of the anatomy and function

    OpenAIRE

    Hesse, Beatrix; Lampert, C.

    2002-01-01

    The anatomical structures of the elbow joint were dissected in layers in human cadavers. The surgical dissection was divided into to deep and superficial areas. Each step was documented by digital video and photographs. The functional and anatomical preparation allowed us to establish the limits and scope of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures by arthroscopy.

  17. THE RECTUS-ABDOMINIS CARDIOMYOPLASTIC PROCEDURE - PRELIMINARY-RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJNBERG, DS; HENSEN, AG; GRANDJEAN, PA; SCHREUDER, JAH; ROBINSON, PH; EBELS, T

    1994-01-01

    The rectus abdominis myofascial flap (RAMF) was investigated as a viable alternative to the latissimus dorsi flap for dynamic cardiomyoplasty. In human and animal cadaver experiments and live sheep, it was possible to use the RAMF for innervated intrathoracic use. The RAMF was stimulated by a specia

  18. EFFECTS OF X-RAY BEAM ANGLE AND GEOMETRIC DISTORTION ON WIDTH OF EQUINE THORACOLUMBAR INTERSPINOUS SPACES USING RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djernaes, Julie D.; Nielsen, Jon V.; Berg, Lise C.

    2017-01-01

    study was to determine whether X-ray beam angle has an effect on apparent widths of interspinous spaces. Thoracolumbar spine specimens were collected from six equine cadavers and left-right lateral radiographs and sagittal and dorsal reconstructed computed tomographic (CT) images were acquired...

  19. Anatomy and Humanity: Examining the Effects of a Short Documentary Film and First Anatomy Laboratory Experience on Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosani, Farah; Neuberger, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Medical students begin their education inside a laboratory dissecting cadavers to learn human gross anatomy. Many schools use the course experience as a way to instill empathy and some have begun integrating video and recorded interviews with body donors to humanize the experience, but their impact has yet to be measured. This study examines the…

  20. Flexor digitorum profundus tendon anatomy in the forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teoman Dogan

    2012-04-01

    Methods: We used 11 forearms belonging to cadavers and fixed with formaldehyde. The forearms numbered 1, 2, 8, 9, 10, 11 were the left and right arms of the same cadavers. Those numbered 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 belonged to different cadavers. Dissections were made by using the atraumatic surgical technique. The tendons were studied to identify the structure and number of the fibers forming them. Results: The presence of a large common tendon was found in 10 of the 11 forearms. In 4 of these, the common tendon included the tendons of all four fingers. While the common tendon included 3 fingers in four forearms, it only included tendons belonging to 2 fingers in two forearms. It was not possible in one forearm to separate the common tendon into its fibers. In another forearm, tendons belonging to each digit were separate and independent starting at the muscle-tendon junction to the attachment points. Conclusion: The majority of the cadaver forearms used in the study displayed a single large FDP tendon in the zone between the muscle-tendon joint to the carpal tunnel entry prior to being distributed into each index. This anatomical feature should be considered in choosing materials and surgical technique for Zone V FDP tendon injuries, as well as in planning the rehabilitation process. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(1.000: 25-29

  1. The Sublime Corpse in Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's Women's Journal "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello" (1860)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGreca, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's choice to include articles depicting the advanced decay of cadavers, which are simultaneously horrible and awesome, in her women's periodical "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello". Background on Avellaneda's biography, women's print culture, and theories of the sublime provide a frame for the…

  2. Clay Modeling versus Written Modules as Effective Interventions in Understanding Human Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareither, Mary Lou; Arbel, Vered; Growe, Meghan; Muszczynski, Emily; Rudd, Adam; Marone, Jane R.

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of clay modeling to written modules is examined to determine the degree of improvement in learning and retention of anatomical 3D relationships among students with different learning preferences. Thirty-nine undergraduate students enrolled in a cadaver dissection course completed a pre-assessment examination and the VARK…

  3. A RARE VARIATION OF GREAT SAPHENOUS VEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakhate Manisha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The venous system is more complex and variable than arterial system due to its frequent anatomical variations. This paper discusses the anatomy of the great saphenous vein and its variation observed in a male cadaver of around 60 years old.

  4. Anatomo-radiological study of the Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crovetto, M., E-mail: macdlt@telefonica.net [Otolaryngology Department, Hospital de Basurto, University of the Basque Country, Avenida de Montevideo 18, Bilbao 48013, Vizcaya (Spain); Whyte, J., E-mail: jwhite@unizar.es [Faculty of Medicine, Department of Human Anatomy and Histology, University of Zaragoza, C/Domingo Mirall s/n, Zaragoza (Spain); Rodriguez, O.M., E-mail: OLIVIAMARIA.RODRIGUEZSANVICENT@osakidetza.net [Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo, Vizcaya (Spain); Lecumberri, I., E-mail: INIGO.LECUMBERRICORTES@osakidetza.net [Hospital de Basurto, Avenida Montevideo 18, Bilbao 498013 (Spain); Martinez, C., E-mail: claudiorayosx@yahoo.es [Hospital General de la Defensa, Via Iberica s/n Zaragoza (Spain); Elexpuru, J., E-mail: jelexpuru@mac.com [Hospital de Basurto, Avenida de Montevideo 18, Bilbao 48013, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: The main purpose of this study is to determine the radiological incidence of Superior (SSCD) and Posterior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence (PSCD) and to compare radiologic SSCD to the incidence of this condition on cadaver specimen. We have also analysed the relation between the ossification state of the semicircular canals and the degree of mastoid pneumatization and integrity of Tegmen Tympani. Material and methods: Temporal bones have been investigated by means of CT scan on patients and direct observation on cadaver specimen, respectively. Results: 604 ears and 160 cadaver temporal bones have been investigated by means of CT scan and direct observation, respectively. 3.6% and 0.3% of the studied ears had SSCD and PSCD, respectively, on CT scan. Only 0.6% of the cadaver specimen ears did have anatomical SSCD. Degree of pneumatization of the mastoid bone is related to the mean thickness of bone overlying the Superior and Posterior Semicircular Canal. Radiological absence of Tegmen Tympani is more frequent in ears that also have radiologic SSCD. Conclusion: CT scanning gives higher incidence figures of SSCD than anatomical studies, 3.6% vs. 0.6%. We also found a 0.6% incidence of radiological PSCD in the studied ears. There is a direct relation between the degree of ossification of Superior and Posterior Semicircular Canal and certain temporal bone anatomic features: temporal bone pneumatization and absence/presence of Tegmen Tympani or Antri.

  5. 40 CFR 799.5115 - Chemical testing requirements for certain chemicals of interest to the Occupational Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... description of the skin preparation method, including measurements of the skin membrane thickness. (C) A... measurements for these tests, samples of human cadaver skin must be obtained from the abdominal region of human... give an undepletable reservoir on the surface of the skin depends on the rate of penetration of...

  6. A finite element lower extremity and pelvis model for predicting bone injuries due to knee bolster loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, L. van; Hoof, J. van; Barbir, A.; Made, R. van der; Slaats, P.M.A.; McCann, M.J.; Ridella, S.A.; Rupp, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Injuries to the knee-thigh-hip (KTH) complex in frontal motor vehicle crashes are of substantial concern because of their frequency and potential to result in long-term disability. Current frontal impact Anthropometric Test Dummies (ATDs) have been shown to respond differently than human cadavers un

  7. Percutaneous Anterior Column Fixation for Acetabulum Fractures, Does It Have to Be Difficult?-The New Axial Pedicle View of the Anterior Column for Percutaneous Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihai; Zhang, Wei; Mullis, Brian; Liu, Daohong; Xiong, Qi; Lv, Houchen; Ji, Xinran; Peng, Ye; Tang, Peifu

    2016-01-01

    Anterior column percutaneous screw fixation can be challenging. The purpose of this new technique is to offer a rapid, simple, and safe method to place an anterior screw. The authors used a 3-dimensional reconstruction simulation, cadaver study, and a clinical case series to demonstrate this new alternative to standard previously described techniques.

  8. Scaling of musculoskeletal models from static and dynamic trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Subject-specific scaling of cadaver-based musculoskeletal models is important for accurate musculoskeletal analysis within multiple areas such as ergonomics, orthopaedics and occupational health. We present two procedures to scale ‘generic’ musculoskeletal models to match segment lengths and joint...

  9. 42 CFR 412.100 - Special treatment: Renal transplantation centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... recipient with a kidney transplant registry; (7) Surgeons' fees for excising cadaver kidneys; (8....2170 and 405.2171 of this chapter) to remove the estimated net expenses associated with kidney acquisition. (2) Kidney acquisition costs are treated apart from the prospective payment rate for...

  10. A Foundation for Systems Anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-31

    joint, sacro -iliac joint, and lumbo-sacral joint were investigated in fresh unembalmed cadavers in the laboratory. These data have been analyzed using a...TR-75-18, July 1976. Hutchinson, A. Labanotation. Theatre Arts Books, New York, 1970. Marcus, J. The accuracy of screw axis analysis using position

  11. Accuracy and repeatability of anthropometric facial measurements using cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of linear anthropometric measurements on the soft tissue surface model generated from cone beam computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of seven cadaver heads. The accuracy and r

  12. Accuracy of implant placement based on pre-surgical planning of three-dimensional cone-beam images: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assche, N. Van; Steenberghe, D van; Guerrero, M.E.; Hirsch, E.; Schutyser, F.A.C.; Quirynen, M.; Jacobs, R.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the precision of transfer of a computer-based three-dimensional (3D) planning, using re-formatted cone-beam images, for oral implant placement in partially edentulous jaws. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Four formalin-fixed cadaver jaws were imaged in a 3D Accuitomo FPD cone-beam computed to

  13. Accuracy and initial stability of open- and closed-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a cadaveric RSA study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasbeek, R.D.A.; Welsing, R.T.C.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Rijnberg, W.J.; Loon, C.J.M. van; Kampen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the difference in angle-correction accuracy and initial stability between open-wedge (OWO) and closed-wedge tibial valgus osteotomy (CWO). Five fresh-frozen pairs of human cadaver lower limbs were used; their bone mineral density (BMD) was measured with DEXA and a planned 7 degrees valgu

  14. Perforator anatomy of the radial forearm free flap versus the ulnar forearm free flap for head and neck reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekner, D.D.; Roeling, TAP; van Cann, EM

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular anatomy of the distal forearm in order to optimize the choice between the radial forearm free flap and the ulnar forearm free flap and to select the best site to harvest the flap. The radial and ulnar arteries of seven fresh cadavers were injecte

  15. PAL(TM) 2.0 Human Anatomy Software Tool Use in Community College Traditional and Online Anatomy Laboratory Classes: Student-Perceived Learning Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyatt, Brian Lee

    2012-01-01

    Human anatomy courses, with laboratory, are curricular requirements in graduate medical, undergraduate nursing, and all allied health science programs. Anatomy laboratory courses engage students in hands-on activities, including human cadaver or mammalian dissection, supported by photos from textbooks, detailed plastic models or human anatomical…

  16. Virtual Reality Anatomy: Is It Comparable with Traditional Methods in the Teaching of Human Forearm Musculoskeletal Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codd, Anthony M.; Choudhury, Bipasha

    2011-01-01

    The use of cadavers to teach anatomy is well established, but limitations with this approach have led to the introduction of alternative teaching methods. One such method is the use of three-dimensional virtual reality computer models. An interactive, three-dimensional computer model of human forearm anterior compartment musculoskeletal anatomy…

  17. Teaching Anatomy and Physiology Using Computer-Based, Stereoscopic Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jamie; Kuehn, David; Langlois, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Learning real three-dimensional (3D) anatomy for the first time can be challenging. Two-dimensional drawings and plastic models tend to over-simplify the complexity of anatomy. The approach described uses stereoscopy to create 3D images of the process of cadaver dissection and to demonstrate the underlying anatomy related to the speech mechanisms.…

  18. Molecular characterization and pathogenicity of fungal isolates for use against the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The analysis of DNA sequences from fungal pathogens obtained from cadavers of the small hive beetle (SHB) collected from several apiaries in Florida revealed a mixture of saprobes and two potential primary entomopathogens, Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana. Spray tower bioassays indicate...

  19. Variation in brachial plexus formation, branching pattern and relation with major vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Anwer Khan

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: The present study carried out on adult human cadavers revealed some rare variations in the formation, branching pattern and relations of the brachial plexus. These variations are of clinical significance for the surgeons, radiologists and the anesthesiologists. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1591-1594

  20. Outcomes of a Rotational Dissection System in Gross Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, David W.; Oakes, Joanne; Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan; Chuang, Alice Z.; Cleary, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    At the University of Texas Houston Medical School, a rotational dissection system was introduced to improve coordination between the Gross Anatomy and the Introduction to Clinical Medicine (ICM) courses. Six students were assigned to each cadaver and divided into two teams. For each laboratory, one team was assigned to dissect and the other to…

  1. Privileged Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Norma E.; Romero-O'Connell, Josina M.

    2009-01-01

    Students often attain memorable experiences from cadaver dissections through reflective writing. For many, facing a dissection for the first time elicits a wide range of emotions. These may include thoughts of their own mortality to the sheer admiration of knowing that someone cared enough to help others learn about the body, even in death. Poems…

  2. Building a Low-Cost Gross Anatomy Laboratory: A Big Step for a Small University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Evan

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates details of the planning, building, and improvement phases of a cost-efficient, full-dissection gross anatomy laboratory on a campus of an historically design-centric university. Special considerations were given throughout the project to the nature of hosting cadavers in a building shared amongst all undergraduate majors.…

  3. Dissecting the Dissectors: Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Body Bequests by Nigerian Anatomists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Emeka G.; Obikili, Emmanuel N.

    2012-01-01

    Anatomy education in most African countries is limited by an insufficient number of cadavers for students to undertake dissection. This already significant shortage is exacerbated by an increasing number of medical schools and students. Virtual dissections are impractical in alleviating such a shortfall in African anatomy education, and further…

  4. Reduction of Mental Distress in the Dissection Course by Introducing the Body Donor Experience through Anatomical Demonstrations of Organ Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockers, Anja; Baader, Christoph; Fassnacht, Ulrich Kai; Ochsner, Wolfgang; Bockers, Tobias Maria

    2012-01-01

    The practice of dissection teaches students not only the foundations of anatomical knowledge but also encourages the development of professional competencies. Yet, the dissection of cadavers in the gross anatomy course can be a stress factor for medical students. There are a minor proportion of students who demonstrate strong emotional reactions…

  5. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  6. Background Music in the Dissection Laboratory: Impact on Stress Associated with the Dissection Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Emeka G.

    2015-01-01

    Notable challenges, such as mental distress, boredom, negative moods, and attitudes, have been associated with learning in the cadaver dissection laboratory (CDL). The ability of background music (BM) to enhance the cognitive abilities of students is well documented. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of BM in the CDL and on…

  7. Body Parts Removed during Surgery: A Useful Training Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Tiengo, Cesare; Parenti, Anna; Cestrone, Adriano; De Caro, Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical curricula provides relatively little time for cadaver dissection. The Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology at the University of Padova has organized a pilot project with the University Hospital for the donation of body parts that are surgically removed for therapeutic purposes and destined under Italian law for…

  8. Phlebography of the sella turcica by a trans-sphenoidal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tvete, S.; Mork, J.

    1982-02-01

    A trans-sphenoidal approach to the filling of spaces within the sella turcica with contrast medium in cadavers is described. The hypophysis appeared on roentgenograms as a contrast medium filling defect. No injury to the hypophysis, carotid arteries or chiasma was seen. The implications of an arachnoid extension into the sella are discussed.

