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Sample records for c1 transfergenes deduced

  1. Fishing for biodiversity: Novel methanopterin-linked C1 transfergenes deduced from the Sargasso Sea metagenome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Nercessian, Olivier; Lapidus, Alla; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2004-07-01

    The recently generated database of microbial genes from anoligotrophic environment populated by a calculated 1,800 of major phylotypes (the Sargasso Sea metagenome) presents a great source for expanding local databases of genes indicative of a specific function. In this paper we analyze the Sargasso Sea metagenome in terms of the presence of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer genes that are signature for methylotrophy. We conclude that more than 10 phylotypes possessing genes of interest are present in this environment, and a few of these are relatively abundant species. The sequences representative of the major phylotypes do not appear to belong to any known microbial group capable of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer. Instead, they separate from all known sequences on phylogenetic trees, pointing towards their affiliation with a novel microbial phylum. These data imply a broader distribution of methanopterin-linked functions in the microbial world than previously known.

  2. C 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Geometrically continuous ( G k ) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are C k also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C 1 geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G 1 surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson's equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O ( h 3 ) convergence in the L ∞ norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis.

  3. C1 esterase inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein called C1, which is part of the complement system. This system is a group of proteins that ... 2013:chap 20. Sullivan KE, Grumach AS. The complement system. In: Adkinson NF, Bochner BS, Burks AW, et ...

  4. Deducing Underlying Mechanisms from Protein Recruitment Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurin Lengert

    Full Text Available By using fluorescent labelling techniques, the distribution and dynamics of proteins can be measured within living cells, allowing to study in vivo the response of cells to a triggering event, such as DNA damage. In order to evaluate the reaction rate constants and to identify the proteins and reactions that are essential for the investigated process, mechanistic models are used, which often contain many proteins and associated parameters and are therefore underdetermined by the data. In order to establish criteria for assessing the significance of a model, we present here a systematic investigation of the information that can be reliably deduced from protein recruitment data, assuming that the complete set of reactions that affect the data of the considered protein species is not known. To this purpose, we study in detail models where one or two proteins that influence each other are recruited to a substrate. We show that in many cases the kind of interaction between the proteins can be deduced by analyzing the shape of the recruitment curves of one protein. Furthermore, we discuss in general in which cases it is possible to discriminate between different models and in which cases it is impossible based on the data. Finally, we argue that if different models fit experimental data equally well, conducting experiments with different protein concentrations would allow discrimination between the alternative models in many cases.

  5. Deducing Underlying Mechanisms from Protein Recruitment Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengert, Laurin; Drossel, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    By using fluorescent labelling techniques, the distribution and dynamics of proteins can be measured within living cells, allowing to study in vivo the response of cells to a triggering event, such as DNA damage. In order to evaluate the reaction rate constants and to identify the proteins and reactions that are essential for the investigated process, mechanistic models are used, which often contain many proteins and associated parameters and are therefore underdetermined by the data. In order to establish criteria for assessing the significance of a model, we present here a systematic investigation of the information that can be reliably deduced from protein recruitment data, assuming that the complete set of reactions that affect the data of the considered protein species is not known. To this purpose, we study in detail models where one or two proteins that influence each other are recruited to a substrate. We show that in many cases the kind of interaction between the proteins can be deduced by analyzing the shape of the recruitment curves of one protein. Furthermore, we discuss in general in which cases it is possible to discriminate between different models and in which cases it is impossible based on the data. Finally, we argue that if different models fit experimental data equally well, conducting experiments with different protein concentrations would allow discrimination between the alternative models in many cases.

  6. Deducer: A Data Analysis GUI for R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Fellows

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available While R has proven itself to be a powerful and flexible tool for data exploration and analysis, it lacks the ease of use present in other software such as SPSS and Minitab. An easy to use graphical user interface (GUI can help new users accomplish tasks that would otherwise be out of their reach, and improves the efficiency of expert users by replacing fifty key strokes with five mouse clicks. With this in mind, Deducer presents dialogs that are understandable for the beginner, and yet contain all (or most of the options that an experienced statistician, performing the same task, would want. An Excel-like spreadsheet is included for easy data viewing and editing. Deducer is based on Java's Swing GUI library and can be used on any common operating system. The GUI is independent of the specific R console and can easily be used by calling a text-based menu system. Graphical menus are provided for the JGR console and the Windows R GUI.

  7. Growth patterns of fossil vertebrates as deduced from bone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2009-10-20

    Ray S, Mukherjee D and S Bandyopadhyay S 2009 Growth patterns of fossil vertebrates as deduced from bone microstructure: case studies from. India; J. Biosci. ..... (sensu Smith-Gill 1983; Ray et al. 2004). This flexibility in.

  8. Alcohol binding in the C1 (C1A + C1B) domain of protein kinase C epsilon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pany, Satyabrata; Das, Joydip

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol regulates the expression and function of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε). In a previous study we identified an alcohol binding site in the C1B, one of the twin C1 subdomains of PKCε. Methods In this study, we investigated alcohol binding in the entire C1 domain (combined C1A and C1B) of PKCε. Fluorescent phorbol ester, SAPD and fluorescent diacylglycerol (DAG) analog, dansyl-DAG were used to study the effect of ethanol, butanol, and octanol on the ligand binding using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). To identify alcohol binding site(s), PKCεC1 was photolabeled with 3-azibutanol and 3-azioctanol, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The effects of alcohols and the azialcohols on PKCε were studied in NG108-15 cells. Results In the presence of alcohol, SAPD and dansyl-DAG showed different extent of FRET, indicating differential effects of alcohol on the C1A and C1B subdomains. Effects of alcohols and azialcohols on PKCε in NG108-15 cells were comparable. Azialcohols labeled Tyr-176 of C1A and Tyr-250 of C1B. Inspection of the model structure of PKCεC1 reveals that these residues are 40 Å apart from each other indicating that these residues form two different alcohol binding sites. Conclusions The present results provide evidence for the presence of multiple alcohol-binding sites on PKCε and underscore the importance of targeting this PKC isoform in developing alcohol antagonists. PMID:26210390

  9. Deducing Reaction Mechanism: A Guide for Students, Researchers, and Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Simon J.; Pitman, Catherine L.; Miller, Alexander J. M.

    2016-01-01

    An introductory guide to deducing the mechanism of chemical reactions is presented. Following a typical workflow for probing reaction mechanism, the guide introduces a wide range of kinetic and mechanistic tools. In addition to serving as a broad introduction to mechanistic analysis for students and researchers, the guide has also been used by…

  10. Deducing Energy Consumer Behavior from Smart Meter Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebeid, Emad Samuel Malki; Heick, Rune; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg

    2017-01-01

    The ongoing upgrade of electricity meters to smart ones has opened a new market of intelligent services to analyze the recorded meter data. This paper introduces an open architecture and a unified framework for deducing user behavior from its smart main electricity meter data and presenting the r...... the recognized home appliances. The framework uses open standard interfaces for exchanging data. The framework has been validated through comprehensive experiments that are related to an European Smart Grid project.......The ongoing upgrade of electricity meters to smart ones has opened a new market of intelligent services to analyze the recorded meter data. This paper introduces an open architecture and a unified framework for deducing user behavior from its smart main electricity meter data and presenting...

  11. On orientifolds of c=1 orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, T.P.T. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Riccioni, F. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: f.riccioni@damtp.cam.ac.uk; Schellekens, A.N. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-10-25

    The aim of this paper is to study orientifolds of c=1 conformal field theories. A systematic analysis of the allowed orientifold projections for c=1 orbifold conformal field theories is given. We compare the Klein bottle amplitudes obtained at rational points with the orientifold projections that we claim to be consistent for any value of the orbifold radius. We show that the recently obtained Klein bottle amplitudes corresponding to exceptional modular invariants, describing bosonic string theories at fractional square radius, are also in agreement with those orientifold projections.

  12. Deduced elasticity of sp3-bonded amorphous diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballato, J.; Ballato, A.

    2017-11-01

    Amorphous diamond was recently synthesized using high temperature and pressure techniques [Z. Zeng, L. Yang, Q. Zeng, H. Lou, H. Sheng, J. Wen, D. J. Miller, Y. Meng, W. Yang, W. L. Mao, and H. K. Mao, Nat. Commun. 8, 322 (2017)]. Here, selected physical properties of this new phase of carbon are deduced using an extension of the Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRHx) methodology whereby single crystal values are averaged over all orientations to yield values for the amorphous analog. Specifically, the elastic constants were deduced to be c11 = 1156.5 GPa, c12 = 87.6 GPa, and c44 = 534.5 GPa, whereas the Young's modulus, bulk modulus, and Poisson's ratio were also estimated to be 1144.2 GPa, 443.9 GPa, and 0.0704, respectively. These numbers are compared with experimental and theoretical literature values for other allotropic forms, specifically, Lonsdaleite, and two forms each of graphite and amorphous carbon. It is unknown at this time how the high temperature and pressure synthesis approach employed influences the structure, hence properties, of amorphous diamond at room temperature. However, the values provided herein constitute a baseline against which future structure/property/processing analyses can be compared.

  13. Viral safety of C1-inhibitor NF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, F. G.; Kleijn, M.; Koenderman, A. H. L.; Over, J.; van Engelenburg, F. A. C.; Schuitemaker, H.; van 't Wout, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of virus reduction by three process steps (polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) precipitation, pasteurization, and 15nm virus filtration) in the manufacturing of C1-inhibitor NF. The potential prion removing capacity in this process was estimated based on data from the literature.

  14. Anti-C1q autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Autoantibodies to complement components are associated with various diseases. Anti-C1q antibodies are present in all patients with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, but also, with varying prevalence, in other conditions. In SLE, these antibodies are neither sensitive nor specific for this

  15. Deducing Energy Consumer Behavior from Smart Meter Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Ebeid

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing upgrade of electricity meters to smart ones has opened a new market of intelligent services to analyze the recorded meter data. This paper introduces an open architecture and a unified framework for deducing user behavior from its smart main electricity meter data and presenting the results in a natural language. The framework allows a fast exploration and integration of a variety of machine learning algorithms combined with data recovery mechanisms for improving the recognition’s accuracy. Consequently, the framework generates natural language reports of the user’s behavior from the recognized home appliances. The framework uses open standard interfaces for exchanging data. The framework has been validated through comprehensive experiments that are related to an European Smart Grid project.

  16. Advance of the perihelion of Mercury deduced from QFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    I deduce the new gravitational formula from the variance in mass of QFT and GR (H05-0029-08, E15-0039 -08, E14-0032-08, D31-0054-10) in the partial differential: f (QFT) = f (GR) = delta∂ (m v)/delta∂ t = f _{P} + f _{C} , f _{P} = m delta∂ v / delta∂ t = - ( G m M /r (2) ) r / r, f _{C} = v delta∂ m / delta∂ t = - ( G m M / r (2) ) v / c (1), f (QFT) is the quasi-Casimir pressure of net virtual neutrinos nuν _{0} flux (after counteract contrary direction nuν _{0}). f (GR) is equivalent to Einstein’s equation, Eq. (1) is a new version of GR and can be solved exactly. Its core content is that the gravity produced by particles collide cannot linear addition, i.e., the nonlinearity of Einstein equation had been replaced by the nonlinearity caused by the variable mass in Eq.(1). Einstein equation can be inferred from Eq.(1) thereby from QFT, but QFT cannot be inferred from Eq.(1) or GR. f (QFT) is essential but f (GR) is phenomenological. Eq.(1) is obtained just by to absorb the essence of corpuscule collided gravitation origin ism proposed by Fatio in 1690 and 1920 Majorana’s experiment concept about gravitational shield effect again fuse with QFT. In my paper ‘QFT’S advance of the perihelion of Mercury, China Science &Technology Overview 125 88-90 (2011)’ QFT gravitational potential U = - G M /r is just the distribution density of net nuν _{0} flux, from SR we again get that: f (QFT) = f _{P} + f _{C}, f _{P} = - m ( delta∂ U / delta∂ r) r / r, f _{C} = - m ( delta∂U / delta∂ r) v / c (2), f _{ P} correspond the change rate of three-dimensional momentum p, f _{C} correspond the change rate of fourth dimensional momentum i m c which show directly as a dissipative force of mass change. According to Eq.(2) the circular motion is instability and elliptic motion is in the auto-stability state. In the fluctuation vacuum a particle with mass M neighbor another particle with mass m, the renormalization mass M and m will be less than that when

  17. Analysis list: Nr3c1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nr3c1 Adipocyte,Blood,Breast,Embryo,Embryonic fibroblast,Liver,Neural + mm9 http://...dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.5.tsv http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscie...ncedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Adipocyte.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp.../kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Breast.tsv,http:

  18. Analysis list: NR3C1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NR3C1 Blood,Bone,Breast,Liver,Others,Prostate,Uterus + hg19 http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/NR3C1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/NR3C1.5.t...sv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/NR3C1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyu...shu-u/hg19/colo/NR3C1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/c...olo/NR3C1.Bone.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/NR3C1.Breast.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience

  19. Structures of C1q-like proteins reveal unique features among the C1q/TNF superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressl, Susanne; Vu, Brandon K; Vivona, Sandro; Martinelli, David C; Südhof, Thomas C; Brunger, Axel T

    2015-04-07

    C1q-like (C1QL) -1, -2, and -3 proteins are encoded by homologous genes that are highly expressed in brain. C1QLs bind to brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 3 (BAI3), an adhesion-type G-protein coupled receptor that may regulate dendritic morphology by organizing actin filaments. To begin to understand the function of C1QLs, we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the globular C1q-domains of C1QL1, C1QL2, and C1QL3. Each structure is a trimer, with each protomer forming a jelly-roll fold consisting of 10 β strands. Moreover, C1QL trimers may assemble into higher-order oligomers similar to adiponectin and contain four Ca(2+)-binding sites along the trimeric symmetry axis, as well as additional surface Ca(2+)-binding sites. Mutation of Ca(2+)-coordinating residues along the trimeric symmetry axis lowered the Ca(2+)-binding affinity and protein stability. Our results reveal unique structural features of C1QLs among C1q/TNF superfamily proteins that may be associated with their specific brain functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. METHODS: Information...... in combination with anti-dsDNA and low complement was the strongest serological association with renal involvement. These data support the usefulness of anti-C1q in SLE, especially in lupus nephritis....

  1. Direct interaction between CD91 and C1q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Karen; Hansen, Erik W; Tacnet, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    . C1q binding to monocytes was shown to be correlated with CD91 expression and could be inhibited by the CD91 chaperone, receptor-associated protein. We also report data showing a direct interaction between CD91 and C1q. The interaction was investigated using various protein interaction assays....... A direct interaction between purified C1q and CD91 was observed both by ELISA and a surface plasmon resonance assay, with either C1q or CD91 immobilized. The interaction showed characteristics of specificity because it was time-dependent, saturable and could be inhibited by known ligands of both CD91 and C...

  2. Acidic β-mannanase from Penicillium pinophilum C1: Cloning, characterization and assessment of its potential for animal feed application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hongying; Shi, Pengjun; Luo, Huiying; Bai, Yingguo; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2011-12-01

    The β-mannanase gene, man5C1, was cloned from Penicillium pinophilum C1, a strain isolated from the acidic wastewater of a tin mine in Yunnan, China, and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The sequence analysis displayed the gene consists of a 1221-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 406 amino acids (Man5C1). The deduced amino acid sequence of Man5C1 showed the highest homology of 57.8% (identity) with a characterized β-mannanase from Aspergillus aculeatus belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 5. The purified rMan5C1 had a high specific activity of 1035U mg(-1) towards locust bean gum (LBG) and showed highest activity at pH 4.0 and 70°C. rMan5C1 was adaptable to a wide range of acidity, retaining >60% of its maximum activity at pH 3.0-7.0. The enzyme was stable over a broad pH range (3.0 to 10.0) and exhibited good thermostability at 50°C. The K(m) and V(max) values were 5.6 and 4.8mgmL(-1), and 2785 and 1608μmolmin(-1)mg(-1), respectively, when LBG and konjac flour were used as substrates. The enzyme had strong resistance to most metal ions and proteases (pepsin and trypsin), and released 8.96mgg(-1) reducing sugars from LBG in the simulated gastric fluid. All these favorable properties make rMan5C1 a promising candidate for use in animal feed. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 17 CFR 240.16c-1 - Brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brokers. 240.16c-1 Section 240... Act of 1934 Exemption of Certain Transactions from Section 16(c) § 240.16c-1 Brokers. Any transaction... a broker of an order for an account in which the broker has no direct or indirect interest. ...

  4. Safety and Usage of C1-Inhibitor in Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedl, Marc A; Bygum, Anette; Lumry, William

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The plasma-derived, highly purified, nanofiltered C1-inhibitor concentrate (Berinert; "pnfC1-INH") is approved in the United States for treating hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and in many European countries for attack treatment and short-term prophylaxis. OBJECTIVE: The objective...... of this study was to describe safety and usage patterns of pnfC1-INH. METHODS: A multicenter, observational, registry was conducted between 2010 and 2014 at 30 United States and 7 European sites to obtain both prospective (occurring after enrollment) and retrospective (occurring before enrollment) safety...... and usage data on subjects receiving pnfC1-INH for any reason. RESULTS: Of 343 enrolled patients, 318 received 1 or more doses of pnfC1-INH for HAE attacks (11,848 infusions) or for prophylaxis (3142 infusions), comprising the safety population. Median dosages per infusion were 10.8 IU/kg (attack treatment...

  5. Physics-based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-07

    please find the Final Technical Report with SF 298 for Dr. Erin E. Hackett’s ONR grant entitled Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine...From- To) 07/03/2017 Final Technica l Dec 2012- Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Physics -based Inverse Problem to Deduce Marine...19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 843-349-4087 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Physics -Based Inverse Problem To

  6. 17 CFR 270.3c-1 - Definition of beneficial ownership for certain 3(c)(1) funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Covered Company, the value of all securities owned by the Covered Company of all issuers that are Section... AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.3c-1... Covered Company means a company that is an investment company, a Section 3(c)(1) Company or a Section 3(c...

  7. Interaction of C1q and mannan-binding lectin (MBL) with C1r, C1s, MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and the MBL-associated protein MAp19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, S; Petersen, Steen Vang; Vorup-Jensen, T

    2000-01-01

    . There is controversy as to whether MBL can utilize C1r and C1s or, inversely, whether C1q can utilize MASP-1 and 2. Serum deficient in C1r produced no complement activation in IgG-coated microwells, whereas activation was seen in mannan-coated microwells. In serum, C1r and C1s were found to be associated only with C1q...

  8. Unilateral extended suboccipital approach for a C1 dumbbell schwanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan R.M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Craniovertebral junction tumors represent a complex pathology carrying a high risk of injuring the vertebral artery and the lower cranial nerves. Dumbbell C1- C2 schannomas are very rare tumors in this location. We present a case of a 66 years old male accepted for left laterocervical localized pain, headache and vertigo, with a large C1 dumbbell schwannoma extending in lateral over the C1 arch and displacing the C3 segment of the vertebral artery superiorly and anteriorly. Complete removal of the tumor was achieved using a far lateral approach. The approach is discussed with focus on the vertebral artery anatomy as the approach should give enough space to gain control of the artery without creating instability. Safe removal of C1 nerve root schwanomas can be achieved even if they compress and displace the vertebral artery by entering a fibrous tissue plane between the tumor and the vertebral artery.

  9. CONSISTENT USE OF THE KALMAN FILTER IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS (CTMS) FOR DEDUCING EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past research has shown that emissions can be deduced using observed concentrations of a chemical, a Chemical Transport Model (CTM), and the Kalman filter in an inverse modeling application. An expression was derived for the relationship between the "observable" (i.e., the con...

  10. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  11. Wildland fire probabilities estimated from weather model-deduced monthly mean fire danger indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush K. Preisler; Shyh-Chin Chen; Francis Fujioka; John W. Benoit; Anthony L. Westerling

    2008-01-01

    The National Fire Danger Rating System indices deduced from a regional simulation weather model were used to estimate probabilities and numbers of large fire events on monthly and 1-degree grid scales. The weather model simulations and forecasts are ongoing experimental products from the Experimental Climate Prediction Center at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography...

  12. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or business, either as an...

  13. Distinguishing C1q nephropathy from lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Andrew; Furness, Peter; Feehally, John

    2004-06-01

    'Seronegative lupus nephritis' describes patients with renal histology typical of lupus nephritis who have no clinical or serological evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We report our experience in nine patients identified as having 'seronegative lupus nephritis' who met the diagnostic criteria for C1q nephropathy. A retrospective review of clinical case notes and renal histology was carried out. We describe nine patients with C1q nephropathy in whom the diagnosis of 'seronegative lupus nephritis' was initially considered. All had renal histological features typical of lupus nephritis with 'wire loop' appearances on light microscopy, 'full house' immunoglobulin and complement deposition by immunoperoxidase, and electron-dense deposits in at least two glomerular locations. None of these nine patients developed clinical or serological evidence of SLE over a median follow-up of 6 years (range 0.1-9). There was no consistent evidence of a response to immunosuppressive therapy. In all cases, C1q staining was dominant on immunoperoxidase, and no tubuloreticular inclusions were seen. These appearances accord with previous descriptions of C1q nephropathy. The implications of a diagnosis of lupus are considerable, and we propose that the term 'seronegative lupus nephritis' is unhelpful, and should be avoided when there is diagnostic uncertainty. The term C1q nephropathy should be preferred when these histological features are seen in the absence of overt lupus, when C1q deposition is dominant and when tubuloreticular bodies are absent. The clinical course in the cases reported here does not support the use of immunosuppressive therapy in C1q nephropathy.

  14. Emerging and novel functions of complement protein C1q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna eKouser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Complement protein C1q, the recognition subcomponent of the classical pathway, performs a diverse range of complement and non-complement functions. It can bind various ligands derived from self, non-self and altered-self and modulate the functions of immune and non-immune cells including dendritic cells and microglia. C1q involvement in the clearance of apoptotic cells and subsequent B cell tolerance is more established now. Recent evidence appears to suggest that C1q plays an important role in pregnancy where its deficiency and dysregulation can have adverse effects, leading to preeclampsia, missed abortion, miscarriage or spontaneous loss and various infections. C1q is also produced locally in the Central Nervous System, and has a protective role against pathogens and possible inflammatory functions while interacting with aggregated proteins leading to neurodegenerative diseases. C1q role in synaptic pruning, and thus CNS development, anti-cancer effects as an immune surveillance molecule, and possibly in ageing are areas of extensive research.

  15. Chondromyxoid fibroma of C1: first case report Fibroma condromixoide de C1: primer caso Fibroma condromixóide de C1: primeiro relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericson Sfreddo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF is a rare, benign primary bone tumor. The cervical spine is an uncommon site for this tumor, with only 10 reported cases to date and none involving the first cervical vertebra (C1. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 25-year-old monozygotic female twin, presented with cervical pain. Radiographic imaging demonstrated a contrast-enhanced, right-sided lytic lesion of the insufflated type in C1, with a punched-out appearance and extending to the anterior arch. A postero-lateral and a posterior approach were performed in two steps to resect the tumor followed by occipitocervical fixation. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of CMF. At one year, the patient remains disease free with excellent spinal stability. CONCLUSION: Spinal surgeons may need to treat rare spinal tumors. Despite the proximity to neural and vascular structures, the goal of surgery is always a radical resection due to high recurrence rates.REVISIÓN: El fibroma condromixoide (FCM es un tumor óseo primario, benigno y raro. La columna cervical es un lugar raro de este tumor, con solamente 10 casos relatados, siendo que ninguno involucra a la primera vértebra cervical (C1. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo femenino, 25 años, gemela monozigótica, presentando dolor cervical. La imagen radiográfica demostró una lesión contrastada, predominantemente en la masa lateral de C1 con extensión hacia el arco posterior y anterior. La resección del tumor se realizó en dos tiempos, inicialmente una aproximación posterolateral, seguida por la vía posterior. En esta última, se realizó una fijación occipitocervical. El análisis anatomopatológico fue compatible con FCM. Pasado un año de los procedimientos, la paciente permanecía sin enfermedad y con estabilidad cranio-cervical. CONCLUSIÓN: Especialistas de columna deben tener el conocimiento de que estos tumores raros pueden acometer a la columna vertebral y, a pesar de su proximidad con el tejido

  16. A proof of the DBRF-MEGN method, an algorithm for deducing minimum equivalent gene networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Kotaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously developed the DBRF-MEGN (difference-based regulation finding-minimum equivalent gene network method, which deduces the most parsimonious signed directed graphs (SDGs consistent with expression profiles of single-gene deletion mutants. However, until the present study, we have not presented the details of the method's algorithm or a proof of the algorithm. Results We describe in detail the algorithm of the DBRF-MEGN method and prove that the algorithm deduces all of the exact solutions of the most parsimonious SDGs consistent with expression profiles of gene deletion mutants. Conclusions The DBRF-MEGN method provides all of the exact solutions of the most parsimonious SDGs consistent with expression profiles of gene deletion mutants.

  17. A proof of the DBRF-MEGN method, an algorithm for deducing minimum equivalent gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoda, Koji; Baba, Kotaro; Kitano, Hiroaki; Onami, Shuichi

    2011-06-24

    We previously developed the DBRF-MEGN (difference-based regulation finding-minimum equivalent gene network) method, which deduces the most parsimonious signed directed graphs (SDGs) consistent with expression profiles of single-gene deletion mutants. However, until the present study, we have not presented the details of the method's algorithm or a proof of the algorithm. We describe in detail the algorithm of the DBRF-MEGN method and prove that the algorithm deduces all of the exact solutions of the most parsimonious SDGs consistent with expression profiles of gene deletion mutants. The DBRF-MEGN method provides all of the exact solutions of the most parsimonious SDGs consistent with expression profiles of gene deletion mutants.

  18. On the influence of neutral turbulence on ambipolar diffusivities deduced from meteor trail expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    Full Text Available By measuring fading times of radar echoes from underdense meteor trails, it is possible to deduce the ambipolar diffusivities of the ions responsible for these radar echoes. It could be anticipated that these diffusivities increase monotonically with height akin to neutral viscosity. In practice, this is not always the case. Here, we investigate the capability of neutral turbulence to affect the meteor trail diffusion rate.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence

  19. Behaviour of the Pleistocene marsupial lion deduced from claw marks in a southwestern Australian cave

    OpenAIRE

    Arman, Samuel D.; Prideaux, Gavin J.

    2016-01-01

    The marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, was the largest-ever marsupial carnivore, and is one of the most iconic extinct Australian vertebrates. With a highly-specialised dentition, powerful forelimbs and a robust build, its overall morphology is not approached by any other mammal. However, despite >150 years of attention, fundamental aspects of its biology remain unresolved. Here we analyse an assemblage of claw marks preserved on surfaces in a cave and deduce that they were generated by mar...

  20. Deducing lightning locations and charge moment change by ELF observations around Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Hobara, Y.; Hayakawa, M.; Shiokawa, K.

    2011-12-01

    The electromagnetic radiations from lightning discharges have been intensively studied for a long time by using different frequency ranges. Recent observations of electromagnetic radiations from lightning in the ELF frequency range so-called ELF transients are recognized as a powerful tool not only to deduce the global lightning distribution but also to obtain one of the most important properties of lightning discharges such as charge moment changes (Qds). Although accurate Qds for the lightning discharges can be deduced from the static electric field measurement by using e.g. electric field mill, the detection ranges of this equipment is significantly limited in space (typically within few decade of km). Therefore Qds distributions of local thunderstorm activities over the spatial scale of Japan (within few thousands km) have not been studied yet. In this paper, we report the initial results of local ELF network observations (i.e. multiple observations over Japan) to deduce the spatio-temporal lightning discharge distributions with a charge moment change of the thunderstorm activity around Japan. The statistical properties of the charge moment changes will be presented as well.

  1. Pediatric hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema (HAE resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (C1-INH is a rare, life-threatening disorder. It is characterized by attacks of angioedema involving the skin and/or the mucosa of the upper airways, as well as the intestinal mucosa. In approximately 50 per cent of cases, clinical manifestations may appear during childhood. The complex management of HAE in pediatric patients is in many respects different from the management of adults. Establishing the diagnosis early, preferably before the onset of clinical symptoms, is essential in cases with a positive family history. Complement studies usually afford accurate diagnosis, whereas molecular genetics tests may prove helpful in uncertain cases. Appropriate therapy, supported by counselling, suitable modification of lifestyle, and avoidance of triggering factors (which primarily include mechanical trauma, mental stress and airway infections in children may spare the patient unnecessary surgery and may prevent mortality. Prompt control of edematous attacks, short-term prophylaxis and intermittent therapy are recommended as the primary means for the management of pediatric cases. Medicinal products currently used for the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema include antifibrinolytics, attenuated androgens, and C1-INH replacement therapy. Current guidelines favour antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis because of their favorable safety profile but efficacy may be lacking. Attenuated androgens administered in the lowest effective dose are another option. C1-INH replacement therapy is also an effective and safe agent for children. Regular monitoring and follow-up of patients are necessary.

  2. C1q Nephropathy: The Unique Underrecognized Pathological Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Devasahayam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C1q nephropathy is a rare glomerular disease with characteristic mesangial C1q deposition noted on immunofluorescence microscopy. It is histologically defined and poorly understood. Light microscopic features are heterogeneous and comprise minimal change disease (MCD, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, and proliferative glomerulonephritis. Clinical presentation is also diverse, and ranges from asymptomatic hematuria or proteinuria to frank nephritic or nephrotic syndrome in both children and adults. Hypertension and renal insufficiency at the time of diagnosis are common findings. Optimal treatment is not clear and is usually guided by the underlying light microscopic lesion. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment, with immunosuppressive agents reserved for steroid resistant cases. The presence of nephrotic syndrome and FSGS appear to predict adverse outcomes as opposed to favorable outcomes in those with MCD. Further research is needed to establish C1q nephropathy as a universally recognized distinct clinical entity. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of pathogenesis, histopathology, clinical features, therapeutic options, and outcomes of C1q nephropathy.

  3. 26 CFR 1.661(c)-1 - Limitation on deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....661(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... any amount which is treated under section 661(b) as consisting of any item of distributable net income..., which reports on the calendar year basis, has distributable net income of $20,000, which is deemed to...

  4. Bivariate C^1 quadratic finite elements and vertex splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Charles K.; He, Tian Xiao

    1990-01-01

    Following work of Heindl and of Powell and Sabin, each triangle of an arbitrary (regular) triangulation Δ of a polygonal region Ω in {R^2} is subdivided into twelve triangles, using the three medians, yielding the refinement hat Δ of Δ , so that {C^1} quadratic finite elements can be constructed. In this paper, we derive the Bezier nets of these elements in terms of the parameters that describe function and first partial derivative values at the vertices and values of the normal derivatives at the midpoints of the edges of Δ . Consequently, bivariate {C^1} quadratic (generalized) vertex splines on Δ have an explicit formulation. Here, a generalized vertex spline is one which is a piecewise polynomial on the refined grid partition hat Δ and has support that contains at most one vertex of the original partition Δ in its interior. The collection of all {C^1} quadratic generalized vertex splines on Δ so constructed is shown to form a basis of S_2^1(hat Δ ) , the vector space of all functions on {C^1}(Ω ) whose restrictions to each triangular cell of the partition hat Δ are quadratic polynomials. A subspace with the basis given by appropriately chosen generalized vertex splines with exactly one vertex of Δ in the interior of their supports, that reproduces all quadratic polynomials, is identified, and hence, has approximation order three. Quasi-interpolation formulas using this subspace are obtained. In addition, a constructive procedure that yields a locally supported basis of yet another subspace with dimension given by the number of vertices of Δ , that has approximation order three, is given.

  5. The topological matrix model of c=1 string

    CERN Document Server

    Imbimbo, Camillo; Imbimbo, Camillo; Mukhi, Sunil

    1995-01-01

    We derive a Kontsevich-type matrix model for the c=1 string directly from the W-infinity solution of the theory. The model that we obtain is different from previous proposals, which are proven to be incorrect. Our matrix model contains the Penner and Kontsevich cases, and we study its quantum effective action. The simplicity of our model leads to an encouraging interpretation in the context of background-independent noncritical string field theory.

  6. Spectroscopic Confirmation of DES13C1feu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.; Okouma, P.; Bassett, B.; Kasai, E.; Crawford, S. M.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Buckley, D.; Maartens, R.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Kessler, R.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Cane, R.; Fischer, J. A.; Gladney, L.; March, M.; Sako, M.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; D'Andrea, C.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Sullivan, M.; Barbary, K.; Bernstein, J. P.; Biswas, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Kim, A.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Thomas, R. C.; Foley, R.

    2013-10-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of a supernova (SN) candidate discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectrum (400-900 nm) of DES13C1feu was obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). A fit of the spectrum with SNID (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) reveals this event to be a type Ic supernova at z=0.06 at peak brightness.

  7. A C1qDC Protein (HcC1qDC6 with Three Tandem C1q Domains Is Involved in Immune Response of Triangle-Shell Pearl Mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC proteins are a family of proteins with a globular C1q (gC1q domain and participate in several immune responses. In this study, a C1qDC gene was identified from the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii (designated as HcC1qDC6. This gene has a full-length cDNA of 1782 bp and an open reading frame of 1,335 bp that encodes a 444-amino acid polypeptide containing three gC1q domains. HcC1qDC6 contains at least five exons and four introns. The mRNA transcripts of HcC1qDC6 were found to have the highest expression levels in the mantle tissue. The expression levels in the mantle and hepatopancreas were significantly upregulated by Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenges. Moreover, knockdown of HcC1qDC6 inhibits the expression of two immune-related genes (tumor necrosis factor and whey acidic protein. The recombinant proteins of C1q1, C1q2, and C1q3 all exhibit a binding activity against seven bacterial species and directly bind to peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. The results indicate that HcC1qDC6 is involved in the innate immunity of H. cumingii.

  8. Thick-target yields of radioactive targets deduced from inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikawa, M., E-mail: aikawa@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Ebata, S.; Imai, S. [Meme Media Laboratory, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The thick-target yield (TTY) is a macroscopic quantity reflected by nuclear reactions and matter properties of targets. In order to evaluate TTYs on radioactive targets, we suggest a conversion method from inverse kinematics corresponding to the reaction of radioactive beams on stable targets. The method to deduce the TTY is theoretically derived from inverse kinematics. We apply the method to the {sup nat}Cu({sup 12}C,X){sup 24}Na reaction to confirm availability. In addition, it is applied to the {sup 137}Cs + {sup 12}C reaction as an example of a radioactive system and discussed a conversion coefficient of a TTY measurement.

  9. Efficient C1-continuous phase-potential upwind (C1-PPU) schemes for coupled multiphase flow and transport with gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiamin; Younis, Rami M.

    2017-10-01

    In the presence of counter-current flow, nonlinear convergence problems may arise in implicit time-stepping when the popular phase-potential upwinding (PPU) scheme is used. The PPU numerical flux is non-differentiable across the co-current/counter-current flow regimes. This may lead to cycles or divergence in the Newton iterations. Recently proposed methods address improved smoothness of the numerical flux. The objective of this work is to devise and analyze an alternative numerical flux scheme called C1-PPU that, in addition to improving smoothness with respect to saturations and phase potentials, also improves the level of scalar nonlinearity and accuracy. C1-PPU involves a novel use of the flux limiter concept from the context of high-resolution methods, and allows a smooth variation between the co-current/counter-current flow regimes. The scheme is general and applies to fully coupled flow and transport formulations with an arbitrary number of phases. We analyze the consistency property of the C1-PPU scheme, and derive saturation and pressure estimates, which are used to prove the solution existence. Several numerical examples for two- and three-phase flows in heterogeneous and multi-dimensional reservoirs are presented. The proposed scheme is compared to the conventional PPU and the recently proposed Hybrid Upwinding schemes. We investigate three properties of these numerical fluxes: smoothness, nonlinearity, and accuracy. The results indicate that in addition to smoothness, nonlinearity may also be critical for convergence behavior and thus needs to be considered in the design of an efficient numerical flux scheme. Moreover, the numerical examples show that the C1-PPU scheme exhibits superior convergence properties for large time steps compared to the other alternatives.

  10. C1 Rational Quadratic Trigonometric Interpolation Spline for Data Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengjun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new C1 piecewise rational quadratic trigonometric spline with four local positive shape parameters in each subinterval is constructed to visualize the given planar data. Constraints are derived on these free shape parameters to generate shape preserving interpolation curves for positive and/or monotonic data sets. Two of these shape parameters are constrained while the other two can be set free to interactively control the shape of the curves. Moreover, the order of approximation of developed interpolant is investigated as O(h3. Numeric experiments demonstrate that our method can construct nice shape preserving interpolation curves efficiently.

