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Sample records for c5a anaphylatoxin receptor

  1. Sulfated Tyrosines Contribute to the Formation of the C5a Docking Site of the Human C5a Anaphylatoxin Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Michael; Schnitzler, Christine E.; Vasilieva, Natalya; Leung, Doris; Kuhn, Jens; Gerard, Craig; Gerard, Norma P.; Choe, Hyeryun

    2001-01-01

    The complement anaphylatoxin C5a and its seven-transmembrane segment (7TMS) receptor play an important role in host defense and in a number of inflammation-associated pathologies. The NH2-terminal domain of the C5a receptor (C5aR/CD88) contributes substantially to its ability to bind C5a. Here we show that the tyrosines at positions 11 and 14 of the C5aR are posttranslationally modified by the addition of sulfate groups. The sulfate moieties of each of these tyrosines are critical to the ability of the C5aR to bind C5a and to mobilize calcium. A C5aR variant lacking these sulfate moieties efficiently mobilized calcium in response to a small peptide agonist, but not to C5a, consistent with a two-site model of ligand association in which the tyrosine-sulfated region of the C5aR mediates the initial docking interaction. A peptide based on the NH2 terminus of the C5aR and sulfated at these two tyrosines, but not its unsulfated analogue or a doubly sulfated control peptide, partially inhibited C5a association with its receptor. These observations clarify structural and mutagenic studies of the C5a/C5aR association and suggest that related 7TMS receptors are also modified by functionally important sulfate groups on their NH2-terminal tyrosines. PMID:11342590

  2. Structural and functional characterization of human and murine C5a anaphylatoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Janus Asbjørn; Yatime, Laure, E-mail: lay@mb.au.dk; Larsen, Casper [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Petersen, Steen Vang [Aarhus University, Bartholin Building, Wilhelm Meyers Allé 4, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Klos, Andreas [Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Andersen, Gregers Rom, E-mail: lay@mb.au.dk [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2014-06-01

    The structure of the human C5aR antagonist, C5a-A8, reveals a three-helix bundle conformation similar to that observed for human C5a-desArg, whereas murine C5a and C5a-desArg both form the canonical four-helix bundle. These conformational differences are discussed in light of the differential C5aR activation properties observed for the human and murine complement anaphylatoxins across species. Complement is an ancient part of the innate immune system that plays a pivotal role in protection against invading pathogens and helps to clear apoptotic and necrotic cells. Upon complement activation, a cascade of proteolytic events generates the complement effectors, including the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Signalling through their cognate G-protein coupled receptors, C3aR and C5aR, leads to a wide range of biological events promoting inflammation at the site of complement activation. The function of anaphylatoxins is regulated by circulating carboxypeptidases that remove their C-terminal arginine residue, yielding C3a-desArg and C5a-desArg. Whereas human C3a and C3a-desArg adopt a canonical four-helix bundle fold, the conformation of human C5a-desArg has recently been described as a three-helix bundle. Here, the crystal structures of an antagonist version of human C5a, A8{sup Δ71–73}, and of murine C5a and C5a-desArg are reported. Whereas A8{sup Δ71–73} adopts a three-helix bundle conformation similar to human C5a-desArg, the two murine proteins form a four-helix bundle. A cell-based functional assay reveals that murine C5a-desArg, in contrast to its human counterpart, exerts the same level of activition as murine C5a on its cognate receptor. The role of the different C5a conformations is discussed in relation to the differential activation of C5a receptors across species.

  3. DMPD: Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and parenchymal cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11367531 Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions o...ol. 2001 Mar;1(3):469-81. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: di...31 Title Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and paren

  4. C5a of Cynoglossus semilaevis has anaphylatoxin-like properties and promotes antibacterial and antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo-Fei; Hu, Yong-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the complement system leads to the cleavage of component factor C5 into C5a and C5b. C5a can induce chemotaxis and inflammatory responses in mammals. The function of C5a in fish is poorly understood. In this study, we report the identification and analysis of a C5 homologue, CsC5, from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsC5 is composed of 1683 amino acid residues that include an anaphylatoxin homologous domain. Expression of CsC5 could be detected in a variety of tissues and was up-regulated by bacterial or viral pathogen infection. Purified recombinant CsC5a (rCsC5a) could bind to peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and stimulate PBL chemotaxis, proliferation, respiratory burst, acid phosphatase activity, and phagocytosis. Tongue sole administered rCsC5a exhibited enhanced resistance against bacterial and viral infections. These results indicate that CsC5a is an anaphylatoxin with a role in innate immune defense against bacterial and viral infections. PMID:26934108

  5. Allosterism in human complement component 5a ((h)C5a): a damper of C5a receptor (C5aR) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The phenomena of allosterism continues to advance the field of drug discovery, by illuminating gainful insights for many key processes, related to the structure-function relationships in proteins and enzymes, including the transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), both in normal as well as in the disease states. However, allosterism is completely unexplored in the native protein ligands, especially when a small covalent change significantly modulates the pharmacology of the protein ligands toward the signaling axes of the GPCRs. One such example is the human C5a ((h)C5a), the potent cationic anaphylatoxin that engages C5aR and C5L2 to elicit numerous immunological and non-immunological responses in humans. From the recently available structure-function data, it is clear that unlike the mouse C5a ((m)C5a), the (h)C5a displays conformational heterogeneity. However, the molecular basis of such conformational heterogeneity, otherwise allosterism in (h)C5a and its precise contribution toward the overall C5aR signaling is not known. This study attempts to decipher the functional role of allosterism in (h)C5a, by exploring the inherent conformational dynamics in (m)C5a, (h)C5a and in its point mutants, including the proteolytic mutant des-Arg(74)-(h)C5a. Prima facie, the comparative molecular dynamics study, over total 500 ns, identifies Arg(74)-Tyr(23) and Arg(37)-Phe(51) "cation-π" pairs as the molecular "allosteric switches" on (h)C5a that potentially functions as a damper of C5aR signaling. PMID:26212097

  6. Stimulation of glycogen phosphorylase in rat hepatocytes via prostanoid release from Kupffer cells by recombinant rat anaphylatoxin C5a but not by native human C5a in hepatocyte/Kupffer cell co-cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Hespeling, Ursula; Püschel, Gerhard; Jungermann, Kurt; Götze, Otto; Zwirner, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Human anaphylatoxin C3a had previously been shown to increase glycogenolysis in perfused rat liver and prostanoid formation in rat liver macrophages. Surprisingly, human C5a, which in other systems elicited stronger responses than C3a, did not increase glycogenolysis in perfused rat liver. Species incompatibilities within the experimental system had been supposed to be the reason. The current study supports this hypothesis: (1) In rat liver macrophages that had been maintained in primary cult...

  7. Anaphylatoxin C3a receptors in asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Panettieri Reynold A; Ali Hydar

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The complement system forms the central core of innate immunity but also mediates a variety of inflammatory responses. Anaphylatoxin C3a, which is generated as a byproduct of complement activation, has long been known to activate mast cells, basophils and eosinophils and to cause smooth muscle contraction. However, the role of C3a in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma remains unclear. In this review, we examine the role of C3a in promoting asthma. Following allergen challenge, C3a i...

  8. Labeling the granulocyte C5a receptor with a unique photoreactive probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human C5a anaphylatoxin is a complement-derived chemotactic factor that binds to specific receptors that are found in the granulocyte plasma membrane. These receptors, or a specific subunit of these receptors, can be covalently labeled with a unique photoreactive analog of human C5a. This photoaffinity probe, p-azidobenzoyl-2-mercapto-N-ethylamide-C5a (ABMEA-SC5a), was synthesized by coupling p-azidobenzoyl-2-mercapto-N-ethylamide-2'-thiopyridine disulfide to human C5a after it had been partially reduced with dithiothreitol. Both direct and competitive binding studies demonstrated that a radioiodinated ABMEA-SC5a derivative retained the capacity to specifically bind to either neutrophil or U937 cell C5a receptors. Half-maximal binding of the photoreactive analog was observed at a concentration of 1 to 2 nM, a value that is comparable to that observed when 125I-C5a is employed as the ligand. The covalent adducts that were formed after irradiation of 125I-ABMEA-SC5a that had been prebound to either neutrophil or U937 cell plasma membranes were found to have an apparent molecular mass of 52,000 daltons when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis techniques. These findings demonstrate that the C5a receptors found on human neutrophils and other granulocytes are not only functionally similar, but biochemically similar as well

  9. Characterization of the isolated granulocyte C5a receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors previously demonstrated that the C5a receptor may be covalently labeled with a photoreactive C5a analog termed AMEA-SC5a. The resulting C5a-receptor complex exhibits a molecular weight of 52,000 Daltons on SDS-PAGE. More recently, they have been able to characterize the C5a receptor itself, rather than the C5a-receptor complex. This was achieved by specifically radioiodinating the granulocyte C5a receptor with a unique C5a photoaffinity probe (ASAMEA-SC5a) that contained on 125I-labeled p-azido-salicylate moiety. After this probe was bound to the membrane receptor and the resulting complex was photolyzed, the C5a polypeptide was released by reductive cleavage with DTT. The resulting radiolabeled receptor was then separated from free C5a and analyzed by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. The C5a receptor was identified as a single molecular species with an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 to 47,000 Daltons. Furthermore, addition of disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS) to preformed C5a receptor complexes resulted in relatively selective crosslinking of the C5a receptor to a second protein with an apparent molecular weight of ca. 40,000 Daltons. These findings suggest that the C5a receptor to a second protein with an apparent molecular weight of ca. 40,000 Daltons. These findings suggest that C5a receptor may consist of two functionally different subunits or it is in close proximity to other unique membrane constituents

  10. N-formylpeptide and complement C5a receptors are expressed in liver cells and mediate hepatic acute phase gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Although the classical chemotactic receptor for complement anaphylatoxin C5a has been associated with polymorphonuclear and mononuclear phagocytes, several recent studies have indicated that this receptor is expressed on nonmyeloid cells including human endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells, hepatocytes, and in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. In this study, we examined the possibility that other members of the chemotactic receptor family ...

  11. The C5a receptor impairs IL-12–dependent clearance of Porphyromonas gingivalis and is required for induction of periodontal bone loss1

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Shuang; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Domon, Hisanori; McIntosh, Megan L.; Hosur, Kavita B.; Qu, Hongchang; Li, Fenge; Tzekou, Apostolia; Lambris, John D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2010-01-01

    The C5a anaphylatoxin receptor (C5aR; CD88) is activated as part of the complement cascade and exerts important inflammatory, antimicrobial and regulatory functions, at least in part, via crosstalk with TLRs. However, the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can control C5aR activation by generating C5a through its own C5 convertase-like enzymatic activity. Here we show that P. gingivalis uses this mechanism to proactively and selectively inhibit TLR2-induced IL-12p70, whereas the sa...

  12. Differential Contributions of the Complement Anaphylotoxin Receptors C5aR1 and C5aR2 to the Early Innate Immune Response against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Horst

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The complement anaphylatoxin C5a contributes to host defense against Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we investigated the functional role of the two known C5a receptors, C5aR1 and C5aR2, in the host response to S. aureus. We found that C5aR1−/− mice exhibited greater susceptibility to S. aureus bloodstream infection than wild type and C5aR2−/− mice, as demonstrated by the significantly higher bacterial loads in the kidneys and heart at 24 h of infection, and by the higher levels of inflammatory IL-6 in serum. Histological and immunohistochemistry investigation of infected kidneys at 24 h after bacterial inoculation revealed a discrete infiltration of neutrophils in wild type mice but already well-developed abscesses consisting of bacterial clusters surrounded by a large number of neutrophils in both C5aR1−/− and C5aR2−/− mice. Furthermore, blood neutrophils from C5aR1−/− mice were less efficient than those from wild type or C5aR2−/− mice at killing S. aureus. The requirement of C5aR1 for efficient killing of S. aureus was also demonstrated in human blood after disrupting C5a-C5aR1 signaling using specific inhibitors. These results demonstrated a role for C5aR1 in S. aureus clearance as well as a role for both C5aR1 and C5aR2 in the orchestration of the inflammatory response during infection.

  13. Connecting the innate and adaptive immune responses in mouse choroidal neovascularization via the anaphylatoxin C5a and γδT-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Beth; Schnabolk, Gloriane; Joseph, Kusumam; Raikwar, Himanshu; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Johnson, Krista; Moore, Kristi; Wang, Yi; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). An overactive complement system is associated with AMD pathogenesis, and serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17, are elevated in AMD patients. IL-17 is produced by complement C5a-receptor-expressing T-cells. In murine CNV, infiltrating γδT- rather than Th17-cells produce the IL-17 measurable in lesioned eyes. Here we asked whether C5a generated locally in response to CNV recruits IL-17-producing T-cells to the eye. CNV lesions were generated using laser photocoagulation and quantified by imaging; T-lymphocytes were characterized by QRT-PCR. CNV resulted in an increase in splenic IL-17-producing γδT- and Th17-cells; yet in the CNV eye, only elevated levels of γδT-cells were observed. Systemic administration of anti-C5- or anti-C5a-blocking antibodies blunted the CNV-induced production of splenic Th17- and γδT-cells, reduced CNV size and eliminated ocular γδT-cell infiltration. In ARPE-19 cell monolayers, IL-17 triggered a pro-inflammatory state; and splenocyte proliferation was elevated in response to ocular proteins. Thus, we demonstrated that CNV lesions trigger a systemic immune response, augmenting local ocular inflammation via the infiltration of IL-17-producing γδT-cells, which are presumably recruited to the eye in a C5a-dependent manner. Understanding the complexity of complement-mediated pathological mechanisms will aid in the development of an AMD treatment. PMID:27029558

  14. Reduced expression of C5a receptors on neutrophils from cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Sørensen, O; Leslie, R; Wang, P

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To describe further functional deficiencies of neonatal neutrophils by measuring the expression of C5a receptors. METHODS: C5a uptake was measured using flow cytometry with fluorescein isothiocynate labelled recombinant C5a. The response of neutrophils to stimulation with C5a and fMLP was...... tested by measuring migration and exocytosis of myeloperoxidase and lactoferrin. RESULTS: C5a mean fluorescence on neutrophils from neonates was significantly lower (22.4 (SD 3.5)) than in adult controls (31.5 (3.1)). Neutrophils from neonates migrated poorly towards both C5a and fMLP compared with those...... from adult controls. Exocytosis of myeloperoxidase, but not lactoferrin from neonatal neutrophils stimulated with C5a, was significantly lower than in adult controls. fMLP stimulation, on the other hand, resulted in significantly higher exocytosis in neonates. CONCLUSION: The lower expression of C5a...

  15. The complement receptor C5aR1 contributes to renal damage but protects the heart in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Sebastian; Rosendahl, Alva; Czesla, Daniel; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Stahl, Rolf A K; Ehmke, Heimo; Kurts, Christian; Zipfel, Peter F; Köhl, Jörg; Wenzel, Ulrich O

    2016-06-01

    Adaptive and innate immune responses contribute to hypertension and hypertensive end-organ damage. Here, we determined the role of anaphylatoxin C5a, a major inflammatory effector of the innate immune system that is generated in response to complement activation, in hypertensive end-organ damage. For this purpose, we assessed the phenotype of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1)-deficient mice in ANG II-induced renal and cardiac injury. Expression of C5aR1 on infiltrating and resident renal as well as cardiac cells was determined using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-C5aR1 reporter knockin mouse. Flow cytometric analysis of leukocytes isolated from the kidney of GFP-C5aR1 reporter mice showed that 28% of CD45-positive cells expressed C5aR1. Dendritic cells were identified as the major C5aR1-expressing population (88.5%) followed by macrophages and neutrophils. Using confocal microscopy, we detected C5aR1 in the kidney mainly on infiltrating cells. In the heart, only infiltrating cells stained C5aR1 positive. To evaluate the role of C5aR1 deficiency in hypertensive injury, an aggravated model of hypertension was used. Unilateral nephrectomy was performed followed by infusion of ANG II (1.5 ng·g(-1)·min(-1)) and salt in wild-type (n = 34) and C5aR1-deficient mice (n = 32). C5aR1-deficient mice exhibited less renal injury, as evidenced by significantly reduced albuminuria. In contrast, cardiac injury was accelerated with significantly increased cardiac fibrosis and heart weight in C5aR1-deficient mice after ANG II infusion. No effect was found on blood pressure. In summary, the C5a:C5aR1 axis drives end-organ damage in the kidney but protects from the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy in experimental ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:27053686

  16. C5a receptor deficiency alters energy utilization and fat storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Roy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of whole body C5a receptor (C5aR deficiency on energy metabolism and fat storage. DESIGN: Male wildtype (WT and C5aR knockout (C5aRKO mice were fed a low fat (CHOW or a high fat high sucrose diet-induced obesity (DIO diet for 14 weeks. Body weight and food intake were measured weekly. Indirect calorimetry, dietary fatload clearance, insulin and glucose tolerance tests were also evaluated. Liver, muscle and adipose tissue mRNA gene expression were measured by RT-PCR. RESULTS: At week one and 12, C5aRKO mice on DIO had increased oxygen consumption. After 12 weeks, although food intake was comparable, C5aRKO mice had lower body weight (-7% CHOW, -12% DIO as well as smaller gonadal (-38% CHOW, -36% DIO and inguinal (-29% CHOW, -30% DIO fat pads than their WT counterparts. Conversely, in WT mice, C5aR was upregulated in DIO vs CHOW diets in gonadal adipose tissue, muscle and liver, while C5L2 mRNA expression was lower in C5aRKO on both diet. Furthermore, blood analysis showed lower plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid levels in both C5aRKO groups, with faster postprandial triglyceride clearance after a fatload. Additionally, C5aRKO mice showed lower CD36 expression in gonadal and muscle on both diets, while DGAT1 expression was higher in gonadal (CHOW and liver (CHOW and DIO and PPARγ was increased in muscle and liver. CONCLUSION: These observations point towards a role (either direct or indirect for C5aR in energy expenditure and fat storage, suggesting a dual role for C5aR in metabolism as well as in immunity.

  17. Increased expression of C5a receptor (CD88) mRNA in canine mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezmee, Mohd Noor Mohd; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat; Lee, Jia Yu Peppermint; Shiels, Ian A; Rolfe, Barbara; Woodruff, Trent; Mills, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    Mammary tumors are among the most common neoplastic conditions in dogs, and there is evidence that inflammation plays a role in the development of some tumor types in dogs. The complement system is a major participant in the inflammatory process and the complement activation component, C5a, is a potent inflammatory peptide. This study investigated the mRNA expression of the major receptor for C5a (C5aR; CD88) in histopathological samples of canine mammary tumors by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using canine-specific primers for CD88. A total of seven canine mammary tumors (four malignant carcinomas, two benign mixed mammary tumors, and one myoepithelioma) and eight normal mammary glands were analysed. All the tumor samples expressed low levels of CD88 mRNA, while none of the normal mammary tissues showed any detectable expression. These preliminary results suggest that C5a-CD88 interaction may play a contributory role in the inflammatory response associated with mammary tumor development in dogs. Further studies investigating the mechanisms behind complement activation and C5a receptor expression in canine mammary tumors are warranted. PMID:20846729

  18. Signaling through C5a receptor and C3a receptor diminishes function of murine natural regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Wing-hong; Van der Touw, William; Paz-Artal, Estela; Li, Ming O.; Heeger, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Thymus-derived (natural) CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (nT reg cells) are required for immune homeostasis and self-tolerance, but must be stringently controlled to permit expansion of protective immunity. Previous findings linking signals transmitted through T cell–expressed C5a receptor (C5aR) and C3a receptor (C3aR) to activation, differentiation, and expansion of conventional CD4+CD25− T cells (T conv cells), raised the possibility that C3aR/C5aR signaling on nT reg cells could physiologi...

  19. Urokinase Receptor Mediates Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Vascular Calcification via the Complement C5a Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Anaraki, Parnian Kalbasi; Patecki, Margret; Larmann, Jan; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jurk, Kerstin; Haller, Hermann; Theilmeier, Gregor; Dumler, Inna

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a severe consequence of several pathological processes with a lack of effective therapy. Recent studies suggest that circulating and resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) contribute to the osteogenic program of vascular calcification. Molecular mechanisms underlying MSC osteogenic potential and differentiation remain, however, sparsely explored. We investigated a role for the complement receptor C5aR in these processes. We found that expression of C5aR was upregulate...

  20. Structural complexes of the agonist, inverse agonist and antagonist bound C5a receptor: insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-04-26

    The C5a receptor (C5aR) is a pharmacologically important G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that interacts with (h)C5a, by recruiting both the "orthosteric" sites (site1 at the N-terminus and site2 at the ECS, extra cellular surface) on C5aR in a two site-binding model. However, the complex pharmacological landscape and the distinguishing chemistry operating either at the "orthosteric" site1 or at the functionally important "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR are still not clear, which greatly limits the understanding of C5aR pharmacology. One of the major bottlenecks is the lack of an experimental structure or a refined model structure of C5aR with appropriately defined active sites. The study attempts to understand the pharmacology at the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR rationally by generating a highly refined full-blown model structure of C5aR through advanced molecular modeling techniques, and further subjecting it to automated docking and molecular dynamics (MD) studies in the POPC bilayer. The first series of structural complexes of C5aR respectively bound to a linear native peptide agonist ((h)C5a-CT), a small molecule inverse agonist (NDT) and a cyclic peptide antagonist (PMX53) are reported, apparently establishing the unique pharmacological landscape of the "orthosteric" site2, which also illustrates an energetically distinct but coherent competitive chemistry ("cation-π" vs. "π-π" interactions) involved in distinguishing the established ligands known for targeting the "orthosteric" site2 of C5aR. Over a total of 1 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the POPC bilayer, it is evidenced that while the agonist prefers a "cation-π" interaction, the inverse agonist prefers a "cogwheel/L-shaped" interaction in contrast to the "edge-to-face/T-shaped" type π-π interactions demonstrated by the antagonist by engaging the F275(7.28) of the C5aR. In the absence of a NMR or crystallographically guided model structure of C5aR, the computational model complexes not only

  1. Effective suppression of C5a-induced proinflammatory response using anti-human C5a repebody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Da-Eun; Choi, Jung-Min; Yang, Chul-Su; Lee, Joong-Jae; Heu, Woosung; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-09-01

    The strongest anaphylatoxin, C5a, plays a critical role in the proinflammatory responses, causing the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases including sepsis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibitors of C5a thus have great potential as therapeutics for various inflammatory disorders. Herein, we present the development of a high-affinity repebody against human C5a (hC5a), which effectively suppresses the proinflammatory response. A repebody scaffold composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules was previously developed as an alternative protein scaffold. A repebody specifically binding to hC5a was selected through a phage display, and its affinity was increased up to 5 nM using modular engineering. The repebody was shown to effectively inhibit the production of C5a-induced proinflammatory cytokines by human monocytes. To obtain insight into a mode of action by the repebody, we determined its crystal structure in complex with hC5a. A structural analysis revealed that the repebody binds to the D1 and D3 regions of hC5a, overlapping several epitope residues with the hC5a receptor (hC5aR). It is thus likely that the repebody suppresses the hC5a-mediated immune response in monocytes by blocking the binding of hC5a to its receptor. The anti-hC5a repebody can be developed as a potential therapeutic for C5a-involved inflammatory diseases. PMID:27416759

  2. Association of Immune and Metabolic Receptors C5aR and C5L2 with Adiposity in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegah Poursharifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue receptors C5aR and C5L2 and their heterodimerization/functionality and interaction with ligands C5a and acylation stimulating protein (ASP have been evaluated in cell and rodent studies. Their contribution to obesity factors in humans remains unclear. We hypothesized that C5a receptors, classically required for host defense, are also associated with adiposity. Anthropometry and fasting blood parameters were measured in 136 women divided by body mass index (BMI: normal/overweight (≤30 kg/m2; n = 34, obese I (≤45 kg/m2; n = 33, obese II (≤51 kg/m2; n = 33, and obese III (≤80 kg/m2; n = 36. Subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue C5aR and C5L2 expression were analysed. C5L2 expression was comparable between subcutaneous and omental across all BMI groups. Plasma ASP and ASP/omental C5L2 expression increased with BMI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, resp.. While plasma C5a was unchanged, C5aR expression decreased with increasing BMI in subcutaneous and omental tissues (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, resp., with subcutaneous omental depots. Omental C5L2/C5aR ratio increased with BMI (P < 0.01 with correlations between C5L2/C5aR and waist circumference, HDL-C, and adiponectin. Tissue and BMI differences in receptors and ligands, particularly in omental, suggest relationship to metabolic disturbances and highlight adipose-immune interactions.

  3. Experimental Malaria in Pregnancy Induces Neurocognitive Injury in Uninfected Offspring via a C5a-C5a Receptor Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloë R McDonald

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The in utero environment profoundly impacts childhood neurodevelopment and behaviour. A substantial proportion of pregnancies in Africa are at risk of malaria in pregnancy (MIP however the impact of in utero exposure to MIP on fetal neurodevelopment is unknown. Complement activation, in particular C5a, may contribute to neuropathology and adverse outcomes during MIP. We used an experimental model of MIP and standardized neurocognitive testing, MRI, micro-CT and HPLC analysis of neurotransmitter levels, to test the hypothesis that in utero exposure to malaria alters neurodevelopment through a C5a-C5aR dependent pathway. We show that malaria-exposed offspring have persistent neurocognitive deficits in memory and affective-like behaviour compared to unexposed controls. These deficits were associated with reduced regional brain levels of major biogenic amines and BDNF that were rescued by disruption of C5a-C5aR signaling using genetic and functional approaches. Our results demonstrate that experimental MIP induces neurocognitive deficits in offspring and suggest novel targets for intervention.

  4. Experimental Malaria in Pregnancy Induces Neurocognitive Injury in Uninfected Offspring via a C5a-C5a Receptor Dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Chloë R; Cahill, Lindsay S; Ho, Keith T; Yang, Jimmy; Kim, Hani; Silver, Karlee L; Ward, Peter A; Mount, Howard T; Liles, W Conrad; Sled, John G; Kain, Kevin C

    2015-09-01

    The in utero environment profoundly impacts childhood neurodevelopment and behaviour. A substantial proportion of pregnancies in Africa are at risk of malaria in pregnancy (MIP) however the impact of in utero exposure to MIP on fetal neurodevelopment is unknown. Complement activation, in particular C5a, may contribute to neuropathology and adverse outcomes during MIP. We used an experimental model of MIP and standardized neurocognitive testing, MRI, micro-CT and HPLC analysis of neurotransmitter levels, to test the hypothesis that in utero exposure to malaria alters neurodevelopment through a C5a-C5aR dependent pathway. We show that malaria-exposed offspring have persistent neurocognitive deficits in memory and affective-like behaviour compared to unexposed controls. These deficits were associated with reduced regional brain levels of major biogenic amines and BDNF that were rescued by disruption of C5a-C5aR signaling using genetic and functional approaches. Our results demonstrate that experimental MIP induces neurocognitive deficits in offspring and suggest novel targets for intervention. PMID:26402732

  5. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W Mei; Stoermer, Martin J; Sweet, Matthew J; Reid, Robert C; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents. PMID:27094554

  6. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1–3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents. PMID:27094554

  7. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1–3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  8. Role of C3, C5 and Anaphylatoxin Receptors in Acute Lung Injury and in Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays a major role in innate immune defenses against infectious agents, but exaggerated activation of complement can lead to severe tissue injury. Systemic (intravascular) activation of complement can, via C5a, lead to neutrophil (PMN) activation, sequestration and adhesion to the pulmonary capillary endothelium, resulting in damage and necrosis of vascular endothelial cells and acute lung injury (ALI). Intrapulmonary (intraalveolar) activation of complement can cause AL...

  9. Nerve Growth Factor Secretion From Pulp Fibroblasts is Modulated by Complement C5a Receptor and Implied in Neurite Outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmilewsky, Fanny; Ayaz, Warda; Appiah, James; About, Imad; Chung, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of sensory innervation in tooth vitality, the identification of signals that control nerve regeneration and the cellular events they induce is essential. Previous studies demonstrated that the complement system, a major component of innate immunity and inflammation, is activated at the injured site of human carious teeth and plays an important role in dental-pulp regeneration via interaction of the active Complement C5a fragment with pulp progenitor cells. In this study, we further determined the role of the active fragment complement C5a receptor (C5aR) in dental nerve regeneration in regards to local secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF) upon carious injury. Using ELISA and AXIS co-culture systems, we demonstrate that C5aR is critically implicated in the modulation of NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The NGF secretion by LTA-stimulated pulp fibroblasts, which is negatively regulated by C5aR activation, has a role in the control of the neurite outgrowth length in our axon regeneration analysis. Our data provide a scientific step forward that can guide development of future therapeutic tools for innovative and incipient interventions targeting the dentin-pulp regeneration process by linking the neurite outgrowth to human pulp fibroblast through complement system activation. PMID:27539194

  10. Functional Identification of the Stable Transfection C5aR Cell Line Molt-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunmei Zhang; Yan Li; Ruonan Xu; Jianan Wang; Gencheng Han; Guojiang Chen; Renxi Wang; Huawei Wei; Beifen Shen; Yuanfang Ma

    2007-01-01

    The complement C5 anaphylatoxin receptor is a member of the seven transmembrane-spanning G protein-coupled receptor superfamily that signals through Gαi and Gα16. C5aR is mostly expressed on neutrophils, macrophages and endothelial cells. C5a and C5aR interaction plays an important role in numerous biological effects such as in vivo cytokine storm which results in inflammatory damage. Considering the limitation of collection of human peripheral blood neutrophils and their short half life, the stably transfected cell line for studying the biological effects of C5aR is needed. In this study, we transfected C5aR gene into Molt-4 cell line and examined the function of ectopic C5aR. Our results showed stable expression of the C5aR in Molt-4 cell line and their interaction with human C5a induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, Ca++ influx. This stable transfected cell line may provide a useful tool for studying signal pathways related to C5a and C5aR interplay and antibody development specific for C5aR.

  11. Complement C5a-C5aR interaction enhances MAPK signaling pathway activities to mediate renal injury in trichloroethylene sensitized BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-xiang; Zha, Wan-sheng; Ye, Liang-ping; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hui; Shen, Tong; Wu, Chang-hao; Zhu, Qi-xing

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown complement activation as a possible mechanism for trichloroethylene (TCE) sensitization, leading to multi-organ damage including the kidneys. In particular, excessive deposition of C5 and C5b-9-the membrane attack complex, which can generate significant tissue damage, was observed in the kidney tissue after TCE sensitization. The present study tested the hypothesis that anaphylatoxin C5a binding to its receptor C5aR mediates renal injury in TCE-sensitized BALB/c mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized through skin challenge with TCE, with or without pretreatment by the C5aR antagonist W54011. Kidney histopathology and the renal functional test were performed to assess renal injury, and immunohistochemistry and fluorescent labeling were carried out to assess C5a and C5aR expressions. TCE sensitization up-regulated C5a and C5aR expressions in kidney tissue, generated inflammatory infiltration, renal tubule damage, glomerular hypercellularity and impaired renal function. Antagonist pretreatment blocked C5a binding to C5aR and attenuated TCE-induced tissue damage and renal dysfunction. TCE sensitization also caused the deposition of major pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the kidney tissue (P TCE sensitization-induced increase of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ (P TCE or other environmental chemicals. PMID:26095957

  12. Treatment with the C5a receptor antagonist ADC-1004 reduces myocardial infarction in a porcine ischemia-reperfusion model

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    Arheden Håkan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils, stimulated by the activated complement factor C5a, have been implicated in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. ADC-1004 is a competitive C5a receptor antagonist that has been shown to inhibit complement related neutrophil activation. ADC-1004 shields the neutrophils from C5a activation before they enter the reperfused area, which could be a mechanistic advantage compared to previous C5a directed reperfusion therapies. We investigated if treatment with ADC-1004, according to a clinically applicable protocol, would reduce infarct size and microvascular obstruction in a large animal myocardial infarct model. Methods In anesthetized pigs (42-53 kg, a percutaneous coronary intervention balloon was inflated in the left anterior descending artery for 40 minutes, followed by 4 hours of reperfusion. Twenty minutes after balloon inflation the pigs were randomized to an intravenous bolus administration of ADC-1004 (175 mg, n = 8 or saline (9 mg/ml, n = 8. Area at risk (AAR was evaluated by ex vivo SPECT. Infarct size and microvascular obstruction were evaluated by ex vivo MRI. The observers were blinded to the treatment at randomization and analysis. Results ADC-1004 treatment reduced infarct size by 21% (ADC-1004: 58.3 ± 3.4 vs control: 74.1 ± 2.9%AAR, p = 0.007. Microvascular obstruction was similar between the groups (ADC-1004: 2.2 ± 1.2 vs control: 5.3 ± 2.5%AAR, p = 0.23. The mean plasma concentration of ADC-1004 was 83 ± 8 nM at sacrifice. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to heart rate, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output and blood-gas data. Conclusions ADC-1004 treatment reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and represents a novel treatment strategy of myocardial infarct with potential clinical applicability.

  13. Local complement-targeted intervention in periodontitis: proof-of-concept using a C5a receptor (CD88) antagonist1

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Toshiharu; Hosur, Kavita B.; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Reis, Edimara S.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2012-01-01

    When excessively activated or deregulated, complement becomes a major link between infection and inflammatory pathology including periodontitis. This oral inflammatory disease is associated with a dysbiotic microbiota, leads to the destruction of bone and other tooth-supporting structures, and exerts an adverse impact on systemic health. We have previously shown that mice deficient either in complement C5a receptor (C5aR; CD88) or TLR2 are highly and similarly resistant to periodontitis, sugg...

  14. Expression of complement C5a receptor and the viability of 4T1 tumor cells following agonist–antagonist treatment

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    Nurneqman Nashreq Kosni

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This experiment shows the presence of C5a receptor on 4T1 cell line. We believe that the antagonist peptide is eligible to be used widely in cancer immunotherapy field; but in vivo studies need to be carried out first in the future, as it will determine how these drugs affect the tumor cell growth.

  15. Treatment with the C5a receptor/CD88 antagonist PMX205 reduces inflammation in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Elizabeth B; Sanderson, Sam D; Wells, Sandra M; Poole, Jill A

    2014-08-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease arising from an aberrant immune response following exposure to environmental stimuli in genetically susceptible persons. The complement component 5 (C5)/C5a Receptor (C5aR/CD88) signaling pathway has been implicated in both experimental allergic asthma and human asthmatic disease. Targeting the C5a/C5aR signaling pathway in rodent models has been shown to either enhance or reduce allergic asthma consequences. Treatment with a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody directed against C5 has shown unclear results in patients with asthma. The objective of this proof-of-concept animal study was to determine whether the low molecular weight C5aR peptidomimetic antagonist, PMX205, would reduce experimental allergic asthma consequences in mice. PMX205 or vehicle control was administered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice prior to and during standard ovalbumin (OVA) allergen sensitization and aerosolized challenge phases. PMX205 substantially reduced OVA-induced total cell (60%), neutrophil (66%) and eosinophil (65%) influxes in lavage fluid sampling. There were also significant reductions in OVA-induced lavage fluid IL-13 protein and lung Th2 cytokine gene expression with PMX205 administration. PMX205 treatment also diminished OVA-induced lung parenchyma cellular infiltration. PMX205 administration did not reduce OVA-induced serum IgE levels or epithelial mucous/goblet cell generation. There was no evidence of toxicity observed with PMX205 treatment in saline or OVA-challenged animals. These data provide evidence that pharmacologic blockade of C5aR by a low molecular weight antagonist (PMX205) reduces airway inflammatory cell and cytokine responses in experimental allergic asthma, and suggests that PMX205 might represent a novel therapeutic agent for reducing asthmatic outcomes. PMID:24859057

  16. Complement Receptors C5aR and C5L2 Are Associated with Metabolic Profile, Sex Hormones, and Liver Enzymes in Obese Women Pre- and Postbariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Rezvani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obesity is associated with metabolic dysfunction with sex differences and chronic, low-grade inflammation. We proposed that hepatic expression of immune complement C3 related receptors (C3aR, C5aR, and C5L2 would be associated with pre- or postmenopausal status and metabolic profile in severely obese women. We hypothesized that C5L2/C5aR ratio, potentially influencing the ASP/C5L2 metabolic versus C5a/C5aR immune response, would predict metabolic profiles after weight loss surgery. Materials and Methods. Fasting plasma (hormone, lipid, and enzyme analysis and liver biopsies (RT-PCR gene expression were obtained from 91 women during surgery. Results. Hepatic C5L2 mRNA expression was elevated in pre- versus postmenopausal women (P<0.01 and correlated positively with circulating estradiol, estrone, ApoB, ApoA1, ApoA1/B, waist circumference, age, and LDL-C (all P<0.05. While plasma ASP was lower in pre- versus postmenopausal women (P<0.01, the hepatic C5L2/C5aR mRNA ratio was increased (P<0.001 and correlated positively with estrone (P<0.01 and estradiol (P<0.001 and negatively with circulating ApoB and liver enzymes ALT, AST, and GGT (all P<0.05. Over 12 months postoperatively, liver enzymes in low C5L2/C5aR mRNA ratio group remained higher (ALP and ALT, P<0.05, AST and GGT, P<0.001 2-way-ANOVA. Conclusion. C5L2-C5aR association with other mediators including estrogens may contribute to hepatic metabolic and inflammatory function.

  17. Micrurus snake venoms activate human complement system and generate anaphylatoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Gabriela D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Micrurus, coral snakes (Serpentes, Elapidae, comprises more than 120 species and subspecies distributed from the south United States to the south of South America. Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and further respiratory arrest within a few hours after envenomation. Clinical observations show mainly neurotoxic symptoms, although other biological activities have also been experimentally observed, including cardiotoxicity, hemolysis, edema and myotoxicity. Results In the present study we have investigated the action of venoms from seven species of snakes from the genus Micrurus on the complement system in in vitro studies. Several of the Micrurus species could consume the classical and/or the lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, and C3a, C4a and C5a were generated in sera treated with the venoms as result of this complement activation. Micrurus venoms were also able to directly cleave the α chain of the component C3, but not of the C4, which was inhibited by 1,10 Phenanthroline, suggesting the presence of a C3α chain specific metalloprotease in Micrurus spp venoms. Furthermore, complement activation was in part associated with the cleavage of C1-Inhibitor by protease(s present in the venoms, which disrupts complement activation control. Conclusion Micrurus venoms can activate the complement system, generating a significant amount of anaphylatoxins, which may assist due to their vasodilatory effects, to enhance the spreading of other venom components during the envenomation process.

  18. Anaphylatoxins coordinate innate and adaptive immune responses in allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmudde, Inken; Laumonnier, Yves; Köhl, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic disease of the airways in which maladaptive Th2 and Th17 immune responses drive airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation and mucus overproduction. Airway epithelial and pulmonary vascular endothelial cells in concert with different resident and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) play critical roles in allergen sensing and consecutive activation of TH cells and their differentiation toward TH2 and TH17 effector or regulatory T cells (Treg). Further, myeloid-derived regulatory cells (MDRC) act on TH cells and either suppress or enhance their activation. The complement-derived anaphylatoxins (AT) C3a and C5a are generated during initial antigen encounter and regulate the development of maladaptive immunity at allergen sensitization. Here, we will review the complex role of ATs in activation and modulation of different DC populations, MDRCs and CD4⁺ TH cells. We will also discuss the potential impact of ATs on the regulation of the pulmonary stromal compartment as an important means to regulate DC functions. PMID:23694705

  19. The anaphylatoxin C3a downregulates the Th2 response to epicutaneously introduced antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamoto, Seiji; Yalcindag, Ali; Laouini, Dhafer; Brodeur, Scott; Bryce, Paul; Lu, Bao; Humbles, Alison A.; Oettgen, Hans; Gerard, Craig; Geha, Raif S.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical injury to the skin results in activation of the complement component C3 and release of the anaphylatoxin C3a. C3a binds to a seven-transmembrane G protein–coupled receptor, C3aR. We used C3aR–/– mice to examine the role of C3a in a mouse model of allergic inflammation induced by epicutaneous sensitization with OVA. C3aR–/– mice exhibited an exaggerated Th2 response to epicutaneous but not to intraperitoneal sensitization with OVA, as evidenced by significantly elevated levels of se...