  9. The 'relics of Joan of Arc'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlier, P.; Poupon, J.; Eb, A.

    2010-01-01

    such as a cadaver X of carbonised aspect: forensic anthropologist, medical examiners, pathologists, geneticists, radiologist, biochemists, palynologists, zoologist and archaeologist. Materials, methods and results of this study are presented here. This study aims to offer an exploitable methodology for the modern...... medico-legal cases of small quantities of human bones of carbonised aspect....

  10. 3T magnetic resonance neurography of pudendal nerve with cadaveric dissection correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Avneesh Chhabra; Courtney A McKenna; Vibhor Wadhwa; Gaurav K Thawait; John A Carrino; Gary P Lees; A Lee Dellon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the pudendal nerve segments that could be identified on magnetic resonance neurography(MRN) before and after surgical marking of different nerve segments.METHODS: The hypothesis for this study was that pudendal nerve and its branches would be more easily seen after the surgical nerve marking. Institutional board approval was obtained. One male and one female cadaver pelvis were obtained from the anatomy board and were scanned using 3 Tesla MRI scanner using MR neurography sequences. All possible pudendal nerve branches were identified. The cadavers were then sent to the autopsy lab and were surgically dissected by a peripheral nerve surgeon and an anatomist to identify the pudendal nerve branches. Radiological markers were placed along the course of the pudendal nerve and its branches. The cadavers were then closed and rescanned using the same MRN protocol as the premarking scan. The remaining pudendal nerve branches were attempted to be identified using the radiological markers. All scans were read by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist.RESULTS: The pre-marking MR Neurography scans clearly showed the pudendal nerve at its exit from the lumbosacral plexus in the sciatic notch, at the level of the ischial spine and in the Alcock’s Canal in both cadavers. Additionally, the right hemorrhoidal branch could be identified in the male pelvis cadaver. The perineal and distal genital branches could not be identified. On post-marking scans, the markers were used as identifiable structures. The location of the perineal branch, the hemorroidal branch and the dorsal nerve to penis(in male cadaver)/clitoris(in female cadaver) could be seen. However, the visualization of these branches was suboptimal. The contralateral corresponding nerves were poorly seen despite marking on the surgical side. The nerve was best seen on axial T1W and T2W SPAIR images. The proximal segment could be seen well on 3D DW PSIF sequence. T2W SPACE was not very useful in

  11. 3T magnetic resonance neurography of pudendal nerve with cadaveric dissection correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Avneesh; McKenna, Courtney A; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thawait, Gaurav K; Carrino, John A; Lees, Gary P; Dellon, A Lee

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the pudendal nerve segments that could be identified on magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) before and after surgical marking of different nerve segments. METHODS The hypothesis for this study was that pudendal nerve and its branches would be more easily seen after the surgical nerve marking. Institutional board approval was obtained. One male and one female cadaver pelvis were obtained from the anatomy board and were scanned using 3 Tesla MRI scanner using MR neurography sequences. All possible pudendal nerve branches were identified. The cadavers were then sent to the autopsy lab and were surgically dissected by a peripheral nerve surgeon and an anatomist to identify the pudendal nerve branches. Radiological markers were placed along the course of the pudendal nerve and its branches. The cadavers were then closed and rescanned using the same MRN protocol as the pre-marking scan. The remaining pudendal nerve branches were attempted to be identified using the radiological markers. All scans were read by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. RESULTS The pre-marking MR Neurography scans clearly showed the pudendal nerve at its exit from the lumbosacral plexus in the sciatic notch, at the level of the ischial spine and in the Alcock’s Canal in both cadavers. Additionally, the right hemorrhoidal branch could be identified in the male pelvis cadaver. The perineal and distal genital branches could not be identified. On post-marking scans, the markers were used as identifiable structures. The location of the perineal branch, the hemorroidal branch and the dorsal nerve to penis (in male cadaver)/clitoris (in female cadaver) could be seen. However, the visualization of these branches was suboptimal. The contralateral corresponding nerves were poorly seen despite marking on the surgical side. The nerve was best seen on axial T1W and T2W SPAIR images. The proximal segment could be seen well on 3D DW PSIF sequence. T2W SPACE was not very useful in

  12. Evaluation of the Kinematic Responses and Potential Injury Mechanisms of the Jejunum during Seatbelt Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Meghan K; Hardy, Warren N; Agnew, Amanda M; Hallman, Jason J

    2015-11-01

    High-speed biplane x-ray was used to research the kinematics of the small intestine in response to seatbelt loading. Six driver-side 3-point seatbelt simulations were conducted with the lap belt routed superior to the pelvis of six unembalmed human cadavers. Testing was conducted with each cadaver perfused, ventilated, and positioned in a fixed-back configuration with the spine angled 30° from the vertical axis. Four tests were conducted with the cadavers in an inverted position, and two tests were conducted with the cadavers upright. The jejunum was instrumented with radiopaque markers using a minimally-invasive, intraluminal approach without inducing preparation-related damage to the small intestine. Tests were conducted at a target peak lap belt speed of 3 m/s, resulting in peak lap belt loads ranging from 5.4-7.9 kN. Displacement of the radiopaque markers was recorded using high-speed x-ray from two perspectives. Marker trajectories were tracked using motion analysis software and projected into calibrated three-dimensional coordinates to quantify the seatbelt and jejunum kinematics for each test. Five of the six tests resulted in jejunum damage. Based on the autopsy findings and the assessment of the belt and jejunum kinematics, it is likely that direct abdominal interactions with the seatbelt resulting in compression and stretch of the jejunum are components of the mechanisms of crash-induced jejunum injuries. In addition, the presence of fluid or air in the portion of the jejunum in the load path appears to be necessary to create jejunum damage in the cadaver model. Overall, the kinematics and damage data generated in this study may be useful for future restraint system development.

  13. From cradle to grave via the dissection room: the role of foetal and infant bodies in anatomical education from the late 1700s to early 1900s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Jenna M; Mitchell, Piers D

    2016-12-01

    The preponderance of men in the narrative of anatomical education during the 1800s has skewed the historical perception of medical cadavers in favour of adult men, and stifled the conversation about the less portrayed individuals, especially children. Although underrepresented in both the historical literature and skeletal remains from archaeological contexts dated to the 1800s, these sources nevertheless illustrate that foetal and infant cadavers were a prized source of knowledge. In the late 1700s and 1800s foetal and infant cadavers were acquired by anatomists following body snatching from graveyards, from the child's death in a charitable hospital, death from infectious disease in large poor families, or following infanticide by desperate unwed mothers. Study of foetal and infant remains from the 1800s in the anatomical collection at the University of Cambridge shows that their bodies were treated differently to adults by anatomists. In contrast to adults it was extremely rare for foetal and infant cadavers to undergo craniotomy, and thoracotomy seems to have been performed through costal cartilages of the chest rather than the ribs themselves. However, many infants and foetuses do show evidence for knife marks on the cranium indicating surgical removal of the scalp by anatomists. These bodies were much more likely to be curated long term in anatomical collections and museums than were adult males who had undergone dissection. They were prized both for demonstrating normal anatomical development, but also congenital abnormalities that led to an early death. The current findings show that the dissection of foetal and infant cadavers was more widespread than previous research on anatomical education suggests. This research details the important role of the youngest members of society in anatomical education during the long 19th century, and how the social identity of individuals in this subgroup affected their acquisition, treatment and disposal by elite medical

  14. Marine bacteria comprise a possible indicator of drowning in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizaki, Eiji; Takahama, Keiichi; Seo, Yasuhisa; Kozawa, Shuji; Sakai, Masahiro; Yukawa, Nobuhiro

    2008-04-07

    To investigate the effectiveness of marine bacteria as a new marker of drowning in seawater, we determined the optimal conditions of media required to selectively detect marine bacteria and applied the technique to drowned cadavers. We incubated model blood samples (n=20 per group) mixed with seawater, river, tap or muddy water on agar plates (Todd Hewitt, TH; Marine 2216, M2216) and determined the NaCl concentration required to selectively detect marine bacteria. We also used TCBS agar plates without manipulation to isolate Vibrio spp. Among the culture media, TH agar was superior. Bioluminescent colonies were detected only in blood mixed with seawater. Blue colonies stained using the cytochrome oxidase test (COT), were detected in blood mixed with both sea and river water. However when the NaCl concentration was above 4%, COT stained colonies were detectable only in blood mixed with seawater. We subsequently used 2, 3 and 4% NaCl in TH and TCBS agar to examine blood from victims who had drowned in seawater (n=8) and in fresh water (n=7), as well as from victims who died near aquatic environments (non drowned; dry-land control, n=7). Bioluminescent colonies were detectable on 2-4% NaCl TH agar only from two victims that drowned in seawater. Bioluminescent colonies did not grow on TCBS agar. Blue colonies from all cadavers that had drowned in seawater (8/8) and in four of those that had drowned in fresh water (4/7) proliferated on TH agar containing 2% and/or 3% NaCl, but at 4% NaCl such colonies were detected only from cadavers that had drowned in seawater (8/8). Colonies from only one cadaver from seawater grew on TCBS agar. Furthermore, neither bioluminescent nor blue colonies were detected on TH agar containing 4% NaCl in samples from two cadavers found in an estuary (brackish water) who were thought to have been carried from areas of fresh water. Homologous analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the dominant colonies on TH agar containing 4% NaCl were

  15. Indoors forensic entomology: colonization of human remains in closed environments by specific species of sarcosaprophagous flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O; Karhunen, Pekka J; Goebeler, Sirkka; Saukko, Pekka; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E

    2010-06-15

    Fly species that are commonly recovered on human corpses concealed in houses or other dwellings are often dependent on human created environments and might have special features in their biology that allow them to colonize indoor cadavers. In this study we describe nine typical cases involving forensically relevant flies on human remains found indoors in southern Finland. Eggs, larvae and puparia were reared to adult stage and determined to species. Of the five species found the most common were Lucilia sericata Meigen, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Protophormia terraenovae Robineau-Desvoidy. The flesh fly Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt is reported for the first time to colonize human cadavers inside houses and a COI gene sequence based DNA barcode is provided for it to help facilitate identification in the future. Fly biology, colonization speed and the significance of indoors forensic entomological evidence are discussed.

  16. Volatile organic compounds released by blowfly larvae and pupae: new perspectives in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickx, C; Dekeirsschieter, J; Brostaux, Y; Wathelet, J-P; Verheggen, F J; Haubruge, E

    2012-06-10

    To evaluate postmortem intervals (PMIs), one should take into account the determined age of necrophagous flies present on the cadaver. However, PMI determination needs further improvement, and rapid and accurate approaches have therefore to be developed. While previous studies have focussed on insect cuticular hydrocarbons, here we explore the volatile profile released by larvae and pupae of Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae). We monitored changes in volatile compounds daily, by headspace solid-phase microextraction, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Branched and unbranched hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters and acids were identified, and the volatile profile was shown to vary, in both composition and quantity, with the age of the larva/pupa under investigation. We concluded, based on the analysis of the released volatile organic compounds, that it is possible to increase the accuracy of the estimated PMI, through improved estimation of the age of blowflies present on the cadaver.

  17. Can Sonography Distinguish a Supraorbital Notch From a Foramen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravi K; Lee, Kenneth S; Kohn, Sarah C; Baskaya, Mustafa K; Afifi, Ahmed M

    2015-11-01

    Diagnostic tools for evaluating the supraorbital rim in preparation for nerve decompression surgery in patients with chronic headaches are currently limited. We evaluated the use of sonography to diagnose the presence of a supraorbital notch or foramen in 11 cadaver orbits. Sonographic findings were assessed by dissecting cadaver orbits to determine whether a notch or foramen was present. Sonography correctly diagnosed the presence of a supraorbital notch in 7 of 7 cases and correctly diagnosed a supraorbital foramen in 4 of 4 cases. We found that sonography had 100% sensitivity in diagnosing a supraorbital notch and foramen. This tool may therefore be helpful in characterizing the supraorbital rim preoperatively and may influence the decision to use a transpalpebral or endoscopic approach for supraorbital nerve decompression as well as the decision to use local or general anesthesia.

  18. PATHOMORPHOLOGY OF ZERO BIOPSIES OF DONOR KIDNEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Arefjev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is well known fact that kidney transplants from Extended Criteria Donors may increase risk of De- layed Graft Function and Primary Non-Function of transplants. We have collected and tested 65 «zero» kidney biopsies from cadaver donors aged from 19 to 71 years old. In the pool of elderly donors who died from cerebrovascular accident the frequency of nephrosclerosis presentation was higher than in donors of yonger age who died from craniocephalic trauma. Nevertheless in the general donor pool the number of sclerosed glomeruli was no more than 12%. We did not meet at all in the whole volume of material any bi- opsy with the severe degree of arteriosclerosis. The «zero» biopsies of cadaver kidneys is quite usable and unexpensive tool to measure the degree of nephrosclerosis in order to exclude kidneys which are not fitable for transplantation. 

  19. Endoscopic anatomy of the approaches to the sellar area and planum sphenoidale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Faria Ramos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The productive work between otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons has resulted in the emergence of endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery. The goal of the present study is to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the endonasal approach to the sellar region and planum sphenoidale, highlighting the key points of the surgical approach and the neurovascular landmarks. METHOD: Descriptive study of the endoscopic endonasal dissection of 9 fresh cadavers with exposure of the anatomic structures. RESULTS: The endoscopic endonasal ethmoidectomy and sphenoidotomy allows an expanded access to the sellar area and planum sphenoidale. The surface anatomy of the sphenoid sinus is easily identifiable and provides safe landmarks, guiding the intracranial dissection. CONCLUSION: The endoscopic endonasal approach to the skull base by the ENT and neurosurgeon is feasible, but it requires adequate anatomical knowledge and endoscopic skills for its realization, which can be obtained by practicing in cadavers.

  20. Shifts in soil biodiversity-A forensic comparison between Sus scrofa domesticus and vegetation decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanye, Ayodeji O; Thompson, Tim; Ralebitso-Senior, T Komang

    2015-12-01

    In a forensic context, microbial-mediated cadaver decomposition and nutrient recycling cannot be overlooked. As a result, forensic ecogenomics research has intensified to gain a better understanding of cadaver/soil ecology interactions as a powerful potential tool for forensic practitioners. For this study, domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) (4g) and grass (Agrostis/Festuca spp) cuttings (4g) were buried (July 2013 to July 2014) in sandy clay loam (80 g) triplicates in sealed microcosms (127 ml; 50 × 70 cm) with parallel soil only controls. The effects of the two carbon sources were determined by monitoring key environmental factors and changes in soil bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (18S rRNA gene) biodiversity. Soil pH changes showed statistically significant differences (pscrofa domesticus and grass trimming decomposition, respectively. In contrast, no statistically significant difference in evenness (p>0.05) was observed between the treatments.

  1. Renaissance Neurosurgery: Italy's Iconic Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Apuzzo, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Various changes in the sociopolitical milieu of Italy led to the increasing tolerance of the study of cadavers in the late Middle Ages. The efforts of Mondino de Liuzzi (1276-1326) and Guido da Vigevano (1280-1349) led to an explosion of cadaver-centric studies in centers such as Bologna, Florence, and Padua during the Renaissance period. Legendary scientists from this era, including Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, Bartolomeo Eustachio, and Costanzo Varolio, furthered the study of neuroanatomy. The various texts produced during this period not only helped increase the understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology but also led to the formalization of medical education. With increased understanding came new techniques to address various neurosurgical problems from skull fractures to severed peripheral nerves. The present study aims to review the major developments in Italy during the vibrant Renaissance period that led to major progress in the field of neurosurgery.