  11. Reduction of CO2 to C1 products and fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mill, T.; Ross, D.

    2002-01-01

    Photochemical semiconductor processes readily reduced CO2 to a broad range of C1 products. However the intrinsic and solar efficiencies for the processes were low. Improved quantum efficiencies could be realized utilizing quantum-sized particles, but at the expense of using less of the visible solar spectrum. Conversely, semiconductors with small bandgaps used more of the visible solar spectrum at the expense of quantum efficiency. Thermal reduction of CO2 with Fe(II) was thermodynamically favored for forming many kinds of organic compounds and occurred readily with olivine and other Fe(II) minerals above 200??C to form higher alkanes and alkenes. No added hydrogen was required.

  12. C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency and elective caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R J; O'Sullivan, G

    2005-07-01

    C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder of the complement system characterised by episodes of cutaneous and mucosal oedema. Life-threatening airway oedema can follow airway instrumentation or minor trauma. We describe the successful management of a 37-year-old primiparous woman with inherited C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency who was admitted at 38 weeks' gestation for elective caesarean section. Whilst undergoing general anaesthesia 18 months previously she had experienced facial and pharyngeal oedema despite prophylaxis (one unit of fresh frozen plasma). On this occasion she underwent elective caesarean section following intrathecal anaesthesia with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 2 mL and diamorphine 300 microg. Cardiovascular stability was ensured using glycopyrolate and intravenous Hartmann's solution 2 L; a live female infant was delivered successfully. There were no peri- or postoperative complications. Regional anaesthesia is the safest method for providing surgical anaesthesia in the obstetric patient. We believe elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia should be considered if there are predicted difficulties with vaginal delivery.

  13. Intestinal and Hepatic Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Woo Park

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Polytopic transmembrane protein, Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1 is localized at the apical membrane of enterocytes and the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. It mediates intestinal cholesterol absorption and prevents extensive loss of cholesterol by transporting biliary cholesterol into hepatocytes. NPC1L1 is a molecular target of ezetimibe, an agent for hypercholesterolemia. Recently, NPC1L1 inhibition has been shown to prevent metabolic disorders such as fatty liver disease, obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. In this review, the identification and characterization of NPC1L1, NPC1L1-dependent cholesterol transport, the relationship with pathogenesis of metabolic disease and its newly introduced function for virus entry are discussed.

  14. Plasma enhanced C1 chemistry for green technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2013-09-01

    Plasma catalysis is one of the innovative next generation green technologies that meet the needs for energy and materials conservation as well as environmental protection. Non-thermal plasma uniquely generates reactive species independently of reaction temperature, and these species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than normal thermochemical reactions. Non-thermal plasma thus broadens the operation window of existing chemical conversion processes, and ultimately allows modification of the process parameters to minimize energy and material consumption. We have been specifically focusing on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) as one of the viable non-thermal plasma sources for practical fuel reforming. In the presentation, room temperature one-step conversion of methane to methanol and hydrogen using a miniaturized DBD reactor (microplasma reactor) is highlighted. The practical impact of plasma technology on existing C1-chemistry is introduced, and then unique characteristics of plasma fuel reforming such as non-equilibrium product distribution is discussed.

  15. A Selection of Recent Advances in C1 Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesters, Carl

    2016-06-07

    This review presents a selection of recent publications related to the chemistry and catalysis of C1 molecules, including methane, methanol, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. These molecules play an important role in the current supply of energy and chemicals and will likely become even more relevant because of the need to decarbonize fuels (shift from coal to natural gas) in line with CO2 capture and use to mitigate global warming, as well as a gradual shift on the supply side from crude oil to natural gas. This review includes both recent industrial developments, such as the huge increase in methanol-to-olefins-capacity build in China and the demonstration of oxidative coupling of methane, and scientific developments in these chemistries facilitated by improved capabilities in, for example, analytical tools and computational modeling.

  16. Vortex magnetic structure in circularly magnetized microwires as deduced from magneto-optical Kerr measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2014-02-14

    The magneto-optic Kerr effect has been employed to determine the magnetization process and estimate the domain structure of microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy. The diameter of microwires was 8 μm, and pieces 2 cm long were selected for measurements. The analysis of the local surface longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops has allowed us to deduce a vortex magnetic structure with axial core and circular external shell. Moreover, a bamboo-like surface domain structure is confirmed with wave length of around 10 to 15 μm and alternating chirality in adjacent circular domains. The width of the domain wall is estimated to be less than 3 μm. Finally, closure domain structures with significant helical magnetization component are observed extending up to around 1000 μm from the end of the microwire.

  17. Deducing fast electron density changes in randomly orientated uncrystallized biomolecules in a pump-probe experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, K; Schwander, P; Schmidt, M; Saldin, D K

    2014-07-17

    We propose a method for deducing time-resolved structural changes in uncrystallized biomolecules in solution. The method relies on measuring the angular correlations of the intensities, when averaged over a large number of diffraction patterns from randomly oriented biomolecules in solution in a liquid solvent. The experiment is somewhat like a pump-probe version of an experiment on small angle X-ray scattering, except that the data expected by the algorithm are not just the radial variation of the averaged intensities. The differences of these correlation functions as measured from a photoexcited and dark structure enable the direct calculation of the difference electron density with a knowledge of only the dark structure. We exploit a linear relation we derive between the difference in these correlation functions and the difference electron density, applicable for small structural changes.

  18. Theoretical model to deduce a PDF with a power law tail using Extreme Physical Information

    CERN Document Server

    Bonilla, Ricardo; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The theory of Extreme Physical Information (EPI) is used to deduce a probability density function (PDF) of a system that exhibits a power law tail. The computed PDF is useful to study and fit several observed distributions in complex systems. This new approach permits to describe extreme and rare events in the tail, and also the frequent events in the distribution head. Using EPI an information functional is constructed, and minimized using Euler-Lagrange equations. As a solution a second order differential equation is derived. By solving this equation a family of functions is calculated. These functions allow describing the system in terms of a eigenstates. A dissipative term is introduced into the model, as a relevant term to study open systems. One of the main results is a mathematical relation between the scaling parameter of the power law observed in the tail and the shape of the head.

  19. Electron density increases due to Lightning activity as deduced from LWPC code and VLF signal perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samir, Nait Amor; Bouderba, Yasmina

    VLF signal perturbations in association with thunderstorm activity appear as changes in the signal amplitude and phase. Several papers reported on the characteristics of thus perturbations and their connection to the lightning strokes amplitude and polarity. In this contribution, we quantified the electrons density increases due to lightning activity by the use of the LWPC code and VLF signal perturbations parameters. The method is similar to what people did in studying the solar eruptions effect. the results showed that the reference height (h') decreased to lower altitudes (between 70 and 80 km). From the LWPC code results the maximum of the electron density was then deduced. Therefore, a numerical simulation of the atmospheric species times dependences was performed to study the recovery times of the electrons density at different heights. The results showed that the recovery time last for several minutes and explain the observation of long recovery Early signal perturbations.

  20. A major protein precursor of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) byssus: deduced sequence and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K E; Waite, J H

    1998-04-01

    The zebra mussel is a nonindigenous invader of North American lakes and rivers and one of the few freshwater bivalve molluscs having a byssus--a sclerotized organ used by the mussel for opportunistic attachment to hard surfaces. We have sequenced a foot-specific cDNA whose composite protein sequence was deduced from a series of overlapping but occasionally nonidentical cDNA fragments. The overall deduced sequence matches tryptic peptides from a major byssal precursor protein--Dreissena polymorpha foot protein 1 (Dpfp1). The calculated mass of Dpfp1 is 49 kDa; but this is known to be extensively hydroxylated and O-glycosylated during maturation. Purified native Dpfp1 analyzed using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry with time-of-flight indicates that the protein occurs as at least two size variants with masses of 48.6 and 54.5 kDa. In all probability, the sequence variants reported in this study are related to the larger mass variant. Dpfp1 has a block copolymer-like structure defined by two consensus motifs that are sharply segregated into domains. The N-terminal side of Dpfp1 has 22 tandem repeats of a heptapeptide consensus (P-[V/E]-Y-P-[T/S/delta]-[K/Q]-X); the C-terminal side has 16 repeats of a tridecapeptide motif (K-P-G-P-Y-D-Y-D-G-P-Y-D-K). Both consensus repeats are unique, with some limited homology to other proteins functioning in tension: marine mussel adhesives, plant extensins, titin, and trematode eggshell precursors.

  1. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Agirrezabal-Telleria, Iker; Bhan, Aditya; Simonetti, Dante; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Iglesia, Enrique

    2017-04-28

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni(2+) active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C1 homologation selectively forms C4 and C7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid acids

  2. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Shuai

    2017-02-23

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C-1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C-1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O-2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni2+ active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C-1 homologation selectively forms C-4 and C-7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid

  3. Cell-specific deletion of C1qa identifies microglia as the dominant source of C1q in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maria I; Chu, Shu-Hui; Hernandez, Michael X; Fang, Melody J; Modarresi, Lila; Selvan, Pooja; MacGregor, Grant R; Tenner, Andrea J

    2017-03-06

    The complement cascade not only provides protection from infection but can also mediate destructive inflammation. Complement is also involved in elimination of neuronal synapses which is essential for proper development, but can be detrimental during aging and disease. C1q, required for several of these complement-mediated activities, is present in the neuropil, microglia, and a subset of interneurons in the brain. To identify the source(s) of C1q in the brain, the C1qa gene was selectively inactivated in the microglia or Thy-1+ neurons in both wild type mice and a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and C1q synthesis assessed by immunohistochemistry, QPCR, and western blot analysis. While C1q expression in the brain was unaffected after inactivation of C1qa in Thy-1+ neurons, the brains of C1qa FL/FL :Cx3cr1 CreERT2 mice in which C1qa was ablated in microglia were devoid of C1q with the exception of limited C1q in subsets of interneurons. Surprisingly, this loss of C1q occurred even in the absence of tamoxifen by 1 month of age, demonstrating that Cre activity is tamoxifen-independent in microglia in Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ mice. C1q expression in C1qa FL/FL : Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ mice continued to decline and remained almost completely absent through aging and in AD model mice. No difference in C1q was detected in the liver or kidney from C1qa FL/FL : Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ mice relative to controls, and C1qa FL/FL : Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ mice had minimal, if any, reduction in plasma C1q. Thus, microglia, but not neurons or peripheral sources, are the dominant source of C1q in the brain. While demonstrating that the Cx3cr1 CreERT2/WganJ deleter cannot be used for adult-induced deletion of genes in microglia, the model described here enables further investigation of physiological roles of C1q in the brain and identification of therapeutic targets for the selective control of complement-mediated activities contributing to neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. The role of ficolins and MASPs in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH) causes disturbances in the complement system. However, the influence of HAE-C1-INH on the lectin pathway of complement is unresolved. Thus, we studied the main initiator molecules, enzymes and regulators in the lectin pathway...... in patients with HAE-C1-INH....

  5. Structure and activation of C1, the complex initiating the classical pathway of the complement cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Simon A; Sander, Bjoern; Jensen, Rasmus K; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Golas, Monika M; Jensenius, Jens C; Hansen, Annette G; Thiel, Steffen; Andersen, Gregers R

    2017-01-31

    The complement system is an important antimicrobial and inflammation-generating component of the innate immune system. The classical pathway of complement is activated upon binding of the 774-kDa C1 complex, consisting of the recognition molecule C1q and the tetrameric protease complex C1r2s2, to a variety of activators presenting specific molecular patterns such as IgG- and IgM-containing immune complexes. A canonical model entails a C1r2s2 with its serine protease domains tightly packed together in the center of C1 and an intricate intramolecular reaction mechanism for activation of C1r and C1s, induced upon C1 binding to the activator. Here, we show that the serine protease domains of C1r and C1s are located at the periphery of the C1r2s2 tetramer both when alone or within the nonactivated C1 complex. Our structural studies indicate that the C1 complex adopts a conformation incompatible with intramolecular activation of C1, suggesting instead that intermolecular proteolytic activation between neighboring C1 complexes bound to a complement activating surface occurs. Our results rationalize how a multitude of structurally unrelated molecular patterns can activate C1 and suggests a conserved mechanism for complement activation through the classical and the related lectin pathway.

  6. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1IB6C-1SMKC [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1IB6C-1SMKC 1IB6 1SMK C C -MKVAVLGAAGGIGQALALLLKTQLPSGSELSLYDIAPVTPGVAVDLSHIPTAVKI...TLKKDIALGQEFVNK GFKVAILGAAGGIGQPLAMLMKM-NPLVSVLHLYDVV-NAPGVTADISHMDTGAVVRGFLGQQQLEAALTG... 1SMK C 1SMKC 1SMK C 1SMKC 1SMK C 1SMKC MLMKM-NPLVS

  7. On the strength of the hydrogen-carbon interaction as deduced from physisorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T X; Bae, J-S; Wang, Y; Bhatia, S K

    2009-04-21

    We deduce a new value for the potential well depth for the C-H2 interaction on the basis of experimental validations of isotherms of H2 and D2 predicted using independently characterized microstructural parameters. We use two carbons, one an activated carbon fiber whose structure has been recently characterized by us (Nguyen, T. X.; cohaut, N.; Bae, J.-S.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2008, 24, 7912) using hybrid reverse Monte Carlo simulation (HRMC) and the other the commercial Takeda 3A carbon molecular sieve whose pore size distribution is determined here from the 273 K CO2 adsorption isotherm. The conventional grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation technique incorporating a semiclassical Feynman and Hibbs (FH) potential approximation (FHGCMC) as well as path integral Monte Carlo calculations is employed to determine theoretical adsorption isotherms. It is found that curvature enhances the well depth for the LJ C-H2 interaction by a factor of 1.134 over that for a flat graphite surface, consistent with our recent study (Nguyen, T. X.; cohaut, N.; Bae, J.-S.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2008, 24, 7912). A value of the C-C well depth of 37.26 K, used for estimating the C-H2 well depth in conjunction with the Berthelot rules, with the Steele C-C well depth used for interaction with heavier gases (Ar, CO2 and CH4), leads to excellent agreement with experimental isotherms in all cases.

  8. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L W; Fallon, P; Clark, R; Delaplanque, M; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S

    2005-08-16

    The authors have deduced the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross-section over an equivalent neutron energy range of 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}'f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}'f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). The energies of the scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} to 131{sup o}.

  9. Plate coupling across the northern Manila subduction zone deduced from mantle lithosphere buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Liang; Doo, Wen-Bin; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Hsu, Shu-Kun

    2017-12-01

    The Manila subduction zone is located at the plate boundary where the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) moves northwestward toward the Eurasian plate (EU) with a high convergence rate. However, historically, no large earthquakes greater than Mw7 have been observed across the northern Manila subduction zone. The poorly understood plate interaction between these two plates in this region creates significant issues for evaluating the seismic hazard. Therefore, the variation of mantle lithospheric buoyancy is calculated to evaluate the plate coupling status across the northern Manila subduction zone, based on recently published forward gravity modeling constrained by the results of the P-wave seismic crustal structure of the TAIGER (Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research) project. The results indicate weak plate coupling between the PSP and EU, which could be related to the release of the overriding PSP from the descending EU's dragging force, which was deduced from the higher elevation of the Luzon arc and the fore-arc basin northward toward the Taiwan orogen. Moreover, serpentinized peridotite is present above the plate boundary and is distributed more widely and thickly closer to offshore southern Taiwan orogen. We suggest that low plate coupling may facilitate the uplifting of serpentinized mantle material up to the plate boundary.

  10. Geoelectrical Structure of Ulleung Island, Korea Deduced from 3D MT Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. J.; Kim, M. S.; Park, I. H.; Song, Y.

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) magnetotelluric (MT) survey has been carried out to delineate subsurface structures and possible fractures for geothermal development in Ulleung Island, Korea. Quite good quality of MT data could be obtained throughout the survey region by locating the remote reference in Sawauchi, Japan, which is approximately 900 km from the centre of the field site. 3D modelling and inversion are performed taking into account the sea effect in MT measurements near the seashore. The modelling results showed that seawater surrounding the Ulleung Island affected MT data at frequencies below 10 Hz, depending on the distance from the seashore. Two kinds of 3D inversion have been performed with the MT data observed from the area; ordinary 3D inversion, and inversion including the sea as a constraint. The sea-effect constraint inversion gave more reasonable and reliable results and showed clear E-W trend of conductive anomaly along the connection line between the test boreholes GH-1 and GH-2, which showed very high geothermal gradients of about 100 °/km. Comparing the gradients of the other two boreholes in north and south directions are of about 70 °/km, one can deduce that the deep circulation of convective water through the deeply connected fractures, say E-W trends conductive anomaly, carries the heat from the deep to near the surface. This can explain the big gradient differences from site to site in this small island.

  11. The Seismic risk perception in Italy deduced by a statistical sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Pessina, Vera; Peruzza, Laura; Cerbara, Loredana; Crescimbene, Cristiana

    2015-04-01

    In 2014 EGU Assembly we presented the results of a web a survey on the perception of seismic risk in Italy. The data were derived from over 8,500 questionnaires coming from all Italian regions. Our questionnaire was built by using the semantic differential method (Osgood et al. 1957) with a seven points Likert scale. The questionnaire is inspired the main theoretical approaches of risk perception (psychometric paradigm, cultural theory, etc.) .The results were promising and seem to clearly indicate an underestimation of seismic risk by the italian population. Based on these promising results, the DPC has funded our research for the second year. In 2015 EGU Assembly we present the results of a new survey deduced by an italian statistical sample. The importance of statistical significance at national scale was also suggested by ISTAT (Italian Statistic Institute), considering the study as of national interest, accepted the "project on the perception of seismic risk" as a pilot study inside the National Statistical System (SISTAN), encouraging our RU to proceed in this direction. The survey was conducted by a company specialised in population surveys using the CATI method (computer assisted telephone interview). Preliminary results will be discussed. The statistical support was provided by the research partner CNR-IRPPS. This research is funded by Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC).

  12. F-region Pedersen conductivity deduced using the TIMED/GUVI limb retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kil

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As a proxy of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate for equatorial plasma bubbles, we investigate the flux-tube integrated F-region Pedersen conductivity (ΣPF using the electron density profiles (EDPs provided by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI on board the Thermosphere Ionosphere and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED satellite. The investigation is conducted using the EDPs obtained in the Atlantic sector at 19:00-22:00 LT during 4–17 August and 6-16 December 2002. The seasonal difference of the strength and location of the equatorial ionization anomalies (EIAs induces a significant difference in the deduced ΣPF. Much stronger EIAs are created at higher altitudes and latitudes in December rather than in August. At 19:00–20:00 LT, the peak value of the ΣPF has 23 mhos at 1100 km apex height during 14–16 December and 18mhos at 600 km during 15–17 August. The ΣPF decreases as local time progresses. Therefore, ΣPF provides a preferred condition for the growth of bubbles to higher altitudes at 19:00-20:00 LT than at later hours, in December rather than in August in the Atlantic sector.

  13. Supercritical fluid in the mantle transition zone deduced from H-D interdiffusion of wadsleyite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yoshino, Takashi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of water in the Earth's mantle is key to understanding the mantle convection and geochemical evolution of the Earth. As wadsleyite and ringwoodite can incorporate large amounts of water in their crystal structures, proton conduction has been invoked to account for the widespread conductive anomalies observed in the mantle wedge, where descending slab stagnates at the transition zone. However, there is a lot of controversy on whether proton conduction by itself is able to explain such anomalies, because of large discrepancy in the extent of the water effect deduced from previous electrical conductivity measurements on hydrous polycrystalline wadsleyite and ringwoodite. Here we report the hydrogen self-diffusion coefficient obtained from H-D interdiffusion experiments in wadsleyite single-crystal couples. Our results demonstrate that the effect of water on the electrical conductivity of wadsleyite is limited and hydrous wadsleyite by itself is unable to explain conductive anomalies in the transition zone. In contrast, the expected hydrogen effective diffusion does not allow the wide propagation of water between the stagnant slab and surrounding mantle, probably leading to persistence of local water saturation and continuous release of supercritical fluids at the stagnant slab roof on geological time scales. This phenomenon provides an alternative explanation for both the high-conductivity and seismic-velocity anomalies observed in the mantle wedge at the transition-zone depth.

  14. [Investigation of C1R gene frequencies in three Han populations in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Z; Gou, Q; Wu, J; Hou, Y

    1997-12-01

    To reveal the C1R polymorphism in Chinese, three Han populations in Guangzhou (101 samples), Jilin (105 samples) and Chengdu (111 samples) were investigated with a technique using PAGIF followed by immunoblotting. The results showed in Chengdu the C1R * 1 = 0.5676, C1R * 2 = 0.3424 and C1R * 5 = 0.0856, in Guangzhou C1R * 1 = 0.5248, C1R * 2 = 0.2663 and C1R * 5 = 0.1089, and in Jilin C1R * 1 = 0.5381, C1R * 2 = 0.2619 and C1R * 5 = 0.1714. Three rare genes C1R * 6, C1R * 7 and C1R * 8 were found in the investigation. These indicate that the frequency of C1R * 2 is elevated from north to south which may imply a geographic cline in this locus. The cumulated heterogeneity of C1R in Han population is 61.5% which means that this polymorphic system is useful in anthropolgy as well as in forensic science.

  15. Biomechanical comparison of a novel C1 posterior locking plate with the harms technique in a C1-C2 fixation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P; Glaser, John A; DiAngelo, Denis J

    2008-11-15

    A biomechanical testing protocol was used to study atlantoaxial fixation techniques in a human cadaveric model. To compare the in vitro biomechanics of locking plate fixation of the posterior arch of C1 to C2 laminar screw fixation, with that of conventional C1 lateral mass to C2 pars screw fixation. Current methods of atlantoaxial fixation pose a risk to neurologic and vascular structures. A novel posterior locking plate for C1 was designed, that when rigidly linked to C2 translaminar screws may offer alternative C1-C2 fixation with greatly decreased surgical risk. No comparative in vitro biomechanical testing has been previously done to evaluate the feasibility of this method. Cadaveric and CT assessments of the thickness of the C1 ring were performed. Seven spines (C0-C4) were evaluated in flexion-extension, left-right bending, and left-right axial rotation in a cadaveric C1-C2 fixation model. Three conditions were evaluated: (1) intact spine, and after odontoidectomy, (2) C1 plate to C2 laminar screw fixation, (3) C1 lateral mass to C2 pars screw fixation. Flexibility and motion data were compared using a 1-way RM analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Kuels tests. Anatomic data indicated that 6 mm of screw purchase was viable for C1 plate fixation. Both the Harms and C1-plated conditions significantly reduced global flexibility in flexion-extension and left-right axial rotation. Motion at the C1-C2 level was significantly reduced for all loading modes for both instrumented conditions with the exception of the C1 plate in right bending. No significant differences occurred between the 2 fixation methods. A novel C1 posterior locking plate was designed and tested in a C1-C2 fixation model. The C1 locking plate technique functioned in an equivalent manner to the existing Harms technique. The C1 plate may be a viable alternative that is technically less demanding with decreased surgical risk.

  16. Characteristics of Turbulent Airflow Deduced from Rapid Surface Thermal Fluctuations: An Infrared Surface Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2017-12-01

    The intermittent nature of turbulent airflow interacting with the surface is readily observable in fluctuations of the surface temperature resulting from the thermal imprints of eddies sweeping the surface. Rapid infrared thermography has recently been used to quantify characteristics of the near-surface turbulent airflow interacting with the evaporating surfaces. We aim to extend this technique by using single-point rapid infrared measurements to quantify properties of a turbulent flow, including surface exchange processes, with a view towards the development of an infrared surface anemometer. The parameters for the surface-eddy renewal (α and β ) are inferred from infrared measurements of a single-point on the surface of a heat plate placed in a wind tunnel with prescribed wind speeds and constant mean temperatures of the surface. Thermally-deduced parameters are in agreement with values obtained from standard three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer measurements close to the plate surface (e.g., α = 3 and β = 1/26 (ms)^{-1} for the infrared, and α = 3 and β = 1/19 (ms)^{-1} for the sonic-anemometer measurements). The infrared-based turbulence parameters provide new insights into the role of surface temperature and buoyancy on the inherent characteristics of interacting eddies. The link between the eddy-spectrum shape parameter α and the infrared window size representing the infrared field of view is investigated. The results resemble the effect of the sampling height above the ground in sonic anemometer measurements, which enables the detection of larger eddies with higher values of α . The physical basis and tests of the proposed method support the potential for remote quantification of the near-surface momentum field, as well as scalar-flux measurements in the immediate vicinity of the surface.

  17. A novel computational framework for deducing muscle synergies from experimental joint moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantharaman eGopalakrishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior experimental studies have hypothesized the existence of a ‘muscle synergy’ based control scheme for producing limb movements and locomotion in vertebrates. Such synergies have been suggested to consist of fixed muscle grouping schemes with the co-activation of all muscles in a synergy resulting in limb movement. Quantitative representations of these groupings (termed muscle weightings and their control signals (termed synergy controls have traditionally been derived by the factorization of experimentally measured EMG. This study presents a novel approach for deducing these weightings and controls from inverse dynamic joint moments that are computed from an alternative set of experimental measurements – movement kinematics and kinetics. This technique was applied to joint moments for healthy human walking at 0.7 and 1.7 m/s, and two sets of ‘simulated’ synergies were computed based on two different criteria (1 synergies were required to minimize errors between experimental and simulated joint moments in a musculoskeletal model (pure-synergy solution (2 along with minimizing joint moment errors, synergies also minimized muscle activation levels (optimal-synergy solution. On comparing the two solutions, it was observed that the introduction of optimality requirements (optimal-synergy to a control strategy solely aimed at reproducing the joint moments (pure-synergy did not necessitate major changes in the muscle grouping within synergies or the temporal profiles of synergy control signals. Synergies from both the simulated solutions exhibited many similarities to EMG derived synergies from a previously published study, thus implying that the analysis of the two different types of experimental data reveals similar, underlying synergy structures.

  18. C1q nephropathy in India: A single-center study

    OpenAIRE

    K V Kanodia; Vanikar, A. V.; Patel, R.D.; Suthar, K. S.; Patel, H. V.; M A Gumber; Shah, P. R.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy (C1qN) is defined by conspicuous C1q deposits in the glomerular mesangial regions of patients who do not have any evidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We present our experience with C1qN over the last three years. In total, 1775 native renal biopsies were reviewed and dominant/co-dominant C1q mesangial deposits in patients with absence of clinical and/or serological evidence of SLE were considered as C1qN. Their clinical profile and renal function status were studie...

  19. Immunohistochemical localization of C1 subunit of V-ATPase (ATPase C1) in oral squamous cell cancer and normal oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, A; Pérez-Sayáns García, M; Rodríguez, M J; Antúnez-López, J; Barros-Angueira, F; Somoza-Martín, M; Gándara-Rey, J M; Aguirre-Urízar, J M

    2012-02-01

    The ATP6V1C1 gene encodes the C1 subunit of the vacuolar-ATPase (V-ATPase) proton pump. This gene is over-expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The aim of our study was to perform an immunohistochemical study of the distribution of the C1 subunit in normal epithelium of the oral cavity and in OSCC. We analyzed the expression of the C1 subunit in eight OSCC samples and two normal oral mucosa samples using polyclonal V-ATPase C1 antibody (clone H-300). In the normal oral mucosa samples, C1 subunit staining was observed in the basal and intermediate layers of the epithelium. No staining was visible in the keratinized superficial layers. More intense staining was observed in the OSCC samples, with the predominant expression at the periphery of tumor nests and absence of expression in dyskeratotic areas. C1 subunit expression in tumor cells was predominantly cytoplasmic, although there was perinuclear and nuclear expression in some samples. These findings demonstrate that V-ATPase is necessary for proper epithelial functioning and show its importance in the development of OSCC as evidenced by the over-expression of ATP6V1C1 in OSCC.

  20. Genetic analysis of complement C1s deficiency associated with systemic lupus erythematosus highlights alternative splicing of normal C1s gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armano, MT; Ferriani, VP; Florido, MP

    2008-01-01

    Deficiencies of complement proteins of the classical pathway are strongly associated with the development of autoimmune diseases. Deficiency of C1r has been observed to occur concomitantly with deficiency in C1s and 9 out of 15 reported cases presented systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we...

  1. Homozygosity for a novel mutation in the C1q C chain gene in a Turkish family with hereditary C1q deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulez, N; Genel, F; Atlihan, F

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary complete deficiency of complement component C1q is associated with a high prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus and increased susceptibility to severe recurrent infections. An 11-year-old girl was screened for immunodeficiency due to a history of recurrent meningitis and pneumonia....... Immunologic studies revealed absence of classic pathway hemolytic activity and undetectable levels of Clq. Exon-specific amplification of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequence analysis revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation at codon 48 in the C1q C gene causing a glycine......-to-arginine substitution affecting the collagen-like region of C1q. No changes were seen in the exons of the A and B chains. The mutation affected both the formation and the secretion of C1q variant molecules. We describe a novel mutation in the C1q C chain gene that leads to an interchange in amino acids resulting...

  2. 17 CFR 270.22c-1 - Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase. 270.22c-1 Section 270.22c-1 Commodity and Securities... 1940 § 270.22c-1 Pricing of redeemable securities for distribution, redemption and repurchase. (a) No...

  3. Safety of C1-Esterase Inhibitor in Acute and Prophylactic Therapy of Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busse, Paula; Bygum, Anette; Edelman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The plasma-derived, pasteurized C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate, Berinert has a 4-decade history of use in hereditary angioedema (HAE), with a substantial literature base that demonstrates safety and efficacy. Thromboembolic events have rarely been reported with C1-INH products, typ...

  4. 26 CFR 1.860C-1 - Taxation of holders of residual interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxation of holders of residual interests. 1.860C-1 Section 1.860C-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860C-1 Taxation of holders...

  5. Marked variability in clinical presentation and outcome of patients with C1q immunodeficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Schaarenburg, Rosanne A; Schejbel, Lone; Truedsson, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Globally approximately 60 cases of C1q deficiency have been described with a high prevalence of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). So far treatment has been guided by the clinical presentation rather than the underlying C1q deficiency. Recently, it was shown that C1q production can be...

  6. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1A - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(c)-1A Section 1.666(c)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1A Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed...

  7. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1 - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(c)-1 Section 1.666(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1 Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed...

  8. Effects of fenofibrate on hyperlipidemia and postprandial triglyceride metabolism in human apolipoprotein C1 transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Princen, H.M.G.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    To study the in vivo role of apolipoprotein (apo) C1 in lipoprotein metabolism, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the human apo C1 gene. Apo C1 is a small 6.6 kDa protein that is primarily synthesized by the liver and is present on chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and

  9. 26 CFR 1.411(c)-1 - Allocation of accrued benefits between employer and employee contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.411(c)-1 Allocation of accrued benefits between employer and employee... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation of accrued benefits between employer and employee contributions. 1.411(c)-1 Section 1.411(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...

  10. Prevalence and clinical significance of anti-C1q antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoantibodies against C1q are strongly linked to immune-complex disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although anti-C1q antibodies have received much interest in the recent years, their biological functions remain unclear. Anti-C1q antibodies are strongly associated with lupus nephritis. The aim of this ...

  11. Prevalence and clinical significance of anti-C1q antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asmaa Hegazy

    2012-04-21

    Apr 21, 2012 ... ponents of the complement system might be inactivated. Anti-. C1q antibodies were first identified as low-molecular weight. C1q precipitins in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus over 30years ago. Anti-C1q antibodies are strongly associated with the development of proliferative lupus.

  12. Presence of C1-Inhibitor Polymers in a Subset of Patients Suffering from Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov; Gram, Jørgen Brodersen

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor (C1-inh). The mutations cause decreased functional plasma levels of C1-inh, which triggers unpredictable recurrent edema attacks...

  13. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of the C1A and C1B subdomains of PKC-delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Brian, P Ziemba; Booth, Jamie C; Jamie, C Booth; Jones, David N M; David, Jones N M

    2011-10-01

    The Protein Kinase C family of enzymes is a group of serine/threonine kinases that play central roles in cell-cycle regulation, development and cancer. A key step in the activation of PKC is translocation to membranes and binding of membrane-associated activators including diacylglycerol (DAG). Interaction of novel and conventional isotypes of PKC with DAG and phorbol esters occurs through the two C1 regulatory domains (C1A and C1B), which exhibit distinct ligand binding selectivity that likely controls enzyme activation by different co-activators. PKC has also been implicated in physiological responses to alcohol consumption and it has been proposed that PKCα (Slater et al. J Biol Chem 272(10):6167-6173, 1997; Slater et al. Biochemistry 43(23):7601-7609, 2004), PKCε (Das et al. Biochem J 421(3):405-413, 2009) and PKCδ (Das et al. J Biol Chem 279(36):37964-37972, 2004; Das et al. Protein Sci 15(9):2107-2119, 2006) contain specific alcohol-binding sites in their C1 domains. We are interested in understanding how ethanol affects signal transduction processes through its affects on the structure and function of the C1 domains of PKC. Here we present the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments for the Rattus norvegicus PKCδ C1A and C1B proteins.

  14. Safety Issues and Neurological Improvement following C1- C2 Fusion using C1 Lateral Mass and C2 Pedicle Screw in Atlantoaxial Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MK Kwan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of instrumentation methods for C1-C2 fusion from the use of posterior wiring methods to transarticular screws and C1 lateral mass with C2 pedicle screw construct have improved fusion rates to almost 100%. However, the C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw technique is technically demanding. This is a prospective review of a series of ten patients who was planned for C1-C2 fusion using C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw technique between January 2007 and June 2009. The procedure was converted to occipital cervical fusion due to a fracture of a hypoplastic lateral mass-posterior arch complex in one patient and Gallie fusion due to a vertebral artery injury in another. Eight patients underwent the C1-C2 fusion using C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw successfully without any complications. The union rate was 100% with an average union time of 5.3 months (range from 3 to 8 months. Postoperatively, the patients achieved an average of one Frankel grade neurological improvement. In conclusion, this technique provides an excellent union rate and good neurological recovery.

  15. DEDUCE Clinical Text: An Ontology-based Module to Support Self-Service Clinical Notes Exploration and Cohort Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christopher; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Horvath, Monica M; Brinson, Stephanie; Evans, Steve; Shang, Howard C; Ferranti, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Large amounts of information, as well as opportunities for informing research, education, and operations, are contained within clinical text such as radiology reports and pathology reports. However, this content is less accessible and harder to leverage than structured, discrete data. We report on an extension to the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), a self-service query tool developed to provide clinicians and researchers with access to data within the Duke Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW). The DEDUCE Clinical Text module supports ontology-based text searching, enhanced filtering capabilities based on document attributes, and integration of clinical text with structured data and cohort development. The module is implemented with open-source tools extensible to other institutions, including a Java-based search engine (Apache Solr) with complementary full-text indexing library (Lucene) employed with a negation engine (NegEx) modified by clinical users to include to local domain-specific negation phrases.

  16. C1-inhibitor polymers activate the FXII-dependent kallikrein-kinin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Biltoft, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The FXII-dependent kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is tightly regulated by the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1-inhibitor (C1-inh). When regulation of the FXII-dependent KKS fails, which is the case in hereditary angioedema (HAE), patients consequently experience invalidating edema...... attacks. HAE is caused by mutations in the C1-inh encoding gene, and we recently demonstrated that some mutations give rise to the presence of polymerized C1-inh in the plasma of HAE patients. METHODS: C1-inh polymers corresponding to the size of polymers observed in vivo were produced using heat...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of a Chitinase-producing Biocontrol Bacterium Serratia sp. C-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seur Kee Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The chitinase-producing bacterial strain C-1 is one of the key chitinase-producing biocontrol agents used for effective bioformulations for biological control. These bioformulations are mixed cultures of various chitinolytic bacteria. However, the precise identification, biocontrol activity, and the underlying mechanisms of the strain C-1 have not been investigated so far. Therefore, we evaluated in planta biocontrol efficacies of C-1 and determined the draft genome sequence of the strain in this study. The bacterial C-1 strain was identified as a novel Serratia sp. by a phylogenic analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence. The Serratia sp. C-1 bacterial cultures showed strong in planta biocontrol efficacies against some major phytopathogenic fungal diseases. The draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. C-1 indicated that the C-1 strain is a novel strain harboring a subset of genes that may be involved in its biocontrol activities.