  20. Degradation of C3a anaphylatoxins by rat mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation of 125I-human C3a with rat peritoneal mast cells (RMC) causes extensive degradation of the ligand. Both cell-bound and free 125I-C3a (hu) was degraded by RMC, even at 00C, based on SDS-PAGE analysis. The authors examined several protease inhibitors for their ability to prevent degradation of 125I-C3a (hu). Degradation of 125I-C3a (hu) by RMC was not inhibited by leupeptin, antipain, elastatinal, pepstatin, α1-antitrypsin or EDTA. TPCK and TLCK were only partially effective. PMSF, chymostatin and SBTI were most effective in preventing 125I-C3a (hu) degradation. These latter compounds are effective inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like enzyme chymase extracted from RMC, as is TPCK, based on hydrolysis of the substrate BTEE. Degradation of cell-bound ligand is totally prevented only by PMSF (or DFP). Therefore, 125I-C3a (hu) bound to the RMC appears to be degraded predominantly by chymase; however the cell-bound ligand is attacked by other surface proteases. Degradation of rat C3a by RMC was examined. After incubation with RMC, cell-bound and free 125I-C3a (rat) showed no evidence of degradation with or without inhibitors present. From these results, the authors conclude that chymase may not play a significant role in regulating anaphylatoxin activity. Furthermore, the authors propose that rat C3a is a preferred ligand for identifying receptors on mast cells because of its resistance to proteolysis

  1. Innate immune induction and influenza protection elicited by a response-selective agonist of human C5a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam D Sanderson

    Full Text Available The anaphylatoxin C5a is an especially potent mediator of both local and systemic inflammation. However, C5a also plays an essential role in mucosal host defense against bacterial, viral, and fungal infection. We have developed a response-selective agonist of human C5a, termed EP67, which retains the immunoenhancing activity of C5a at the expense of its inflammatory, anaphylagenic properties. EP67 insufflation results in the rapid induction of pulmonary cytokines and chemokines. This is followed by an influx of innate immune effector cells, including neutrophils, NK cells, and dendritic cells. EP67 exhibits both prophylactic and therapeutic protection when tested in a murine model of influenza A infection. Mice treated with EP67 within a twenty-four hour window of non-lethal infection were significantly protected from influenza-induced weight loss. Furthermore, EP67 delivered twenty-four hours after lethal infection completely blocked influenza-induced mortality (0% vs. 100% survival. Since protection based on innate immune induction is not restricted to any specific pathogen, EP67 may well prove equally efficacious against a wide variety of possible viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens. Such a strategy could be used to stop the worldwide spread of emergent respiratory diseases, including but not limited to novel strains of influenza.

  2. Increased local concentration of complement C5a contributes to incisional pain in mice

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    Clark David J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous study, we demonstrated that local injection of complement C5a and C3a produce mechanical and heat hyperalgesia, and that C5a and C3a activate and sensitize cutaneous nociceptors in normal skin, suggesting a contribution of complement fragments to acute pain. Other studies also have shown that the complement system can be activated by surgical incision, and the systemic blockade of C5a receptor (C5aR reduces incision-induced pain and inflammation. In this study, we further examined the possible contribution of wound area C5a to incisional pain. Methods Using of a hind paw incisional model, the effects of a selective C5aR antagonist, PMX53, on nociceptive behaviors were measured after incision in vivo. mRNA levels of C5 and C5aR in skin, dorsal root ganglia (DRG and spinal cord, and C5a protein levels in the skin were quantified after incision. The responses of nociceptors to C5a were also evaluated using the in vitro skin-nerve preparation. Results Local administration of PMX53 suppressed heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia induced by C5a injection or after hind paw incision in vivo. mRNA levels of C5 and C5aR in the skin, but not DRG and spinal cord, were dramatically increased after incision. C5a protein in the skin was also increased after incision. In vitro C5a did not increase the prevalence of fibers with ongoing activity in afferents from incised versus control, unincised skin. C5a sensitized C-fiber afferent responses to heat; however, this was less evident in afferents adjacent to the incision. PMX53 blocked sensitization of C-fiber afferents to heat by C5a but did not by itself influence ongoing activity or heat sensitivity in afferents innervating control or incised skin. The magnitude of mechanical responses was also not affected by C5a in any nociceptive fibers innervating incised or unincised skin. Conclusions This study demonstrates that high locally generated C5a levels are present in

  3. Negative Regulation of Pulmonary Th17 Responses by C3a Anaphylatoxin during Allergic Inflammation in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyong Lim; Young Uk Kim; Drouin, Scott M.; Stacey Mueller-Ortiz; Kyoungah Yun; Eva Morschl; Wetsel, Rick A.; Yeonseok Chung

    2012-01-01

    Activation of complement is one of the earliest immune responses to exogenous threats, resulting in various cleavage products including anaphylatoxin C3a. In addition to its contribution to host defense, C3a has been shown to mediate Th2 responses in animal models of asthma. However, the role of C3a on pulmonary Th17 responses during allergic inflammation remains unclear. Here, we show that mice deficient in C3a receptor (C3aR) exhibited (i) higher percentages of endogenous IL-17-producing CD...

  4. The synthesis and expression of a gene for the complement factor C5a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gene coding for the 74 amino acid human complement factor C5a has been chemically synthesized, cloned and expressed in E. coli. The 253 base-pair fragment was constructed from 16 oligodeoxyribonucleotides using the phosphoramidite chemistry. It was assembled in two steps: the assembly of three sub-fragments from the oligonucleotides and the final assembly from the three subfragments. The gene was cloned into a pBR322 derived plasmid containing the lac UV5-D up-promoter mutation. Expression was quanitified by immunoassay and by measuring competition for binding of human 125labelled C5a to the receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The C5a now being obtained possesses a 40-fold higher specific activity (C5atotal protein) than C5a from complement-activated human serum. This should avoid the problem of contamination of intact C5a with the des-Arg form of the molecule found in serum

  5. Netrin-1 Reduces Monocyte and Macrophage Chemotaxis towards the Complement Component C5a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lewis; Brodermann, Maximillian Hugo; McCaffary, David; Iqbal, Asif Jilani; Greaves, David R

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1, acting at its cognate receptor UNC5b, has been previously demonstrated to inhibit CC chemokine-induced immune cell migration. In line with this, we found that netrin-1 was able to inhibit CCL2-induced migration of bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs). However, whether netrin-1 is capable of inhibiting chemotaxis to a broader range of chemoattractants remains largely unexplored. As our initial experiments demonstrated that RAW264.7 and BMDMs expressed high levels of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1) on their surface, we aimed to determine the effect of netrin-1 exposure on monocyte/macrophage cell migration induced by C5a, a complement peptide that plays a major role in multiple inflammatory pathologies. Treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages, BMDMs and human monocytes with netrin-1 inhibited their chemotaxis towards C5a, as measured using two different real-time methods. This inhibitory effect was found to be dependent on netrin-1 receptor signalling, as an UNC5b blocking antibody was able to reverse netrin-1 inhibition of C5a induced BMDM migration. Treatment of BMDMs with netrin-1 had no effect on C5aR1 proximal signalling events, as surface C5aR1 expression, internalisation and intracellular Ca2+ release following C5aR1 ligation remained unaffected after netrin-1 exposure. We next examined receptor distal events that occur following C5aR1 activation, but found that netrin-1 was unable to inhibit C5a induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p38, pathways important for cellular migration. Furthermore, netrin-1 treatment had no effect on BMDM cytoskeletal rearrangement following C5a stimulation as determined by microscopy and real-time electrical impedance sensing. Taken together these data highlight that netrin-1 inhibits monocyte and macrophage cell migration, but that the mechanism behind this effect remains unresolved. Nevertheless, netrin-1 and its cognate receptors warrant further investigation as they may represent a potential avenue for the development of

  6. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Högberg Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2, may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2, a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist ramatroban, and compares the ability of ramatroban and TM30089 to inhibit asthma-like pathology. Methods Affinity for and antagonistic potency of TM30089 on many mouse receptors including thromboxane A2 receptor mTP, CRTH2 receptor, and selected anaphylatoxin and chemokines receptors were determined in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. Results TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other receptors including the related anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors, selected chemokine receptors and the cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 which are all recognized players in allergic diseases. Furthermore, TM30089 and ramatroban, the latter used as a reference herein, similarly inhibited asthma pathology in vivo by reducing peribronchial eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia. Conclusion This is the first report to demonstrate anti-allergic efficacy in vivo of a highly selective small molecule CRTH2 antagonist. Our data suggest that CRTH2 antagonism alone is effective in mouse allergic airway inflammation even to the extent that this mechanism can explain the efficacy of ramatroban.

  7. C5a enhances dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenic responses to malaria in vitro: potential implications for placental malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Conroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Placental malaria (PM is a leading cause of maternal and infant mortality. Although the accumulation of parasitized erythrocytes (PEs and monocytes within the placenta is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of PM, the molecular mechanisms underlying PM remain unclear. Based on the hypothesis that excessive complement activation may contribute to PM, in particular generation of the potent inflammatory peptide C5a, we investigated the role of C5a in the pathogenesis of PM in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using primary human monocytes, the interaction between C5a and malaria in vitro was assessed. CSA- and CD36-binding PEs induced activation of C5 in the presence of human serum. Plasmodium falciparum GPI (pfGPI enhanced C5a receptor expression (CD88 on monocytes, and the co-incubation of monocytes with C5a and pfGPI resulted in the synergistic induction of cytokines (IL-6, TNF, IL-1beta, and IL-10, chemokines (IL-8, MCP-1, MIP1alpha, MIP1beta and the anti-angiogenic factor sFlt-1 in a time and dose-dependent manner. This dysregulated response was abrogated by C5a receptor blockade. To assess the potential role of C5a in PM, C5a plasma levels were measured in malaria-exposed primigravid women in western Kenya. Compared to pregnant women without malaria, C5a levels were significantly elevated in women with PM. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that C5a may contribute to the pathogenesis of PM by inducing dysregulated inflammatory and angiogenic responses that impair placental function.

  8. Human Serum Induces Streptococcal C5a Peptidase Expression ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gleich-Theurer, Ute; Aymanns, Simone; Haas, Gregor; Mauerer, Stefanie; Vogt, Julia; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major pathogen in humans and animals. Virulence factors are often associated with mobile genetic elements, and their expression can be modulated by host factors. S. agalactiae harbors the genes for C5a peptidase (scpB) and Lmb on a composite transposon structure which is absent in many bovine isolates. To investigate whether these genes participate in the adaptation to human hosts, we determined the influence of human and bovine serum on the promoter activity of ...

  9. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27041467

  10. Loxoprofen sodium induces the production of complement C5a in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Kodani, Yoshiko; Hashiguchi, Akihiko; Haida, Michiko; Nakamura, Masataka

    2016-04-01

    Basophil activation test (BAT) is an in vitro allergy test that is useful to identify allergens that cause IgE-dependent allergies. The test has been used to detect not only food allergies and allergies caused by environmental factors but also to detect drug hypersensitivity, which has been known to include IgE-independent reactions. In our preliminary studies in which BAT was applied to detect hypersensitivity of loxoprofen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), conventional BAT with incubation for 30min did not show basophil activation by means of increased CD203c expression. In this study, we extended the incubation time to 24h on the basis of the hypothesis that loxoprofen indirectly activates basophils. Basophils from healthy control donors as well as allergic patients showed up-regulation of CD203c after incubation with loxoprofen for 24h. Activation was induced using loxoprofen-treated serum. Proteomic and pharmacologic analyses revealed that serum incubation with loxoprofen generated an active complement component C5a, which induced CD203c expression via binding to the C5a receptor on basophils. Because C3a production was also detected after incubation for 24h, loxoprofen is likely to stimulate the complement classical pathway. Our findings suggest that the complement activation is involved in drug hypersensitivity and the suppression of this activation may contribute to the elimination of false positive of BAT for drug allergies. PMID:26854577

  11. Properdin-Mediated C5a Production Enhances Stable Binding of Platelets to Granulocytes in Human Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Adam Z; Saggu, Gurpanna; Kulkarni, Koustubh V; Cortes, Claudio; Thurman, Joshua M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Ferreira, Viviana P

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced levels of platelet/granulocyte aggregates (PGAs) are found in patients suffering from many different inflammatory vascular diseases, and their formation in animal models of vascular disease is associated with increased thromboinflammation and worsened outcomes. The complement system, a part of the innate immune system, influences PGA formation, but the mechanisms for its effects are unknown. In this study, we have defined complement-mediated mechanisms that enhance PGA formation in human whole blood stimulated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP) using ex vivo flow cytometry assays. We demonstrate that physiological properdin, a positive regulator of complement alternative pathway activity, increases PGA formation when added to TRAP-stimulated blood. All physiological properdin forms increase PGA formation, but properdin tetramers are the most efficient at increasing complement activity and PGA formation. Inhibition of endogenous properdin, either circulating in the blood or produced locally by leukocytes, impairs TRAP-mediated PGA formation to the same level as specific inhibition of either the alternative or classical pathway. Additionally, blocking the interaction of C5a with its cellular receptor prevents properdin-mediated increases in PGA formation. Adding either properdin tetramers or C5a to whole blood increases CD11b expression on granulocytes, and this increase is prevented by blockade of the C5a-C5a receptor axis. Finally, we demonstrate that the effects of properdin on PGA formation are tightly regulated by Factor H. Cumulatively, our data indicate that properdin enhances PGA formation via increased production of C5a, and that inhibition of properdin function has therapeutic potential to limit thromboinflammation in diseases characterized by increased PGA formation. PMID:27183616

  12. Negative regulation of pulmonary Th17 responses by C3a anaphylatoxin during allergic inflammation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyong Lim

    Full Text Available Activation of complement is one of the earliest immune responses to exogenous threats, resulting in various cleavage products including anaphylatoxin C3a. In addition to its contribution to host defense, C3a has been shown to mediate Th2 responses in animal models of asthma. However, the role of C3a on pulmonary Th17 responses during allergic inflammation remains unclear. Here, we show that mice deficient in C3a receptor (C3aR exhibited (i higher percentages of endogenous IL-17-producing CD4(+ T cells in the lungs, (ii higher amounts of IL-17 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and (iii more neutrophils in the lungs than wild-type mice when challenged with intranasal allergens. Moreover, adoptive transfer experiments showed that the frequencies of antigen-specific IL-17-producing CD4(+ T cells were significantly higher in the lungs and bronchial lymph nodes of C3aR-deficient recipients than those of wild-types recipients. Bone-marrow reconstitution study indicated that C3aR-deficiency on hematopoietic cells was required for the increased Th17 responses. Furthermore, C3aR-deficient mice exhibited increased percentages of Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells; however, depletion of these cells minimally affected the induction of antigen-specific Th17 cell population in the lungs. Neutralization of IL-17 significantly reduced the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of C3aR-deficient mice. Our findings demonstrate that C3a signals negatively regulate antigen-specific Th17 responses during allergic lung inflammation and the size of Foxp3(+ regulatory T cell population in the periphery.

  13. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  14. Methylation of the phosphate oxygen moiety of phospholipid-methoxy(polyethylene glycol) conjugate prevents PEGylated liposome-mediated complement activation and anaphylatoxin production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S.M.; Hamad, I.; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2006-01-01

    anaphylatoxin production through complement activation. Despite the general view that vesicle surface camouflaging with mPEG should dramatically suppress complement activation, here we show that bilayer enrichment of noncomplement activating liposomes [di-palmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles] with...

  15. The Group B Streptococcal C5a Peptidase Is Both a Specific Protease and an Invasin

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Qi; Stafslien, Deborah; Purushothaman, Sai Sudha; Cleary, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    The group B streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis in neonates and a serious cause of mortality or morbidity in immunocompromised adults. Although these streptococci adhere efficiently and invade a variety of tissue-specific epithelial and endothelial cells, adhesins and invasins are still unknown. All serotypes of GBS studied to date express C5a peptidase (SCPB) on their surface. This investigation addresses the possibility that this relatively large surfac...

  16. CYP4F18-Deficient Neutrophils Exhibit Increased Chemotaxis to Complement Component C5a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Vaivoda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CYP4Fs were first identified as enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4. CYP4F18 has an unusual expression in neutrophils and was predicted to play a role in regulating LTB4-dependent inflammation. We compared chemotaxis of wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout neutrophils using an in vitro assay. There was no significant difference in the chemotactic response to LTB4, but the response to complement component C5a increased 1.9–2.25-fold in knockout cells compared to wild-type (P < 0.01. This increase was still observed when neutrophils were treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis. There were no changes in expression of other CYP4 enzymes in knockout neutrophils that might compensate for loss of CYP4F18 or lead to differences in activity. A mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate colitis was used to investigate the consequences of increased C5a-dependent chemotaxis in vivo, but there was no significant difference in weight loss, disease activity, or colonic tissue myeloperoxidase between wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout mice. This study demonstrates the limitations of inferring CYP4F function based on an ability to use LTB4 as a substrate, points to expanding roles for CYP4F enzymes in immune regulation, and underscores the in vivo challenges of CYP knockout studies.

  17. Methylation of the phosphate oxygen moiety of phospholipid-methoxy(polyethylene glycol) conjugate prevents PEGylated liposome-mediated complement activation and anaphylatoxin production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S.M.; Hamad, I.; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jørgensen, Kent; Szebeni, J.

    2006-01-01

    Methoxy(polyethylene glycol), mPEG, -grafted liposomes are known to exhibit prolonged circulation time in the blood, but their infusion into a substantial percentage of human subjects triggers immediate non-IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. These reactions are strongly believed to arise from...... anaphylatoxin production through complement activation. Despite the general view that vesicle surface camouflaging with mPEG should dramatically suppress complement activation, here we show that bilayer enrichment of noncomplement activating liposomes [di-palmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles] with...... in activation of both classical and alternative pathways of complement and anaphylatoxin production (reflected in significant rises in SC5b-9, C4d, and C3a-desarg levels in normal human sera as well as SC5b-9 in EGTA-chelated/Mg2+ supplemented serum), since methylation of the phosphate oxygen of...

  18. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.;

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed-typ...... arthritic disease development in a DTHA model strengthening the rationale of C5aR-blockade as a treatment strategy for RA, especially during the early stages of arthritis flare.......-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised...... and rapid disease onset driven by T-cells, immune complexes and neutrophils. We show that a reduction in paw swelling, bone erosion, cartilage destruction, synovitis and new bone formation is apparent as little as 60 h after administration of a single dose of a blocking, non-depleting anti-mouse C5a...

  19. C5a regulates IL-12+ DC migration to induce pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells in sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It is well known that complement system C5a is excessively activated during the onset of sepsis. However, it is unclear whether C5a can regulate dentritic cells (DCs to stimulate adaptive immune cells such as Th1 and Th17 in sepsis. METHODS: Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. CLP-induced sepsis was treated with anti-C5a or IL-12. IL-12(+DC, IFNγ(+Th1, and IL-17(+Th17 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. IL-12 was measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Our studies here showed that C5a induced IL-12(+DC cell migration from the peritoneal cavity to peripheral blood and lymph nodes. Furthermore, IL-12(+DC cells induced the expansion of pathogenic IFNγ(+Th1 and IL-17(+Th17 cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. Moreover, IL-12, secreted by DC cells in the peritoneal cavity, is an important factor that prevents the development of sepsis. CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that C5a regulates IL-12(+DC cell migration to induce pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells in sepsis.

  20. Compromised neutrophil function and severe bovine E.coli mastitis: is C5a the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Around the periparturient period and during early lactation dairy cows have an elevated risk for clinical mastitis. The severity of Gram-negative infections during these periods has been correlated with reduced neutrophil functions. In this review we focus on the potential role of C5a in the develop...

  1. Design of Formaldehyde detector based on STC12C5A32S2%基于STC12C5A32S2的甲醛检测仪设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德新; 贺小凤

    2011-01-01

    A formaldehyde detector is designed with STC12C5A32S2 control chip and Switzerland Membrapor sensor. The hardware architecture and the software design process of formaldehyde detectors are described. An environmental test is carried out using the formaldehyde detector designed. Comparison is made to compare the formaldehyde detector designed and other formaldehyde detectors from home and abroad. Results show that the formaldehyde detector designed has reliable quality and competitive price.%提出一种以STC12C5A32S2为控制芯片,瑞士Membmpor为传感器的甲醛监测仪。介绍了甲醛检测仪的硬件架构,给出了软件设计流程。用设计的监测仪进行了环境测试,并和国内外其它甲醛检测仪进行了对比,结果表明,设计的监测仪合理可靠,性价比高。

  2. 基于STC12C5A60S2的电子相框设计%Design of digital photo frame based on STC12C5A60S2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪天龙; 路林

    2011-01-01

    Based on the new 8-bit high speed microcontroller STC12C5A60S2, comprehensive using the SMALL RTOS51 embedded real-time operating system,znFAT embedded file system and WAV format decoding technology, a digital photo frame was designed. The photo frame has the advantages of small size, simple interface,easy implementation and low price,etc. ,and the music play flowing,good sound texture and smooth switch of picture.%基于新型的高速8位单片机STC12C5A60S2,综合运用SMALL RTOS51嵌入式实时操作系统、znFAT嵌入式文件系统和WAV格式解码技术,设计了一款电子相框.该电子相框具有体积小巧、接口简单、实现方便、价格低廉等优点,且音乐播放流畅、声音质感尚佳、图片切换平滑.

  3. Design of Intelligent Tracking Car Based on STC12C5A60S2%基于STC12C5A60S2的智能循迹小车设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈和娟

    2012-01-01

      The design adopts STC12C5A60S2 microcontrol er as the core device of simple smart car. The tracking module is composed of a plurality of photoelectric tube, by reflecting infrared changes in judgments of black have to achieve the tracking function, motor drive module selection of commonly used H bridge driver L293D with single-chip microcomputer to control the motor working. The electric circuit construction of whole system is simple, reliable performance. It can meet a variety of design requirements.%  本设计采用STC12C5A60S2单片机为简易智能小车的核心器件。循迹模块由3对红外收发管组成,通过反射红外线的变化判断黑线的有无以达到循迹的功能,电机驱动模块选用H桥驱动芯片L293D结合单片机来控制电机工作。整个系统的电路结构简单,可靠性能高,能满足设计的要求。

  4. A Novel C5a-neutralizing Mirror-image (l-)Aptamer Prevents Organ Failure and Improves Survival in Experimental Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Hoehlig, Kai; Maasch, Christian; Shushakova, Nelli; Buchner, Klaus; Huber-Lang, Markus; Purschke, Werner G.; Vater, Axel; Klussmann, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Complement factor C5a is a potent proinflammatory mediator that contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous inflammatory diseases. Here, we describe the discovery of NOX-D20, a PEGylated biostable mirror-image mixed (l-)RNA/DNA aptamer (Spiegelmer) that binds to mouse and human C5a with picomolar affinity. In vitro, NOX-D20 inhibited C5a-induced chemotaxis of a CD88-expressing cell line and efficiently antagonized the activation of primary human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) by C5a. Bind...

  5. 基于STC12C5A60S2自动太阳能跟踪器的设计%Design of automatic solar tracker based on STC12C5A60S2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张树人; 周景雷

    2015-01-01

    The principle to look for the direct sun by using photosensitive resistance is expounded in this article. An auto⁃matic solar tracker taking the STC12C5A60S2 as its core was designed. The sun’s irradiation status is measured by the four pho⁃tosensitive resistances embedded on four sides of the solar panel,sent to the single chip microcomputer(SCM)after amplifica⁃tion,and then analyzed and calculated in the SCM by software to get deviation direction and angle that the panel needs to be moved. At last,two servo motors are adopted to control panels’left⁃right and up⁃down migration,and improve the luminous effi⁃ciency.%在此阐述了利用光敏电阻寻找直射太阳的原理,以STC12C5A60S2为控制核心,设计了一种自动太阳能跟踪器。太阳照射情况通过太阳能电池板4边上的4个光敏电阻测得,经过放大后输送到单片机,在单片机内由软件进行分析计算,得出电池板需要偏移的方向和角度,最后通过2个伺服电机对电池板左右和上下偏移进行控制,从而提高了转化效率。

  6. Gene : CBRC-HSAP-19-0100 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iens] dbj|BAA95414.1| G protein-coupled receptor C5L2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAP23197.1| C5A anap...23872 /ug=Hs.534412 /len=1287 0.0 100% C5a-des-Arg anaphylatoxin Gi/o,Gq/11 MGNDSVSYEYGDYSDLSDRPVDCLDGACLAIDPLRVAP...CBRC-HSAP-19-0100 19 A Chemokines and chemotactic factors receptors C5ARL_HUMAN 0.0... 100% ref|NP_060955.1| G protein-coupled receptor 77 [Homo sapiens] sp|Q9P296|C5ARL_HUMAN C5a anaphylatoxin ...chemotactic receptor C5L2 (G-protein coupled receptor 77) gb|AAK12640.1|AF317655_1 G protein-coupled receptor [Homo sap

  7. Chemotaxins C5a and fMLP induce release of calprotectin (leucocyte L1 protein) from polymorphonuclear cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Hetland, G.; Talgö, G J; Fagerhol, M K

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether the chemotaxins C5a and formyl peptide (fMLP) can stimulate the release of calprotectin, the major leucocyte protein of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). METHODS: A dose response curve for the uptake of 125I labelled rC5a and fMLP in PMN was determined by radioimmunoassay. The unlabelled chemotaxins were then incubated with PMN and the concentration of calprotectin in PMN lysates and supernatants was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Both rC5a and fMLP ...

  8. Immune receptors and adhesion molecules in human pulmonary leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carlo Bernardi, Fabiola; Ctenas, Bruno; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Mauad, Thais

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary involvement in leptospirosis has been increasingly reported in the last 20 years, being related to the severity and mortality of the disease. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis is not understood. Lung endothelial cells have been proposed as targets in the pathogenesis of lung involvement in leptospirosis through the activation of Toll-like receptor 2 or the complement system, which stimulates the release of cytokines that lead to the activation of adhesion molecules. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of immune pathways and of the intercellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule and vascular cell adhesion molecule, respectively) in the lungs of patients with pulmonary involvement of leptospirosis. We studied the lungs of 18 patients who died of leptospirosis and compared them with 2 groups of controls: normal and noninfectious hemorrhagic lungs. Using immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we quantified the expression of the C3a anaphylatoxin receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, and Toll-like receptor 2 in small pulmonary vessels and in the alveolar septa. There was an increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (P < .03) and C3a anaphylatoxin receptor (P < .008) in alveolar septa in the leptospirosis group compared with the normal and hemorrhagic controls. In the vessels of the leptospirosis group, there was an increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (P = .004), vascular cell adhesion molecule (P = .030), and Toll-like receptor 2 (P = .042) compared with the normal group. Vascular cell adhesion molecule expression in vessels was higher in the leptospirosis group compared with the hemorrhagic group (P = .015). Our results indicate that immune receptors and adhesion molecules participate in the phenomena leading to pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis. PMID:22436623

  9. Complement component C5a Promotes Expression of IL-22 and IL-17 from Human T cells and its Implication in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Michael L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in elderly populations worldwide. Inflammation, among many factors, has been suggested to play an important role in AMD pathogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between AMD and complement factor H (CFH, the down-regulatory factor of complement activation. Elevated levels of complement activating molecules including complement component 5a (C5a have been found in the serum of AMD patients. Our aim is to study whether C5a can impact human T cells and its implication in AMD. Methods Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from the blood of exudative form of AMD patients using a Ficoll gradient centrifugation protocol. Intracellular staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure protein expression. Apoptotic cells were detected by staining of cells with the annexin-V and TUNEL technology and analyzed by a FACS Caliber flow cytometer. SNP genotyping was analyzed by TaqMan genotyping assay using the Real-time PCR system 7500. Results We show that C5a promotes interleukin (IL-22 and IL-17 expression by human CD4+ T cells. This effect is dependent on B7, IL-1β and IL-6 expression from monocytes. We have also found that C5a could protect human CD4+ cells from undergoing apoptosis. Importantly, consistent with a role of C5a in promoting IL-22 and IL-17 expression, significant elevation in IL-22 and IL-17 levels was found in AMD patients as compared to non-AMD controls. Conclusions Our results support the notion that C5a may be one of the factors contributing to the elevated serum IL-22 and IL-17 levels in AMD patients. The possible involvement of IL-22 and IL-17 in the inflammation that contributes to AMD may herald a new approach to treat AMD.

  10. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  11. Levels of complement components C3a and C5a in renal injury among trichloroethylene-sensitized BALB/c mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查晚生

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the levels of complement components C3a and C5a in the kidneys of trichloroethylene(TCE)-sensitized BALB/c mice,and to investigate the role of complement components in TCE-induced renal injury among BALB/c mice.Methods Sixty-two female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into blank control group,vehicle control group,and TCE sensitization

  12. Combined Yeast β-Glucan and Antitumor Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Requires C5a-Mediated Neutrophil Chemotaxis via Regulation of Decay-Accelerating Factor CD55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Allendorf, Daniel J.; Hansen, Richard; Marroquin, Jose; Cramer, Daniel E.; Harris, Claire L.; Yan, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Administration of a combination of yeast-derived β-glucan with antitumor monoclonal antibodies (mAb) has significant therapeutic efficacy in a variety of syngeneic murine tumor models. We have now tested this strategy using human carcinomas implanted in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficient mice. Combined immunotherapy was therapeutically effective in vivo against NCI-H23 human non–small-cell lung carcinomas, but this modality was surprisingly ineffective against SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinomas. Whereas NCI-H23 tumors responded to this combination therapy with increased intratumoral neutrophil infiltration and C5a production, these responses were lacking in treated SKOV-3 tumors. Further results suggested that SKOV-3 tumors were protected by up-regulation of the membrane complement regulatory protein CD55 (decay-accelerating factor). Blockade of CD55 in vitro led to enhanced deposition of C activation product C3b and increased cytotoxicity mediated by β-glucan–primed neutrophils. In vivo, administration of anti-CD55 mAb along with β-glucan and anti–Her-2/neu mAb caused tumor regression and greatly improved long-term survival in animals bearing the previously resistant SKOV-3 tumors. This was accompanied by increased intratumoral neutrophil accumulation and C5a production. We conclude that CD55 suppresses tumor killing by antitumor mAb plus β-glucan therapy (and, perhaps, in other circumstances). These results suggest a critical role for CD55 to regulate iC3b and C5a release and in turn to influence the recruitment of β-glucan–primed neutrophils eliciting killing activity. PMID:17671212

  13. Cessation of neutrophil influx in C5a-induced acute experimental arthritis is associated with loss of chemoattractant activity from the joint space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutrophil emigration is a critical component of the inflammatory process and is generally thought to play a role in host defense as well as in the tissue injury that often accompanies inflammation. Most inflammatory reactions exhibit a sequence of emigrating cell types, thus clearly demonstrating that the neutrophil influx eventually ceases and that the neutrophils are then removed from the lesion. It has been our premise that in order to understand the processes that lead to the progressive inflammatory reactions that underly so many disease processes, it is important to determine the mechanism by which the ''normal'' inflammatory response resolves. The purpose of this study was to identify the time of cessation of neutrophil influx in experimental arthritis induced by the injection of C5 fragments (C5f) and to investigate mechanisms underlying the cessation process. The migration of i.v. delivery pulses to inflamed joints was assessed by lavage of the joint space and by external scintigraphy. We found no evidence for the development of inhibitory systems against chemotactic factors or ''desensitization'' of the inflamed site, because a second injection of C5f into joints which had been injected previously with C5f resulted in enhancement rather than inhibition of migration. Neither was evidence found for altered tissue barriers to migration or for desensitization of neutrophils as possible explanations for cessation of influx. The major mechanism appeared to be a loss of chemoattractant activity in the joint space between 2 h and 6 h after C5f injection which was detected by transfer into a fresh joint. Radiolabeled C5a des-Arg had a t1/2 of disappearance from the joint of less than 1 h, which suggested that the transferred chemoattractant must, in part, have been due to the generation of new chemotaxins by C5f injection

  14. Design of Ultrasonic Detection System of Engineering Truck Loading Capacity Based on STC12C5A60S2 Microcontroller%基于超声波的STC12C5A60S2单片机的工程车装载量检测系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冼子翔; 华斌

    2013-01-01

    Based on an effective non-contact ultrasonic distance measurement principle, uses STC12-C5A60S2 microcontroller controls ultrasonic module to launch ultrasonic beams, can not only get real-time detection of changes in truck loading, but also exclude the case of artificial shel-ter to make intelligent judgments on no-load and full load. The system uses ultrasonic modules to work in turn, the mode which ensures the system stability and reliability.%基于超声波有效的非接触式的测距原理,STC12C5A60S2单片机通过控制超声波模块发射超声波波束去实时检测工程车装载量的变化,并且能排除人为遮挡的情况下对工程车空载或者满载做出智能判断。该系统采用超声模块轮循的工作方式保证系统的稳定性和可靠性。

  15. Structural insight into the recognition of complement C3 activation products by integrin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    associated with microbes and apoptotic or necrotic cells. Complement not only protects against pathogens but also maintains body homeostasis. Activation of complement leads to cleavage of the complement proteins C4, C3 and C5, and their fragments have effector functions through binding to pathogen surfaces...... small fragment C3a called anaphylatoxin. Complement leads to opsonization as the proteolytic fragment C3b becomes covalently linked to the activator surface through a reactive thioester. Self-surfaces are protected by complement regulators, whereas complement activation vividly amplifies on pathogens....... An important outcome of the regulators is the degradation of C3b to iC3b. Phagocytic receptor αMβ2 integrin (also called CR3, CD11b/CD18, or Mac-1) on leukocytes engages the opsonized activator subsequently to C3b cleavage into iC3b. Apoptotic cells activate complement leading to iC3b deposition and...

  16. Design of music player based on MCU STC12C5A60S2%一种基于51单片机的音乐播放器的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何谐; 唐大权; 张淑廷; 陈雪

    2014-01-01

    The hardware design method of the music player based on MCU STC12C5A60S2 is introduced in this paper. The program design of the music player based on principle of FAT32 file system is studied. In the music player, MCU STC12C5A60S2 is taken as a main controller,SD card as a memory medium of music files and VS1003 chip as a decoder unit. When the player is running,MCU STC12C5A60S2 reads the music file from the SD card and continuously transfers data flow to VS1003 for decoding. In the meantime,the OLED liquid crystal display shows the message of the music in real time. The tested results from experiments show the music player can play the music files in multiple formats fluently if the player is connected with ear phone.%主要介绍一种基于51单片机的音乐播放器的硬件设计方法,并研究在FAT32文件系统下音乐播放器的程序设计。该音乐播放器采用STC12C5A60S2单片机为主控制器,SD卡作为音乐文件的存储介质,VS1003芯片作为解码器。STC12C5A60S2单片机从 SD卡中读取音乐文件,并不断将数据流传送至VS1003解码,最后连接耳机播放,同时STC12C5A60S2连接OLED液晶显示屏实时显示音乐播放信息。实验表明,该音乐播放器连接耳机能流畅播放多种格式的音乐文件。

  17. Complement C3: an emerging risk factor in cardiometabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hertle, E.; van Greevenbroek, M.M.J.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2012-01-01

    C3 is the central component of the complement system and activation of C3 via any of the three major activation pathways—the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathways—results in initiation of the terminal complement pathway and release of the anaphylatoxin C3a. Both terminal pathway activation and signalling of C3a and its inactivation product C3a-desarg via the C3a receptor and C5a-like receptor 2, respectively, can induce inflammatory, immunomodulatory and metabolic responses. C3 h...

  18. Role of C5 Activation Products in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ward

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement activation products are known to be generated in the setting of both experimental and human sepsis. C5 activation products (C5a anaphylatoxin and the membrane attack complex [MAC] C5b-9 are generated during sepsis following infusion of endotoxin, or after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, which produces polymicrobial sepsis. C5a reacts with its receptors C5aR and C5L2 in a manner that creates the “cytokine storm”, and is associated with development of multiorgan failure (MOF. A number of other complications arising from the interaction of C5a with its receptors include apoptosis of lymphoid cells, loss of innate immune functions of neutrophils (PMNs, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, cardiomyopathy, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and complications associated with MOF. Neutralization of C5a in vivo or absence/blockade of C5a receptors greatly reduces the adverse events in the setting of sepsis, markedly attenuates MOF, and greatly improves survival. Regarding the possible role of C5b-9 in sepsis, the literature is conflicting. Some studies suggest that C5b-9 is protective, while other studies suggest the contrary. Clearly, in human sepsis, C5a and its receptors may be logical targets for interception.

  19. AcEST: DK946423 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU02A01NGRL0012_J06 194 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU02A01NGRL0012_J06. 5' end...finition sp|O70129|C5AR_CAVPO C5a anaphylatoxin chemotactic receptor OS=Cavia porcellus Align length 39 Scor...ro A. Schaffer, Jinghui Zhang, Zheng Zhang, Webb Miller, and David J. Lipman...ence: Altschul, Stephen F., Thomas L. Madden, Alejandro A. Schaffer, Jinghui Zhang, Zheng Zhang, Webb Miller, and David J. Lipman... sequence. DK946423 - Show DK946423 Clone id YMU02A01NGRL0012_J06 Library YMU02 Length 194 Definition Adian

  20. Tsh receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Frauman, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The TSH receptor is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor(GPCR)family. It is one of the glycoprotein hormone receptors, which also includes the FSH and LH/CG receptors. The TSH receptor mediates the action of the pituitary-derived glycoprotein, TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone, thyrotropin or thyrotrophin). TSH binds to the TSH receptor which is located on thyroid follicular cells (but is also expressed in extrathyroidal sites). Glycosylation of the TSH receptor occurs, as does cleavage ...

  1. Modulation of Neutrophil Chemokine Receptors by Staphylococcus aureus Supernate

    OpenAIRE

    Veldkamp, K. E.; Heezius, H. C. J. M.; Verhoef, J; Strijp, J.A.G. van; van Kessel, K. P. M.

    2000-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that Staphylococcus aureus supernate (SaS) is a potent agonist for both neutrophils and mononuclear cells. To further investigate the immunomodulating effects of SaS, the effect on different neutrophil receptors was studied. Expression of various neutrophil receptors, before and after treatment with SaS, was quantified by flow cytometry. We found that SaS treatment of neutrophils resulted in a specific and total downregulation of the C5a and the fMLP receptor, b...

  2. Microbial Hijacking of Complement–Toll-like Receptor Crosstalk*

    OpenAIRE

    WANG Min; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Domon, Hisanori; Hosur, Kavita B.; Liang, Shuang; Magotti, Paola; Triantafilou, Martha; Triantafilou, Kathy; Lambris, John D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that complement and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) crosstalk to coordinate innate immunity. We report a novel immune subversion mechanism involving microbial exploitation of the ability of complement and TLRs for communication. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major oral and systemic pathogen expressing complement C5 convertase-like activity, was shown to synergize with C5a for cAMP elevation resulting in macrophage immunosuppression and enhanced pathogen survival in vitro and...