  2. Rendering-based video-CT registration with physical constraints for image-guided endoscopic sinus surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Y.; Leonard, S.; Reiter, A.; Rajan, P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Ishii, M.; Taylor, R. H.; Hager, G. D.

    2015-03-01

    We present a system for registering the coordinate frame of an endoscope to pre- or intra- operatively acquired CT data based on optimizing the similarity metric between an endoscopic image and an image predicted via rendering of CT. Our method is robust and semi-automatic because it takes account of physical constraints, specifically, collisions between the endoscope and the anatomy, to initialize and constrain the search. The proposed optimization method is based on a stochastic optimization algorithm that evaluates a large number of similarity metric functions in parallel on a graphics processing unit. Images from a cadaver and a patient were used for evaluation. The registration error was 0.83 mm and 1.97 mm for cadaver and patient images respectively. The average registration time for 60 trials was 4.4 seconds. The patient study demonstrated robustness of the proposed algorithm against a moderate anatomical deformation.

  3. UNILATERAL HIGH DIVISION OF SCIATIC NERVE AND ITS RELATION TO BIFID PIRIFORMIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi C. Goshi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sciatic Nerve can rarely be separated into tibial and common fibular Nerve within the Pelvis. In such cases the tibial nerve and common fibular nerve leave the pelvis through different routes. Materials and Method: The variation found during routine dissection for MBBS students in a 30 yr old male cadaver in the department of Anatomy, JJM Medical college Davangere, Karnataka, India. Result: The variation is High division of sciatic Nerve unilaterally on right side in 30yrs old male cadaver. Common peroneal Nerve is found passing between the two divisions of bifid piriformis while tibial Nerve passed below the inferior piriformis Conclusion: Knowledge of this variation is important clinically in sciatic nerve entrapment resulting in non-discogenic sciatica and also requires reviewing of the piriformis syndrome

  4. Development, Validation and Parametric study of a 3-Year-Old Child Head Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shihai; Chen, Yue; Li, Haiyan; Ruan, ShiJie

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury caused by drop and traffic accidents is an important reason for children's death and disability. Recently, the computer finite element (FE) head model has been developed to investigate brain injury mechanism and biomechanical responses. Based on CT data of a healthy 3-year-old child head, the FE head model with detailed anatomical structure was developed. The deep brain structures such as white matter, gray matter, cerebral ventricle, hippocampus, were firstly created in this FE model. The FE model was validated by comparing the simulation results with that of cadaver experiments based on reconstructing the child and adult cadaver experiments. In addition, the effects of skull stiffness on the child head dynamic responses were further investigated. All the simulation results confirmed the good biofidelity of the FE model.

  5. The assessment of virtual reality for human anatomy instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Karen P.

    1994-01-01

    This research project seeks to meet the objective of science training by developing, assessing, and validating virtual reality as a human anatomy training medium. In ideal situations, anatomic models, computer-based instruction, and cadaver dissection are utilized to augment the traditional methods of instruction. At many institutions, lack of financial resources limits anatomy instruction to textbooks and lectures. However, human anatomy is three dimensional, unlike the one dimensional depiction found in textbooks and the two dimensional depiction found on the computer. Virtual reality is a breakthrough technology that allows one to step through the computer screen into a three dimensional world. This technology offers many opportunities to enhance science education. Therefore, a virtual testing environment of the abdominopelvic region of a human cadaver was created to study the placement of body parts within the nine anatomical divisions of the abdominopelvic region and the four abdominal quadrants.

  6. Impact of graft mass on the clinical outcome of kidney transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giral, Magali; Nguyen, Jean Michel; Karam, Georges; Kessler, Michelle; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno; Buchler, Mattias; Bayle, François; Meyer, Carole; Foucher, Yohann; Martin, Marie Laure; Daguin, Pascal; Soulillou, Jean Paul

    2005-01-01

    The effect of nephronic mass reduction of kidney transplants has not been analyzed specifically in a large cohort. Transplant injuries in cadaver kidney graft may have led to an underestimation of the magnitude of this factor. The aim of this study was to analyze the consequences of kidney mass reduction on transplantation outcome. The weights of 1142 kidney grafts were collected prospectively immediately before grafting. Donors and recipients /=4 g/kg). Next, using a Cox model analysis, it was shown that the risk of having a proteinuria >0.5 g/kg was significantly increased for the low DKW/RBW ratios /=4 g/kg (P < 0.001). In cadaver transplant recipients, graft mass has a rapid impact on graft filtration rate and proteinuria. Avoiding major kidney/recipient inadequacy should have a significant influence on long-term transplant function.

  7. Functional Scaling of Musculoskeletal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark;

    The validity of the predictions from musculoskeletal models depends largely on how well the morphology of the model matches that of the patient. To address this problem, we present a novel method to scale a cadaver-based musculoskeletal model to match both the segment lengths and joint parameters...... orientations are then used to morph/scale a cadaver based musculoskeletal model using a set of radial basis functions (RBFs). Using the functional joint axes to scale musculoskeletal models provides a better fit to the marker data, and allows for representation of patients with considerable difference in bone...... geometry, without the need for MR/CT scans. However, more validation activities are needed to better understand the effect of morphing musculoskeletal models based on functional joint parameters....

  8. Surgical approach to the superior mid-orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn-Hansen, Dag; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Meling, Torstein R; Haaskjold, Erling

    2013-09-01

    Access to the superior mid-orbit is required for procedures on the levator muscle in the correction of upper eyelid ptosis and in surgery aimed at local lesions in this region. The purpose with this human cadaver study was to clarify the anatomical substrate for a surgical approach to the levator muscle and the upper mid-orbit structures, in which the orbital septum and the retroseptal fat pad is not harmed during surgery. Macro-anatomical dissections and histological examinations were performed on five human orbits from three formalin embalmed cadaver heads. It was found that the orbital septum extends posteriorly from its junction with the levator aponeurosis. This posterior continuation of the orbital septum encloses the superior orbital fat pad and separates this from the anterior surface of the levator muscle. In between the orbital septum and the levator, there is a dissection space that provides a minimal invasive access corridor to the structures in the upper mid-orbit.

  9. Anatomical variation of the origin of the left vertebral artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patasi B

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and describes the anatomical variation of the left vertebral artery originating from the arch of aorta as a case report. This variation was found in one of the cadavers at the Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa. During routine dissection of a male cadaver, in the superior mediastinum and the neck we observed an atypical origin of the left vertebral artery. Atypical origin was compared to the typical origin of the left vertebral artery in the anatomical literature. We compared our findings with different possible variations of the origin of the left vertebral artery reported in the literature. The clinical importance of the variation is discussed.

  10. Computed tomography of the abdomen of calves during the first 105 days of life: III. Urinary tract and adrenal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, U; Schnetzler, C; Augsburger, H; Bettschart, R; Ohlerth, S

    2014-05-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings of the urinary tract and adrenal glands of five healthy male calves in the first 105 days of life were compared with corresponding cadaver slices. The structures seen on CT images were identified using the corresponding cadaver slices. CT produced exact images of the kidneys, urinary bladder, urethra and adrenal glands, but reliable images of the ureters were only obtained near the renal hilus. There was excellent agreement between the structures on the CT images and the tissue slices. The structure and vessels of the kidneys, the origin of the ureters, the location, size and content of the urinary bladder and the course of the urethra in the pelvis and penis were evident on images. The size and volume of the kidneys and the length and width of the adrenal glands increased significantly during the study, but the ureteral and urethral diameters changed little.

  11. Reflections on dissection: leave no student behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalakis, John E

    2008-01-01

    Dissection is being reduced--and even removed--from the medical curriculum in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and the United States. Dissection's contribution to the curriculum is too important to be diminished. To understand the human body, students must dissect. To avoid anatomical complications, future surgeons need the knowledge they can gain from dissection. Cadavers reveal the uniqueness of each body and the body's strength and fragility, which cannot be learned from books or computers. Cadavers offer surgical skill-building opportunities and confrontation with death. For all its strengths, however, dissection alone does not teach everything the student needs to know. Other educational tools (books, CT and MRI, animation of developmental processes) successfully fill in gaps of knowledge. Surgeons and educators must recognize the threat that decreased dissection poses to our students and patients. They must take steps to support dissection in the medical curriculum or, if it has disappeared, to bring it back.

  12. Morphometric analysis of the hip joint in fetuses and neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowski, Dariusz; Popko, Janusz

    2003-12-30

    Background. Information's about prenatal development of hip joint are necessary for full understanding of it's neonatal abnormalities. Material and methods. Our research was carried out during autopsies on 43 cadavers of 20-40 week old fetuses and 7 cadavers of newborns which died before twelfth week. Observation of development of hip in the second half of the prenatal growth and the neonatal period was based on morphometric analysis. Results and Conclusions. In the hips of 20 to 40 weeks old fetuses, 3 cases of dysplasia were found. Morphometric analysis of hips in this age group, showed very complex developmental processes. The most important of them seems to be the decreasing overlay of acetabulum over femoral head in the last few weeks before the birth. This physiological process is an result of the relative decrease in acetabulum depth and simultaneous faster increase of femoral head diameter in two last weeks of prenatal development.

  13. Estimation of the time of death of decomposed or skeletonized bodies found outdoors in cold season in Sapporo city, located in the northern district of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Kotaro; Terazawa, Koichi

    2008-03-01

    In Sapporo city, located in the northern district of Japan, it is very difficult to estimate the time of death of decomposed or skeletonized bodies found outdoors in cold season (November-April) because postmortem changes are markedly retarded in the season compared with warm season (May-October), and the bodies are often damaged and skeletonized by carnivorous animals such as wild dogs and foxes. However, they cannot damage the brain in the cranium. The brain is mainly damaged by fly larvae. In Sapporo city, we can estimate that the time of death of a cadaver found outdoors in the cold season is in the beginning of November or before if fly larvae hatched in autumn exist on the cadaver, and that the time of death is in the beginning of November or after if fly larvae hatched in autumn do not exist and most of the brain remains in the cranium.

  14. The relationship of hip joint space to self reported hip pain. A survey of 4.151 subjects of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: the Osteoarthritis Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2004-01-01

    degrees). At each 3 degrees increment an anteroposterior radiograph was recorded. Measurements of JSW were performed. (2) Self reported recurrent pain in or around the hip joint during 12 months prior to baseline examinations, and minimum JSW in pelvic radiographs of the cohort were registered......OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate the effect of pelvic orientation on measurements of hip joint space widths (JSW) in cadaver pelvic radiographs, thereby validating the pelvic radiographs of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: The Osteoarthritis Substudy (CCHS III) cohort of 4.152 subjects, and (2......) to investigate the relationship between minimal JSW and self reported hip pain of the cohort. METHODS: (1) Cadaver pelves and proximal femora of one male and one female donor were mounted in holding devices permitting independent rotation (total arc of 42 degrees), and inclination/reclination (total arc of 24...

  15. Transoral robotic thyroidectomy: a preclinical feasibility study using the da Vinci Xi platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jonathon O; Noureldine, Salem I; Al Khadem, Mai G; Chaudhary, Hamad A; Day, Andrew T; Kim, Hoon Yub; Tufano, Ralph P; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2017-02-02

    Transoral thyroid surgery allows the surgeon to conceal incisions within the oral cavity without significantly increasing the amount of required dissection. TORT provides an ideal scarless, midline access to the thyroid gland and bilateral central neck compartments. This approach, however, presents multiple technical challenges. Herein, we present our experience using the latest generation robotic surgical system to accomplish transoral robotic thyroidectomy (TORT). In two human cadavers, the da Vinci Xi surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) was used to complete TORT. Total thyroidectomy and bilateral central neck dissection was successfully completed in both cadavers. The da Vinci Xi platform offered several technologic advantages over previous robotic generations including overhead docking, narrower arms, and improved range of motion allowing for improved execution of previously described TORT techniques.

  16. Estimativa do tempo decorrido de morte atraves da analise do esfriamento corporal

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Renato Silveira Costa

    1998-01-01

    Resumo: O estudo da cronotanatognose (determinação do tempo de morte) baseia-se na avaliação dos fenômenos cadavéricos conhecidos como fenômenos consecutivos, posto que surgem algum tempo após a morte, a saber: a evaporação cutânea, os livores hipostáticos, a rigidez cadavérica e o esfriamento corporal. Dentre esses fenômenos, somente as variações da temperatura corporal são passíveis de medição, sendo que os demais permitem, apenas, avaliações qualitativas, sujeitas à interpretação individua...

  17. [Valid constructing method of three-dimensional finite element human foot model and experimental analysis on its rationality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenxin; Yang, Yunfeng; Yu, Guangrong; Ding, Zuquan

    2009-02-01

    To provide a digital simulation platform for foot-ankle biomechanics research, a 3-D finite element model was established through helical CT images under the principle of RE (reverse engineering) and meshed in FEM software. In the process of modeling cartilage, ligaments, tendons and plantar soft tissue, many anatomic data and results of cadaver specimen experiment were referenced; LINE elements and SHELL elements were used skillfully to simplify the model and resemble the physiological state. The model was then validated by specimen experimentation, which was done on seven fresh cadaver foot specimens, and digital speckle correlation method (DSCM) was used to measure their displacements. Upon the comparison with experimentation and others models, this study also testified that the model, of which the plantar fascia is linked to the heads of metatarsus, is more reasonable to clinical application.

  18. Penetration of tamoxifen citrate loaded ethosomes and liposomes across human skin: a comparative study with confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwa, Khomendra K; Suresh, Preeti K; Rudrapal, Mithun; Verma, Vinod K

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, ethosomal and liposomal formulations containing tamoxifen citrate were prepared and evaluated for their penetration properties in human cadaver skin using Franz diffusion cell and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The results clearly revealed that ethosomal vesicles showed a better drug permeation profile than that of liposomal vesicles. In addition, low fluorescence intensity in CLSM was recorded with liposomes as compared to ethosomes, indicating lower cumulative amount of drug permeation from liposomal vesicles. Furthermore, CLSM showed uniform fluorescence intensity across the entire depth of skin in ethosomal treatment, indicating high penetrability of ethosomal vesicles through human cadaver skin. In contrast, low penetrability of conventional liposomal vesicles was recorded as penetration was limited to the 7(th) section (i.e. upper epidermis layer) of skin as evident from visualization of intact liposomal vesicles in CLSM.

  19. Body donation in India: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant A. Rokade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of anatomy is inseparable from cadaveric dissection. However scarcity of cadavers is felt all over the world. Body donation is the preferred and major source of cadavers worldwide. It is defined as an informed and free act of giving one’s whole body after death for medical education and research. This article gives a brief review of history of body donation. It reveals the details about who can donate and who can accept the body along with procedure followed to donate body in India. It discusses the donors’ attitude behind body donation and factors preventing people from body donation. It deals with approach of various religions towards body donation. It discusses some important ways to overcome the scarcity of bodies in India and the world. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 173-177

  20. Computed tomographic evaluation of the orbit and sella turcica. An atlas of anatomic-CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, C.Y.; Iwakawa, N. (Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of this study is the correlation of the gross anatomy of the orbit and sella turcica with their appearance on CT images. The head of an embalmed human cadaver was scanned in axial and coronal planes according to Reid's base line, using the GE CT/T 8800 scanner with 1.5 mm collimation. The technique of Review sup(TM) target reconstruction was applied. The cadaver was sectioned in axial and coronal planes 2 to 3 mm slices. We analysed the appearance of the orbit and sella turcica in various axial and coronal sections, and then correlated the anatomic and CT appearances in corresponding planes. Based on the analysis of extra-ocular muscles and optic nerve, judgements regarding their size should be based only on true cross sections, 90/sup 0/ to the course of the individual muscle or optic nerve.