  18. Silencing of atp6v1c1 prevents breast cancer growth and bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shengmei; Zhu, Guochun; McConnell, Matthew; Deng, Lianfu; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Mengrui; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Jinshen; Qi, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Atp6v1c1, a regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex, is up-regulated in metastatic oral tumors. Despite these studies, the function of Atp6v1c1 in tumor growth and metastasis is still unknown. Atp6v1c1's expression in metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma indicates that Atp6v1c1 has an important function in cancer growth and metastasis. We hypothesized that elevated expression of Atp6v1c1 is essential to cancer growth and metastasis and that Atp6v1c1 promotes cancer growth and metastasis through activation of V-ATPase activity. To test this hypothesis, a Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown approach was used to study the function of Atp6v1c1 in mouse 4T1 mammary tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro and cancer growth and metastasis in vivo. Our data revealed that silencing of Atp6v1c1 in 4T1 cancer cells inhibited lysosomal acidification and severely impaired 4T1 cell growth, migration, and invasion through Matrigel in vitro. We also show that Atp6v1c1 knockdown with Lenti-c1s3, a lentivirus targeting Atp6v1c1 for shRNA mediated knockdown, can significantly inhibit 4T1 xenograft tumor growth, metastasis, and osteolytic lesions in vivo. Our study demonstrates that Atp6v1c1 may promote breast cancer growth and bone metastasis through regulation of lysosomal V-ATPase activity, indicating that Atp6v1c1 may be a viable target for breast cancer therapy and silencing of Atp6v1c1 may be an innovative therapeutic approach for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  19. Laminar Flame Characteristics of C1–C5 Primary Alcohol-Isooctane Blends at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The laminar combustion characteristics of blends of isooctane and C1–C5 primary alcohols (i.e., methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol and n-pentanol were investigated using the spherical expanding flame methodology in a constant volume chamber at various equivalence ratios and volume fractions of alcohol. The stretch effect was removed using the nonlinear methodology. The results indicate that the laminar flame speeds of alcohol-isooctane blends increase monotonously with the increasing volume fraction of alcohol. Among the five alcohols, the addition of methanol is identified to be the most effective in enhancing laminar flame speed. The addition of ethanol results in an approximately equivalent laminar flame speed enhancement rate as those of n-propanol, n-butanol and n-pentanol at ratios of 0.8 and 1.5, and a higher rate at 1.0 and 1.2. An empirical correlation is provided to describe the laminar flame speed variation with the volume fraction of alcohol. Meanwhile, the laminar flame speed increases with the mass content of oxygen in the fuel blends. At the equivalence ratio of 0.8 and fixed oxygen content, similar laminar flame speeds are observed with different alcohols blended into isooctane. Nevertheless, with the increase of equivalence ratio, heavier alcohol-isooctane blends tend to exhibit higher values. Markstein lengths of alcohol-isooctane blends decrease with the addition of alcohol into isooctane at 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2, however they increase at 1.5. This is consistent with the behavior deduced from the Schlieren images.

  20. Limited proteolysis of beta 2-microglobulin at Lys-58 by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Roepstorff, P; Thim, L

    1990-01-01

    a modified form of beta 2-microglobulin with a two-chain structure. The C-terminal Lys-58 in the A chain is highly susceptible to removal by a carboxypeptidase-B-like activity causing the formation of des-Lys58-beta 2-microglobulin. This is the first demonstration of a noncomplement protein substrate......We have now demonstrated that activated complement component C1s cleaves beta 2-microglobulin at the position identical to that at which beta 2-microglobulin is cleaved in serum of patients suffering from lung cancer. The main cleavage is in the disulphide loop C-terminal to Lys-58, generating...... for the proteolytic activity of C1s. The C1s-induced cleavage of beta 2-microglobulin can be inhibited in the presence of C1 esterase inhibitor, demonstrating a regulatory function of C1 esterase inhibitor in the C1s-induced cleavage of beta 2-microglobulin....

  1. Cell surface expression and function of the macromolecular C1 complex on the surface of human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga K Hosszu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the subunits of the C1 complex (C1q, C1s, C1r, and its regulator C1 inhibitor (C1-Inh by human monocytes has been previously established. However, surface expression of these molecules by monocytes has not been shown. Using flow cytometry and antigen-capture ELISA, we show here for the first time that, in addition to C1q, PB monocytes and the monocyte-derived U937 cells express C1s and C1r, as well as Factor B and C1-Inh on their surface. C1s and C1r immunoprecipitated with C1q, suggesting that at least some of the C1q on these cells is part of the C1 complex. Furthermore, the C1 complex on U937 cells was able to trigger complement activation via the classical pathway. The presence of C1-Inh may ensure that an unwarranted autoactivation of the C1 complex does not take place. Since C1-Inh closely monitors the activation of the C1 complex in a sterile or infectious inflammatory environment, further elucidation of the role of C1 complex is crucial to dissect its function in monocyte, DC and T cell activities, and its implications in host defense and tolerance.

  2. Placement of C1 Pedicle Screws Using Minimal Exposure: Radiographic, Clinical, and Literature Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Richard P; Storey, Christopher M; Nixon, Menarvia K C; Haydel, Justin; Nanda, Anil; Sin, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Traditional C1-2 fixation involves placement of C1 lateral mass screws. Evolving techniques have led to the placement of C1 pedicle screws to avoid exposure of the C1-C2 joint capsule. Our minimal dissection technique utilizes anatomical landmarks with isolated exposure of C2 and the inferior posterior arch of C1. We evaluate this procedure clinically and radiographically through a technical report. Consecutive cases of cranial-vertebral junction surgery were reviewed for one fellowship trained spinal surgeon from 2008-2014. Information regarding sex, age, indication for surgery, private or public hospital, intra-operative complications, post-operative neurological deterioration, death, and failure of fusion was extracted. Measurement of pre-operative axial and sagittal CT scans were performed for C1 pedicle width and C1 posterior arch height respectively. 64 patients underwent posterior cranio-vertebral junction fixation surgery. 40 of these patients underwent occipital-cervical fusion procedures. 7/9 (77.8%) C1 instrumentation cases were from trauma with the remaining two (22.2%) from oncologic lesions. The average blood loss among isolated C1-C2 fixation was 160cc. 1/9 patients (11.1%) suffered pedicle breech requiring sub-laminar wiring at the C1 level. On radiographic measurement, the average height of the C1 posterior arch was noted at 4.3mm (range 3.8mm to 5.7mm). The average width of the C1 pedicle measured at 5.3mm (range 2.8 to 8.7mm). The patient with C1 pedicle screw failure had a pedicle width of 2.78mm on pre-operative axial CT imaging. Our study directly adds to the literature with level four evidence supporting a minimal dissection of C1 arch in the placement of C1 pedicle screws with both radiographic and clinical validation. Justification of this technique avoids C2 nerve root manipulation or sacrifice, reduces bleeding associated with the venous plexus, and leaves the third segment of the vertebral artery unexplored. Pre-operative review of

  3. Estimation of immune complexes by a microplate-adapted C1q-Protein A enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay (C1q-PA-ELISA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, L; Glikmann, G; Jensenius, J C

    1983-01-01

    A microplate-adapted enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of C1q-binding immune complexes (IC) and aggregated IgG (delta IgG) is described. Purified human C1q was adsorbed to the wells of flat-bottomed microtiter plates and EDTA-treated serum samples were subsequently introduced....... Bound IC was measured by use of alkaline phosphatase-labelled Protein A followed by the substrate para-nitro-phenyl-phosphate. A dose response was found for both delta IgG and BSA anti-BSA complexes, while variations in the concentration of monomer IgG did not affect the optical density. Elevated levels...... of IC were found in the majority of sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and SLE. The described C1q-PA-ELISA is a simple and inexpensive method for detection of C1q-binding immune complexes. The reproducibility is acceptable and the sensitivity is higher than for most IC-methods based on C1q-binding....

  4. Observation of $B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi$ decay and study of $B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1,2}K^{*0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The first observation of the decay $B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi$ and a study of $B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1,2}K^{*0}$ decays are presented. The analysis is performed using a dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: \\begin{equation*} \\begin{array}{lll} \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi)}{\\cal{B}(B^0_s\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi)} &=& (18.9 \\pm1.8\\,(stat)\\pm1.3\\,(syst)\\pm0.8\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}K^{*0})}{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K^{*0})} &=& (19.8 \\pm1.1\\,(stat)\\pm1.2\\,(syst)\\pm0.9\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c2}K^{*0})}{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c 1}K^{*0})} &=& (17.1 \\pm5.0\\,(stat)\\pm1.7\\,(syst)\\pm1.1\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\end{array} \\end{equation*} where the third uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge o...

  5. Complement protein C1q induces maturation of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csomor, Eszter; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Sándor, Noémi; Kristóf, Katalin; Arlaud, Gérard J; Thiel, Steffen; Erdei, Anna

    2007-07-01

    Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is known to be induced by several stimuli, including microbial products, inflammatory cytokines and immobilized IgG, as demonstrated recently. Since immune complexes formed in vivo also contain C1q, moreover apoptotic cells and several pathogens fix C1q in the absence of antibodies, we undertook to investigate whether this complement protein has an impact on various functions of human DCs. Maturation of monocyte-derived immature DCs (imMDCs) cultured on immobilized C1q was followed by monitoring expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, MHCII and CCR7. The functional activity of the cells was assessed by measuring cytokine secretion and their ability to activate allogeneic T lymphocytes. Cytokine production by T cells co-cultured with C1q-matured DCs was also investigated. C1q, but not the structurally related mannose-binding lectin was found to bind to imMDC in a dose-dependent manner and induced NF-kappaB translocation to the nucleus. Immobilized C1q induced maturation of MDCs and enhanced secretion of IL-12 and TNF-alpha, moreover, elevated their T-cell stimulating capacity. As IFN-gamma levels were increased in supernatants of MDC-T cell co-cultures, our data suggest that C1q-induced DC maturation generates a Th1-type response. Interestingly, IL-10 levels were elevated by C1q-treated MDCs but not in the supernatant of their co-cultures with allogeneic T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that C1q-opsonized antigens may play a role in the induction and regulation of immune response. Moreover our data are relevant in view of the role of C1q in removal of apoptotic cells and the association between C1q-deficiency and autoimmunity.

  6. The C1q family of proteins: insights into the emerging non-traditional functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane eGhebrehiwet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders—including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh and colleagues showing that pregnant C1q-/- mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q-/- mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al., which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. Recent evidence also shows that C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNFα-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the TNF family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral cytokine-like activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions.

  7. 26 CFR 1.641(c)-1 - Electing small business trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electing small business trust. 1.641(c)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.641(c)-1 Electing small business trust. (a) In general. An electing small business trust (ESBT) within the meaning of section 1361...

  8. C1 polymerisation and related C-C bond forming ‘carbene insertion’ reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, E.; Jongerius, A.L.; Reek, J.N.H.; de Bruin, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this critical review we summarise the currently available ‘C1 polymerisation’ techniques as valuable alternatives for ‘C2 polymerisation’ in the preparation of saturated main-chain carbon-based polymers. C1 polymerisation involves the growth of polymers from monomers delivering only one

  9. Stereoselective synthesis and absolute configuration of the C1'-C25' fragment of symbiodinolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Hiroyoshi; Murata, Takeshi; Asai, Takahiro; Kadota, Isao; Uemura, Daisuke

    2009-09-04

    Stereoselective synthesis of the C1'-C25' fragment of symbiodinolide, which was obtained as a degraded product from symbiodinolide by alkaline hydrolysis, has been accomplished. The synthetic route features Kotsuki coupling and Julia-Kocienski olefination in the introduction of the side chains. This enantio- and stereoselective synthesis has established the absolute configuration of the C1'-C25' fragment.

  10. Differential regulation of Aβ42-induced neuronal C1q synthesis and microglial activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenner Andrea J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Expression of C1q, an early component of the classical complement pathway, has been shown to be induced in neurons in hippocampal slices, following accumulation of exogenous Aβ42. Microglial activation was also detected by surface marker expression and cytokine production. To determine whether C1q induction was correlated with intraneuronal Aβ and/or microglial activation, D-(--2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV, an NMDA receptor antagonist and glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine-proline peptide (RGD, an integrin receptor antagonist, which blocks and enhances Aβ42 uptake, respectively, were assessed for their effect on neuronal C1q synthesis and microglial activation. APV inhibited, and RGD enhanced, microglial activation and neuronal C1q expression. However, addition of Aβ10–20 to slice cultures significantly reduced Aβ42 uptake and microglial activation, but did not alter the Aβ42-induced neuronal C1q expression. Furthermore, Aβ10–20 alone triggered C1q production in neurons, demonstrating that neither neuronal Aβ42 accumulation, nor microglial activation is required for neuronal C1q upregulation. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that multiple receptors are involved in Aβ injury and signaling in neurons. Some lead to neuronal C1q induction, whereas other(s lead to intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ and/or stimulation of microglia.

  11. Autoantibodies against C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus are antigen-driven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaller, Monica; Bigler, Cornelia; Danner, Doris

    2009-01-01

    Autoantibodies against complement C1q (anti-C1q Abs) were shown to strongly correlate with the occurrence of severe nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), suggesting a potential pathogenic role by interfering with the complement cascade. To analyze the humoral immune...

  12. Functional C1-inhibitor diagnostics in hereditary angioedema: assay evaluation and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke G A; Drouet, Christian; Aygören-Pursun, Emel

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of potentially life-threatening angioedema. The most widespread underlying genetic deficiency is a heterozygous deficiency of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). In addition ...

  13. Amplitude analysis of the chi(c1) -> eta pi(+)pi(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Tiemens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Using 448.0 x 10(6) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, an amplitude analysis is performed for psi(3686) -> gamma chi(c1), chi(c1) ->eta pi(+)pi(-) decays. The most dominant two- body structure observed is a(0)(980)(+/-) pi(-/+); a(0)(980)(+/-) -> eta pi(+/-.) line shape is modeled

  14. 26 CFR 31.3405(c)-1 - Withholding on eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; questions and answers. 31.3405(c)-1 Section 31.3405(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Withholding on eligible rollover distributions; questions and answers. The following questions and answers... received in a direct rollover? Questions and Answers Q-1: What are the withholding requirements under...

  15. C1-esterase inhibitor blocks T lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Bregenholt, S; Nording, J A

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that activated C1s complement and activated T cells cleave beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) in vitro leading to the formation of desLys58 beta2m. This process can specifically be inhibited by C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh). Furthermore we showed that exogenously added desLys58...... beta2m in nanomolar amounts to a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) increased the endogenous production of IL-2 and the generation of allo-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. C1-inh was purified from fresh human plasma and added to human or murine MLC and mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte...... cultures grown in the presence of complement-inactivated serum. Read-outs were cell proliferation, lymphokine production and development of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that addition of C1-inh to MLC and mitogen-exposed murine and human lymphocyte cultures inhibited proliferation, the development...

  16. ERP C1 is top-down modulated by orientation perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gong-Liang; Li, Hao; Song, Yan; Yu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    The brain site of perceptual learning has been frequently debated. Recent psychophysical evidence for complete learning transfer to new retinal locations and orientations/directions suggests that perceptual learning may mainly occur in high-level brain areas. Contradictorily, ERP C1 changes associated with perceptual learning are cited as evidence for training-induced plasticity in the early visual cortex. However, C1 can be top-down modulated, which suggests the possibility that C1 changes may result from top-down modulation of the early visual cortex by high-level perceptual learning. To single out the potential top-down impact, we trained observers with a peripheral orientation discrimination task and measured C1 changes at an untrained diagonal quadrant location where learning transfer was previously known to be significant. Our assumption was that any C1 changes at this untrained location would indicate top-down modulation of the early visual cortex, rather than plasticity in the early visual cortex. The expected learning transfer was indeed accompanied with significant C1 changes. Moreover, C1 changes were absent in an untrained shape discrimination task with the same stimuli. We conclude that ERP C1 can be top-down modulated in a task-specific manner by high-level perceptual learning, so that C1 changes may not necessarily indicate plasticity in the early visual cortex. Moreover, learning transfer and associated C1 changes may indicate that learning-based top-down modulation can be remapped to early visual cortical neurons at untrained locations to enable learning transfer.

  17. Similarities and dissimilarities between the binding ability of C1q and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csákó, G; Suba, E A; Herp, A

    1981-04-01

    Based on chemical-structural similarities between C1q and collagen, we studied their activities in reactions which are typically induced in collagen or mediated by C1q. Human C1q suppressed the collagen-induced platelet aggregation in human platelet-rich plasmas. Both human C1q and a suspension in insoluble bovine collagen inhibited in time-dependent fashion the lysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes (EA) by guinea-pig complement. They both agglutinated sheep erythrocytes (EA and EAC4) sensitized with rabbit haemolysin, mainly in the IgM type, polystyrene latex particles complexed with heat-denatured human IgG, a combination of horse, goat and sheep globulins, or deoxyribonucleoprotein. Heating of C1q and collagen (56 degrees C, 30 min), which disrupts the collagen fold into a random coil structure, almost completely abrogated all activities of C1q and considerably reduced those of collagen, suggesting that an intact triple helix is essential for their activities. In spite of their far-ranging similarities, C1q was more potent by weight in most reactions, showed evidence of a faster rate of binding to EA, and was more sensitive to heat treatment at 56 degrees C than was collagen. on the basis of the binding activities of collagen, a model is proposed according to which platelets, sensitized erythrocytes, aggregated gammaglobulins, immune complexes and deoxyribonucleoprotein might accumulate at the site of endothelial damage where blood and its components are exposed to collagenous substances. C1q is able to inhibit all these reactions, indicating that not only is C1q collagen-like in its behaviour, but that collagen also had C1q-like properties.

  18. Endogenous C1-inhibitor production and expression in the heart after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmens, Reindert W; Baylan, Umit; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Karia, Rashmi V; Ylstra, Bauke; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Simsek, Suat; van Ham, Marieke; Niessen, Hans W M; Krijnen, Paul A J

    2016-01-01

    Complement activation contributes significantly to inflammation-related damage in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. Knowledge on factors that regulate postinfraction complement activation is incomplete however. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous C1-inhibitor, a well-known inhibitor of complement activation, is expressed in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. C1-inhibitor and complement activation products C3d and C4d were analyzed immunohistochemically in the hearts of patients who died at different time intervals after acute myocardial infarction (n=28) and of control patients (n=8). To determine putative local C1-inhibitor production, cardiac transcript levels of the C1-inhibitor-encoding gene serping1 were determined in rats after induction of acute myocardial infarction (microarray). Additionally, C1-inhibitor expression was analyzed (fluorescence microscopy) in human endothelial cells and rat cardiomyoblasts in vitro. C1-inhibitor was found predominantly in and on jeopardized cardiomyocytes in necrotic infarct cores between 12h and 5days old. C1-inhibitor protein expression coincided in time and colocalized with C3d and C4d. In the rat heart, serping1 transcript levels were increased from 2h up until 7days after acute myocardial infarction. Both endothelial cells and cardiomyoblasts showed increased intracellular expression of C1-inhibitor in response to ischemia in vitro (n=4). These observations suggest that endogenous C1-inhibitor is likely involved in the regulation of complement activity in the myocardium following acute myocardial infarction. Observations in rat and in vitro suggest that C1-inhibitor is produced locally in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thyroid hormone transport and metabolism by OATP1C1 and consequences of genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Deure, Wendy M; Hansen, Pia Skov; Peeters, Robin P

    2008-01-01

    with TH levels, nor did they affect transport function in vitro. In conclusion, OATP1C1 mediates transport of T4, T4S and rT3 and increases the access of these substrates to the intracellular active sites of the deiodinases. No effect of genetic variation on the function of OATP1C1 was observed.......OATP1C1 has been characterized as a specific thyroid hormone transporter. Based on its expression in capillaries in different brain regions, OATP1C1 is thought to play a key-role in transporting thyroid hormone across the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, we studied the specificity...... of iodothyronine transport by OATP1C1 in detail by analysis of thyroid hormone uptake in OATP1C1-transfected COS1 cells. Furthermore, we examined whether OATP1C1 is rate-limiting in subsequent thyroid hormone metabolism in cells co-transfected with deiodinases. We also studied the effect of genetic variation...

  20. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host's immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated.The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration.Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9.

  1. Identifying a Resistance Determinant for the Antimitotic Natural Products Disorazole C1 and A1S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Celeste E.; Vogt, Andreas; Vollmer, Laura L.; Kitchens, Carolyn A.; Günther, Eckhard; Graham, Thomas H.; Hopkins, Chad D.; Wipf, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Disorazoles are macrocyclic polyketides first isolated from the fermentation broth of the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. Both the major fermentation product disorazole A1 and its much rarer companion disorazole C1 exhibit potent cytotoxic activity against many human tumor cells. Furthermore, the disorazoles appear to bind tubulin uniquely among known antimitotic agents, promoting apoptosis or premature senescence. It is uncertain what conveys tumor cell sensitivity to these complex natural products. Therefore, we generated and characterized human tumor cells resistant to disorazole C1. Resistant cells proved exceedingly difficult to generate and required single step mutagenesis with chronic stepwise exposure to increasing concentrations of disorazole C1. Compared with wild-type HeLa cells, disorazole C1-resistant HeLa/DZR cells were 34- and 8-fold resistant to disorazole C1 and disorazole A1 growth inhibition, respectively. HeLa/DZR cells were also remarkably cross-resistant to vinblastine (280-fold), paclitaxel (2400-fold), and doxorubicin (47-fold) but not cisplatin, suggesting a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Supporting this hypothesis, MCF7/MDR cells were 10-fold cross-resistant to disorazole C1. HeLa/DZR disorazole resistance was not durable in the absence of chronic compound exposure. Verapamil reversed HeLa/DZR resistance to disorazole C1 and disorazole A1. Moreover, HeLa/DZR cells expressed elevated levels of the drug resistance ATP-binding cassette ABCB1 transporter. Loss of ABCB1 by incubation with short interfering RNA restored sensitivity to the disorazoles. Thus, the multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1 can affect the cytotoxicity of both disorazole C1 and A1. Disorazole C1, however, retained activity against cells resistant against the clinically used microtubule-stabilizing agent epothilone B. PMID:20008956

  2. Development of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) for NPOESS C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brann, C.; Kunkee, D.

    2008-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is planned for flight on the first NPOESS mission (C1) in 2013. The C1 ATMS will be the second instrument of the ATMS series and will provide along with the companion Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles for NPOESS. The first flight of the ATMS is scheduled in 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, which is an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. This poster will focus on the development of the ATMS for C1 including aspects of the sensor calibration, antenna beam and RF characteristics and scanning. New design aspects of the C1 ATMS, required primarily by parts obsolescence, will also be addressed in this poster.

  3. Methyl Chloride Measurements in the Taylor Dome M3C1 Ice Core, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes methyl chloride (CH3CI) measurements made on air extracted from 62 samples from the Taylor Dome M3C1 ice core in East Antarctica. CH3CI was...

  4. Synthesis of the C1-C25 southern domain of spirastrellolides B and F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabitha, Gowravaram; Rao, Allu Senkara; Yadav, J S

    2013-11-07

    Synthesis of the C1-C25 ABC spiroketal ring system of spirastrellolides B and F has been executed. The synthetic strategy relied on radical cyclization, HWE olefination, (BDP)CuH conjugate reduction and spiro acetalization reactions.

  5. Structural and functional characterization of hBD-1(Ser35), a peptide deduced from a DEFB1 polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circo, Raffaella; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Gennaro, Renato; Amoroso, Antonio; Zanetti, Margherita

    2002-04-26

    beta-Defensins are mammalian antimicrobial peptides that share a unique disulfide-bonding motif of six conserved cysteines. An intragenic polymorphism of the DEFB1 gene that changes a highly conserved Cys to Ser in the peptide coding region has recently been described. The deduced peptide cannot form three disulfide bonds, as one of the cysteines is unpaired. We have determined the cysteine connectivities of a corresponding synthetic hBD-1(Ser35) peptide, investigated the structure by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and assayed the in vitro antimicrobial activity. Despite a different arrangement of the disulfides, hBD-1(Ser35) proved as active as hBD-1 against the microorganisms tested. This activity likely depends on the ability of hBD-1(Ser35) to adopt an amphipathic conformation in hydrophobic environment, similar to the wild type peptide, as suggested by CD spectroscopy.

  6. Long-term midlatitude mesopause region temperature trend deduced from quarter century (1990–2014 Na lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. She

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The long-term midlatitude temperature trend between 85 and 105 km is deduced from 25 years (March 1990–December 2014 of Na Lidar observations. With a strong warming episode in the 1990s, the time series was least-square fitted to an 11-parameter nonlinear function. This yields a cooling trend starting from an insignificant value of 0.64 ± 0.99 K decade−1 at 85 km, increasing to a maximum of 2.8 ± 0.58 K decade−1 between 91 and 93 km, and then decreasing to a warming trend above 103 km. The geographic altitude dependence of the trend is in general agreement with model predictions. To shed light on the nature of the warming episode, we show that the recently reported prolonged global surface temperature cooling after the Mt Pinatubo eruption can also be very well represented by the same response function.

  7. Expression of ATP6V1C1 during oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Alves, M G; Carta, C F L; Padín-Iruegas, M-E; Pérez-Sayáns, M; Suarez-Peñaranda, J M; Issa, J S; García-García, A; Almeida, J D

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the gene and protein expressions of V-type ATPase protein subunit C1 (ATP6V1C1) in cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and contralateral normal mucosa in smokers, nonsmokers and former smokers. Subjects were separated into five groups of 15: group 1, smokers with OSCC; group 2, normal contralateral mucosa of OSCC patients; group 3, chronic smokers; group 4, former smokers who had stopped smoking 1 year earlier; group 5, individuals who had never smoked. Exfoliative cytology specimens from oral mucosa of smokers, former smokers and nonsmokers showed normal gene and protein expression. We found significantly greater gene expression in the OSCC group than in the nonsmoker groups. No difference in gene expression was observed between normal contralateral mucosa and nonsmoker groups, smoker and nonsmoker groups or former smoker and nonsmoker groups. We observed intense immunostaining for ATP6V1C1 protein in all cases of OSCC and weak or no staining in smoker, former smoker and nonsmoker groups. Significantly greater expression of ATP6V1C1 protein was observed in the OSCC group compared to the other groups, which supports the role of ATP6V1C1 in effecting changes associated with oral cancer. Analysis of the mucosae of chronic smokers, former smokers and the normal contralateral mucosa of patients with OSCC showed unaltered ATP6V1C1 gene and protein expression. Early stages of carcinogenesis, represented by altered epithelium of chronic smokers, had neither gene nor protein alterations as seen in OSCC. Therefore, we infer that the changes in ATP6V1C1 occur during later stages of carcinogenesis. Our preliminary study provides a basis for future studies of using ATP6V1C1 levels for detecting early stage OSCC.

  8. Aneurysmal bone cyst of clivus and C1 C2: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Dinesh; Tungaria, Arun; Jaiswal, Avdhesh; Jain, Vijendra

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst are benign rapidly expanding bone destructive lesions of any bone. They are common in the metaphysis of long bones but 10-30% involve the spine. Cervical region involvement is uncommon. We report a case of aneurysmal bone cyst of clivus C1 and C2 with minimum symptoms. Involvement of C1 and clivus separately had been reported in past, but simultaneous involvement of both is presented in this report for the very first time.

  9. Analysis of healthy cohorts for single nucleotide polymorphisms in C1q gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA A. RADANOVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available C1q is the first component of the classical pathway of complement activation. The coding region for C1q is localized on chromosome 1p34.1–36.3. Mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in C1q gene cluster can cause developing of Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE because of C1q deficiency or other unknown reason. We selected five SNPs located in 7.121 kbp region on chromosome 1, which were previously associated with SLE and/or low C1q level, but not causing C1q deficiency and analyzed them in terms of allele frequencies and genotype distribution in comparison with Hispanic, Asian, African and other Caucasian cohorts. These SNPs were: rs587585, rs292001, rs172378, rs294179 and rs631090. One hundred eighty five healthy Bulgarian volunteers were genotyped for the selected five C1q SNPs by quantative real-time PCR methods. International HapMap Project has been used for information about genotype distribution and allele frequencies of the five SNPs in, Hispanics, Asians, Africans and others Caucasian cohorts. Bulgarian healthy volunteers and another pooled Caucasian cohort had similar frequencies of genotypes and alleles of rs587585, rs292001, rs294179 and rs631090 SNPs. Nevertheless, genotype AA of rs172378 was significantly overrepresented in Bulgarians when compared to other healthy Caucasians from USA and UK (60% vs 31%. Genotype distribution of rs172378 in Bulgarians was similar to Greek-Cyriot Caucasians. For all Caucasians the major allele of rs172378 was A. This is the first study analyzing the allele frequencies and genotype distribution of C1q gene cluster SNPs in Bulgarian healthy population.

  10. Syntheses of the C1-C14 and C15-C25 fragments of amphidinolide C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dimao; Forsyth, Craig J

    2013-03-15

    Divergent syntheses of the C1-C14 and C15-C25 fragments of amphidinolide C have been achieved. The synthesis of the C15-C25 fragment featured cobalt-catalyzed modified Mukaiyama aerobic alkenol cyclization and sulfur-directed regiocontrolled Wacker oxidation of an internal alkene. The C1-C14 fragment was established by alkenyllithium addition to an aldehyde followed by a challenging olefination of a highly inert C9 ketone.

  11. 17 CFR 240.15c1-8 - Sales at the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sales at the market. 240.15c1... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Rules Relating to Over-The-Counter Markets § 240.15c1-8 Sales at the market... securities exchange that such security is being offered to such customer “at the market” or at a price...

  12. The 36C1 ages of the brines in the Magadi-Natron basin, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Aaron; Margaritz, Mordeckai; Paul, Michael; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Hollos, George; Boaretto, Elisabetta; Taieb, Maurice

    1990-10-01

    The depression in the East African Rift which includes both Lake Magadi and Lake Natron forms a closed basin within which almost all the dissolved chloride originates in precipitation, since there is no important source of very ancient sedimentary chloride. This provides an ideal setting for the evaluation of the 36Cl methodology as a geochemical and hydrological tracer. The main source of recent water, as represented by the most dilute samples measured, is characterized by a 36C1/C1 ratio of 2.5 × 10 -14, in agreement with the calculated value expected in precipitation. Surface evaporation increases the chlorinity of the local freshwater inflow by about a factor of 110 without changing the isotopic ratio, indicating that little chloride enters the system in the form of sediment leachate. A second type of brine found in the basin occurs in a hot deep groundwater reservoir and is characterized by lower 36C1/C1 ratios (salt accumulation age of 760 Ka which is consistent with the time of the first appearance of the lake. These older brines also have lower 18O and 2H values which indicate that they were recharged during a climatically different era. The 36C1/C1 ratios in the inflowing waters and in the accumulated brine, together with the known age of the Lake Magadi basin, may be used to estimate the importance of the hypogene and epigene, as opposed to the meteoric, mode of 36C1 production. Such a calculation shows that the hypogene and epigene processes together contribute less than 6% of the total 36C1 present in the lake.

  13. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) Subunit of the Iejimalides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendlik, Matthew T.; Cottard, Muriel; Rein, Tobias

    1997-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) subunit of the iejimalides has been accomplished through a combination of an asymmetric Homer-Wadsworth-Emmons condensation and a chiral pool approach. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.......An enantioselective synthesis of the C(1)-C(11) subunit of the iejimalides has been accomplished through a combination of an asymmetric Homer-Wadsworth-Emmons condensation and a chiral pool approach. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  14. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the Lewis{sup X} antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poveda, Ana [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion (Spain); Asensio, Juan Luis; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Instituto de Quimica Organica, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain)

    1997-07-15

    {sup 1}H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-{alpha}-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-(1{sup {yields}}4)[3-O-{alpha}-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, {sup 13}C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The {sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The{sup 13}C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the{sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS{sup 2}. Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Specific, sensitive, precise, and rapid functional chromogenic assay of activated first complement component (C1) in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkvad, S; Jespersen, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1990-01-01

    We present a new functional assay for the first complement component (C1) in plasma, based on its activation by inhibition of the C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh) when monospecific antiserum to C1-inh is added to the plasma. After maximal activation, we can determine the concentration of activated ...

  16. Complement protein C1q induces maturation of human dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosmor, E; Bajtay, Z; Sándor, N

    2007-01-01

    activity of the cells was assessed by measuring cytokine secretion and their ability to activate allogeneic T lymphocytes. Cytokine production by T cells co-cultured with C1q-matured DCs was also investigated. C1q, but not the structurally related mannose-binding lectin was found to bind to imMDC in a dose......q-induced DC maturation generates a Th1-type response. Interestingly, IL-10 levels were elevated by C1q-treated MDCs but not in the supernatant of their co-cultures with allogeneic T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that C1q-opsonized antigens may play a role in the induction......Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is known to be induced by several stimuli, including microbial products, inflammatory cytokines and immobilized IgG, as demonstrated recently. Since immune complexes formed in vivo also contain C1q, moreover apoptotic cells and several pathogens fix C1q...

  17. The Cyclic Peptide Ecumicin Targeting ClpC1 Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Kim, Jin-Yong; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Akopian, Tatos; Hong, Seungpyo; Jin, Ying-Yu; Kandror, Olga; Kim, Jong-Woo; Lee, In-Ae; Lee, Sun-Young; McAlpine, James B.; Mulugeta, Surafel; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Wang, Yuehong; Yang, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Cho, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) has lent urgency to finding new drug leads with novel modes of action. A high-throughput screening campaign of >65,000 actinomycete extracts for inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability identified ecumicin, a macrocyclic tridecapeptide that exerts potent, selective bactericidal activity against M. tuberculosis in vitro, including nonreplicating cells. Ecumicin retains activity against isolated multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis. The subcutaneous administration to mice of ecumicin in a micellar formulation at 20 mg/kg body weight resulted in plasma and lung exposures exceeding the MIC. Complete inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in the lungs of mice was achieved following 12 doses at 20 or 32 mg/kg. Genome mining of lab-generated, spontaneous ecumicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains identified the ClpC1 ATPase complex as the putative target, and this was confirmed by a drug affinity response test. ClpC1 functions in protein breakdown with the ClpP1P2 protease complex. Ecumicin markedly enhanced the ATPase activity of wild-type (WT) ClpC1 but prevented activation of proteolysis by ClpC1. Less stimulation was observed with ClpC1 from ecumicin-resistant mutants. Thus, ClpC1 is a valid drug target against M. tuberculosis, and ecumicin may serve as a lead compound for anti-TB drug development. PMID:25421483

  18. Post-transplant development of C1q-positive HLA antibodies and kidney graft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Adorno, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The development of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) donor specific antibodies (DSA), detected by both cytotoxic or solid phase assays, was considered the major risk factor for allograft failure in kidney transplantation. However, it was shown that not all patients with persistent production of DSA suffered loss of their grafts. Modified Luminex-Single Antigen assays, able to identify C1q-fixing antibodies, represent a new strategy in assessing the clinical relevance of detected DSA. This study demonstrated that C1q-fixing capability of de novo DSA is a clinically relevant marker of worse outcome and inferior graft survival in kidney transplantation. In fact, our findings evidenced a very low graft survival only in the patients who developed DSA able to fix C1q during post-transplant course, while patients producing C1q-negative DSA had good graft survival, which was comparable to that found in our previous study for DSA-negative patients. Moreover, anti-HLA class II antibodies had a higher incidence than anti-HLA class I, and the ability to fix C1q was significantly more frequent among anti-DQ DSA than anti-DR DSA. Monitoring of de novo C1q-DSA production represents a useful, non-invasive tool for risk stratification and prediction of graft outcome in kidney transplantation.