  3. Roles for NHERF1 and NHERF2 on the regulation of C3a receptor signaling in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariharan Subramanian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anaphylatoxin C3a binds to the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR, C3aR and activates divergent signaling pathways to induce degranulation and cytokine production in human mast cells. Adapter proteins such as the Na(+/H(+ exchange regulatory factor (NHERF1 and NHERF2 have been implicated in regulating functions of certain GPCRs by binding to the class I PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/Zo1 motifs present on their cytoplasmic tails. Although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, the possibility that it interacts with NHERF proteins to modulate signaling in human mast cells has not been determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting, we found that NHERF1 and NHERF2 are expressed in human mast cell lines (HMC-1, LAD2 and CD34(+-derived primary human mast cells. Surprisingly, however, C3aR did not associate with these adapter proteins. To assess the roles of NHERFs on signaling downstream of C3aR, we used lentiviral shRNA to stably knockdown the expression of these proteins in human mast cells. Silencing the expression of NHERF1 and NHERF2 had no effect on C3aR desensitization, agonist-induced receptor internalization, ERK/Akt phosphorylation or chemotaxis. However, loss of NHERF1 and NHERF2 resulted in significant inhibition of C3a-induced mast cell degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, it does not associate with NHERF1 and NHERF2. Surprisingly, these proteins provide stimulatory signals for C3a-induced degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine generation in human mast cells. These findings reveal a new level of complexity for the functional regulation of C3aR by NHERFs in human mast cells.

  4. Lipoxin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Romano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxins (LXs represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL. In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1. This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed.

  5. Glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P;

    2006-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS relies almost entirely on the neurotransmitter glutamate and its family of ion channel receptors. An appreciation of the coupling between agonist binding and channel opening has advanced rapidly during the past five years, largely as a result of ne...

  6. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette;

    2003-01-01

    In 1972, Brazeau et al. isolated somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting factor, SRIF), a cyclic polypeptide with two biologically active isoforms (SRIF-14 and SRIF-28). This event prompted the successful quest for SRIF receptors. Then, nearly a quarter of a century later, it was announced...

  7. C3a、C5a、TXA2、LT表达在婴幼儿体外循环肺损伤中作用及改良超滤效果%Expression of C3a, C5a, TXA2, LT in pulmonary injury of infant open heart surgery improved with the modified ultrafiltration technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宏生; 杨宁; 褚衍林; 马黎明; 费忠化; 仇杰; 董海新

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨婴幼儿体外循环(CPB)术后肺损害机制及改良超滤肺功能保护效果.方法 收集本院先天性心脏病患儿施行手术40例,根据患儿家长意愿是否采用改良超滤分为无改良超滤组(20例)和改良超滤组(20例),患儿家长均签署知情同意书.分别收集转流前及转流后不同时点所测定气道峰压、呼吸停顿压、潮气量、呼吸频率、吸入氧浓度和吸气比例,及所测量动脉血中C3a、C5a及血栓素(TXA2)、白三烯(LT)的浓度.结果 两组患儿CPB后肺静态顺应性(Cstat)、氧合指数(OI)较术前降低,肺泡-动脉氧分压(AaDO2)增加(P<0.05);在T3、T4、T5时间改良超滤组的Cstat、OI高于无改良超滤组,AaDO2低于无改良超滤组(P<0.05).C3a、C5a术后浓度立即降低,但两组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);无改良超滤组TXA2、LT浓度术后升高;在T2、T3、T4、T5时点改良超滤组的TXA2、LT低于无改良超滤组(P<0.05).结论 术后肺功能损害可能与CPB术后补体激活及再灌注损伤(L/R)致肺毛细血管内皮损伤有关.血浆补体浓度减低可作为观察炎性反应及组织损害早期指标.改良超滤可通过迅速滤出水份,提高胶体渗透压及降低TXA2、LT浓度达到良好肺保护效果.%Objective To study the mechanism of pulmonary injury and protective effect of modified ultrafiltration on lung function in infant open heart surgery.Methods According to the wishes of parents,40 cases of congenital heart disease were divided into without modified ultrafiltration control group (C) and modified ultrafiltration group (M),and parents signed informed consent.The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was used without ultrafiltration in Group C,while with modified ultrafiltration in group M.The pneumodynamic parameters and C3a,C5a,TXA2,LT were measured at specific time points.Results The static pulmonary compliance (Cstat) and oxygen index (OI) were lower,and alveolar-arteria oxygen difference

  8. C5a反义肽对脓毒症凝血异常及其急性肺损伤发病的影响%Effects of C5a anti-sense peptide on sepsis-induced abnormal coagulation and acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭振辉; 姜巧; 陈蕊; 孙杰; 俞宙; 肖飞; 熊日成; 吕凤林

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察C5a反义肽对脓毒症凝血异常及ALI发病的影响。方法 盲肠结扎穿孔复制小鼠脓毒症ALI模型,随机(随机数字法)分为健康组、假手术组、造模组和C5a反义肽干预组,分别在2,4,8,12 h时点观察肺组织损伤的病理改变和凝血指标;并采用ELISA检测血浆TF质量浓度的变化。结果 盲肠结扎穿孔后,2h后出现肺组织炎症细胞浸润、蛋白渗出和毛细血管内弥漫血栓形成,并进行性加重;而反义肽干预后的不同时间点上述病理改变均显著改善。造模组和C5a反义肽干预组,PT,TT,APTT进行性延长和DD进行性升高,而Fbg和PLT计数进行性降低,与健康组和假手术组比较P<0.05;而与造模组比较,反义肽干预后相应时间点的各指标明显改善(P<0.05)。TF质量浓度在健康组、假手术组分别为(42.75 ±1.25) pg/mL和(60.73±1.43) pg/mL;造模组2,4,6,12 h时点其浓度进行性升高,其中,12 h组最高为(139.81±6.17) pg/mL;而与造模组相比,反义肽组各相应时间点明显降低,12 h组为(121.41±7.21)pg/mL,各组比较有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 CSa反义肽能改善脓毒症的促凝亢进与ALI/ARDS的病理改变。%Objective To investigate the effects of C 5a anti-sense peptide on the pathogenesis of sepsis -induced abnormal coagulation and acute lung injury (ALI) in the early stage of sepsis. Methods The method of cecal ligature and puncture (CLP) was used to establish sepsis modeL Mice were randomly (random number) divided into control group, sham operation group, model group and C5a anti-sense peptide treatment group. In each group, pathological changes of the lung tissue and coagulation marker of mice were observed at intervals of 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 12 hours after CLP. Meanwhile, the blood levels of tissue factor (TF) were detected by using ELISA at various intervals. Results The microscopicexamination showed that inflammatory

  9. 罗非鱼无乳链球菌C5a肽酶的克隆及原核表达质粒构建%Cloning and construction of recombinant expression plasmid of C5 a peptidase of Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from tilapia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆勇; 可小丽; 卢迈新; 朱华平; 高风英

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae surface proteins can stimulate the host to produce protective immune. The protein C5a peptidase is widespread in a variety of serotypes of Streptococcus strains,highly conserved and has good immunogenicity. It is a possible carrier protein that could induce protective immune response by itself. However,the immune epitopes and the role of virulence groups of S. agalactiae scpB gene of fish is still unclear. In this study,the scpB gene was amplified from genome DNA of S. agalactiae isolated from tilapia by PCR with specific primers. Restriction analysis and DNA sequencing confirmed that the scpB gene has a ORF of 3 405 bp, encoding 1 134 amino acid,which was highly conserved and had a surprising degree of homology among strains i-solated from other mammals. Molecular analysis of scpB gene was performed by bioinformatics tools such as DNAstar,Clustal X 2. 0,MEGA 5. 05,ExPASy ProtParam,NCBI Protein blast,and NCBI Conserved Domain et al. The results showed that the amino acid encoded by the scpB gene contained 3 catalytic triad,7 putative active sites,2 specific hits,and 4 super families (2 Peptidases-S8-S53,1 DUF1034,and 1 FlgD-lg). Moreover,it was found that C5a peptidase had mutiple epitopes,suggesting that the protein may have strong immunogenicity. Then the PCR product was inserted into pET32a(+) and the constructed recombinant plasmid pET32a(+)/scpB was transformed to E. coli BL21(DE3) for expression. The positive colony,which were identified by PCR and diges-tion (EcoRⅠand XhoⅠ),showed that the recombinant plasmid pET32a (+)/scpB was constructed successfully. This study paved the way for further study of immune mechanism and polypeptide vaccine based on C5 a peptidase from the tilapia S. agalactiae.%为进一步了解无乳链球菌表面蛋白C5a肽酶scpB基因免疫表位及毒力作用基团的相关信息,通过提取罗非鱼无乳链球菌基因组DNA,利用特异性引物PCR扩增出scpB基因的全长开放阅读框( ORF)

  10. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty acids, and other small hydrophobic molecules). Their combined effects are vast, influencing virtually every fundamental biological process, from development and homeostasis, to proliferation and different...

  11. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans......Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of...

  12. Rat liver insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using insulin affinity chromatography, the authors have isolated highly purified insulin receptor from rat liver. When evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions, the rat liver receptor contained the M/sub r/ 125,000 α-subunit, the M/sub r/ 90,000 β-subunit, and varying proportions of the M/sub r/ 45,000 β'-subunit. The specific insulin binding of the purified receptor was 25-30 μg of 125I-insulin/mg of protein, and the receptor underwent insulin-dependent autophosphorylation. Rat liver and human placental receptors differ from each other in several functional aspects: (1) the adsorption-desorption behavior from four insulin affinity columns indicated that the rat liver receptor binds less firmly to immobilized ligands; (2) the 125I-insulin binding affinity of the rat liver receptor is lower than that of the placental receptor; (3) partial reduction of the rat liver receptor with dithiothreitol increases its insulin binding affinity whereas the binding affinity of the placental receptor is unchanged; (4) at optimal insulin concentration, rat liver receptor autophosphorylation is stimulated 25-50-fold whereas the placental receptor is stimulated only 4-6-fold. Conversion of the β-subunit to β' by proteolysis is a major problem that occurs during exposure of the receptor to the pH 5.0 buffer used to elute the insulin affinity column. Proteolytic destruction and the accompanying loss of insulin-dependent autophosphorylation can be substantially reduced by proteolysis inhibitors. In summary, rat liver and human placental receptors differ functionally in both α- and β-subunits. Insulin binding to the α-subunit of the purified rat liver receptor communicates a signal that activates the β-subunit; however, major proteolytic destruction of the β-subunit does not affect insulin binding to the α-subunit

  13. P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377721

  14. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  15. GABA receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABAA-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABAB-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABAA-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABAA-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with 11C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, 18F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome 11C's short half-life. 18F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '11C-FMZ PET instead of 18F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABAA receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas

  16. [Nuclear receptors PPARalpha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soska, V

    2006-06-01

    Mechanism of the fibrates action is mediated by nuclear PPARalpha receptors (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor). These receptors regulate a number of genes that are involved both in lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and other mediators (e.g. inflammatory mediatores). Due to PPARalpha activation by fibrates, triglycerides and small dense LDL concentration is decreased, HDL cholesterol is increased and both inflammation and prothrombotic status are reduced. These effects are very important in patients with metabolic syndrom. PMID:16871768

  17. Novel cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A J

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids have numerous physiological effects. In the years since the molecular identification of the G protein-coupled receptors CB1 and CB2, the ion channel TRPV1, and their corresponding endogenous ligand systems, many cannabinoid-evoked actions have been shown conclusively to be mediated by one of these specific receptor targets. However, there remain several examples where these classical cannabinoid receptors do not explain observed pharmacology. Studies using mice genetically delete...

  18. Androgen receptor mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkmann, Albert; Jenster, Guido; Ris-Stalpers, Carolyn; Korput, J. A G M; Brüggenwirth, Hennie; Boehmer, A.L.; Trapman, Jan

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMale sexual differentiation and development proceed under direct control of androgens. Androgen action is mediated by the intracellular androgen receptor, which belongs to the superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. At least three pathological situations are associated with abnormal androgen receptor structure and function: androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and prostate cancer. In the X-linked androgen insensitivity syn...

  19. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Cristina Berumen; Angelina Rodríguez; Ricardo Miledi; Guadalupe García-Alcocer

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a fu...

  20. Imidazoline receptors ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbaba Danica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive biochemical and pharmacological studies have determined three different subtypes of imidazoline receptors: I1-imidazoline receptors (I1-IR involved in central inhibition of sympathicus that produce hypotensive effect; I2-imidazoline receptors (I2-IR modulate monoamine oxidase B activity (MAO-B; I3-imidazoline receptors (I3-IR regulate insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, the I1/I2/I3 imidazoline receptors are selected as new, interesting targets for drug design and discovery. Novel selective I1/I2/I3 agonists and antagonists have been recently developed. In the present review, we provide a brief update to the field of imidazoline research, highlighting some of the chemical diversity and progress made in the 2D-QSAR, 3D-QSAR and quantitative pharmacophore development studies of I1-IR and I2-IR imidazoline receptor ligands. Theoretical studies of I3-IR ligands are not yet performed because of insufficient number of synthesized I3-IR ligands.

  1. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  2. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  3. Selective orexin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebold, Terry P; Bonaventure, Pascal; Shireman, Brock T

    2013-09-01

    The orexin, or hypocretin, neuropeptides (orexin-A and orexin-B) are produced on neurons in the hypothalamus which project to key areas of the brain that control sleep-wake states, modulation of food intake, panic, anxiety, emotion, reward and addictive behaviors. These neuropeptides exert their effects on a pair of G-protein coupled receptors termed the orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptors. Emerging biology suggests the involvement of these receptors in psychiatric disorders as they are thought to play a key role in the regulation of multiple systems. This review is intended to highlight key selective OX1 or OX2 small-molecule antagonists. PMID:23891187

  4. Estrogen receptor scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidhauer, K; Scharl, A; Schicha, H

    1998-03-01

    Radio-labeled estrogen receptor ligands are tracers that can be used for functional receptor diagnosis. Their specificity towards receptors, together with the fact that only 50-70% of mammary carcinomas are receptor positive, renders them unsuitable for detection of primary tumors or metastases, and this means that estrogen receptor scintigraphy can be used neither for tumor screening nor for staging. However, both 18F-labeled and 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives are suitable for in vivo imaging of estrogen receptors. Their high specificity, established in animal experiments and in vitro studies has been reproduced in in vivo applications in humans. Tracers with positron radiation emitters are, however, hardly suitable for broad application owing to the short half-life of 18F, which would mean that users would need to be situated close to a cyclotron and a correspondingly equipped radiochemical laboratory. The number of available PET scanners, on the other hand, has increased over the last few years, especially in Germany, so that this, at least, does not present a limiting factor. All the same, 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives will find more widespread application, since the number of gamma-cameras incorporating modern multi-head systems is several times greater. The results of studies with 123I-E2-scintigraphy published to date are very promising, even given the initial technical problems mentioned above. As a method of examination, it could be optimised by using improved tracers with a higher tumor contrast and less disturbance from overlapping in diagnostically relevant locations, for instance, by selecting tracers with higher activities whose excretion is more renal than hepatobiliary. The use of modern multi-head camera systems can also be expected to improve the photon yield. PMID:9646642

  5. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz L. Dickert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE, but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors.

  6. Chemokine Receptors and Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinquan Tan; Gang Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A complex process including both the innate and acquired immune responses results in allograft rejection. Some chemokine receptors and their ligands play essential roles not only for leukocyte migration into the graft but also in facilitating dendritic and T cell trafficking between lymph nodes and the transplant in the early and late stage of the allogeneic response. This review focuses on the impact of these chemoattractant proteins on transplant outcome and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for antirejection therapy based on targeting of chemokine receptors and/or their ligands. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  7. Beyond the Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Russell Jones

    2008-01-01

    @@ Had this Special Issue on plant hormones been published 5 years ago,it is likely that details about biosynthetic pathways would have taken center stage.As articles in this issue show,however,the field of plant hormone research has progressed rapidly and is now moving beyond the search for receptors.Progress in research on the mechanism of action of plant hormones has been rapid;receptors for the main classes of hormones have been identified;and the search is on for players downstream in signal-transduction chains.

  8. Somatostatin receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intention of the meeting was to present: 1.Results from large-scale diagnositc imaging studies, carried out in various somatostatin receptorpositive tumors by Germany nuclear medicine specialists; 2. Potential clinical indications for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in gastroenterology, endocrinology, and other clinical disciplines. These presentations were balanced by the reports of distinguished clinicians on their experience with somatostatin analogs in therapeutic settings and by the comments of a number of investigators on the basic mechanisms of somatostatin-receptor/ligand-system(s) and on peptide radiopharmacology. Separate entries are proposed for 8 of the 11 individual papers presented at the conference. (orig./MG). 48 figs., 22 tabs

  9. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors1234

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhari, Nirupa; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5′-monophosphate and guanosine-5′-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein–coupled receptors,...

  10. AT1 receptors as mechanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Storch, Ursula; Gudermann, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are appreciated as central components of neurohormonal signaling. Recently, it turned out that they may also play a role in mechanotransduction. The angiotensin II AT(1) receptor was the first G-protein-coupled receptor claimed to be a mechanosensor. In the meantime, several other G(q/11)-coupled receptors were found to be sensitive to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, there is first evidence to support the concept that G(i/o)-coupled receptors are susceptible to mechanical stimulation as well. Mechanical receptor activation appears to be agonist-independent and is initiated by a conformational change of the receptor protein discernible from agonist-bound conformations. Mechanically induced receptor activation plays a physiological role for myogenic vasoconstriction and is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:21147033

  11. Metformin and insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific 125I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific 125I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded

  12. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Stensbøl, Tine B; Nielsen, Birgitte; Karla, Rolf; Santi, Flavio; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl; Madsen, Ulf

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...

  13. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    polyamines are known to modulate the function of these receptors in vivo. In this study, recent developments in the medicinal chemistry of polyamine-based ligands are given, particularly focusing on the use of solid-phase synthesis (SPS) as a tool for the facile generation of libraries of polyamine toxin...

  14. Ginkgolides and glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaracz, Stanislav; Nakanishi, Koji; Jensen, Anders A.;

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgolides from the Ginkgo biloba tree are diterpenes with a cage structure consisting of six five-membered rings and a unique tBu group. They exert a variety of biological properties. In addition to being antagonists of the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR), it has recently been shown...

  15. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over th...

  16. G Protein-coupled receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Elliott M.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors and heterotrimeric G proteins can diffuse laterally in the plasma membrane such that one receptor can catalyze the activation (GDP/GTP exchange) of multiple G proteins. In some cases, these processes are fast enough to support molecular signal amplification, where a single receptor maintains the activation of multiple G proteins at steady-state. Amplification in cells is probably highly regulated. It depends upon the identities of the G receptor and G protein - som...

  17. Vasopressin and Vasopressin Receptor Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Yun Kyu

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin, a neurohypophyseal peptide hormone, is the endogenous agonist at V1a, V1b, and V2 receptors. The most important physiological function of vasopressin is the maintenance of water homeostasis through interaction with V2 receptors in the kidney. Vasopressin binds to V2 receptor and increases the number of aquaporin-2 at the apical plasma membrane of collecting duct principal cells. That induces high water permeability across the membrane. Several non-peptide vasopressin receptor ant...

  18. Nuclear Receptors and Inflammatory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kun; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that the steroid hormone glucocorticoid and its nuclear receptor regulate the inflammatory process, a crucial component in the pathophysiological process related to human diseases that include atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and liver tumors. Growing evidence demonstrates that orphan and adopted orphan nuclear receptors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver × receptors, t...

  19. An essential role for complement C5a in the pathogenesis of septic cardiac dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Niederbichler, Andreas D; Hoesel, Laszlo M.; Westfall, Margaret V.; Gao, Hongwei; Ipaktchi, Kyros R; Sun, Lei; Zetoune, Firas S.; Su, Grace L; Arbabi, Saman; Sarma, J. Vidya; Wang, Stewart C.; Hemmila, Mark R.; Ward, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    Defective cardiac function during sepsis has been referred to as “cardiomyopathy of sepsis.” It is known that sepsis leads to intensive activation of the complement system. In the current study, cardiac function and cardiomyocyte contractility have been evaluated in rats after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Significant reductions in left ventricular pressures occurred in vivo and in cardiomyocyte contractility in vitro. These defects were prevented in CLP rats given blocking antibody to C...

  20. C5a Mediates Peripheral Blood Neutrophil Dysfunction in Critically Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Conway-Morris, Andrew; Kefala, Kallirroi; Wilkinson, Thomas S.; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Farrell, Lesley; Walsh, Tim; Mackenzie, Simon J; Reid, Hamish; Davidson, Donald J.; Haslett, Chris; Rossi, Adriano G; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Simpson, A. John

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Critically ill patients are highly susceptible to hospital-acquired infection. Neutrophil function in critical illness remains poorly understood.Objectives: To characterize and define mechanisms of peripheral blood neutrophil (PBN) dysfunction in critically ill patients. To determine whether the inflamed lung contributes additional phagocytic impairment.Methods: Prospective collection of blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with suspected ventilator-associated pneum...

  1. Observation level combination of SLR and VLBI with c5++: A case study for TIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Otsubo, Toshimichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    A multi-technique space geodetic analysis software named c5++ has been developed and allows one to combine data on the observation level. With SLR and VLBI modules being ready and tested, this software has been used to compute coordinate time series of the geodetic fundamental station TIGO, located near Concepción, Chile. It can be shown that the combination of space geodetic data on the observation level leads to a significant improvement of station position repeatability, which is an important measure for the stability of a station in the terrestrial reference frame. Moreover, it could be demonstrated that the geophysical signal of the post-seismic tectonic plate movement is usually more complete than detected by any of the two single-technique solutions. In addition, it has been confirmed that so-called nuisance parameters, which are relying on data from a single technique, are not biased when combing observations from different space geodetic techniques.

  2. Protektive Wirkung einer C5A-Blockade nach experimentellem stumpfen Thoraxtrauma

    OpenAIRE

    Flierl, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The inflammatory response after severe blunt chest trauma often leads to acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome which are associated with high mortality rates. Whereas the role of innate immunity in acute lung injury has been broadly investigated, the immune response after blunt chest trauma is still poorly understood. Therefore, the role of complement and neutrophils was determined in bilateral lung injury induced by a single blast wave. The following time-points were inve...

  3. Prostaglandin Receptor Signaling in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuoka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, consisting of the prostaglandins (PGs and the thromboxanes (TXs, are a group of lipid mediators formed in response to various stimuli. They include PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2, and TXA2. They are released outside of the cells immediately after synthesis, and exert their actions by binding to a G-protein coupled rhodopsin-type receptor on the surface of target cells. There are eight types of the prostanoid receptors conserved in mammals from mouse to human. They are the PGD receptor (DP, four subtypes of the PGE receptor (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, the PGF receptor (FP, PGI receptor (IP, and TXA receptor (TP. Recently, mice deficient in each of these prostanoid receptors were generated and subjected to various experimental models of disease. These studies have revealed the roles of PG receptor signaling in various pathological conditions, and suggest that selective manipulation of the prostanoid receptors may be beneficial in treatment of the pathological conditions. Here we review these recent findings of roles of prostanoid receptor signaling and their therapeutic implications.

  4. Ligand-Receptor Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The formation and dissociation of specific noncovalent interactions between a variety of macromolecules play a crucial role in the function of biological systems. During the last few years, three main lines of research led to a dramatic improvement of our understanding of these important phenomena. First, combination of genetic engineering and X ray cristallography made available a simultaneous knowledg of the precise structure and affinity of series or related ligand-receptor systems differing by a few well-defined atoms. Second, improvement of computer power and simulation techniques allowed extended exploration of the interaction of realistic macromolecules. Third, simultaneous development of a variety of techniques based on atomic force microscopy, hydrodynamic flow, biomembrane probes, optical tweezers, magnetic fields or flexible transducers yielded direct experimental information of the behavior of single ligand receptor bonds. At the same time, investigation of well defined cellular models raised the ...

  5. Angiotensin type 2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumners, Colin; de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G;

    2015-01-01

    In most situations, the angiotensin AT2-receptor (AT2R) mediates physiological actions opposing those mediated by the AT1-receptor (AT1R), including a vasorelaxant effect. Nevertheless, experimental evidence vastly supports that systemic application of AT2R-agonists is blood pressure neutral....... However, stimulation of AT2R locally within the brain or the kidney apparently elicits a systemic blood pressure lowering effect. A systemic effect of AT2R stimulation on blood pressure can also be achieved, when the prevailing effect of continuous background AT1R-stimulation is attenuated by low-dose AT1......R blockade. Despite a lack of effect on blood pressure, AT2R stimulation still protects from hypertensive end-organ damage. Current data and evidence therefore suggest that AT2R agonists will not be suitable as future anti-hypertensive drugs, but that they may well be useful for end-organ protection...

  6. Glutamate Receptors in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Davenport, Romola

    2002-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors function in animals as glutamate‐gated non‐selective cation channels. Numerous glutamate receptor‐like (GLR) genes have been identified in plant genomes, and plant GLRs are predicted, on the basis of sequence homology, to retain ligand‐binding and ion channel activity. Non‐selective cation channels are ubiquitous in plant membranes and may function in nutrient uptake, signalling and intra‐plant transport. However, there is little evidence for amino acid gating o...

  7. Sensory receptors in monotremes.

    OpenAIRE

    Proske, U; Gregory, J E; Iggo, A.

    1998-01-01

    This is a summary of the current knowledge of sensory receptors in skin of the bill of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, and the snout of the echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus. Brief mention is also made of the third living member of the monotremes, the long-nosed echidna, Zaglossus bruijnii. The monotremes are the only group of mammals known to have evolved electroreception. The structures in the skin responsible for the electric sense have been identified as sensory mucous glands with a...

  8. Somatostatin receptor skintigrafi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karin; Nielsen, Jørn Theil; Rehling, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is a very valuable imaging technique for visualisation of a diversity of neuroendocrine tumours. The sensitivity for localisation of carcinoid tumours is high, but somewhat lower for other neuroendocrine tumours. The methodology, multiple clinical aspects...... and limitations of the examination are described. The value of the method in patients with non-neuroendocrine tumours has yet to be established. The development of new radio-labelled somatostatin analogues for diagnosis and treatment is briefly discussed....

  9. Anaphylactic actions of platelet-activating factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Stimler, N. P.; Bloor, C. M.; Hugli, T E; Wykle, R. L.; McCall, C E; O'Flaherty, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) is a potent inducer of systemic anaphylactoid reactions in animals. It was found to be similarly potent in contracting smooth muscle of guinea pig ileum and lung and in enhancing vascular permeability when injected subcutaneously into these animals. This factor, therefore, possesses in vitro and in vivo bioactions that resemble those of C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins. However, platelet-activating factor induces a slowl...

  10. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  11. Teaching old receptors new tricks: biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Rajagopal, Keshava; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple effector pathways. Signalling that is mediated by β-arrestins has distinct biochemical and functional consequences from those mediated by G p...

  12. Endothelin receptor-mediated vasodilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, David; Wackenfors, Angelica; Gustafsson, Lotta;

    2008-01-01

    Culture of intact arteries is a frequently employed experimental model for investigating the mechanisms governing the regulation of vascular endothelin receptors. Endothelin type A (ET(A)) and type B (ET(B)) receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells are up-regulated in organ culture and the...... enhanced vasoconstriction mimics the changes that occur in cardiovascular disease. The effect of organ culture on endothelial dilatory endothelin ET(B) receptors is not known. We hypothesize that organ culture decreases the endothelin receptor-mediated dilatation and that this is one possible mechanism by...... denudation. The increase in sarafotoxin 6c contraction after removal of the endothelium was more pronounced before than after organ culture, suggesting down-regulated endothelial endothelin ET(B) receptors. Also, the immunofluorescence staining intensities for endothelial endothelin ET(B) receptors were...

  13. Tubular crystals of acetylcholine receptor

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Well-ordered tubular crystals of acetylcholine receptor were obtained from suspensions of Torpedo marmorata receptor-rich vesicles. They are composed of pairs of oppositely oriented molecules arranged on the surface lattice with the symmetry of the plane group p2 (average unit cell dimensions: a = 90 A, b = 162 A, gamma = 117 degrees). The receptor in this lattice has an asymmetric distribution of mass around its perimeter, yet a regular pentagonal shape; thus its five transmembrane subunits ...

  14. Receptors of mammalian trace amines

    OpenAIRE

    Lewin, Anita H.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of a family of G-protein coupled receptors, some of which bind and are activated by biogenic trace amines, has prompted speculation as to the physiological role of these receptors. Observations associated with the distribution of these trace amine associated receptors (TAARs) suggest that they may be involved in depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, eating disorders, migraine headaches, and Parkinson's disease. Preliminary in vitro data, obtained using cloned rec...

  15. Immunobiology of the TAM receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Lemke, Greg; Rothlin, Carla V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases — TYRO3, AXL and MER — have pivotal roles in innate immunity. They inhibit inflammation in dendritic cells and macrophages, promote the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and membranous organelles, and stimulate the maturation of natural killer cells. Each of these phenomena may depend on a cooperative interaction between TAM receptor and cytokine receptor signalling systems. Although its importance was previously unreco...

  16. Serotonin receptors as cardiovascular targets

    OpenAIRE

    Villalón, Carlos; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod Ranjan

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSerotonin exerts complex effects in the cardiovascular system, including hypotension or hypertension, vasodilatation or vasoconstriction, and/or bradycardia or tachycardia; the eventual response depends primarily on the nature of the 5-HT receptors involved. In the light of current 5-HT receptor classification, the authors reanalyse the cardiovascular responses mediated by 5-HT receptors and discuss the established and potential therapeutic applications of 5-HT ligands in the trea...

  17. Flavonoid modulation of GABAA receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jane R. Hanrahan; Chebib, Mary; Johnston, Graham A. R.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of interest in synthetic and plant-derived flavonoids as modulators of γ-amino butyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor function influencing inhibition mediated by the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the brain. Areas of interest include (i) flavonoids that show subtype selectivity in recombinant receptor studies in vitro consistent with their behavioural effects in vivo, (ii) flumazenil-insensitive modulation of GABAA receptor function by flavonoids, (iii) the abi...

  18. Gene : CBRC-HSAP-12-0004 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 100% ref|NP_004045.1| complement component 3a receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] sp|Q16581|C3AR_HUMAN C3a anaphylatox...in chemotactic receptor (C3a-R) (C3AR) emb|CAA97504.1| C3a anaphylatoxin receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH20742....1| Complement component 3a receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAC06088.1| seven trans...membrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAP23198.1| complement component 3a receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|A...AR13862.1| complement component 3a receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88640.1| complement component 3a receptor

  19. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R; Schwartz, T W

    2001-01-01

    A number of herpes- and poxviruses encode 7TM G-protein coupled receptors most of which clearly are derived from their host chemokine system as well as induce high expression of certain 7TM receptors in the infected cells. The receptors appear to be exploited by the virus for either immune evasion...... expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  20. Kinins and peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regoli, Domenico; Gobeil, Fernand

    2016-04-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first contains the essential elements of the opening lecture presented by Pr. Regoli to the 2015 International Kinin Symposium in S. Paulo, Brazil on June 28th and the second is the celebration of Dr. Regoli's 60 years of research on vasoactive peptides. The cardiovascular homeostasis derives from a balance of two systems, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). The biologically active effector entity of RAS is angiotensin receptor-1 (AT-1R), and that of KKS is bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). The first mediates vasoconstriction, the second is the most potent and efficient vasodilator. Thanks to its complex and multi-functional mechanism of action, involving nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelial hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). B2R is instrumental for the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrition to tissues. KKS is present on the vascular endothelium and functions as an autacoid playing major roles in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes. KKS exerts a paramount role in the prevention of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Such knowledge emphasizes the already prominent value of the ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) for the treatment of CVDs and diabetes. Indeed, the ACEIs, thanks to their double action (block of the RAS and potentiation of the KKS) are the ideal agents for a rational treatment of these diseases. PMID:26408609

  1. Role of iso-receptors in receptor-receptor interactions with a focus on dopamine iso-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnati, Luigi F; Guidolin, Diego; Cervetto, Chiara; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular and intracellular communication processes consist of signals and recognition/decoding apparatuses of these signals. In humans, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest family of cell surface receptors. More than 30 years ago, it has been proposed that GPCR could form dimers or higher-order oligomers (receptor mosaics [RMs] at the plasma membrane level and receptor-receptor interactions [RRIs] have been proposed as a new integrative mechanism for chemical signals impinging on cell plasma membranes). The basic phenomena involved in RRIs are allostery and cooperativity of membrane receptors, and the present paper provides basic information concerning their relevance for the integrative functions of RMs. In this context, the possible role of iso-receptor RM is discussed (with a special focus on dopamine receptor subtypes and on some of the RMs they form with other dopamine iso-receptors), and it is proposed that two types of cooperativity, namely, homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity, could allow distinguishing two types of functionally different RMs. From a general point of view, the presence of iso-receptors and their topological organization within RMs allow the use of a reduced number of signals for the intercellular communication processes, since the target cells can recognize and decode the same signal in different ways. This theoretical aspect is further analyzed here by means of an analogy with artificial information systems. Thus, it is suggested that the 'multiplexer' and 'demultiplexer' concepts could, at least in part, model the role of RMs formed by iso-receptors in the information handling by the cell. PMID:26418645

  2. Receptor studies in biological psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the pharmacological treatment of endogenous psychosis have led to the development of biological studies in psychiatry. Studies on neurotransmitter receptors were reviewed in order to apply positron-emission tomograph (PET) for biological psychiatry. The dopamine (DA) hypothesis for schizophrenia was advanced on the basis of the observed effects of neuroleptics and methamphetamine, and DA(D2) receptor supersensitivity measured by PET and receptor binding in the schizophrenic brain. The clinical potencies of neuroleptics for schizophrenia were correlated with their abilities to inhibit the D2 receptor, and not other receptors. The σ receptor was expected to be a site of antipsychotic action. However, the potency of drugs action on it was not correlated with clinical efficacy. Haloperidol binds with high affinity to the σ receptor, which may mediate acute dystonia, an extrapyramidal side effect of neuroleptics. Behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by methamphetamine treatment were studied as an animal model of schizophrenia, and both a decrease of D2 receptor density and an increase of DA release were detected. The monoamine hypothesis for manic-depressive psychosis was advanced on the basis of the effect of reserpine, monoamine oxidase inhibitor and antidepressants. 3H-clonidine binding sites were increased in platelet membranes of depressive patients, 3H-imipramine binding sites were decreased. The GABAA receptor is the target site for the action of anxiolytics and antiepileptics such as benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recent developments in molecular biology techniques have revealed the structure of receptor proteins, which are classified into two receptor families, the G-protein coupled type (D2) and the ion-channel type (GABAA). (J.P.N.)

  3. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: A moving story of receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Thue W; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2008-01-01

    Animals sense light and chemical signals through proteins called G-protein-coupled receptors. The crystal structure of one such receptor in complex with a G-protein fragment shows how these receptors are activated.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions leptin receptor deficiency leptin receptor deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Leptin receptor deficiency is a condition that causes severe ...

  5. Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause important diseases in humans and animals. Coronavirus infection starts with the virus binding with its spike proteins to molecules present on the surface of host cells that act as receptors. This spike-receptor interaction is highly specific and determines the virus’ cell, tissue

  6. *601007 LEPTIN RECEPTOR; LEPR [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 601007 FIELD TI 601007 LEPTIN RECEPTOR; LEPR ;;OBR FIELD TX DESCRIPTION Leptin (LEP; 16 ... ession of the OBR gene in hypothalamic tissue from lean ... and obese humans. The tissue was obtained shortly ... ference in the amount of leptin-receptor mRNA in 7 lean ... and 8 obese subjects as determined by RT-PCR. A se ...

  7. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  8. MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, Leonardo; Cervantes, Gustavo M.; El-Hashani, Essam; Salgia, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    MET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) have become important therapeutic target in oncology, especially lung cancer. MET RTK is involved in cancer cell growth/survival, motility/migration, invasion/metastasis, and in angiogenesis. MET can be overexpressed in lung cancer, sometimes mutated, and sometimes amplified. Not only can MET be overexpressed, there are subsets of lung cancer tumors that have HGF overexpression. The mutations of MET can occur in the semaphorin and/or juxtamembrane domain in a majority of times. Amplification of MET can occur de novo in primary/metastatic tumors, as well arise in the context of therapeutic inhibition. There are a number of clinical inhibitors that have been developed against MET/HGF. Small molecule inhibitors such as XL184 and PF02341066 have come to clinical fruition, as well as antibodies against MET (such as MetMAb). These inhibitors will be discussed. PMID:19861919

  9. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja;

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a “volume transmitter” in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes the ...

  10. Discoidin domain receptors in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2014-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, lie at the intersection of two large receptor families, namely the extracellular matrix and tyrosine kinase receptors. As such, DDRs are uniquely positioned to function as sensors for extracellular matrix and to regulate a wide range of cell functions from migration and proliferation to cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix homeostasis/remodeling. While activation of DDRs by extracellular matrix collagens is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, aberrant activation of these receptors following injury or in disease is detrimental. The availability of mice lacking DDRs has enabled us to identify key roles played by these receptors in disease initiation and progression. DDR1 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis and kidney injury, while DDR2 contributes to osteoarthritis. Furthermore, both DDRs have been implicated in cancer progression. Yet the mechanisms whereby DDRs contribute to disease progression are poorly understood. In this review we highlight the mechanisms whereby DDRs regulate two important processes, namely inflammation and tissue fibrosis. In addition, we discuss the challenges of targeting DDRs in disease. Selective targeting of these receptors requires understanding of how they interact with and are activated by extracellular matrix, and whether their cellular function is dependent on or independent of receptor kinase activity. PMID:24361528

  11. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [123I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [123I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [123I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  12. Purinergic receptors in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krügel, Ute

    2016-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders describe different mental or behavioral patterns, causing suffering or poor coping of ordinary life with manifold presentations. Multifactorial processes can contribute to their development and progression. Purinergic neurotransmission and neuromodulation in the brain have attracted increasing therapeutic interest in the field of psychiatry. Purine nucleotides and nucleosides are well recognized as signaling molecules mediating cell to cell communication. The actions of ATP are mediated by ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptor subfamilies, whilst the actions of adenosine are mediated by P1 (A1 or A2) adenosine receptors. Purinergic mechanisms and specific receptor subtypes have been shown to be linked to the regulation of many aspects of behavior and mood and to dysregulation in pathological processes of brain function. In this review the recent knowledge on the role of purinergic receptors in the two most frequent psychiatric diseases, major depression and schizophrenia, as well as on related animal models is summarized. At present the most promising data for therapeutic strategies derive from investigations of the adenosine system emphasizing a unique function of A2A receptors at neurons and astrocytes in these disorders. Among the P2 receptor family, in particular P2X7 and P2Y1 receptors were related to disturbances in major depression and schizophrenia, respectively. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26518371

  13. Immunisation with Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, L

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine mediates the transfer of information between neurons in the electric organ of, for example, Torpedo as well as in vertebrate skeletal muscle. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex translates the binding of acetylcholine into ion permeability changes. This leads to an action potential in the muscle fibre. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein has been purified from Torpedo by use of affinity chromatography. The receptor is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein composed of five polypeptide chains. When various animals are immunised with the receptor they demonstrate clinical signs of severe muscle weakness coincident with high antibody titres in their sera. The symptoms resemble those found in the autoimmune neuromuscular disease myasthenia gravis in humans. This animal model has constituted a unique model for studying autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews some of the work using Torpedo acetylcholine receptor in order to increase the understanding of the motor nervous system function and myasthenia gravis. It is now known that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein is the antigen involved in myasthenia gravis. The mechanism of immune damage involves a direct block of the receptor function. This depends on the presence of antibodies which crosslink the postsynaptic receptors leading to their degradation. The questions to be answered in the future are; (a) what initiates or triggers the autoimmune response, (b) how do the antibodies cause the symptoms--is there a steric hindrance of the interaction of acetylcholine and the receptor, (c) why is there not a strict relationship between antibody titre and severity of symptoms, and (d) why are some muscles affected and other spared? With help of the experimental model, answers to these questions may result in improved strategies for the treatment of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. PMID:6097937

  14. Hemoglobin and heme scavenger receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2010-01-01

    Heme, the functional group of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other hemoproteins, is a highly toxic substance when it appears in the extracellular milieu. To circumvent potential harmful effects of heme from hemoproteins released during physiological or pathological cell damage (such as hemolysis and......-binding haptoglobin and the receptor CD163, and b) the heme-binding hemopexin and the receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/CD91. Apart from the disclosure of the molecular basis for these important heme scavenging systems by identifying the functional link between the carrier proteins and the...