  1. How to do it: importance of left atrial side retraction in robotic and minimally invasive mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Sun, You Su; Nifong, L Wiley; Watanabe, Go; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2008-01-01

    A customized transthoracic atrial retractor was previously developed for robotic and minimally invasive mitral valve surgery, but it has sometimes failed to provide sufficient exposure of the mitral valve because some atrial tissues push away the operative field from the right side. This report describes 3 new atrial side retractors (the foldaway retractor, the spoon retractor, and the wired retractor) and their use in performing robotic mitral valve repair in fresh frozen human cadavers. These retractors provided exceptional and consistent exposure of the left atrium in robotic and minimally invasive mitral valve surgery in human cadavers without causing traumatic injury, and these retractors should be useful in live patients because they will be used in arrested hearts.

  2. Who Donates Their Bodies to Science? The Combined Role of Gender and Migration Status Among California Whole-body Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Asad, Asad Lugman; Anteby, Michel James; Garip, Filiz

    2014-01-01

    The number of human cadavers available for medical research and training, as well as organ transplantation, is limited. Researchers disagree about how to increase the number of whole-body bequeathals, citing a shortage of donations from the one group perceived as most likely to donate from attitudinal survey data—educated white males over 65. This focus on survey data, however, suffers from two main limitations: First, it reveals little about individuals' actual registration or donation behav...

  3. Zur Legitimation der Verwendung menschlicher Leichen in der heutigen Anatomie

    OpenAIRE

    Winkelmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Anatomists use human bodies for research, teaching and advanced medical training. Despite a long tradition and the more recent legal regulation of 'body donation', this practise is nevertheless burdened with legal and ethical uncertainties. Therefore, modern-day anatomy still needs a well-founded legitimation of cadaver use. The educational research presented here demonstrates that, on methodological grounds, it remains difficult to produce a 'final' judgement on the effectiveness of anato...

  4. A Case Report on Unilateral Accessory Humeral Head of Pronator Teres

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Suman; Sakthivel, Sulochana

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an accessory muscle in the forearm is likely to compress on the neurovascular structures and has clinical implications. We encountered an accessory humeral head of pronator teres during routine dissection of left upper limb in a male cadaver. The accessory head had fleshy origin from medial supracondylar line, medial intermuscular septum and brachialis fascia. It coursed downwards in the cubital region covering brachial artery and median nerve. Further, it narrowed becoming mo...

  5. Technique for and an anatomic guide to forearm tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Jeremy M; Hollister, Anne M; Rush, David A; Avallone, Thomas J; Shi, Runhua; Jordan, Jenee' C

    2011-06-01

    Forearm lacerations involving muscle bellies are usually treated by repairing muscle fascia. Repair of tendons themselves is stronger and restores normal muscle anatomy better. Tendon repair requires good knowledge of forearm muscle and tendon anatomy. We have made cadaver measurements to produce graphical maps of locations of individual muscles tendons of origin and insertion, some practical guides for finding tendon ends and a simple grasping stitch for intramuscular tendons.

  6. A Rare Variant of the Ulnar Artery with Important Clinical Implications: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Casal Diogo; Pais Diogo; Toscano Tiago; Bilhim Tiago; Rodrigues Luís; Figueiredo Inês; Aradio Sónia; Angélica-Almeida Maria; Goyri-O’Neill João

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Variations in the major arteries of the upper limb are estimated to be present in up to one fifth of people, and may have significant clinical implications. Case presentation During routine cadaveric dissection of a 69-year-old fresh female cadaver, a superficial brachioulnar artery with an aberrant path was found bilaterally. The superficial brachioulnar artery originated at midarm level from the brachial artery, pierced the brachial fascia immediately proximal to the elb...

  7. Left musculus sternalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arráez-Aybar, L A; Sobrado-Perez, J; Merida-Velasco, J R

    2003-07-01

    During routine dissection in the Morphological Sciences Department II of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, the presence of a sternalis muscle was observed in the left hemithorax of a 70-year-old male cadaver. We report on its position, relationships, and innervation, as well as its clinical relevance, indicating some guidelines for its physical examination. We also present a brief overview of the existing literature regarding the nomenclature, historical reports, and incidence of this muscle.

  8. [Polish forensic entomology--the past, present and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Rafał; Chowaniec, Czesław

    2010-01-01

    Forensic medicine increasingly more often benefits from the achievements of other biological sciences, which may be used in post mortem investigation. One of them is forensic entomology--the science based on the knowledge about biology of insects preying on cadavers. The objective of this article is to present the history of Polish forensic entomology, its present state and possibilities and directions of further development.

  9. Reduction of Biomechanical Models for Subject Specific Real-Time Simulation of Surgical Trocar Insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Channa Naik, Ravi Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Trocar insertion is the first step in Laparoscopy, Thoracoscopy and most other micro surgery procedures. It is a difficult procedure to learn and practice because procedure is carried out almost entirely without any visual feedback of the organs underlying the tissues being punctured. A majority of injuries is attributed to excessive use of force by surgeons. Practicing on cadavers and synthetic tissues may not accurately simulate the process. So there is a need for haptic based computer simu...

  10. The Angle at Which the Facial Nerve Leaves the Mastoid

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Some skull base procedures require extensive dissection of the facial nerve. This can be difficult at the mastoid tip, where the nerve is approximated to soft tissues. The nerve was dissected in this area in 15 cadaver specimens. The mean angle at which the facial nerve leaves the mastoid tip in 117°. This information should aid the skull base surgeon in the identification of the facial nerve at the mastoid tip.

  11. Vascularization of the facial bones by facial artery: implications for full face allotransplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rampazzo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background-The maxillary artery is recognized as the main vascular supply of the facial bones; nonetheless clinical evidence supports a co-dominant role for the facial artery. This study explores the extent of the facial skeleton within a facial allograft that can be harvested based on the facial artery. Methods-Twenty-three cadaver heads were used in this study. In 12 heads, the right facial, superficial temporal and maxillary arteries were injected. In 1 head, facial artery angiography w...

  12. Wide distribution of immunoreactive renin in nerve cells of human brain.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    By use of the indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase complex immunocytochemical technique, antibody to purified human renal renin was applied to formalin-fixed paraffin sections of human cadaver brain. Immune reaction products were observed in most nerve cells in all areas of the brain examined; staining was limited to the soma and proximal dendrites. These experiments have confirmed the presence of a renin-like substance in central nervous tissue and suggest a more generalized function for "brai...

  13. Inguinal Abnormalities in Male Patients with Acetabular Fractures Treated Using an Ilioinguinal Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Firoozabadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Surgeons performing an ilioinguinal exposure for acetabular fracture surgery need to be aware of aberrant findings such as inguinal hernias and spermatic cord lesions. The purpose of this study is to report these occurrences in a clinical series of adult males undergoing acetabular fracture fixation and a series of adult male cadavers. The secondary aim is to characterize these abnormalities to aid surgeons in detecting these abnormalities preoperatively and coordinating a surgical plan with a general surgeon.Methods: Clinical study- Retrospective review of treated acetabular fractures through an ilioinguinal approach. Incidence of inguinal canal and spermatic cord abnormalities requiring general surgery consultation were identified. Corresponding CT scans were reviewed and radiographic characteristics of the spermatic cord abnormalities and/or hernias were noted.Cadaveric study- 18 male cadavers dissected bilaterally using an ilioinguinal exposure. The inguinal canal and the contents of the spermatic cord were identified and characterized.Results: Clinical Study- 5.7% (5/87 of patients had spermatic cord lesion and/or inguinal hernia requiring general surgical intervention. Preoperative pelvic CT scan review identified abnormalities noted intraoperatively in four of the five patients. Cord lipomas visualized as enlargements of the spermatic cord with homogeneous density. Hernias visualized as enlarged spermatic cords with heterogeneous density. Cadaver Study- 31% (11/36 of cadavers studied had spermatic cord and/or inguinal canal abnormalities. Average cord diameter in those with abnormalities was 24.9 mm (15-28 compared to 16 mm (11-22 in normal cords, which was statistically significant.Conclusion: The clinical and cadaveric findings emphasize the importance of understanding inguinal abnormalities and the value of detecting them preoperatively. The preoperative pelvic CT scans were highly sensitive in detecting inguinal abnormalities.

  14. The Stress-Strain Data of the Hip Capsule Ligaments Are Gender and Side Independent Suggesting a Smaller Contribution to Passive Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Pieroh, Philipp; Schneider, Sebastian; Lingslebe, Uwe; Sichting, Freddy; Wolfskämpf, Thomas; Josten, Christoph; Böhme, Jörg; Hammer, Niels; Steinke, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    Background The ligaments in coherence with the capsule of the hip joint are known to contribute to hip stability. Nevertheless, the contribution of the mechanical properties of the ligaments and gender- or side-specific differences are still not completely clear. To date, comparisons of the hip capsule ligaments to other tissues stabilizing the pelvis and hip joint, e.g. the iliotibial tract, were not performed. Materials & Methods Hip capsule ligaments were obtained from 17 human cadavers (9...

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Bone Microstructure Using Tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson, I. H. (1996). “ Fractal dimension and architecture of trabecular bone.” J Pathol 178(1): 100-105. Flynn, M. J., McGee, R. and Blechinger, J...microstructure ( fractal dimension, lacunarity, mean intercept length and line fraction deviation) to those derived from microCT (distribution properties...cadavers. Methods of fractal , lacunarity, mean intercept length and line fraction deviation analyses are used to quantify cancellous microstructure

  16. Sensory disturbances of buccal and lingual nerve by muscle compression: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Alvira González, Joaquín; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies on cadavers dissection have shown that collateral branches of the trigeminal nerve cross muscle bundles on their way, being a possible etiological factor of some nerve disturbances. Case Report A 45-year-old man attended to the Temporomandibular Joint and Orofacial Pain Unit of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology in Hospital Odontològic of Barcelona University, referring tingling in the left hemifacial región and ipsilateral lingual side for one year, with...

  17. Recent Developments in the Methods of Estimating Shooting Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Zeichner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of developments during the past 10 years in the methods of estimating shooting distance is provided. This review discusses the examination of clothing targets, cadavers, and exhibits that cannot be processed in the laboratory. The methods include visual/microscopic examinations, color tests, and instrumental analysis of the gunshot residue deposits around the bullet entrance holes. The review does not cover shooting distance estimation from shotguns that fired pellet loads.

  18. Harvesting and preparation of cadaveric osseoligamentous lower cervical spine (C2-C7) for biomechanical testing

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, J; Jackowski, A

    1998-01-01

    Cadaveric osseoligamentous lower cervical spines (C2-C7) are often used in the investigation of spinal biomechanics in vitro. Surprisingly, however, the techniques of harvesting at postmortem and preparation of cadaveric osseoligamentous lower cervical spine for biomechanical testing have not been described in detail. We describe a simple and effective method that can be readily integrated into the routine autopsy procedure. Points on the avoidance of disfiguring the cadaver and damaging the ...

  19. Individual variability in human tibia lead concentration.

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, A. C.; Parsons, P J; Tang, S.; Moshier, E L

    2001-01-01

    Our aims in this study were to determine proximal-distal variability in adult human tibia lead concentration via electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and to determine whether there were any differences between core and surface tibia lead concentrations. We analyzed duplicate core and surface tibia samples for lead at multiple proximal-distal sections on 10 adult human cadaver legs. Dried bone samples were digested in nitric acid using microwave-assisted heating, a...

  20. Long-Term Followup of Dermal Substitution with Acellular Dermal Implant in Burns and Postburn Scar Corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Juhasz, I.; Kiss, B.; Lukacs, L.; Erdei, I.; Peter, Z.; Remenyik, E.

    2010-01-01

    Full-thickness burn and other types of deep skin loss will result in scar formation. For at least partial replacement of the lost dermal layer, there are several options to use biotechnologically derived extracellular matrix components or tissue scaffolds of cadaver skin origin. In a survey, we have collected data on 18 pts who have previously received acellular dermal implant Alloderm. The age of these patients at the injury varied between 16 months and 84 years. The average area of the impl...

  1. IN THE GROSS ANATOMY LABORATORY: A REVIEW OF THE EMBRYOLOGY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS OF THE ABERRANT RIGHT SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY. EN EL LABORATORIO DE ANATOMÍA MACROSCÓPICA: REVISIÓN DE LA EMBRIOLOGÍA Y GENÉTICA MOLECULAR DE LA ARTERIA SUBCLAVIA DERECHA ABERRANTE

    OpenAIRE

    Todd M. Chappell; Prakash N. Panchani; James Barksdale; Kenneth H. Astrin; Anthony C. DiLandro; Anthony V. D’Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Dissection of a 66-year-old female embalmed cadaver by medical students in a first-year gross anatomy course revealed the presence of an aberrant (retroesophageal) right subclavian artery (ARSA). The prevalence of an ARSA is between 0.2-2.0% in the normal population. ARSA has been reported to have an association with various congenital deformities, such as Down syndrome, Kommerell diverticulum, and various other anomalies. Clinical symptoms are usually not associated with ARSAs but when prese...

  2. Use of Tekscan K-Scan Sensors for Retropatellar Pressure Measurement Avoiding Errors during Implantation and the Effects of Shear Forces on the Measurement Precision

    OpenAIRE

    Wilharm, A; Ch. Hurschler; Dermitas, T; Bohnsack, M.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive K-Scan 4000 sensors (Tekscan, USA) provide new possibilities for the dynamic measurement of force and pressure in biomechanical investigations. We examined the sensors to determine in particular whether they are also suitable for reliable measurements of retropatellar forces and pressures. Insertion approaches were also investigated and a lateral parapatellar arthrotomy supplemented by parapatellar sutures proved to be the most reliable method. The ten human cadaver knees w...

  3. Tissue quality assessment using a novel direct elasticity assessment device (the E-finger: a cadaveric study of prostatectomy dissection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Good

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (RP (robotic and laparoscopic, have brought improvements in the outcomes of RP due to improved views and increased degrees of freedom of surgical devices. Robotic and laparoscopic surgeries do not incorporate haptic feedback, which may result in complications secondary to inadequate tissue dissection (causing positive surgical margins, rhabdosphincter damage, etc. We developed a micro-engineered device (6 mm2 sized [E-finger] capable of quantitative elasticity assessment, with amplitude ratio, mean ratio and phase lag representing this. The aim was to assess the utility of the device in differentiating peri-prostatic tissue types in order to guide prostate dissection.Two embalmed and 2 fresh frozen cadavers were used in the study. Baseline elasticity values were assessed in bladder, prostate and rhabdosphincter of pre-dissected embalmed cadavers using the micro-engineered device. A measurement grid was created to span from the bladder, across the prostate and onto the rhabdosphincter of fresh frozen cadavers to enable a systematic quantitative elasticity assessment of the entire area by 2 independent assessors. Tissue was sectioned along each row of elasticity measurement points, and stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E. Image analysis was performed with Image Pro Premier to determine the histology at each measurement point.Statistically significant differences in elasticity were identified between bladder, prostate and sphincter in both embalmed and fresh frozen cadavers (p = < 0.001. Intra-class correlation (ICC reliability tests showed good reliability (average ICC = 0.851. Sensitivity and specificity for tissue identification was 77% and 70% respectively to a resolution of 6 mm2.This cadaveric study has evaluated the ability of our elasticity assessment device to differentiate bladder, prostate and rhabdosphincter to a resolution of 6 mm2. The results provide useful data for which to continue to

  4. Anatomic variation of the iliacus and psoas major muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio PA

    2011-01-01

    Routine dissection has identified a previously unrecorded unilateral variation of the iliacus and psoas muscles in a 91-year-old female cadaver. A variant iliacus muscle belly originated from the superior lateral aspect of the iliac fossa and after traversing the iliac fossa in a nearly horizontal plane, inserted into the psoas major muscle forming a blended iliacus-psoas muscle. The femoral nerve coursed laterally behind the muscle variant to the superior edge of the blended iliacus-psoas. T...