  19. Antithrombin III/SerpinC1 insufficiency exacerbates renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Guangyuan; Lu, Zeyuan; Geurts, Aron M; Usa, Kristie; Jacob, Howard J; Cowley, Allen W; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-10-01

    Antithrombin III, encoded by SerpinC1, is a major anti-coagulation molecule in vivo and has anti-inflammatory effects. We found that patients with low antithrombin III activities presented a higher risk of developing acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. To study this further, we generated SerpinC1 heterozygous knockout rats and followed the development of acute kidney injury in a model of modest renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Renal injury, assessed by serum creatinine and renal tubular injury scores after 24 h of reperfusion, was significantly exacerbated in SerpinC1(+/-) rats compared to wild-type littermates. Concomitantly, renal oxidative stress, tubular apoptosis, and macrophage infiltration following this injury were significantly aggravated in SerpinC1(+/-) rats. However, significant thrombosis was not found in the kidneys of any group of rats. Antithrombin III is reported to stimulate the production of prostaglandin I2, a known regulator of renal cortical blood flow, in addition to having anti-inflammatory effects and to protect against renal failure. Prostaglandin F1α, an assayable metabolite of prostaglandin I2, was increased in the kidneys of the wild-type rats at 3 h after reperfusion. The increase of prostaglandin F1α was significantly blunted in SerpinC1(+/-) rats, which preceded increased tubular injury and oxidative stress. Thus, our study found a novel role of SerpinC1 insufficiency in increasing the severity of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  20. Two human homeobox genes, c1 and c8: structure analysis and expression in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, A; Mavilio, F; Acampora, D; Giampaolo, A; Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; D'Esposito, M; Pannese, M; Russo, G; Boncinelli, E

    1987-07-01

    Two human cDNA clones (HHO.c1.95 and HHO.c8.5111) containing a homeobox region have been characterized, and the respective genomic regions have been partially analyzed. Expression of the corresponding genes, termed c1 and c8, was evaluated in different organs and body parts during human embryonic/fetal development. HHO.c1.95 apparently encodes a 217-amino acid protein containing a class I homeodomain that shares 60 out of 61 amino acid residues with the Antennapedia homeodomain of Drosophila melanogaster. HHO.c8.5111 encodes a 153-amino acid protein containing a homeodomain identical to that of the frog AC1 gene. Clones HHO.c1 and HHO.c8 detect by blot-hydridization one and two specific polyadenylylated transcripts, respectively. These are differentially expressed in spinal cord, backbone rudiments, limb buds (or limbs), heart, and skin of human embryos and early fetuses in the 5- to 9-week postfertilization period, thus suggesting that the c1 and c8 genes play a key role in a variety of developmental processes. Together, the results of the embryonic/fetal expression of c1 and c8 and those of two previously analyzed genes (c10 and c13) indicate a coherent pattern of expression of these genes in early human ontogeny.

  1. Bilateral C1-C2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation and bone graft fusion for reducible atlantoaxial dislocation: a seven-year analysis of outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bilateral C1-2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation was developed on the basis of transarticular screws fixation. The modified technique has showed a better biomechanical stability than established techniques in previous study. However, long-term (minimum follow-up 7 years outcomes of patients with reducible atlantoaxial dislocation who underwent this modified fixation technique have not still been reported. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the outcome of 36 patients who underwent this modified technique. Myelopathy was assessed using the Ranawat myelopathy score and Myelopathy Disability Index. Pain scores were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale. Radiological imaging was assessed and the following data were extracted: the atlantodental intervals, the space available for cord, presence of spinal cord signal change on T2 weighted image, C1-C2 angle, C2-C7 angle and fusion rates. FINDINGS: All patients achieved a minimum seven-year follow up. 95% patients with neck and suboccipital pain improved after surgery; in their Visual Analogue pain scores, there was a greater than 50% improvement in their VAS scores with a drop of 5 points on the VAS (P<0.05. 92% of patients improved in the Ranawat myelopathy grade; the Myelopathy Disability Index assessment showed a preoperative mean score of 35.62 with postoperative mean 12.75(P<0.05. There was not any significant atlantoaxial instability at each follow-up time. The space available for cord increased in all patients. Postoperative sagittal kyphosis of the subaxial spine was not observed. After six months after surgery, bone grafts of all patients were fused. No complications related to surgery were found in the period of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The long-term outcomes of this case series demonstrate that under the condition of thorough preoperative preparations, bilateral C1-C2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation and bone graft fusion is a

  2. ClC-1 chloride channels: state-of-the-art research and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eImbrici

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-dependent ClC-1 chloride channel belongs to the CLC channel/transporter family. It is a homodimer comprising two individual pores which can operate independently or simultaneously according to two gating modes, the fast and the slow gate of the channel. ClC-1 is preferentially expressed in the skeletal muscle fibers where the presence of an efficient Cl- homeostasis is crucial for the correct membrane repolarization and propagation of action potential. As a consequence, mutations in the CLCN1 gene cause dominant and recessive forms of Myotonia Congenita, a rare skeletal muscle channelopathy caused by abnormal membrane excitation, and clinically characterized by muscle stiffness and various degrees of transitory weakness. Elucidation of the mechanistic link between the genetic defects and the disease pathogenesis is still incomplete and, at this time, there is no specific treatment for Myotonia Congenita. Still controversial is the subcellular localization pattern of ClC-1 channels in skeletal muscle as well as its modulation by some intracellular factors. The expression of ClC-1 in other tissues such as in brain and heart and the possible assembly of ClC-1/ClC-2 heterodimers further expand the physiological properties of ClC-1 and its involvement in diseases. A recent de novo CLCN1 truncation mutation in a patient with generalized epilepsy indeed postulates an unexpected role of this channel in the control of neuronal network excitability. This review summarizes the most relevant and state-of-the-art research on ClC-1 chloride channels physiology and associated diseases.

  3. ClC-1 chloride channels: state-of-the-art research and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrici, Paola; Altamura, Concetta; Pessia, Mauro; Mantegazza, Renato; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-dependent ClC-1 chloride channel belongs to the CLC channel/transporter family. It is a homodimer comprising two individual pores which can operate independently or simultaneously according to two gating modes, the fast and the slow gate of the channel. ClC-1 is preferentially expressed in the skeletal muscle fibers where the presence of an efficient Cl(-) homeostasis is crucial for the correct membrane repolarization and propagation of action potential. As a consequence, mutations in the CLCN1 gene cause dominant and recessive forms of myotonia congenita (MC), a rare skeletal muscle channelopathy caused by abnormal membrane excitation, and clinically characterized by muscle stiffness and various degrees of transitory weakness. Elucidation of the mechanistic link between the genetic defects and the disease pathogenesis is still incomplete and, at this time, there is no specific treatment for MC. Still controversial is the subcellular localization pattern of ClC-1 channels in skeletal muscle as well as its modulation by some intracellular factors. The expression of ClC-1 in other tissues such as in brain and heart and the possible assembly of ClC-1/ClC-2 heterodimers further expand the physiological properties of ClC-1 and its involvement in diseases. A recent de novo CLCN1 truncation mutation in a patient with generalized epilepsy indeed postulates an unexpected role of this channel in the control of neuronal network excitability. This review summarizes the most relevant and state-of-the-art research on ClC-1 chloride channels physiology and associated diseases.

  4. In silico Analysis of osr40c1 Promoter Sequence Isolated from Indica Variety Pokkali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.S.I. de Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The promoter region of a drought and abscisic acid (ABA inducible gene, osr40c1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant indica rice variety Pokkali, which is 670 bp upstream of the putative translation start codon. In silico promoter analysis of resulted sequence showed that at least 15 types of putative motifs were distributed within the sequence, including two types of common promoter elements, TATA and CAAT boxes. Additionally, several putative cis-acing regulatory elements which may be involved in regulation of osr40c1 expression under different conditions were found in the 5′-upstream region of osr40c1. These are ABA-responsive element, light-responsive elements (ATCT-motif, Box I, G-box, GT1-motif, Gap-box and Sp1, myeloblastosis oncogene response element (CCAAT-box, auxin responsive element (TGA-element, gibberellin-responsive element (GARE-motif and fungal-elicitor responsive elements (Box E and Box-W1. A putative regulatory element, required for endosperm-specific pattern of gene expression designated as Skn-1 motif, was also detected in the Pokkali osr40c1 promoter region. In conclusion, the bioinformatic analysis of osr40c1 promoter region isolated from indica rice variety Pokkali led to the identification of several important stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements, and therefore, the isolated promoter sequence could be employed in rice genetic transformation to mediate expression of abiotic stress induced genes.

  5. Second-order optimality conditions for problems with C1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginchev, Ivan; Ivanov, Vsevolod I.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we obtain second-order optimality conditions of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker type and Fritz John one for a problem with inequality constraints and a set constraint in nonsmooth settings using second-order directional derivatives. In the necessary conditions we suppose that the objective function and the active constraints are continuously differentiable, but their gradients are not necessarily locally Lipschitz. In the sufficient conditions for a global minimum we assume that the objective function is differentiable at and second-order pseudoconvex at , a notion introduced by the authors [I. Ginchev, V.I. Ivanov, Higher-order pseudoconvex functions, in: I.V. Konnov, D.T. Luc, A.M. Rubinov (Eds.), Generalized Convexity and Related Topics, in: Lecture Notes in Econom. and Math. Systems, vol. 583, Springer, 2007, pp. 247-264], the constraints are both differentiable and quasiconvex at . In the sufficient conditions for an isolated local minimum of order two we suppose that the problem belongs to the class C1,1. We show that they do not hold for C1 problems, which are not C1,1 ones. At last a new notion parabolic local minimum is defined and it is applied to extend the sufficient conditions for an isolated local minimum from problems with C1,1 data to problems with C1 one.

  6. Building information deduced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Myrup Jensen, Morten; Beetz, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, Building Information Models have become commonplace in building profession. The extensive use and increasing experience with BIM models offers new perspectives and potentials for design and planning. A recent stakeholder study conducted by the authors of this paper show...... of a model, differences in separate models or models from different point of time. Current BIM tools support both modes only in a rudimentary form. This paper discusses current modes of information query within and across BIM models, shows beneficial scenarios for building and planning practice through...... that in practice models are no longer solely observed as culmination of knowledge in a 3d representation of future built structures, but as a source of information in itself. Experienced users of BIM want to Find Information within a model or across a set of these and Compare models in order to evaluate states...

  7. Quantification of the catalytic performance of C1-cellulose-specific lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Westphal, Adrie H; Hilgers, Roelant; Koetsier, Martijn J; Hinz, Sandra W A; Visser, Jaap; Gruppen, Harry; van Berkel, Willem J H; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2018-02-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have recently been shown to significantly enhance the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides and are of interest for the production of biochemicals and bioethanol from plant biomass. The copper-containing LPMOs utilize electrons, provided by reducing agents, to oxidatively cleave polysaccharides. Here, we report the development of a β-glucosidase-assisted method to quantify the release of C1-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose by two C1-oxidizing LPMOs from Myceliophthora thermophila C1. Based on this quantification method, we demonstrate that the catalytic performance of both MtLPMOs is strongly dependent on pH and temperature. The obtained results indicate that the catalytic performance of LPMOs depends on the interaction of multiple factors, which are affected by both pH and temperature.

  8. Detection of vanC1 gene transcription in vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Tiane Martin; Cassenego, Ana Paula Vaz; Campos, Fabrício Souza; Ribeiro, Andrea Machado Leal; Franco, Ana Cláudia; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves; Frazzon, Jeverson; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the presence and expression levels of the vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes in vancomycin-susceptible strains of Enterococcus faecalis. The vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes were located in the plasmid DNA and on the chromosome, respectively. Specific mRNA of the vanC 1 gene was detected in one of these strains. Additionally, analysis of the vanC gene sequences showed that these genes are related to the vanC genes of Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus. The presence of vanC genes is useful for the identification of E. gallinarum and E. casseliflavus. Moreover, this is the first report of vanC mRNA in E. faecalis. PMID:23828012

  9. Detection of vanC 1 gene transcription in vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiane Martin de Moura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the presence and expression levels of the vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes in vancomycin-susceptible strains of Enterococcus faecalis. The vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes were located in the plasmid DNA and on the chromosome, respectively. Specific mRNA of the vanC 1 gene was detected in one of these strains. Additionally, analysis of the vanC gene sequences showed that these genes are related to the vanC genes of Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus. The presence of vanC genes is useful for the identification of E. gallinarum and E. casseliflavus. Moreover, this is the first report of vanC mRNA in E. faecalis.

  10. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Keppler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, could be an important substrate for methanogenesis and thus be envisaged as a possible source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  11. Characterization of two new dominant ClC-1 channel mutations associated with myotonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; Colding-Jørgensen, Eskild

    2003-01-01

    Voltage-gated ClC-1 chloride channels encoded by the CLCN1 gene have a major role in setting the membrane potential in skeletal muscle. More than 60 CLCN1 mutations have been associated with myotonia congenita. These mutations are traditionally classified as recessive (Becker's disease) or dominant...... revealed a change in reversal potential compared to wild-type channels. This finding supports the notion that the E193 amino acid is an important determinant in the selectivity filter of the human ClC-1 channel. The electrophysiological behavior of both mutants demonstrates a severe reduction in ClC-1...... channel conductance under physiologically relevant membrane potentials. These studies thereby explain the molecular background for the observed myotonia in patients....

  12. Identification and Analysis of the Chloroplast rpoC1 Gene Differentially Expressed in Wild Ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kwang-Ho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng is a well-known herbal medicine in traditional Asian medicine, and wild ginseng is widely accepted to be more active than cultivated ginseng in chemoprevention. However, little has actually been reported on the difference between wild ginseng and cultivated ginseng. Thus, to identify and analyze those differences, we used suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH sequences with microarrays, realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and reverse transcription PCRs (RT-PCRs. One of the clones isolated in this research was the chloroplast rpoC1 gene, a β subunit of RNA polymerase. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that the expression of the rpoC1 gene was significantly upregulated in wild ginseng as compared to cultivated ginseng, so, we conclude that the rpoC1 gene may be one of the important markers of wild ginseng.

  13. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De

    2017-05-09

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  14. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase PDE1C1 in human cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeput, Fabrice; Wolda, Sharon L; Krall, Judith; Hambleton, Ryan; Uher, Lothar; McCaw, Kim N; Radwanski, Przemyslaw B; Florio, Vincent; Movsesian, Matthew A

    2007-11-09

    Isoforms in the PDE1 family of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases were recently found to comprise a significant portion of the cGMP-inhibited cAMP hydrolytic activity in human hearts. We examined the expression of PDE1 isoforms in human myocardium, characterized their catalytic activity, and quantified their contribution to cAMP hydrolytic and cGMP hydrolytic activity in subcellular fractions of this tissue. Western blotting with isoform-selective anti-PDE1 monoclonal antibodies showed PDE1C1 to be the principal isoform expressed in human myocardium. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that PDE1C1 is distributed along the Z-lines and M-lines of cardiac myocytes in a striated pattern that differs from that of the other major dual-specificity cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in human myocardium, PDE3A. Most of the PDE1C1 activity was recovered in soluble fractions of human myocardium. It binds both cAMP and cGMP with K(m) values of approximately 1 microm and hydrolyzes both substrates with similar catalytic rates. PDE1C1 activity in subcellular fractions was quantified using a new PDE1-selective inhibitor, IC295. At substrate concentrations of 0.1 microm, PDE1C1 constitutes the great majority of cAMP hydrolytic and cGMP hydrolytic activity in soluble fractions and the majority of cGMP hydrolytic activity in microsomal fractions, whereas PDE3 constitutes the majority of cAMP hydrolytic activity in microsomal fractions. These results indicate that PDE1C1 is expressed at high levels in human cardiac myocytes with an intracellular distribution distinct from that of PDE3A and that it may have a role in the integration of cGMP-, cAMP- and Ca(2+)-mediated signaling in these cells.

  15. Gaussian quadrature rules for C 1 quintic splines with uniform knot vectors

    KAUST Repository

    Bartoň, Michael

    2017-03-21

    We provide explicit quadrature rules for spaces of C1C1 quintic splines with uniform knot sequences over finite domains. The quadrature nodes and weights are derived via an explicit recursion that avoids numerical solvers. Each rule is optimal, that is, requires the minimal number of nodes, for a given function space. For each of nn subintervals, generically, only two nodes are required which reduces the evaluation cost by 2/32/3 when compared to the classical Gaussian quadrature for polynomials over each knot span. Numerical experiments show fast convergence, as nn grows, to the “two-third” quadrature rule of Hughes et al. (2010) for infinite domains.

  16. Mutational spectrum and phenotypes in Danish families with hereditary angioedema because of C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A; Fagerberg, C R; Ponard, D

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), type I and II, is an autosomal dominant disease with deficiency of functional C1 inhibitor protein causing episodic swellings of skin, mucosa and viscera. HAE is a genetically heterogeneous disease with more than 200 different mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A genotype......-phenotype relationship does not seem to exist in HAE, although the polymorphism c.-21T>C of exon 2 has been reported to be associated with a more severe phenotype. We aimed to establish the mutational spectrum of C1 inhibitor deficiency in Denmark and investigate the possible disease-aggravating effect of the c.-21T...

  17. SYNTHESIS OF THE ISOQUINO-[2,1-c][1,3]-BENZODIAZEPINE DERIVATIVE FROM PAPAVERINE

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    I Made Sudarma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to synthesize isoquino[2,1-c][1,3]benzodiazepine from papaverine alkaloid. Functional Group Interconversion (FGI and Carbon -Nitrogen bond connection approach was investigated. Papaverine (1 was nitrated by HNO3 to compound (2 and followed by reduction with Sn and HCl to afford aminonorlaudanosine (3. Formation of cyclic benzodiazepine (4 was achieved by reaction of (3 with CS2. Products of reactions were confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonances (n.m.r, Mass Spectrum, and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR.   Keywords: isoquino[2,1-c][1,3]benzodiazepine, papaverine

  18. C1q binding to Dengue Virus inhibits infection of THP-1 and cellular inflammatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douradinha, Bruno; McBurney, Sean P.; de Melo, Klecia M. Soares; Smith, Amanda P.; Krishna, Neel K.; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M.; Evans, Jared D.; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Marques, Ernesto T. A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus infection elicits a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic to severe disease. The mechanisms leading to severe dengue are not known, however it has been reported that the complement system is hyper-activated in severe dengue. Screening of complement proteins demonstrated that C1q, a pattern recognition molecule, can bind directly to Dengue Virus Envelope protein and to whole Dengue Virus serotype 2. Incubation of Dengue Virus serotype 2 with C1q prior to infection of THP-1 cells led to decreased virus infectivity and modulation of mRNA expression of immunoregulatory molecules suggesting reduced inflammatory responses. PMID:24246304

  19. Complement C1q activates tumor suppressor WWOX to induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunying Hong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue exudates contain low levels of serum complement proteins, and their regulatory effects on prostate cancer progression are largely unknown. We examined specific serum complement components in coordinating the activation of tumor suppressors p53 and WWOX (also named FOR or WOX1 and kinases ERK, JNK1 and STAT3 in human prostate DU145 cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DU145 cells were cultured overnight in 1% normal human serum, or in human serum depleted of an indicated complement protein. Under complement C1q- or C6-free conditions, WOX1 and ERK were mainly present in the cytoplasm without phosphorylation, whereas phosphorylated JNK1 was greatly accumulated in the nuclei. Exogenous C1q rapidly restored the WOX1 activation (with Tyr33 phosphorylation in less than 2 hr. Without serum complement C9, p53 became activated, and hyaluronan (HA reversed the effect. Under C6-free conditions, HA induced activation of STAT3, an enhancer of metastasis. Notably, exogenous C1q significantly induced apoptosis of WOX1-overexpressing DU145 cells, but not vehicle-expressing cells. A dominant negative and Y33R mutant of WOX1 blocked the apoptotic effect. C1q did not enhance p53-mediated apoptosis. By total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy, it was determined that C1q destabilized adherence of WOX1-expressing DU145 cells by partial detaching and inducing formation of clustered microvilli for focal adhesion particularly in between cells. These cells then underwent shrinkage, membrane blebbing and death. Remarkably, as determined by immunostaining, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer were shown to have a significantly reduced expression of tissue C1q, compared to age-matched normal prostate tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that complement C1q may induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q enhances prostate hyperplasia and cancerous

  20. Deducing receptor signaling parameters from in vivo analysis: LuxN/AI-1 quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swem, Lee R.; Swem, Danielle L.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing, a process of bacterial cell-cell communication, relies on production, detection, and response to autoinducer signaling molecules. Here we focus on LuxN, a nine transmembrane domain protein from Vibrio harveyi, and the founding example of membrane-bound receptors for acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducers. Previously, nothing was known about signal recognition by membrane-bound AHL receptors. We used mutagenesis and suppressor analyses to identify the AHL-binding domain of LuxN, and discovered LuxN mutants that confer decreased and increased AHL sensitivity. Our analysis of dose-response curves of multiple LuxN mutants pins these inverse phenotypes on quantifiable opposing shifts in the free-energy bias of LuxN for its kinase and phosphatase states. To extract signaling parameters, we exploited a strong LuxN antagonist, one of fifteen small-molecule antagonists we identified. We find that quorum-sensing-mediated communication can be manipulated positively and negatively to control bacterial behavior, and that signaling parameters can be deduced from in vivo data. PMID:18692469

  1. Geomechanical log deduced from porosity and mineralogical content; Diagraphie geomecanique deduite de la porosite et de la composition mineralogique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemer, E.; Vincke, O.; Longuemare, P. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    2004-07-01

    The 'geomechanical log' research project aims at estimating rock mechanical properties from a set of models, whose input data can be deduced from drilling logs and measurements on core samples (if these are available). The key point is to focus on defining relatively general and easy to handle models. In this paper, we propose various analytical models allowing one to estimate poroelastic and failure properties of limestones and sandstones directly from their porosity and, in the specific case of sandstone poroelastic characteristics, their mineralogical content. The properties obtained are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The second step of the project will be to actually infer the input data for the models (here porosity and mineral content) from drilling logs and to compare the results obtained to tests on core samples. A geomechanical log could then be automatically created from standard logs and help to optimize drilling. We also intend to test the same approaches on rock plastic properties and shale behavior. (authors)

  2. C 1 natural element method for strain gradient linear elasticity and its application to microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhi-Feng; Zhou, Shen-Jie; Han, Ru-Jun; Xiao, Lin-Jing; Wang, Kai

    2012-02-01

    C 1 natural element method ( C 1 NEM) is applied to strain gradient linear elasticity, and size effects on microstructures are analyzed. The shape functions in C 1 NEM are built upon the natural neighbor interpolation (NNI), with interpolation realized to nodal function and nodal gradient values, so that the essential boundary conditions (EBCs) can be imposed directly in a Galerkin scheme for partial differential equations (PDEs). In the present paper, C 1 NEM for strain gradient linear elasticity is constructed, and several typical examples which have analytical solutions are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the constructed method. In its application to microstructures, the size effects of bending stiffness and stress concentration factor (SCF) are studied for microspeciem and microgripper, respectively. It is observed that the size effects become rather strong when the width of spring for microgripper, the radius of circular perforation and the long axis of elliptical perforation for microspeciem come close to the material characteristic length scales. For the U-shaped notch, the size effects decline obviously with increasing notch radius, and decline mildly with increasing length of notch.

  3. Association of the rs3743205 variant of DYX1C1 with dyslexia in Chinese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waye Mary MY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dyslexia is a learning disability that is characterized by difficulties in the acquisition of reading and spelling skills independent of intelligence, motivation or schooling. Studies of western populations have suggested that DYX1C1 is a candidate gene for dyslexia. In view of the different languages used in Caucasian and Chinese populations, it is therefore worthwhile to investigate whether there is an association of DYX1C1 in Chinese children with dyslexia. Method and Results Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped from three hundred and ninety three individuals from 131 Chinese families with two which have been reported in the literature and six tag SNPs at DYX1C1. Analysis for allelic and haplotypic associations was performed with the UNPHASED program and multiple testing was corrected using false discovery rates. We replicated the previously reported association of rs3743205 in Chinese children with dyslexia (pcorrected = 0.0072. This SNP was also associated with rapid naming, phonological memory and orthographic skills in quantitative trait analysis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that DYX1C1 is associated with dyslexia in people of Chinese ethnicity in Hong Kong.

  4. Simulation of XPS C1s Spectra of Organic Monolayers by Quantum Chemical Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbers, M.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Several simple methods are presented and evaluated to simulate the X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of organic monolayers and polymeric layers by density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller–Plesset theory (MP2) in combination with a series of basis sets. The simulated carbon (C1s) XPS

  5. C1-continuous Virtual Element Method for Poisson-Kirchhoff plate problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyrya, Vitaliy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mourad, Hashem Mohamed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    We present a family of C1-continuous high-order Virtual Element Methods for Poisson-Kirchho plate bending problem. The convergence of the methods is tested on a variety of meshes including rectangular, quadrilateral, and meshes obtained by edge removal (i.e. highly irregular meshes). The convergence rates are presented for all of these tests.

  6. Methyl Bromide Measurements in the Taylor Dome M3C1 Ice Core, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The data set includes methyl bromide (CH3Br) measurements made on air extracted from 70 samples from the Taylor Dome M3C1 ice core. CH3Br was measured in air from...

  7. Alterations of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, M; Cugno, M; Lap, P; Loof, A; Cicardi, M; van Heerde, W

    2012-01-01

    Patients with functional deficiency of C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) suffer from recurrent acute attacks (AA) of localized oedema associated with activation of the contact system, complement and fibrinolysis. To unravel further the role of coagulation and fibrinolysis in the pathophysiology of C1-INH deficiency, we performed simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation measurements in plasma from patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1-INH deficiency during AA (n = 23), in remission (R) (n = 20) and in controls (n = 20). During AA thrombin generation after in-vitro activation of plasma was higher than in controls, as demonstrated by shorter thrombin peak-time (P fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) in patients during AA providing possible evidence for a regulatory effect on fibrinolysis. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was reduced in patients during AA indicating, together with the observed reduction of plasmin generation, the consumption of fibrinolytic factors. In conclusion, our results support the involvement of coagulation and fibrinolysis in the pathophysiology of HAE and show the possible application of simultaneous measurement of thrombin and plasmin generation to evaluate different clinical conditions in HAE patients. PMID:22288590

  8. Protection from obesity and insulin resistance in mice overexpressing human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M. C.; Voshol, P. J.; Muurling, M.; Dahlmans, V. E.; Romijn, J. A.; Pijl, H.; Havekes, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (APO) C1 is a 6.6-kDa protein present in plasma and associated with lipoproteins. Using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests, we previously found that in APOC1 transgenic mice, the whole-body insulin-mediated glucose uptake is increased concomitant with a decreased fatty acid

  9. C1 compounds as auxiliary substrate for engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F.W.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to efficiently utilize the C1 compounds methanol and formaldehyde as auxiliary substrate. The hps and phi genes of Bacillus brevis, encoding two key steps of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway, were introduced to construct a

  10. 26 CFR 41.4482(c)-1 - Definition of State, taxable period, use, and customarily used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a private roadway, or other private property, does not constitute use of the vehicle within the... VEHICLES Tax on Use of Certain Highway Motor Vehicles § 41.4482(c)-1 Definition of State, taxable period...”, as used in the regulations in this part with reference to a highway motor vehicle, means the use of...

  11. Construction of pECFP-C1- CIRP and its effect on cold-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluorescence microscopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot detection were done for transient and stable expression assays. CIRP gene was successfully subcloned into eukaryotic expression vector of pECFP-C1, confirmed by restrictive enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing.

  12. Crossing the c=1 barrier in 2d Lorentzian quantum gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K.N.; Loll, R.

    1999-01-01

    In an extension of earlier work we investigate the behaviour of two-dimensional Lorentzian quantum gravity under coupling to a conformal field theory with c > 1. This is done by analyzing numerically a system of eight Ising models (corresponding to c=4) coupled to dynamically triangulated

  13. Hyperlipidemia and cutaneous abnormalities in transgenic mice overexpressing human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M. C.; Gijbels, M. J.; Dahlmans, V. E.; Gorp, P. J.; Koopman, S. J.; Ponec, M.; Hofker, M. H.; Havekes, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated with different levels of human apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) expression in liver and skin. At 2 mo of age, serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and FFA were strongly elevated in APOC1 transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. These elevated levels of serum

  14. Rh-mediated C1-polymerization: copolymers from diazoesters and sulfoxonium ylides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivos Suarez, A.I.; del Río, M.P.; Remerie, K.; Reek, J.N.H.; de Bruin, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present new results obtained in our investigations of Rh-catalyzed C1 (co)polymerization reactions using carbene units as monomers. We demonstrate here, for the first time, the use of transition metal catalysts in carbene polymerization using sulfur ylides as the carbene monomer

  15. 26 CFR 31.3406(c)-1 - Notified payee underreporting of reportable interest or dividend payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(c)-1 Notified... utilizes a universal account system described in the first sentence of paragraph (c)(3)(ii) of this section...

  16. Identifying a Resistance Determinant for the Antimitotic Natural Products Disorazole C1 and A1S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Lazo, John S; Reese, Celeste E.; Vogt, Andreas; Vollmer, Laura L.; Kitchens, Carolyn A.; Günther, Eckhard; Graham, Thomas H.; Hopkins, Chad D.; Wipf, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Disorazoles are macrocyclic polyketides first isolated from the fermentation broth of the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. Both the major fermentation product disorazole A1 and its much rarer companion disorazole C1 exhibit potent cytotoxic activity against many human tumor cells. Furthermore, the disorazoles appear to bind tubulin uniquely among known antimitotic agents, promoting apoptosis or premat...

  17. Cloning and tissue expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 and 1C1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... reading frame of 1551 bp encoding a protein of 517 amino acids; while, CYP1C1 having 2601 bp consists of an open ... expression. Key words: Cytochrome P450, Javanese medaka, salinity, starvation, heavy fuel oil, cloning, expression. .... had no influence on hepatic EROD activities, (Vigano et al., 1993) ...

  18. Cloning and tissue expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 and 1C1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... cellular macromolecules like DNA, lipids and proteins. (Breimer, 1990; Romero et al., ... Starva- tion has been reported to have pro-oxidant effects, and both the inadequate ..... boxes indicate the conserved motif region and red boxes indicates substrate recognition sites (SRS). CYP1C1 shares a number of ...

  19. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

    2007-07-25

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

  20. Probing the Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c1 / c552 interaction by mutagenesis and fast kinetics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzon, Julia; Yuan, Quan; Malatesta, Francesco; Hellwig, Petra; Ludwig, Bernd; Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2008-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) between Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c1 and cytochrome c552 was studied using the soluble redox fragments cyt c1CF and cyt c552F. A new ruthenium cyt c552F derivative labeled at C23 (Ruz-23-c552F) was designed to measure rapid electron transfer with cyt c1CF in the physiological direction using flash photolysis. The bimolecular rate constant k12 decreased rapidly with ionic strength above 40 mM, consistent with a diffusional process guided by long-range electrostatic interactions between the two proteins. However, a new kinetic phase was detected below 35 mM ionic strength with the ruthenium photoexcitation technique in which k12 became very rapid (3 × 109 M−1s−1) and nearly independent of ionic strength, suggesting that the reaction became so fast that it was controlled by short-range diffusion along the protein surfaces guided by hydrophobic interactions. These results are consistent with a two-step model for formation of the final encounter complex. No intracomplex electron transfer between Ruz-23-c552F and c1CF was observed even at the lowest ionic strength, indicating that the dissociation constant of the complex was greater than 30 µM. On the other hand, the ruthenium-labeled yeast cytochrome c derivative Ruz-39-Cc formed a tight 1:1 complex with cyt c1CF at ionic strengths below 60 mM with an intracomplex electron transfer rate constant of 50,000 s−1. A group of cyt c1CF variants in the presumed docking site were generated based on information from the yeast cyt bc1/cyt c co-crystal structure. Kinetic analysis of cyt c1CF mutants located near the heme crevice provided preliminary identification of the interaction site for cyt c552F, and suggest that formation of the encounter complex is guided primarily by the overall electrostatic surface potential rather than by defined ions. PMID:19006325

  1. DC-SIGN, C1q, and gC1qR form a trimolecular receptor complex on the surface of monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Vinayagasundaram, Uma; Vinayagasundaram, Rama; Joyce, M. Gordon; Ji, Yan; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2012-01-01

    C1q modulates the differentiation and function of cells committed to the monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) lineage. Because the 2 C1q receptors found on the DC surface—gC1qR and cC1qR—lack a direct conduit into intracellular elements, we postulated that the receptors must form complexes with transmembrane partners. In the present study, we show that DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed on DCs, binds directly to C1q, as assessed by ELISA, flow cytometry, and immunoprecipitation experiments. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the interaction was specific, and both intact C1q and the globular portion of C1q bound to DC-SIGN. Whereas IgG reduced this binding significantly, the Arg residues (162-163) of the C1q-A chain, which are thought to contribute to the C1q-IgG interaction, were not required for C1q binding to DC-SIGN. Binding was reduced significantly in the absence of Ca2+ and by preincubation of DC-SIGN with mannan, suggesting that C1q binds to DC-SIGN at its principal Ca2+-binding pocket, which has increased affinity for mannose residues. Antigen-capture ELISA and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that C1q and gC1qR associate with DC-SIGN on blood DC precursors and immature DCs. The results of the present study suggest that C1q/gC1qR may regulate DC differentiation and function through the DC-SIGN–mediated induction of cell-signaling pathways. PMID:22700724

  2. Intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring for C1-2 spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muncie, Laura M; Ellens, Nathaniel R; Tolod-Kemp, Emeline; Feler, Claudio A; Winestone, John S

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE This study is a retrospective case series involving C1-2 spinal cord stimulation in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) under general endotracheal anesthesia. Currently, C1-2 paddle lead placement is an accepted practice, which provides effective cervical stimulation to ameliorate upper-extremity and sometimes lower-extremity symptoms experienced by patients with CRPS. However, this technique must be performed under general endotracheal anesthesia rather than in an awake or semiconscious state due to intraoperative safety concerns and patient comfort. The authors aim to provide additional data to support the following novel technique: the use of somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) diminution data to assist with proper midline placement of C1-2 leads under general anesthesia. METHODS SSEP median nerve (MN) and posterior tibial nerve (PTN) data were collected from 6 patients undergoing placement of C1-2 leads under general anesthesia. Fluoroscopy was used as an initial guide for proper anatomical midline placement. This was followed by the activation of the spinal cord stimulator and simultaneous collection of primarily MN SSEPs as well as PTN SSEPs for physiological midline placement. Unilateral and bilateral reductions in SSEPs assisted with the correct lateralization of the lead to ensure effective postoperative coverage according to the patient's individual preoperative symptoms. RESULTS Six patients were monitored using SSEPs and repeatable, reliable MN and PTN baseline responses were obtained from all. A reduction in amplitude ranging from 5% to 87% was observed, confirming inhibition of dorsal column conduction, and an average pain relief of 63% at short-term and 64% at long-term follow-up was recorded with 6 of 6 and 5 of 6 patients responding, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative SSEP collision study testing appears to be a safe technique to monitor placement of C1-2 paddle leads intraoperatively under general anesthesia.

  3. Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by peptide microarray immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereda, Andrea; Andreae, Doerthe A.; Lin, Jing; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Ibañez, Maria Dolores; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Bardina, Luda; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lentils are oftentimes responsible for allergic reactions to legumes in Mediterranean children. Though the primary sequence of the major allergen, Len c 1 is known, the location of the IgE binding epitopes remains undefined. Objective We sought to identify IgE-binding epitopes of Len c 1 and relate epitope binding to clinical characteristics. Methods 135 peptides corresponding to the primary sequence of Len c 1 were probed with sera from 33 lentil-allergic individuals and 15 non-atopic controls by means of microarray immunoassay. Lentil-specific IgE, Skin Prick Tests and clinical reactions to lentil were determined. Epitopes were defined as overlapping signal above inter- and intra-slide cut-offs and confirmed by inhibition assays using a peptide from the respective region. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data was used to correlate binding patterns with clinical findings. Results The lentil-allergic patients specifically recognized IgE-binding epitopes located in the C-terminal region, between peptide 107 and 135. Inhibition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgE binding in this region, identifying different epitopes. Linkage of cluster results with clinical data and lentil specific IgE levels displayed a positive correlation between lentil-specific IgE levels, epitope recognition and respiratory symptoms. Modeling based on the three-dimensional structure of a homologous soy vicilin suggests that the Len c 1 epitopes identified are exposed on the surface of the molecule. Conclusion Several IgE-binding sequential epitopes of Len c 1 have been identified. Epitopes are located in the C-terminal region, and are predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein. Epitope diversity is positively correlated with IgE levels, pointing to a more polyclonal IgE response. PMID:20816193

  4. The nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence of the cytochrome cL gene of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, a novel class of c-type cytochrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Nunn, D N; Anthony, C

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence of the cytochrome cL of Methylobacterium extorquens (Pseudomonas AM1; Methylobacterium AM1) shows that this cytochrome c is completely different, except for its haem-binding site, from all other cytochromes.

  5. 17 CFR 230.160 - Registered investment company exemption from Section 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... exemption from Section 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. 230.160...(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. A prospectus for an... 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. ...