  15. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  16. Profiling Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Heregulin Receptor 3 Heteromerization Using Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Heteromer Investigation Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Akli Ayoub; Heng B See; Seeber, Ruth M.; Armstrong, Stephen P.; Pfleger, Kevin D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Heteromerization can play an important role in regulating the activation and/or signal transduction of most forms of receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). The study of receptor heteromerization has evolved extensively with the emergence of resonance energy transfer based approaches such as bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). Here, we report an adaptation of our Receptor-Heteromer Investigation Technology (Receptor-HIT) that has recently been published as the G p...

  17. Are olfactory receptors really olfactive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2011-01-01

    consequence of the environmental conditions olfactory receptor genes have explored during evolution. The association of odorant patterns with specific environmental or contextual situations makes their relationship semiotically triadic, due to the emergence of an interpretant capable of perceiving odorants as...

  18. A threading receptor for polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Harniman, Robert L; Renney, Charles M; Carter, Tom S; Crump, Matthew P; Davis, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (K(a) up to 19,000 M(-1)), and is shown--by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy--to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules. PMID:26673266

  19. A threading receptor for polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J.; Casas-Solvas, Juan M.; Harniman, Robert L.; Renney, Charles M.; Carter, Tom S.; Crump, Matthew P.; Davis, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (Ka up to 19,000 M-1), and is shown—by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy—to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules.

  20. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  1. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  2. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy

  3. Glycine receptors and brain development

    OpenAIRE

    Avila, Ariel; Nguyen, Laurent; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are ligand-gated chloride ion channels that mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the spinal cord and the brainstem. There, they are mainly involved in motor control and pain perception in the adult. However, these receptors are also expressed in upper regions of the central nervous system, where they participate in different processes including synaptic neurotransmission. Moreover, GlyRs are present since early stages of brain development and might influence ...

  4. Dopamine D4 Receptors in Psychostimulant Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Di Ciano, Patricia; Grandy, David; Le Foll, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Since the cloning of the D4 receptor in the 1990s, interest has been building in the role of this receptor in drug addiction, given the importance of dopamine in addiction. Like the D3 receptor, the D4 receptor has limited distribution within the brain suggesting it may have a unique role in drug abuse. However, compared to the D3 receptor, few studies have evaluated the importance of the D4 receptor. This may be due, in part, to the relative lack of compounds selective for the D4 receptor; t...

  5. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. PMID:24679540

  6. Thermostabilisation of the neurotensin receptor NTS1

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, Yoko; White, Jim F.; Serrano-Vega, Maria J.; Magnani, Francesca; Aloia, Amanda L.; Grisshammer, Reinhard; Tate, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been hampered for many years by their instability in detergent solution and by the number of potential conformations that receptors can adopt. Recently, the structures of the β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors and the adenosine A2a receptor were determined with antagonist bound, a receptor conformation that is thought to be more stable than the agonist-bound state. In contrast to these receptors, the neurotensin receptor NTS1 is much ...

  7. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  8. Structure, function, and regulation of adrenergic receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Strosberg, A.D.

    1993-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors for adrenaline and noradrenaline belong to the large multigenic family of receptors coupled to GTP-binding proteins. Three pharmacologic types have been identified: alpha 1-, alpha 2-, and beta-adrenergic receptors. Each of these has three subtypes, characterized by both structural and functional differences. The alpha 2 and beta receptors are coupled negatively and positively, respectively, to adenylyl cyclase via Gi or Gs regulatory proteins, and the alpha 1 receptors m...

  9. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  10. Pharmacology of benzodiazepine receptors: an update.

    OpenAIRE

    Sieghart, W.

    1994-01-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors are allosteric modulatory sites on GABAA receptors. GABAA receptors are probably composed of five protein subunits, at least some of which belong to different subunit classes. So far six alpha-, four beta-, three gamma-, and delta- and two rho = p subunits of GABAA receptors have been identified. A large number of different subunit combinations, each of which will result in a GABAA receptor with distinct electrophysiological and pharmacological properties, are therefo...

  11. Studies on insulin receptor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is to investigate an influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor of the plasma membrane by means of radioreceptor assay using 125I-labelled insulin. Male guinea pigs of Hartley strain were employed for the starvation study, and 125I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours of the fast after the last meal. Male rats of Wistar strain were employed for the high fat study where the diet containing 35% of butter was fed ad libitum for 38 or 68 days. The animals were killed at the fast of 12 hours, and 125I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver was determined. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) An increase in 125I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was observed by the starvation for 24 to 72 hours. 2) The mechanism of the increase by starvation was considered to be different by the organs; it was due to an increase in number of insulin receptor in the liver, and due to an increase in affinity of insulin receptor in the kidney. 3) In non-obese rats fed with high fat diet, the number of insulin receptor on the liver plasma membrane showed a decrease, and this observation clearly indicated that the decrease in number of the receptor did not depend on the obesity. 4) Obese rats also fed with high fat diet presented a decrease in number of insulin receptor without an elevation of insulin levels in the circulating blood. This indicated that at least in the obese rats fed with high fat diet, the decrease in number of the receptor was not due to hyperinsulinemia. (author)

  12. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric (NU Sinapore); (Van Andel); (UCR)

    2010-11-11

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands.

  13. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  14. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect the...... receptor calcium sites....

  15. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  16. Monoallelic expression of olfactory receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron's odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  17. Receptor Proteins in Selective Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Behrends

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy has long been thought to be an essential but unselective bulk degradation pathway. However, increasing evidence suggests selective autophagosomal turnover of a broad range of substrates. Bifunctional autophagy receptors play a key role in selective autophagy by tethering cargo to the site of autophagosomal engulfment. While the identity of molecular components involved in selective autophagy has been revealed at least to some extent, we are only beginning to understand how selectivity is achieved in this process. Here, we summarize the mechanistic and structural basis of receptor-mediated selective autophagy.

  18. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  19. Transcriptional Corepressor SMILE Recruits SIRT1 to Inhibit Nuclear Receptor Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor γ Transactivation*

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yuan-Bin; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Kim, Don-Kyu; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Oh, Sangmi; Park, Seung Bum; Shong, Minho; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-01-01

    SMILE (small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein) has been identified as a corepressor of the glucocorticoid receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α. Here we show that SMILE also represses estrogen receptor-related receptor γ (ERRγ) transactivation. Knockdown of SMILE gene expression increases ERRγ activity. SMILE directly interacts with ERRγ in vitro and in vivo. Domain mapping analysis showed that SMILE binds to the AF2 domain of ERRγ....

  20. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  1. Uncompetitive antagonism of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Tikhonov, Denis B; Bølcho, Ulrik;

    2006-01-01

    Philanthotoxins are uncompetitive antagonists of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors presumed to bind to the pore-forming region, but a detailed molecular mechanism for this interaction is missing. Here a small library of novel philanthotoxins was designed and synthesized using a solid-phase strategy. ...

  2. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B;

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  3. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  4. Serotonin receptors as cardiovascular targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Villalón (Carlos); P.A.M. de Vries (Peter); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSerotonin exerts complex effects in the cardiovascular system, including hypotension or hypertension, vasodilatation or vasoconstriction, and/or bradycardia or tachycardia; the eventual response depends primarily on the nature of the 5-HT receptors involved. In the light of current 5-HT

  5. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  6. Radioligand Binding at Muscarinic Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 37-68. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * radioligand binding Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  7. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 95-130. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulation * radioligand binding functional response Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  8. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  9. Evolution of the nuclear receptor gene superfamily.

    OpenAIRE

    Laudet, V; Hänni, C; Coll, J.; F. Catzeflis; Stéhelin, D

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear receptor genes represent a large family of genes encoding receptors for various hydrophobic ligands such as steroids, vitamin D, retinoic acid and thyroid hormones. This family also contains genes encoding putative receptors for unknown ligands. Nuclear receptor gene products are composed of several domains important for transcriptional activation, DNA binding (C domain), hormone binding and dimerization (E domain). It is not known whether these genes have evolved through gene duplica...

  10. Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonists in Primary ITP

    OpenAIRE

    Siegal, Deborah; Crowther, Mark; Cuker, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates thrombopoiesis through activation of TPO receptors on the megakaryocyte cell surface, resulting in increased platelet production. The TPO receptor agonists are novel treatments for patients with chronic ITP aimed at increasing platelet production through interactions with the TPO receptor on megakaryocytes. Two TPO receptor agonists, romiplostim and eltrombopag, have received regulatory approval. In patients with chronic ITP who remain at risk of bleeding follow...

  11. Beta adrenergic receptors in pigmented ciliary processes.

    OpenAIRE

    Trope, G. E.; Clark, B.

    1982-01-01

    Beta adrenergic receptors from membrane fragments of pigmented sheep eyes were studied and characterised by ligand binding techniques after the removal of melanin. In a representative experiment the beta max (total number of beta receptors) was 394.9 fmol/mg protein. The receptor affinity (Ka) was 440 pM. The potency series of drugs to displace 125I-HYP from the receptors was timolol = (-) propranolol greater than (+) propranolol greater than salbutamol greater than practolol. beta 1 Recepto...

  12. Localization of CGRP receptor components and receptor binding sites in rhesus monkey brainstem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Roberts, Rhonda; Chen, Tsing-Bau;

    2016-01-01

    -like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1), respectively. To define CGRP receptor binding sites, in vitro autoradiography was performed with [(3)H]MK-3207 (a CGRP receptor antagonist). CLR and RAMP1 mRNA and protein expression were detected in the pineal gland, medial mammillary...

  13. Estrogen receptors in human vaginal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, M.A.H.M.; Poortman, J.; Agema, A.R.; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of specific estrogen receptors could be demonstrated in vaginal tissue, obtained during operation from 38 women, age 27–75 yr. In 23 premenopausal women the receptor concentration in the vaginal tissue varied between 12 and 91 fmol/mg protein, no significant difference in the receptor

  14. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaasse, E.C.; IJzerman, A.P.; Grip, W.J. de; Beukers, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein clas

  15. Agonism and antagonism at the insulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Louise; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia; Pedersen, Thomas Åskov; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Schäffer, Lauge; Blagoev, Blagoy; Oleksiewicz, Martin B; Kiselyov, Vladislav V; De Meyts, Pierre Marcel Joseph

    2012-01-01

    insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been...

  16. Characterization of the thyrotropin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scatchard analysis of the binding of [125I]TSH to thyroid plasma membranes results in a curvilinear, concave-upward plot. This phenomenon could be indicative of several conditions, including radioligand heterogeneity, negative cooperativity, or multiple binding sites. To investigate the first of these possibilities, [125I]TSH was purified by chromatography on Sepharose 6B. The receptor active [125I]TSH continued to yield a curvilinear Scatchard plot in equilibrium binding analyses, indicating that this phenomenon was not the result of radioligand impurities of heterogeneity. To determine the contribution of the receptor to this complex behavior, the TSH receptor was solubilized and subjected to concanavalin A chromatography. Two populations of binding sites were recovered. The pass-through fraction contained 70% of the total sites and exhibited a linear Scatchard plot with a K/sub D/ of 67 nM, while 0.2 M methylmannoside eluted 10% of the sites which exhibited a single K/sub D/ of 0.3 nM. To characterize its structure, the TSH receptor was labeled with [125I]TSH and cross-linked with disuccinimidyl suberate. Analysis by electrophoresis and autoradiography demonstrated the labeling of two hormone-receptor complexes with M/sub r/ of 80,000 and 68,000. These two bands were demonstrated to be TSH-specific and were present in plasma membranes from thyroid, but not from muscle or liver. Furthermore, antibodies isolated from the sera of Graves' disease patients, which inhibit the bindings of [125I]TSH, blocked the labeling of the two complexes. When the separated high and low affinity TSH binding components were similarly analyzed, both components exhibited the 80,000 and 68,000 bands. Furthermore, the autoantibodies from Graves' disease sera inhibited the binding of [125I]TSH to both the high and low affinity species

  17. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter; Yndestad, Arne; Aukrust, Pål; Lappegård, Knut T; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic diseases, although interventional trials have this far been disappointing. However, based on recent research showing an intimate interplay between complement and TLRs we propose a model in which combined inhibition of both complement and TLRs may represent a potent anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach to reduce atherosclerosis. PMID:26086357

  18. A Rapid and Efficient Immunoenzymatic Assay to Detect Receptor Protein Interactions: G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Zappelli; Simona Daniele; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Claudia Martini; Maria Letizia Trincavelli

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the largest families of cell surface receptors, and are the target of at least one-third of the current therapeutic drugs on the market. Along their life cycle, GPCRs are accompanied by a range of specialized GPCR-interacting proteins (GIPs), which take part in receptor proper folding, targeting to the appropriate subcellular compartments and in receptor signaling tasks, and also in receptor regulation processes, such as desensitization and...

  19. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W.; Hinkle, Patricia M.

    2007-01-01

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355–365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization...

  20. σ1 Receptor Modulation of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling: Potentiation of Opioid Transduction Independent from Receptor Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J.; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    σ Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned μ opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, by σ1 receptors. σ Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither σ agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Yet σ receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC50 of opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. σ1 Receptors physically associate with μ opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, σ receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of σ1 in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated μ opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to μ and δ opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, σ1-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding, suggesting a broader role for σ receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  1. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    sigma Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned mu opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding, by sigma(1) receptors. sigma Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither sigma agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Yet sigma receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC(50) of opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. sigma(1) Receptors physically associate with mu opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, sigma receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of sigma(1) in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated mu opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to mu and delta opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, sigma(1)-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, suggesting a broader role for sigma receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  2. Histamine modulates multiple functional activities of monocyte-derived dendritic cell subsets via histamine receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Tünde; Gogolák, Péter; Kis-Tóth, Katalin; Jelinek, Ivett; László, Valéria; Rajnavölgyi, Eva

    2012-02-01

    Expression of CD1a proteins in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) specifies functionally distinct subsets with different inflammatory properties. Histamine is recognized as an inflammatory mediator released by various cell types including DCs. The diverse biological effects of histamine are mediated by G-protein-coupled histamine receptors (HRs), which are able to modulate the functional activities of DC subsets. The goal of the present study was to compare the expression and activity of HRs in the CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) monocyte-derived DC subsets and to test the effects of histamine on the differentiation, activation and functional activities of these subsets. We show that H2R is present at high levels in both DC subsets, whereas H1R and H4R are expressed in a subset-specific manner. Histamine shifts DC differentiation to the development of CD1a(-) DCs and modulates DC activation through its inhibitory effect on CD1a(+) DC differentiation. Histamine-induced reduction of CD1a(+) DCs is associated with increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-10, up-regulation of a typical combination of chemokines, expression C5aR1 by the CD1a(-) DC subset and enhanced migration of both activated DC subsets supported by the production of MMP-9 and MMP-12 enzymes. All these effects were shown to be mediated in a H2R-specific manner as revealed by the specific antagonist of the receptor. As H2R is expressed at high levels in both DC subsets, we propose that it may dominate the regulation of multiple DC functions. In contrast, H1R and H4R with opposing subset-related expression may have a regulatory or fine-tuning role in histamine-induced functional activities. PMID:22232416

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor transformation and DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall goal is to probe the mechanism whereby glucocorticoid receptors are transformed from a non-DNA-binding form to their active DNA-binding form. The author has examined the effect of an endogenous inhibitor purified from rat liver cytosol on receptor binding to DNA. The inhibitor binds to transformed receptors in whole cytosol and prevent their binding to DNA. He also examined the role of sulfhydryl groups in determining the DNA binding activity of the transformed receptor and in determining the transformation process. Treatment of rat liver cytosol containing temperature-transformed, [3H]dexamethasone-bound receptors at 00C with the sulfhydryl modifying reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate inhibits the DNA-binding activity of the receptor, and DNA-binding activity is restored after addition of dithiothreitol. In addition, he has examined the relationship between receptor phosphorylation and DNA binding. Untransformed receptor complexes purified from cytosol prepared from mouse L cells grown in medium containing [32P]orthophosphate contain two components, a 100 k-Da and a 90-kDa subunit, both of which are phosphoproteins. On transformation, the receptor dissociates from the 90-kDa protein. Transformation of the complex under cell free conditions does not result in a dephosphorylation of the 100-kDa steroid-binding protein. Transformed receptor that has been bound to DNA and purified by monoclonal antibody is still in a phosphorylated form. These results suggest that dephosphorylation is not required for receptor binding to DNA

  4. The heat response of hydrocortisone receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of hydrocortisone (HC) receptors to heat damage has been measured in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The impetus for the study came from three observations: A. Hormone receptors (e.g. insulin) are very heat sensitizer and may be a primary target for heat damage (BBA 756, 1 (1983)). B. HC induces a receptor-mediated heat resistance in CHO cells (J. Cell. Physiol. 128, 127 (1986)). C. The HC receptor is a soluble protein complex, which, in its unactivated state, contains HSP 89 (EMBO J. 4, 3131 (1985); JBC 260 12398 (1985)). Upon binding of the ligand, HSP 89 dissociates and the activated receptor enters the nucleus and binds DNA. The current study reveals that the HC receptor is also very heat sensitive, losing 50% of its activity after 5 min at 450C, 10 min at 440C or 20 min at 430C. Receptor activity recovers quickly after heat, returning to levels close to normal within 2-4 hours after a treatment of 10 min at 450C which initially reduces receptor activity to less than 20% of control. Pretreatment with HC, using conditions that induce heat resistance, depresses receptor activity to 10-20% of control, but residual receptors display a heat sensitivity similar to that of control cells. So far, the authors have been unable to demonstrate any heat protection of HC receptors in thermotolerant cells

  5. Hormone activation of baculovirus expressed progesterone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliston, J F; Beekman, J M; Tsai, S Y; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1992-03-15

    Human and chicken progesterone receptors (A form) were overproduced in a baculovirus expression system. These recombinant progesterone receptors were full-length bound progesterone specifically and were recognized by monoclonal antibodies, AB52 and PR22, specific for human and chicken progesterone receptor, respectively. In gel retardation studies, binding of recombinant human and chicken progesterone receptors to their progesterone response element (PRE) was specific and was enhanced in the presence of progesterone. Binding of human progesterone receptor to the PRE was also enhanced in the presence of the antiprogestin, RU486, but very little effect was observed in the presence of estradiol, dexamethasone, testosterone, and vitamin D. In our cell-free transcription system, human progesterone receptor induced transcription in a receptor-dependent and hormone-activable manner. Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of the PRE in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by excess PRE oligonucleotides. Furthermore, chicken progesterone receptor also induced in vitro transcription in a hormone-activable manner. These results demonstrate that steroid receptors overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system are functional and exhibit steroid-responsive binding and transcription. These observations support our present understanding of the mechanism of steroid receptor-regulated gene expression and provide a technological format for studies of the role of hormone and antihormone in altering gene expression. PMID:1544902

  6. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-[3H]3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent

  7. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  8. CGRP receptor antagonism and migraine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Warfvinge, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is the most prevalent of the neurological disorders and can affect the patient throughout the lifetime. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide that is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is now 2 decades since it was proposed to be involved in...... migraine pathophysiology. The cranial sensory system contains C-fibers storing CGRP and trigeminal nerve activation and acute migraine attacks result in release of CGRP. The CGRP receptor consists of a complex of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) and....... CGRP receptor antagonists have been developed as novel antimigraine drugs and found to be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. Other ways to stop CGRP activity has been introduced recently through antibodies against CGRP and the CGRP receptor. While the CGRP receptors are expressed...

  9. A new family of insect tyramine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klærke, Dan Arne; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project database contains a gene, CG7431, annotated to be an "unclassifiable biogenic amine receptor." We have cloned this gene and expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells. After testing various ligands for G protein-coupled receptors, we found that the receptor was...... specifically activated by tyramine (EC(50), 5x10(-7)M) and that it showed no cross-reactivity with beta-phenylethylamine, octopamine, dopa, dopamine, adrenaline, noradrenaline, tryptamine, serotonin, histamine, and a library of 20 Drosophila neuropeptides (all tested in concentrations up to 10(-5) or 10(-4)M......-like receptor genes in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The...

  10. Receptor arrays optimized for natural odor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Zwicker, David; Brenner, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Natural odors typically consist of many molecules at different concentrations. It is unclear how the numerous odorant molecules and their possible mixtures are discriminated by relatively few olfactory receptors. Using an information-theoretic model, we show that a receptor array is optimal for this task if it achieves two possibly conflicting goals: (i) each receptor should respond to half of all odors and (ii) the response of different receptors should be uncorrelated when averaged over odors presented with natural statistics. We use these design principles to predict statistics of the affinities between receptors and odorant molecules for a broad class of odor statistics. We also show that optimal receptor arrays can be tuned to either resolve concentrations well or distinguish mixtures reliably. Finally, we use our results to predict properties of experimentally measured receptor arrays. Our work can thus be used to better understand natural olfaction and it also suggests ways to improve artificial sensor...

  11. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  12. Plant hormone receptors: new perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Spartz, Angela K.; William M Gray

    2008-01-01

    Plant growth and development require the integration of a variety of environmental and endogenous signals that, together with the intrinsic genetic program, determine plant form. Central to this process are several growth regulators known as plant hormones or phytohormones. Despite decades of study, only recently have receptors for several of these hormones been identified, revealing novel mechanisms for perceiving chemical signals and providing plant biologists with a much clearer picture of...

  13. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin Hisahara; Shun Shimohama

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic) neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa) significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first ...

  14. The vanilloid receptor and hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donna H WANG

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels consist of six related protein sub-families that are involved in a variety of pathophysiological function, and disease development. The TRPV1 channel, a member of the TRPV sub-family, is identified by expression cloning using the "hot" pepper-derived vanilloid compound capsaicin as a ligand. Therefore, TRPV1 is also referred as the vanilloid receptor (VR1) or the capsaicin receptor. VR1 is mainly expressed in a subpopulation of primary afferent neurons that project to cardiovascular and renal tissues.These capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons are not only involved in the perception of somatic and visceral pain, but also have a "sensory-effector" function.Regarding the latter, these neurons release stored neuropeptides through a calcium-dependent mechanism via the binding of capsaicin to VR1. The most studied sensory neuropeptides are calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP), which are potent vasodilators and natriuretic/diuretic factors. Recent evidence using the model of neonatal degeneration of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves revealed novel mechanisms that underlie increased salt sensitivity and several experimental models of hypertension. These mechanisms include insufficient suppression of plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone levels subsequent to salt loading, enhancement of sympathoexcitatory response in the face of a salt challenge, activation of the endothelin- 1 receptor, and impaired natriuretic response to salt loading in capsaicin-pretreated rats. These data indicate that sensory nerves counterbalance the prohypertensive effects of several neurohormonal systems to maintain normal blood pressure when challenged with salt loading. The therapeutic utilities of vanilloid compounds, endogenous agonists,and sensory neuropeptides are also discussed.

  15. Endothelin receptors and their antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Janet J; Davenport, Anthony P

    2015-03-01

    All three members of the endothelin (ET) family of peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, are expressed in the human kidney, with ET-1 being the predominant isoform. ET-1 and ET-2 bind to two G-protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB, whereas at physiological concentrations ET-3 has little affinity for the ET(A) receptor. The human kidney is unusual among the peripheral organs in expressing a high density of ET(B). The renal vascular endothelium only expresses the ET(B) subtype and ET-1 acts in an autocrine or paracrine manner to release vasodilators. Endothelial ETB in kidney, as well as liver and lungs, also has a critical role in scavenging ET-1 from the plasma. The third major function is ET-1 activation of ET(B) in in the nephron to reduce salt and water re-absorption. In contrast, ET(A) predominate on smooth muscle, causing vasoconstriction and mediating many of the pathophysiological actions of ET-1. The role of the two receptors has been delineated using highly selective ET(A) (BQ123, TAK-044) and ET(B) (BQ788) peptide antagonists. Nonpeptide antagonists, bosentan, macitentan, and ambrisentan, that are either mixed ET(A)/ET(B) antagonists or display ET(A) selectivity, have been approved for clinical use but to date are limited to pulmonary hypertension. Ambrisentan is in clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. This review summarizes ET-receptor antagonism in the human kidney, and considers the relative merits of selective versus nonselective antagonism in renal disease. PMID:25966344

  16. Autophagy selectivity through receptor clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Brown, Aidan

    Substrate selectivity in autophagy requires an all-or-none cellular response. We focus on peroxisomes, for which autophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized. Using computational models, we explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the peroxisome surface provides an appropriate all-or-none response. We find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first, and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity. We then consider a secondary hypothesis that p62 inhibits NBR1 cluster formation. We find that p62 inhibition enhances size-selectivity enough that, even if there is no change of the pexophagy rate, the volume of remaining peroxisomes can significantly decrease. We find that enhanced ubiquitin levels suppress size-selectivity, and that this effect is more pronounced for individual peroxisomes. Sufficient ubiquitin allows receptor clusters to form on even the smallest peroxisomes. We conclude that NBR1 cluster formation provides a viable physical mechanism for all-or-none substrate selectivity in pexophagy. We predict that cluster formation is associated with significant size-selectivity. Now at Simon Fraser University.

  17. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  18. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound 125I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to 125I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to 125I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development

  19. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes

  20. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2007-11-13

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355-365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization of a TRH receptor-FK506-binding protein (FKBP) fusion protein was stimulated by a dimeric FKBP ligand. The chemical dimerizer caused a large increase in TRH-dependent phosphorylation within 1 min, whereas a monomeric FKBP ligand had no effect. The dimerizer did not alter phoshorylation of receptors lacking the FKBP domain. Dimerization of receptors containing an N-terminal HA epitope also was induced with anti-HA antibody. Anti-HA IgG strongly increased TRH-induced phosphorylation, whereas monomeric Fab fragments had no effect. Anti-HA antibody did not alter phosphorylation in receptors lacking an HA tag. Furthermore, two phosphorylation-defective TRH receptors functionally complemented one another and permitted phosphorylation. Receptors with a D71A mutation in the second transmembrane domain do not signal, whereas receptors with four Ala mutations in the 355-365 region signal normally but lack phosphorylation sites. When D71A- and 4Ala-TRH receptors were expressed alone, neither underwent TRH-dependent phosphorylation. When they were expressed together, D71A receptor was phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases in response to TRH. These results suggest that the TRH receptor is phosphorylated preferentially when it is in dimers or when preexisting receptor dimers are driven into microaggregates. Increased receptor phosphorylation may amplify desensitization. PMID:17989235

  1. Localization of mineralocorticoid receptors at mammalian synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Prager

    Full Text Available In the brain, membrane associated nongenomic steroid receptors can induce fast-acting responses to ion conductance and second messenger systems of neurons. Emerging data suggest that membrane associated glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors may directly regulate synaptic excitability during times of stress when adrenal hormones are elevated. As the key neuron signaling interface, the synapse is involved in learning and memory, including traumatic memories during times of stress. The lateral amygdala is a key site for synaptic plasticity underlying conditioned fear, which can both trigger and be coincident with the stress response. A large body of electrophysiological data shows rapid regulation of neuronal excitability by steroid hormone receptors. Despite the importance of these receptors, to date, only the glucocorticoid receptor has been anatomically localized to the membrane. We investigated the subcellular sites of mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral amygdala of the Sprague-Dawley rat. Immunoblot analysis revealed the presence of mineralocorticoid receptors in the amygdala. Using electron microscopy, we found mineralocorticoid receptors expressed at both nuclear including: glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and extra nuclear sites including: presynaptic terminals, neuronal dendrites, and dendritic spines. Importantly we also observed mineralocorticoid receptors at postsynaptic membrane densities of excitatory synapses. These data provide direct anatomical evidence supporting the concept that, at some synapses, synaptic transmission is regulated by mineralocorticoid receptors. Thus part of the stress signaling response in the brain is a direct modulation of the synapse itself by adrenal steroids.

  2. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  3. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Eismann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures.

  4. Alternative splicing of human and mouse NPFF2 receptor genes: Implications to receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankö, Minna-Liisa; Ostergård, Maria; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Panula, Pertti

    2006-12-22

    Alternative splicing has an important role in the tissue-specific regulation of gene expression. Here we report that similar to the human NPFF2 receptor, the mouse NPFF2 receptor is alternatively spliced. In human the presence of three alternatively spliced receptor variants were verified, whereas two NPFF2 receptor variants were identified in mouse. The alternative splicing affected the 5' untranslated region of the mouse receptor and the variants in mouse were differently distributed. The mouse NPFF system may also have species-specific features since the NPFF2 receptor mRNA expression differs from that reported for rat. PMID:17157836

  5. Identification and Characterization of Novel Renal Sensory Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, Premraj; Aisenberg, William H.; Acres, Omar W; Protzko, Ryan J.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the important roles that “sensory” receptors (olfactory receptors, taste receptors, and orphan “GPR” receptors) play in a variety of tissues, including the kidney. Although several studies have identified important roles that individual sensory receptors play in the kidney, there has not been a systematic analysis of the renal repertoire of sensory receptors. In this study, we identify novel renal sensory receptors belonging to the GPR (n = 76), olfactory recep...

  6. Transcriptional targets shared by estrogen receptor- related receptors (ERRs) and estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, but not by ERbeta.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanacker, J M; K. Pettersson; Gustafsson, J.A.; Laudet, V

    1999-01-01

    The physiological activities of estrogens are thought to be mediated by specific nuclear receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta. However, certain tissues, such as the bone, that are highly responsive to estrogens only express a low level of these receptors. Starting from this apparent contradiction, we have evaluated the potentials of two related receptors ERRalpha and ERRbeta to intervene in estrogen signaling. ERalpha, ERRalpha and ERRbeta bind to and activate transcription through both the classica...

  7. Characterization of antisera to prolactin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted to improve the techniques of obtaining purified prolactin receptors and to immunize several species of animals with the partially purified receptor in order to increase the yield of antisera and to characterize the specific of these antisera in different target organs. Prolactin receptors were partially purified from crude microsomal fractions of lactating mammary glands, using affinity chromatography. For the assay of solubilized extracts of mammary gland samples at various stages of purification, 125I-labelled human growth hormone or ovine prolactin were used as labelled hormones. Antisera produced from partially purified prolactin receptors are able to inhibit binding of labelled hormone to its receptors in sera from sheep, goats, and guinea pigs. The antisera also inhibit the binding of prolactin to a number of tissues containing receptors in rabbits and rats

  8. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam E. El-Fakahany

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity or decrease (negative cooperativity in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine. Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  9. Receptor binding studies of the living heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Receptors form a class of intrinsic membrane proteins (or glycoproteins) defined by the high affinity and specificity with which they bind ligands. Many receptors are associated directly or indirectly with membrane ion channels that open or close after a conformational change of the receptor induced by the binding of the neurotransmitter. Changes in number and/or affinity of cardiac neurotransmitter receptors have been associated with myocardial ischemia and infarction, congestive heart failure, and cardiomyopathy as well as diabetes or thyroid-induced heart muscle disease. These alterations of cardiac receptors have been demonstrated in vitro on membrane homogenates from samples collected mainly during surgery or postmortem. The disadvantage of these in vitro binding techniques is that receptors lose their natural environment and their relationships with the other components of the tissue

  10. Yeast Ste2 receptors as tools for study of mammalian protein kinases and adaptors involved in receptor trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Background Mammalian receptors that couple to effectors via heterotrimeric G proteins (e.g., beta 2-adrenergic receptors) and receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity (e.g., insulin and IGF-I receptors) constitute the proximal points of two dominant cell signaling pathways. Receptors coupled to G proteins can be substrates for tyrosine kinases, integrating signals from both pathways. Yeast cells, in contrast, display G protein-coupled receptors (e.g., alpha-factor pheromone receptor ...

  11. Molecular mechanisms of alternative estrogen receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Björnström, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen is a key regulator of growth, differentiation and function in a broad range of target tissues, including the male and female reproductive tracts, mammary gland, bone, brain and the cardiovascular system. The biological effects of estrogen are mediated through estrogen receptor a (ERalpha) and estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta), which belong to a large superfamily of nuclear receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. The classical mechanism of ER acti...

  12. LPA receptor signaling: pharmacology, physiology, and pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Yung, Yun C.; Stoddard, Nicole C.; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a small ubiquitous lipid found in vertebrate and nonvertebrate organisms that mediates diverse biological actions and demonstrates medicinal relevance. LPA’s functional roles are driven by extracellular signaling through at least six 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are named LPA1–6 and signal through numerous effector pathways activated by heterotrimeric G proteins, including Gi/o, G12/13, Gq, and Gs. LPA receptor-mediated effects ha...

  13. The melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandrappa, Shwetha; Gorrigan, Rebecca J.; Clark, Adrian J.L.; Chan, Li F.

    2013-01-01

    The five melanocortin receptors (MCRs) named MC1R–MC5R have diverse physiological roles encompassing pigmentation, steroidogenesis, energy homeostasis and feeding behavior as well as exocrine function. Since their identification almost 20 years ago much has been learnt about these receptors. As well as interacting with their endogenous ligands the melanocortin peptides, there is now a growing list of important peptides that can modulate the way these receptors signal, acting as agonists, anta...

  14. The melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    LiChan

    2013-01-01

    The five melanocortin receptors named MC1R-MC5R have diverse physiological roles encompassing pigmentation, steroidogenesis, energy homeostasis and feeding behaviour as well as exocrine function. Since their identification almost 20 years ago much has been learnt about these receptors. As well as interacting with their endogenous ligands the melanocortin peptides, there is now a growing list of important peptides that can modulate the way these receptors signal, acting as agonists, antagonis...

  15. NUREBASE: database of nuclear hormone receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Jorge; Perrière, Guy; Laudet, Vincent; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are an abundant class of ligand activated transcriptional regulators, found in varying numbers in all animals. Based on our experience of managing the official nomenclature of nuclear receptors, we have developed NUREBASE, a database containing protein and DNA sequences, reviewed protein alignments and phylogenies, taxonomy and annotations for all nuclear receptors. The reviewed NUREBASE is completed by NUREBASE_DAILY, automatically updated every 24 h. Both databases...

  16. NMDA Receptor Activation by Spontaneous Glutamatergic Neurotransmission

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, Felipe; Kavalali, Ege T.

    2009-01-01

    Under physiological conditions N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation requires coincidence of presynaptic glutamate release and postsynaptic depolarization due to the voltage-dependent block of these receptors by extracellular Mg2+. Therefore spontaneous neurotransmission in the absence of action potential firing is not expected to lead to significant NMDA receptor activation. Here we tested this assumption in layer IV neurons in neocortex at their resting membrane potential (approxi...

  17. TRPA1 receptors in cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Megan S; Belvisi, Maria G

    2011-06-01

    In the early 1990's ion channels of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) class were implicated in the afferent sensory loop of the cough reflex and in the heightened cough sensitivity seen in disease. Agonists of the TRPV1 capsaicin receptor such as vanilloids and protons were demonstrated to be amongst the most potent chemical stimuli which cause cough. However, more recently, the TRPA1 receptor (not activated by capsaicin) has become of interest in the cough field because it is known to be activated by ligands such as acrolein which is present in air pollution and the acrid smoke from organic material. TRPA1 is a Ca(2+)-permeant non-selective cation channel with 14 ankyrin repeats in its amino terminus which belongs to the larger TRP family. TRPA1 has been characterised as a thermoreceptor which is activated by cold temperature, environmental irritants and reactive electrophilic molecules which can be generated by oxidant stress and inflammation. TRPA1 is primarily expressed in small diameter, nociceptive neurons where its activation probably contributes to the perception of noxious stimuli and the phenomena known as inflammatory hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation. The respiratory tract is innervated by primary sensory afferent nerves which are activated by mechanical and chemical stimuli. Activation of these vagal sensory afferents leads to central reflexes including dyspnoea, changes in breathing pattern and cough. Recently, it has been demonstrated that stimulating TRPA1 channels activates vagal bronchopulmonary C-fibres in the guinea pig and rodent lung, and recent data have shown that TRPA1 ligands cause cough in both animal models and normal volunteers. In summary, due to their activation by a wide range of irritant and chemical substances, either by exogenous agents, endogenously produced mediators during inflammation or by oxidant stress, we suggest TRPA1 channels should be considered as one of the most promising targets currently identified for

  18. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-05-30

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the alpha7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the alpha7nAChR and caused influx of Ca(2+), activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the alpha7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10-15% CO(2) similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the alpha7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention. PMID:17459420

  19. CGRP receptor antagonism and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Ho, Tony W

    2010-01-01

    inflammation, and central release induces hyperalgesia. CGRP is released from trigeminal nerves in migraine. Trigeminal nerve activation results in antidromic release of CGRP to cause non-endothelium-mediated vasodilatation. At the central synapses in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis, CGRP acts postjunctionally...... on second-order neurons to transmit pain signals centrally via the brainstem and midbrain to the thalamus and highercortical pain regions. Recently developed CGRP receptor antagonists are effective at aborting acute migraine attacks. They may act both centrally and peripherally to attenuate signaling...

  20. [Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have the potential to provide the skeletal benefits of estrogen without the increased risk of uterine and breast cancer. Raloxifene, second generation SERM has been approved for the prevention and treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis. Bazedoxifene, third generation SERM acts as a tissue selective estrogen antagonist or agonist. These SERMs inhibited bone turnover and prevented bone loss caused estrogen deficiency. Furthermore, these SERMs did not affect the uterine endometrial thickness and reduced serum cholesterol. These data suggest that SERMs are potential drug for the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. PMID:26529929

  1. Impact of receptor clustering on ligand binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caré Bertrand R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular response to changes in the concentration of different chemical species in the extracellular medium is induced by ligand binding to dedicated transmembrane receptors. Receptor density, distribution, and clustering may be key spatial features that influence effective and proper physical and biochemical cellular responses to many regulatory signals. Classical equations describing this kind of binding kinetics assume the distributions of interacting species to be homogeneous, neglecting by doing so the impact of clustering. As there is experimental evidence that receptors tend to group in clusters inside membrane domains, we investigated the effects of receptor clustering on cellular receptor ligand binding. Results We implemented a model of receptor binding using a Monte-Carlo algorithm to simulate ligand diffusion and binding. In some simple cases, analytic solutions for binding equilibrium of ligand on clusters of receptors are provided, and supported by simulation results. Our simulations show that the so-called "apparent" affinity of the ligand for the receptor decreases with clustering although the microscopic affinity remains constant. Conclusions Changing membrane receptors clustering could be a simple mechanism that allows cells to change and adapt its affinity/sensitivity toward a given stimulus.

  2. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are re...

  3. Neuropeptide receptor transcriptome reveals unidentified neuroendocrine pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Yamamoto, Sachie; Zitnan, Dusan; Watanabe, Ken; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo; Kaneko, Yu; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT), remain undefined. In this paper, we report the comprehensive cloning of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and systematic analyses of their expression. Based on the expression patterns of orphan receptors, we identified the long-sought receptor for AT, which is thought to stimulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the corpora allata (CA). Surprisingly, however, the AT receptor was not highly expressed in the CA, but instead was predominantly transcribed in the corpora cardiaca (CC), an organ adjacent to the CA. Indeed, by using a reverse-physiological approach, we purified and characterized novel allatoregulatory peptides produced in AT receptor-expressing CC cells, which may indirectly mediate AT activity on the CA. All of the above findings confirm the effectiveness of a systematic analysis of the receptor transcriptome, not only in characterizing orphan receptors, but also in identifying novel players and hidden mechanisms in important biological processes. This work illustrates how using a combinatorial approach employing bioinformatic, molecular, biochemical and physiological methods can help solve recalcitrant problems in neuropeptide research. PMID:18725956

  4. Subtype selective kainic acid receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl

    2009-01-01

    (S)-Glutamic acid (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, activating the plethora of glutamate receptors (GluRs). In broad lines, the GluRs are divided into two major classes: the ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) and the metabotropic Glu receptors ....... In total, over 100 compounds are described by means of chemical structure and available pharmacological data. With this perspective review, it is our intention to ignite and stimulate inspiration for future design and synthesis of novel subtype selective KA receptor agonists....