  5. Comparison of DNA yield and STR success rates from different tissues in embalmed bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda; Czado, Natalia; Gangitano, David; Turnbough, Meredith; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree

    2017-01-01

    Formalin fixation is commonly used to preserve tissue sections for pathological testing and embalming cadavers for medical dissection or burial. DNA extracted from formalin-fixed tissues may also provide an alternative source of genetic material for medical diagnosis and forensic casework, such as identifying unknown embalmed human remains. Formaldehyde causes DNA damage, chemical modifications, and degradation, thereby reducing the quantity and quality of DNA available for downstream genetic analyses. By comparing the DNA yield, level of DNA degradation, and short tandem repeat (STR) success of various tissue types, this study is the first of its kind to provide some guidance on which samples from embalmed bodies are likely to generate more complete STR profiles. Tissue samples were dissected from three male embalmed cadavers and included bone, cartilage, hair, muscle, internal organs, skin, teeth, and nail clippings. DNA was purified from all samples using the QIAamp® FFPE Tissue Kit (Qiagen), quantified using the QuantiFiler® Trio DNA Quantification kit (Life Technologies), and genotyped using the GlobalFiler® PCR Amplification Kit (Life Technologies). Results of this study showed variation in DNA quantity and STR success between different types of tissues and some variation between cadavers. Overall, bone marrow samples resulted in the highest DNA yields, the least DNA degradation, and greatest STR success. However, several muscle, hair, and nail samples generated higher STR success rates than traditionally harvested bone and tooth samples. A key advantage to preferentially using these tissue samples over bone (and marrow) and teeth is their comparative ease and speed of collection from the cadaver and processing during DNA extraction. Results also indicate that soft tissues affected by lividity (blood pooling) may experience greater exposure to formalin, resulting in more DNA damage and reduced downstream STR success than tissues under compression. Overall

  6. MEDIAN NERVE AS A NERVE OF ANTERIOR COMPARTMENT OF ARM WITH ITS VARIANT FORMATION: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charushila D. Shinde

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Absence of Musculocutaneous nerve and unusual formation and innervation of Median nerve were noted in left upper limb during anatomical dissection of 60 yr old female cadaver. Median nerve normally does not give any branch in arm but in this case it innervates all the muscles of anterior compartment of arm in place of Musculocutaneous nerve. Here we discussed its embryology. It is important to be aware of such possible anatomical variations in routine clinical practice.

  7. Autopsy imaging for cardiac tamponade in a Thoroughbred foal

    OpenAIRE

    YAMADA, Kazutaka; Sato, Fumio; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; HIGUCHI, Tohru; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; SASAKI, Naoki; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autopsy imaging (Ai), postmortem imaging before necropsy, is used in human forensic medicine. Ai was performed using computed tomography (CT) for a 1-month-old Thoroughbred foal cadaver found in a pasture. CT revealed pericardial effusion, collapse of the aorta, bleeding in the lung lobe, gas in the ventricles and liver parenchyma, and distension of the digestive tract. Rupture in the left auricle was confirmed by necropsy; however, it was not depicted on CT. Therefore, Ai and conven...

  8. [De novo tumours of renal transplants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hétet, J F; Rigaud, J; Dorel-Le Théo, M; Láuté, F; Karam, G; Blanchet, P

    2007-12-01

    Kidney cancer occurs rarely and late in renal transplants. The lack of grafts and the increasing age of the cadaver donors are likely to result in an increasing number of such cancers. To date, the treatment of choice is the transplant removal. Nevertheless partial nephrectomy may be discussed in selected cases. Ultrasonographic screening should allow detection of low volume tumours suitable for partial nephrectomy. Alternative techniques (radiofrequency, cryoablation) are to be assessed in such patients.

  9. The characteristics of the mechanoreceptors of the hip with arthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraes Miguel RB

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mechanoreceptors have been extensively studied in different joints and distinct signals that convey proprioceptive information to the cortex. Several clinical reports have established a link between the number of mechanoreceptors and a deficient proprioceptive system; however, little or no literature suggest concentration of mechanoreceptors might be affected by hip arthrosis. The purpose of this study is first to determine the existence of mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings in the hip joint and to distinguish between their conditions: those with arthrosis and without arthrosis. Samples of 45 male hips were analyzed: 30 taken from patients with arthrosis that were submitted to total arthroplasty and 15 taken from male cadavers without arthrosis. The patients' ages ranged from 38 to75 years (average 56.5 and the cadavers' ages ranged from 21 to 50 years (average 35.5. The capsule, labrum, and femoral head ligament tissues were obtained during the arthroplasty procedure from 30 patients with arthrosis and from 15 male cadavers. The tissue was cut into fragments of around 3 mm. Each fragment was then immediately stained with gold chloride 1% solution and divided into sections of 6 μm thickness. The Mann-Whitney test was used for two groups and the ANOVA, Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests for more than two groups. Results show the mechanoreceptors (Pacini, Ruffini and Golgi corpuscles and free nerve endings are present in the capsule, femoral head ligament, and labrum of the hip joint. When all the densities of the nerve endings were examined with regard to those with arthrosis and those without arthrosis, the mechanoreceptors of cadavers without arthrosis were found to be more pronounced and an increase in free nerve endings could be observed (p = 0.0082. Further studies, especially electrophysiological studies, need to be carried out to clarify the functions of the mechanoreceptors in the joints.

  10. Anatomia cirúrgica do fígado

    OpenAIRE

    Triviño,Tarcisio; Abib,Simone de Campos Vieira

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this article is to sudy the functional anatomy of the liver and its segmentation, based on vascular (venous) structures in the parenquima. METHODS: Liver dissection in recent cadavers, identifying the portal pedicles and hepatic veins, which define the liver segments or its functional units. RESULTS: Anatomic caracterization of the eight liver segments, its afferent and efferent vascular structures, in order to guide anatomical resections that preserve the function and irr...

  11. Début d'un programme adulte de donneurs vivants de foie en Suisse

    OpenAIRE

    Mentha, Gilles; Morel, Philippe; Majno, Pietro; Giostra, Emiliano; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Bednarkiewicz, Marek; van Gessel, Elisabeth; Klopfenstein, Claude-Eric; Romand, Jacques-André; Hadengue, Antoine

    2000-01-01

    The shortage of cadaver organs has prompted transplant centres to seek new sources of grafts. While living-donor left lobe transplantation (segments II and III) is an established procedure for children, living donor right liver transplantation (segments V, VI, VII, VIII), which can provide adequate liver mass for an average-sized adult patient, is technically more demanding and potentially associated with higher risks for the donor. In view of the permanent shortage of organs in Switzerland, ...

  12. Results of kidney transplantation in relation to HLA-A, B, DR matching and quality of donor organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, V; Dreikorn, K; Röhl, L

    1980-01-01

    The influence of HLA compatibility as well as immediate postoperative function on survival rates was investigated in 203 cadaver kidney transplants. HLA compatibility, especially DR compatibility, improved transplant survival significantly. A direct correlation was found between primary transplant function and long-term results. HLA compatibility and quality of the donor organ had a cumulative effect on kidney transplant survival. Our results are a further indication that besides HLA compatibility, optimal quality of donor organs has crucial significance for the results of transplantation.

  13. Variant position of the medial plantar nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Astik RB; Dave UH; Gajendra KS

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of variation of position of the medial plantar nerve is important for the forefoot surgeon for plantar reconstruction, local injection therapy and an excision of interdigital neuroma. During routine dissection of 50-year-old female cadaver, we found the medial plantar nerve and vessels variably located between plantar aponeurosis and the muscles of the first layer of the sole of the right foot. Due to this variant position, the medial plantar nerve and vessels lose their protection ...

  14. FORMATION AND BRANCHING PATTERN OF CORDS OF BRACHIAL PLEXUS- A CADAVERIC STUDY IN NORTH INDIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Chaudhary

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anatomical variations in the different parts of brachial plexus in human have been described by many authors. These variations have clinical significance for the surgeons, radiologists and the anatomists. A lot of work has been done on the morphology of branching pattern of the different cords of brachial plexus but almost all the workers are silent about their morphometry. That’s why this study is planned on morphology & morphometry of branching pattern of different cords of brachial plexus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present study was conducted on 60 upper limbs belonging to 30 cadavers (Male:Female = 28:02, (Right:Left = 30:30 obtained from Department of Anatomy, Govt. Medical College, Amritsar. These were dissected to expose the different components of brachial plexus. OBSERVATIONS: Out of 60 limbs, the lateral and the medial cords were formed in the usual way in 56 limbs, while the posterior cord was normal in 57 limbs. The average lengths of lateral, medial & posterior cords were 3.37 cm, 4.05 cm & 1.95 cm respectively. The branches of lateral cord depicted more variations in the form of origin as compared with those of medial & posterior cords. The distance of different branches of all the cords from the point of origin to parent cord varied between the two sides of same cadaver as well as on the same side of different cadavers. DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION: The present study on the adult human cadavers is an essential prerequisite for the initial built up of the data base at the grass root level. The anatomy has always provided a bedrock for the sound surgical endeavors. It definitely has an upper edge to widely and indiscriminately used radiological and sophisticated CT and MRI observations which carry a margin of error inherent to any diagnostic procedure because no doubt the machines are a good bet but the eyes see the best.

  15. The characteristics of the mechanoreceptors of the hip with arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Miguel R B; Cavalcante, Maria L C; Leite, José A D; Macedo, José N; Sampaio, Marianna L B; Jamacaru, Vagnaldo F; Santana, Mariana G

    2011-11-16

    Mechanoreceptors have been extensively studied in different joints and distinct signals that convey proprioceptive information to the cortex. Several clinical reports have established a link between the number of mechanoreceptors and a deficient proprioceptive system; however, little or no literature suggest concentration of mechanoreceptors might be affected by hip arthrosis. The purpose of this study is first to determine the existence of mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings in the hip joint and to distinguish between their conditions: those with arthrosis and without arthrosis. Samples of 45 male hips were analyzed: 30 taken from patients with arthrosis that were submitted to total arthroplasty and 15 taken from male cadavers without arthrosis. The patients' ages ranged from 38 to75 years (average 56.5) and the cadavers' ages ranged from 21 to 50 years (average 35.5). The capsule, labrum, and femoral head ligament tissues were obtained during the arthroplasty procedure from 30 patients with arthrosis and from 15 male cadavers. The tissue was cut into fragments of around 3 mm. Each fragment was then immediately stained with gold chloride 1% solution and divided into sections of 6 μm thickness. The Mann-Whitney test was used for two groups and the ANOVA, Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests for more than two groups. Results show the mechanoreceptors (Pacini, Ruffini and Golgi corpuscles) and free nerve endings are present in the capsule, femoral head ligament, and labrum of the hip joint. When all the densities of the nerve endings were examined with regard to those with arthrosis and those without arthrosis, the mechanoreceptors of cadavers without arthrosis were found to be more pronounced and an increase in free nerve endings could be observed (p = 0.0082). Further studies, especially electrophysiological studies, need to be carried out to clarify the functions of the mechanoreceptors in the joints.

  16. A novel suture method to place and adjust peripheral nerve catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C.; Steen-Hansen, C.; Madsen, M. H.;

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a peripheral nerve catheter, attached to a needle, which works like an adjustable suture. We used in-plane ultrasound guidance to place 45 catheters close to the femoral, saphenous, sciatic and distal tibial nerves in cadaver legs. We displaced catheters after their initial plac...... successful and 42/43 secondary placements successful by ultrasound, confirmed in 10/10 cases by magnetic resonance imaging....

  17. PERFORATION OF INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE BY MAXILLARY ARTERY. LA PERFORACION DEL NERVIO ALVEOLAR INFERIOR POR LA ARTERIA MAXILAR

    OpenAIRE

    Vanishree S Nayak; Ramachandra Bhat K; Prakash Billakanti Babu

    2011-01-01

    Infratemporal fossa is clinically important anatomical area for the delivery of local anesthetic agents in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Variations in the anatomy of the inferior alveolar nerve and maxillary artery were studied in infratemporal dissection. During routine dissection of the head in an adult male cadaver an unusual variation in the origin of the inferior alveolar nerve and its relationship with the surrounding structures was observed. The inferior alveolar nerve originate...

  18. Bilateral variations of abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis: Surgical significance

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abductor pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) muscles are known to exhibit numerous variations. Aims: We would like to put across an accidental unusual finding of APL and EPB muscles. Materials and Methods: During routine cadaveric dissection of a 52 year old female cadaver, we found an unusual APL and EPB muscles variations bilaterally. Results: Duplication of APL tendon was noted, one showing normal attachment and the additional one on trapezium. EPB muscle had an ...

  19. Applied anatomical study of the vascularized ulnar nerve and its blood supply for cubital tunnel syndrome at the elbow region

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is often accompanied by paresthesia in ulnar nerve sites and hand muscle atrophy. When muscle weakness occurs, or after failure of more conservative treatments, anterior transposition is used. In the present study, the ulnar nerve and its blood vessels were examined in the elbows of 18 adult cadavers, and the external diameter of the nutrient vessels of the ulnar nerve at the point of origin, the distances between the origin of the vessels and the medial epicondyle of ...

  20. Effect of diffusion potential, osmosis and ion-exchange on transdermal drug delivery: theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, J; Murtomäki, L; Kontturi, K

    1998-12-04

    Equations expressing the effect of the diffusion potential on the trace ion transfer across a porous charged membrane have been derived. These equations have been tested with experiments with human cadaver skin. The transfer of sotalol and salicylate was measured varying the salt (NaCl) concentration in the donor and receiver compartments. It appears that osmotic pressure and ion-exchange make a significant contribution to the flux enhancement by the diffusion potential.

  1. [Role of modern cross-sectional imaging in thanatology: a pictorial essay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedouit, F; Otal, P; Costagliola, R; Loubes Lacroix, F; Telmon, N; Rouge, D; Joffre, F

    2006-06-01

    The development of new imaging modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is a new phenomenon in thanatology. The growing accessibility to these technologies allows, under some conditions, the acquisition of cross-sectional images on cadavers. The authors present a practical pictorial review of post-mortem changes and deadly injuries, illustrating the contributions of modern cross-sectional imaging techniques in thanatology.