  6. A novel multi-domain C1qDC protein from Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri provides new insights into the function of invertebrate C1qDC proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leilei; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Daoxiang; Jiang, Qiufen; Sun, Rui; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Huan; Song, Linsheng

    2015-10-01

    The C1q domain containing (C1qDC) proteins are a family of proteins possessing globular C1q (gC1q) domains, and they rely on this domain to recognize various ligands such as PAMPs, immunoglobulins, ligands on apoptotic cell. In the present study, a novel multi-domain C1qDC protein (CfC1qDC-2) was identified from scallop Chlamys farreri, and its full length cDNA was composed of 1648 bp, encoding a signal peptide and three typical gC1q domains. BLAST analysis revealed significant sequence similarity between CfC1qDC-2 and C1qDC proteins from mollusks. Three gC1q domains were predicted in its tertiary structure to form a tightly packed bell-shaped trimer, and each one adopted a typical 10-stranded sandwich fold with a jelly-roll topology and contained six aromatic amino acids forming the hydrophobic core. The mRNA transcripts of CfC1qDC-2 were mainly detected in the tissues of hepatopancreas and gonad of adult scallops, and the expression level was up-regulated in hemocytes after stimulated by LPS, PGN and β-glucan. During the embryonic development of scallop, the mRNA transcripts of CfC1qDC-2 were presented in all the detected stages, and the expression level was up-regulated from D-hinged larvae and reached the highest at eye-spot larvae. The recombinant protein of MBP-CfC1qDC-2 (rCfC1qDC-2) could bind various PAMPs including LPS, PGN, LTA, β-glucan, mannan as well as polyI:C, and different microorganisms including three Gram-negative bacteria, three Gram-positive bacteria and two yeasts, as well as scallop apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, rCfC1qDC-2 could interact with human heat-aggregated IgG and IgM, and inhibit the C1q-dependent hemolysis of rabbit serum. All these results indicated that CfC1qDC-2 could recognize not only PAMPs as a PRR, but also the apoptotic cells. Moreover, the similar structures and functions shared by CfC1qDC-2 and complement C1q provided a new insight into the evolution of C1qDC proteins in complement system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Deducing hybrid performance from parental metabolic profiles of young primary roots of maize by using a multivariate diallel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Kristen; Lisec, Jan; Römisch-Margl, Lilla; Selbig, Joachim; Gierl, Alfons; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nikoloski, Zoran; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2014-01-01

    Heterosis, the greater vigor of hybrids compared to their parents, has been exploited in maize breeding for more than 100 years to produce ever better performing elite hybrids of increased yield. Despite extensive research, the underlying mechanisms shaping the extent of heterosis are not well understood, rendering the process of selecting an optimal set of parental lines tedious. This study is based on a dataset consisting of 112 metabolite levels in young roots of four parental maize inbred lines and their corresponding twelve hybrids, along with the roots' biomass as a heterotic trait. Because the parental biomass is a poor predictor for hybrid biomass, we established a model framework to deduce the biomass of the hybrid from metabolite profiles of its parental lines. In the proposed framework, the hybrid metabolite levels are expressed relative to the parental levels by incorporating the standard concept of additivity/dominance, which we name the Combined Relative Level (CRL). Our modeling strategy includes a feature selection step on the parental levels which are demonstrated to be predictive of CRL across many hybrid metabolites. We demonstrate that these selected parental metabolites are further predictive of hybrid biomass. Our approach directly employs the diallel structure in a multivariate fashion, whereby we attempt to not only predict macroscopic phenotype (biomass), but also molecular phenotype (metabolite profiles). Therefore, our study provides the first steps for further investigations of the genetic determinants to metabolism and, ultimately, growth. Finally, our success on the small-scale experiments implies a valid strategy for large-scale experiments, where parental metabolite profiles may be used together with profiles of selected hybrids as a training set to predict biomass of all possible hybrids.

  8. Deducing hybrid performance from parental metabolic profiles of young primary roots of maize by using a multivariate diallel approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Feher

    Full Text Available Heterosis, the greater vigor of hybrids compared to their parents, has been exploited in maize breeding for more than 100 years to produce ever better performing elite hybrids of increased yield. Despite extensive research, the underlying mechanisms shaping the extent of heterosis are not well understood, rendering the process of selecting an optimal set of parental lines tedious. This study is based on a dataset consisting of 112 metabolite levels in young roots of four parental maize inbred lines and their corresponding twelve hybrids, along with the roots' biomass as a heterotic trait. Because the parental biomass is a poor predictor for hybrid biomass, we established a model framework to deduce the biomass of the hybrid from metabolite profiles of its parental lines. In the proposed framework, the hybrid metabolite levels are expressed relative to the parental levels by incorporating the standard concept of additivity/dominance, which we name the Combined Relative Level (CRL. Our modeling strategy includes a feature selection step on the parental levels which are demonstrated to be predictive of CRL across many hybrid metabolites. We demonstrate that these selected parental metabolites are further predictive of hybrid biomass. Our approach directly employs the diallel structure in a multivariate fashion, whereby we attempt to not only predict macroscopic phenotype (biomass, but also molecular phenotype (metabolite profiles. Therefore, our study provides the first steps for further investigations of the genetic determinants to metabolism and, ultimately, growth. Finally, our success on the small-scale experiments implies a valid strategy for large-scale experiments, where parental metabolite profiles may be used together with profiles of selected hybrids as a training set to predict biomass of all possible hybrids.

  9. Complement component C1r mediated cleavage of the heavy chain of the major histocompatibility class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1992-01-01

    Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native con......-chain of MHC class I was shown to take place between the alpha 2- and alpha 3- domains as estimated by the Con A-Sepharose precipitation pattern on SDS-PAGE. The alpha 1/alpha 2 fragment was still shown to interact with beta 2-microglobulin as shown by immunoprecipitation.......Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native...... configuration of the MHC class I antigen, since heat denaturation of the HLA antigens reduce the cleavage. The proteolytic fragments following C1 cleavage were characterized by precipitation with Con A-Sepharose, anti-MHC class I and anti-beta 2-microglobulin antibodies. The proteolysis of the alpha...

  10. The C1XS X-ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Maddison, B. J.; Howe, C. J.; Kellett, B. J.; Sreekumar, P.; Huovelin, J.; Crawford, I. A.; Duston, C. L.; Smith, D.; Anand, M.; Bhandari, N.; Cook, A.; Fernandes, V.; Foing, B.; Gasnaut, O.; Goswami, J. N.; Holland, A.; Joy, K. H.; Kochney, D.; Lawrence, D.; Maurice, S.; Okada, T.; Narendranath, S.; Pieters, C.; Rothery, D.; Russell, S. S.; Shrivastava, A.; Swinyard, B.; Wilding, M.; Wieczorek, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) is a compact X-ray spectrometer for the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument on ESA's SMART-1 mission. As a result of detailed developments to all aspects of the design, its performance as measured in the laboratory greatly surpasses that of D-CIXS. In comparison with SMART-1, Chandrayaan-1 is a science-oriented rather than a technology mission, leading to far more favourable conditions for science measurements. C1XS is designed to measure absolute and relative abundances of major rock-forming elements (principally Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe) in the lunar crust with spatial resolution ⩽25 FWHM km, and to achieve relative elemental abundances of better than 10%.

  11. Cloning and tissue expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 and 1C1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) is widely used as an indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants. In the study, two full-length complementary DNAs encode for CYP1B1 and CYP1C1 were cloned from medaka liver exposed to 500 ppb β-naphthoflavone for 24 h. CYP1B1, having 1984 bp, contains an open reading ...

  12. Treatment of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloisa Malbrán

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of the worldwide approval of new drugs for the treatment of acute C1-INH-HAE attacks may still not reach all patients. Identifying the current barriers in the access to medication, as well as conducting a detailed assessment of the progress in this area, is essential to achieve universal treatment. Two hundred and twenty five patients registered in the Argentina Hereditary Angioedema Patient Association (AHAEPA were randomly selected and invited to participate in a web based questionnaire on accessibility to icatibant and pdC1-INH, self-treatment, delay to treatment, and coverage. The data retrieved was compared to our previous reports in 2008 and 2013. We collected 156/225 answers. One hundred and eighteen (76% patients have either pdC1-INH (n = 86, icatibant (n = 10 or both (n = 22, while 38 (24% do not have access to treatment. In 2008, 26% had access while 82% had it in 2013. Thirty-two subjects (22% self-inject themselves, similar to 29% in 2013, even though between studies, widespread self-injection training activities have taken place. However, considering injections by proxy, home treatment reached 56%. Only half of the patients decide to receive treatment early during the attack. Ninety-nine patients (63% have full coverage, thirty (19% have no coverage at all and the rest only obtain partial reimbursement. Twenty-nine families (31% share a single treatment dose of the medication, better than 36% in 2013. Argentina's C1-INH-HAE patients had a sustained improvement in their access to medication. Efforts should continue to further improve accessibility and optimal management of HAE acute attacks to all patients in the country.

  13. Explicit Gaussian quadrature rules for C^1 cubic splines with symmetrically stretched knot sequence

    KAUST Repository

    Ait-Haddou, Rachid

    2015-06-19

    We provide explicit expressions for quadrature rules on the space of C^1 cubic splines with non-uniform, symmetrically stretched knot sequences. The quadrature nodes and weights are derived via an explicit recursion that avoids an intervention of any numerical solver and the rule is optimal, that is, it requires minimal number of nodes. Numerical experiments validating the theoretical results and the error estimates of the quadrature rules are also presented.

  14. Synthetic studies on hemicalide: development of a convergent approach toward the C1-C25 fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, Geoffroy; Fleury, Etienne; Tran, Christine; Prost, Elise; Molinier, Nicolas; Sautel, François; Massiot, Georges; Specklin, Simon; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine; Lannou, Marie-Isabelle; Ardisson, Janick

    2013-09-20

    Synthetic studies on hemicalide, a recently isolated marine natural product displaying highly potent antiproliferative activity and a unique mode of action, have highlighted a reliable Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons olefination to create the C6-C7 alkene and a remarkable efficient Suzuki-Miyaura coupling to form the C15-C16 bond, resulting in the development of a convergent approach toward the C1-C25 fragment.

  15. Rapid Reactivation of Deep Subsurface Microbes in the Presence of C-1 Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Rajala

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in the deep biosphere are believed to conduct little metabolic activity due to low nutrient availability in these environments. However, destructive penetration to long-isolated bedrock environments during construction of underground waste repositories can lead to increased nutrient availability and potentially affect the long-term stability of the repository systems, Here, we studied how microorganisms present in fracture fluid from a depth of 500 m in Outokumpu, Finland, respond to simple carbon compounds (C-1 compounds in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. C-1 compounds such as methane and methanol are important intermediates in the deep subsurface carbon cycle, and electron acceptors such as sulphate are critical components of oxidation processes. Fracture fluid samples were incubated in vitro with either methane or methanol in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Metabolic response was measured by staining the microbial cells with fluorescent dyes that indicate metabolic activity and transcriptional response with RT-qPCR. Our results show that deep subsurface microbes exist in dormant states but rapidly reactivate their transcription and respiration systems in the presence of C-1 substrates, particularly methane. Microbial activity was further enhanced by the addition of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Sulphate- and nitrate-reducing microbes were particularly responsive to the addition of C-1 compounds and sulphate. These taxa are common in deep biosphere environments and may be affected by conditions disturbed by bedrock intrusion, as from drilling and excavation for long-term storage of hazardous waste.

  16. Polygonumnolides C1-C4; minor dianthrone glycosides from the roots of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Bo; Li, Li; Dai, Zhong; Wu, Yu; Geng, Xing-Chao; Li, Bo; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Wang, Ai-Guo; Su, Ya-Lun

    2016-09-01

    Four new dianthrone glycosides, named polygonumnolides C1-C4 (1-4), were isolated from the dried roots of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, together with two known emodin dianthrones (5-6). Their hepatotoxicities were evaluated against L-02 cell lines. Compounds 1-4 showed weak hepatotoxicity against L-02 cell lines with IC50 values of 313.05, 205.20, 294.20, and 207.35 μM, respectively.

  17. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  18. Overcoming Intrinsic Restriction Enzyme Barriers Enhances Transformation Efficiency in Arthrospira platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeamton, Wattana; Dulsawat, Sudarat; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Vonshak, Avigad; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon

    2017-04-01

    The development of a reliable genetic transformation system for Arthrospira platensis has been a long-term goal, mainly for those trying either to improve its performance in large-scale cultivation systems or to enhance its value as food and feed additives. However, so far, most of the attempts to develop such a transformation system have had limited success. In this study, an efficient and stable transformation system for A. platensis C1 was successfully developed. Based on electroporation and transposon techniques, exogenous DNA could be transferred to and stably maintained in the A. platensis C1 genome. Most strains of Arthrospira possess strong restriction barriers, hampering the development of a gene transfer system for this group of cyanobacteria. By using a type I restriction inhibitor and liposomes to protect the DNA from nuclease digestion, the transformation efficiency was significantly improved. The transformants were able to grow on a selective medium for more than eight passages, and the transformed DNA could be detected from the stable transformants. We propose that the intrinsic endonuclease enzymes, particularly the type I restriction enzyme, in A. platensis C1 play an important role in the transformation efficiency of this industrial important cyanobacterium. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Reactions of water and C1 molecules on carbide and metal-modified carbide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weiming; Tackett, Brian M; Chen, Jingguang G

    2017-04-03

    The formation of carbides can significantly modify the physical and chemical properties of the parent metals. In the current review, we summarize the general trends in the reactions of water and C1 molecules over transition metal carbide (TMC) and metal-modified TMC surfaces and thin films. Although the primary focus of the current review is on the theoretical and experimental studies of reactions of C1 molecules (CO, CO2, CH3OH, etc.), the reactions of water will also be reviewed because water plays an important role in many of the C1 transformation reactions. This review is organized by discussing separately thermal reactions and electrochemical reactions, which provides insights into the application of TMCs in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, respectively. In thermal reactions, we discuss the thermal decomposition of water and methanol, as well as the reactions of CO and CO2 over TMC surfaces. In electrochemical reactions, we summarize recent studies in the hydrogen evolution reaction, electrooxidation of methanol and CO, and electroreduction of CO2. Finally, future research opportunities and challenges associated with using TMCs as catalysts and electrocatalysts are also discussed.

  20. Gene Expression and Methylation Signatures of MAN2C1 are Associated with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Uddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As potential regulators of DNA accessibility and activity, epigenetic modifications offer a mechanism by which the environment can moderate the effects of genes. To date, however, there have been relatively few studies assessing epigenetic modifications associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Here we investigate PTSD-associated methylation differences in 33 genes previously shown to differ in whole blood-derived gene expression levels between those with vs. without the disorder. Drawing on DNA samples similarly obtained from whole blood in 100 individuals, 23 with and 77 without lifetime PTSD, we used methylation microarray data to assess whether these 33 candidate genes showed epigenetic signatures indicative of increased risk for, or resilience to, PTSD. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the main and interacting effects of candidate genes’ methylation values and number of potentially traumatic events (PTEs, adjusting for age and other covariates. Results revealed that only one candidate gene–MAN2C1–showed a significant methylation x PTE interaction, such that those with both higher MAN2C1 methylation and greater exposure to PTEs showed a marked increase in risk of lifetime PTSD (OR 4.35, 95% CI: 1.07, 17.77, p = 0.04. These results indicate that MAN2C1 methylation levels modify cumulative traumatic burden on risk of PTSD, and suggest that both gene expression and epigenetic changes at specific loci are associated with this disorder.

  1. Initial Results from the C1XS X-Ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Kellett, B. J.; Maddison, B.. J.; Sreekumar, P.; Huovelin, J.; Howe, C. J.; Crawford, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission, which was successfully launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on 22 October, carried as part of its payload the C1XS Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spec-trometer [1]. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument [2] on ESA's SMART-1 mission. Whereas SMART-1 was a technology mission, Chandrayaan-1 is science oriented, with a far more favourable orbit for science measurements. C1XS is designed to measure abundances of major rock-forming elements (princi-pally Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe). The instrument has been commissioned, and is operating nominally. The Sun continues to show X-ray emission charac-teristic of the Solar minimum. As has been commented by [7], the onset of this solar maximum is significantly delayed. However, C1XS has been able to observe the Moon even in these very low illumination conditions. Figure 3 shows the result of an integration during an A class flare on the 12th Dec. 2008. Characteristic energy lines at Mg, Al and Si are clearly seen and resolved from the average extreme quiet time data background. This performance shows that the instrument is easily meeting its design requirements, and in the higher illumination conditions expected during the rest of the mission will be capable of meeting its science goals.

  2. Clinical presentation of human C1q deficiency: How much of a lupus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegert, Mihaela; Bock, Merete; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary human C1q deficiency has been well described to be associated with high susceptibility for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The majority of subjects present a clinical syndrome closely related to SLE. However, limited information is available about the primary diagnosis and particular clinical manifestations of SLE in this specific subgroup of patients. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of electronic databases up to November 2014 to identify and analyze reports on patients with C1q deficiency. We identified 71 C1q-deficient patients descending from 45 families that had been published. According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for SLE 39/71 (55%) subjects could be classified as having SLE. Another 16/71 (22.5%) presented a SLE-like syndrome (defined as 3 positive ACR criteria) whereas in 16/71 (22.5%) no SLE could be diagnosed at time of publication. Symptoms began at a median age of 5 years, male and females being equally affected. Discoid rash (56% versus 10%, poral ulcers (49% versus 24%, pmanifestations were found to occur similarly frequent. The severe course of disease in some patients seemed to be mostly due to severe infections at early ages and not in particular due to more aggressive SLE manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Styloid/C1 transverse process juxtaposition as a cause of Eagle's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sandra; Luginbuhl, Adam; Finden, Steven; Curry, Joseph M; Cognetti, David M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this case report was to characterize styloid/C1 transverse process juxtaposition as a cause for Eagle's syndrome. A case series was conducted with a chart review of 5 patients with radiographic evidence of jugular vein compression who underwent styloid process excision between 2010 and 2013. There were 4 men and 1 woman, aged 35 to 62 years (mean, 46 years). Cervicalgia (4 of 5 patients) and otalgia (4 of 5 patients) were the most commonly reported symptoms. Styloid process length ranged from 2.4 to 8.5 cm. The distance between the styloid process and the transverse process of C1 ranged from 0.05 to 0.46 cm. All patients underwent a transcervical approach for the excision of the styloid process with immediate postoperative resolution of symptoms and good cosmetic results. Styloid/C1 transverse process juxtaposition can produce symptoms of cervicalgia and otalgia even in the setting of a normal length styloid process. The transcervical approach is safe and effective for excision of the styloid process and has good functional and cosmetic results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 differ in substrate preference and reducing agent specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Koetsier, Martijn J; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Jaap; Hinz, Sandra W A; Vincken, Jean-Paul; van Berkel, Willem J H; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxgygenases (LPMOs) are known to boost the hydrolytic breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, especially cellulose, due to their oxidative mechanism. For their activity, LPMOs require an electron donor for reducing the divalent copper cofactor. LPMO activities are mainly investigated with ascorbic acid as a reducing agent, but little is known about the effect of plant-derived reducing agents on LPMOs activity. Here, we show that three LPMOs from the fungus Myceliophthora thermophila C1, MtLPMO9A, MtLPMO9B and MtLPMO9C, differ in their substrate preference, C1-/C4-regioselectivity and reducing agent specificity. MtLPMO9A generated C1- and C4-oxidized, MtLPMO9B C1-oxidized and MtLPMO9C C4-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose. The recently published MtLPMO9A oxidized, next to cellulose, xylan, β-(1 → 3, 1 → 4)-glucan and xyloglucan. In addition, MtLPMO9C oxidized, to a minor extent, xyloglucan and β-(1 → 3, 1 → 4)-glucan from oat spelt at the C4 position. In total, 34 reducing agents, mainly plant-derived flavonoids and lignin-building blocks, were studied for their ability to promote LPMO activity. Reducing agents with a 1,2-benzenediol or 1,2,3-benzenetriol moiety gave the highest release of oxidized and non-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose for all three MtLPMOs. Low activities toward cellulose were observed in the presence of monophenols and sulfur-containing compounds. Several of the most powerful LPMO reducing agents of this study serve as lignin building blocks or protective flavonoids in plant biomass. Our findings support the hypothesis that LPMOs do not only vary in their C1-/C4-regioselectivity and substrate specificity, but also in their reducing agent specificity. This work strongly supports the idea that the activity of LPMOs toward lignocellulosic biomass does not only depend on the ability to degrade plant polysaccharides like cellulose, but also on their specificity toward plant

  5. Unilateral C-1 posterior arch screws and C-2 laminar screws combined with a 1-side C1-2 pedicle screw system as salvage fixation for atlantoaxial instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo-Xin, Jin; Huan, Wang

    2015-10-30

    OBJECT Atlantoaxial instability often requires surgery, and the current methods for fixation pose some risk to vascular and neurological tissues. Thus, new effective and safer methods are needed for salvage operations. This study sought to assess unilateral C-1 posterior arch screws (PASs) and C-2 laminar screws (LSs) combined with 1-side C1-2 pedicle screws (PSs) for posterior C1-2 fixation using biomechanical testing with bilateral C1-2 PSs in a cadaveric model. METHODS Six fresh ligamentous human cervical spines were evaluated for their biomechanics. The cadaveric specimens were tested in their intact condition, stabilization after injury, and after injury at 1.5 Nm of pure moment in 6 directions. The 3 groups tested were bilateral C1-2 PSs (Group A); left side C1-2 PSs with an ipsilateral C-1 PAS + C-2 laminar screw (Group B); and left side C1-2 PSs with a contralateral C-1 PAS + C-2 LS (Group C). During the testing, angular motion was measured using a motion capture platform. Data were recorded, and statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS Biomechanical testing showed that there was no significant difference among the stabilities of these fixation systems in flexion-extension and rotation control. In left lateral bending, the bilateral C1-2 PS group decreased flexibility by 71.9% compared with the intact condition, the unilateral C1-2 PS and ipsilateral PAS+LS group decreased flexibility by 77.6%, and the unilateral C1-2 PS and contralateral PAS+LS group by 70.0%. Each method significantly decreased C1-2 movements in right lateral bending compared with the intact condition, and the bilateral C1-2 PS system was more stable than the C1-2 PS and contralateral PAS+LS system (p = 0.036). CONCLUSIONS A unilateral C-1 PAS + C-2 LS combined with 1-side C-1 PSs provided the same acute stability as the PS, and no statistically significant difference in acute stability was found between the 2 screw techniques. These methods may constitute an alternative method for

  6. Rupture planes of the Gazli earthquakes deduced from local stress tensor calculation and geodetic data inversion: Geotectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    AmorèSe, D.; Grasso, J.-R.

    1996-05-01

    -ESE strike of σ1 and the NNE-SSW strike of σ2 deduced from this study for the Kyzylkum Desert can be explained at once by the interaction of the regional plate boundary motions.

  7. Characterization of a gC1qR from the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Huang, Xin; Wang, Xian-Wei; Shi, Yan-Ru; Hui, Kai-Min; Ren, Qian

    2015-03-01

    gC1qR, as a multicompartmental and a multifunctional protein, plays an important role in innate immunity. In this study, a gC1qR homolog (MrgC1qR) in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii was identified. MrgC1qR, a 258-amino-acid polypeptide, shares high identities with gC1qR from other species. MrgC1qR gene was expressed in different tissues and was highest expressed in the hepatopancreas. In addition, the MrgC1qR transcript was significantly enhanced after 6 h of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection or post 2 h, 24 h of Vibrio anguillarum challenge compared to appropriate controls. Moreover, recombinant MrgC1qR (rMrgC1qR) had bacterial binding activity, the result also revealed that rMrgC1qR could bind pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as LPS or PGN, suggesting that MrgC1qRmight function as a pathogen-recognition receptor (PRR). Furthermore, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays showed that rMrgC1qR with GST-tag could bind to rMrFicolin1 or rMrFicolin2 with His-tag. Altogether, these results may demonstrate a role for MrgC1qR in innate immunity in the giant freshwater prawns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Elucidating the Mechanism of Gain of Toxic Function From Mutant C1 Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary Angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    antibodies to 5 specifically blot wild-type C1INH in the pathologic polymers.. A FLAG tag was placed into the wild-type C1INH cDNA located immediately... constructs . The table below shows the results of this experiment. Origin of mutation Co-Transfection Construct A1AT Equiv. Replicate 1 Replicate 2... Construct n/a WT-C1INH n/a 1.00 1.01 A1AT E429K-Mu-C1INH Z 0.74 0.68 A1AT H421D-Mu-C1INH King’s 0.66 0.67 A1AT S148F-Mu-C1INH Silyama 0.71 0.54

  9. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M

    2014-12-01

    Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of "smart dimensions", and dynamically-generated user interfaces. DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort "join" functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source system changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  10. Modular design, application architecture, and usage of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery: The Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M.; Rusincovitch, Shelley A.; Brinson, Stephanie; Shang, Howard C.; Evans, Steve; Ferranti, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data generated in the care of patients are widely used to support clinical research and quality improvement, which has hastened the development of self-service query tools. User interface design for such tools, execution of query activity, and underlying application architecture have not been widely reported, and existing tools reflect a wide heterogeneity of methods and technical frameworks. We describe the design, application architecture, and use of a self-service model for enterprise data delivery within Duke Medicine. Methods Our query platform, the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE), supports enhanced data exploration, cohort identification, and data extraction from our enterprise data warehouse (EDW) using a series of modular environments that interact with a central keystone module, Cohort Manager (CM). A data-driven application architecture is implemented through three components: an application data dictionary, the concept of “smart dimensions”, and dynamically-generated user interfaces. Results DEDUCE CM allows flexible hierarchies of EDW queries within a grid-like workspace. A cohort “join” functionality allows switching between filters based on criteria occurring within or across patient encounters. To date, 674 users have been trained and activated in DEDUCE, and logon activity shows a steady increase, with variability between months. A comparison of filter conditions and export criteria shows that these activities have different patterns of usage across subject areas. Conclusions Organizations with sophisticated EDWs may find that users benefit from development of advanced query functionality, complimentary to the user interfaces and infrastructure used in other well-published models. Driven by its EDW context, the DEDUCE application architecture was also designed to be responsive to source data and to allow modification through alterations in metadata rather than programming, allowing an agile response to source

  11. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  12. Synthetic studies toward (-)-FR901483 using a conjugate allylation to install the C-1 quaternary carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, Dimitar B; Comins, Daniel L

    2006-12-08

    Two approaches to the aza-tricyclo dodecane skeleton of (-)-FR901483 are reported. Both routes utilized a Grignard addition to an N-acylpyridinium salt to establish the absolute stereochemistry at C-6 and a highly diastereoselective conjugate allylation reaction to form the quaternary center at C-1 of the natural product in an excellent yield. Although the desired polysubstituted piperidine intermediates were prepared regio- and stereoselectively, the construction of the C-8/C-9 bond connectivity could not be achieved. All attempts at a pinacol cyclization or an intramolecular 6-exo-tet epoxide opening were unsuccessful because of an unfavorable A(1,3) strain inherent in the molecule.

  13. iAK692: a genome-scale metabolic model of Spirulina platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanchui, Amornpan; Khannapho, Chiraphan; Phodee, Atchara; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Meechai, Asawin

    2012-06-15

    Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis is a well-known filamentous cyanobacterium used in the production of many industrial products, including high value compounds, healthy food supplements, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, for example. It has been increasingly studied around the world for scientific purposes, especially for its genome, biology, physiology, and also for the analysis of its small-scale metabolic network. However, the overall description of the metabolic and biotechnological capabilities of S. platensis requires the development of a whole cellular metabolism model. Recently, the S. platensis C1 (Arthrospira sp. PCC9438) genome sequence has become available, allowing systems-level studies of this commercial cyanobacterium. In this work, we present the genome-scale metabolic network analysis of S. platensis C1, iAK692, its topological properties, and its metabolic capabilities and functions. The network was reconstructed from the S. platensis C1 annotated genomic sequence using Pathway Tools software to generate a preliminary network. Then, manual curation was performed based on a collective knowledge base and a combination of genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The genome-scale metabolic model consists of 692 genes, 837 metabolites, and 875 reactions. We validated iAK692 by conducting fermentation experiments and simulating the model under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic growth conditions using COBRA toolbox. The model predictions under these growth conditions were consistent with the experimental results. The iAK692 model was further used to predict the unique active reactions and essential genes for each growth condition. Additionally, the metabolic states of iAK692 during autotrophic and mixotrophic growths were described by phenotypic phase plane (PhPP) analysis. This study proposes the first genome-scale model of S. platensis C1, iAK692, which is a predictive metabolic platform for a global understanding of

  14. iAK692: A genome-scale metabolic model of Spirulina platensis C1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klanchui Amornpan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis is a well-known filamentous cyanobacterium used in the production of many industrial products, including high value compounds, healthy food supplements, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, for example. It has been increasingly studied around the world for scientific purposes, especially for its genome, biology, physiology, and also for the analysis of its small-scale metabolic network. However, the overall description of the metabolic and biotechnological capabilities of S. platensis requires the development of a whole cellular metabolism model. Recently, the S. platensis C1 (Arthrospira sp. PCC9438 genome sequence has become available, allowing systems-level studies of this commercial cyanobacterium. Results In this work, we present the genome-scale metabolic network analysis of S. platensis C1, iAK692, its topological properties, and its metabolic capabilities and functions. The network was reconstructed from the S. platensis C1 annotated genomic sequence using Pathway Tools software to generate a preliminary network. Then, manual curation was performed based on a collective knowledge base and a combination of genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The genome-scale metabolic model consists of 692 genes, 837 metabolites, and 875 reactions. We validated iAK692 by conducting fermentation experiments and simulating the model under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic growth conditions using COBRA toolbox. The model predictions under these growth conditions were consistent with the experimental results. The iAK692 model was further used to predict the unique active reactions and essential genes for each growth condition. Additionally, the metabolic states of iAK692 during autotrophic and mixotrophic growths were described by phenotypic phase plane (PhPP analysis. Conclusions This study proposes the first genome-scale model of S. platensis C1, iAK692, which is a

  15. Association between the presence of anti-C1q antibodies and active nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Gómez, Graciela; Khoury, Marina; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena; Álvarez, Clarisa; Sarano, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A retrospective analysis was carried out on a group of 24 patients with SLE to evaluate whether the presence of anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q) is related to renal involvement and to explore the behaviour of anti-C1q with respect to LN during a four-year follow-up period. A first serum sample stored at the serum bank, taken not more than three years after SLE diagnosis and one serum sample per year for the subsequent four years were used to detect anti-C1q. Lupus clinical manifestations and serological markers of activity corresponding to the date of each serum sample selected were collected from medical records. In the first serum sample, anti-C1q were found in 8 active SLE. LN was confirmed by histology in 5/8 patients who were positive for anti-C1q and in 1/16 patients who were negative for these autoantibodies (p = 0.0069). Three patients (3/8) had anti-C1q without renal involvement but with lupus skin manifestation. Anti-C1q levels decreased in 3/5 patients with LN who responded to treatment and remained higher in 2/5 patients who needed a new renal biopsy which showed severe renal disease. The 15 patients without severe kidney disease and anti-C1q negative at diagnosis did not develop LN and anti-C1q remained negative in the 4 years of follow up. Anti-C1q were found in SLE patients with active renal involvement or with lupus skin disease. The absence of anti-C1q seemed to be linked to low probabilities of renal involvement.

  16. Association between the presence of anti-c1q antibodies and active nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María De Los Ángeles Gargiulo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. A retrospective analysis was carried out on a group of 24 patients with SLE to evaluate whether the presence of anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q is related to renal involvement and to explore the behaviour of anti-C1q with respect to LN during a four-year follow-up period. A first serum sample stored at the serum bank, taken not more than three years after SLE diagnosis and one serum sample per year for the subsequent four years were used to detect anti-C1q. Lupus clinical manifestations and serological markers of activity corresponding to the date of each serum sample selected were collected from medical records. In the first serum sample, anti-C1q were found in 8 active SLE. LN was confirmed by histology in 5/8 patients who were positive for anti-C1q and in 1/16 patients who were negative for these autoantibodies (p = 0.0069. Three patients (3/8 had anti-C1q without renal involvement but with lupus skin manifestation. Anti-C1q levels decreased in 3/5 patients with LN who responded to treatment and remained higher in 2/5 patients who needed a new renal biopsy which showed severe renal disease. The 15 patients without severe kidney disease and anti-C1q negative at diagnosis did not develop LN and anti-C1q remained negative in the 4 years of follow up. Anti-C1q were found in SLE patients with active renal involvement or with lupus skin disease. The absence of anti-C1q seemed to be linked to low probabilities of renal involvement.

  17. Potential therapeutic benefit of C1-esterase inhibitor in neuromyelitis optica evaluated in vitro and in an experimental rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukmanee Tradtrantip

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which binding of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4 autoantibodies (NMO-IgG to astrocytes causes complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC and inflammation resulting in oligodendrocyte and neuronal injury. There is compelling evidence for a central role of complement in NMO pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the potential of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh for complement-targeted therapy of NMO. C1-inh is an anti-inflammatory plasma protein with serine protease inhibition activity that has a broad range of biological activities on the contact (kallikrein, coagulation, fibrinolytic and complement systems. C1-inh is approved for therapy of hereditary angioedema (HAE and has been studied in a small safety trial in acute NMO relapses (NCT 01759602. In vitro assays of NMO-IgG-dependent CDC showed C1-inh inhibition of human and rat complement, but with predicted minimal complement inhibition activity at a dose of 2000 units in humans. Inhibition of complement by C1-inh was potentiated by ∼10-fold by polysulfated macromolecules including heparin and dextran sulfate. In rats, intravenous C1-inh at a dose 30-fold greater than that approved to treat HAE inhibited serum complement activity by <5%, even when supplemented with heparin. Also, high-dose C1-inh did not reduce pathology in a rat model of NMO produced by intracerebral injection of NMO-IgG. Therefore, although C1r and C1s are targets of C1-inh, our in vitro data with human serum and in vivo data in rats suggest that the complement inhibition activity of C1-inh in serum is too low to confer clinical benefit in NMO.

  18. Chloromethane-Induced Genes Define a Third C1 Utilization Pathway in Methylobacterium chloromethanicum CM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Alex; McAnulla, Craig; Büchele, Rainer; Leisinger, Thomas; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2002-01-01

    Methylobacterium chloromethanicum CM4 is an aerobic α-proteobacterium capable of growth with chloromethane as the sole carbon and energy source. Two proteins, CmuA and CmuB, were previously purified and shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of chloromethane and the vitamin B12-mediated transfer of the methyl group of chloromethane to tetrahydrofolate. Three genes located near cmuA and cmuB, designated metF, folD and purU and encoding homologs of methylene tetrahydrofolate (methylene-H4folate) reductase, methylene-H4folate dehydrogenase-methenyl-H4folate cyclohydrolase and formyl-H4folate hydrolase, respectively, suggested the existence of a chloromethane-specific oxidation pathway from methyl-tetrahydrofolate to formate in strain CM4. Hybridization and PCR analysis indicated that these genes were absent in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, which is unable to grow with chloromethane. Studies with transcriptional xylE fusions demonstrated the chloromethane-dependent expression of these genes. Transcriptional start sites were mapped by primer extension and allowed to define three transcriptional units, each likely comprising several genes, that were specifically expressed during growth of strain CM4 with chloromethane. The DNA sequences of the deduced promoters display a high degree of sequence conservation but differ from the Methylobacterium promoters described thus far. As shown previously for purU, inactivation of the metF gene resulted in a CM4 mutant unable to grow with chloromethane. Methylene-H4folate reductase activity was detected in a cell extract of strain CM4 only in the presence of chloromethane but not in the metF mutant. Taken together, these data provide evidence that M. chloromethanicum CM4 requires a specific set of tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes for growth with chloromethane. PMID:12057941

  19. Inclusive and exclusive measurements of $B$ decays to $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, V; Panzenböck, E; Trabelsi, K; Frey, A; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bansal, V; Barberio, E; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Frost, O; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Greenwald, D; Haba, J; Hamer, P; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kawasaki, T; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, N; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lee, I S; Li, C; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Loos, A; Lukin, P; Masuda, M; Matvienko, D; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Purohit, M V; Rauch, J; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Seino, Y; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Singh, J B; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Stypula, J; Sumihama, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wehle, S; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report inclusive and exclusive measurements for $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ production in $B$ decays. We measure $\\mathcal{B}(B \\to \\chi_{c1} X)$= $(3.03 \\pm 0.05(\\mbox{stat}) \\pm 0.24(\\mbox{syst})) \\times 10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(B \\to \\chi_{c2} X)$= $(0.70 \\pm 0.06(\\mbox{stat}) \\pm 0.10(\\mbox{syst})) \\times 10^{-3}$. For the first time, $\\chi_{c2}$ production in exclusive $B$ decays in the modes $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c2}\\pi^- K^+$ and $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c2} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K^+$ has been observed, along with first evidence for the $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c2} \\pi^+ K_S^0$ decay mode. For $\\chi_{c1}$ production, we report the first observation in the $B^+ \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K^+$, $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^- K_S^0$ and $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c1} \\pi^0 \\pi^- K^+$ decay modes. Using these decay modes, we observe a difference in the production mechanism of $\\chi_{c2}$ in comparison to $\\chi_{c1}$ in $B$ decays. In addition, we report searches for $X(3872)$ and $\\chi_{c1}(2P)$ in the $B^+ \\to (\\chi_{c1} \\pi^+ \\pi^-) K^+$ decay mode....