  5. Binding of Glutamate to the Umami Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez Cacales, J.; Oliviera Costa, S.; de Groot, B.; Walters, D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The umami taste receptor is a heterodimer composed of two members of the T1R taste receptor family: T1R1 and T1R3. It detects glutamate in humans, and is a more general amino acid detector in other species. We have constructed homology models of the ligand binding domains of the human umami receptor (based on crystallographic structures of the metabotropic glutamate receptor of the central nervous system). We have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the ligand bi...

  6. NMDA receptor activation by spontaneous glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Felipe; Kavalali, Ege T

    2009-05-01

    Under physiological conditions N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation requires coincidence of presynaptic glutamate release and postsynaptic depolarization due to the voltage-dependent block of these receptors by extracellular Mg(2+). Therefore spontaneous neurotransmission in the absence of action potential firing is not expected to lead to significant NMDA receptor activation. Here we tested this assumption in layer IV neurons in neocortex at their resting membrane potential (approximately -67 mV). In long-duration stable recordings, we averaged a large number of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs, >100) before or after application of dl-2 amino 5-phosphonovaleric acid, a specific blocker of NMDA receptors. The difference between the two mEPSC waveforms showed that the NMDA current component comprises approximately 20% of the charge transfer during an average mEPSC detected at rest. Importantly, the contribution of the NMDA component was markedly enhanced at membrane potentials expected for the depolarized up states (approximately -50 mV) that cortical neurons show during slow oscillations in vivo. In addition, partial block of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor component of the mEPSCs did not cause a significant reduction in the NMDA component, indicating that potential AMPA receptor-driven local depolarizations did not drive NMDA receptor activity at rest. Collectively these results indicate that NMDA receptors significantly contribute to signaling at rest in the absence of dendritic depolarizations or concomitant AMPA receptor activity. PMID:19261712

  7. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2010-08-22

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Somatostatin receptors in differentiated ovarian tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of somatostatin receptors was investigated in 57 primary human ovarian tumors using in vitro receptor autoradiography with three different somatostatin radioligands, 125I-[Tyr11]-somatostatin-14, 125I-[Leu8, D-Trp22, Tyr25]-somatostatin-28, or 125I-[Tyr3]-SMS 201-995. Three cases, all belonging to epithelial tumors, were receptor positive; specifically 1 of 42 adenocarcinomas, 1 of 3 borderline malignancies, and 1 of 2 cystadenomas. Four other epithelial tumors (3 fibroadenomas, 1 Brenner tumor), 4 sex cord-stromal tumors (2 fibrothecomas, 2 granulosa cell tumors), and 2 germ cell tumors (1 dysgerminoma, 1 teratoma) were receptor negative. In the positive cases, the somatostatin receptors were localized on epithelial cells exclusively, were of high affinity (KD = 4.6 nmol/l [nanomolar]), and specific for somatostatin analogs. These receptors bound somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 radioligands with a higher affinity than the octapeptide [Tyr3]-SMS 201-995. Healthy ovarian tissue had no somatostatin receptors. A subpopulation of relatively well-differentiated ovarian tumors, therefore, was identified pathobiochemically on the basis of its somatostatin receptor content. This small group of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors may be a target for in vivo diagnostic imaging with somatostatin ligands

  9. Effects of thermal fluctuation and the receptor-receptor interaction in bacterial chemotactic signalling and adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yu

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is controlled by the conformational changes of the receptors, in response to the change of the ambient chemical concentration. In a statistical mechanical approach, the signalling due to the conformational changes is a thermodynamic average quantity, dependent on the temperature and the total energy of the system, including both ligand-receptor interaction and receptor-receptor interaction. This physical theory suggests to biology a new understanding of cooperation in lig...

  10. Endothelin B receptors exert antipruritic effects via peripheral κ-opioid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Wenjin; Liang, Jiexian; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    Endothelin B receptor agonists exert antipruritic effects on itching induced via endothelin-1 (ET-1) and compound 48/80. Peripheral µ- and κ-opioid receptors (MORs and KORs, respectively) are reported to be involved in the anti-nociceptive properties triggered by ETB agonists. Therefore, we investigated the role of peripheral opioid receptors in the scratching response induced by ET-1. ETA and ETB antagonists and non-selective and selective opioid receptor antagonists were co-injected with ET...

  11. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signalling receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Resat Haluk; Wiley H Steven; Shankaran Harish

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In addition to initiating signaling events, the activation of cell surface receptors also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (endocytic downregulation) or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of adaptation wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in th...

  12. Profiling Carbohydrate-Receptor Interaction with Recombinant Innate Immunity Receptor-Fc Fusion Proteins*

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Yang, Wen-Bin; Chin, See-Wen; Bo-hua CHEN; Huang, Ming-Ting; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2009-01-01

    The recognition of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other microbes is controlled by host immune cells, which are equipped with many innate immunity receptors, such as Toll-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, and immunoglobulin-like receptors. Our studies indicate that the immune modulating properties of many herbal drugs, for instance, the medicinal fungus Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum) and Cordyceps sinensis, could be attributed to their polysaccharide components. These polysaccharides specifi...

  13. CNTF variants with increased biological potency and receptor selectivity define a functional site of receptor interaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Saggio, I; Gloaguen, I; Poiana, G; Laufer, R

    1995-01-01

    Human CNTF is a neurocytokine that elicits potent neurotrophic effects by activating a receptor complex composed of the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and two signal transducing proteins, which together constitute a receptor for leukemia inhibitory factor (LIFR). At high concentrations, CNTF can also activate the LIFR and possibly other cross-reactive cytokine receptors in the absence of CNTFR alpha. To gain a better understanding of its structure-function relationships ...

  14. Segregation of steroid receptor coactivator-1 from steroid receptors in mammary epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Woo-Shin; DiRenzo, James; DeCaprio, James A.; Santen, Richard J; Brown, Myles; Jeng, Meei-Huey

    1999-01-01

    Steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) family members interact with steroid receptors, including estrogen receptor α (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR), to enhance ligand-dependent transcription. However, the expression of ERα and SRC-1 was found to be segregated in distinct subsets of cells within the epithelium of the estrogen-responsive rat mammary gland. This finding was in contrast to the finding for the stroma, where significant numbers of cells coexpressed ERα and SRC-1. Treatment of...

  15. Hypothyroidism Affects D2 Receptor-mediated Breathing without altering D2 Receptor Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Rio, Rodrigo Del; Schultz, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age- matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a periphera...

  16. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus;

    2012-01-01

    , GPCR oligomerization has been extensively studied using methods like bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and today, receptor-receptor interactions within the GPCR superfamily is a well-established phenomenon. Evidence of the impact of GPCR oligomerization on, e.g., ligand binding, receptor...

  17. A novel fluorescent receptor assay : Based upon receptors embedded in labeled liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viel, Gerhard Theodoor

    1999-01-01

    Receptor proteins play an essential role in life. All organisms, from bacteria to plants, animals and human beings use receptors for their response to (external) signals. By definition, a receptor is a (macro) molecule which is able to recognize a distinct chemical entity (e.g. a hormone or neurotra

  18. A novel fluorescent receptor assay : based upon receptors embedded in labeled liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viel, Gerhard Theodoor

    1999-01-01

    Receptor proteins play an essential role in life. All organisms, from bacteria to plants, animals and human beings use receptors for their response to (external) signals. By definition, a receptor is a (macro) molecule which is able to recognize a distinct chemical entity (e.g. a hormone or neurotra

  19. Autophagy and the (prorenin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KatrinaJeanBinger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The (prorenin receptor (PRR is a newly reported member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS; a hormonal cascade responsible for regulating blood pressure. Originally, the identification of PRR was heralded as the next drug target of the RAS, of which such therapies would have increased benefits against target-organ damage and hypertension. However, in the years since its discovery several conditional knockout mouse models of PRR have demonstrated an essential role for this receptor unrelated to the renin-angiotensin system and blood pressure. Deletion of PRR in podocytes or cardiomyocytes resulted in the rapid onset of organ failure, eventuating in animal mortality after only a matter of weeks. In both cases, deletion of PRR resulted in the intracellular accumulation of autophagosomes and misfolded proteins, indicating a disturbance in autophagy. In light of the fact that the majority of PRR is located intracellularly, this molecular function appears to be more relevant than its ability to bind to high, non-physiological concentrations of (prorenin. This review will focus on the role of PRR in autophagy and its importance in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Understanding the link between PRR, autophagy and how its loss results in cell death will be essential for deciphering its role in physiology and pathology.

  20. Nicotinic receptors in addiction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Frances M; Mojica, Celina Y; Reynaga, Daisy D

    2013-04-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that consist of pentameric combinations of α and β subunits. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the brain and are highly expressed in addiction circuitry. The role of nAChRs in regulating neuronal activity and motivated behavior is complex and varies both in and among brain regions. The rich diversity of central nAChRs has hampered the characterization of their structure and function with use of classic pharmacological techniques. However, recent molecular approaches using null mutant mice with specific regional lentiviral re-expression, in combination with neuroanatomical and electrophysiological techniques, have allowed the elucidation of the influence of different nAChR types on neuronal circuit activity and behavior. This review will address the influence of nAChRs on limbic dopamine circuitry and the medial habenula-interpeduncular nucleus complex, which are critical mediators of reinforced behavior. Characterization of the mechanisms underlying regulation of addiction pathways by endogenous cholinergic transmission and by nicotine may lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for treating tobacco dependence and other addictions. PMID:23247824

  1. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  2. Postischemic regulation of central histamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada, A; Munyao, N; Sallmen, T; Lintunen, M; Leurs, R; Lindsberg, P J; Panula, P

    2005-01-01

    This study characterizes changes occurring in the central histaminergic system associated with ischemia-reperfusion pathology in the rat. Specifically, after a postocclusion time period of 48 h, we have analyzed histamine H(1) receptor mRNA expression, histamine H(2) receptor protein amount and binding densities, and histamine H(3) receptor mRNA expression and binding densities in brain regions that have been suggested to be selectively vulnerable to transient global ischemia, i.e. hippocampus, thalamus, caudate-putamen, and cerebral cortex. We found an increase in H(1) receptor mRNA expression in the caudate-putamen: given that ischemia reduces glucose uptake and H(1) receptor activation has been shown to decrease this effect, an increase of expression levels may result in mitigating tissue damage due to energy failure observed in ischemia. A decrease in H(2) receptor binding densities in the caudate-putamen was also observed; the ischemia-induced decrease in H(2) receptor protein was also detectable by Western blot analysis. This phenomenon may underlie the previously reported ischemia induced striatal dopamine release. H(3) receptor mRNA expression was increased in the caudate putamen of the postischemic brain but was decreased in the globus pallidus and the thalamus; in association with this, H(3) receptor binding densities were increased in the cortex, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, and hippocampus. The upregulation of H(3) receptor ligand binding may be involved in the previously reported continuous neuronal histamine release. Our data suggest that central histamine receptor expression and ligand binding are altered in brain ischemia in distinct areas, and may participate in neuroprotection and/or ischemia-associated neuronal damage. PMID:16181737

  3. Receptor crosstalk: haloperidol treatment enhances A2A adenosine receptor functioning in a transfected cell model

    OpenAIRE

    Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Cuboni, Serena; Catena Dell’Osso, Mario; Maggio, Roberto; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Novi, Francesca; Panighini, Anna; Daniele, Simona; Martini, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors are considered an excellent target for drug development in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. It is noteworthy that the responses evoked by A2A adenosine receptors are regulated by D2 dopamine receptor ligands. These two receptors are co-expressed at the level of the basal ganglia and interact to form functional heterodimers. In this context, possible changes in A2A adenosine receptor functional responses caused by the chronic blockade/activation of D2 dop...

  4. Leptin_receptor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [Gene Wiki

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Leptin receptor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaLeptin receptorFrom Wikipedia, the free encycl ... nce variation at the human leptin receptor gene in lean ... and obese Pima Indians". Hum. Mol. Genet. 6 (5): 6 ...

  5. Steroid Hormone Receptor Signals as Prognosticators for Urothelial Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a substantial amount of preclinical or clinical evidence suggesting that steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals play a critical role in urothelial tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These receptors include androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor, retinoid receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, and others including orphan receptors. In particular, studies using urothelial cancer tissue specimens have demonstrated that elevated or reduced expression of these receptors as well as alterations of their upstream or downstream pathways correlates with patient outcomes. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting that steroid hormone receptors and related signals serve as biomarkers for urothelial carcinoma and are able to predict tumor recurrence or progression.

  6. Counting NMDA Receptors at the Cell Surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Martin; Suh, Y. H.

    Totowa: Humana Press Inc., 2016, s. 31-44. (Neuromethods. 106). ISBN 978-1-4939-2811-8 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02219S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : NMDA receptor * ionotropic glutamate receptor * mammalian cell lines * intracellular trafficking * quantitative assay * biotinylation assay * biochemistry Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. ALT telomeres get together with nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, Eric; Lingner, Joachim

    2015-02-26

    Nuclear receptors bind chromosome ends in "alternative lengthening of telomeres" (ALT) cancer cells that maintain their ends by homologous recombination instead of telomerase. Marzec et al. now demonstrate that, in ALT cells, nuclear receptors not only trigger distal chromatin associations to mediate telomere-telomere recombination events, but also drive chromosome-internal targeted telomere insertions (TTI). PMID:25723159

  8. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  9. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented

  10. Molecular identification of the first SIFamide receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars M; Hauser, Frank; Cazzamali, Giuseppe;

    2006-01-01

    . Database searches revealed SIFamide receptor orthologues in the genomes from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, the silkworm Bombyx mori, the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, and the honey bee Apis mellifera. An alignment of the five insect SIFamide or SIFamide-like receptors showed, again, an...

  11. Nanobiosensors based on individual olfactory receptors

    CERN Document Server

    Pajot-Augy, E

    2008-01-01

    In the SPOT-NOSED European project, nanoscale sensing elements bearing olfactory receptors and grafted onto functionalized gold substrates are used as odorant detectors to develop a new concept of nanobioelectronic nose, through sensitive impedancemetric measurement of single receptor conformational change upon ligand binding, with a better specificity and lower detection threshold than traditional physical sensors.

  12. Efficient Amide Based Halogenide Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xing WU; Feng Hua LI; Hai LIN; Shou Rong ZHU; Hua Kuan LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and anion recognition properties of the amide based phenanthroline derivatives 1, 2 and 3. In all cases 1:1 receptor: anion complexes were observed. The receptors were found to be selective for fluoride and chloride respectively over other putative anionic guest species.

  13. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the asialoglycoprotein receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor undergoes constitutive endocytosis through the coated pit/coated vesicle pathway in hepatocytes. Studies on HepG2 cells have shown that the receptor is phosphorylated at serine under control conditions and following protein kinase C stimulation. This study examined whether the ASGP receptor could also serve as a substrate for a tyrosine kinase in HepG2 cells. 32P labeling was performed in membrane preparations, in permeabilized cells at 4 degrees C, and in intact cells at 37 degrees C. The phosphorylated ASGP receptor was isolated by immunoprecipitation, hydrolyzed in 6 N HCl at 110 degrees C, and analyzed by two-dimensional high voltage electrophoresis. The receptor isolated from a membrane preparation incubated in vitro with [gamma-32P]ATP incorporated radiolabel predominantly (greater than 90%) into phosphotyrosine. ASGP receptor phosphorylation at both tyrosine and serine was detected in intact cells incubated with phosphatase inhibitors for 60 min at 37 degrees C. The presence of both phenylarsine oxide (20 microM) and sodium orthovanadate (200 microM) was required for tyrosine phosphorylation. Use of these inhibitors together resulted in a 16.4-fold increase in phosphorylation of the immunoprecipitated ASGP receptor, whereas phosphorylation of total HepG2 membrane proteins was not significantly augmented by this procedure. Selective proteolytic digestion of ASGP receptors in isolated vesicles demonstrated that the phosphorylation site identified in these studies is located at tyrosine 5 in the cytoplasmic tail

  14. Receptor study of psychiatric disorders using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent receptor studies of psychiatric disorders using PET have been focused on the change in the number of D2 dopamine receptors in the striatum of drug-naive schizophrenic patients. One study confirmed an increase in D2 receptors, while another study denied it. Although there were some differences in the approaches of the two groups, the reason for the discrepancy is not clear yet. Looking to psychiatric disorders other than schizophrenia, our recent study revealed a possible role of dopamine D1 receptors in bipolar mood disorders. However, some problems must be resolved for further receptor studies with PET. For example, our recent study shows that desipamine decreases the in vivo binding of dopramine D1 and D2 receptors whereas these is no effect on dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in vitro. Additionally significant methodological problems lie in the method of evaluation of the non-specific binding and the effect of endogenous neurotransmitters. Moreover, difficulties in the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and ethical problems in psychiatric research are critical factors in receptor studies with PET in psychiatric disorders. (author)

  15. Regulation of gonadotropin receptor gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); R. Kraaij (Robert); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe receptors for the gonadotropins differ from the other G protein-coupled receptors by having a large extracellular hormone-binding domain, encoded by nine or ten exons. Alternative splicing of the large pre-mRNA of approximately 100 kb can result in mRNA species that encode truncated

  16. [Interactions between dopamine receptor and NMDA/type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Ying; Wei, Ting-Jia; Weng, Jing-Jin; Qin, Jiang-Yuan; Huang, Xi; Su, Ji-Ping

    2016-04-25

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the major inhibitory and excitatory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Co-expression of the receptors in the synapse may lead to functional influence between receptors, namely receptor interaction. The interactions between GABAAR and NMDAR can be either positive or negative. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two receptors remain poorly understood, and potential mechanisms include (1) through a second messenger; (2) by receptors trafficking; (3) by direct interaction; (4) by a third receptor-mediation. Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the brain, and its receptors, dopamine receptors (DR) can activate multiple signaling pathways. Earlier studies on the interaction between DR and GABAAR/NMDAR have shown some underlying mechanisms, suggesting that DR could mediate the interaction between GABAAR and NMDAR. This paper summarized some recent progresses in the studies of the interaction between DR and NMDAR/GABAAR, providing a further understanding on the interaction between NMDAR and GABAAR mediated by DR. PMID:27108906

  17. Human Neuroepithelial Cells Express NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappell B

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1 cerebral endothelial barrier and 2 cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1 were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease.

  18. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: gonadal androgen receptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether abnormalities of the androgen receptor previously observed in skin fibroblasts from patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome also occur in the gonads of affected individuals, androgen receptor activity in the gonads of a patient with testicular feminization syndrome was investigated. Using conditions for optimal recovery of androgen receptor from human testes established by previous studies, we detected the presence of a high-affinity (dissociation constant . 3.2 X 10(-10) mol/L), low-capacity (4.2 X 10(-12) mol/mg DNA), androgen-binding protein when tritium-labeled R1881 was incubated at 4 degrees C with nuclear extracts from the gonads of control patients or from a patient with testicular feminization syndrome but not when incubated at 37 degrees C. Thus this patient has an androgen receptor with a temperature lability similar to that of receptors from normal persons

  19. Structure of Leptin Receptor Related with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toleikis, Zigmantas

    The hormone leptin is central to obesity, but the molecular processes underlying the activation of the leptin receptor are unknown. To further the understanding of the system, an atomic resolution structure of this cytokine type I receptor in the unbound inactive form and in the activated bound...... receptor, while the D5 domain is the central leptin-binding domain, implicated in the first steps of activation. Both domains are characterized by a fibronectin type III fold and both contain a conserved WSXWS motif (X represents an unconserved amino acid residue), a distinct feature of the cytokine...... receptors. This motif is thought to play a major role in correct folding and activation of the receptor. The complex between leptin and the D5CA domain was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the amino acid residues implicated in the binding were determined. To investigate which parts...

  20. Molecular pharmacology of human NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Maiken; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Andersen, Karen Toftegaard;

    2012-01-01

    current knowledge of the relationship between NMDA receptor structure and function. We summarize studies on the biophysical properties of human NMDA receptors and compare these properties to those of rat orthologs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive pharmacological characterization that allows side......-by-side comparison of agonists, un-competitive antagonists, GluN2B-selective non-competitive antagonists, and GluN2C/D-selective modulators at recombinant human and rat NMDA receptors. The evaluation of biophysical properties and pharmacological probes acting at different sites on the receptor suggest that the...... binding sites and conformational changes leading to channel gating in response to agonist binding are highly conserved between human and rat NMDA receptors. In summary, the results of this study suggest that no major detectable differences exist in the pharmacological and functional properties of human...

  1. Complex Pharmacology of Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond;

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are historically the most successful family of drug targets. In recent times it has become clear that the pharmacology of these receptors is far more complex than previously imagined. Understanding of the pharmacological regulation of GPCRs now extends beyond...... pharmacology have shaped understanding of the complex pharmacology of receptors that recognize and are activated by nonesterified or "free" fatty acids (FFAs). The FFA family of receptors is a recently deorphanized set of GPCRs, the members of which are now receiving substantial interest as novel targets for...... the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Further understanding of the complex pharmacology of these receptors will be critical to unlocking their ultimate therapeutic potential....

  2. Role of retinoic receptors in lung carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyi-Vamos Ferenc

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several in vitro and in vivo studies have examined the positive and negative effects of retinoids (vitamin A analogs in premalignant and malignant lesions. Retinoids have been used as chemopreventive and anticancer agents because of their pleiotropic regulator function in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation and apoptosis through interaction with two types of nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors. Recent investigations have gradually elucidated the function of retinoids and their signaling pathways and may explain the failure of earlier chemopreventive studies. In this review we have compiled basic and recent knowledge regarding the role of retinoid receptors in lung carcinogenesis. Sensitive and appropriate biological tools are necessary for screening the risk population and monitoring the efficacy of chemoprevention. Investigation of retinoid receptors is important and may contribute to the establishment of new strategies in chemoprevention for high-risk patients and in the treatment of lung cancer.

  3. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors increases 5-HT2A receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Krey, Gesa; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Chourbaji, Sabine; Brandwein, Christiane; Ridder, Stephanie; Halldin, Christer; Gass, Peter; Knudsen, Gitte M; Aznar, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Major depression is associated with both dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and serotonergic deficiency, not the least of the 5-HT2A receptor. However, how these phenomena are linked to each other, and whether a low 5-HT2A receptor level is a state or a trait marker of...... depression is unknown. In mice with altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression we investigated 5-HT2A receptor levels by Western blot and 3H-MDL100907 receptor binding. Serotonin fibre density was analyzed by stereological quantification of serotonin transporter immunopositive fibers. To establish an...... effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A levels, mature organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to corticosterone with or without GR antagonist mifepristone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone. In GR under-expressing mice, hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor protein levels were decreased...

  4. Enhanced sensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptor associated with dopaminergic receptor subsensitivity after chronic antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chronic effects of antidepressant treatment on striatal dopaminergic (DA) and muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors of the rat brain have been examined comparatively in this study using 3H-spiroperidol (3H-SPD) and 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H-QNB) as the respective radioactive ligands. Imipramine and desipramine were used as prototype antidepressants. Although a single administration of imipramine or desipramine did not affect each receptor sensitivity, chronic treatment with each drug caused a supersensitivity of mACh receptor subsequent to DA receptor subsensitivity. Furthermore, it has been suggested that anti-mACh properties of imipramine or desipramine may not necessarily be related to the manifestation of mACh receptor supersensitivity and that sustained DA receptor subsensitivity may play some role in the alterations of mACh receptor sensitivity

  5. Protein-Protein Interactions at the Adrenergic Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Cotecchia, Susanna; Stanasila, Laura; Diviani, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors are among the best characterized G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and knowledge on this receptor family has provided several important paradigms about GPCR function and regulation. One of the most recent paradigms initially supported by studies on adrenergic receptors is that both βarrestins and G protein-coupled receptors themselves can act as scaffolds binding a variety of proteins and this can result in growing complexity of the receptor-mediated cellular effect...

  6. Human Receptor Activation by Aroclor 1260, a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K. Cameron; Clair, Heather B.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A.; States, J. Christopher; Coslo, Denise M.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), ...

  7. Molecular Recognition in the Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Family

    OpenAIRE

    Truc-Chi, T.; Fells, James I.; Osborne, Daniel A.; North, E. Jeffrey; Naor, Mor M.; Parrill, Abby L.

    2007-01-01

    Computational modeling and its application in ligand screening and ligand receptor interaction studies play important roles in structure-based drug design. A series of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor ligands with varying potencies and receptor selectivities were docked into homology models of the S1P1-5 receptors. These studies provided molecular insights into pharmacological trends both across the receptor family as well as at single receptors. This study identifies ligand recognition...

  8. Renal dopamine receptors in health and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, P A; Eisner, G M; Felder, R A

    1998-11-01

    During the past decade, it has become evident that dopamine plays an important role in the regulation of renal function and blood pressure. Dopamine exerts its actions via a class of cell-surface receptors coupled to G-proteins that belong to the rhodopsin family. Dopamine receptors have been classified into two families based on pharmacologic and molecular cloning studies. In mammals, two D1-like receptors that have been cloned, the D1 and D5 receptors (known as D1A and D1B, respectively, in rodents), are linked to stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Three D2-like receptors that have been cloned (D2, D3, and D4) are linked to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and Ca2+ channels and stimulation of K+ channels. All the mammalian dopamine receptors, initially cloned from the brain, have been found to be expressed outside the central nervous system, in such sites as the adrenal gland, blood vessels, carotid body, intestines, heart, parathyroid gland, and the kidney and urinary tract. Dopamine receptor subtypes are differentially expressed along the nephron, where they regulate renal hemodynamics and electrolyte and water transport, as well as renin secretion. The ability of renal proximal tubules to produce dopamine and the presence of receptors in these tubules suggest that dopamine can act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion; this action becomes most evident during extracellular fluid volume expansion. This renal autocrine/paracrine function is lost in essential hypertension and in some animal models of genetic hypertension; disruption of the D1 or D3 receptor produces hypertension in mice. In humans with essential hypertension, renal dopamine production in response to sodium loading is often impaired and may contribute to the hypertension. The molecular basis for the dopaminergic dysfunction in hypertension is not known, but may involve an abnormal post-translational modification of the dopamine receptor. PMID:9839770

  9. Cocaine inhibits dopamine D2 receptor signaling via sigma-1-D2 receptor heteromers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Navarro

    Full Text Available Under normal conditions the brain maintains a delicate balance between inputs of reward seeking controlled by neurons containing the D1-like family of dopamine receptors and inputs of aversion coming from neurons containing the D2-like family of dopamine receptors. Cocaine is able to subvert these balanced inputs by altering the cell signaling of these two pathways such that D1 reward seeking pathway dominates. Here, we provide an explanation at the cellular and biochemical level how cocaine may achieve this. Exploring the effect of cocaine on dopamine D2 receptors function, we present evidence of σ1 receptor molecular and functional interaction with dopamine D2 receptors. Using biophysical, biochemical, and cell biology approaches, we discovered that D2 receptors (the long isoform of the D2 receptor can complex with σ1 receptors, a result that is specific to D2 receptors, as D3 and D4 receptors did not form heteromers. We demonstrate that the σ1-D2 receptor heteromers consist of higher order oligomers, are found in mouse striatum and that cocaine, by binding to σ1 -D2 receptor heteromers, inhibits downstream signaling in both cultured cells and in mouse striatum. In contrast, in striatum from σ1 knockout animals these complexes are not found and this inhibition is not seen. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which the initial exposure to cocaine can inhibit signaling via D2 receptor containing neurons, destabilizing the delicate signaling balance influencing drug seeking that emanates from the D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons in the brain.

  10. Anorexia nervosa and estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Gorwood, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a chronic psychiatric disorder with a high prevalence of 0.6% and the highest mortality rates among psychiatric diseases, around 10%, mostly due to undernutrition and suicide. AN is characterized by physiological features with a body mass index less than 17.5 kg/m(2), low bone mineral density and amenorrhea, psychological symptoms with a distortion of image body, and behavioral abnormalities. Estrogen molecules and estrogen biological pathway are clearly involved in food intake and body weight in animals and humans. Further, hypoestrogenism has been demonstrated in AN patients and convergent evidence involves the estrogen pathway in the development of AN. AN presents a high heritability and polymorphisms in genes coding the estrogen receptors alpha and beta have been found significantly associated with the disorder. This chapter shows the implication of estrogens in AN and suggests investigation to develop future pharmacological treatments for anorexia. PMID:23601424

  11. Emerging GLP-1 receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Asger; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have become available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These agents exploit the physiological effects of GLP-1, which is able to address several of the pathophysiological features of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1R agonists...... presently available are administered once or twice daily, but several once-weekly GLP-1R agonists are in late clinical development. Areas covered: The present review aims to give an overview of the clinical data on the currently available GLP-1R agonists used for treatment of type 2 diabetes, exenatide and...... liraglutide, as well as the emerging GLP-1R agonists including the long-acting compounds. Expert opinion: An emerging therapeutic trend toward initial or early combination therapy with metformin- and incretin-based therapy is anticipated for patients with type 2 diabetes. GLP-1-based therapy has so far proven...

  12. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology.

  13. Selective effects of ligands on vitamin D3 receptor- and retinoid X receptor-mediated gene activation in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Lemon, B D; Freedman, L P

    1996-01-01

    Steroid/nuclear hormone receptors are ligand-regulated transcription f factors that play key roles in cell regulation, differentiation, and oncogenesis. Many nuclear receptors, including the human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor (VDR), bind cooperatively to DNA either as homodimers or as heterodimers with the 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) receptor (retinoid X-receptor [RXR]). We have previously reported that the ligands for VDR and RXR can differentially modulate the affinity of the receptors' i...

  14. Multiple autophosphorylation sites of the epidermal growth factor receptor are essential for receptor kinase activity and internalization. Contrasting significance of tyrosine 992 in the native and truncated receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorkin, A; Helin, K; Waters, C M; Carpenter, G; Beguinot, L

    1992-01-01

    similar to a kinase-negative receptor. Mutation of tyrosine residue Y992 alone in the context of full length EGF receptor, however, did not affect receptor internalization or kinase activity toward phospholipase C-gamma 1. These data indicate that tyrosine 992 is critical for substrate phosphorylation and...... internalization only in the context of the truncated receptor, and that minor autophosphorylation sites, such as Y992, may act as compensatory regulatory sties in the absence of the major EGF receptor autophosphorylation sites....

  15. GABAA receptors: post-synaptic co-localization and cross-talk with other receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system (CNS, and importantly contribute to the functional regulation of the nervous system. Several studies in the last few decades have convincingly shown that GABA can be co-localized with other neurotransmitters in the same synapse, and can be co-released with these neurotransmitters either from the same vesicles or from different vesicle pools. The co-released transmitters may act on post-synaptically co-localized receptors resulting in a simultaneous activation of both receptors. Most of the studies investigating such co-activation observed a reduced efficacy of GABA for activating GABAARs and thus, a reduced inhibition of the postsynaptic neuron. Similarly, in several cases activation of GABAARs has been reported to suppress the response of the associated receptors. Such a receptor cross-talk is either mediated via a direct coupling between the two receptors or via the activation of intracellular signaling pathways and is used for fine tuning of inhibition in the nervous system. Recently, it was demonstrated that a direct interaction of different receptors might already occur in intracellular compartments and might also be used to specifically target the receptors to the cell membrane. In this article, we provide an overview on such cross-talks between GABAARs and several other neurotransmitter receptors and briefly discuss their possible physiological and clinical importance.

  16. Action mechanisms of Liver X Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbi, Chiara; Warner, Margaret [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, University of Houston, 3056 Cullen Blv, 77204 Houston, Texas (United States); Gustafsson, Jan-Åke, E-mail: jgustafs@central.uh.edu [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, University of Houston, 3056 Cullen Blv, 77204 Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Novum S-141 86 (Sweden)

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • LXRα and LXRβ are ligand-activated nuclear receptors. • They share oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, RXR. • LXRs regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, CNS and immune functions, and water transport. - Abstract: The two Liver X Receptors, LXRα and LXRβ, are nuclear receptors belonging to the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. They share more than 78% homology in amino acid sequence, a common profile of oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, Retinoid X Receptor. LXRs play crucial roles in several metabolic pathways: lipid metabolism, in particular in preventing cellular cholesterol accumulation; glucose homeostasis; inflammation; central nervous system functions and water transport. As with all nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of LXR is the result of an orchestration of numerous cellular factors including ligand bioavailability, presence of corepressors and coactivators and cellular context i.e., what other pathways are activated in the cell at the time the receptor recognizes its ligand. In this mini-review we summarize the factors regulating the transcriptional activity and the mechanisms of action of these two receptors.

  17. Action mechanisms of Liver X Receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • LXRα and LXRβ are ligand-activated nuclear receptors. • They share oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, RXR. • LXRs regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, CNS and immune functions, and water transport. - Abstract: The two Liver X Receptors, LXRα and LXRβ, are nuclear receptors belonging to the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. They share more than 78% homology in amino acid sequence, a common profile of oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, Retinoid X Receptor. LXRs play crucial roles in several metabolic pathways: lipid metabolism, in particular in preventing cellular cholesterol accumulation; glucose homeostasis; inflammation; central nervous system functions and water transport. As with all nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of LXR is the result of an orchestration of numerous cellular factors including ligand bioavailability, presence of corepressors and coactivators and cellular context i.e., what other pathways are activated in the cell at the time the receptor recognizes its ligand. In this mini-review we summarize the factors regulating the transcriptional activity and the mechanisms of action of these two receptors

  18. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.W.; Sant' Ambrogio, F.B.; Orani, G.P.; Sant' Ambrogio, G.; Mathew, O.P. (Univ. of Texas, Galveston (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

  19. Cannabinoid receptor type-1: breaking the dogmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets Garcia, Arnau; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is abundantly expressed in the brain. This system regulates a plethora of physiological functions and is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of endocannabinoids. In this review, we highlight the new advances in cannabinoid signaling, focusing on a key component of the ECS, the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB 1). In recent years, the development of new imaging and molecular tools has demonstrated that this receptor can be distributed in many cell types (e.g., neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g., mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB 1 receptors according to their specific localization (e.g., glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Moreover, this receptor is expressed in the periphery, where it can modulate periphery-brain connections. Finally, the better understanding of the CB 1 receptor structure led researchers to propose interesting and new allosteric modulators. Thus, the advances and the new directions of the CB 1 receptor field will provide new insights and better approaches to profit from its interesting therapeutic profile.

  20. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  1. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  2. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  3. Receptor mapping in psychiatric patients with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes some data of our studies with the single-photon-emission-computerized tomography (SPECT), focussing on the dopamine-D2- and the benzodiazepine receptor mapping. Benzodiazepine receptors: Central benzodiazepine receptors (BZr) can be visualized with iomazenil which is an analogue of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil, labeled with 123-iodine. Since the involvement of the BZr system is discussed in the pathogenesis of anxiety and depression, patients with these disorders were investigated. A third study investigated the BZr-occupancy during benzodiazepine treatment (lorazepam). Results: (a) Patients with panic disorders had lower iomazenil uptake values compared to epileptic patients. (b) Depressed patients showed a positive correlation between severity of illness and frontal uptake. (c) BZr occupancy during lorazepam treatment was measurable, but not associated with lorazepam plasma levels. Dopamine-D2-receptors: With 123-I-iodobenzamide (IBZM), and iodine-labeled dopamine receptor ligand, the D2 receptor density can be measured by a semiquantitative approach (striatum/frontal cortex=ST/FC). Therefore, we investigated the D2-receptor occupancy during treatment with typical and atypical neuroleptics in relationship to dosages (normalized with different formulas of chlorpromazine equivalents), side effects, and prolactin plasma levels. Results: Dependent on the selected formula for chlorpromazine equivalents, the ST/FC ratio was correlated with dosages. Side effects and prolactin plasma levels showed a negative association with lower ST/FC ratios. (orig.)

  4. Tachykinin receptors in the equine pelvic flexure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachykinins, of which substance P (SP) is the prototype, are neuropeptides which are widely distributed in the nervous systems. In the equine gut, SP is present in enteric nerves and is a powerful constrictor of enteric muscle; in other species, SP is also known to have potent vasodilatory and pro-inflammatory effects. The specific effects of SP are determined by the subtype of receptor present in the target tissue. There are 3 known subtypes of tachykinin receptors, distinguished by their relative affinities for SP and other tachykinins. The distribution of SP binding sites in the equine pelvic flexure was determined using 125I-Bolton Hunter SP (I-BHSP) autoradiography. Most I-BHSP binding sites were determined to be saturable and specific, therefore presumably representing tachykinin receptors. The greatest degree of I-BHSP binding occurred over very small vessels, and over the muscularis mucosae; I-BHSP binding was also intense over the circular muscle of the muscularis externa and mucosa, and present, although less intense, over the longitudinal muscle of the muscularis externa. Competition of I-BHSP with specific receptor agonists for binding sites in the equine pelvic flexure were used to determine the subtypes of tachykinin receptors present. The neurokinin-1 receptor subtype predominated in the equine pelvic flexure, followed by the neurokinin-3 receptor subtype

  5. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  6. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity

  7. Soluble cytokine receptors in biological therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Crespo, Fabian A; Sun, Xichun

    2002-08-01

    Due to their fundamental involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases, cytokines constitute key targets for biotherapeutic approaches. The discovery that soluble forms of cytokine receptors are involved in the endogenous regulation of cytokine activity has prompted substantial interest in their potential application as immunotherapeutic agents. As such, soluble cytokine receptors have many advantages, including specificity, low immunogenicity and high affinity. Potential disadvantages, such as low avidity and short in vivo half-lifes, have been addressed by the use of genetically-designed receptors, hybrid proteins or chemical modifications. The ability of many soluble cytokine receptors to inhibit the binding and biological activity of their ligands makes them very specific cytokine antagonists. Several pharmaceutical companies have generated a number of therapeutic agents based on soluble cytokine receptors and many of them are undergoing clinical trials. The most advanced in terms of clinical development is etanercept (Enbrel, Immunex), a fusion protein between soluble TNF receptor Type II and the Fc region of human IgG1. This TNF-alpha; antagonist was the first soluble cytokine receptor to receive approval for use in humans. In general, most agents based on soluble cytokine receptors have been safe, well-tolerated and have shown only minor side effects in the majority of patients. Soluble cytokine receptors constitute a new generation of therapeutic agents with tremendous potential for applications in a wide variety of human diseases. Two current areas of research are the identification of their most promising applications and characterisation of their long-term effects. PMID:12171504

  8. Immune response to snake envenoming and treatment with antivenom; complement activation, cytokine production and mast cell degranulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley F Stone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Snake bite is one of the most neglected public health issues in poor rural communities worldwide. In addition to the clinical effects of envenoming, treatment with antivenom frequently causes serious adverse reactions, including hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis and pyrogenic reactions. We aimed to investigate the immune responses to Sri Lankan snake envenoming (predominantly by Russell's viper and antivenom treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Plasma concentrations of Interleukin (IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, soluble TNF receptor I (sTNFRI, anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a, C5a; markers of complement activation, mast cell tryptase (MCT, and histamine were measured in 120 Sri Lankan snakebite victims, both before and after treatment with antivenom. Immune mediator concentrations were correlated with envenoming features and the severity of antivenom-induced reactions including anaphylaxis. Envenoming was associated with complement activation and increased cytokine concentrations prior to antivenom administration, which correlated with non-specific systemic symptoms of envenoming but not with coagulopathy or neurotoxicity. Typical hypersensitivity reactions to antivenom occurred in 77/120 patients (64%, satisfying criteria for a diagnosis of anaphylaxis in 57/120 (48%. Pyrogenic reactions were observed in 32/120 patients (27%. All patients had further elevations in cytokine concentrations, but not complement activation, after the administration of antivenom, whether a reaction was noted to occur or not. Patients with anaphylaxis had significantly elevated concentrations of MCT and histamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated that Sri Lankan snake envenoming is characterized by significant complement activation and release of inflammatory mediators. Antivenom treatment further enhances the release of inflammatory mediators in all patients, with anaphylactic reactions characterised by high

  9. 6-Methoxyflavanones as Bitter Taste Receptor Blockers

    OpenAIRE

    Roland, W.S.U.; Gouka, R J; Gruppen, H.; Driesse, M.; Buren, van, Ruud; Smit, G; Vincken, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Many (dietary) bitter compounds, e.g. flavonoids, activate bitter receptor hTAS2R39 in cell-based assays. Several flavonoids, amongst which some flavanones, are known not to activate this receptor. As certain flavanones are known to mask bitter taste sensorially, flavanones might act as bitter receptor antagonists. Fourteen flavanones were investigated for their potential to reduce activation of hTAS2R39 by epicatechin gallate (ECG), one of the main bitter compounds occurring in green tea. Th...