  2. Biomechanics of Head, Neck, and Chest Injury Prevention for Soldiers: Phase 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    posterior pole damage. Exp Eye Res. 2012;99:63-70. Hodgson VR. National operating committee on standards for athletic equipment football helmet...consis- tency with the reported experimental results, all simulation data was filtered using a 100 Hz, eight- pole Butterworth filter. The fil- tered...cadavers. While it is possible to use inverse kinematic methods in to estimate the forces and moments at the occipital condyle [31] and T1 [32] in

  3. Arthroscopic Fixation of Cell Free Polymer-Based Cartilage Implants with a Bioinspired Polymer Surface on the Hip Joint: A Cadaveric Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Lahner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the adhesion capacity of a polyglycolic acid- (PGA- hyaluronan scaffold with a structural modification based on a planar polymer (PM surface in a cadaver cartilage defect model. Two cadaver specimens were used to serially test multiple chondral matrices. In a cadaver hip model, cell free polymer-based cartilage implants with a planar bioinspired PM surface (PGA-PM-scaffolds were implanted arthroscopically on 10 mm × 15 mm full-thickness femoral hip cartilage lesions. Unprocessed cartilage implants without a bioinspired PM surface were used as control group. The cartilage implants were fixed without and with the use of fibrin glue on femoral hip cartilage defects. After 50 movement cycles and removal of the distraction, a rearthroscopy was performed to assess the outline attachment and integrity of the scaffold. The fixation techniques without and with fibrin fixation showed marginal differences for outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation after 50 cycles. The PGA-PM-scaffolds with fibrin fixation achieved a higher score in terms of the attachment, integrity, and endpoint fixation than the PGA-scaffold on the cartilage defect. Relating to the outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation, the fixation with PGA-PM-scaffolds accomplished significantly better results compared to the PGA-scaffolds (P=0.03752, P=0.03078, P=0.00512, P=0.00512. PGA-PM-scaffolds demonstrate increased observed initial fixation strength in cadaver femoral head defects relative to PGA-scaffold, particularly when fibrin glue is used for fixation.

  4. The influence of conidial Pr1 protease on pathogenicity potential of Metarhizium anisopliae senso latu to ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golo, Patrícia S; Santos, Huarrisson A; Perinotto, Wendell M S; Quinelato, Simone; Angelo, Isabele C; Camargo, Mariana G; Sá, Fillipe A; Massard, Carlos L; Fernandes, Éverton K K; Roberts, Donald W; Bittencourt, Vânia R E P

    2015-06-01

    Pr1 is a subtilisin-like protease produced by Metarhizium spp. entomopathogenic fungi, and it is recognized as heavily involved in the initial steps of the fungal invasion of arthropod-host cuticles. In the current study, correlation was sought between mortality of tick larvae and conidial Pr1 levels of one Metarhizium anisopliae senso latu (s.l.) isolate (CG 148). Conidia with different levels of pr1 gene expression and enzymatic activity were obtained by producing them on either artificial medium (to yield low Pr1 activity) or on Rhipicephalus microplus cadavers (to yield high Pr1 activity). Conidial proteolytic activity was assessed using N-suc-ala-ala-pro-phe-ρNA as the chromogenic substrate, and pr1 expression was profiled by qPCR using three genes (gpd, try, and tef) as reference genes. Pr1 enzymatic (proteolytic) activity on conidia obtained from tick cadavers was 36 U mg(-1) in comparison to 4 U mg(-1) on conidia from PDA medium. Also, pr1 gene expression level was ten times higher in conidia from tick cadavers compared to PDA medium. Bioassays of M. anisopliae s.l. CG 148 spores with elevated Pr1 proteolytic activity and gene expression levels did not demonstrate increased virulence (= significant change percent mortality of tick larvae). The minimal levels of Pr1 on conidia produced on artificial medium was adequate to afford high levels of virulence, and the elevated amounts of the enzyme on tick-cadaver-produced conidia did not induce elevated larval mortality. As long as some Pr1 activity was present, fungal virulence of isolate CG 148 against tick larvae was not elevated by increased levels of conidial Pr1.

  5. Analysis of the Stress and Displacement Distribution of Inferior Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injuries Repaired with Screw Fixation: A Finite Element Study

    OpenAIRE

    Qinghua Liu; Kun Zhang; Yan Zhuang; Zhong Li; Bin Yu; Guoxian Pei

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of syndesmosis injuries have concentrated on cadaver models. However, they are unable to obtain exact data regarding the stress and displacement distribution of various tissues, and it is difficult to compare models. We investigated the biomechanical effects of inferior tibiofibular syndesmosis injuries (ITSIs) and screw fixation on the ankle using the finite element (FE) method. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A three-dimensional model of a healthy ankle complex was devel...

  6. Comparison of Mandibular Surgical Techniques for Accessing Cranial Base Vascular Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, Michael A.; Hoffmann, Keith D.; Johnson, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    This study compared mandibular distraction and vertical ramus osteotomy in terms of their effectiveness at increasing access to the cranial base and distal internal carotid artery. Five fresh–frozen cadavers were used to obtain a total of ten cranial base exposures. The following two techniques were evaluated on each of the ten exposures: (1) anterior distraction of the mandible without violation of the temporomandibular joint capsule, and (2) vertical ramus osteotomy of the mandible with dis...

  7. Is dissection humane?

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Tabinda

    2011-01-01

    Dissection is being jeopardized in the modern medical education. It has unrelentingly faced the lashes of time and has been the scapegoat for numerous convenient curricula reforms and subjective biases. The cadaver is unparallel in establishing core knowledge among the medical community and it needs to be appreciated in a new light in the “cyber anatomy” realm of today. This article elucidates the medical and ethical validity of continuing human body dissection in medicine which outweighs all...

  8. Glycosaminoglycans of human rotator cuff tendons: changes with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, G P; Harrall, R. L.; Constant, C R; Chard, M D; Cawston, T E; Hazleman, B L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To analyse the glycosaminoglycans of the adult human rotator cuff tendon matrix, to characterise changes in the glycosaminoglycan composition with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis. METHODS--Rotator cuff (supraspinatus) tendons (n = 84) and common biceps tendons (n = 26) were obtained from cadavers with no history of tendon pathology (age range 11-95 years). Biopsies of rotator cuff tendons (supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons, n = 53) were obtained during open should...

  9. Plastination in Anatomy Learning: An Experience at Cambridge University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Rafael; Bainbridge, David; Tavernor, Angie; López Albors, Octavio

    2016-01-01

    Due to lack of objective data, the benefits of using plastination in combination with wet dissection in teaching gross anatomy are unknown. The aim of this study was to obtain objective evidence from students regarding the effectiveness of combining plastinated specimens (PS) with an established gross anatomy education program at Cambridge University that uses wet cadaver dissection and small-group tutorials. For a complete academic year, a total of 135 PS were used alongside wet cadaver dissections. The PS were also available for small-group tutorials. An anonymous closed questionnaire, using a 5-point numerical-estimation Likert scale, was used to gather information relating to the effectiveness of the PS. The level of student satisfaction with the combined use of wet dissections and PS was high, although higher (p<.05) for second-year students (98.4%) than for first-year students (95.5%). Students felt the specimens allowed them to see details that were often more difficult to identify in their dissections, for instance nerves. Voluntary use of PS was higher (p<.01) for second-year students (96.9%), who had previously experienced anatomy teaching with cadaver dissection alone, than for first-year students (77.7%). Overall, 97.7% of all students thought that the PS helped them understand and learn anatomy. All students surveyed (100%) recommended the use of PS in the future. Students considered the use of PS in the dissection room combined with wet cadaver dissection to be beneficial when learning anatomy, particularly when combined with their use during small-group tutorials.

  10. Preclinical evaluation of intraoperative low-energy photon radiotherapy using sphericalapplicators in locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François eBuge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy is standard care for locally advanced prostatecancer (stage pT3R1. Intraoperative low-energy photon radiotherapy offers several advantages overexternal beam radiotherapy, and several systems are now available for its delivery, using sphericalapplicators which require only limited shielding. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibilityof this technique for the prostate bed.Materials & Methods: Applicators were assessed using MRI image data and cadavericdissection. In cadavers, targeted tissues, defined as a urethral section, both neurovascular bundlesections, the bladder neck and the beds of the seminal vesicles, were marked with metallic surgicalclips. Distances between clips and applicator were measured using CT. A dosimetric study of theapplication of 12 Gy at 5mm depth was performed using CT images of prostatectomized cadavers.Results: Using MRI images from 34 prostate cancer patients, we showed that the ideal applicatordiameter ranges from 45 to 70 mm. Using applicators of different sizes to encompass the prostate bedin nine cadavers, we showed that the distance between target tissues and applicator was less than 2mm for all target tissues except the upper extremity of the seminal vesicles (19 mm. Dosimetric studyshowed a good dose distribution in all target tissues in contact with the applicator, with a lowprobability of rectum and bladder complication.Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy of the prostate bed is feasible, with good coverage oftargeted tissues. Clinical study of safety and efficacy is now required.

  11. Cadaveric in-situ testing of optical coherence tomography system-based skull base surgery guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuiru; Khan, Osaama H.; Siegler, Peter; Jivraj, Jamil; Wong, Ronnie; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2015-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has extensive potential for producing clinical impact in the field of neurological diseases. A neurosurgical OCT hand-held forward viewing probe in Bayonet shape has been developed. In this study, we test the feasibility of integrating this imaging probe with modern navigation technology for guidance and monitoring of skull base surgery. Cadaver heads were used to simulate relevant surgical approaches for treatment of sellar, parasellar and skull base pathology. A high-resolution 3D CT scan was performed on the cadaver head to provide baseline data for navigation. The cadaver head was mounted on existing 3- or 4-point fixation systems. Tracking markers were attached to the OCT probe and the surgeon-probe-OCT interface was calibrated. 2D OCT images were shown in real time together with the optical tracking images to the surgeon during surgery. The intraoperative video and multimodality imaging data set, consisting of real time OCT images, OCT probe location registered to neurosurgical navigation were assessed. The integration of intraoperative OCT imaging with navigation technology provides the surgeon with updated image information, which is important to deal with tissue shifts and deformations during surgery. Preliminary results demonstrate that the clinical neurosurgical navigation system can provide the hand held OCT probe gross anatomical localization. The near-histological imaging resolution of intraoperative OCT can improve the identification of microstructural/morphology differences. The OCT imaging data, combined with the neurosurgical navigation tracking has the potential to improve image interpretation, precision and accuracy of the therapeutic procedure.

  12. High-speed seatbelt pretensioner loading of the abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Craig D; Hardy, Warren N; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Hashimoto, Syuzo

    2006-11-01

    This study characterizes the response of the human cadaver abdomen to high-speed seatbelt loading using pyrotechnic pretensioners. A test apparatus was developed to deliver symmetric loading to the abdomen using a seatbelt equipped with two low-mass load cells. Eight subjects were tested under worst-case scenario, out-of-position (OOP) conditions. A seatbelt was placed at the level of mid-umbilicus and drawn back along the sides of the specimens, which were seated upright using a fixed-back configuration. Penetration was measured by a laser, which tracked the anterior aspect of the abdomen, and by high-speed video. Additionally, aortic pressure was monitored. Three different pretensioner designs were used, referred to as system A, system B and system C. The B and C systems employed single pretensioners. The A system consisted of two B system pretensioners. The vascular systems of the subjects were perfused. Peak anterior abdominal loads due to the seatbelt ranged from 2.8 kN to 10.1 kN. Peak abdominal penetration ranged from 49 mm to 138 mm. Peak penetration speed ranged from 4.0 m/s to 13.3 m/s. Three cadavers sustained liver injury: one AIS 2, and two AIS 3. Cadaver abdominal response corridors for the A and B system pretensioners are proposed. The results are compared to the data reported by Hardy et al. (2001) and Trosseille et al. (2002).

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of immediate stability with rectangular versus cylindrical interbody cages in stabilization of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb John K

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent cadaver studies show stability against axial rotation with a cylindrical cage is marginally superior to a rectangular cage. The purpose of this biomechanical study in cadaver spine was to evaluate the stability of a new rectangular titanium cage design, which has teeth similar to the threads of cylindrical cages to engage the endplates. Methods Ten motion segments (five L2-3, five L4-5 were tested. From each cadaver spine, one motion segment was fixed with a pair of cylindrical cages (BAK, Sulzer Medica and the other with paired rectangular cages (Rotafix, Corin Spinal. Each specimen was tested in an unconstrained state, after cage introduction and after additional posterior translaminar screw fixation. The range of motion (ROM in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and rotation was tested in a materials testing machine, with +/- 5 Nm cyclical load over 10 sec per cycle; data from the third cycle was captured for analysis. Results ROM in all directions was significantly reduced (p Conclusions There was no significant difference in immediate stability in any direction between the threaded cylindrical cage and the new design of the rectangular cage with endplate teeth.

  14. Using augmented reality as a clinical support tool to assist combat medics in the treatment of tension pneumothoraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kenneth L; Doswell, Jayfus T; Fashola, Olatokunbo S; Debeatham, Wayne; Darko, Nii; Walker, Travelyan M; Danner, Omar K; Matthews, Leslie R; Weaver, William L

    2013-09-01

    This study was to extrapolate potential roles of augmented reality goggles as a clinical support tool assisting in the reduction of preventable causes of death on the battlefield. Our pilot study was designed to improve medic performance in accurately placing a large bore catheter to release tension pneumothorax (prehospital setting) while using augmented reality goggles. Thirty-four preclinical medical students recruited from Morehouse School of Medicine performed needle decompressions on human cadaver models after hearing a brief training lecture on tension pneumothorax management. Clinical vignettes identifying cadavers as having life-threatening tension pneumothoraces as a consequence of improvised explosive device attacks were used. Study group (n = 13) performed needle decompression using augmented reality goggles whereas the control group (n = 21) relied solely on memory from the lecture. The two groups were compared according to their ability to accurately complete the steps required to decompress a tension pneumothorax. The medical students using augmented reality goggle support were able to treat the tension pneumothorax on the human cadaver models more accurately than the students relying on their memory (p augmented reality group required more time to complete the needle decompression intervention (p = 0.0684), this did not reach statistical significance.

  15. Etiopathogenesis of hyperostosis frontalis interna: a mystery still.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikos, Athanasios; Paraskevas, George K; Yusuf, Faisal; Kordali, Panagiota; Meditskou, Soultana; Al-Haj, Abdulatif; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2011-10-20

    Hyperostosis frontalis interna is a morphological pattern characterized by single or multiple bony nodules situated on the inner lamina of the frontal bone. It is seldom found in males, but it is a common phenomenon among post-menopausal females in modern societies but relatively rare in antiquity. The etiopathogenesis of the trait is a matter of debate and ranges from genetic predisposition to epigenetic, while endocrine disturbances, aging, and dietary factors are also listed among the causes. We studied the frequency, characteristic features, and etiopathogenesis of the disease in recent cadaveric and dry skull specimens. The frequency of hyperostosis frontalis interna in cadavers and dry skull materials was almost identical, 12.5% and 12.3%, respectively. In cadavers, 87.5% of severe hyperostosis frontalis interna cases were found in females over 65 years-old. Interestingly, in two cadavers we found hyperostotic lesions spreading onto adjacent tissues such as the dura and falx cerebri. We provide some new aspects that may help in better understanding of the etiopathogenesis of hyperostosis frontalis interna. Thereby, we discuss the various etiopathogenesis models found in the literature.