  20. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response.

  1. Global significance of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high-resolution seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, K.; Tittgemeyer, M.; Ryberg, T.; Wenzel, F.; Mooney, W.

    2002-01-01

    an on-going processes; nevertheless, the derived quantitative estimates of the SMBL properties provide important constraints for any hypothesis on scale-forming processes. Models to be tested by future numerical and field experiments are, for example, repeated subduction-convection stretching of oceanic lithosphere (marble-cake model) and schlieren formation at mid-ocean ridges. It is also proposed that the modeling of the observed blocking of Sn and Pn propagation at active plate margins offers a new tool to study the depth range of tectonics below the crust-mantle boundary. Finally, the deduced schlieren structure of the SMBL closes an important scale gap of three to four orders of magnitude between structural dimensions studied in petrological analysis of mantle samples (xenoliths or outcrop of oceanic lithosphere) and those imaged in classical seismological studies of the lithosphere.

  2. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  3. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Gao, Bo; Li, Jun; Chen, Haining; Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-11-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

  4. Development of dysphagia and trismus developed after c1-2 posterior fusion in extended position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Haruo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Koshimune, Kouichiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Cervical misalignment after upper cervical fusion including the occipital bone may cause trismus or dysphagia, because the occipito-atlanto joint is associated with most of the flex and extended motion of the cervical spine. There are no reports of dysphagia and trismus after C1-2 fusion. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential risk of dysphagia and trismus even after upper cervical short fusion without the occipital bone. The patient was a 69-year-old man with myelopathy caused by os odontoideum and Klippel-Feil syndrome, who developed dysphagia and trismus immediately after C1-2 fusion and C3-6 laminoplasty. Radiographs and CT revealed that his neck posture was extended, but his symptoms still existed a week after surgery. The fixation angle was hyperextended 12 days after the first surgery. His symptoms disappeared immediately after revision surgery. The fixation in the neck-flexed position is thought to be the main cause of the patient's post-operative dysphagia and trismus. Dysphagia and trismus may occur even after short upper cervical fusion without the occipital bone or cervical fusion in the neck-extended position. The pre-operative cervical alignment and range of motion of each segment should be thoroughly evaluated.

  5. Association of the DYX1C1 Dyslexia Susceptibility Gene with Orthography in the Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Twila; Burmeister, Margit; Villafuerte, Sandra M.; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Li, Hong; Shi, Bingjie; Liang, Weilan; Zhang, Zhixiang; Shu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Several independent studies have supported the association of DYX1C1 with dyslexia, but its role in general reading development remains unclear. Here, we investigated the contribution of this gene to reading, with a focus on orthographic skills, in a sample of 284 unrelated Chinese children aged 5 to 11 years who were participating in the Chinese Longitudinal Study of Reading Development. We tested this association using a quantitative approach for Chinese character reading, Chinese character dictation, orthographic judgment, and visual skills. Significant or marginally significant associations were observed at the marker rs11629841 with children's orthographic judgments at ages 7 and 8 years (all P valuesdictation (all P values<0.013) were also observed for this single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at ages 9, 10, and 11 years. Further analyses revealed that the association with orthographic skills was specific to the processing of specific components of characters (P values<0.046). No association was found at either SNP of rs3743205 or rs57809907. Our findings suggest that DYX1C1 influences reading development in the general Chinese population and supports a universal effect of this gene. PMID:23028439

  6. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2005-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  7. XMM-Newton study of the supersoft symbiotic system Draco C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Sara; Sasaki, Manami; Ducci, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of thirty-one XMM-Newton observations of the symbiotic star Draco C1 located in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. This object had been identified as a supersoft source based on ROSAT data. We analysed X-ray, ultraviolet (UV) and optical data taken with XMM-Newton in order to obtain the physical parameters and the geometry of the system. We have also performed the first X-ray timing analysis of Draco C1. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted with a blackbody model with a temperature of (1.8 ± 0.3) × 105 K. We obtained a bolometric luminosity of ≳1038 erg s-1 for the white dwarf. The X-ray spectrum and luminosity suggest stable nuclear burning on the surface of the white dwarf. The low column density derived from the X-ray spectrum is consistent with the lack of nebular lines found in previous UV studies. The long-term variability in the optical and the UV suggests that the system is not observed face-on and that the variability is caused by the reflection effect. For the red giant companion, we estimate a radius of ∼110 R⊙ and an upper limit ≲1.5 M⊙ for its mass assuming Roche lobe overflow.

  8. Ebola virus entry requires the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carette, Jan E; Raaben, Matthijs; Wong, Anthony C; Herbert, Andrew S; Obernosterer, Gregor; Mulherkar, Nirupama; Kuehne, Ana I; Kranzusch, Philip J; Griffin, April M; Ruthel, Gordon; Dal Cin, Paola; Dye, John M; Whelan, Sean P; Chandran, Kartik; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2011-08-24

    Infections by the Ebola and Marburg filoviruses cause a rapidly fatal haemorrhagic fever in humans for which no approved antivirals are available. Filovirus entry is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein (GP), which attaches viral particles to the cell surface, delivers them to endosomes and catalyses fusion between viral and endosomal membranes. Additional host factors in the endosomal compartment are probably required for viral membrane fusion; however, despite considerable efforts, these critical host factors have defied molecular identification. Here we describe a genome-wide haploid genetic screen in human cells to identify host factors required for Ebola virus entry. Our screen uncovered 67 mutations disrupting all six members of the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS) multisubunit tethering complex, which is involved in the fusion of endosomes to lysosomes, and 39 independent mutations that disrupt the endo/lysosomal cholesterol transporter protein Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). Cells defective for the HOPS complex or NPC1 function, including primary fibroblasts derived from human Niemann-Pick type C1 disease patients, are resistant to infection by Ebola virus and Marburg virus, but remain fully susceptible to a suite of unrelated viruses. We show that membrane fusion mediated by filovirus glycoproteins and viral escape from the vesicular compartment require the NPC1 protein, independent of its known function in cholesterol transport. Our findings uncover unique features of the entry pathway used by filoviruses and indicate potential antiviral strategies to combat these deadly agents.

  9. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. PMID:26497555

  10. Glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 finely modulates cytokinin responses via cytokinin N-glucosylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Xin-Mei; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Hou, Bing-Kai

    2013-04-01

    Cytokinins are master regulators of plant growth and development. The glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 capable of N-glucosylation of different cytokinins at the N(7)- and N(9)-position was previously identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, but its physiological relevance in plants remains unclear. In the present work, we investigated the physiological characteristics of UGT76C1 mutant (ugt76c1) and its overexpressors. Under normal growth conditions, although ugt76c1 plants and UGT76C1 overexpressors did not display obvious phenotypic alteration, ugt76c1 plants significantly reduced the accumulation of cytokinin N-glucosides, whereas UGT76C1 overexpressors increased cytokinin N-glucosides. Unexpectedly, the concentrations of free forms of cytokinins (mainly trans-zeatin and N(6)-isopentenyladenine) were comparable to those of the wild type. Upon application of exogenous cytokinin, the mutant showed the same tendency of more sensitive cytokinin response in primary root elongation, chlorophyll retention and anthocyanin accumulation. In contrast, overexpressors showed a tendency of less sensitive cytokinin response in most tests. Furthermore, cytokinin-related genes were investigated for their expression; and the expression levels of AHK3, ARR1, CYP735A2 and LOG2 noticeably changed in ugt76c1 plants, suggesting that plants employ a set of cytokinin regulation mechanisms to coordinate the loss-of-function of UGT76C1. Tissue-specific expression of UGT76C1 showed a high level of expression in germinating seeds and young seedlings. Taken together, our data suggest that the glucosyltransferase UGT76C1 could finely modulate cytokinin responses in planta via N-glucosylation of cytokinins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Cross-sectional study of the ossification center of the C1-S5 vertebral bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpinda, Michał; Baumgart, Mariusz; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Małkowski, Bogdan; Wiśniewski, Marcin; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Króliczewski, Dariusz

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge on the normative growth of the spine is relevant in the prenatal detection of its abnormalities. This study describes the size of the ossification center of C1-S5 vertebral bodies. Using CT, digital-image analysis, and statistics, the size of the ossification center of C1-S5 vertebral bodies in 55 spontaneously aborted human fetuses aged 17-30 weeks was examined. No sex significant differences were found. The body ossification centers were found within the entire presacral spine and in 85.5 % of S1, in 76.4 % of S2, in 67.3 % of S3, in 40.0 % of S4, and in 14.5 % of S5. All the values for the atlas were sharply smaller than for the axis. The mean transverse diameter of the body ossification center gradually increased from the axis to T12 vertebra, so as to stabilize through L1-L3 vertebrae, and finally was intensively decreasing to S5 vertebra. There was a gradual increase in sagittal diameter of the body ossification center from the axis to T5 vertebra and its stabilization for T6-T9 vertebrae. Afterward, an alternate progression was observed: a decrease in values for T10-T12 vertebrae, an increase in values for L1-L2 vertebrae, and finally a decrease in values for L3-S5 vertebrae. The values of cross-sectional area of ossification centers were gradually increasing from the axis to L2 vertebra and then started decreasing to S5 vertebra. The following cross-sectional areas were approximately equivalent to each other: for L5 and T3-T5, and for S4 and C1. The volumetric growth of the body ossification center gradually increased from the axis to L3 vertebra and then sharply decreased from L4 to S5. No male-female differences are found in the size of the body ossification centers of the spine. The growth dynamics for morphometric parameters of the body ossification centers of the spine follow similarly with gestational age.

  12. 17 CFR 270.22e-2 - Pricing of redemption requests in accordance with Rule 22c-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pricing of redemption requests in accordance with Rule 22c-1. 270.22e-2 Section 270.22e-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....22e-2 Pricing of redemption requests in accordance with Rule 22c-1. An investment company shall not be...

  13. Molecular basis of hereditary C1q deficiency-revisited: identification of several novel disease-causing mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Skattum, L; Hagelberg, S

    2011-01-01

    C1q is the central pattern-recognition molecule in the classical pathway of the complement system and is known to have a key role in the crossroads between adaptive and innate immunity. Hereditary C1q deficiency is a rare genetic condition strongly associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and...

  14. Molecular basis of hereditary C1q deficiency-revisited: identification of several novel disease-causing mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Skattum, L; Hagelberg, S

    2011-01-01

    C1q is the central pattern-recognition molecule in the classical pathway of the complement system and is known to have a key role in the crossroads between adaptive and innate immunity. Hereditary C1q deficiency is a rare genetic condition strongly associated with systemic lupus erythematosus...

  15. 17 CFR 240.19c-1 - Governing certain off-board agency transactions by members of national securities exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Governing certain off-board agency transactions by members of national securities exchanges. 240.19c-1 Section 240.19c-1 Commodity... members of national securities exchanges. The rules of each national securities exchange shall provide as...

  16. Use of a C1 Inhibitor Concentrate in Adults ≥65 Years of Age with Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada; Bas, Murat

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in 'older adults' (those aged ≥65 years) has not been well studied. The international Berinert Patient Registry collected data on the use of intravenous plasma-derived, pasteurized, nanofiltered C1-inhibitor concentrate (pnfC1-INH; Berinert(®)/...

  17. International consensus on the diagnosis and management of pediatric patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, H; Martinez-Saguer, I; Bork, K

    2017-01-01

    -HAE information card and medicine for emergency use. The regulatory approval status of the drugs for prophylaxis and for acute treatment is different in each country. Plasma-derived C1-INH, recombinant C1-INH, and ecallantide are the only agents licensed for the acute treatment of pediatric patients. Clinical...

  18. Dietary cholesterol induces trafficking of intestinal Niemann-Pick Type C1 Like 1 from the brush border to endosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Tønnesen, Carina K; Hansen, Gert H

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 (NPC1L1) belongs to the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) family of cholesterol transporters and is mainly expressed in the liver and the small intestine. NPC1L1 is believed to be the main transporter responsible for the absorption of dietary cholesterol. Like...

  19. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification Pollutant Concentration range...

  20. The first report of the vanC1 gene in Enterococcus faecium isolated from a human clinical specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Sun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The vanC1 gene, which is chromosomally located, confers resistance to vancomycin and serves as a species marker for Enterococcus gallinarum. Enterococcus faecium TJ4031 was isolated from a blood culture and harbours the vanC1gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were performed to detect vanXYc and vanTc genes. Only the vanXYc gene was found in the E. faecium TJ4031 isolate. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin were 2 µg/mL and 1 µg/mL, respectively. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed that the vanC1and vanXYc genes were not expressed. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and southern hybridisation results showed that the vanC1 gene was encoded in the chromosome. E. faecalis isolated from animals has been reported to harbour vanC1gene. However, this study is the first to report the presence of the vanC1gene in E. faecium of human origin. Additionally, our research showed the vanC1gene cannot serve as a species-specific gene of E. gallinarum and that it is able to be transferred between bacteria. Although the resistance marker is not expressed in the strain, our results showed that E. faecium could acquire the vanC1gene from different species.

  1. Non-Ideal ELM Stability and Non-Axisymmetric Field Penetration Calculations with M3D-C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Chu, M. S.; Snyder, P. B.; Jardin, S. C.; Luo, X.

    2009-11-01

    Numerical studies of ELM stability and non-axisymmetric field penetration in diverted DIII-D and NSTX equilibria are presented, with resistive and finite Larmor radius effects included. These results are obtained with the nonlinear two-fluid code M3D-C1, which has recently been extended to allow linear non-axisymmetric calculations. Benchmarks of M3D-C1 with ideal codes ELITE and GATO show good agreement for the linear stability of peeling-ballooning modes in the ideal limit. New calculations of the resistive stability of ideally stable DIII-D equilibria are presented. M3D-C1 has also been used to calculate the linear response to non-axisymmetric external fields; these calculations are benchmarked with Surfmn and MARS-F. New numerical methods implemented in M3D-C1 are presented, including the treatment of boundary conditions with C^1 elements in a non-rectangular mesh.

  2. Overlapping ATP2C1 and ASTE1 Genes in Human Genome: Implications for SPCA1 Expression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Micaroni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATP2C1 gene encodes for the secretory pathway calcium (Ca2+-ATPase pump (SPCA1, which localizes along the secretory pathway, mainly in the trans-Golgi. The loss of one ATP2C1 allele causes Hailey-Hailey disease in humans but not mice. Examining differences in genomic organization between mouse and human we speculate that the overlap between ATP2C1 and ASTE1 genes only in humans could explain this different response to ATP2C1 dysregulation. We propose that ASTE1, overlapping with ATP2C1 in humans, affects alternative splicing, and potentially protein expression of the latter. If dysregulated, the composition of the SPCA1 isoform pool could diverge from the physiological status, affecting cytosolic Ca2+-signaling, and in turn perturbing cell division, leading to cell death or to neoplastic transformation.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue identifies reduced expression of complement complex C1Q Genes in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peijie; Nicholls, Laura; Assareh, Hassan; Fang, Zhiming; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Assareh, Amelia A; Voineagu, Irina

    2016-06-06

    MECP2, the gene mutated in the majority of Rett syndrome cases, is a transcriptional regulator that can activate or repress transcription. Although the transcription regulatory function of MECP2 has been known for over a decade, it remains unclear how transcriptional dysregulation leads to the neurodevelopmental disorder. Notably, little convergence was previously observed between the genes abnormally expressed in the brain of Rett syndrome mouse models and those identified in human studies. Here we carried out a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue from Rett syndrome brain using both RNA-seq and microarrays. We identified over two hundred differentially expressed genes, and identified the complement C1Q complex genes (C1QA, C1QB and C1QC) as a point of convergence between gene expression changes in human and mouse Rett syndrome brain. The results of our study support a role for alterations in the expression level of C1Q complex genes in RTT pathogenesis.

  4. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-09-30

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

  5. Traumatic posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without related fractures of C1-C2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruti Kambali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior dislocation without any associated fracture of odontoid is exceedingly rare and only 11 cases have been reported so far. A 32 year old male presented with pain, stiffness in neck, difficulty in breathing, associated lacerations on face and deformity of mandible and inability to open mouth. His plain radiographs, CT scan, MRI demonstrated a posterior dislocation of the atlas with respect of axis and a flake of bone from odontoid process on CT scan. He was successfully managed by closed reduction, C1C2 lateral mars pedicular screw stabilization and inter facetal fusion with synthetic bone graft substitute. At 10 months followup he had lost only 30° cervical rotation. The case is reported in view of rarity and to discuss the treatment rationale.

  6. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Muncrief, T

    2000-01-01

    The antigenic specificity of an unusual antinuclear antibody pattern in three patient sera was identified after separating HeLa-cell nuclear extracts by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and localizing the antigens by immunoblotting with patient serum. Protein spots were excised from the 2D...... gel and their contents were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) or nanoelectrospray ionization time-of-flight (TOF) tandem mass spectrometry (MS) after in-gel digestion with trypsin. A database search identified the proteins as the C1 and C2 heterogeneous nuclear......-separation methods and mass-spectrometric peptide mapping in combination with database searches are powerful tools in the identification of novel autoantigen specificities....

  7. Calculation of the graphene C 1 s core level binding energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Ljungberg, Mathias P.; Ayala, Paola

    2015-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with first-principles modeling is a powerful tool for determining the chemical composition and electronic structure of novel materials. Of these, graphene is an especially important model system for understanding the properties of other carbon nanomaterials. Here, we calculate the carbon 1 s core level binding energy of pristine graphene using two methods based on density functional theory total energy differences: a calculation with an explicit core-hole, and an all-electron extension of the delta self-consistent field (Δ SCF ) method. We study systematically their convergence and computational workload, and the dependence of the energies on the chosen exchange-correlation functional. The Δ SCF method is computationally more expensive, but gives consistently higher C 1 s energies. Although there is a significant functional dependence, the binding energy calculated using the PBE functional is found to be remarkably close to what has been measured for graphite.

  8. Physiological and transcriptional responses to high temperature in Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakampol, Jaruta; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Sutheeworapong, Sawannee; Chaijaruwanich, Jeerayut; Senachak, Jittisak; Siangdung, Wipawan; Jeamton, Wattana; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Paithoonrangsarid, Kalyanee

    2015-03-01

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a well-known commercial cyanobacterium that is used as a food and in feed supplements. In this study, we examined the physiological changes and whole-genome expression in A. platensis C1 exposed to high temperature. We found that photosynthetic activity was significantly decreased after the temperature was shifted from 35°C to 42°C for 2 h. A reduction in biomass production and protein content, concomitant with the accumulation of carbohydrate content, was observed after prolonged exposure to high temperatures for 24 h. Moreover, the results of the expression profiling in response to high temperature at the designated time points (8 h) revealed two distinct phases of the responses. The first was the immediate response phase, in which the transcript levels of genes involved in different mechanisms, including genes for heat shock proteins; genes involved in signal transduction and carbon and nitrogen metabolism; and genes encoding inorganic ion transporters for magnesium, nitrite and nitrate, were either transiently induced or repressed by the high temperature. In the second phase, the long-term response phase, both the induction and repression of the expression of genes with important roles in translation and photosynthesis were observed. Taken together, the results of our physiological and transcriptional studies suggest that dynamic changes in the transcriptional profiles of these thermal-responsive genes might play a role in maintaining cell homeostasis under high temperatures, as reflected in the growth and biochemical composition, particularly the protein and carbohydrate content, of A. platensis C1. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Biochemical aromatization of 2-methyleneandrostenedione: stereochemistry of hydrogen removal at the C-1 position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Handa, Wakako; Matsuzaki, Hisao

    2006-11-01

    To explore a stereochemistry of hydrogen removal at C-1 of the powerful aromatase inhibitor 2-methyleneandrostenedione (1), of which the A-ring conformation is markedly different from that of the natural substrate androstenedione (AD), in the course of the aromatase-catalyzed A-ring aromatization producing 2-methylestrone (2), we synthesized [1alpha-2H]labeled steroid 1 and its [1beta-2H]stereoisomer, and the metabolic fate of the C-1 deuterium in aromatization was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in each. Parallel experiments with the natural substrates [1alpha-2H] and [1beta-2H]ADs were also carried out. The GC-MS analysis indicated that 2-methyl estrogen 2 produced from [1alpha-2H]labeled substrate 1 retained completely the 1alpha-deuterium (1beta-H elimination), while product 2 obtained from [1beta-2H]isomer 1 lost completely the 1beta-deuterium. Stereospecific 1beta-hydrogen elimination was also observed in the parallel experiments with the labeled ADs as established previously. The results indicate that biochemical aromatization of the 2-methylene steroid 1 proceeds through the 1beta-hydrogen removal concomitant with cleavage of the C(10)-C(19) bond, yielding 1(10),4-dienone 9, in a similar manner to that involved in AD aromatization. This would give additional evidence for the stereomechanisms for the last step of aromatization of AD, requiring the stereospecific 1beta-hydrogen abstraction and cleavage of the C(10)-C(19) bond, and for the enolization of a carbonyl group at C-3 in the A-ring aromatization.

  10. Electronic Cigarette Explosion Resulting in a C1 and C2 Fracture: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norii, Tatsuya; Plate, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes have seen a drastic increase in use. A lithium-ion battery is often used as the rechargeable battery of the electronic cigarette device and has recently received much attention in terms of safety. There are several recent case reports in the scientific literature of injuries due to electronic cigarette explosions that involved soft-tissue injuries. We report a significant spinal fracture from an electronic-cigarette explosion in a 27-year-old male. The electronic cigarette exploded during use, sending the mouthpiece through the pharynx and into the first cervical vertebra and resulting in fractures of the first and second vertebrae. An x-ray study of the neck showed a foreign body in the neck at the level of C1. A computed tomography scan of the neck showed fractures of C1. The foreign body was removed in the operating room. The patient was discharged home without neurologic sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Our case report is the first case of a cervical spine injury due to the explosion of an electronic cigarette. This case demonstrates that an electronic cigarette explosion can cause potentially serious penetrating neck injury. Emergency physicians should be aware of the potential danger of electronic cigarettes and have a low threshold to obtain radiographic tests and surgical consultation in the case of electronic cigarette explosion in the oral cavity. As the use of electronic cigarettes continue to increase, it is likely that injuries associated with them will also increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Allergenicity and safety of recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor in patients with allergy to rabbit or cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Elzen, Mignon T; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Röckmann-Helmbach, Heike; van Hoffen, Els; Lebens, Ans F M; van Doorn, Helma; Klemans, Rob J B; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Hack, C Erik; Kaufman, Leonard; Relan, Anurag; Knulst, André C

    2016-08-01

    Recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) for on-demand treatment of hereditary angioedema is purified from milk of transgenic rabbits. It contains low amounts (cow's milk allergy (CMA). This study is an assessment of allergenicity and safety of rhC1INH in patients with RA and/or CMA. Patients with CMA and/or RA underwent skin prick test (SPT), intracutaneous test (ICT), and, when results for both were negative, subcutaneous (SC) challenge with up to 2100U (14 mL) rhC1INH. The negative predictive value of the skin test protocol was calculated, defined as the ratio of patients without systemic symptoms of hypersensitivity following SC challenge, over the number of patients having tested negative for both the SPT and the ICT. Adverse events after exposure to rhC1INH were recorded. Twenty-six patients with RA and/or CMA were enrolled. Twenty-four had negative SPT and ICT results for rhC1INH, whereas 2 had negative SPT result but positive ICT result to rhC1INH (only the highest concentration). Twenty-two patients with negative SPT and ICT results underwent SC challenge. None developed allergic symptoms. Local treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 7 patients (32%) after SC challenge. In 5 these were considered drug related. All were mild. None of the patients with negative SPT and ICT results for rhC1INH had allergic symptoms during rhC1INH challenge. The negative predictive value of the combination of SPT and ICT for the outcome of the SC challenge was 100% (95% CI, 84.6%-100%). SC administration of rhC1INH was well tolerated. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Os odontoideum with "free-floating" atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh; Srivastava, Arun; Rajput, Dinesh; Jain, Vijendra K

    2010-10-01

    Os odontoideum (OO) with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anterior arch-os complex displaced anteriorly relative to remnant odontoid-C2 body. The posteriorly directed hypoplastic remnant odontoid sliding below the atlas and forward translation of the C1 posterior arch caused concomitant cervicomedullary compression. During neck extension, there was retrolisthesis of the "free-floating" C1 arch-os complex into spinal canal. Spinal stenosis and lateral C1-2 facet dislocation; Klippel-Feil anomaly; and posterior circulation infarcts were also present in one patient each, respectively. Posterior C1-2 (n=10) or occipitocervical fusion (n=3) was performed in neutral position to stabilize atlantoaxial movements. Follow-up (mean, 3.9 years) assessment revealed improvement in spasticity and weakness in 13 patients. One patient had neurological deterioration following C1-2 posterior sublaminar fusion, requiring its conversion to occipitocervical contoured rod fusion. One patient with posterior circulation stroke died prior to any operative intervention. Follow-up lateral view radiographs showed a bony union or a stable construct in these 13 patients. OO with free-floating atlantal arch may precipitate cord injury both during neck flexion and extension. This condition may be overlooked unless lateral radiographs of craniovertebral junction are undertaken in neck extension, along with the usual ones in neutral and flexed positions. Etiological factors include C1 ring-OO unrestrained movements above the hypoplastic odontoid; upward pull on OO by alar and apical ligaments; lax C1-2 facet

  13. (1)H NMR-Linked Metabolomics Analysis of Liver from a Mouse Model of NP-C1 Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rodado, Victor; Nicoli, Elena-Raluca; Probert, Fay; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Wassif, Christopher A; Platt, Frances M; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-10-07

    Clinical manifestations of Niemann-Pick type C1 (NP-C1) disease include neonatal hepatosplenomegaly and in some patients progressive liver dysfunction and failure. This study involved a (1)H NMR-linked metabolomics analysis of liver samples collected from a NP-C1 disease mutant mouse model in order to explore time-dependent imbalances in metabolic pathways associated with NP-C1 liver dysfunction, including fibrosis. NP-C1 mutant (Npc1(-/-); NP-C1), control (Npc1(+/+); WT), and NP-C1 heterozygous mice (Npc1(+/-); HET) were generated from heterozygote matings. Aqueous extracts of these liver samples collected at time points of 3, 6, 9, and 11 weeks were subjected to high-resolution NMR analysis, and multivariate (MV) metabolomics analyses of data sets acquired were performed. A MV random forests (RFs) model effectively discriminated between NP-C1 and a combined WT/HET hepatic NMR profiles with very high predictive accuracy and reliability. Key distinguishing features included significant upregulations in the hepatic concentrations of phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate, lysine/ornithine, valine, threonine, and hypotaurine/methionine, and diminished levels of nicotinate/niacinamide, inosine, phosphoenolpyruvate, and 3-hydroxyphenylacetate. Quantitative pathway topological analysis confirmed that imbalances in tyrosine biosynthesis, and hepatic phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate/glutamine, and nicotinate/niacinamide metabolism were involved in the pathogenesis of NP-C1 disease-associated liver dysfunction/damage. (1)H NMR-linked metabolomics analysis provides valuable biomarker information regarding hepatic dysfunction or damage in NP-C1 disease.

  14. Chlamydomonas DYX1C1/PF23 is essential for axonemal assembly and proper morphology of inner dynein arms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Yamamoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic assembly of ciliary dyneins, a process known as preassembly, requires numerous non-dynein proteins, but the identities and functions of these proteins are not fully elucidated. Here, we show that the classical Chlamydomonas motility mutant pf23 is defective in the Chlamydomonas homolog of DYX1C1. The pf23 mutant has a 494 bp deletion in the DYX1C1 gene and expresses a shorter DYX1C1 protein in the cytoplasm. Structural analyses, using cryo-ET, reveal that pf23 axonemes lack most of the inner dynein arms. Spectral counting confirms that DYX1C1 is essential for the assembly of the majority of ciliary inner dynein arms (IDA as well as a fraction of the outer dynein arms (ODA. A C-terminal truncation of DYX1C1 shows a reduction in a subset of these ciliary IDAs. Sucrose gradients of cytoplasmic extracts show that preassembled ciliary dyneins are reduced compared to wild-type, which suggests an important role in dynein complex stability. The role of PF23/DYX1C1 remains unknown, but we suggest that DYX1C1 could provide a scaffold for macromolecular assembly.

  15. [Phylogenetic comparison between Spirulina and Arthrospira based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuemei; Wang, Suying; Dong, Shirui

    2016-02-04

    Based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene sequences, the phylogenetic relationship between Spirulina and Arthrospira were studied and compared. We amplified, sequenced and analyzed 16S rRNA and rpoC1 of 84 strains. Then the phylogenetic trees were constructed and compared. The conserved sites percentage, average G+C content and sequence identity of rpoC1 were 49.7%, 47.7%, 76%-100% respectively, significantly lower than 79.4%, 55.6% and 91%-100% of 16S rRNA, and the heterogeneity degree was higher. The trees generated with two different genes showed similar topologies and thus inferred consistent phylogenetic relationships. Eighty-four experimental strains were divided into 3 groups belonging to 2 genera: F-35 1, F-904-2, F-1070 and TJBC14 were Spirulina and the rest were Arthrospira. Although morphospecies and geographical species could not be distinguished based on 16S rRNA and rpoC1 gene sequences, the bootstrap value of rpoC1 (100%) was higher than that of 16S rRNA (99%). Moreover, clustering effect of rpoC1 for Spirulina and Arthrospirai was better than 16S rRNA. Spirulina and Arthrospira were different genera, rpoC1 gene has more advantage to distinguish the strains in the same genus than that of 16S rRNA gene.

  16. Sialic acid on the neuronal glycocalyx prevents complement C1 binding and complement receptor-3-mediated removal by microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnartz, Bettina; Kopatz, Jens; Tenner, Andrea J; Neumann, Harald

    2012-01-18

    Microglial cells are professional phagocytes of the CNS responsible for clearance of unwanted structures. Neuronal processes are marked by complement C1 before they are removed in development or during disease processes. Target molecules involved in C1 binding and mechanisms of clearance are still unclear. Here we show that the terminal sugar residue sialic acid of the mouse neuronal glycocalyx determines complement C1 binding and microglial-mediated clearance function. Several early components of the classical complement cascade including C1q, C1r, C1s, and C3 were produced by cultured mouse microglia. The opsonin C1q was binding to neurites after enzymatic removal of sialic acid residues from the neuronal glycocalyx. Desialylated neurites, but not neurites with intact sialic acid caps, were cleared and taken up by cocultured microglial cells. The removal of the desialylated neurites was mediated via the complement receptor-3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18). Data demonstrate that mouse microglial cells via CR3 recognize and remove neuronal structures with an altered neuronal glycocalyx lacking terminal sialic acid.

  17. Enzymatically Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein Is Recognized by C1q and Activates the Classical Complement Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard J. Arlaud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies suggest that the complement system is involved in atherogenesis. To further investigate this question, we have studied the ability of native and modified forms of LDL to bind and activate C1, the complex protease that triggers the classical pathway of complement. Unlike native LDL, oxidized (oxLDL and enzymatically modified (E-LDL derivatives were both recognized by the C1q subunit of C1, but only E-LDL particles, obtained by sequential treatment with a protease and then with cholesterol esterase, had the ability to trigger C1 activation. Further investigations revealed that C1q recognizes a lipid component of E-LDL. Several approaches, including reconstitution of model lipid vesicles, cosedimentation, and electron microscopy analyses, provided evidence that C1 binding to E-LDL particles is mediated by the C1q globular domain, which senses unesterified fatty acids generated by cholesterol esterase. The potential implications of these findings in atherogenesis are discussed.

  18. Nucleotide sequence of Phaseolus vulgaris L. alcohol dehydrogenase encoding cDNA and three-dimensional structure prediction of the deduced protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelia, Kassim; Khor, Chin Yin; Shah, Farida Habib; Bhore, Subhash J

    2015-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are widely consumed as a source of proteins and natural products. However, its yield needs to be increased. In line with the agenda of Phaseomics (an international consortium), work of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) generation from bean pods was initiated. Altogether, 5972 ESTs have been isolated. Alcohol dehydrogenase (AD) encoding gene cDNA was a noticeable transcript among the generated ESTs. This AD is an important enzyme; therefore, to understand more about it this study was undertaken. The objective of this study was to elucidate P. vulgaris L. AD (PvAD) gene cDNA sequence and to predict the three-dimensional (3D) structure of deduced protein. positive and negative strands of the PvAD cDNA clone were sequenced using M13 forward and M13 reverse primers to elucidate the nucleotide sequence. Deduced PvAD cDNA and protein sequence was analyzed for their basic features using online bioinformatics tools. Sequence comparison was carried out using bl2seq program, and tree-view program was used to construct a phylogenetic tree. The secondary structures and 3D structure of PvAD protein were predicted by using the PHYRE automatic fold recognition server. The sequencing results analysis showed that PvAD cDNA is 1294 bp in length. It's open reading frame encodes for a protein that contains 371 amino acids. Deduced protein sequence analysis showed the presence of putative substrate binding, catalytic Zn binding, and NAD binding sites. Results indicate that the predicted 3D structure of PvAD protein is analogous to the experimentally determined crystal structure of s-nitrosoglutathione reductase from an Arabidopsis species. The 1294 bp long PvAD cDNA encodes for 371 amino acid long protein that contains conserved domains required for biological functions of AD. The predicted deduced PvAD protein's 3D structure reflects the analogy with the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana s-nitrosoglutathione reductase. Further study is required

  19. Structure and function of complement protein C1q and its role in the development of autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Smykał-Jankowiak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Complement plays an important role in the immune system. Three different pathways of complement activation are known: the classical, alternative, and lectin dependent. They involve more than 30 serum peptides. C1q is the first subcomponent of the classical pathway of complement activation. It is composed of three types of chains, A, B, and C, which form a molecule containing 18 peptides. Each of the chains has a short amino-terminal region followed by a collagen-like region (playing a role in the activation of C1r2C1s2 and a carboxy-terminal head, which binds to immune complexes. Recent studies have shown a great number of ligands for C1q, including aggregated IgG, IgM, human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I, gp21 peptide, human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 gp21 peptide, β-amyloid, fragments of bacterial walls, apoptotic cells, and many others. However, the role of C1q is not only associated with complement activation. It also helps in the removal of immune complexes and necrotic cells, stimulates the production of some cytokines, and modulates the function of lymphocytes. Complete C1q deficiency is a rare genetic disorder. The C1q gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 1. So far, only a few mutations in C1q gene have been reported. The presence of these mutations is strongly associated with recurrent bacterial infections and the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Recent clinical studies point to the significance of anti-C1q antibodies in the diagnosis and assessment of lupus nephritis activity.