  10. Receptores de radio monochip para FM

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel López, José María

    2005-01-01

    Este libro aborda de forma estructurada tanto los aspectos de diseño como los de realización de receptores de radio para la banda de FM. Tras unos primeros capítulos dedicados al estudio de las propiedades de la modulación de frecuencia y de los circuitos básicos que configuran un receptor de radio, se desarrolla un minucioso análisis de los circuitos integrados TDA7000/10/21. Paso a paso se muestra cómo diseñar con estos circuitos receptores de FM que, al requerir muy pocos ajustes, puede...

  11. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  12. Interaction of ethanol with opiate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the action of ethanol on membrane-bound opiate receptors. Ethanol at 370C was shown to produce dose-dependent inhibition of binding of 3H-naloxone with opiate receptors. ID50 under these conditions was 462 mM. Temperature-dependent inhibition of ligand-receptor binding suggests that ethanol does not compete for the stereospecific binding site of 3H-naloxone. Analysis of the inhibitory action of ethanol on 3H-naloxone binding in animals at different stages of experimental alcoholism revealed no differences between the control and experimental animals after 3.5 and 10 months of voluntary alcoholization

  13. Somatostatin receptors in differentiated ovarian tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Reubi, J. C.; Horisberger, U.; Klijn, J. G.; Foekens, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of somatostatin receptors was investigated in 57 primary human ovarian tumors using in vitro receptor autoradiography with three different somatostatin radioligands, 125I-[Tyr11]-somatostatin-14, 125I-[Leu8, D-Trp22, Tyr25]-somatostatin-28, or 125I-[Tyr3]-SMS 201-995. Three cases, all belonging to epithelial tumors, were receptor positive; specifically 1 of 42 adenocarcinomas, 1 of 3 borderline malignancies, and 1 of 2 cystadenomas. Four other epithelial tumors (3 fibroadenomas, ...

  14. Advances in Variations of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 Status in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yuan; Zhang Lili

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and molecular targeted therapy are vital means in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC), whose reasonable and standard applications are of great importance to prolong patients’ survival and improve the quality of life. The expressions of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) present signiifcant differences between primary and metastatic breast cancer. However, these differences may affect the selection of MBC patients for therapeutic strategies and judgment on the prognosis. Hence, the relevant researches on variations of hormone receptors and HER-2 in primary and metastatic breast cancer, discordant causes of ER, PR and HER-2 expression in primary and metastatic lesions and clinical value of biopsy to the metastases are reviewed in the study.

  15. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J. (UWA); (St. Vincent); (Queensland)

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  16. Identification of the salmon somatolactin receptor, a new member of the cytokine receptor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Haruhisa; Ozaki, Yuichi; Pierce, Andrew L; Adachi, Shinji; Yamauchi, Kohei; Hara, Akihiko; Swanson, Penny; Dickhoff, Walton W

    2005-05-01

    Somatolactin (SL) is a pituitary hormone of the GH/prolactin (PRL) family that so far has been found only in fish. Compared with GH and PRL, the primary structure of SL is highly conserved among divergent fish species, suggesting it has an important function and a discriminating receptor that constrains structural change. However, SL functions are poorly understood, and receptors for SL have not yet been identified. During cloning of GH receptor cDNA from salmon, we found a variant with relatively high (38-58%) sequence identity to vertebrate GH receptors and low (28-33%) identity to PRL receptors; however, the recombinant protein encoding the extracellular domain showed only weak binding of GH. Ligand binding of the recombinant extracellular domain for this receptor confirmed that the cDNA encoded a specific receptor for SL. The SL receptor (SLR) has common features of a GH receptor including FGEFS motif, six cysteine residues in the extracellular domain, a single transmembrane region, and Box 1 and 2 regions in the intracellular domain. These structural characteristics place the SLR in the cytokine receptor type I homodimeric group, which includes receptors for GH, PRL, erythropoietin, thrombopoietin, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and leptin. Transcripts for SLR were found in 11 tissues with highest levels in liver and fat, supporting the notion that a major function of SL is regulation of lipid metabolism. Cloning SLR cDNA opens the way for discovery of new SL functions and target tissues in fish, and perhaps novel members of this receptor family in other vertebrates. PMID:15718271

  17. Thyroid hormone receptor β mutants: Dominant negative regulators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ action

    OpenAIRE

    Araki, Osamu; Ying, Hao; Furuya, Fumihiko; Zhu, Xuguang; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) and peroxisome proliferators have overlapping metabolic effects in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis. Their actions are mediated by their respective receptors: thyroid hormone receptors (TR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). We recently found that a dominantly negative TRβ mutant (PV) that causes a genetic disease, resistance to thyroid hormone, acts to repress the ligand (troglitazone)-mediated transcriptional activity of PPARγ in cultured thyroi...

  18. Trans-activation by thyroid hormone receptors: functional parallels with steroid hormone receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, C C; Evans, R M

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormones are mediated through nuclear receptor proteins that modulate the transcription of specific genes in target cells. We previously isolated cDNAs encoding two different mammalian thyroid hormone receptors, one from human placenta (hTR beta) and the other from rat brain (rTR alpha), and showed that their in vitro translation products bind thyroid hormones with the characteritistic affinities of the native thyroid hormone receptor. We now demonstrate that both of th...

  19. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signaling receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2007-11-09

    The activation of cell surface receptors in addition to initiating signaling events also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (receptor downregulation) or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of “adaptation” wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in the presence of sustained ligand stimuli and thereby prevents the cell from “over-responding” to the ligand. Here we use the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) as model systems to respectively examine the effects of downregulation and desensitization on the ability of signaling receptors to decode time-varying ligand stimuli. We show that downregulation and desensitization mechanisms can lead to tight and efficient input-output coupling thereby ensuring synchronous processing of ligand inputs. Frequency response analysis indicates that upstream elements of the EGFR and GPCR networks behave like low-pass filters. Receptor downregulation and desensitization increase the filter bandwidth thereby enabling the receptor systems to decode inputs in a wider frequency range. Further, system-theoretic analysis reveals that the receptor systems are analogous to classical mechanical over-damped oscillators. This analogy enables us to describe downregulation and desensitization as phenomena that make the systems more resilient in responding to ligand perturbations thereby improving the stability of the system resting state. We hypothesize that, in addition to serving as mechanisms for adaptation, receptor downregulation and desensitization play a critical role in temporal information processing.

  20. The insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in regulation of the receptor kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P; Baron, V; Alengrin, F; Takata, Y; Webster, N J; Olefsky, J M; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-09-21

    During the insulin receptor activation process, ligand binding and autophosphorylation induce two distinct conformational changes in the C-terminal domain of the receptor beta-subunit. To analyze the role of this domain and the involvement of the C-terminal autophosphorylation sites (Tyr1316 and Tyr1322) in receptor activation, we used (i) antipeptide antibodies against three different C-terminal sequences (1270-1281, 1294-1317, and 1309-1326) and (ii) an insulin receptor mutant (Y/F2) where Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 have been replaced by Phe. We show that the autophosphorylation-induced C-terminal conformational change is preserved in the Y/F2 receptor, indicating that this change is not induced by phosphorylation of the C-terminal sites but most likely by phosphorylation of the major sites in the kinase domain (Tyr1146, Tyr1150, and Tyr1151). Binding of antipeptide antibodies to the C-terminal domain modulated (activated or inhibited) both mutant and wild-type receptor-mediated phosphorylation of poly(Glu/Tyr). In contrast to the wild-type receptor, Y/F2 exhibited the same C-terminal configuration before and after insulin binding, evidencing that mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 introduced conformational changes in the C-terminus. Finally, the mutant receptor was 2-fold more active than the wild-type receptor for poly(Glu/Tyr) phosphorylation. In conclusion, the whole C-terminal region of the insulin receptor beta-subunit is likely to exert a regulatory influence on the receptor kinase activity. Perturbations of the C-terminal region, such as binding of antipeptides or mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322, provoke alterations at the receptor kinase level, leading to activation or inhibition of the enzymic activity. PMID:7690586

  1. Formyl peptide receptors are candidate chemosensory receptors in the vomeronasal organ

    OpenAIRE

    Liberles, Stephen D.; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Kuang, Donghui; Contos, James J.; Wilson, Kathleen L.; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Liberles, David A; Buck, Linda B.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of receptors that detect environmental stimuli lays a foundation for exploring the mechanisms and neural circuits underlying sensation. The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO), which detects pheromones and other semiochemicals, has 2 known families of chemoreceptors, V1Rs and V2Rs. Here, we report a third family of mouse VNO receptors comprising 5 of 7 members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family. Unlike other FPRs, which function in the immune system, these FPRs are selec...

  2. Modulation of Opioid Receptor Ligand Affinity and Efficacy Using Active and Inactive State Receptor Models

    OpenAIRE

    Anand, Jessica P.; Purington, Lauren C.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Traynor, John R.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2012-01-01

    Mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonists are widely used for the treatment of pain; however chronic use results in the development of tolerance and dependence. It has been demonstrated that co-administration of a MOR agonist with a delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist maintains the analgesia associated with MOR agonists, but with reduced negative side effects. Using our newly refined opioid receptor models for structure-based ligand design, we have synthesized several pentapeptides with tailored a...

  3. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  4. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Julie Ladeby; Blaabjerg, Morten; Bogetofte Thomasen, Helle;

    2015-01-01

    Human neural stem cells (NSCs) from the developing embryo or the subventricular zone of the adult brain can potentially elicit brain repair after injury or disease, either via endogenous cell proliferation or by cell transplantation. Profound knowledge of the diverse signals affecting these cells...... differentiated an immortalized, forebrain-derived stem cell line in the presence or absence of glutamate and with addition of either the group I mGluR agonist DHPG or the selective antagonists; MPEP (mGluR5) and LY367385 (mGluR1). Characterization of differentiated cells revealed that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 were...... is, however, needed to realise their therapeutic potential. Glutamate and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) affect proliferation and survival of rodent NSCs both during embryonic and postnatal development. To investigate the role of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and mGluR5) on human NSCs, we...

  5. Application of autoradiography in receptor localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies demonstrated that 3H-DHA bound to frozen section of guineapig lung with the characteristics expected of interactions with beta-receptors. Specific binding accounted for, as mean value, 85 per cent of total binding when the lung sections were incubated with 2nM 3H-DHA at 25 deg C for 20 minutes. The Binding was saturable with a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 32.37 ± 6.0 fmol/mg wet weight of the tissue. Binding was of high affinity with a Kd of 1.8 ± 0.51 nM. Autoradiography revealed that the distribution of beta-receptors in the lung sections was widespread. The highest density of beta-receptors was found in alveolar wall, labelling also occured in airway epithelium, bronchial smooth muscle and submucosal glands. Beta-receptors were sparse in vascular smooth muscle and connective tissue

  6. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor gene transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have studied in vitro transcription of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor proto-oncogene using nuclear extracts of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells, which overproduce the EGF receptor. With the in vitro system we found that Sp1 and other trans-acting factors bound to the EGF receptor promoter regions and are required for maximal expression. Fractionation showed that a DEAE-Sepharose fraction (BA) contained a novel factor, which specifically stimulated EGF receptor transcription 5- to 10-fold. The molecular mass of the native form of the factor is about 270-kDa based on its migration on Sephacryl S-300. This factor may activate transcription of the proto-oncogene through a weak or indirect interaction with the DNA template

  7. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Semen Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihani, Saleem A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs used to treat the acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as ulcer and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Although such drugs, especially ranitidine and famotidine, are still widely used, their effects on semen quality, and hence on male infertility, is still unclear. This MiniReview systematically addresses and summarizes the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, nizatidine and famotidine) on semen quality, particularly, on sperm function. Cimetidine appears to have adverse effects on semen quality. While the effects of ranitidine and nizatidine on semen quality are still controversial, famotidine does not appear to change semen quality. Therefore, additional studies will be required to clarify whether histamine-2 receptor-independent effects of these drugs play a role in semen quality as well as further clinical studies including direct comparison of the histamine-2 receptor antagonists. PMID:26176290

  8. Structure biology of selective autophagy receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process tightly regulated by various autophagy-related proteins. It is generally classified into non-selective and selective autophagy. Whereas non-selective autophagy is triggered when the cell is under starvation, selective autophagy is involved in eliminating dysfunctional organelles, misfolded and/or ubiquitylated proteins, and intracellular pathogens. These components are recognized by autophagy receptors and delivered to phagophores. Several selective autophagy receptors have been identified and characterized. They usually have some common domains, such as motif, a specific cargo interacting (ubiquitin-dependent or ubiquitin-independent) domain. Recently, structural data of these autophagy receptors has been described, which provides an insight of their function in the selective autophagic process. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date findings about the structure-function of autophagy receptors that regulates selective autophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 73-80] PMID:26698872

  9. Adenosine and its receptors as therapeutic targets: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdeva, Sakshi; Gupta, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the authors is to present an overview of adenosine and its receptors, which are G-protein coupled receptors. The four known adenosine receptor subtypes are discussed along with the therapeutic potential indicating that these receptors can serve as targets for various dreadful diseases.

  10. G-protein-coupled receptors: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most versatile group of cell surface receptors. Drugs active at these receptors have therapeutic actions across a wide range of human diseases ranging from allergic rhinitis to pain, hypertension and schizophrenia. This review provides a brief historical overview of the properties and signalling characteristics of this important family of receptors.

  11. The MC4 receptor and control of appetite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, R A H; Tiesjema, B; Hillebrand, J J G; la Fleur, S E; Kas, M J H; de Krom, M

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the human melanocortin (MC)4 receptor have been associated with obesity, which underscores the relevance of this receptor as a drug target to treat obesity. Infusion of MC4R agonists decreases food intake, whereas inhibition of MC receptor activity by infusion of an MC receptor antagoni

  12. Posttranslational Modification Biology of Glutamate Receptors and Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Fibuch, Eugene E.; Wang, John Q.

    2011-01-01

    Posttranslational covalent modifications of glutamate receptors remain a hot topic. Early studies have established that this family of receptors, including almost all ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes, undergoes active phosphorylation at serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues on their intracellular domains. Recent evidence identifies several glutamate receptor subtypes to be direct substrates for palmitoylation at cysteine residues. Other modifications such as ubiqui...

  13. Regulation of Glutamate Receptors by Their Auxiliary Subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are major excitatory receptors in the brain. Recent findings have established auxiliary subunits of glutamate receptors as critical modulators of synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and neurological disorder. The elucidation of the molecular rules governing glutamate receptors and subunits will improve our understanding of synapses and of neural-circuit regulation in the brain.

  14. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    The human chemokine system comprises 19 seven-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors and 45 endogenous chemokines that often interact with each other in a promiscuous manner. Due to the chemokine system's primary function in leukocyte migration, it has a central role in immune homeostasis and...... interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly...

  15. The G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P;

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C G protein-coupled receptor, that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L......, there is increasing evidence that the receptor is involved in regulation of inflammation, metabolism and endocrine functions. GPRC6A could thus be an interesting target for new drugs in these therapeutic areas....

  16. Nuclear Receptor Genes - Regulation and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Yogita

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that typically bind ligands in order to regulate the expression level of their target genes. Members of this family work with their co-regulators and repressors to maintain a variety of biological and physiological processes such as metabolism, development and reproduction. Nuclear receptors are promising drug targets and have therefore attracted immense attention in recent decades in the field of pharmacology. Irregular expression of nuclear recept...

  17. G Protein–Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    The rhodopsin crystal structure provides a structural basis for understanding the function of this and other G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). The major structural motifs observed for rhodopsin are expected to carry over to other GPCRs, and the mechanism of transformation of the receptor from inactive to active forms is thus likely conserved. Moreover, the high expression level of rhodopsin in the retina, its specific localization in the internal disks of the photoreceptor structures [term...

  18. Morphine Induces Desensitization of Insulin Receptor Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu; Eitan, Shoshana; Wu, Jiong; Evans, Christopher J.; Kieffer, Brigitte; Sun, Xiaojian; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.

    2003-01-01

    Morphine analgesia is mediated principally by the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Since morphine and other opiates have been shown to influence glucose homeostasis, we investigated the hypothesis of direct cross talk between the MOR and the insulin receptor (IR) signaling cascades. We show that prolonged morphine exposure of cell lines expressing endogenous or transfected MOR, IR, and the insulin substrate 1 (IRS-1) protein specifically desensitizes IR signaling to Akt and ERK cascades. Morphine cau...

  19. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J. E.; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O. H.; Tadepalli, A.; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe he...

  20. Molecular Physiology of Enteric Opioid Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Galligan, James J.; Akbarali, Hamid I.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca2+ channels and activation of K+ channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter rel...

  1. Angiotensin Receptors, Autoimmunity, and Preeclampsia1

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Yang; Zhou, Cissy Chenyi; RAMIN, Susan M.; Kellems, Rodney E.

    2007-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorder that causes substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite being a leading cause of maternal death and a major contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity, the mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of preeclampsia are poorly understood. Recent studies indicate that women with preeclampsia have autoantibodies that activate the angiotensin receptor, AT1, and that autoantibody-mediated receptor activation contri...

  2. Estrogen receptors in mouse testis and sperm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostálová, Pavla; Děd, Lukáš; Pěknicová, Jana

    Montréal: Society for the Study of Reproduction, 2013 - (Suarez, S.). s. 340-340 [SSR 46th Annual Meeteing. Reproduction Health: Nano to Global. 22.07.2013-26.07.2013, Montréal] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Estrogen receptor α * Estrogen receptor β * Reproduction * Spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    A high degree of structural heterogeneity of the GABAA receptors (GABAARs) has been revealed and is reflected in multiple receptor subtypes. The subunit composition of GABAAR subtypes is believed to determine their localization relative to the synapses and adapt their functional properties to the...... antagonists have been essential in defining the tonic current but both remaining issues concerning the GABAARs involved and the therapeutic possibilities of modulating tonic inhibition underline the need for GABAAR antagonists with improved selectivity....

  4. Estrogen receptor β in male mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostálová, Pavla; Děd, Lukáš; Dorosh, Andriy; Elzeinová, Fatima; Pěknicová, Jana

    Elsinore: International Society of Andrology, 2014. s. 48-48. [18th European Testis Workshop. 13.05.2014-17.05.2014, Elsinore] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) CZ1.05/1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR GA14-05547S Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : estrogen receptor alpha * estrogen receptor beta * spermatozoa Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Melanocortin receptors and their accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cooray, Sadani N.; Clark, Adrian J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The melanocortin receptor family consists of 5 members which belong to the GPCR superfamily. Their specific ligands, the melanocortins are peptide hormones which are formed by the proteolytic cleavage of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) protein. It is now recognised that certain GPCRs require accessory proteins for their function. Like these GPCRs the melanocortin receptor family is also known to be associated with accessory proteins that regulate their function. ...

  6. Tachykinins and tachykinin receptors in human uterus

    OpenAIRE

    Patak, Eva; Luz Candenas, M; Pennefather, Jocelyn N.; Ziccone, Sebastian; Lilley, Alison; Martín, Julio D; Flores, Carlos; Mantecón, Antonio G; Story, Margot E; Pinto, Francisco M

    2003-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the nature of the receptors mediating contractile effects of tachykinins in the uteri of nonpregnant women, and to analyse the expression of preprotachykinins (PPT), tachykinin receptors and the cell-surface peptidase, neprilysin (NEP), in the myometrium from pregnant and nonpregnant women.The neurokinin B (NKB) precursor PPT-B was expressed in higher levels in the myometrium from nonpregnant than from pregnant women. Faint expression of PPT-A mRNA was det...

  7. Neuropeptide Receptor Transcriptome Reveals Unidentified Neuroendocrine Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Yamamoto, Sachie; Žitňan, Dušan; Watanabe, Ken; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo; Kaneko, Yu; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT), remain undefined. ...

  8. Androgen receptor profiling predicts prostate cancer outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Stelloo, Suzan; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; van der Poel, Henk G.; de Jong, Jeroen; van Leenders, Geert JLH; Jenster, Guido; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Bergman, Andries M; Zwart, Wilbert

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent malignancy in men. Biomarkers for outcome prediction are urgently needed, so that high-risk patients could be monitored more closely postoperatively. To identify prognostic markers and to determine causal players in prostate cancer progression, we assessed changes in chromatin state during tumor development and progression. Based on this, we assessed genomewide androgen receptor/chromatin binding and identified a distinct androgen receptor/chromati...

  9. NMDA receptor function, memory, and brain aging

    OpenAIRE

    Newcomer, John W.; Farber, Nuri B.; Olney, John W.

    2000-01-01

    An increasing level of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction within the brain is associated with memory and learning impairments, with psychosis, and ultimately with excitotoxic brain injury. As the brain ages, the NMDA receptor system becomes progressively hypofunctional, contributing to decreases in memory and learning performance. In those individuals destined to develop Alzheimer's disease, other abnormalities (eg, amyloidopathy and oxidative stress) interact to increase the N...

  10. Biased Signaling of Protease-activated Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    PeishenZhao; NigelWilliamBunnett

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their role in protein degradation and digestion, proteases can also function as hormone-like signaling molecules that regulate vital patho-physiological processes, including inflammation, hemostasis, pain and repair mechanisms. Certain proteases can signal to cells by cleaving protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of four G protein-coupled receptors. PARs are expressed by almost all cell types, control important physiological and disease-relevant processes, and are an e...

  11. GABAB Receptors, Schizophrenia and Sleep Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantrowitz, Joshua; Citrome, Leslie; Javitt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for an intrinsic relationship between sleep, cognition and the symptomatic manifestations of schizophrenia is accumulating. This review presents evidence for the possible utility of GABAB receptor agonists for the treatment of subjective and objective sleep abnormalities related to schizophrenia. At the phenotypic level, sleep disturbance occurs in 16–30% of patients with schizophrenia and is related to reduced quality of life and poor coping skills. On the neurophysiological level, studies suggest that sleep deficits reflect a core component of schizophrenia. Specifically, slow-wave sleep deficits, which are inversely correlated with cognition scores, are seen. Moreover, sleep plays an increasingly well documented role in memory consolidation in schizophrenia. Correlations of slow-wave sleep deficits with impaired reaction time and declarative memory have also been reported. Thus, both behavioural insomnia and sleep architecture are critical therapeutic targets in patients with schizophrenia. However, long-term treatment with antipsychotics often results in residual sleep dysfunction and does not improve slow-wave sleep, and adjunctive GABAA receptor modulators, such as benzodiazepines and zolpidem, can impair sleep architecture and cognition in schizophrenia. GABAB receptor agonists have therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. These agents have minimal effect on rapid eye movement sleep while increasing slow-wave sleep. Preclinical associations with increased expression of genes related to slow-wave sleep production and circadian rhythm function have also been reported. GABAB receptor deficits result in a sustained hyperdopaminergic state and can be reversed by a GABAB receptor agonist. Genetic, postmortem and electrophysiological studies also associate GABAB receptors with schizophrenia. While studies thus far have not shown significant effects, prior focus on the use of GABAB receptor agonists has been on the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, with

  12. P2X receptors in neuroglia

    OpenAIRE

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Pankratov, Yuri; Lalo, Ulyana; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Different types of ionotropic P2X purinoceptors are expressed in all major types of neuroglia, where they mediate a variety of physiological and pathological signaling. Cortical astrocytes express specific P2X1/5 heteromeric receptors that are activated by ongoing synaptic transmission and can trigger fast local signaling through elevation in cytoplasmic Ca2+ and Na+ concentrations. Oligodendrocytes express several types of P2X receptors that may control their development and mediate axonal–g...

  13. Steroid hormone receptors in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, B A; Nurshireen, A; Rashidah, M; Zainal, B Y; Roslan, B A; Mahamooth, Z

    1990-06-01

    One hundred and six prostatic tissue samples obtained from transurethral resection were analysed for androgen and estrogen receptors. In 62 of these, progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were also assayed. Steroid receptors were assayed using single saturation dose 3H-labelled ligand assays. Ninety percent of the 97 prostatic hyperplasia tissues and six of the nine prostatic carcinoma tissues were positive for androgen receptors. Estrogen receptors were only present in 19% and 33% respectively. Progesterone receptors were present in 70% of the tissues, but glucocorticoid receptors were present in only 16% of prostatic hyperplasia and none in prostatic carcinoma. PMID:1725553

  14. Profiling epidermal growth factor receptor and heregulin receptor 3 heteromerization using receptor tyrosine kinase heteromer investigation technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli Ayoub

    Full Text Available Heteromerization can play an important role in regulating the activation and/or signal transduction of most forms of receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. The study of receptor heteromerization has evolved extensively with the emergence of resonance energy transfer based approaches such as bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET. Here, we report an adaptation of our Receptor-Heteromer Investigation Technology (Receptor-HIT that has recently been published as the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR Heteromer Identification Technology (GPCR-HIT. We now demonstrate the utility of this approach for investigating RTK heteromerization by examining the functional interaction between the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor (EGFR; also known as erbB1/HER1 and heregulin (HRG receptor 3 (HER3; also known as erbB3 in live HEK293FT cells using recruitment of growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2 to the activated receptors. We found that EGFR and HER3 heteromerize specifically as demonstrated by HRG inducing a BRET signal between EGFR/Rluc8 and Grb2/Venus only when HER3 was co-expressed. Similarly, EGF stimulation promoted a specific BRET signal between HER3/Rluc8 and Grb2/Venus only when EGFR was co-expressed. Both EGF and HRG effects on Grb2 interaction are dose-dependent, and specifically blocked by EGFR inhibitor AG-1478. Furthermore, truncation of HER3 to remove the putative Grb2 binding sites appears to abolish EGF-induced Grb2 recruitment to the EGFR-HER3 heteromer. Our results support the concept that EGFR interacts with Grb2 in both constitutive and EGF-dependent manners and this interaction is independent of HER3 co-expression. In contrast, HER3-Grb2 interaction requires the heteromerization between EGFR and HER3. These findings clearly indicate the importance of EGFR-HER3 heteromerization in HER3-mediated Grb2-dependent signaling pathways and supports the central role of HER3 in the diversity and regulation of HER

  15. Direct imaging of lateral movements of AMPA receptors inside synapses

    CERN Document Server

    Tardin, Catherine; Bats, Cécile; Lounis, Brahim; Choquet, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Trafficking of AMPA receptors in and out of synapses is crucial for synaptic plasticity. Previous studies have focused on the role of endo/exocytosis processes or that of lateral diffusion of extra-synaptic receptors. We have now directly imaged AMPAR movements inside and outside synapses of live neurons using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Inside individual synapses, we found immobile and mobile receptors, which display restricted diffusion. Extra-synaptic receptors display free diffusion. Receptors could also exchange between these membrane compartments through lateral diffusion. Glutamate application increased both receptor mobility inside synapses and the fraction of mobile receptors present in a juxtasynaptic region. Block of inhibitory transmission to favor excitatory synaptic activity induced a transient increase in the fraction of mobile receptors and a decrease in the proportion of juxtasynaptic receptors. Altogether, our data show that rapid exchange of receptors between a synaptic and ext...

  16. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC50 for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by ∼ 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  17. The new biology of histamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Feng; Thurmond, Robin L

    2008-03-01

    The physiologic functions of histamine have been recognized for more than 100 years, yet new roles are still being uncovered. Most importantly, a newly discovered receptor of the amine has helped refine our understanding of histamine. This new receptor, the histamine H4 receptor (H4R), has a higher affinity for histamine compared with the histamine H1 receptor and appears to be more selectively expressed, found mainly on hematopoietic cells. H4R is involved in chemotaxis and inflammatory mediator release by eosinophils, mast cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and T cells. Studies in animal models using selective antagonists or H4R-deficient mice have shown a role for the receptor in inflammation in vivo. In particular, H4R antagonists have shown promise in experimental models of asthma and pruritus, two conditions where currently marketed antihistamines targeting the histamine H1 receptor are not optimally effective in humans. Thus, a new class of H4R-specific antihistamines may be distinctively effective in treating allergic diseases associated with chronic pruritus and asthma. PMID:18377770

  18. Molecular physiology of enteric opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, James J; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2014-09-10

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca(2+) channels and activation of K(+) channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca(2+) channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl(-) secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  19. Rapid steroid hormone actions via membrane receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Nofrat; Verma, Anjali; Bivens, Caroline B; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2016-09-01

    Steroid hormones regulate a wide variety of physiological and developmental functions. Traditional steroid hormone signaling acts through nuclear and cytosolic receptors, altering gene transcription and subsequently regulating cellular activity. This is particularly important in hormonally-responsive cancers, where therapies that target classical steroid hormone receptors have become clinical staples in the treatment and management of disease. Much progress has been made in the last decade in detecting novel receptors and elucidating their mechanisms, particularly their rapid signaling effects and subsequent impact on tumorigenesis. Many of these receptors are membrane-bound and lack DNA-binding sites, functionally separating them from their classical cytosolic receptor counterparts. Membrane-bound receptors have been implicated in a number of pathways that disrupt the cell cycle and impact tumorigenesis. Among these are pathways that involve phospholipase D, phospholipase C, and phosphoinositide-3 kinase. The crosstalk between these pathways has been shown to affect apoptosis and proliferation in cardiac cells, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes as well as cancer cells. This review focuses on rapid signaling by 17β-estradiol and 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 to examine the integrated actions of classical and rapid steroid signaling pathways both in contrast to each other and in concert with other rapid signaling pathways. This new approach lends insight into rapid signaling by steroid hormones and its potential for use in targeted drug therapies that maximize the benefits of traditional steroid hormone-directed therapies while mitigating their less desirable effects. PMID:27288742

  20. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with 125I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of 125iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype

  1. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  2. NMDA receptors in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llansola, Marta; Rodrigo, Regina; Monfort, Pilar; Montoliu, Carmina; Kosenko, Elena; Cauli, Omar; Piedrafita, Blanca; El Mlili, Nisrin; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-12-01

    The NMDA type of glutamate receptors modulates learning and memory. Excessive activation of NMDA receptors leads to neuronal degeneration and death. Hyperammonemia and liver failure alter the function of NMDA receptors and of some associated signal transduction pathways. The alterations are different in acute and chronic hyperammonemia and liver failure. Acute intoxication with large doses of ammonia (and probably acute liver failure) leads to excessive NMDA receptors activation, which is responsible for ammonia-induced death. In contrast, chronic hyperammonemia induces adaptive responses resulting in impairment of signal transduction associated to NMDA receptors. The function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway is impaired in brain in vivo in animal models of chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia and in homogenates from brains of patients died in hepatic encephalopathy. The impairment of this pathway leads to reduced cGMP and contributes to impaired cognitive function in hepatic encephalopathy. Learning ability is reduced in animal models of chronic liver failure and hyperammonemia and is restored by pharmacological manipulation of brain cGMP by administering phosphodiesterase inhibitors (zaprinast or sildenafil) or cGMP itself. NMDA receptors are therefore involved both in death induced by acute ammonia toxicity (and likely by acute liver failure) and in cognitive impairment in hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:17701332

  3. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, J; Hoeper, M M

    2008-02-01

    The endothelin (ET) system, especially ET-1 and the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Together with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, ET receptor antagonists have become mainstays in the current treatment of PAH. Three substances are currently available for the treatment of PAH. One of these substances, bosentan, blocks both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, whereas the two other compounds, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are more selective blockers of the ET(A) receptor. There is ongoing debate as to whether selective or nonselective ET receptor blockade is advantageous in the setting of PAH, although there is no clear evidence that receptor selectivity is relevant with regard to the clinical effects of these drugs. For the time being, other features, such as safety profiles and the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used in the treatment of PAH, may be more important than selectivity or nonselectivity when selecting treatments for individual patients. PMID:18238950

  4. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor...-4. Palsson-McDermott EM, O'Neill LA. Immunology. 2004 Oct;113(2):153-62. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal... transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signal

  5. Expressing exogenous functional odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Fomina Alla F; Dadsetan Sepehr; Chen Huaiyang; Gong Qizhi

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Olfactory discrimination depends on the large numbers of odorant receptor genes and differential ligand-receptor signaling among neurons expressing different receptors. In this study, we describe an in vitro system that enables the expression of exogenous odorant receptors in cultured olfactory sensory neurons. Olfactory sensory neurons in the culture express characteristic signaling molecules and, therefore, provide a system to study receptor function within its intrinsic...

  6. BRET biosensor analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StuartMaudsley

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET is an improved version of earlier resonance energy transfer technologies used for the analysis of biomolecular protein interaction. BRET analysis can be applied to many transmembrane receptor classes, however the majority of the early published literature on BRET has focused on G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR research. In contrast, there is limited scientific literature using BRET to investigate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK activity. This limited investigation is surprising as RTKs often employ dimerization as a key factor in their activation, as well as being important therapeutic targets in medicine, especially in the cases of cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative and respiratory conditions. In this review, we consider an array of studies pertinent to RTKs and other non-GPCR receptor protein-protein signaling interactions; more specifically we discuss receptor-protein interactions involved in the transmission of signaling communication. We have provided an overview of functional BRET studies associated with the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK super family involving: neurotrophic receptors (e.g. tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR; insulinotropic receptors (e.g. insulin receptor (IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR and growth factor receptors (e.g. ErbB receptors including the EGFR, the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR and the c-kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR. In addition, we review BRET-mediated studies of other tyrosine kinase-associated receptors including cytokine receptors, i.e. leptin receptor (OB-R and the growth hormone receptor (GHR. It is clear even from the relatively sparse experimental RTK BRET evidence that there is tremendous potential for this technological application for the functional investigation of RTK biology.

  7. Structure, function and regulation of the melanocortin receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yingkui

    2011-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven-transmembrane (TM) domain proteins that are coupled to G-proteins and signaled through intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Many structural features conserved in other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found in the melanocortin receptors. There are five melanocortin receptor subtypes and each of the melanocortin receptor subtypes has a different pattern of tissue expression and has its own profile regarding the relative potency of diff...

  8. Physiological roles of the melanocortin MC3 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Renquist, Benjamin J.; Lippert, Rachel; Sebag, Julien A.; Ellacott, Kate L.J; Cone, Roger D.

    2011-01-01

    The melanocortin MC3 receptor remains the most enigmatic of the melanocortin receptors with regard to its physiological functions. The receptor is expressed both in the CNS and in multiple tissues in the periphery. It appears to be an inhibitory autoreceptor on proopiomelanocortin neurons, yet global deletion of the receptor causes an obesity syndrome. Knockout of the receptor increases adipose mass without a readily measurable increase in food intake or decrease in energy expenditure. And fi...

  9. Receptor autoradiography in the hippocampus of man and rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter deals with the following questions: regional distribution of binding sites for 5-HT, glutamate, and acetylcholine in Ammon's horn and the dentate gyrus of rat and human brain; comparison of receptor distribution and neuronal pathways with identified transmitters; correlation of region-specific densities between different receptors and receptor subtypes (colocalization of different receptors on the level of hippocampal layers) and comparison of receptor distribution in human and rat hippocampus

  10. Differential effect of glucocorticoid receptor antagonists on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Francesca; Knight, David M; Droste, Susanne K; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacSweeney, Cliona P; Thomson, Fiona J; Craighead, Mark; Peeters, Bernard WMM; Lightman, Stafford L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of RU486 and S-P, a more selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist from Schering-Plough, were investigated on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding. In the in vitro study, AtT20 cells were treated with vehicle or with RU486, S-P or corticosterone (3–300 nM) or co-treated with vehicle or glucocorticoid receptor antagonists (3–300 nM) and 30 nM corticosterone. Both glucocorticoid receptor antagonists induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation but only RU486 induced DNA binding. RU486 potentiated the effect of corticosterone on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding, S-P inhibited corticosterone-induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation, but not glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding. In the in vivo study, adrenalectomized rats were treated with vehicle, RU486 (20 mg/kg) and S-P (50 mg/kg) alone or in combination with corticosterone (3 mg/kg). RU486 induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation in the pituitary, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding in the hippocampus, whereas no effect of S-P on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation or DNA binding was observed in any of the areas analysed. These findings reveal differential effects of RU486 and S-P on areas involved in regulation of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activity in vivo and they are important in light of the potential use of this class of compounds in the treatment of disorders associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. PMID:20093322

  11. Identification and characterization of novel renal sensory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premraj Rajkumar

    Full Text Available Recent studies have highlighted the important roles that "sensory" receptors (olfactory receptors, taste receptors, and orphan "GPR" receptors play in a variety of tissues, including the kidney. Although several studies have identified important roles that individual sensory receptors play in the kidney, there has not been a systematic analysis of the renal repertoire of sensory receptors. In this study, we identify novel renal sensory receptors belonging to the GPR (n = 76, olfactory receptor (n = 6, and taste receptor (n = 11 gene families. A variety of reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR screening strategies were used to identify novel renal sensory receptors, which were subsequently confirmed using gene-specific primers. The tissue-specific distribution of these receptors was determined, and the novel renal ORs were cloned from whole mouse kidney. Renal ORs that trafficked properly in vitro were screened for potential ligands using a dual-luciferase ligand screen, and novel ligands were identified for Olfr691. These studies demonstrate that multiple sensory receptors are expressed in the kidney beyond those previously identified. These results greatly expand the known repertoire of renal sensory receptors. Importantly, the mRNA of many of the receptors identified in this study are expressed highly in the kidney (comparable to well-known and extensively studied renal GPCRs, and in future studies it will be important to elucidate the roles that these novel renal receptors play in renal physiology.