  16. Examination of the variations of lateral femoral cutaneous nerves: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, Kadriye Mine; Sargon, Fevzi Mustafa; Sen, Fikret; Oztürk, Hakan; Taşcioğlu, Beliz; Yener, Nuran; Ozozan, Vefik Omer

    2002-12-01

    The origins, courses and relations of lateral femoral cutaneous nerves (LFCNs) were examined bilaterally in 28 cadavers, and the variations were observed in two. On the right side of one cadaver, the ventral rami of the first and second lumbar spinal nerves were united and then this nerve was divided into four branches. From medial to lateral, these branches were the obturator nerve, the femoral nerve, the medially located LFCN and the laterally located LFCN. On the left side of another cadaver, there were three LFCNs. All of these nerves pierced the psoas major muscle anterolaterally. Two of these nerves, which pierced the psoas major muscle more proximally than the third, united with each other by a communicating branch anterior to the iliacus muscle. These types of variations are very important, especially in the presence of paresthesias or pain in the anterior thigh, lateral thigh and gluteal region. In these cases, surgeons must always remember the possible variations of the LFCN during surgical procedures in order to prevent injury and the occurrence of meralgia paresthetica.

  17. Wireless Mobile Technology to Improve Workflow and Feasibility of MR-Guided Percutaneous Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rube, Martin A.; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Cox, Benjamin F.; Buciuc, Razvan; Melzer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A wireless interactive display and control device combined with a platform-independent web-based User Interface (UI) was developed to improve the workflow for interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (iMRI). Methods The iMRI-UI enables image acquisition of up to three independent slices using various pulse sequences with different contrast weighting. Pulse sequence, scan geometry and related parameters can be changed on the fly via the iMRI-UI using a tablet computer for improved lesion detection and interventional device targeting. The iMRI-UI was validated for core biopsies with a liver phantom (n=40) and Thiel soft-embalmed human cadavers (n=24) in a clinical 1.5T MRI scanner. Results The iMRI-UI components and setup were tested and found conditionally MRI-safe to use according to current ASTM standards. Despite minor temporary touchscreen interference at a close distance to the bore (<20 cm), no other issues regarding quality or imaging artefacts were observed. The 3D root-mean-square distance error was 2.8±1.0 (phantom) / 2.9±0.8 mm (cadaver) and overall procedure times ranged between 12–22 (phantom) / 20–55 minutes (cadaver). Conclusions The wireless iMRI-UI control setup enabled fast and accurate interventional biopsy needle placements along complex trajectories and improved the workflow for percutaneous interventions under MRI guidance in a preclinical trial. PMID:25179151

  18. Identification of parathyroid glands: anatomical study and surgical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Catarina; Pinheiro, Susana; Carvalho, Lina; Bernardes, António

    2015-03-01

    While performing thyroid surgery, the unintentional lesion of parathyroid glands and laryngeal nerves results in a profound alteration in patient's quality of life. To minimize thyroid surgery morbidity, the surgeon must have an in-depth knowledge of the thyroid gland morphology and its anatomical relations in the anterior compartment of the neck. This work intended to simulate total thyroidectomies using cadaver parts and isolate fragments that may correspond to parathyroid glands. The thyroid glands and "eventual" parathyroid glands were then submitted to histological study. Ninety-two cadaver parts were used for macroscopic dissection. A total of 242 fragments were isolated, 154 of which were confirmed through histological study to be parathyroid glands. In 36 cases, all "eventual" parathyroid glands isolated during dissection were confirmed through histological verification. In 40 cases, some glands were confirmed. In 16 cases, none of the "eventual" parathyroid glands was confirmed. The 92 thyroid glands isolated during dissection were also submitted to histological study. In 21 thyroid glands, 16 parathyroid glands were identified in the histological cuts: 8 sub-capsular, 8 extra-capsular, 6 intra-thyroidal. There was no statistical difference between the dimensions of the parathyroid glands. Parathyroid gland identification and preservation are sometimes a challenge during thyroid surgery, difficulty that has been demonstrated during dissection of cadaver parts.

  19. Biomechanical comparison of the human cadaveric pelvis with a fourth generation composite model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Brandon L; Attia, Tarik; Backstein, David; Safir, Oleg; Willett, Thomas L; Kuzyk, Paul R T

    2016-02-29

    The use of cadavers for orthopaedic biomechanics research is well established, but presents difficulties to researchers in terms of cost, biosafety, availability, and ease of use. High fidelity composite models of human bone have been developed for use in biomechanical studies. While several studies have utilized composite models of the human pelvis for testing orthopaedic reconstruction techniques, few biomechanical comparisons of the properties of cadaveric and composite pelves exist. The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical properties of cadaveric pelves to those of the 4th generation composite model. An Instron ElectroPuls E10000 mechanical testing machine was used to load specimens with orientation, boundary conditions and degrees of freedom that approximated those occurring during the single legged phase of walking, including hip abductor force. Each specimen was instrumented with strain gauge rosettes. Overall specimen stiffness and principal strains were calculated from the test data. Composite specimens showed significantly higher overall stiffness and slightly less overall variability between specimens (composite K=1448±54N/m, cadaver K=832±62N/m; p<0.0001). Strains measured at specific sites in the composite models and cadavers were similar (but did differ) only when the applied load was scaled to overall construct stiffness. This finding regarding strain distribution and the difference in overall stiffness must be accounted for when using these composite models for biomechanics research. Altering the cortical wall thickness or tuning the elastic moduli of the composite material may improve future generations of the composite model.

  20. Voluntary Body Donation: The Gift that Lives on Forever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritha, S.; Rao, M. Vittoo; Sumangala; Supriya, G.; Kumar, Praveen

    2012-10-01

    Body donation is a gracious act, Shankarcharaya firmly believed in concept of Body Donation or Organ Donation and said Iddham sharirum paropakarum i.e. the body is for use of others and death is not the end, it is the beginning. Anatomy is important basic subject for medicalstudents, both U.G. & P.G. Best method of Anatomy learning is by dissection on human cadavers, which remains principle teaching tool. Human cadavers for purpose of study are a scarcity with mushrooming of medical institutions in this country. Unclaimed bodies are no more origin of cadavers. Whole Body donation is the need of the hour. A Voluntary Body Donation is defined as the act of giving oneís Body after death for Medical research and education. In this article a survey was done in S.V.S. Medical & Dental Colleges Faculty members and medical exhibition visitors which include lawyers, engineers, teachers and others during the year of 2010. The body donation including organ donation and various factors such as age, religion, culture and donorís attitude are discussed. Body donation provides the students and medical researchers with unparalleled opportunities to study the human body. Computers nor books cannot totally replace body dissection in learning the anatomy.

  1. Preliminary experimental results of radiofrequency-cement-augmented and cannulated pedicle screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goost H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of cut-out of a pedicle screw is high in the presence of osteoporotic bone. In cadaver studies it was found that cement augmentation of pedicle screws markedly increases pullout forces. However, the use of conventional low viscosity vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty cement is associated with the risk of cement extravasation. The risk might be reduced by using high viscosity, radiofrequency-activated bone cement. After performing DEXA scans, six fresh-frozen vertebral bodies of different bone densities were obtained from cadavers. Two pedicle screws (WSI Expertise-Inject, Peter Brehm, Germany were placed in the pedicles. About 3 ml of radiofrequency-activated, ultra-high viscosity cement (ER2 Bone Cement, DFine Europe GmbH, Germany was injected through the right pedicle. The left pedicle screw was left uncemented and served as control. Axial pullout tests were performed using a material testing device (Zwick/Roell Zmartpro, Ulm, Germany. The tests revealed that cementaugmented pedicle screws were able to withstand markedly higher pullout forces. Extravasation of cement did not occur. The value of the study is limited by the fact that only six samples were investigated. Further cadaver studies and clinical evaluation will be needed in the future. However, this pilot study showed that combining cannulated pedicle screws with ultra-high viscosity bone cement is a successful approach. Revision due to cut-out and complications secondary to cement extravasation can be reduced by this method.

  2. Dental pathology in conventionally fed and pasture managed dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadden, A N; Poulsen, K P; Vanegas, J; Mecham, J; Bildfell, R; Stieger-Vanegas, S M

    2016-01-02

    Healthy teeth are important in the first stages of digestion for dairy cattle, yet little is known about bovine dental disease. This study aimed to investigate dental pathology of dairy cattle in two parts. First dairy cattle cadaver heads (n=11) were examined at the time of culling. Second, the authors performed oral exams in cattle fed a total mixed ration (TMR) (n=200) and pasture-based (n=71) grazing cattle. Cadaver heads were imaged using radiography and computed tomography before gross dissection to study dental anatomy and pathology. The most prevalent dental abnormalities were excessive transverse ridging of the occlusal surface, the presence of diastemas and third molar dental overgrowths (M3DO) in cadaver heads. Average thickness of subocclusal dentine ranged from 3.5 mm to 5.8 mm in cheek teeth but was >10 mm in maxillary teeth with M3DO. Radiographic findings were compared with oral examinations in live cattle. Prevalence of M3DO upon oral examination was 19 per cent and 28 per cent in herds of cattle fed a TMR diet and 0 per cent in a herd of grazing cattle. Dental abnormalities are prevalent in dairy cattle but due to thin subocclusal dentine in the cheek teeth, established equine dental treatment methodology is not appropriate for bovine cheek teeth with the exception of those that have developed M3DO.

  3. On the use of laser scans to validate reverse engineering of bony anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Joseph B; Smith, Erin J; Rasquinha, Brian; Rudan, John F; Ellis, Randy E

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to suggest the arthritic hip is an irregularly-shaped, aspherical joint, especially in severely pathological cases. Current methods used to study the shape and motion of the hip in-vivo, are invasive and impractical. This study aimed to assess whether a plastic model of the hip joint can be accurately made from a pelvic CT scan. A cadaver hemi-pelvis was CT imaged and segmented from which a 3D plastic model of the proximal femur and hemi-pelvis were fabricated using rapid-prototyping. Both the plastic model and the cadaver were then imaged using a high-resolution laser scanner. A three-way shape analysis was performed to compare the goodness-of-fit between the cadaver, image segmentation, and the plastic model. Overall, we obtained sub-millimeter fit accuracy between all three hip representations. Shape fit was least favorable in areas where the boundary between cartilage and bone is difficult to distinguish. We submit that rapid-prototyping is an accurate and efficient mechanism for obtaining 3D specimens as a means to further study the irregular geometry of the hip.

  4. The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, John; Hayashi, Koji; Toumi, Hechmi; Lyons, Kathleen; Bydder, Graeme; Phillips, Nicola; Best, Thomas M; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-03-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common overuse injury in runners and cyclists. It is regarded as a friction syndrome where the ITB rubs against (and 'rolls over') the lateral femoral epicondyle. Here, we re-evaluate the clinical anatomy of the region to challenge the view that the ITB moves antero-posteriorly over the epicondyle. Gross anatomical and microscopical studies were conducted on the distal portion of the ITB in 15 cadavers. This was complemented by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of six asymptomatic volunteers and studies of two athletes with acute ITB syndrome. In all cadavers, the ITB was anchored to the distal femur by fibrous strands, associated with a layer of richly innervated and vascularized fat. In no cadaver, volunteer or patient was a bursa seen. The MR scans showed that the ITB was compressed against the epicondyle at 30 degrees of knee flexion as a consequence of tibial internal rotation, but moved laterally in extension. MR signal changes in the patients with ITB syndrome were present in the region occupied by fat, deep to the ITB. The ITB is prevented from rolling over the epicondyle by its femoral anchorage and because it is a part of the fascia lata. We suggest that it creates the illusion of movement, because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres during knee flexion. Thus, on anatomical grounds, ITB overuse injuries may be more likely to be associated with fat compression beneath the tract, rather than with repetitive friction as the knee flexes and extends.

  5. Regulatory cascade and biological activity of Beauveria bassiana oosporein that limits bacterial growth after host death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanhua; Liu, Xi; Keyhani, Nemat O; Tang, Guirong; Pei, Yan; Zhang, Wenwen; Tong, Sheng

    2017-02-28

    The regulatory network and biological functions of the fungal secondary metabolite oosporein have remained obscure. Beauveria bassiana has evolved the ability to parasitize insects and outcompete microbial challengers for assimilation of host nutrients. A novel zinc finger transcription factor, BbSmr1 (B. bassiana secondary metabolite regulator 1), was identified in a screen for oosporein overproduction. Deletion of Bbsmr1 resulted in up-regulation of the oosporein biosynthetic gene cluster (OpS genes) and constitutive oosporein production. Oosporein production was abolished in double mutants of Bbsmr1 and a second transcription factor, OpS3, within the oosporein gene cluster (ΔBbsmr1ΔOpS3), indicating that BbSmr1 acts as a negative regulator of OpS3 expression. Real-time quantitative PCR and a GFP promoter fusion construct of OpS1, the oosporein polyketide synthase, indicated that OpS1 is expressed mainly in insect cadavers at 24-48 h after death. Bacterial colony analysis in B. bassiana-infected insect hosts revealed increasing counts until host death, with a dramatic decrease (∼90%) after death that correlated with oosporein production. In vitro studies verified the inhibitory activity of oosporein against bacteria derived from insect cadavers. These results suggest that oosporein acts as an antimicrobial compound to limit microbial competition on B. bassiana-killed hosts, allowing the fungus to maximally use host nutrients to grow and sporulate on infected cadavers.

  6. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Campos Pace Lasmar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS: Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance and Tukey's tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study.

  7. Feasibility and accuracy of ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeryl C; Gonzalez, Luis M; Larson, Martha M; Freeman, Larry E; Werre, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    Frozen cadaver specimens from three dogs were used to create a sectional anatomic atlas of the sacroiliac region. Frozen/thawed cadaver specimens from 12 dogs were used to develop an ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique. Accuracy of the technique was tested in 15 additional canine cadaver specimens, using injectate containing blue dye and iodinated contrast medium. Sonoanatomic landmarks for consistently identifying a caudodorsal window into the canine sacroiliac joint space included the L7-S1 articular process joints, ilial wing, sacral wing, sacral lamina, and median sacral crest. Accuracy of ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection was not significantly affected by operator, but was affected by the tissue location targeted and the reference standard used for calculations. Accuracy of the technique was good for placing injectate into either the synchondrosis component, dorsal sacroiliac ligament or ventral sacroiliac ligament; fair to poor for placing injectate into the synovial component; and poor for placing injectate into all four sacroiliac soft tissue structures. Concurrent placement of injectate into extraarticular tissues occurred frequently. We conclude that ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection is feasible for evaluation as a treatment method for lumbosacral region pain in dogs, but is not sufficiently accurate for localizing pain to the sacroiliac joint alone.

  8. Postmortem circulation: a new model for testing endovascular devices and training clinicians in their use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, Christine; Willaert, Wouter; Kawa, Emilia; Centola, Marcos; Steger, Beat; Dirnhofer, Richard; Mangin, Patrice; Grabherr, Silke

    2014-05-01

    The development of new medical devices, such as aortic valves, requires numerous preliminary studies on animals and training of personnel on cadavers before the devices can be used in patients. Postmortem circulation, a technique used for postmortem angiography, allows the vascular system to be reperfused in a way similar to that in living persons. This technique is used for postmortem investigations to visualize the human vascular system and to make vascular diagnoses. Specific material for reperfusing a human body was developed recently. Our aim was to investigate whether postmortem circulation that imitates in vivo conditions allows for the testing of medical materials on cadavers. We did this by delivering an aortic valve using minimally invasive methods. Postmortem circulation was established in eight corpses to recreate an environment as close as possible to in vivo conditions. Mobile fluoroscopy and a percutaneous catheterization technique were used to deliver the material to the correct place. Once the valve was implanted, the heart and primary vessels were extracted to confirm its position. Postmortem circulation proved to be essential in several of the cadavers because it helped the clinicians to deliver the material and improve their implantation techniques. Due to the intravascular circulation, sites with substantial arteriosclerotic stenosis could be bypassed, which would have been impossible without perfusion. Although originally developed for postmortem investigations, this reperfusion technique could be useful for testing new medical devices intended for living patients.