  20. Rotational and Fine Structure of Pseudo-Jahn Molecules with C_1 Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    It has been found in our previous works that rotational and fine-structure analysis of spectra involving nearly degenerate electronic states may aid in interpretation and analysis of the vibronic structure, specifically in the case of pseudo-Jahn-Teller (pJT) molecules with C_s symmetry. The spectral analysis of pJT derivatives (isopropoxy and cyclohexoxy of a prototypical JT molecule (the methoxy radical) allowed for quantitative determination of various contributions to the energy separation between the nearly degenerate electronic states, including the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) effect, the electrostatic interaction, and their zero-point energy difference. These states are coupled by SO and Coriolis interactions, which can also be determined accurately in rotational and fine structure analysis. Most recently, the spectroscopic model for rotational analysis of pJT molecules has been extended for analysis of molecules with C_1 symmetry, i.e., no symmetry. This model includes the six independently determinable components of the spin-rotation (SR) tensor and the three components of the SO and Coriolis interactions. It has been employed to simulate and fit high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of jet-cooled alkoxy radicals with C_1 symmetry, including the 2-hexoxy and the 2-pentoxy radicals, as well as previously recorded LIF spectrum of the trans-conformer (defined by its OCCC dihedral angle) of the 2-butoxy radical. Although the LIF spectra can be reproduced by using either the SR constants or SO and Coriolis constants, the latter simulation offers results that are physically more meaningful whereas the SR constants have to be regarded as effective constants. Furthermore, we will review the SO and Coriolis constants of alkoxy radicals that have been investigated, starting from the well-studied methoxy radical (CH_3O). J. Liu, D. Melnik, and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 094308 (2013) J. Liu and T. A. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11871

  1. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-09-30

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. These feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Some highlights of the results obtained during the first year of the current research contract are summarized as: (1) Terminal alkynes are an effective chain initiator for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactions, producing normal paraffins with C numbers {ge} to that of the added alkyne. (2) Significant improvement in the product distribution towards heavier hydrocarbons (C{sub 5} to C{sub 19}) was achieved in supercritical fluid (SCF) FT reactions compared to that of gas-phase reactions. (3) Xerogel and aerogel silica supported cobalt catalysts were successfully employed for FT synthesis. Selectivity for diesel range products increased with increasing Co content. (4) Silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) molecular sieve catalysts have been developed for methanol to olefin conversion, producing value-added products such as ethylene and propylene. (5) Hybrid Pt-promoted tungstated and sulfated zirconia catalysts are very effective in cracking n-C{sub 36} to jet and diesel fuel; these catalysts will be tested for cracking of FT wax. (6) Methane, ethane, and propane are readily decomposed to pure

  2. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-03-30

    Professors and graduate students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and hydrocarbon gases and liquids produced from coal. An Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report summarizes the results obtained in this program during the period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2006. The results are presented in detailed reports on 16 research projects headed by professors at each of the five CFFS Universities and an Executive Summary. Some of the highlights from these results are: (1) Small ({approx}1%) additions of acetylene or other alkynes to the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction increases its yield, causes chain initiation, and promotes oxygenate formation. (2) The addition of Mo to Fe-Cu-K/AC F-T catalysts improves catalyst lifetime and activity. (3) The use of gas phase deposition to place highly dispersed metal catalysts on silica or ceria aerogels offers promise for both the F-T and the water-gas shift WGS reactions. (4) Improved activity and selectivity are exhibited by Co F-T catalysts in supercritical hexane. (5) Binary Fe

  3. From SMART-1 D-CIXS lunar results to C1XS on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Manuel

    The D-CIXS X-ray spectrometer on SMART-1 demonstrated the potential of the technique of X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy of the Moon. We will show recent results, indicating the capabilities of the technique. The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) is a compact X-ray spectrometer for the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission, launching mid 2008. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument on ESA's SMART1 mission. By comparison with SMART-1, Chandrayaan-1 is intended as a science rather than a technology mission, leading to far more favourable conditions for science measurements. The CIXS instrument hardware is built by an international team led from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The Principal Investigator is M. Grande at the Aberystwyth University, and there is also a major science and design contribution from ISAC, ISRO, Bangalore, India; CESR, Toulouse, France provide amplifiers. The Science team is led by I A Crawford of Birkbeck College London. In order to record the incident solar X-ray flux at the Moon, a good measure of which is essential to derive absolute lunar elemental surface abundances, CIXS carries an X-ray Solar Monitor (XSM) provided by the University of Helsinki, Finland. The baseline design consists of 24 nadir pointing Swept Charge Device detectors, which provide high detection efficiency in the 1 to 7 keV range, which contains the X-ray fluorescence lines of interest. Micro-machined collimators provide a 14 degree FWHM FOV, equivalent to 25 km from 100km altitude. A deployable door protects the instrument during launch and cruise, and also provides a Fe55 calibration X-ray sources for each of the detectors. Additional refinements to the electronics, onboard software and thermal design greatly increase detector stability and signal to noise ratio compared to D-CIXS. This will result in a significantly improved energy resolution which should therefore be better than 200eV throughout the lifetime of the

  4. Self-administration of intravenous C1-inhibitor therapy for hereditary angioedema and associated quality of life benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer

    2009-01-01

    the impact of self-administered home therapy with intravenous C1-INH concentrate on QOL in patients with HAE. Nine patients experiencing frequent or severe debilitating HAE attacks were offered self-administration of C1-INH concentrate. QOL was assessed prior to and following home therapy using...... for the individual and combined components also improved significantly. No serious complications were documented during a follow-up period of 27 to 72 months. Self-administration of C1-INH improved QOL on both physical and psychological parameters. Patients were able to resume a normal life without restrictions...

  5. Measurement of the $\\eta_c (1S)$ production cross-section in proton-proton collisions via the decay $\\eta_c (1S) \\rightarrow p \\bar{p}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Graverini, Elena; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The production of the $\\eta_c (1S)$ state in proton-proton collisions is probed via its decay to the $p \\bar{p}$ final state with the LHCb detector, in the rapidity range $2.0 6.5$ GeV/c. The cross-section for prompt production of $\\eta_c (1S)$ mesons relative to the prompt $J/\\psi$ cross-section is measured, for the first time, to be $\\sigma_{\\eta_c (1S)}/\\sigma_{J/\\psi} = 1.74 \\pm 0.29 \\pm 0.28 \\pm 0.18 _{B}$ at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb$^{-1}$, and $\\sigma_{\\eta_c (1S)}/\\sigma_{J/\\psi} = 1.60 \\pm 0.29 \\pm 0.25 \\pm 0.17 _{B}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV using 2.0 fb$^{-1}$. The uncertainties quoted are, in order, statistical, systematic, and that on the ratio of branching fractions of the $\\eta_c (1S)$ and $J/\\psi$ decays to the $p \\bar{p}$ final state. In addition, the inclusive branching fraction of $b$-hadron decays into $\\eta_c (1S)$ mesons is measured, for the first time, to be $B ( b \\rightarrow \\eta_c X ) = (4.88 \\pm 0.64 \\pm ...

  6. Designing of skull defect implants using C1 rational cubic Bezier and offset curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Najihah; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Piah, Abd Rahni Mt; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    Some of the reasons to construct skull implant are due to head trauma after an accident or an injury or an infection or because of tumor invasion or when autogenous bone is not suitable for replacement after a decompressive craniectomy (DC). The main objective of our study is to develop a simple method to redesign missing parts of the skull. The procedure begins with segmentation, data approximation, and estimation process of the outer wall by a C1 continuous curve. Its offset curve is used to generate the inner wall. A metaheuristic algorithm, called harmony search (HS) is a derivative-free real parameter optimization algorithm inspired from the musical improvisation process of searching for a perfect state of harmony. In this study, data approximation by a rational cubic Bézier function uses HS to optimize position of middle points and value of the weights. All the phases contribute significantly in making our proposed technique automated. Graphical examples of several postoperative skulls are displayed to show the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  7. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 Inhibits the Peroxidase Activity of Hemoglobin and Myoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela S. Hair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin is the natural carrier of oxygen in red blood cells (RBCs. While intracellular hemoglobin provides life-sustaining oxygen transport, extracellular free hemoglobin displays toxicity due to inherent peroxidase activity generating reactive oxygen species that subsequently react with the hemoglobin molecule to produce toxic heme degradation products resulting in free radicals, oxidative stress damage, and lipid peroxidation. We have recently demonstrated that Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1 inhibits peroxidase activity of the heme-based enzyme myeloperoxidase. To elucidate whether PIC1 could inhibit peroxidase activity of hemoglobin, we evaluated the consequence of PIC1 on RBC lysates, methemoglobin, and myoglobin using tetramethylbenzidine (TMB as an oxidation target. PIC1 reversibly and dose-dependently prevented TMB oxidation to tetramethylbenzidine diimine by RBC lysates, methemoglobin, and myoglobin, having comparable activity to the inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. PIC1 inhibited TMB oxidation of RBC lysates similar to L-cysteine suggesting that the two cysteine residues contained in PIC1 may mediate peroxidase activity. PIC1 also inhibited heme destruction by NaOCl for RBC lysates, hemoglobin, and myoglobin as assayed by preservation of the Soret absorbance peak in the presence of NaOCl and reduction in free iron release. In conclusion, PIC1 inhibits peroxidase activity of hemoglobin and myoglobin likely via an antioxidant mechanism.

  8. Crambescin C1 Exerts a Cytoprotective Effect on HepG2 Cells through Metallothionein Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roel, María; Rubiolo, Juan A.; Ternon, Eva; Thomas, Olivier P.; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean marine sponge Crambe crambe is the source of two families of guanidine alkaloids known as crambescins and crambescidins. Some of the biological effects of crambescidins have been previously reported while crambescins have undergone little study. Taking this into account, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to examine the effect of crambescin-C1 (CC1) on human tumor hepatocarcinoma cells HepG2 followed by validation experiments to confirm its predicted biological activities. We report herein that, while crambescin-A1 has a minor effect on these cells, CC1 protects them against oxidative injury by means of metallothionein induction even at low concentrations. Additionally, at high doses, CC1 arrests the HepG2 cell cycle in G0/G1 and thus inhibits tumor cell proliferation. The findings presented here provide the first detailed approach regarding the different effects of crambescins on tumor cells and provide a basis for future studies on other possible cellular mechanisms related to these bioactivities. PMID:26225985

  9. Endocan: A Novel Marker of Endothelial Dysfunction in C1-Inhibitor-Deficient Hereditary Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirturk, Mustafa; Akpinar, Timur Selcuk; Kose, Murat; Gelincik, Aslı; Colakoğlu, Bahattin; Buyukozturk, Suna

    2017-10-24

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) related to C1-inhibitor deficiency is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. Vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM) are known as endothelial activation markers. Endocan (also called ESM-1) is proposed as an endothelial dysfunction indicator. We aimed to investigate endothelial activation in attack-free periods in HAE patients by measuring their levels of endocan and VCAM-1. Twenty-six HAE patients (22 female, mean age 40 ± 13 years) and 38 healthy control patients (13 female, mean age 36.9 ± 12 years) were included in the study. Peripheral blood samples were collected from HAE patients during symptom-free periods and control subjects. Endocan and VCAM-1 levels were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The median serum levels of endocan (647 ± 101 ng/mL) and VCAM-1 (500 ± 79 ng/mL) in the HAE patients were significantly higher than in the control patients (391 ± 41 and 325 ± 4; p < 0.001 for both). The increased endocan and VCAM-1 levels may reflect an endothelial activation even in attack-free periods in HAE patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Cytochrome c1 in ductal carcinoma in situ of breast associated with proliferation and comedo necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishiki, Mayuko; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Sato, Ai; Miki, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuta; Ebata, Akiko; Shibahara, Yukiko; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Takanori; Sasano, Hironobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that comedo necrosis is closely associated with an aggressive phenotype of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of human breast, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Therefore, in this study, we first examined the gene expression profile of comedo DCIS based on microarray data and identified CYC1 as a gene associated with comedo necrosis. Cytochrome c1 (CYC1) is a subunit of complex III in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation that is involved in energy production. However, the significance of CYC1 has not yet been examined in DCIS. We therefore immunolocalized CYC1 in 47 DCIS cases. CYC1 immunoreactivity was detected in 40% of DCIS cases, and the immunohistochemical CYC1 status was significantly associated with tumor size, nuclear grade, comedo necrosis, van Nuys classification, and Ki-67 labeling index. Subsequent in vitro studies indicated that CYC1 was significantly associated with mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF10DCIS.com DCIS cells. Moreover, CYC1 significantly promoted proliferation activity of MCF10DCIS.com cells and the cells transfected with CYC1 siRNA decreased pro-apoptotic caspase 3 activity under hypoxic or anoxic conditions. Considering that the center of DCIS is poorly oxygenated, these results indicate that CYC1 plays important roles in cell proliferation and comedo necrosis through the elevated oxidative phosphorylation activity in human DCIS. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Crossing the c=1 barrier in 2D Lorentzian quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K.; Loll, R.

    2000-02-01

    In an extension of earlier work we investigate the behavior of two-dimensional (2D) Lorentzian quantum gravity under coupling to a conformal field theory with c>1. This is done by analyzing numerically a system of eight Ising models (corresponding to c=4) coupled to dynamically triangulated Lorentzian geometries. It is known that a single Ising model couples weakly to Lorentzian quantum gravity, in the sense that the Hausdorff dimension of the ensemble of two-geometries is two (as in pure Lorentzian quantum gravity) and the matter behavior is governed by the Onsager exponents. By increasing the amount of matter to eight Ising models, we find that the geometry of the combined system has undergone a phase transition. The new phase is characterized by an anomalous scaling of spatial length relative to proper time at large distances, and as a consequence the Hausdorff dimension is now three. In spite of this qualitative change in the geometric sector, and a very strong interaction between matter and geometry, the critical exponents of the Ising model retain their Onsager values. This provides evidence for the conjecture that the KPZ values of the critical exponents in 2D Euclidean quantum gravity are entirely due to the presence of baby universes. Lastly, we summarize the lessons learned so far from 2D Lorentzian quantum gravity.

  12. Toward the synthesis of spirastrellolide A: construction of two C1-C25 diastereomers containing the BC-spiroacetal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Ian; Anderson, Edward A; Dalby, Stephen M; Loiseleur, Olivier

    2005-09-15

    [reaction: see text] Stereo-controlled syntheses of two possible C1-C25 diastereomers of spirastrellolide A containing the cis-disubstituted tetrahydropyran and [6,6]-spiroacetal are reported, exploiting boron-mediated asymmetric aldol and allylation methodology.

  13. Tetrafibricin: synthesis of the C1-C13, C15-C25, and C27-C40 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BouzBouz, Samir; Cossy, Janine

    2004-09-30

    [structure: see text] A sequence of chemoselective cross-metathesis reactions and enantioselective allyltitanations of aldehydes has been used to prepare the C1-C13, C15-C26, and C27-C40 fragments of tetrafibricin.

  14. Epigenetic Regulation of Placental NR3C1: Mechanism Underlying Prenatal Programming of Infant Neurobehavior by Maternal Smoking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Laura R; Papandonatos, George D; Salisbury, Amy L; Phipps, Maureen G; Huestis, Marilyn A; Niaura, Raymond; Padbury, James F; Marsit, Carmen J; Lester, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of the placental glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) was investigated as a mechanism underlying links between maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) and infant neurobehavior in 45 mother-infant pairs (49% MSDP-exposed; 52% minorities; ages 18-35). The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Network Neurobehavioral Scale was administered 7 times over the 1st postnatal month; methylation of placental NR3C1 was assessed via bisulfite pyrosequencing. Increased placental NR3C1 methylation was associated with increased infant attention and self-regulation, and decreased lethargy and need for examiner soothing over the 1st postnatal month. A causal steps approach revealed that NR3C1 methylation and MSDP were independently associated with lethargic behavior. Although preliminary, results highlight the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in elucidating pathways to neurobehavioral alterations from MSDP. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  15. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event—the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids—as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches. PMID:26821048

  16. Evolutionary Steps in the Emergence of Life Deduced from the Bottom-Up Approach and GADV Hypothesis (Top-Down Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Ikehara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is no doubt quite difficult to solve the riddle of the origin of life. So, firstly, I would like to point out the kinds of obstacles there are in solving this riddle and how we should tackle these difficult problems, reviewing the studies that have been conducted so far. After that, I will propose that the consecutive evolutionary steps in a timeline can be rationally deduced by using a common event as a juncture, which is obtained by two counter-directional approaches: one is the bottom-up approach through which many researchers have studied the origin of life, and the other is the top-down approach, through which I established the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis or GADV hypothesis on the origin of life starting from a study on the formation of entirely new genes in extant microorganisms. Last, I will describe the probable evolutionary process from the formation of Earth to the emergence of life, which was deduced by using a common event—the establishment of the first genetic code encoding [GADV]-amino acids—as a juncture for the results obtained from the two approaches.

  17. Is the A-Chain the Engine That Drives the Diversity of C1q Functions? Revisiting Its Unique Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane Ghebrehiwet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The immunopathological functions associated with human C1q are still growing in terms of novelty, diversity, and pathologic relevance. It is, therefore, not surprising that C1q is being recognized as an important molecular bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. The secret of this functional diversity, in turn, resides in the elegant but complex structure of the C1q molecule, which is assembled from three distinct gene products: A, B, and C, each of which has evolved from a separate and unique ancestral gene template. The C1q molecule is made up of 6A, 6B, and 6C polypeptide chains, which are held together through strong covalent and non-covalent bonds to form the 18-chain, bouquet-of-flower-like protein that we know today. The assembled C1q protein displays at least two distinct structural and functional regions: the collagen-like region (cC1q and the globular head region (gC1q, each being capable of driving a diverse range of ligand- or receptor-mediated biological functions. What is most intriguing, however, is the observation that most of the functions appear to be predominantly driven by the A-chain of the molecule, which begs the question: what are the evolutionary modifications or rearrangements that singularly shaped the primordial A-chain gene to become a pluripotent and versatile component of the intact C1q molecule? Here, we revisit and discuss some of the known unique structural and functional features of the A-chain, which may have contributed to its versatility.

  18. Methylation of NR3C1 and SLC6A4 and internalizing problems. The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Knaap, Lisette J; van Oort, Floor V A; Verhulst, Frank C; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Riese, Harriëtte

    2015-07-15

    The relationship between early adverse life events and later internalizing problems could be mediated by DNA methylation. Adversity has been associated with higher methylation levels in the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) and the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) in adolescents. We investigated cross-sectional and prospective associations of NR3C1 and SLC6A4 methylation with adolescents׳ clinical diagnoses of internalizing disorders and internalizing symptom scores. In a population sample (mean age=16.2) we measured DNA methylation in three regions of NR3C1 (NR3C1_1, N=454; NR3C1_2, N=904; NR3C1_3, N=412) and one region of SLC6A4 (N=939) at baseline. Internalizing problems were operationalized as clinical DSM-IV diagnoses, assessed at 3 year follow-up with a diagnostic interview, and internalizing symptom scores, assessed with Self-Report questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Only NR3C1_1 methylation was positively associated with risk of lifetime internalizing disorders, and with symptom scores at follow-up. However, after accounting for baseline symptom scores there was only a tendency for association with internalizing symptom scores at follow-up. There was no association between SLC6A4 methylation and risk of lifetime internalizing disorders. SLC6A4 methylation and internalizing symptom scores showed a tendency for association, also after accounting for baseline symptom scores. There was no repeated measure of DNA methylation to study causality between methylation and internalizing problems. Gene expression data were not available. Although the role of gene methylation in the development of internalizing problems remains unclear, our findings suggest that gene methylation, particularly of NR3C1, may be involved in the development of internalizing problems in adolescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlation of Serum Soluble Interleukin-7 Receptor and Anti-C1q Antibody in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Serum concentrations of soluble interleukin-7 receptor (sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibody have recently been identified as unique serological markers for lupus nephritis (LN in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In this study, we evaluated the correlation of serum sIL-7R and anti-C1q in SLE patients. Methods. Sera from 134 patients with SLE and 84 healthy cohorts were tested for levels of sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies in terms of ELISA. Correlations of the sIL-7R and anti-C1q autoantibodies were evaluated. Results. The serum concentrations of sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies were significantly higher in SLE patients and LN patients in comparison with healthy individuals/controls and SLE patients with non-LN, respectively. In addition, both sIL-7R and anti-C1q concentrations were found to significantly correlate with the SLE disease activity as evaluated by SLEDAI scores. Interestingly, the serum sIL-7R concentration was strongly correlated with the level of anti-C1q antibodies (r=0.2871, p=0.0008 but not statistically correlated with other serological markers, including the anti-dsDNA and complements C3 and C4 concentrations in SLE patients. Conclusion. Both serum sIL-7R and anti-C1q antibodies were strongly associated with disease activity and LN in SLE patients, suggesting that they may be reliable serological markers for identification of SLE patients with active diseases and LN.

  20. Distinctive regulation of contact activation by antithrombin and C1-inhibitor on activated platelets and material surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Jennie; Lang, Markus Huber; Elgue, Graciela; Kalbitz, Miriam; Sanchez, Javier; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Nilsson, Bo

    2009-12-01

    Activated human plate lets trigger FXII-mediated contact activation, which leads to the generation of FXIIa-antithrombin (AT) and FXIa-AT complexes. This suggests that contact activation takes place at different sites, on activated platelets and material surfaces, during therapeutic procedures involving biomaterials in contact with blood and is differentially regulated. Here we show that activation in platelet-poor plasma, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and whole blood induced by glass, kaolin, and polyphosphate elicited high levels of FXIIa-C1-inhibitor (C1INH), low levels of FXIa-C1INH and KK-C1INH, and almost no AT complexes. Platelet activation, in both PRP and blood, led to the formation of FXIIa-AT, FXIa-AT, and kallikrein (KK)-AT but almost no C1INH complexes. In severe trauma patients, FXIIa-AT and FXIa-AT were correlated with the release of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) from activated platelets. In contrast, FXIIa-C1INH complexes were detected when the FXIIa-AT levels were low. No correlations were found between FXIIa-C1INH and FXIIa-AT or TSP-1. Inhibition of FXIIa on material surfaces was also shown to affect the function of aggregating platelets. In conclusion, formation of FXIIa-AT and FXIIa-C1INH complexes can help to distinguish between contact activation triggered by biomaterial surfaces and by activated platelets. Platelet aggregation studies also demonstrated that platelet function is influenced by material surface-mediated contact activation and that generation of FXIIa-AT complexes may serve as a new biomarker for thrombotic reactions during therapeutic procedures employing biomaterial devices.

  1. Os odontoideum with ?free-floating? atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression

    OpenAIRE

    Behari Sanjay; Jaiswal Awadhesh; Srivastava Arun; Rajput Dinesh; Jain Vijendra

    2010-01-01

    Background: Os odontoideum (OO) with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anter...

  2. Deviation analysis for C1/2 pedicle screw placement using a three-dimensional printed drilling guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinghuo; Liu, Rong; Yu, Jie; Lu, Lin; Yang, Cao; Shao, Zengwu; Ye, Zhewei

    2017-06-01

    Cervical transarticular fixation is a technically demanding procedure. This study aimed to develop a safer and more accurate method for C1/2 pedicle screw placement using a three-dimensional printed drilling guide. A total of 20 patients with C1/2 fractures and dislocations were recruited, and their computed tomography scans were evaluated. Under the assistance of the three-dimensional printed drilling guide, bilateral C1/2 pedicle screws were successfully placed in the three-dimensional C1/2 models. Then, sagittal and axial computed tomography scans were obtained, and the accuracy and safety of screw placement were evaluated based on X-Y-Z axis setup. The average depths for C1 and C2 pedicle screws were 30.1 ± 1.12 and 31.81 ± 0.85 mm on the left side and 29.54 ± 1.01 and 31.35 ± 0.27 mm on the right side, respectively. The average dimensional parameters for C1/C2 pedicle screw of both sides were measured and analyzed, which showed no statistically significant differences in the ideal and the actual entry points, inclined angles, and tailed angles. The method of developing a three-dimensional printed drilling guide is an easy and safe technique. This novel technique is applicable for C1/2 pedicle screw fixation; the potential use of the three-dimensional printed guide to place C1/2 pedicle screw is promising.

  3. Suppressing ABA uridine diphosphate glucosyltransferase (SlUGT75C1) alters fruit ripening and the stress response in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yufei; Ji, Kai; Liang, Bin; Du, Yangwei; Jiang, Li; Wang, Juan; Kai, Wenbin; Zhang, Yushu; Zhai, Xiawan; Chen, Pei; Wang, Hongqing; Leng, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) glucose conjugation mediated by uridine diphosphate glucosyltransferases (UGTs) is an important pathway in regulating ABA homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated three tomato SlUGTs that are highly expressed in fruit during ripening, and these SlUGTs were localized to the cytoplasm and cell nucleus. Among these three UGTs, SlUGT75C1 catalyzes the glucosylation of both ABA and IAA in vitro; SlUGT76E1 can only catalyze the conjugation of ABA; and SlUGT73C4 cannot glycosylate either ABA or IAA. Therefore, SlUGT75C1 was selected for further investigation. SlUGT75C1 RNA interference significantly up-regulated the expression level of SlCYP707A2, which encodes an ABA 8'-hydroxylase but did not affect the expression of SlNCED1, which encodes a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis. Suppression of SlUGT75C1 significantly accelerated fruit ripening by enhancing ABA levels and promoting the early release of ethylene. SlUGT75C1-RNAi altered the expression of fruit ripening genes (genes involved in ethylene release and cell wall catabolism). SlUGT75C1-RNAi seeds showed delayed germination and root growth compared with wild-type as well as increased sensitivity to exogenous ABA. SlUGT75C1-RNAi plants were also more resistant to drought stress. These results demonstrated that SlUGT75C1 plays a crucial role in ABA-mediated fruit ripening, seed germination, and drought responses in tomato. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Deficits in learning and memory in mice with a mutation of the candidate dyslexia susceptibility gene Dyx1c1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendall, Amanda R; Tarkar, Aarti; Contreras-Mora, Hector M; LoTurco, Joseph J; Fitch, R Holly

    2017-09-01

    Dyslexia is a learning disability characterized by difficulty learning to read and write. The underlying biological and genetic etiology remains poorly understood. One candidate gene, dyslexia susceptibility 1 candidate 1 (DYX1C1), has been shown to be associated with deficits in short-term memory in dyslexic populations. The purpose of the current study was to examine the behavioral phenotype of a mouse model with a homozygous conditional (forebrain) knockout of the rodent homolog Dyx1c1. Twelve Dyx1c1 conditional homozygous knockouts, 7 Dyx1c1 conditional heterozygous knockouts and 6 wild-type controls were behaviorally assessed. Mice with the homozygous Dyx1c1 knockout showed deficits on memory and learning, but not on auditory or motor tasks. These findings affirm existing evidence that DYX1C1 may play an underlying role in the development of neural systems important to learning and memory, and disruption of this function could contribute to the learning deficits seen in individuals with dyslexia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PAM-Dependent Target DNA Recognition and Cleavage by C2c1 CRISPR-Cas Endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui; Gao, Pu; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC); (Cornell); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2016-12-01

    C2c1 is a newly identified guide RNA-mediated type V-B CRISPR-Cas endonuclease that site-specifically targets and cleaves both strands of target DNA. We have determined crystal structures of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris C2c1 (AacC2c1) bound to sgRNA as a binary complex and to target DNAs as ternary complexes, thereby capturing catalytically competent conformations of AacC2c1 with both target and non-target DNA strands independently positioned within a single RuvC catalytic pocket. Moreover, C2c1-mediated cleavage results in a staggered seven-nucleotide break of target DNA. crRNA adopts a pre-ordered five-nucleotide A-form seed sequence in the binary complex, with release of an inserted tryptophan, facilitating zippering up of 20-bp guide RNA:target DNA heteroduplex on ternary complex formation. Notably, the PAM-interacting cleft adopts a “locked” conformation on ternary complex formation. Structural comparison of C2c1 ternary complexes with their Cas9 and Cpf1 counterparts highlights the diverse mechanisms adopted by these distinct CRISPR-Cas systems, thereby broadening and enhancing their applicability as genome editing tools.

  6. Successful C1 inhibitor short-term prophylaxis during redo mitral valve replacement in a patient with hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Suzanne

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema is characterized by sudden episodes of nonpitting edema that cause discomfort and pain. Typically the extremities, genitalia, trunk, gastrointestinal tract, face, and larynx are affected by attacks of swelling. Laryngeal swelling carries significant risk for asphyxiation. The disease results from mutations in the C1 esterase inhibitor gene that cause C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency. Attacks of hereditary angioedema result from contact, complement, and fibrinolytic plasma cascade activation, where C1 esterase inhibitor irreversibly binds substrates. Patients with hereditary angioedema cannot replenish C1 esterase inhibitor levels on pace with its binding. When C1 esterase inhibitor is depleted in these patients, vasoactive plasma cascade products cause swelling attacks. Trauma is a known trigger for hereditary angioedema attacks, and patients have been denied surgical procedures because of this risk. However, uncomplicated surgeries have been reported. Appropriate prophylaxis can reduce peri-operative morbidity in these patients, despite proteolytic cascade and complement activation during surgical trauma. We report a case of successful short-term prophylaxis with C1 esterase inhibitor in a 51-year-old man with hereditary angioedema who underwent redo mitral valve reconstructive surgery.

  7. Aerosol retrieval for second global imager on GCOM-C1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo; Nakata, Makiko

    2017-04-01

    The second global imager (SGLI) on global change observation mission - 1st climate satellite (GCOM-C1) will be launched in December of 2017 as a part of Japanese GCOM project. In addition, GCOM-W has already been launched in 2012. The SGLI is an imager which measures Earth's reflectance's from near ultra violet (NUV) to thermal infrared (TIR) for estimation of physical parameters of atmosphere, land and ocean. It can be pointed out that unique features of SGLI are as follows; 1) high resolution imager provides us 250 m resolution dataset from NUV to near infrared (NIR) wavelengths, 2) polarization information (I, Q, and U as Stokes components) are available at two wavelengths (red and NIR) with 45 degrees forward or backward tilting along satellite tracking direction. Note that the resolution of polarization channels is 1 km x 1 km at nadir. This work introduces current status of aerosol retrieval algorithm for SGLI. Here we use the two set of stokes components (Q and U) at red and near infrared for polarization information as well as total reflectance at blue channel for aerosol retrieval. It is still difficult to retrieve variety of the aerosol properties simultaneously. We propose appropriate aerosol size distribution model which is based on compiled results of world wide NASA/AERONET observations. The proposed aerosol size distribution can reduce the number of unknown parameters. The values of complex refractive index of aerosols show weak dependence on wavelength for visible range, and hence it is assumed to be ranged from the value of 1.4 as transparent particles to the absorbing one as 1.60 - 0.02i. Further the reflectance of land surface should be taken into account. As a result, the aerosol properties obtained from the satellite data, radiation simulation and ground measurements are investigated.

  8. Magnetic properties of the charged Anderson-Brinkman-Morel state: Absence of H sub c 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, T. (Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-22-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106, Japan (JP))

    1991-03-01

    Magnetic properties of the charged Anderson-Brinkman-Morel state are investigated theoretically as a special case of time-reversal-symmetry-breaking superconductivity. The magnetic field is expressed as a superposition of the one from the supercurrent {bold j}{sup {ital s}}({bold r}) and that from the magnetic moment l({bold r}) due to the internal motion of each Cooper pair. This procedure enables us to get rid of the paradox in zero external field that the moments are ordered (l=const) with no magnetic field nor supercurrent, leading to a natural conclusion that there is indeed a field due to l({bold r}) which is screened almost completely by {bold j}{sup {ital s}}({bold r}). If the system size is large enough compared with the penetration depth, the direction l({bold r}) changes gradually toward the surface and the current {bold j}{sup {ital s}}({bold r}) flows over the bulk. This means that the system is essentially nonuniform and forms a coreless vortex in zero external field. As for the magnetization process, the lattice of coreless vortices grows from the infinitesimal external field without {ital H}{sub {ital c}1} (i.e., no Meissner state), which is subsequently followed by the first-order transition to the lattice with cores. Finally, the transition to the normal state occurs at {ital H}{sub {ital c}2} enhanced over that of the conventional type-II superconductor due to the field l. An example of the magnetization curve is also given.

  9. Characterization of the T-cell response to Dau c 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in carrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulehner, N; Nagl, B; Briza, P; Roulias, A; Ballmer-Weber, B; Zlabinger, G J; Ferreira, F; Bohle, B

    2017-02-01

    In contrast to other Bet v 1-related food allergens, the major carrot allergen, Dau c 1, has been suggested to induce food allergy independently from Bet v 1. As T cells are crucial in the sensitization process, we sought to characterize the T-cell response to Dau c 1 and its cross-reactivity with Bet v 1. Dau c 1-specific T-cell lines (TCL) and clones (TCC) established from PBMC of birch pollen-allergic patients with carrot allergy were analyzed for reactivity to Bet v 1, epitope specificity, allergen-induced cytokine secretion, and expression of integrins α4β7 and α4β1, critical for gut and lung homing, respectively. mRNA expression of GATA3 and Tbet was analyzed in sorted CD3+ CD4+ CFSElow cells proliferating upon stimulation of PBMC with Dau c 1 or Bet v 1. Dau c 1 was incubated with endolysosomal proteases, and the resulting fragments were identified by mass spectrometry. Among 14 distinct T-cell-activating regions, Dau c 1139-153 was recognized by 55% of the patients. Only 6 of 15 (40%) Dau c 1-specific TCL and 9 of 21 (43%) TCC reacted with Bet v 1. Bet v 1-nonreactive TCC were mainly Th1-like and showed a higher expression of the integrin β7 and a significantly lower expression of the integrin β1 than Bet v 1-positive TCC. A Th1-like response was also detected in Dau c 1-reactive CD3+ CD4+ CFSElow cells. Full-length Dau c 1 was still detectable after 48 h of endolysosomal degradation. Proteolytic fragments of Dau c 1 matched its T-cell-activating regions. Dau c 1 displays several characteristics of sensitizing allergens, namely a major T-cell-activating region, low susceptibility to endolysosomal degradation, and induction of a Bet v 1-independent T-cell response. These cellular insights confirm that the major carrot allergen has a special status among Bet v 1-related food allergens. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Os odontoideum with “free-floating” atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh; Srivastava, Arun; Rajput, Dinesh; Jain, Vijendra K

    2010-01-01

    Background: Os odontoideum (OO) with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anterior arch-os complex displaced anteriorly relative to remnant odontoid-C2 body. The posteriorly directed hypoplastic remnant odontoid sliding below the atlas and forward translation of the C1 posterior arch caused concomitant cervicomedullary compression. During neck extension, there was retrolisthesis of the “free-floating” C1 arch-os complex into spinal canal. Spinal stenosis and lateral C1-2 facet dislocation; Klippel-Feil anomaly; and posterior circulation infarcts were also present in one patient each, respectively. Posterior C1-2 (n=10) or occipitocervical fusion (n=3) was performed in neutral position to stabilize atlantoaxial movements. Results: Follow-up (mean, 3.9 years) assessment revealed improvement in spasticity and weakness in 13 patients. One patient had neurological deterioration following C1-2 posterior sublaminar fusion, requiring its conversion to occipitocervical contoured rod fusion. One patient with posterior circulation stroke died prior to any operative intervention. Follow-up lateral view radiographs showed a bony union or a stable construct in these 13 patients. Conclusions: OO with free-floating atlantal arch may precipitate cord injury both during neck flexion and extension. This condition may be overlooked unless lateral radiographs of craniovertebral junction are undertaken in neck extension, along with the usual ones in neutral and flexed positions. Etiological factors include C1 ring-OO unrestrained movements above the hypoplastic odontoid

  11. Os odontoideum with "free-floating" atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behari Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Os odontoideum (OO with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anterior arch-os complex displaced anteriorly relative to remnant odontoid-C2 body. The posteriorly directed hypoplastic remnant odontoid sliding below the atlas and forward translation of the C1 posterior arch caused concomitant cervicomedullary compression. During neck extension, there was retrolisthesis of the "free-floating" C1 arch-os complex into spinal canal. Spinal stenosis and lateral C1-2 facet dislocation; Klippel-Feil anomaly; and posterior circulation infarcts were also present in one patient each, respectively. Posterior C1-2 (n=10 or occipitocervical fusion (n=3 was performed in neutral position to stabilize atlantoaxial movements. Results: Follow-up (mean, 3.9 years assessment revealed improvement in spasticity and weakness in 13 patients. One patient had neurological deterioration following C1-2 posterior sublaminar fusion, requiring its conversion to occipitocervical contoured rod fusion. One patient with posterior circulation stroke died prior to any operative intervention. Follow-up lateral view radiographs showed a bony union or a stable construct in these 13 patients. Conclusions: OO with free-floating atlantal arch may precipitate cord injury both during neck flexion and extension. This condition may be overlooked unless lateral radiographs of craniovertebral junction are undertaken in neck extension, along with the usual ones in neutral and flexed positions. Etiological factors include C1 ring-OO unrestrained movements above the hypoplastic

  12. Complement factors C1q, C3 and C5 in brain and serum of mice with cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helbok Raimund

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patho-mechanisms leading to brain damage due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Immune-mediated and ischaemic mechanisms have been implicated. The role of complement factors C1q, C3 and C5 for the pathogenesis of CM were investigated in this study. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. The clinical severity of the disease was assessed by a battery of 40 standardized tests for evaluating neurological functions in mice. Brain homogenates and sera of mice with CM, infected animals without CM and non-infected control animals were analyzed for C1q, C3 and C5 up-regulation by Western blotting. Results Densitometric analysis of Western blots of brain homogenates yielded statistically significant differences in the levels of C1q and C5 in the analyzed groups. Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant association of C1q and C5 levels with the clinical severity of the disease. More severely affected animals showed higher levels of C1q and C5. No differences in complement levels were observed between frontal and caudal parts of the brain. Densitometric analysis of Western blot of sera yielded statistically lower levels of C1q in infected animals without CM compared to animals of the control group. Conclusion The current study provides direct evidence for up-regulation of complement factors C1q and C5 in the brains of animals with CM. Local complement up-regulation is a possible mechanism for brain damage in experimental cerebral malaria.