  12. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  13. Cannabinoid-receptor expression in human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaboula, M; Rinaldi, M; Carayon, P; Carillon, C; Delpech, B; Shire, D; Le Fur, G; Casellas, P

    1993-05-15

    Marijuana and many of its constituent cannabinoids influence the central nervous system (CNS), probably through the cannabinoid receptor, which has recently been cloned in rat and human. While numerous reports have also described effects of cannabinoids on the immune system, the observation of both mRNA and cannabinoid receptor has hitherto been exclusively confined to the brain, a reported detection in the testis being the sole example of its presence at the periphery. Here we report the expression of the cannabinoid receptor on human immune tissues using a highly sensitive polymerase-chain-reaction-based method for mRNA quantification. We show that, although present in a much lower abundance than in brain, cannabinoid receptor transcripts are found in human spleen, tonsils and peripheral blood leukocytes. The distribution pattern displays important variations of the mRNA level for the cannabinoid receptor among the main human blood cell subpopulations. The rank order of mRNA levels in these cells is B cells > natural killer cells > or = polymorphonuclear neutrophils > or = T8 cells > monocytes > T4 cells. Cannabinoid-receptor mRNA, which is also found in monocytic, as well as T and B leukemia cell lines but not in Jurkat cells, presents a great diversity of expression on these cells as well, B-cell lines expressing a much higher level than T-cell lines. The cannabinoid receptor PCR products from leukocytes and brain are identical both in size and sequence suggesting a strong similarity between central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors. The expression of this receptor was demonstrated on membranes of the myelomonocytic U937 cells using the synthetic cannabinoid [3H]CP-55940 as ligand. The Kd determined from Scatchard analysis was 0.1 nM and the Bmax for membranes was 525 fmol/mg protein. The demonstration of cannabinoid-receptor expression at both mRNA and protein levels on human leukocytes provides a molecular basis for cannabinoid action on these cells. PMID

  14. Implementation of a fluorescence-based screening assay identifies histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit as subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara; Kurtkaya, Natalie L; Yuan, Hongjie; Vance, Katie M; Orr, Anna G; Kvist, Trine; Ogden, Kevin K; Le, Phuong; Vellano, Kimberly M; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Du, Yuhong; Qui, Min; Murphy, T J; Snyder, James P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptor function, including the histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit, as well as the vanilloid receptor transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine. These compounds are noncompetitive antagonists and the histamine...

  15. Retinoid X Receptor Regulates Nur77/Thyroid Hormone Receptor 3-Dependent Apoptosis by Modulating Its Nuclear Export and Mitochondrial Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Xihua; Liu, Wen; Lin, Feng; Li, Hui; Kolluri, Siva Kumar; Lin, Bingzhen; Han, Young-Hoon; Dawson, Marcia I.; Zhang, Xiao-kun

    2004-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) plays a central role in the regulation of intracellular receptor signaling pathways by acting as a ubiquitous heterodimerization partner of many nuclear receptors, including the orphan receptor Nur77 (also known as thyroid hormone receptor 3 or NGFI-B), which translocates from the nucleus to mitochondria, where it interacts with Bcl-2 to induce apoptosis. Here, we report that RXRα is required for nuclear export and mitochondrial targeting of Nur77 through their uniqu...

  16. Thyrotropin-luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor extracellular domain chimeras as probes for thyrotropin receptor function.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagayama, Y; Wadsworth, H L; Chazenbalk, G D; Russo, D.; Seto, P; Rapoport, B

    1991-01-01

    To define the sites in the extracellular domain of the human thyrotropin (TSH) receptor that are involved in TSH binding and signal transduction we constructed chimeric thyrotropin-luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin (TSH-LH/CG) receptors. The extracellular domain of the human TSH receptor was divided into five regions that were replaced, either singly or in various combinations, with homologous regions of the rat LH/CG receptor. The chimeric receptors were stably expressed in Chinese ...

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of gastrin and motilin peptides, their receptors, VIP receptors and caspase activity from the abomasal wall of cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Özcan, Aycan

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the possible effects of gastrin, motilin peptides, their receptors and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) receptors on the occurrence of abomasal displacement (AD). A decreased amount of stimulating factors (motilin, motilin receptors) accompanied by an increased amount of inhibiting factors (gastrin, gastrin receptors, VIP receptors) in the abomasal wall could be a cause of the hypo- or atony of the abomasum prior to the abomasal displac...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor that activate glucose transport but not insulin receptor kinase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Forsayeth, J R; Caro, J F; Sinha, M K; Maddux, B A; Goldfine, I D

    1987-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the alpha subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate ...

  19. Bidirectional effects of fentanyl on dendritic spines and AMPA receptors depend upon the internalization of mu opioid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hang; Higgins, Paul; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee; Liao, Dezhi

    2009-01-01

    Fentanyl is a frequently used and abused opioid analgesic and can cause internalization of mu opioid receptors (MORs). Receptor internalization modulates the signaling pathways of opioid receptors. Because changes in dendritic spines and synaptic AMPA receptors play important roles in addiction and memory loss, we investigated how fentanyl affects dendritic spines and synaptic AMPA receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons. Fentanyl at low concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 µM) caused collapse of d...

  20. Selenoprotein W controls epidermal growth factor receptor surface expression, activation and degradation via receptor ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) is the founding member of the ErbB family of growth factor receptors that modulate a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways controlling growth, proliferation and differentiation. Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a diet-regulated, highly conserved...

  1. Vitamin D receptor and estrogen receptor gene polymorphisms in postmenopausal Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Y Z; Hassager, C; Heegaard, Anne-Marie;

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and estrogen receptor (ER) genes in relation to biochemical markers of bone turnover (serum osteocalcin and urinary collagen type I degradation products (CrossLaps), and to study ER genotypes in relation to serum lipoproteins, blood...

  2. Soman- or kainic acid-induced convulsions decrease muscarinic receptors but not benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding to muscarinic receptors decreased in the rat forebrain after convulsions induced by a single dose of either soman, a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, or kainic acid, an excitotoxin. A Rosenthal plot revealed that the receptors decreased in number rather than affinity. When the soman-induced convulsions were blocked, the decrease in muscarinic receptors at 3 days was less extensive than when convulsions occurred and at 10 days they approached control levels in most of the brain areas. The most prominent decrements in QNB binding were in the piriform cortex where the decline in QNB binding is probably related to the extensive convulsion-associated neuropathology. The decrements in QNB binding after convulsions suggest that the convulsive state leads to a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors in some brain areas. In contrast to the decrease in QNB binding after convulsions, [3H]flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors did not change even in the piriform cortex where the loss in muscarinic receptors was most prominent. Thus, it appears that those neuronal processes that bear muscarinic receptors are more vulnerable to convulsion-induced change than those with benzodiazepine receptors

  3. Pharmacophore Pattern Identification of Tachykinin Receptor Selective Peptide Agonists: Implications in Receptor Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Dike

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian tachykinin (TK peptides and their three Neurokinin (NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptors represent an effector system with wide-ranging actions on neuronal, airway smooth muscle, mucosal, endothelial, immune, inflammatory and remodeling cell function. Recent clinical and preclinical data suggests the pathophysiological role of TKs in various diseases including asthma, emesis and depression. The TK-NK receptor interactions and overlapping functions mediated by each NK receptor indicate added therapeutic benefit of using multiple NK receptor blockade. In the absence of structural data on neurokinin receptors, the membrane-induced structure of tachykinins play an important role as a first step towards understanding structure-activity relationship. A comparison of the conformational features of different NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptor agonists highlights several features which might be responsible for determining selectivity for the particular receptor subtype. An attempt has been made to correlate the observed conformational differences to the binding ability and biological activity of various NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptor agonists. The membrane bound conformations of tachykinins have been used as a starting point, leading to useful pharmacophore patterns that can be used for identifying lead structures with novel scaffolds.

  4. The WSXWS motif in cytokine receptors is a molecular switch involved in receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagil, Robert; Knudsen, Maiken J.; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt;

    2012-01-01

    The prolactin receptor (PRLR) is activated by binding of prolactin in a 2:1 complex, but the activation mechanism is poorly understood. PRLR has a conserved WSXWS motif generic to cytokine class I receptors. We have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the membrane prox...

  5. Identification of novel viral receptors with cell line expressing viral receptor-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Mei; Ye, Jianqiang; Qin, Aijian; Wang, Lin; Hu, Xuming; Qian, Kun; Shao, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    The viral cell receptors and infection can be blocked by the expression of the viral receptor-binding protein. Thus, the viral cell receptor is an attractive target for anti-viral strategies, and the identification of viral cell receptor is critical for better understanding and controlling viral disease. As a model system for viral entry and anti-retroviral approaches, avian sarcoma/leukosis virus (ASLV, including the A-J ten subgroups) has been studied intensively and many milestone discoveries have been achieved based on work with ASLV. Here, we used a DF1 cell line expressed viral receptor-binding protein to efficiently identify chicken Annexin A2 (chANXA2) as a novel receptor for retrovirus ALV-J (avian leukosis virus subgroup J). Our data demonstrate that antibodies or siRNA to chANXA2 significantly inhibited ALV-J infection and replication, and over-expression of chANXA2 permitted the entry of ALV-J into its non-permissible cells. Our findings have not only identified chANXA2 as a novel biomarker for anti-ALV-J, but also demonstrated that cell lines with the expression of viral receptor-binding protein could be as efficient tools for isolating functional receptors to identify novel anti-viral targets. PMID:25604889

  6. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric (Michigan-Med); (Van Andel)

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  7. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-05-05

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4/sup 0/C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37/sup 0/C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation.

  8. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 40C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 370C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation

  9. On the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers and Their Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in the Central Nervous System: Focus on Their Role in Pain Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kjell Fuxe; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Luigi F. Agnati; Alicia Rivera; Kathleen Van Craenenbroeck; Wilber Romero-Fernandez; Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2013-01-01

    The modulatory role of allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in the pain pathways of the Central Nervous System and the peripheral nociceptors has become of increasing interest. As integrators of nociceptive and antinociceptive wiring and volume transmission signals, with a major role for the opioid receptor heteromers, they likely have an important role in the pain circuits and may be involved in acupuncture. The delta opioid receptor (DOR) exerts an antagonistic allosteric influence on ...

  10. DMPD: Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15031527 Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses... (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses. PubmedID 1503...1527 Title Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses

  11. Genome-Wide Profiling of Liver X Receptor, Retinoid X Receptor, and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α in Mouse Liver Reveals Extensive Sharing of Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boergesen, Michael; Pedersen, Thomas Åskov; Gross, Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    The liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that form permissive heterodimers with retinoid X receptor (RXR) and are important regulators of lipid metabolism in the liver. We have recently shown that RXR agonist-induced hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis in mice are dependent on LXRs...

  12. G-protein coupling of cannabinoid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since the cloning of the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the early 1990's extensive research has focused on understanding their signal transduction pathways. While it has been known for sometime that both receptors can couple to intracellular signalling via pertussis toxin sensitive G-proteins (Gi/Go), the specificity and kinetics of these interactions have only recently been elucidated. We have developed an in situ reconstitution approach to investigating receptor-G-protein interactions. This approach involves chaotropic extraction of receptor containing membranes in order to inactivate or remove endogenous G-proteins. Recombinant or isolated brain G-proteins can then be added back to the receptors, and their activation monitored through the binding of [35S]-GTPγS. This technique has been utilised for an extensive study of cannabinoid receptor mediated activation of G-proteins. In these studies we have established that CB1 couples with high affinity to both Gi and Go type G-proteins. In contrast, CB2 couples strongly to Gi, but has a very low affinity for Go. This finding correlated well with the previous findings that while CB1 and CB2 both couple to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, CB1 but not CB2 could also inhibit calcium channels. We then examined the ability of a range of cannabinoid agonists to activate the Gi and Go via CB1. Conventional receptor theory suggests that a receptor is either active or inactive with regard to a G-protein and that the active receptor activates all relevant G-proteins equally. However, in this study we found that agonists could produce different degrees of activation, depending on which G-protein was present. Further studies have compared the ability of the two endocannabinoids to drive the activation of Gi or Go. These studies show that agonists can induce multiple forms of activated receptor that differ in their ability to catalyse the activation of Gi or Go. The ability of an agonist to drive a receptor

  13. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  14. Brain CB2 Receptors: Implications for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Roche

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although previously thought of as the peripheral cannabinoid receptor, it is now accepted that the CB2 receptor is expressed in the central nervous system on microglia, astrocytes and subpopulations of neurons. Expression of the CB2 receptor in the brain is significantly lower than that of the CB1 receptor. Conflicting findings have been reported on the neurological effects of pharmacological agents targeting the CB2 receptor under normal conditions. Under inflammatory conditions, CB2 receptor expression in the brain is enhanced and CB2 receptor agonists exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects. These findings have prompted research into the CB2 receptor as a possible target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Neuroinflammatory alterations are also associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and polymorphisms in the CB2 gene have been reported in depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. This review will examine the evidence to date for a role of brain CB2 receptors in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  15. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of [125I]insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine

  16. Estrogen receptor beta treats Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Tian; Jia Fan; Yang Zhao; Sheng Bi; Lihui Si; Qun Liu

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies have shown that estrogen receptor β can attenuate the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β protein on PC12 cells through the Akt pathway without estrogen stimulation. In this study, we aimed to observe the effect of estrogen receptor β in Alzheimer's disease rat models established by intraventricular injection of amyloid β protein. Estrogen receptor β lentiviral particles delivered via intraventricular injection increased Akt content in the hippocampus, decreased interleukin-1β mRNA, tumor necrosis factor α mRNA and amyloid β protein levels in the hippocampus, and improved the learning and memory capacities in Alzheimer's disease rats. Estrogen receptor β short hairpin RNA lentiviral particles delivered via intraventricular injection had none of the above impacts on Alzheimer's disease rats. These experimental findings indicate that estrogen receptor β, independent from estrogen, can reduce inflammatory reactions and amyloid β deposition in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease rats, and improve learning and memory capacities. This effect may be mediated through activation of the Akt pathway.

  17. Roles of transferrin receptors in erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Soichiro; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H Phillip; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-07-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis, which is mainly provided by macrophages and the intestines in a transferrin (Tf)-bound form. Bone marrow erythroblasts incorporate Tf through endocytosis, which is mediated by transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Recently, human TFR1, aside from its role as a Tf receptor, was also found to be a receptor for the H-subunit of ferritin (FTH). In humans, hematopoietic erythroid precursor cells express high levels of TFR1 and specifically take up the FTH homopolymer (H-ferritin). H-ferritin inhibits the formation of burst forming unit-erythroid colonies in vitro. TFR2, which is also a Tf receptor, is predominantly expressed in hepatocytes and erythroid precursor cells. In the liver, TFR2 forms a complex with HFE, a hereditary hemochromatosis-associated protein, and acts as an iron sensor. In mice, hepatocyte-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene has been shown to cause systemic iron-overload with decreased expression of hepcidin, the central regulator of iron homeostasis. In erythroid cells, TFR2 forms a complex with the erythropoietin receptor and facilitates its trafficking to the cell membrane. Moreover, hematopoietic cell-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene causes microcytic erythrocytosis in mice. This review focuses on the molecular evolution and functions of these TFRs and their ligands. PMID:27498743

  18. Medicinal chemistry of competitive kainate receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ann M; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-02-16

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1-5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure-activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  19. Dihydropyridine receptor mutations cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptacek, L.J.; Leppert, M.F. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Tawil, R. [Univ. of Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) is an autosomal dominant skeletal muscle disorder manifested by episodic weakness associated with low serum potassium. Genetic linkage analysis has localized the hypoKPP gene to chromosome 1q31-q32 near a dihydropyridine receptor (DHP) gene. This receptor functions as a voltage-gated calcium channel and is also critical for excitation-contraction coupling in a voltage-sensitive and calcium-independent manner. We have characterized patient-specific DHP receptor mutations in 11 probands of 33 independent hypoKPP kindreds that occur at one of two adjacent nucleotides within the same codon and predict substitution of a highly conserved arginine in the S4 segment of domain 4 with either histidine or glycine. In one kindred, the mutation arose de novo. Taken together, these data establish the DHP receptor as the hypoKPP gene. We are unaware of any other human diseases presently known to result from DHP receptor mutations.

  20. Molecular evolution of the neuropeptide S receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejkiran Pitti

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide S receptor (NPSR is a recently deorphanized member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily and is activated by the neuropeptide S (NPS. NPSR and NPS are widely expressed in central nervous system and are known to have crucial roles in asthma pathogenesis, locomotor activity, wakefulness, anxiety and food intake. The NPS-NPSR system was previously thought to have first evolved in the tetrapods. Here we examine the origin and the molecular evolution of the NPSR using in-silico comparative analyses and document the molecular basis of divergence of the NPSR from its closest vertebrate paralogs. In this study, NPSR-like sequences have been identified in a hemichordate and a cephalochordate, suggesting an earlier emergence of a NPSR-like sequence in the metazoan lineage. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the NPSR is most closely related to the invertebrate cardioacceleratory peptide receptor (CCAPR and the group of vasopressin-like receptors. Gene structure features were congruent with the phylogenetic clustering and supported the orthology of NPSR to the invertebrate NPSR-like and CCAPR. A site-specific analysis between the vertebrate NPSR and the well studied paralogous vasopressin-like receptor subtypes revealed several putative amino acid sites that may account for the observed functional divergence between them. The data can facilitate experimental studies aiming at deciphering the common features as well as those related to ligand binding and signal transduction processes specific to the NPSR.

  1. Cholesterol modulates bitter taste receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pydi, Sai Prasad; Jafurulla, Md; Wai, Lisa; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Chelikani, Prashen; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Bitter taste perception in humans is believed to act as a defense mechanism against ingestion of potential toxic substances. Bitter taste is perceived by 25 distinct bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the overall context of the role of membrane lipids in GPCR function, we show here that T2R4, a representative member of the bitter taste receptor family, displays cholesterol sensitivity in its signaling function. In order to gain further insight into cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4, we mutated two residues Tyr114(3.59) and Lys117(3.62) present in the cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif in T2R4 with alanines. We carried out functional characterization of the mutants by calcium mobilization, followed by cholesterol depletion and replenishment. CRAC motifs in GPCRs have previously been implicated in preferential cholesterol association. Our analysis shows that the CRAC motif represents an intrinsic feature of bitter taste receptors and is conserved in 22 out of 25 human T2Rs. We further demonstrate that Lys117, an important CRAC residue, is crucial in the reported cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4. Interestingly, cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4 was observed at quinine concentrations in the lower mM range. To the best of our knowledge, our results represent the first report addressing the molecular basis of cholesterol sensitivity in the function of taste receptors. PMID:27288892

  2. CLAVATA 1-type receptors in plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazak, Ora; Hardtke, Christian S

    2016-08-01

    A fundamental aspect of plant development is the coordination of growth through endogenous signals and its integration with environmental inputs. Similar to animals, plants frequently use cell surface-localized receptors to monitor such stimuli, for instance through plasma membrane-integral receptor-like kinases (RLKs). Compared to other organisms, plants possess a large number of RLKs (more than 600 in Arabidopsis thaliana), which implies that ligand-receptor-mediated molecular mechanisms regulate a wide range of processes during plant development. Here, we focus on A. thaliana RLKs of the CLAVATA 1 (CLV1) type, which orchestrate key steps during plant development, including the regulation of meristem maintenance, anther development, vascular tissue formation, and root system architecture. These receptors are regulated by small signalling peptides that belong to the family of CLE (CLV3 / EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION) ligands. We discuss different aspects of plant development that are regulated by these receptors in light of their molecular mechanism of action. As so often, the intensive research on this group of plant RLKs has raised many intriguing questions, which remain to be answered. PMID:27340234

  3. Corazonin receptor signaling in ecdysis initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Spalovská-Valachová, Ivana; Cho, Kook-Ho; Zitnanova, Inka; Park, Yoonseong; Adams, Michael E; Zitnan, Dusan

    2004-04-27

    Corazonin is a highly conserved neuropeptide hormone of wide-spread occurrence in insects yet is associated with no universally recognized function. After discovery of the corazonin receptor in Drosophila, we identified its ortholog in the moth, Manduca sexta, as a prelude to physiological studies. The corazonin receptor cDNA in M. sexta encodes a protein of 436 amino acids with seven putative transmembrane domains and shares common ancestry with its Drosophila counterpart. The receptor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for corazonin when expressed in Xenopus oocytes (EC(50) approximately 200 pM) or Chinese hamster ovary cells (EC(50) approximately 75 pM). Northern blot analysis locates the receptor in peripheral endocrine Inka cells, the source of preecdysis- and ecdysis-triggering hormones. Injection of corazonin into pharate larvae elicits release of these peptides from Inka cells, which induce precocious preecdysis and ecdysis behaviors. In vitro exposure of isolated Inka cells to corazonin (25-100 pM) induces preecdysis- and ecdysis-triggering hormone secretion. Using corazonin receptor as a biosensor, we show that corazonin concentrations in the hemolymph 20 min before natural preecdysis onset range from 20 to 80 pM and then decline over the next 30-40 min. These findings support the role of corazonin signaling in initiation of the ecdysis behavioral sequence. We propose a model for peptide-mediated interactions between Inka cells and the CNS underlying this process in insect development. PMID:15096620

  4. Erythropoietin receptor signaling is membrane raft dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy L McGraw

    Full Text Available Upon erythropoietin (Epo engagement, Epo-receptor (R homodimerizes to activate JAK2 and Lyn, which phosphorylate STAT5. Although recent investigations have identified key negative regulators of Epo-R signaling, little is known about the role of membrane localization in controlling receptor signal fidelity. Here we show a critical role for membrane raft (MR microdomains in creation of discrete signaling platforms essential for Epo-R signaling. Treatment of UT7 cells with Epo induced MR assembly and coalescence. Confocal microscopy showed that raft aggregates significantly increased after Epo stimulation (mean, 4.3±1.4(SE vs. 25.6±3.2 aggregates/cell; p≤0.001, accompanied by a >3-fold increase in cluster size (p≤0.001. Raft fraction immunoblotting showed Epo-R translocation to MR after Epo stimulation and was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy in Epo stimulated UT7 cells and primary erythroid bursts. Receptor recruitment into MR was accompanied by incorporation of JAK2, Lyn, and STAT5 and their activated forms. Raft disruption by cholesterol depletion extinguished Epo induced Jak2, STAT5, Akt and MAPK phosphorylation in UT7 cells and erythroid progenitors. Furthermore, inhibition of the Rho GTPases Rac1 or RhoA blocked receptor recruitment into raft fractions, indicating a role for these GTPases in receptor trafficking. These data establish a critical role for MR in recruitment and assembly of Epo-R and signal intermediates into discrete membrane signaling units.

  5. Cellular receptors for human enterovirus species A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorihiro eNishimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Human enterovirus species A (HEV-A is one of the four species of HEV in the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae. Among HEV-A, coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 and enterovirus 71 (EV71 are the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Some other types of HEV-A are commonly associated with herpangina. Although HFMD and herpangina due to HEV-A are common febrile diseases among infants and children, EV71 can cause various neurological diseases, such as aseptic meningitis and fatal encephalitis.Recently, two human transmembrane proteins, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 and scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2, were identified as functional receptors for EV71 and CVA16. In in vitro infection experiments using the prototype HEV-A strains, PSGL-1 and SCARB2 could be responsible for the specific receptors for EV71 and CVA16. However, the involvement of both receptors in the in vitro and in vivo infections of clinical isolates of HEV-A has not been clarified yet. To elucidate a diverse array of the clinical outcome of HEV-A-associated diseases, the identification and characterization of HEV-A receptors may provide useful information in understanding the HEV-A pathogenesis at a molecular level.

  6. Responses to microbial challenges by SLAMF receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Job Van Driel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The SLAMF Family (SLAMF of cell surface glycoproteins is comprised of nine glycoproteins and whilst SLAMF1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 are self-ligand receptors, SLAMF2 and SLAMF4 interact with each other. Their interactions induce signal transduction networks in trans, thereby shaping immune cell-cell communications. Collectively, these receptors modulate a wide range of functions, such as myeloid cell and lymphocyte development and, T and B cell responses to microbes and parasites. In addition, several SLAMF receptors serve as microbial sensors, which either positively or negatively modulate the function of macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils and NK cells in response to microbial challenges. The SLAMF receptor-microbe interactions contribute both to intracellular microbicidal activity as well as to migration of phagocytes to the site of inflammation. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on how the SLAMF receptors and their specific adapters SAP and EAT-2 regulate innate and adaptive immune responses to microbes.

  7. Chemokine receptor expression by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juremalm, Mikael; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of chemokines and their receptors in the determination of mast cell tissue localization and how chemokines regulate mast cell function. At least nine chemokine receptors (CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, CCR1, CCR3, CCR4 and CCR5) have been described to be expressed by human mast cells of different origins. Seven chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL5, CXCL8, CXCL14, CX3CL1, CCL5 and CCL11) have been shown to act on some of these receptors and to induce mast cell migration. Mast cells have a unique expression pattern of CCR3, CXCR1 and CXCR2. These receptors are mainly expressed intracellularly on cytoplasmic membranes. Upon an allergic activation, CCR3 expression is increased on the cell surface and the cell becomes vulnerable for CCL11 treatment. Chemokines do not induce mast cell degranulation but CXCL14 causes secretion of de novo synthesized CXCL8. Because of the expression of CCR3, CCR5 and CXCR4 on mast cell progenitors, these cells are susceptible to HIV infection and mast cells might therefore be a persistent HIV reservoir in AIDS. In this review, we summarize the knowledge about chemokine receptor expression and function on mast cells. PMID:16107768

  8. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-05

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  9. A search for presynaptic inhibitory histamine receptors in guinea-pig tissues: Further H3 receptors but no evidence for H4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Doris; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2016-07-01

    The histamine H4 receptor is coupled to Gi/o proteins and expressed on inflammatory cells and lymphoid tissues; it was suggested that this receptor also occurs in the brain or on peripheral neurones. Since many Gi/o protein-coupled receptors, including the H3 receptor, serve as presynaptic inhibitory receptors, we studied whether the sympathetic neurones supplying four peripheral tissues and the cholinergic neurones in the hippocampus from the guinea-pig are equipped with release-modulating H4 and H3 receptors. For this purpose, we preincubated tissue pieces from the aorta, atrium, renal cortex and vas deferens with (3)H-noradrenaline and hippocampal slices with (3)H-choline and determined the electrically evoked tritium overflow. The stimulation-evoked overflow in the five superfused tissues was inhibited by the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine, which served as a positive control, but not affected by the H4 receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine. The H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine inhibited noradrenaline release in the peripheral tissues without affecting acetylcholine release in the hippocampal slices. Thioperamide shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine in the aorta and the renal cortex to the right, yielding apparent pA2 values of 8.0 and 8.1, respectively, which are close to its affinity at other H3 receptors but higher by one log unit than its pKi at the H4 receptor of the guinea-pig. In conclusion, histamine H4 receptors could not be identified in five experimental models of the guinea-pig that are suited for the detection of presynaptic inhibitory receptors whereas H3 receptors could be shown in the peripheral tissues but not in the hippocampus. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26211976

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor that activate glucose transport but not insulin receptor kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsayeth, J.R.; Caro, J.F.; Sinha, M.K.; Maddux, B.A.; Goldfine, I.D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the ..cap alpha.. subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated /sup 125/I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited /sup 125/I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor that activate glucose transport but not insulin receptor kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity

  12. Emerging roles of orphan nuclear receptors in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sung Hee; Kim, Keun Il

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a subset of orphan nuclear receptors are amplified and prognostic for some human cancers. However, the specific roles of these orphan nuclear receptors in tumor progression and their utility as drug targets are not fully understood. In this review, we summarize recent progress in elucidating the direct and indirect involvement of orphan nuclear receptors in cancer as well as their therapeutic potential in a variety of human cancers. Furthermore, we contrast the role of orphan nuclear receptors in cancer with the known roles of estrogen receptor and androgen receptor in hormone-dependent cancers. PMID:24215441

  13. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-09-15

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery. PMID:25981301

  14. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  15. NMDA receptor activity in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShaheenELakhan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors play a variety of physiologic roles and their proper signaling is essential for cellular homeostasis. Any disruption in this pathway, leading to either enhanced or decreased activity, may result in the manifestation of neuropsychiatric pathologies such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance induced psychosis, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we explore the notion that the overlap in activity of at least one biochemical pathway, the NMDA receptor pathway, may be the link to understanding the overlap in psychotic symptoms between diseases. This review intends to present a broad overview of those neuropsychiatric disorders for which alternations in NMDA receptor activity is prominent thus suggesting that continued direction of pharmaceutical intervention to this pathway may present a viable option for managing symptoms.

  16. [Estrogen receptor alpha in obesity and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahua-Pablo, José Ángel; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Cruz, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) is an important hormone in reproductive physiology, cardiovascular, skeletal and in the central nervous system (CNS). In human and rodents, E2 and its receptors are involved in the control of energy and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NR), which are transcription factors that regulate gene expression. Three ER, ER-alpha, ER-beta and the G protein-coupled ER (GPER; also called GPR30) in tissues are involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Also, it may have important implications for risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MS), insulin resistance (IR), obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). PMID:27197110

  17. Metabotropic Regulation of Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Martin Connelly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A large body of work now shows the importance of GABAA receptor-mediated tonic inhibition in regulating CNS function. However, outside of pathological conditions, there is relatively little evidence that the magnitude of tonic inhibition is itself under regulation. Here we review the mechanisms by which tonic inhibition is known to be modulated, and outline the potential behavioural consequences of this modulation. Specifically, we address the ability of protein kinase A and C to phosphorylate the extrasynaptic receptors responsible for the tonic GABAA current, and how G-protein coupled receptors can regulate tonic inhibition through these effectors. We then speculate about the possible functional consequences of regulating the magnitude of the tonic GABAA current.

  18. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Ulrik L;

    2016-01-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also...... excitability, metabolism and inflammation. Recent publications predict effects of the lactate receptor on neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative diseases in retina, where the retinal ganglion cells die, notably glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, may be linked to disturbed lactate homeostasis. Pilot studies...... reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect...

  19. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  20. The biology of Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, T K; Golenbock, D T; Fenton, M J

    2000-09-01

    In 1997, a human homologue of the Drosophila Toll protein was described, a protein later to be designated Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Since that time, additional human and murine TLR proteins have been identified. Mammalian TLR proteins appear to represent a conserved family of innate immune recognition receptors. These receptors are coupled to a signaling pathway that is conserved in mammals, insects, and plants, resulting in the activation of genes that mediate innate immune defenses. Numerous studies have now identified a wide variety of chemically-diverse bacterial products that serve as putative ligands for TLR proteins. More recent studies have identified the first endogenous protein ligands for TLR proteins. TLR signaling represents a key feature of innate immune response to pathogen invasion. PMID:10817965

  1. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore.......05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...... studies of vitamin D's effect on TCC cells in vitro are necessary before the efficacy of treatment with vitamin D analogues in TCC can be evaluated in patients....

  2. Melanocortin-4 receptor-regulated energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashes, Michael J; Lowell, Bradford B; Garfield, Alastair S

    2016-02-01

    The melanocortin system provides a conceptual blueprint for the central control of energetic state. Defined by four principal molecular components--two antagonistically acting ligands and two cognate receptors--this phylogenetically conserved system serves as a prototype for hierarchical energy balance regulation. Over the last decade the application of conditional genetic techniques has facilitated the neuroanatomical dissection of the melanocortinergic network and identified the specific neural substrates and circuits that underscore the regulation of feeding behavior, energy expenditure, glucose homeostasis and autonomic outflow. In this regard, the melanocortin-4 receptor is a critical coordinator of mammalian energy homeostasis and body weight. Drawing on recent advances in neuroscience and genetic technologies, we consider the structure and function of the melanocortin-4 receptor circuitry and its role in energy homeostasis. PMID:26814590

  3. Functional Significance of Serotonin Receptor Dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick-Davis, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    The original model of G protein activation by a single G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is giving way to a new model wherein two protomers of a GPCR dimer interact with a single G protein. This article will review the evidence suggesting that 5-HT receptors form dimers/oligomers and will compare the findings with results obtained from studies with other biogenic amine receptors. Topics to be covered include the origin or biogenesis of dimer formation, potential dimer interface(s), and oligomer size (dimer versus tetramer or higher order). The functional significance will be discussed in terms of G-protein activation following ligand binding to one or two protomers in a dimeric structure, the formation of heterodimers and the development of bivalent ligands. PMID:23811735

  4. Genetic features of thyroid hormone receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maha Rebaï; Imen Kallel; Ahmed Rebaï

    2012-12-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) are prototypes of nuclear transcription factors that regulate the expression of target genes. These receptors play an important role in many physiological processes. Moreover, a dysfunction of these proteins is often implicated in several human diseases and malignancies. Here we report genetic variations and alterations of the TRs that have been described in the literature as well as their potential role in the development of some human diseases including cancers. The functional effects of some mutations and polymorphisms in TRs on disease susceptibility, especially on cancer risk, are now established. Therefore, further investigations are needed in order to use these receptors as therapeutic targets or as biological markers to decide on appropriate forms of treatment.

  5. Tachykinin receptors mediating airway marcomolecular secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three tachykinin receptor types, termed NK1, NK2, and NK3, can be distinguished by the relative potency of various peptides in eliciting tissue responses. Airway macromolecular secretion is stimulated by the tachykinin substance P (SP). The purposes of this study were to determine the tachykinin receptor subtype responsible for this stimulation, and to examine the possible involvement of other neurotransmitters in mediating this effect. Ferret tracheal explants maintained in organ culture were labeled with 3H-glucosamine, a precursor of high molecular weight glycoconjugates (HMWG) which are released by airway secretory cells. Secretion of labeled HMWG then was determined in the absence and presence of the tachykinins SP, neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), physalaemin (PHY), and eledoisin (ELE). To evaluate the possible contribution of other mediators, tachykinin stimulation was examined in the presence of several receptor blockers

  6. AT2 Receptor and Tissue Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namsolleck, Pawel; Recarti, Chiara; Foulquier, Sébastien;

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the initiation and progression of tissue injuries in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The detrimental actions of the AT1 receptor (AT1R) in hypertension and vascular injury, myocardial infarction and brain ischemia are well...... established. In the past twenty years, protective actions of the RAS, not only in the cardiovascular, but also in the nervous system, have been demonstrated. The so-called protective arm of the RAS includes AT2-receptors and Mas receptors (AT2R and MasR) and is characterized by effects different from and...... often opposing those of the AT1R. These include anti-inflammation, anti-fibrosis, anti-apoptosis and neuroregeneration that can counterbalance pathological processes and enable recovery from disease. The recent development of novel, small-molecule AT2R agonists offers a therapeutic potential in humans...

  7. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  8. Interaction of ethanol with opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukhananov, R.Y.; Bujov, Y.V.; Maiskii, A.I.

    1986-04-01

    The authors study the action of ethanol on membrane-bound opiate receptors. Ethanol at 37/sup 0/C was shown to produce dose-dependent inhibition of binding of /sup 3/H-naloxone with opiate receptors. ID/sub 50/ under these conditions was 462 mM. Temperature-dependent inhibition of ligand-receptor binding suggests that ethanol does not compete for the stereospecific binding site of /sup 3/H-naloxone. Analysis of the inhibitory action of ethanol on /sup 3/H-naloxone binding in animals at different stages of experimental alcoholism revealed no differences between the control and experimental animals after 3.5 and 10 months of voluntary alcoholization.

  9. Influencia de la cocaína en la expresión de receptores relacionados al dolor: receptores opioides y receptores de la sustancia P

    OpenAIRE

    López Bellido, Roger

    2012-01-01

    [ES] Se ha sugerido la exposición prenatal de cocaína afecta la expresión de los receptores opioides, sustancia (SP) y sus receptores, que pueden tener repercusión en el proceso del dolor. Asimismo, ciertos microRNAs, como let-7, regulan la expresión de los receptores opioides y por lo tanto, sus funciones. Nuestro objetivo fue determinar, en primer lugar la existencia de la SP y su receptor en el pez cebra y luego evaluar las acciones de la cocaína en la expresión de los receptores opioides...

  10. Ligand-directed trafficking of receptor stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2014-12-01

    GPCRs are seven transmembrane-spanning receptors that convey specific extracellular stimuli to intracellular signalling. They represent the largest family of cell surface proteins that are therapeutically targeted. According to the traditional two-state model of receptor theory, GPCRs were considered as operating in equilibrium between two functional conformations, an active (R*) and inactive (R) state. Thus, it was assumed that a GPCR can exist either in an "off" or "on" conformation causing either no activation or equal activation of all its signalling pathways. Over the past several years it has become evident that this model is too simple and that GPCR signalling is far more complex. Different studies have presented a multistate model of receptor activation in which ligand-specific receptor conformations are able to differentiate between distinct signalling partners. Recent data show that beside G proteins numerous other proteins, such as β-arrestins and kinases, may interact with GPCRs and activate intracellular signalling pathways. GPCR activation may therefore involve receptor desensitization, coupling to multiple G proteins, Gα or Gβγ signalling, and pathway activation that is independent of G proteins. This latter effect leads to agonist "functional selectivity" (also called ligand-directed receptor trafficking, stimulus trafficking, biased agonism, biased signalling), and agonist intervention with functional selectivity may improve the therapy. Many commercially available drugs with beneficial efficacy also show various undesirable side effects. Further studies of biased signalling might facilitate our understanding of the side effects of current drugs and take us to new avenues to efficiently design pathway-specific medications. PMID:25443729

  11. NMDA receptors mediate synaptic competition in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin She

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activity through NMDA type glutamate receptors sculpts connectivity in the developing nervous system. This topic is typically studied in the visual system in vivo, where activity of inputs can be differentially regulated, but in which individual synapses are difficult to visualize and mechanisms governing synaptic competition can be difficult to ascertain. Here, we develop a model of NMDA-receptor dependent synaptic competition in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: GluN1 -/- (KO mouse hippocampal neurons lacking the essential NMDA receptor subunit were cultured alone or cultured in defined ratios with wild type (WT neurons. The absence of functional NMDA receptors did not alter neuron survival. Synapse development was assessed by immunofluorescence for postsynaptic PSD-95 family scaffold and apposed presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut1. Synapse density was specifically enhanced onto minority wild type neurons co-cultured with a majority of GluN1 -/- neighbour neurons, both relative to the GluN1 -/- neighbours and relative to sister pure wild type cultures. This form of synaptic competition was dependent on NMDA receptor activity and not conferred by the mere physical presence of GluN1. In contrast to these results in 10% WT and 90% KO co-cultures, synapse density did not differ by genotype in 50% WT and 50% KO co-cultures or in 90% WT and 10% KO co-cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The enhanced synaptic density onto NMDA receptor-competent neurons in minority coculture with GluN1 -/- neurons represents a cell culture paradigm for studying synaptic competition. Mechanisms involved may include a retrograde 'reward' signal generated by WT neurons, although in this paradigm there was no 'punishment' signal against GluN1 -/- neurons. Cell culture assays involving such defined circuits may help uncover the rules and mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic competition in the

  12. ESTROGEN RECEPTORS OF HAIRS BLACKS AND WHITES

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    H. Laswati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aging is termed as same as degenerative process, in which all part of tissue organs retarted the microstructure either macrostructure, forming and function even the colour, including black hair change to white hair. Several researchers have been recommended that estrogen hormone be able ease black to white hair, but hormone without any presenting of receptor won’t be work properly. The main aim of this study were to determine amount of estrogen receptor contents in famales and males black and white hairs included the microscopically structure. Method: Twelve females and males there were 50 -56 years old each pairs black and white head hairs were plucked along with follicles. This estrogen receptors analyzed using radioreceptor binding assay there were 5mm eah hair follices including the root cutted and each pair put its in 2 ml glass tube already filled in with 500 µl 125I-estradiol and incubated in 37oC for 3 hrs. Following times were over the tube flushed twice carefully the hair won’t be flushed. Then count by putting in the gamma counter chamber for 1 minute each. The values that shown in the monitor as CPM (count per minute, recorded as receptor of estradiol. Results: Mean (±SD sum estrogen receptor in females black and white hairs were 479.3 ± 37.5 and 387.7 ± 33.0, but significantly decreased in male black hair was 316.9±17.8 and 274.0 ± 19.8. All those pairs significantly different either female black and white hairs or male black and white hair and also significantly different among groups. Conclusion: The lowest estrogen receptors recorded in male white hairs and microstructure decreasing of melanin contents.