  9. Is Dissection a Must for Better Knowledge Among Future Doctors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Barkat Irfan Deeba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While the importance of anatomy education in contemporary medicine remains undisputable, the medium used to deliver anatomy information to medical learners is rapidly changing .The traditional dissection lies in the midst of a downward spiral as modern technological teaching alternatives rapidly substitute the cadaver. In this climate of pedagogical metamorphosis, the long-term cognitive impact of a ‘cadaver less' curriculum in the assimilation of core knowledge among our future physicians and surgeons remains an issue of fervent debate.The authors propose the hypothesis that active cadaveric dissection directly enhances the ‘long term learning outcomes' among students and is indispensible to the creation and retention of anatomy memory in the minds of learners. This retention of core concepts is not attainable through other instructional aids and might go a long way in framing the professional character of our medical community and the fate of our patients.To prove the same, this study provides objective evidence based on measurable data regarding the medical student's pedagogic preferences in anatomy education and their superior academic performance with the aid of dissection, thereby indicating the pivotal role of the cadaver in enhancing cognitive outcomes.

  10. Transoral robotic-assisted skull base surgery to approach the sella turcica: cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Dorian; Missistrano, Antoine; Hivelin, Mikaël; Carpentier, Alexandre; Cornu, Philippe; Hans, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) offers new possibilities that have not been experimented in the field of minimally invasive skull base neurosurgery. We propose to evaluate the feasibility of transoral approach to the sella turcica with the da Vinci system on cadavers. We performed four robot-assisted dissections on human fresh cadavers in order to reach the pituitary fossa by the oral cavity. Cavum mucosa dissection was performed by the head and neck surgeon at the console and then the sphenoid was drilled by the neurosurgeon at the bedside, with intraoperative fluoroscopy and a "double surgeon" control. Mucosa closure was attempted with robotic arms. We succeeded in performing a sellar opening in all cadavers with a minimally invasive approach, as the hard palate was never drilled. The video endoscope offered a large view inside the sphenoidal sinus, as observed in transnasal endoscopy, but with 3D visualization. The camera arm could be inserted into the sphenoidal sinus, and instrument arms in the pituitary fossa. Operative time to reach the pituitary fossa was approximately 60 min in all procedures: 20 min of initial setup, 10 min of mucosal dissection, and 30 min of sphenoid surgery. New anatomical landmarks were defined. Advantages and pitfalls of such an unpublished technique were discussed. This is the first cadaveric study reported da Vinci robotic transoral approach to the sella turcica with a minimally invasive procedure. This innovative technique may modify the usual pituitary adenoma removal as the sella is approached infero-superiorly.

  11. The sickest first? Disparities with model for end-stage liver disease-based organ allocation: one region's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Randolph L; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Harper, Ann; Millis, J Michael; Cronin, David C

    2003-11-01

    February 27, 2002, allocation of cadaver livers for transplantation changed from a waiting-time-based system to an evidence-based system referred to as the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD). We reviewed data from 1 of the 11 United Network for Organ Sharing regions to determine the impact of the MELD on the allocation of cadaver livers for transplantation in that region. The region of interest (study region) consists of three distinct geographic areas (referred to as Transplant Service Areas [TSAs]). Based on information obtained from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network for the United States and for the study region, the following observations were made: (1) study region patients who received a cadaver liver had higher mean and median MELD scores than cadaver liver recipients in the United States (study region mean score, 25.1; median, 26.0; US mean score, 23.9; median, 24.0); (2) within the study region, TSAs with competing liver transplant programs performed transplantation on patients at a significantly higher mean MELD score than TSAs dominated by a single center (TSA-1 mean score, 27.3; TSA-2 mean score, 26.6; TSA-3 mean score, 21.3); this disparity persisted when transplantations for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were excluded; and (3) study region patients removed from the waiting list because of death or being too sick for transplantation have higher MELD scores than the national average (study region mean score, 25.4; US mean score, 23.8). Overall, implementation of the MELD resulted in a substantial increase in the number of transplantations performed for HCC, and MELD exceptions for all reasons were more common in TSAs that have multiple centers. Despite the MELD, there remains disparity in organ allocation within the study region. The MELD may accurately predict pretransplantation mortality, but it does not ensure equitable organ distribution. We propose that intraregional sharing of cadaver livers based on the MELD may help limit

  12. Development/global validation of a 6-month-old pediatric head finite element model and application in investigation of drop-induced infant head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2013-12-01

    Drop is a frequent cause for infant head injury. To date, finite element (FE) modeling was gradually used to investigate child head dynamic response under drop impact conditions, however, two shortages still exist on this topic: (1) due to ethical reasons, none of developed 6-month-old (6MO) head FE model was found to be quantitatively validated against child cadaver tests at similar age group; (2) drop height and impact surface stiffness effects on infant head responses were not comprehensively investigated. In this study, motivated by the recently published material properties of soft tissues (skull and suture, etc.) and reported pediatric head global cadaver tests, a 6MO child head FE model was developed and simulated results compared with the child cadaver experimental data under compression and drop conditions. Comparison of results indicated that the FE model showed a fairly good biofidelic behavior in most dynamic responses. The validated FE model was further used to investigate effects of different drop heights and impact surface stiffness on the head dynamic responses. Numerical results show that the pediatric head mechanical parameters (peak acceleration, HIC, maximal vonMises stress and maximal first principal strain of skull) keep increasing with the increase in drop height, and exhibit "logarithmic function" shapes at "fast-slow" trends with increase in impact surface stiffness. Based on above analysis, the regressions were conducted to describe the relationship between drop height and impact surface stiffness and head global injury predictors (head peak acceleration, HIC, etc.). This paper provides a fundamental study of child head injury mechanism and protection under drop conditions.

  13. CT and MRI Determination of Intermuscular Space within Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles at Different Intervertebral Disc Levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Deng

    Full Text Available Recognition of the intermuscular spaces within lumbar paraspinal muscles is critically important for using the paramedian muscle-splitting approach to the lumbar spine. As such, it is important to determine the intermuscular spaces within the lumbar paraspinal muscles by utilizing modern medical imaging such as computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.A total of 30 adult cadavers were studied by sectional anatomic dissection, and 60 patients were examined using CT (16 slices, 3-mm thickness, 3-mm intersection gap, n = 30 and MRI (3.0T, T2-WI, 5-mm thickness, 1-mm intersection gap, n = 30. The distances between the midline and the superficial points of the intermuscular spaces at different intervertebral disc levels were measured.Based on study of our cadavers, the mean distances from the midline to the intermuscular space between multifidus and longissimus, from intervertebral disc levels L1-L2 to L5-S1, were 0.9, 1.1, 1.7, 3.0, and 3.5 cm, respectively. Compared with the upper levels (L1-L3, the superficial location at the lower level (L4-S1 is more laterally to the midline (P<0.05. The intermuscular space between sacrospinalis and quadratus lumborum, and that between longissimus and iliocostalis did not exist at L4-S1. The intermuscular spaces in patients also varied at different levels of the lumbar spine showing a low discontinuous density in CT and a high signal in MRI. There were no significant differences between the observations in cadavers and those made using CT and MRI.The intermuscular spaces within the paraspinal muscles vary at different intervertebral disc levels. Preoperative CT and MRI can facilitate selection of the muscle-splitting approach to the lumbar spine. This paper demonstrates the efficacy of medical imaging techniques in surgical planning.

  14. Cell Differentiation in a Bacillus thuringiensis Population during Planktonic Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Host Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is armed to complete a full cycle in its insect host. During infection, virulence factors are expressed under the control of the quorum sensor PlcR to kill the host. After the host’s death, the quorum sensor NprR controls a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing the vegetative cells to use the insect cadaver as a bioincubator and to survive. Only a part of the Bt population sporulates in the insect cadaver, and the precise composition of the whole population and its evolution over time are unknown. Using fluorescent reporters to record gene expression at the single-cell level, we have determined the differentiation course of a Bt population and explored the lineage existing among virulent, necrotrophic, and sporulating cells. The dynamics of cell differentiation were monitored during growth in homogenized medium, biofilm formation, and colonization of insect larvae. We demonstrated that in the insect host and in planktonic culture in rich medium, the virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation regulators are successively activated in the same cell. In contrast, in biofilms, activation of PlcR is dispensable for NprR activation and we observed a greater heterogeneity than under the other two growth conditions. We also showed that sporulating cells arise almost exclusively from necrotrophic cells. In biofilm and in the insect cadaver, we identified an as-yet-uncharacterized category of cells that do not express any of the reporters used. Overall, we showed that PlcR, NprR, and Spo0A act as interconnected integrators to allow finely tuned adaptation of the pathogen to its environment. PMID:25922389

  15. CT and MRI Determination of Intermuscular Space within Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles at Different Intervertebral Disc Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shidong; Zhang, Yu; Han, Hui; Zheng, Dengquan; Ding, Zihai; Wong, Kelvin K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recognition of the intermuscular spaces within lumbar paraspinal muscles is critically important for using the paramedian muscle-splitting approach to the lumbar spine. As such, it is important to determine the intermuscular spaces within the lumbar paraspinal muscles by utilizing modern medical imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A total of 30 adult cadavers were studied by sectional anatomic dissection, and 60 patients were examined using CT (16 slices, 3-mm thickness, 3-mm intersection gap, n = 30) and MRI (3.0T, T2-WI, 5-mm thickness, 1-mm intersection gap, n = 30). The distances between the midline and the superficial points of the intermuscular spaces at different intervertebral disc levels were measured. Results Based on study of our cadavers, the mean distances from the midline to the intermuscular space between multifidus and longissimus, from intervertebral disc levels L1–L2 to L5–S1, were 0.9, 1.1, 1.7, 3.0, and 3.5 cm, respectively. Compared with the upper levels (L1–L3), the superficial location at the lower level (L4–S1) is more laterally to the midline (Pquadratus lumborum, and that between longissimus and iliocostalis did not exist at L4–S1. The intermuscular spaces in patients also varied at different levels of the lumbar spine showing a low discontinuous density in CT and a high signal in MRI. There were no significant differences between the observations in cadavers and those made using CT and MRI. Conclusion The intermuscular spaces within the paraspinal muscles vary at different intervertebral disc levels. Preoperative CT and MRI can facilitate selection of the muscle-splitting approach to the lumbar spine. This paper demonstrates the efficacy of medical imaging techniques in surgical planning. PMID:26458269

  16. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    Full Text Available To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery.In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems.The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons.The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon's skills and knowledge, not as a substitute.

  17. Classic versus millennial medical lab anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Brion; Matsler, Nik; Delamarter, Taylor

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the integration, implementation, and use of cadaver dissection, hospital radiology modalities, surgical tools, and AV technology during a 12-week contemporary anatomy course suggesting a millennial laboratory. The teaching of anatomy has undergone the greatest fluctuation of any of the basic sciences during the past 100 years in order to make room for the meteoric rise in molecular sciences. Classically, anatomy consisted of a 2-year methodical, horizontal, anatomy course; anatomy has now morphed into a 12-week accelerated course in a vertical curriculum, at most institutions. Surface and radiological anatomy is the language for all clinicians regardless of specialty. The objective of this study was to investigate whether integration of full-body dissection anatomy and modern hospital technology, during the anatomy laboratory, could be accomplished in a 12-week anatomy course. Literature search was conducted on anatomy text, journals, and websites regarding contemporary hospital technology integrating multiple image mediums of 37 embalmed cadavers, surgical suite tools and technology, and audio/visual technology. Surgical and radiology professionals were contracted to teach during the anatomy laboratory. Literature search revealed no contemporary studies integrating full-body dissection with hospital technology and behavior. About 37 cadavers were successfully imaged with roentograms, CT, and MRI scans. Students were in favor of the dynamic laboratory consisting of multiple activity sessions occurring simultaneously. Objectively, examination scores proved to be a positive outcome and, subjectively, feedback from students was overwhelmingly positive. Despite the surging molecular based sciences consuming much of the curricula, full-body dissection anatomy is irreplaceable regarding both surface and architectural, radiological anatomy. Radiology should not be a small adjunct to understand full-body dissection, but rather, full-body dissection

  18. A CASE REPORT ON ABNORMAL COURSE OF VENA SAPHENA PARVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Krupa Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Great saphenous vein and short saphenous veins are the superficial veins of the lower limb. Variations in the superficial veins of the lowerlimb are uncommon. Our case report discusses anomalous course and its abnormal termination of short/small saphenous vein/Vena saphena parva. Materials and Methods: 80 Cadavers, Blade scalpel, Scissors, Forceps, Cotton, Other stationeries. Results: The short saphenous vein deviates the anatomical course without draining into popliteal vein, instead drains into deep femoral vein, femoral vein and Great saphenous vein. Discussion: During a routine dissection with 80 cadavers, an abnormal short saphenous vein was observed in the left lower limb of an aged male cadaver. The origin of small saphneous vein from the dorsum of the foot at the lateral end of the dorsal venous arch and continues behind the lateral malleolus and courses upward along the posterior side of the leg and has to end in popliteal vein but in our continuity of dissection the short saphenous vein has bifurcated into proper short saphenous vein and accessory saphenous vein at the junction of back of leg which drains into great saphenous vein. Conclusion: The knowledge of superficial veins of the lower limb is useful for clinicians during coronary bypass procedures, as these vessels are commonly used in such surgeries. It is therefore, essential for surgeons before harvesting the great saphenous vein to look for the abnormal drainage pattern of the short saphenous vein into the great saphenous vein either directly or through communication veins or with the presence of the Giacomini vein, Accessory saphenous vein.

  19. A new technique of bladder neck reconstruction during radical prostatectomy in patients with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Tolkach

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate continence after radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients, in whom a new method of the bladder neck reconstruction (BNR using deep dorsal stitch was implemented (deep single stitch through all bladder layers directly dorsal to the bladder opening after “tennis racket” reconstruction and to provide justification for its use by means of anatomical study in cadavers.Material and Methods:Open radical retropubic prostatectomy was performed in 84 patients: 39 patients with a new BNR method used to improve continence and control group of 45 patients with standard “tennis racket” BNR. Median follow-up was 14 months in control group and 12 months in study group. Continence recovery was accessed early postoperatively and every 3 months thereafter. Anatomical study was performed on 2 male fresh cadavers reproducing two different BNR techniques to clarify any underlying continence related mechanisms.Results:Patients with new BNR achieved full continence significantly faster (p=0.041, but the continence rates after 12 months were similar between groups. The severity of incontinence up to month 9 was significantly reduced in BNR group. The anastomotic stricture rate was not affected. Applying new BNR to the cadaver model revealed effects on early continence, namely presence of proximal passive closure mechanism in area of bladder neck.Conclusions:Continence in patients with the new BNR method using deep dorsal stitch recovered significantly faster. Moreover, a reduced grade of residual incontinence was documented. The effect was non-significant at month 12 of follow-up, meaning that only early effect was present.

  20. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Emmanuel [Department of Physical Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Kerckaert, Ingrid; D' Herde, Katharina [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.