  13. Prostaglandins and their receptors in insect biology

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    David eStanley

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We treat the biological significance of prostaglandins (PGs and their known receptors in insect biology. PGs and related eicosanoids are oxygenated derivatives of arachidonic acid (AA and two other C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids. PGs are mostly appreciated in the context of biomedicine, but a growing body of literature indicates the biological significance of these compounds extends throughout the animal kingdom, and possibly beyond. PGs act in several crucial areas of insect biology. In reproduction, a specific PG, PGE2, releases oviposition behavior in most crickets and a few other insect species; PGs also mediate events in egg development in some species, which may represent all insects. PGs play major roles in modulating fluid secretion in Malpighian tubules, rectum and salivary glands, although, again, this has been studied in only a few insect species that may represent the Class. Insect immunity is a very complex defense system. PGs and other eicosanoids mediate a large number of immune reactions to infection and invasion. The actions of most PGs are mediated by specific receptors. Biomedical research has discovered a great deal of knowledge about PG receptors in mammals, including their structures, pharmacology, molecular biology and cellular locations. Studies of PG receptors in insects lag behind the biomedical background, however, recent results hold the promise of accelerated research in this area. A PG receptor has been identified in a class of lepidopteran hemocytes and experimentally linked to the release of prophenoloxidase. We conclude that research into PGs and their receptors in insects will lead to important advances in our understanding of insect biology.

  14. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

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    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  15. Prostaglandins and prostaglandin receptor antagonism in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, Maria

    2013-05-01

    Human models of headache may contribute to understanding of prostaglandins' role in migraine pathogenesis. The current thesis investigated the migraine triggering effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in migraine patients without aura, the efficacy of a novel EP4 receptor antagonist, BGC20-1531, in prevention of PGE2-induced headache and the ability of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) to trigger headache without any vasodilatation in healthy volunteers. All studies were designed as double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over experiments, where PGE2/PGF2α or saline were infused over 20-25 min. In the study with EP4 receptor antagonist healthy volunteers were pre-treated with two different doses of BGC20-1531 or placebo followed by PGE2 infusion over 25 min. The headache data were collected during the whole study day, whereas the possible vascular changes were measured during the in-hospital phase of 1.5 h. The infusion of PGE2 caused the immediate migraine-like attacks and vasodilatation of the middle cerebral artery in migraine patients without aura. The highly specific and potent EP4 receptor antagonist, BGC20-1531, was not able to attenuate PGE2-induced headache and vasodilatation of both intra- and extra-cerebral arteries. The intravenous infusion of PGF2α did not induce headache or statistically significant vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries in healthy volunteers. Novel data on PGE2-provoked immediate migraine-like attacks suggest that PGE2 may be one of the important final products in the pathogenesis of migraine. The lack of efficacy of EP4 receptor antagonist suggests that a single receptor blockade is not sufficient to block PGE2 responses, hence EP2 receptor should be investigated as a potential drug target for the treatment of migraine. The absence of headache during the PGF2α infusion demonstrates that vasodilating properties are necessary for the induction of headache and migraine. PMID:23673269

  16. Computer Modeling of Human Delta Opioid Receptor

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    Tatyana Dzimbova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of selective agonists of δ-opioid receptor as well as the model of interaction of ligands with this receptor is the subjects of increased interest. In the absence of crystal structures of opioid receptors, 3D homology models with different templates have been reported in the literature. The problem is that these models are not available for widespread use. The aims of our study are: (1 to choose within recently published crystallographic structures templates for homology modeling of the human δ-opioid receptor (DOR; (2 to evaluate the models with different computational tools; and (3 to precise the most reliable model basing on correlation between docking data and in vitro bioassay results. The enkephalin analogues, as ligands used in this study, were previously synthesized by our group and their biological activity was evaluated. Several models of DOR were generated using different templates. All these models were evaluated by PROCHECK and MolProbity and relationship between docking data and in vitro results was determined. The best correlations received for the tested models of DOR were found between efficacy (erel of the compounds, calculated from in vitro experiments and Fitness scoring function from docking studies. New model of DOR was generated and evaluated by different approaches. This model has good GA341 value (0.99 from MODELLER, good values from PROCHECK (92.6% of most favored regions and MolProbity (99.5% of favored regions. Scoring function correlates (Pearson r = -0.7368, p-value = 0.0097 with erel of a series of enkephalin analogues, calculated from in vitro experiments. So, this investigation allows suggesting a reliable model of DOR. Newly generated model of DOR receptor could be used further for in silico experiments and it will give possibility for faster and more correct design of selective and effective ligands for δ-opioid receptor.

  17. Somatostatin receptor imaging in patients with sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granulomatous diseases can be visualized in vivo after the injection of indium-111-DTPA-octreotide (111In-pentetreotide), a radiolabelled somatostatin analogue. We evaluated whether somatostatin receptor imaging reflects disease activity, whether certain scintigraphic characteristics can predict the disease prognosis and whether repeat scintigraphy correlates with the clinical course in patients with sarcoidosis. 111In-pentetreotide was injected in 46 patients and images were obtained 24 h later. Known mediastinal, hilar and interstitial disease was recognized in 36 of 37 patients. Also, such pathology was found in seven other patients who had normal chest X-rays. In five of these, somatostatin receptor imaging pointed to interstitial disease. Frequently, accumulation of radioactivity in parotid glands and supraclavicular lymph nodes was found. Neither the degree of radioactive accumulation in the thorax nor a specific pattern of pathological uptake was correlated with disease severity or clinical course. The degree of uptake of radioactivity in the parotid glands was correlated with significantly higher serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) levels. Somatostatin receptor imaging was repeated in 13 patients. In five of six patients in whom chest X-ray monitored improvement of disease activity, the pentetreotide scintigram also showed a decrease in pathological uptake. In two of five patients in whom the chest X-ray was unchanged, but serum ACE concentrations had decreased and lung function improved, normalization on pentetreotide scintigrams was found. It is concluded that: (1) somatostatin receptor imaging can demonstrate active granulomatous disease in patients with sarcoidosis; (2) pathological uptake of radioactivity in the parotid glands during somatostatin receptor imaging is correlated with higher serum ACE concentrations; (3) the value of somatostatin receptor imaging in the follow-up of patients with sarcoidosis will have to be determined in a

  18. Phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor I receptor by insulin receptor tyrosine kinase in intact cultured skeletal muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) receptors was examined by determining the ability of each receptor type to phosphorylate tyrosine residues on the other receptor in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells. This was made possible through a sequential immunoprecipitation method with two different antibodies that effectively separated the phosphorylated insulin and IGF I receptors. After incubation of intact L6 cells with various concentrations of insulin or IGF I in the presence of [32P]-orthophosphate, insulin receptors were precipitated with one of two human polyclonal anti-insulin receptor antibodies (B2 or B9). Phosphorylated IGF I receptors remained in solution and were subsequently precipitated by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. The identifies of the insulin and IGF I receptor β-subunits in the two immunoprecipitates were confirmed by binding affinity, by phosphopeptide mapping after trypsin digestion, and by the distinct patterns of expression of the two receptors during differentiation. Stimulated phosphorylation of the β-subunit of the insulin receptor correlated with the occupancy of the β-subunit of the insulin receptor by either insulin or IGF I as determined by affinity cross-linking. Similarly, stimulation of phosphorylation of the β-subunit of the IGF I receptor by IGF I correlated with IGF I receptor occupancy. In contrast, insulin stimulated phosphorylation of the β-subunit of the IGF I receptor at hormone concentrations that were associated with significant occupancy of the insulin receptor but negligible IGF I receptor occupancy. These findings indicate that the IGF I receptor can be a substrate for the hormone-activated insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells

  19. Phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor I receptor by insulin receptor tyrosine kinase in intact cultured skeletal muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beguinot, F.; Smith, R.J.; Kahn, C.R.; Maron, R.; Moses, A.C.; White, M.F.

    1988-05-03

    The interaction between insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) receptors was examined by determining the ability of each receptor type to phosphorylate tyrosine residues on the other receptor in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells. This was made possible through a sequential immunoprecipitation method with two different antibodies that effectively separated the phosphorylated insulin and IGF I receptors. After incubation of intact L6 cells with various concentrations of insulin or IGF I in the presence of (/sup 32/P)-orthophosphate, insulin receptors were precipitated with one of two human polyclonal anti-insulin receptor antibodies (B2 or B9). Phosphorylated IGF I receptors remained in solution and were subsequently precipitated by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. The identifies of the insulin and IGF I receptor ..beta..-subunits in the two immunoprecipitates were confirmed by binding affinity, by phosphopeptide mapping after trypsin digestion, and by the distinct patterns of expression of the two receptors during differentiation. Stimulated phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the insulin receptor correlated with the occupancy of the ..beta..-subunit of the insulin receptor by either insulin or IGF I as determined by affinity cross-linking. Similarly, stimulation of phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the IGF I receptor by IGF I correlated with IGF I receptor occupancy. In contrast, insulin stimulated phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the IGF I receptor at hormone concentrations that were associated with significant occupancy of the insulin receptor but negligible IGF I receptor occupancy. These findings indicate that the IGF I receptor can be a substrate for the hormone-activated insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells.

  20. C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors: new points on the oncogenomics map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group of pattern recognition receptors includes families of Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors. They are key sensors for a number of infectious agents, some of which are oncogenic, and they launch an immune response against them, normally promoting their eradication. Inherited variations in genes encoding these receptors and proteins and their signaling pathways may affect their function, possibly modulating cancer risk and features of cancer progression. There are numerous studies investigating the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms within or near genes encoding Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, cancer risk, and features of cancer progression. However, there is an almost total absence of articles analyzing the correlation between polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors and cancer risk or progression. Nevertheless, there is some evidence supporting the hypothesis that inherited C-type lectin receptor and RIG-I-like receptor variants can be associated with increased cancer risk. Certain C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns of potentially oncogenic infectious agents, and certain polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors may have functional consequences at the molecular level that can lead to association of such single nucleotide polymorphisms with risk or progression of some diseases that may modulate cancer risk, so these gene polymorphisms may affect cancer risk indirectly. Polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors thereby may be correlated with a risk of lung, oral, esophageal, gastric, colorectal, and liver cancer, as well as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, glioblastoma, multiple myeloma, and lymphoma. The list of the most promising polymorphisms for oncogenomic investigations may include rs1926736, rs2478577

  1. Cloning, constitutive activity and expression profiling of two receptors related to relaxin receptors in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Proost, Paul; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors (LGRs) comprise a cluster of transmembrane proteins, characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular domain. This receptor group can be classified into three subtypes. Belonging to the subtype C LGRs are the mammalian relaxin receptors LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8 (RXFP2), which mediate important reproductive and other processes. We identified two related receptors in the genome of the fruit fly and cloned their open reading frames into an expression vector. Interestingly, dLGR3 demonstrated constitutive activity at very low doses of transfected plasmid, whereas dLGR4 did not show any basal activity. Both receptors exhibited a similar expression pattern during development, with relatively high transcript levels during the first larval stage. In addition, both receptors displayed higher expression in male adult flies as compared to female flies. Analysis of the tissue distribution of both receptor transcripts revealed a high expression of dLGR3 in the female fat body, while the expression of dLGR4 peaked in the midgut of both the wandering and adult stage. PMID:25064813

  2. Study of bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor 131-2: receptor purification and secondary structure analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwong-Joo Leck

    Full Text Available How fishes are able to detect trace molecules in large bodies of water is not understood. It is plausible that they use olfactory receptors to detect water-soluble compounds. How the zebra fish Danio Rerio, an organism with only 98 functional olfactory receptors, is able to selectively detect and recognize numerous compounds in water remains a puzzling phenomenon. We are interested in studying the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of olfaction in fish. Here, we report on the study of a bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor OR131-2, affinity-purified from a HEK293S tetracycline-inducible system. This receptor was expressed and translocated to the cell plasma membrane as revealed by confocal microscopy. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the purified zebra fish receptor folded into an α-helical structure, as observed for other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Our study shows that it is possible to produce viable quantities of the zebra fish olfactory receptor. This will not only enable detailed structural and functional analyses, but also aid in the design of biosensor devices in order to detect water-soluble metabolites or its intermediates, which are associated with human health.

  3. Transport of receptors, receptor signaling complexes and ion channels via neuropeptide-secretory vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhao; Hai-Bo Wang; Ying-Jin Lu; Jian-Wen Hu; Lan Bao; Xu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Stimulus-induced exocytosis of large dense-core vesicles(LDCVs)leads to discharge of neuropeptides and fusion of LDCV membranes with the plasma membrane. However, the contribution of LDCVs to the properties of the neuronal membrane remains largely unclear. The present study found that LDCVs were associated with multiple receptors, channels and signaling molecules, suggesting that neuronal sensitivity is modulated by an LDCV-mediated mechanism. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with immunoblotting of subcellular fractions identified 298 proteins in LDCV membranes purified from the dorsal spinal cord, including Gprotein-coupled receptors, Gproteins and other signaling molecules, ion channels and trafficking-related proteins. Morphological assays showed that δ-opioid receptor 1(DORI), β2 adrenergic receptor(AR), Gα12,voltage-gated calcium channel a2δ1subunit and P2X purinoceptor 2 were localized in substance P(SP)-positive LDCVs in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons, whereas β1 AR, Wnt receptor frizzled 8 and dishevelled 1 were present in SP-negative LDCVs.Furthermore, DOR1/α12/Gβ1γ5/phospholipase C β2 complexes were associated with LDCVs. Blockade of the DOR1/Gαi2 interaction largely abolished the LDCV localization of Gαi2 and impaired stimulation-induced surface expression of Gαi2. Thus, LDCVs serve as carriers of receptors, ion channels and preassembled receptor signaling complexes, enabling a rapid, activity-dependent modulation of neuronal sensitivity.

  4. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π-cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG-W-NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78-85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  5. PACAP and its receptors in migraine pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors (PAC1 , VPAC1 and VPAC2 ) are present in sensory neurons and in vascular smooth muscle related to the trigeminovascular system, a key factor in migraine pain. Recent data point to an involvement of PACAP, and in particular the...... PAC1 receptor, in the pathophysiology of migraine. Available data are discussed in relation to a study by Walker in this issue of the Journal with the goal of identifying possibilities for the development of novel antagonists and to further define the role of PACAP in migraine pathophysiology and as a...

  6. Identification of murine complement receptor type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Fingeroth, J D; Benedict, M A; Levy, D.N.; Strominger, J L

    1989-01-01

    A rabbit antiserum reactive with the human complement component C3d/Epstein-Barr virus receptor (complement receptor type 2, CR2) immunoprecipitates a Mr 155,000 murine B-cell surface antigen. The apparent molecular weight and cellular distribution of this murine antigen are similar to those of human CR2. Cells expressing the murine protein bind sheep erythrocytes coated with antibody and murine C1-C3d but do not bind Epstein-Barr virus at all. The monospecific antiserum to human CR2 together...

  7. Toll-like receptors in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    Innate pattern recognition receptors are implicated in first-line defense against pathogens but also participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis and response to injury. This chapter reviews the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in neuronal and glial responses that are associated with...... neurodegeneration. Accompanying roles for infection and inflammation, involvement in clinical neurodegenerative disorders, and heterogeneity of glial response are discussed. A "strength of signal" hypothesis is advanced in an attempt to reconcile evolutionarily selected and therefore likely beneficial effects of...... TLR signaling in the nervous system with capability for neurotoxocity and gliotoxicity....

  8. CERAPP: Collaborative estrogen receptor activity prediction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER......). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. oBjectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) and...

  9. Muscarinic receptor signaling and colon cancer progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Xie; Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of effective treatments, advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Emerging evidence supports the observation that muscarinic receptor (MR) signaling plays a critical role in growth and progression of CRC. MR activation by acetylcholine and bile acids results in transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and post-EGFR signal transduction that enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, the authors review recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MR-mediated CRC progression and its therapeutic implications.

  10. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter; Meens, Merlijn J P M T

    2011-01-01

    The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects. In resista...... that discriminate between ET(A)-mediated effects of the endogenous isopeptides ET1, ET2 and ET3 and that become more effective when the activity of the endogenous endothelin system is elevated....

  11. Receptor binding studies of soft anticholinergic agents

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Fenglei; Buchwald, Peter; Browne, Clinton E.; Farag, Hassan H.; Wu, Wnei-Mei; Ji, Fubao; Hochhaus, Guenther; Bodor, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Receptor binding studies were performed on 24 soft anticholinergic agents and 5 conventional anticholinergic agents using 4 cloned human muscarinic receptor subtypes. The measured pKi values of the soft anticholinergic agents ranged from 6.5 to 9.5, with the majority being in the range of 7.5 to 8.5. Strong correlation was observed between the pKis determined here and the pA2 values measured earlier in guinea pig ileum contraction assays. The corresponding correlation coefficients (r2) were 0...

  12. Human receptors for sweet and umami taste

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaodong; Staszewski, Lena; Xu, Hong; Durick, Kyle; Zoller, Mark; Adler, Elliot

    2002-01-01

    The three members of the T1R class of taste-specific G protein-coupled receptors have been hypothesized to function in combination as heterodimeric sweet taste receptors. Here we show that human T1R2/T1R3 recognizes diverse natural and synthetic sweeteners. In contrast, human T1R1/T1R3 responds to the umami taste stimulus l-glutamate, and this response is enhanced by 5′-ribonucleotides, a hallmark of umami taste. The ligand specificities of rat T1R2/T1R3 and T1R1/T1R3 correspond to those of t...

  13. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy

  14. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.A. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hegg, R. [Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Freitas, F.R.; Tavares, E.R.; Almeida, C.P. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baracat, E.C. [Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maranhão, R.C. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-04

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy.

  15. Laminar pattern of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in rat visual cortex using quantitative receptor autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laminar distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, including the M1-receptor subtype, of beta-adrenergic receptors, and noradrenaline uptake sites, was studied in the adult rat visual, frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex, using quantitative receptor autoradiography. In the visual cortex, the highest density of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was found in layer I. From layer II/III to layer V binding decreases continueously reaching a constant binding level in layers V and VI. This laminar pattern of muscarinic receptor density differs somewhat from that observed in the non-visual cortical regions examined: layer II/III contained the highest receptor density followed by layer I and IV: lowest density was found in layer V and VI. The binding profile of the muscarinic cholinergic M1-subtype through the visual cortex shows a peak in cortical layer II and in the upper part of layer VI, whereas in the non-visual cortical regions cited the binding level was high in layer II/III, moderate in layer I and IV, and low in layer VI. Layers I to IV of the visual cortex contained the highest beta-adrenergic receptor densities, whereas only low binding levels were observed in the deeper layers. A similar laminar distribution was found also in the frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex. The density of noradrenaline uptake sites was high in all layers of the cortical regions studied, but with noradrenaline uptake sites somewhat more concentrated in the superficial layers than in deeper ones. The distinct laminar pattern of cholinergic and noradrenergic receptor sites indicates a different role for acetylcholine and noradrenaline in the functional anatomy of the cerebral cortex, and in particular, the visual cortex. (author)

  16. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L;

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  17. Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors in rheumatic diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCormack, William J

    2012-02-01

    The past 10 years have seen the description of families of receptors that drive proinflammatory cytokine production in infection and tissue injury. Two major classes have been examined in the context of inflammatory joint disease--the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs). TLRs such as TLR2 and TLR4 are being implicated in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, lyme arthritis and osteoarthritis. Nalp3 has been identified as a key NLR for IL-1beta production and has been shown to have a particular role in gout. These findings present new therapeutic opportunities, possibly allowing for the replacement of biologics with small molecule inhibitors.

  18. Patient selection for personalized peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are malignant solid tumors originating from neuroendocrine cells dispersed throughout the body. Differentiated neuroendocrine tumors overexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), which enable the diagnosis using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. Internalization and retention within the tumor cell are important for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using the same peptide. The use of the same DOTA-peptide for SSTR PET/CT using (68)Ga and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using therapeutic radionuclides like (177)Lu and (90)Y offers a unique theranostic advantage. PMID:25029937

  19. Nuclear receptor corepressor-dependent repression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor delta-mediated transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsdam, Anne-M; Nielsen, Curt A F; Neve, Søren;

    2002-01-01

    delta-RXR alpha heterodimer bound to an acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO)-type peroxisome-proliferator response element recruited a glutathione S-transferase-NCoR fusion protein in a ligand-independent manner. Contrasting with most other nuclear receptors, PPAR delta was found to interact equally well......The nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) was isolated as a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system. NCoR interacted strongly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR delta, whereas interactions with the ligand-binding domains...

  20. Prevalence of androgen receptors in invasive breast carcinoma and its relation with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and Her2/neu expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and aims: Although Breast carcinoma had many targeted bio markers for its treatment, however, it is a heterogeneous disease with different outcomes and need new markers especially for the triple negative group when estrogen receptor, progesterone receptors and Her2/ neu are negative. Androgen receptor is a new target with unclear role. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of androgen receptors in invasive breast cancer and tries to elucidate its relation to some well recognized clinico pathological and immunohistochemical markers. Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty cases of invasive breast carcinoma were evaluated for type, grade and stage and studied immunohistochemically for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Her2/neu and androgen expression. Androgen receptor expression was correlated with histopathological factors and the three studied markers separately then the studied cases were classified into three groups according to estrogen, progesterone receptor and Her2/neu expression and correlated with androgen receptor expression. Results: Androgen receptor was expressed in 71% of breast cancer cases. Its expression is associated significantly with both the stage and the grade. Also it was significantly associated with estrogen receptor and Her2/neu expression. It was expressed in a significant number of triple negative breast carcinoma, in Her2/neu positive cases and in estrogen negative cases which indicate that androgen receptor could be a new target for the treatment of these groups. Conclusions: Although the impact of androgen receptor on breast cancer outcomes had not been clearly established, this result may provide evidence that androgen receptor is a good prognostic and predictive marker.

  1. Synaptic Bistability Due to Nucleation and Evaporation of Receptor Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2012-01-10

    We introduce a bistability mechanism for long-term synaptic plasticity based on switching between two metastable states that contain significantly different numbers of synaptic receptors. One state is characterized by a two-dimensional gas of mobile interacting receptors and is stabilized against clustering by a high nucleation barrier. The other state contains a receptor gas in equilibrium with a large cluster of immobile receptors, which is stabilized by the turnover rate of receptors into and out of the synapse. Transitions between the two states can be initiated by either an increase (potentiation) or a decrease (depotentiation) of the net receptor flux into the synapse. This changes the saturation level of the receptor gas and triggers nucleation or evaporation of receptor clusters. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  2. AT2 Receptors Targeting Cardiac Protection Post-Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaschina, Elena; Lauer, Dilyara; Schmerler, Patrick; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha

    2014-01-01

    The angiotensin AT2-receptor mediates tissue protective actions. Its regenerative potential has been tested in multiple disease models including models of myocardial infarction. These studies used different experimental approaches in order to detect AT2-receptor-related effects such as AT2-receptor...... deficiency or overexpression, treatment with an AT1-receptor blocker leading to indirect stimulation of the unopposed AT2-receptor, or studies using AT2-receptor agonists. It is a common finding in these studies that the AT2-receptor improves cardiac function in the early phase post-MI, and that this effect...... is preserved over periods of up to four months. Depending on the experimental protocol, the AT2R also attenuates post-MI left ventricular remodeling or protects the heart from early left ventricular thinning and rupture. In combination with AT1-receptor blockade or deficiency, post-MI cardiac...

  3. Evidence for an androgen receptor in porcine Leydig cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytosol and nuclear androgen receptor concentrations were measured in freshly prepared and cultured Leydig cells of immature pig testis with exchange assays using (3H)methyltrienolone as labelled ligand. Androgen receptors in Leydig cells had high affinity for (3H)methyltrienolone and sterios binding specificity typical of an androgen receptor. The mean receptor concentrations were 76 fmol/mg protein and 210 fmol/mg DNA for cytosol and nuclei, respectively. In sucrose gradients, cytosol androgen receptors sedimented in the 4 S region. The cells maintained androgen receptors under culture conditions. Exposure of cultured cells to (3H)methyltrienolone (10 nmol/l) resulted in accumulation of androgen receptors in the nuclei with maximal uptake by 1 h. We conclude that methyltrienolone binding sites with characteristics of androgen receptors were idenfified in both cytosol and nuclei of porcine Leydig cells. (author)

  4. Contractile 5-HT1B receptors in human cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, T; Longmore, J; Shaw, D;

    1999-01-01

    immunocytochemistry with antibodies selective for human 5-HT1B and human 5-HT1D receptors and also studied the contractile effects of a range of 5-HT receptor agonists and antagonists in HCA. 2 Immunocytochemistry of cerebral arteries showed dense 5-HT1B receptor immunoreactivity (but no 5-HT1D receptor......1 The cerebrovascular receptor(s) that mediates 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced vasoconstriction in human cerebral arteries (HCA)has proven difficult to characterize, yet these are essential in migraine. We have examined 5-HT receptor subtype distribution in cerebral blood vessels by...... immunoreactivity) within the smooth muscle wall of the HCA. The endothelial cell layer was well preserved and weak 5-HT1B receptor immunoreactivity was present. 3 Pharmacological experiments on HCA with intact endothelium showed that 5-carboxamidotryptamine was significantly more potent than alpha-methyl-5-HT, 2...

  5. Selective labeling of apomorphine receptors by 3H-LSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are at least two types of dopamine receptors: the 3H-dopamine or 3H-apomorphine receptor (with high or nM affinity for dopamine), and the 3H-neuroleptic receptor (with low or μm affinity for dopamine). While 3H-LSD can label the 3H-neuroleptic receptor, this study was done in order to label the 3H-apomorphine/dopamine receptor site. In the presence of excess phentolamine, serotonin and spiperone (to preculude binding to α-adrenergic, serotonergic and neuroleptic receptors, respectively) similar concentrations of dopaminergic drugs inhibited the binding (to calf caudate) of 3H-LSD and 3H-apomorphine. This is compatible with the concept that the 3H-apomorphine/dopamine receptor and the 3H-neuroleptic/dopamine receptor are separate. (Auth.)

  6. Extracellular Neurotransmitter Receptor Clustering: Think Outside the Box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kneussel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Postsynaptic submembrane scaffolds cluster neurotransmitter receptors through intracellular protein-protein interactions. Growing evidence supports the view that extracellular factors can be almost as important to trigger synaptic receptor aggregation.

  7. Membrane Trafficking of Death Receptors: Implications on Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulf Schneider-Brachert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Death receptors were initially recognised as potent inducers of apoptotic cell death and soon ambitious attempts were made to exploit selective ignition of controlled cellular suicide as therapeutic strategy in malignant diseases. However, the complexity of death receptor signalling has increased substantially during recent years. Beyond activation of the apoptotic cascade, involvement in a variety of cellular processes including inflammation, proliferation and immune response was recognised. Mechanistically, these findings raised the question how multipurpose receptors can ensure selective activation of a particular pathway. A growing body of evidence points to an elegant spatiotemporal regulation of composition and assembly of the receptor-associated signalling complex. Upon ligand binding, receptor recruitment in specialized membrane compartments, formation of receptor-ligand clusters and internalisation processes constitute key regulatory elements. In this review, we will summarise the current concepts of death receptor trafficking and its implications on receptor-associated signalling events.

  8. Endocrine therapy use among elderly hormone receptor-pos...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Clinical guidelines recommend that women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer receive endocrine therapy (selective estrogen receptor modulators or aromatase...

  9. Hormone-receptor expression and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieh, Weiva; Köbel, Martin; Longacre, Teri A;

    2013-01-01

    Few biomarkers of ovarian cancer prognosis have been established, partly because subtype-specific associations might be obscured in studies combining all histopathological subtypes. We examined whether tumour expression of the progesterone receptor (PR) and oestrogen receptor (ER) was associated ...

  10. Carboxyl-terminal receptor domains control the differential dephosphorylation of somatostatin receptors by protein phosphatase 1 isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lehmann

    Full Text Available We have recently identified protein phosphatase 1β (PP1β as G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR phosphatase for the sst2 somatostatin receptor using siRNA knockdown screening. By contrast, for the sst5 somatostatin receptor we identified protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ as GPCR phosphatase using the same approach. We have also shown that sst2 and sst5 receptors differ substantially in the temporal dynamics of their dephosphorylation and trafficking patterns. Whereas dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst2 receptor requires extended time periods of ∼30 min, dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst5 receptor is completed in less than 10 min. Here, we examined which receptor domains determine the selection of phosphatases for receptor dephosphorylation. We found that generation of tail-swap mutants between sst2 and sst5 was required and sufficient to reverse the patterns of dephosphorylation and trafficking of these two receptors. In fact, siRNA knockdown confirmed that the sst5 receptor carrying the sst2 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1β, whereas the sst2 receptor carrying the sst5 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1γ. Thus, the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of individual somatostatin receptor subtypes is primarily determined by their different carboxyl-terminal receptor domains. This phosphatase specificity has in turn profound consequences for the dephosphorylation dynamics and trafficking patterns of GPCRs.

  11. Virus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemo...

  12. Calixarene-based receptors for molecular recognition

    OpenAIRE

    YILMAZ, Mustafa; ERDEMİR, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    Calixarene-based molecular receptors have been a widely developing area in material science and technology for the last few decades. Due to their bowl-shaped geometry, calixarene macrocycles are used as hosts allowing organic and inorganic guests to coordinate/sorb onto their cavity. This work briefly reviews the recent development of calixarenes.

  13. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Reinhoudt

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  14. Thyrotropin receptor antibodies and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb) are not homogeneous, which are composed by four antibodies at least. TRAb plays very important roles in autoimmune thyroid diseases ad off-thyroid symptoms associated, and other thyroiditis in clinical diagnosis, assessment of curative effects, determination of the time to stop medicine, prognostication of recurrence and inspection of high risk population

  15. Cannabinoid receptor CB2 modulates axon guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duff, Gabriel; Argaw, Anteneh; Cecyre, Bruno; Cherif, Hosni; Tea, Nicolas; Zabouri, Nawal; Casanova, Christian; Ptito, Maurice; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Navigation of retinal projections towards their targets is regulated by guidance molecules and growth cone transduction mechanisms. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo evidences that the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) is expressed along the retino-thalamic pathway and exerts a modulatory action ...

  16. P2X Receptors and Synaptic Plasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pankratov, Y.; Lalo, U.; Krishtal, A.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 1 (2009), s. 137-148. ISSN 0306-4522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : ATP * P2X receptors * synaptic plasticity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2009

  17. Amping up estrogen receptors in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Amy M; Alarid, Elaine T

    2007-01-01

    This article highlights a recent study by Holst et al. in Nature Genetics that finds estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) amplification in early benign lesions and more advanced invasive carcinomas of the breast, and discusses the potential implications to our present understanding of the role of ER-α in breast tumorigenesis.

  18. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ER alpha and ER beta, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ER alpha mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most nota

  19. The rat androgen receptor gene promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Baarends (Willy); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); L.J. Blok (Leen); P. Mackenbach (Petra); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); D.N. Meijer (Dies); P.W. Faber; J. Trapman (Jan); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The androgen receptor (AR) is activated upon binding of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone and exerts regulatory effects on gene expression in androgen target cells. To study transcriptional regulation of the rat AR gene itself, the 5' genomic region of this gene was clon

  20. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2010), s. 2838-2860. ISSN 1424-8247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * allosteric modulation * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  1. Ontogenesis of peripheral electromagnetic receptors in hornets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishay, JS; Pertsis, [No Value; Skutelsky, E; Kalicharan, D; van der Want, H

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the ontogenesis of peripheral electromagnetic receptors (PER) in the cuticle of the Oriental hornet (Vespa orientalis). in the abdominal cuticle of adult hornets, the PERs are densely distributed throughout, but there are even more than 30 at the margins of the segments. These or

  2. Cellular Functions of Transient Receptor Potential channels

    OpenAIRE

    Dadon, Daniela; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by increasing cellular Ca2+. In this review we focus on the roles of these channels in: i) cell death ii) proliferation and differentiation and iii) synaptic vesicle release.

  3. Melanocortin Receptors, Melanotropic Peptides and Penile Erection

    OpenAIRE

    King, Stephen H.; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Balse-Srinivasan, Preeti; Hruby, Victor J.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Wessells, Hunter

    2007-01-01

    Penile erection is a complex physiologic event resulting from the interactions of the nervous system on a highly specialized vascular organ. Activation of central nervous system melanocortinergic (MC) receptors with either endogenous or synthetic melanotropic ligands may initiate and/or facilitate spontaneous penile erection.

  4. Conformational regulation of urokinase receptor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Jacobsen, Benedikte; Kriegbaum, Mette C;

    2011-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein with an established role in focalizing uPA-mediated plasminogen activation on cell surfaces. Distinct from this function, uPAR also modulates cell adhesion and migration on vitronectin-rich matrices...

  5. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Moestrup, Søren K

    2006-01-01

    CD163 is the monocyte/macrophage-specific receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) complexes. The cytoplasmic tail of human CD163 exists as a short tail variant and two long tail variants. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that all three CD163 variants are...

  6. Virus-Encoded 7 Transmembrane Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth;

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular chemo...

  7. Kidney Protection During Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Rolleman

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe discovery of somatostatin and the cloning and characterisation of its five receptor subtypes have led to many intriguing developments in clinical nuclear medicine. It was found that somatostatin administration resulted in inhibition of hormonal overproduction syndromes [5], which

  8. Thyroid hormone receptor expression in cardiovascular disease and pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrara, Shiva

    1999-01-01

    The heart is a major target organ for thyroid hormone actions. Thyroid hormone exerts effects on the myocardium, which are mediated by specific nuclear receptors. The thyroid hormone receptors (TR) are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily. These receptors regulate gene expression by binding to the promotor region of target genes as monomers, homodimers or heterodimers depending on the thyroid hormone response element (TRE) and the presence or absence of th...

  9. Methoxychalcone Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Translocation and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yeong Sang; Kumar, Vineet; Lee, Sunmin; Iwai, Aki; Neckers, Len; Malhotra, Sanjay V.; Trepel, Jane B

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor activity drives incurable castrate-resistant prostate cancer. All approved antiandrogens inhibit androgen receptor-driven transcription, and in addition the second-generation antiandrogen MDV3100 inhibits ligand-activated androgen receptor nuclear translocation, via an unknown mechanism. Here, we report methoxychalcones that lock the heat shock protein 90-androgen receptor complex in the cytoplasm in an androgen-non-responsive state, thus demonstrating a novel chemical scaff...

  10. Quantifying Agonist Activity at G Protein-coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlert, Frederick J.; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    When an agonist activates a population of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it elicits a signaling pathway that culminates in the response of the cell or tissue. This process can be analyzed at the level of a single receptor, a population of receptors, or a downstream response. Here we describe how to analyze the downstream response to obtain an estimate of the agonist affinity constant for the active state of single receptors.

  11. Structure and biological properties of scavenger receptor MARCO

    OpenAIRE

    Brännström, Annika

    2002-01-01

    Macrophages are monocyte-derived cells that play an important role in the innate immune response against invading pathogens. These cells express several host defense receptors that can be divided into two classes; those dependent on opsonizing components for recognition of pathogens, and those that can recognize pathogens directly, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Class A scavenger receptors are a family of PRRs composed of three members: Scavenger Receptor A (SRA), MAc...

  12. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: A zinc finger transcription factor

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; D'Souza, Ursula M.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Yajima, Shunsuke; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich; Yang, Young; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Man; Nestler, Eric J.; Mouradian, M. Maral

    2001-01-01

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in ...

  13. Melanocortin receptor accessory proteins in adrenal disease and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, David S.; Ramachandrappa, Shwetha; Clark, Adrian J; Chan, Li F.

    2015-01-01

    Melanocortin receptor accessory proteins (MRAPs) are regulators of the melanocortin receptor family. MRAP is an essential accessory factor for the functional expression of the MC2R/ACTH receptor. The importance of MRAP in adrenal gland physiology is demonstrated by the clinical condition familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 2. The role of its paralog melanocortin-2-receptor accessory protein 2 (MRAP2), which is predominantly expressed in the hypothalamus including the paraventricular nucle...

  14. Steroid hormone receptors in human salivary gland tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamey, P J; Leake, R. E.; Cowan, S K; Soutar, D S; McGregor, I. A.; McGregor, F M

    1987-01-01

    Major salivary gland tumours were studied for the presence of hormone receptors for oestrogen and progesterone. Of the eight salivary gland tumours exhibiting varied histology, none showed high affinity receptors for oestrogen or progesterone. Salivary tissue from four patients with non-neoplastic salivary gland disease was also studied and found not to contain high affinity receptor sites. The absence of hormone receptors in these glands suggests that such tumours are not dependent on endocr...

  15. Common Promoter Elements in Odorant and Vomeronasal Receptor Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Jussara S Michaloski; Galante, Pedro A. F.; Nagai, Maíra H.; Lucia Armelin-Correa; Ming-Shan Chien; Hiroaki Matsunami; Bettina Malnic

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, odorants and pheromones are detected by hundreds of odorant receptors (ORs) and vomeronasal receptors (V1Rs and V2Rs) expressed by sensory neurons that are respectively located in the main olfactory epithelium and in the vomeronasal organ. Even though these two olfactory systems are functionally and anatomically separate, their sensory neurons show a common mechanism of receptor gene regulation: each neuron expresses a single receptor gene from a single allele. The mechanisms unde...

  16. Palmitoylation of Estrogen Receptors Is Essential for Neuronal Membrane Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Meitzen, John; Luoma, Jessie I.; Boulware, Marissa I.; Hedges, Valerie L.; Peterson, Brittni M.; Tuomela, Krista; Britson, Kyla A.; Mermelstein, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to activating nuclear estrogen receptor signaling, 17β-estradiol can also regulate neuronal function via surface membrane receptors. In various brain regions, these actions are mediated by the direct association of estrogen receptors (ERs) activating metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). These ER/mGluR signaling partners are organized into discrete functional microdomains via caveolin proteins. A central question that remains concerns the underlying mechanism by which these s...

  17. Benefit of farnesoid X receptor inhibition in obstructive cholestasis

    OpenAIRE

    Stedman, Catherine; Liddle, Christopher; Coulter, Sally; Sonoda, Junichiro; Alvarez, Jacqueline G.; Evans, Ronald M; Downes, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and pregnane X receptor have been implicated in regulating bile acid, lipid, carbohydrate, and xenobiotic metabolism. Bile duct ligation was used to increase endogenous bile acids and evaluate the roles of these receptors in modulating cholestatic liver injury. FXR knockout (KO) mice were found to be protected from obstructive cholestasis. Concurrent deletion of FXR also could ameliorate an increase in liver injury that is seen usually ...

  18. Genetic and Functional Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggenwirth, Hennie

    1998-01-01

    textabstractNuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are intermediary factors through which extracellular signals regulate expression of genes that are involved in homeostasis, development, and differentiation (Beato et al. '995, Mangelsdorf and Evans 1995). These receptors are characterized by a modular structure, with domains involved in transcription activation, DNA binding. hormone binding, and dimerization. The nuclear receptor super-family comprises three subfamilies of receptors, which might h...

  19. NMDA Receptor Modulators in the Treatment of Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Foster Olive, M.; Natali E. Nemirovsky; Tomek, Seven E.; LaCrosse, Amber L.

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction, and the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subtype serves as a molecular target for several drugs of abuse. In this review, we will provide an overview of NMDA receptor structure and function, followed by a review of the mechanism of action, clinical efficacy, and side effect profile of NMDA receptor ligands that are currently in use or being explored for the treatment of drug addiction. These ligands include the NMDA receptor modu...

  20. Multiple gustatory receptors required for the caffeine response in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Youngseok; Moon, Seok Jun; Montell, Craig

    2009-01-01

    The ability of insects to detect and avoid ingesting naturally occurring repellents and insecticides is essential for their survival. Nevertheless, the gustatory receptors enabling them to sense toxic botanical compounds are largely unknown. The only insect gustatory receptor shown to be required for avoiding noxious compounds is the Drosophila caffeine receptor, Gr66a. However, this receptor is not sufficient for the caffeine response, suggesting that Gr66a may be a subunit of a larger recep...