  13. Research on simulation calculation method of biomechanical characteristics of C1-3 motion segment damage mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Ju-ying

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To develop the finite element model (FEM of cervical spinal C1-3 motion segment, and to make biomechanical finite element analysis (FEA on C1-3 motion segment and thus simulate the biomechanical characteristics of C1-3 motion segment in distraction violence, compression violence, hyperextension violence and hyperflexion violence. Methods According to CT radiological data of a healthy adult, the vertebrae and intervertebral discs of cervical spinal C1-3 motion segment were respectively reconstructed by Mimics 10.01 software and Geomagic 10.0 software. The FEM of C1-3 motion segment was reconstructed by attaching the corresponding material properties of cervical spine in Ansys software. The biomechanical characteristics of cervical spinal C1-3 motion segment model were simulated under the 4 loadings of distraction violence, compression violence, hyperextension violence and hyperflexion violence by finite element method. Results In the loading of longitudinal stretch, the stress was relatively concentrated in the anterior arch of atlas, atlantoaxial joint and C3 lamina and spinous process. In the longitudinal compressive loads, the maximum stress of the upper cervical spine was located in the anterior arch of atlas. In the loading of hyperextension moment, the stress was larger in the massa lateralis atlantis, the lateral and posterior arch junction of atlas, the posterior arch nodules of the atlas, superior articular surface of axis and C2 isthmus. In the loading of hyperflexion moment, the stress was relatively concentrated in the odontoid process of axis, the posterior arch of atlas, the posterior arch nodules of atlas, C2 isthmic and C2 inferior articular process. Conclusion Finite element biomechanical testing of C1-3 motion segment can predict the biomechanical mechanism of upper cervical spine injury.

  14. Expression of CYP1C1 and CYP1A in Fundulus heteroclitus during PAH-induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lu [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States); Camus, Alvin C. [Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Dong, Wu; Thornton, Cammi [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States); Willett, Kristine L., E-mail: kwillett@olemiss.edu [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    2010-09-15

    CYP1C1 is a relatively newly identified member of the cytochrome P450 family 1 in teleost fish. However, CYP1C1's expression and physiological roles relative to the more recognized CYP1A in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) induced toxicities are unclear. Fundulus heteroclitus fry were exposed at 6-8 days post-hatch (dph) and again at 13-15 dph for 6 h to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) control, 5 mg/L benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), or 5 mg/L dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA). Fry were euthanized at 0, 6, 18, 24 and 30 h after the second exposure. In these groups, both CYP1A and CYP1C1 protein expression were induced within 6 h after the second exposure. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results from fry revealed strongest CYP1C1 expression in renal tubular and intestinal epithelial cells. Additional fish were examined for liver lesions 8 months after initial exposure. Gross lesions were observed in 20% of the BaP and 35% of the DMBA-treated fish livers. Histopathologic findings included foci of cellular alteration and neoplasms, including hepatocellular adenoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangioma. Strong CYP1A immunostaining was detected diffusely in altered cell foci and on the invading margin of hepatocelluar carcinomas. Lower CYP1A expression was seen in central regions of the neoplasms. In contrast, CYP1C1 was only detectable and highly expressed in proliferated bile duct epithelial cells. Our CYP1C1 results suggest the potential for tissue specific CYP1C1-mediated PAH metabolism but not a more chronic role in progression to liver hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. PhaM Is the Physiological Activator of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) Synthase (PhaC1) in Ralstonia eutropha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthase (PhaC1) is the key enzyme of PHB synthesis in Ralstonia eutropha and other PHB-accumulating bacteria and catalyzes the polymerization of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to PHB. Activity assays of R. eutropha PHB synthase are characterized by the presence of lag phases and by low specific activity. It is assumed that the lag phase is caused by the time necessary to convert the inactive PhaC1 monomer into the active dimeric form by an unknown priming process. The lag phase can be reduced by addition of nonionic detergents such as hecameg [6-O-(N-heptyl-carbamoyl)-methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside], which apparently accelerates the formation of PhaC1 dimers. We identified the PHB granule-associated protein (PGAP) PhaM as the natural primer (activator) of PHB synthase activity. PhaM was recently discovered as a novel type of PGAP with multiple functions in PHB metabolism. Addition of PhaM to PHB synthase assays resulted in immediate polymerization of 3HB coenzyme A with high specific activity and without a significant lag phase. The effect of PhaM on (i) PhaC1 activity, (ii) oligomerization of PhaC1, (iii) complex formation with PhaC1, and (iv) PHB granule formation in vitro and in vivo was shown by cross-linking experiments of purified proteins (PhaM, PhaC1) with glutardialdehyde, by size exclusion chromatography, and by fluorescence microscopic detection of de novo-synthesized PHB granules. PMID:24212577

  16. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of Comet Austin (1989c1) using a two-dimensional diode array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahnow, David James

    A two-dimensional, photon-counting intensified photodiode array detector has been constructed and successfully tested in the laboratory and on a spectrograph in three sounding rocket flights. The detector is an extension of the one-dimensional intensified diode array detector used in the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. Extensive laboratory measurements have shown that it can successfully centroid with sub-diode resolution, and can be used in place of ranicon detectors to measure the spectra of faint objects. The instrument successfully obtained long slit far-ultraviolet spectra (1250-1850 A) of Comet Austin (1989 c1) on 21 April 1990. Emissions of OI, CI, SI and CO were detected during the 270 seconds of data acquisition. The spectral resolution was 5.5 A, while the spatial resolution was limited by pointing jitter to approximately 30 arcseconds. The spatial profiles of the carbon and oxygen emissions show narrow enhancements which are suggestive of a cometary outburst which occurred 15-20 hours before the observation. The overall shape of the atomic carbon profile is similar to those measured during two observations of Comet Halley (1986 III), and is similarly incompatible with photodissociation of CO as its primary source, as determined by model calculations. The CO profile, however, is consistent with that of a parent molecule evaporating directly from the nucleus, with a production rate of 4 plus or minus 1 x 1027 molecules s-1. The O I lambda 1304 emission, also similar in spatial shape to that detected in Halley, includes a contribution due to Bowen fluorescence induced by solar HI Lyman-beta, and its profile can be understood as that due to the photodissociation of H2O, with a production rate of 6.2 plus or minus 0.3 x 1028 molecules s-1, giving an abundance of CO relative to water of 6.5 percent. Spatial profiles of SI lambda 1814 were also obtained, with profiles attributable to that of a daughter product of short-lived species such as CS2 and H2S.

  17. Covalent binding of quinones activates the Ah receptor in Hepa1c1c7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Yumi; Puga, Alvaro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    Highly reactive quinone species produced by photooxidation and/or metabolic activation of mono- or bi-aromatic hydrocarbons modulate cellular homeostasis and electrophilic signal transduction pathways through the covalent modification of proteins. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but not mono- or bi-aromatic hydrocarbons, are well recognized as ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). However, quinone species produced from mono- and bi-aromatic hydrocarbons could potentially cause AhR activation. To clarify the AhR response to mono- and bi-aromatic hydrocarbon quinones, we studied Cyp1a1 (cytochrome P450 1A1) induction and AhR activation by these quinones. We detected Cyp1a1 induction during treatment with quinones in Hepa1c1c7 cells, but not their parent compounds. Nine of the twelve quinones with covalent binding capability for proteins induced Cyp1a1. Cyp1a1 induction mediated by 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ), 1,4-NQ, 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ) and tert-butyl-1,4-BQ was suppressed by a specific AhR inhibitor and was not observed in c35 cells, which do not have a functional AhR. These quinones stimulated AhR nuclear translocation and interaction with the AhR nuclear translocator. Interestingly, 1,2-NQ covalently modified AhR, which was detected by an immunoprecipitation assay using a specific antibody against 1,2-NQ, resulting in enhancement of xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-derived luciferase activity and binding of AhR to the Cyp1a1 promoter region. While mono- and bi-aromatic hydrocarbons are generally believed to be poor ligands for AhR and hence unable to induce Cyp1a1, our study suggests that the quinones of these molecules are able to modify AhR and activate the AhR/XRE pathway, thereby inducing Cyp1a1. Since we previously reported that 1,2-NQ and tert-butyl-1,4-BQ also activate NF-E2-related factor 2, it seems likely that some of quinones are bi-functional inducers for phase-I and phase-II reaction of xenobiotics.

  18. Pre-operative irreducible C1-C2 dislocations: intra-operative reduction and posterior fixation. The "always posterior strategy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visocchi, Massimiliano; Pietrini, Domenico; Tufo, Tommaso; Fernandez, Eduardo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2009-05-01

    According to Menezes' algorithm, pre-operative dynamic neuroradiological investigation in C1-C2 dislocations (C1C2D) instability is strongly advocated in order to exclude those patients not eligible for posterior fixation and fusion without previous anterior trans-oral decompression. Anterior irreducible compression due to C1C2D instability, it is said, needs trans-oral anterior decompression. We reviewed our experience in order to refute such a paradigm. The study involves 23 patients who were operated on for cranio-vertebral junction (CVJ) instability; all of them had C1C2D of varying degree on x-ray, computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the CVJ. Pre-operatively, irreducible C1C2D was demonstrated only in 3 patients, (2 with Down's Syndrome, one of them was harbouring os odontoideum, 1 Rheumatoid Arthritis), i.e. 13.04%; the remaining 19 (86.9%) had reducible C1-C2 dislocation. After an unsuccessful traction test conducted in the pre-operative phase under sedation, it was possible to completely reduce the C1C2D (with a combination of axial traction with light extension of the neck on the chest and a light flexion of the head on the neck by using a Mayfield head holder) and proceed to posterior fixation in all the patients under general anaesthesia using a precise "timing sequences fixation technique". Wiring (C0 and C3 were fixed first being stretched up to approximately 10 lbs, then C2 in order to pull up this vertebra last by forcing approximately 8 lbs) or screw fixation methods were used to achieve fusion along with post-operative external orthosis and neuroradiological assessment of the C1C2D. The instrumentation produced a lever and pulley effect which assisted reduction of the dislocation. At follow up (range 34-55 months-mean 45.33 months) the clinical picture was improved or stable in all patients. Pre-operative irreducibility of the C1C2D should not be an absolute indication for trans-oral decompression. An attempt to

  19. Use of Intraoperative Navigation for Reconstruction of the C1 Lateral Mass After Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neva, Jennifer; Smith, Brandon W; Joseph, Jacob R; Park, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are rare blood-filled cystic lesions that are found in the long bones and spine. Here, we present a case of an ABC found in the lateral mass and lamina of C1. Lesions in this area provide a surgical challenge because of its difficulty to access as well as its need for reconstruction. We describe a novel use of intraoperative navigation (ION) to assist in the placement of a C1 lateral mass titanium cage. An 18-year-old female patient presented with headaches and progressive neck pain. Imaging revealed a large cystic lesion involving the C1 lamina and right lateral mass. The patient underwent ION-assisted aggressive intralesional resection of the ABC and reconstruction of the C1 lateral mass with a static titanium cage, supplemented with posterior fusion from the occiput to C3. At 2-year follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence and the hardware remained intact. ION is a useful aid in assessing the extent of tumor resection and performing cage reconstruction of the C1 lateral mass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of the decay $B^0 \\to \\chi_{c1} K^+ \\pi^-$ and search of exotic resonances at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Sbordone, Francesco; Alves Junior, Antonio Augusto

    In 2008 the Belle Collaboration reported the observation of two charged resonance-like structures in the ${\\chi_c}_1 \\pi^-$ mass spectrum produced in the decay $B^0 \\to {\\chi_c}_1 K^+ \\pi^-$. These were labelled as $Z_1(4050)^-$ and $Z_2(4250)^-$. Alternatively, a single wider resonance hypothesis was also pursued by Belle, and labelled as $Z(4150)^-$. The fact that these are charged states would be a clear sample, if they really exist, of four quark bound systems; for this reason this observation has given rise to a great deal of interest. In 2012 the BABAR Collaboration has searched for these resonances in the channels $B^{0,+} \\to {\\chi_c}_1 K^{+,0} \\pi^-$ and did not find any evidence of them. In this thesis a search for these claimed exotic charmonium-like states $Z_1(4050)^-$ and $Z_2(4250)^-$ is presented, in the decay $B^0 \\to {\\chi_c}_1 K^+ \\pi^-$, where ${\\chi_c}_1 \\to J/\\psi \\gamma$ and $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. Charged conjugate are implied throughout the whole thesis. The analysis is performed us...

  1. Cytoadhesion to gC1qR through Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in severe malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magallón-Tejada, Ariel; Machevo, Sónia; Cisteró, Pau

    2016-01-01

    Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes to gC1qR has been associated with severe malaria, but the parasite ligand involved is currently unknown. To assess if binding to gC1qR is mediated through the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family, we analyzed...... by static binding assays and qPCR the cytoadhesion and var gene transcriptional profile of 86 P. falciparum isolates from Mozambican children with severe and uncomplicated malaria, as well as of a P. falciparum 3D7 line selected for binding to gC1qR (Pf3D7gC1qR). Transcript levels of DC8 correlated...... positively with cytoadhesion to gC1qR (rho = 0.287, P = 0.007), were higher in isolates from children with severe anemia than with uncomplicated malaria, as well as in isolates from Europeans presenting a first episode of malaria (n = 21) than Mozambican adults (n = 25), and were associated with an increased...

  2. Comparing the effects of symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium) clades C1 and D on early growth stages of Acropora tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, Ikuko; Higuchi, Tomihiko

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals switch endosymbiotic algae of the genus Symbiodinium during their early growth stages and during bleaching events. Clade C Symbiodinium algae are dominant in corals, although other clades - including A and D - have also been commonly detected in juvenile Acroporid corals. Previous studies have been reported that only molecular data of Symbiodinium clade were identified within field corals. In this study, we inoculated aposymbiotic juvenile polyps with cultures of clades C1 and D Symbiodinium algae, and investigated the different effect of these two clades of Symbiodinium on juvenile polyps. Our results showed that clade C1 algae did not grow, while clade D algae grew rapidly during the first 2 months after inoculation. Polyps associated with clade C1 algae exhibited bright green fluorescence across the body and tentacles after inoculation. The growth rate of polyp skeletons was lower in polyps associated with clade C1 algae than those associated with clade D algae. On the other hand, antioxidant activity (catalase) of corals was not significantly different between corals with clade C1 and clade D algae. Our results suggested that clade D Symbiodinium algae easily form symbiotic relationships with corals and that these algae could contribute to coral growth in early symbiosis stages.

  3. Ionic liquid promoted one pot approach for the synthesis of pyrido[1,2-c][1,3,5]thiadiazin-4-ones and thiazolo[3,2-c][1,3,5]thiadiazin-4-ones in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R. Siddiqui

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel three component one pot methodology for rapid access to pyrido[1,2-c][1,3,5]thiadiazin-4-ones and thiazolo[3,2-c][1,3,5]thiadiazin-4-ones has been developed. A task specific ionic liquid [bmIm]SCN has been used as thiocyanating reagent. The reaction provides high yields of the product and proceeds at ambient reaction conditions in water. The use of water as the reaction medium and easy recyclability of the ionic liquid used as a reagent as well as promoter of the reaction endows the reaction with green aspects.

  4. Genetic makeup of the Corynebacterium glutamicum LexA regulon deduced from comparative transcriptomics and in vitro DNA band shift assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, Nina; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Czaja, Lisa F; Brinkrolf, Karina; Brune, Iris; Hüser, Andrea T; Hansmeier, Nicole; Pühler, Alfred; Borovok, Ilya; Tauch, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    The lexA gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was deleted to create the mutant strain C. glutamicum NJ2114, which has an elongated cell morphology and an increased doubling time. To characterize the SOS regulon in C. glutamicum, the transcriptomes of NJ2114 and a DNA-damage-induced wild-type strain were compared with that of a wild-type control using DNA microarray hybridization. The expression data were combined with bioinformatic pattern searches for LexA binding sites, leading to the detection of 46 potential SOS boxes located upstream of differentially expressed transcription units. Binding of a hexahistidyl-tagged LexA protein to 40 double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the potential SOS boxes was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. It turned out that LexA binds not only to SOS boxes in the promoter-operator region of upregulated genes, but also to SOS boxes detected upstream of downregulated genes. These results demonstrated that LexA controls directly the expression of at least 48 SOS genes organized in 36 transcription units. The deduced genes encode a variety of physiological functions, many of them involved in DNA repair and survival after DNA damage, but nearly half of them have hitherto unknown functions. Alignment of the LexA binding sites allowed the corynebacterial SOS box consensus sequence TcGAA(a/c)AnnTGTtCGA to be deduced. Furthermore, the common intergenic region of lexA and the differentially expressed divS-nrdR operon, encoding a cell division suppressor and a regulator of deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, was characterized in detail. Promoter mapping revealed differences in divS-nrdR expression during SOS response and normal growth conditions. One of the four LexA binding sites detected in the intergenic region is involved in regulating divS-nrdR transcription, whereas the other sites are apparently used for negative autoregulation of lexA expression.

  5. New constraints on the rupture process of the 1999 August 17 Izmit earthquake deduced from estimates of stress glut rate moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clévédé, E.; Bouin, M.-P.; Bukchin, B.; Mostinskiy, A.; Patau, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper illustrates the use of integral estimates given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 for constraining the rupture scenario of a large earthquake in the particular case of the 1999 Izmit mainshock. We determine the integral estimates of the geometry, source duration and rupture propagation given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 by inverting long-period surface wave (LPSW) amplitude spectra. Kinematic and static models of the Izmit earthquake published in the literature are quite different from one another. In order to extract the characteristic features of this event, we calculate the same integral estimates directly from those models and compare them with those deduced from our inversion. While the equivalent rupture zone and the eastward directivity are consistent among all models, the LPSW solution displays a strong unilateral character of the rupture associated with a short rupture duration that is not compatible with the solutions deduced from the published models. With the aim of understand this discrepancy, we use simple equivalent kinematic models to reproduce the integral estimates of the considered rupture processes (including ours) by adjusting a few free parameters controlling the western and eastern parts of the rupture. We show that the joint analysis of the LPSW solution and source tomographies allows us to elucidate the scattering of source processes published for this earthquake and to discriminate between the models. Our results strongly suggest that (1) there was significant moment released on the eastern segment of the activated fault system during the Izmit earthquake; (2) the apparent rupture velocity decreases on this segment.

  6. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    and passive distribution—enable ClC-1 to conduct membrane current that inhibits muscle excitability. This depressing effect of ClC-1 current on muscle excitability has mostly been associated with skeletal muscle hyperexcitability in myotonia congenita, which arises from loss-of-function mutations in the CLCN1......Electrical membrane properties of skeletal muscle fibers have been thoroughly studied over the last five to six decades. This has shown that muscle fibers from a wide range of species, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, are all characterized by high resting membrane...... permeability for Cl- ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl- ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl- transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl- lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance...

  7. Anti-tumor agent celecoxib activity towards SP-C1 tongue cancer cells invasion (in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Achmad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasion is a characteristic of the occurrence of cancer and indicates the cancer cells' capability to destroy and degrade the border between the epithet and basal membrane to further spread into the surrounding extra-cellular matrix. The purpose of this research was to find the existence of impediment at the SP-C1 tongue cancer cell using celecoxib chemopreventive medication. The SP-C1 tongue cancer cells were treated in vitro using celecoxib medication as a research subject at the following concentrations 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, 100, 125%; and 0 as control group (only DMEM growth medium treatment. Pure experimental testing was carried out for 24 and 48 hours, with observation and calculation of an average number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells. The data collected were analyzed using the ANOVA test with Newman Keuls paired range test or t-test. Research results indicated that the average number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells invasion after administration of celecoxib medication based on administration concentration and time statistically yielded significant results. The ANOVA test results were statistically significant, that is, average occurrence of the number of SP-C1 tongue cancer cells due to the use of celecoxib at certain concentrations compared to that without celecoxib was different. At celecoxib of zero (control concentration was 24.4 with celecoxib concentration starting at 5 up to 125% experienced a decline from its average 11 to become 2.3. The conclusion of the research was that the greater the celecoxib concentration administered, the greater the effect on the impediment of SP-C1 tongue cancer cell invasion.

  8. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F; Parker, Ernest T; Baldwin, W Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete; Meeks, Shannon L

    2016-10-20

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Frequency and epitope specificity of anti-factor VIII C1 domain antibodies in acquired and congenital hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Joerg; Orlowski, Aleksander; Stichel, Diana; Healey, John F; Parker, Ernest T; Jacquemin, Marc; Krause, Manuela; Tiede, Andreas; Schwabe, Dirk; Lollar, Pete; Königs, Christoph

    2017-08-10

    Several studies showed that neutralizing anti-factor VIII (anti-fVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) in patients with acquired hemophilia A (AHA) and congenital hemophilia A (HA) are primarily directed to the A2 and C2 domains. In this study, the frequency and epitope specificity of anti-C1 antibodies were analyzed in acquired and congenital hemophilia inhibitor patients (n = 178). The domain specificity of antibodies was studied by homolog-scanning mutagenesis (HSM) with single human domain human/porcine fVIII proteins and antibody binding to human A2, C1, and C2 domains presented as human serum albumin (HSA) fusion proteins. The analysis with HSA-fVIII domain proteins confirmed the results of the HSM approach but resulted in higher detection levels. The higher detection levels with HSA-fVIII domain proteins are a result of antibody cross-reactivity with human and porcine fVIII leading to false-negative HSM results. Overall, A2-, C1-, and C2-specific antibodies were detected in 23%, 78%, and 68% of patients with AHA (n = 115) and in 52%, 57%, and 81% of HA inhibitor patients (n = 63). Competitive binding of the human monoclonal antibody (mAb) LE2E9 revealed overlapping epitopes with murine C1-specific group A mAbs including 2A9. Mutational analyses identified distinct crucial binding residues for LE2E9 (E2066) and 2A9 (F2068) that are also recognized by anti-C1 antibodies present in patients with hemophilia. A strong contribution of LE2E9- and 2A9-like antibodies was particularly observed in patients with AHA. Overall, our study demonstrates that the C1 domain, in addition to the A2 and C2 domains, contributes significantly to the humoral anti-fVIII immune response in acquired and congenital hemophilia inhibitor patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Clinical Pattern and Acute and Long-term Management of Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1-Esterase Inhibitor Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Traseira, C; Pérez-Fernández, E; López-Serrano, M C; García-Ara, M C; Pedrosa, M; López-Trascasa, M; Caballero, T

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH) is a life-threatening disease. To describe the clinical characteristics and management of patients with HAE-C1-INH during routine clinical practice. An observational, retrospective study was performed in patients with HAE-C1-INH. Demographic, clinical, and analytical data were collected from 2 periods: period A (October 2009-September 2010) and period B (October 2007-September 2009). We studied 112 patients with HAE-C1-INH (57.1% females). Age at onset of symptoms was 14.4 years (lower in patients who had experienced attacks in the previous year). In period B (n=87), 62.1% of patients presented at least 1 edema attack (median, 3.5 attacks/patient/2 years), and 19.1% of attacks were treated. In period A (n=77), 58.4% of patients were on maintenance therapy. Stanozolol was the most widely used drug (48.9%), with a mean weekly dose of 6.7 mg. At least 1 attack was recorded in 72.7% of patients (median, 3.0 attacks/patient/year), and 31.5% of the attacks were treated. Treatment of acute attacks increased by 12.4%. Age at onset of symptoms is associated with clinical expression of disease. The higher age at onset of symptoms, the fewer number of attacks per patient and year, and the lower dose of attenuated androgens necessary to control the disease than in other series lead us to hypothesize that HAE-C1-INH could have a less severe expression in Spain. Acute attacks seem to be treated increasingly often.

  11. Accurate and Simple Screw Insertion Procedure With Patient-Specific Screw Guide Templates for Posterior C1-C2 Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Taku; Higashiyama, Naoki; Kaneyama, Shuichi; Sumi, Masatoshi

    2017-03-15

    Prospective clinical trial of the screw insertion method for posterior C1-C2 fixation utilizing the patient-specific screw guide template technique. To evaluate the efficacy of this method for insertion of C1 lateral mass screws (LMS), C2 pedicle screws (PS), and C2 laminar screws (LS). Posterior C1LMS and C2PS fixation, also known as the Goel-Harms method, can achieve immediate rigid fixation and high fusion rate, but the screw insertion carries the risk of injury to neuronal and vascular structures. Dissection of venous plexus and C2 nerve root to confirm the insertion point of the C1LMS may also cause problems. We have developed an intraoperative screw guiding method using patient-specific laminar templates. Preoperative bone images of computed tomography (CT) were analyzed using three-dimensional (3D)/multiplanar imaging software to plan the trajectories of the screws. Plastic templates with screw guiding structures were created for each lamina using 3D design and printing technology. Three types of templates were made for precise multistep guidance, and all templates were specially designed to fit and lock on the lamina during the procedure. Surgery was performed using this patient-specific screw guide template system, and placement of the screws was postoperatively evaluated using CT. Twelve patients with C1-C2 instability were treated with a total of 48 screws (24 C1LMS, 20 C2PS, 4 C2LS). Intraoperatively, each template was found to exactly fit and lock on the lamina and screw insertion was completed successfully without dissection of the venous plexus and C2 nerve root. Postoperative CT showed no cortical violation by the screws, and mean deviation of the screws from the planned trajectories was 0.70 ± 0.42 mm. The multistep, patient-specific screw guide template system is useful for intraoperative screw navigation in posterior C1-C2 fixation. This simple and economical method can improve the accuracy of screw insertion, and reduce operation time and

  12. Association of anti C1q and ds-DNA levels with the pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis among SLE patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Sohail

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lupus nephritis (LN is the most common and serious complication associated with SLE and it results in significant morbidity and mortality. It is known by several studies that patients of LN have higher levels of anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q compared with SLE patients without renal involvement. The current study was designed to determine and compare the level of anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q in patients of SLE with and without lupus nephritis in the Pakistani population. This current study was also aimed at providing proof that anti-C1q levels are more prominent in LN/non-LN SLE as compared to anti-dsDNA. This project may help in the determination of results in Pakistan and contribute to the further confirmation of the sensitivity of anti-C1q. Method: The patient samples were collected from Sheikh Zayed hospital, Lahore. These patients were clinically diagnosed by the Rheumatologists as SLE and LN positive on the basis of ACR and SLEDAI scoring criteria. This study was performed and samples were analyzed in the Department of Medical and Laboratory Sciences, Imperial College of Business Study, Lahore on the patient’s serum by ELISA technique. Result: About 38% (12 patients with LN were positive for anti-dsDNA and 31% (9 SLE patients without LN were positive whereas about 38.7% (12 were anti-dsDNA negative in LN cases and 58.6% (17 in SLE without LN. In case of anti-C1q 100% (31 of these LN patients were positive and 93.1% (27 patients SLE without LN showed positive anti C1q results. Only 6.9% (2 patients showed negative results for anti-C1q in LN negative patients Conclusion: The higher levels of anti-C1q suggest that it may be a better diagnostic marker for LN than that of anti-dsDNA and that it can be helpful in the prognosis of SLE patients.

  13. Common European Framework of Reference for Languages in Croatia: an analysis of writing competence at level C1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Spajić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present the results of a research conducted with advanced (C1 level learners of French as a foreign language in Croatia, in which their writing competence was studied according to the CEFR descriptors. Our hypothesis was that reaching level C1 demanded that a considerable amount of effort be invested in the development of learners’ writing and pragmatic skills.  In the evaluation of these skills, characteristics of culture-specific learning contexts are to be taken into account. To test our hypothesis, we used a structured questionnaire and interviews with teachers. The results of our research are presented in the conclusion.

  14. Precise measurement of the $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ resonance parameters with the decays $\\chi_{c1,c2}\\to J\\psi\\mu^+\\mu^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Chapman, Matthew George; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu Faye; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Hu, Wenhua; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Ibis, Philipp; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kazeev, Nikita; Kecke, Matthieu; Keizer, Floris; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Kress, Felix Johannes; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luchinsky, Alexey; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malecki, Bartosz; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Mead, James Vincent; Meadows, Brian; Meaux, Cedric; Meier, Frank; Meinert, Nis; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Millard, Edward James; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Minzoni, Luca; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Mombächer, Titus; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pisani, Flavio; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Weisser, Constantin; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Menglin; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The decays $\\chi_{c1} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $\\chi_{c2} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ are observed and used to study the resonance parameters of the $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ mesons. The masses of these states are measured to be \\begin{align*} m(\\chi_{c1}) = 3510.71 \\pm 0.04(stat) \\pm 0.09(syst)~ \\text{MeV}\\,, \\\\ m(\\chi_{c2}) = 3556.10 \\pm 0.06(stat) \\pm 0.11(syst)~ \\text{MeV}\\,, \\end{align*} where the knowledge of the momentum scale for charged particles dominates the systematic uncertainty. The momentum-scale uncertainties largely cancel in the mass difference \\begin{equation*} m(\\chi_{c2}) - m(\\chi_{c1}) = 45.39 \\pm 0.07(stat) \\pm 0.03(syst)~ \\text{MeV}. \\end{equation*} The natural width of the $\\chi_{c2}$ meson is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\Gamma(\\chi_{c2}) = 2.10 \\pm 0.20(stat) \\pm 0.02(syst)~ \\text{MeV}. \\end{equation*} These results are in good agreement with and have comparable precision to the current world averages.

  15. Bilateral C1–C2 Transarticular Screw and C1 Laminar Hook Fixation and Bone Graft Fusion for Reducible Atlantoaxial Dislocation: A Seven-Year Analysis of Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang; Ni, Bin; Xie, Ning; Lu, Xuhua; Guo, Qunfeng; Lu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Bilateral C1-2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation was developed on the basis of transarticular screws fixation. The modified technique has showed a better biomechanical stability than established techniques in previous study. However, long-term (minimum follow-up 7 years) outcomes of patients with reducible atlantoaxial dislocation who underwent this modified fixation technique have not still been reported. Methods A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the outcome of 36 patients who underwent this modified technique. Myelopathy was assessed using the Ranawat myelopathy score and Myelopathy Disability Index. Pain scores were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale. Radiological imaging was assessed and the following data were extracted: the atlantodental intervals, the space available for cord, presence of spinal cord signal change on T2 weighted image, C1–C2 angle, C2–C7 angle and fusion rates. Findings All patients achieved a minimum seven-year follow up. 95% patients with neck and suboccipital pain improved after surgery; in their Visual Analogue pain scores, there was a greater than 50% improvement in their VAS scores with a drop of 5 points on the VAS (Patlantoaxial instability at each follow-up time. The space available for cord increased in all patients. Postoperative sagittal kyphosis of the subaxial spine was not observed. After six months after surgery, bone grafts of all patients were fused. No complications related to surgery were found in the period of follow-up. Conclusions The long-term outcomes of this case series demonstrate that under the condition of thorough preoperative preparations, bilateral C1–C2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation and bone graft fusion is a reliable posterior atlantoaxial fusion technique for reducible atlantoaxial dislocation. PMID:24498163

  16. Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1 Variants Associate with the Muscle Strength and Size Response to Resistance Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett I Ash

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1 polymorphisms associate with obesity, muscle strength, and cortisol sensitivity. We examined associations among four NR3C1 polymorphisms and the muscle response to resistance training (RT. European-American adults (n = 602, 23.8±0.4yr completed a 12 week unilateral arm RT program. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC assessed isometric strength (kg and MRI assessed biceps size (cm2 pre- and post-resistance training. Subjects were genotyped for NR3C1 -2722G>A, -1887G>A, -1017T>C, and +363A>G. Men carrying the -2722G allele gained less relative MVC (17.3±1.2vs33.5±6.1% (p = 0.010 than AA homozygotes; men with -1887GG gained greater relative MVC than A allele carriers (19.6±1.4vs13.2±2.3% (p = 0.016. Women carrying the -1017T allele gained greater relative size (18.7±0.5vs16.1±0.9% (p = 0.016 than CC homozygotes. We found sex-specific NR3C1 associations with the muscle strength and size response to RT. Future studies should investigate whether these associations are partially explained by cortisol's actions in muscle tissue as they interact with sex differences in cortisol production.

  17. Nitrobacter winogradskyi cytochrome a1c1 is an iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme having hemes a and c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, M; Fukumori, Y; Yamanaka, T

    1987-09-01

    Cytochrome a1c1 (nitrite-cytochrome c oxidoreductase) purified from Nitrobacter winogradskyi (formerly N. agilis) contained molybdenum, non-heme iron, and acid-labile sulfur in addition to hemes a and c; it contained 1 mol of heme a, 4-5 g atoms of non-heme iron, 2-5 g atoms of acid-labile sulfur, and 1-2 g atoms of molybdenum per mol of heme c, but did not contain copper. The fluorescence spectra of the molybdenum cofactor derivative prepared from cytochrome a1c1 were very similar to those of the cofactor derivative from xanthine oxidase, and the aponitrate reductase of nit-1 mutant of Neurospora crassa was complemented by addition of the molybdenum cofactor derived from the cytochrome. Further, the ESR spectrum of cytochrome a1c1 was similar to that of liver sulfite oxidase. The content of cytochrome a1 in the cells cultivated with the medium in which tungsten was substituted for molybdenum markedly decreased as compared with that in the cells cultivated in the molybdenum-supplemented medium. These results indicate that cytochrome a1c1 is an iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme which contains hemes a and c.

  18. STABILITAS EPIGALOKATEKIN GALAT DALAM KRIM EKSTRAK TEH HIJAU DENGAN VARIASI KONSENTRASI ANTIOKSIDAN VITAMIN C 1% DAN VITAMIN E 1%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nining Sugihartini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechingallate (EGCG in green tea extract has activity as an anti-inflammatory agent. On the other hand the stability of EGCG is poor because of the oxidation. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of Vitamine C and Vitamine E in formulation of green tea extract cream to the stabiliy of EGCG. The green tea extract was obtained from the extraction process by infundation followed by fractination with ethyl acetate as the solvent. The three formulas were compiled in similar composition with the concentration of vitamine C 1% (FI, Vitamine E 1% (FII and there was no Vitamine C and Vitamine E (FIII as a control. The EGCG level was determinated by TLC-densitometry methode. The stability parameter was determinated by calculated of the Q10 of each formula. The result of this study showed that the parameter of t90 of EGCG with Vitamine C 1%, Vitamine E 1% and control addition were 0.0108 hours, 0.0087 hours, 0.0084 hours, respectively. Stability of EGCG in green tea leaf extract cream with addition of the vitamin C 1% was higher than it stability with the addition of vitamin E 1%. The concentration of Vitamin C 1% was the optimum concentration as antioxidant in formulation of green tea extract cream.

  19. C1q nephropathy and isolated CD59 deficiency manifesting as necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis: A rare association of two diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C1q nephropathy is a recently described clinico-pathologic entity with a variable clinical presentation and pathology. Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN has been reported in only two patients in the available literature. CD59 deficiency, along with lack of CD55, is responsible for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH. Few cases of isolated CD59 deficiency have been described with PNH-like features. A middle-aged adult male presented with rapidly progressive renal failure. Serological investigations were negative. A renal biopsy revealed necrotizing crescentic GN with rupture of Bowman′s capsule. Immunofluorescence on the frozen sections showed dominant mesangial deposits of C1q along with IgM. Hematological work-up of the patient revealed isolated CD59 deficiency. Hence, a final diagnosis of C1q nephropathy and CD59 deficiency manifesting as crescentic GN and hemolytic anemia was made. The co-existence of two rare disorders, C1q nephropathy and CD59 deficiency, in a patient with necrotizing crescentic GN is described for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The pathogenetic link of these two entities with the clinical manifestation requires further study.

  20. Methylation of NR3C1 and SLC6A4 and internalizing problems. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Knaap, Lisette J.; van Oort, Floor V. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Riese, Harriette

    2015-01-01

    Background: The relationship between early adverse life events and later internalizing problems could be mediated by DNA methylation. Adversity has been associated with higher methylation levels in the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) and the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) in adolescents.

  1. Metabolism of mono- and dihalogenated C1 and C2 compounds by Xanthobacter autotrophicus growing on 1,2-dichloroethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torz, Maciej; Wietzes, Piet; Beschkov, Venko; Janssen, Dick B.

    2007-01-01

    The conversion of and toxic effects exerted by several mono- and dihalogenated C1 and C2 compounds on cultures of Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 growing on 1,2-dichloroethane were investigated. Bromochloromethane, dibromomethane and 1-bromo-2-chloroethane were utilized by strain GJ10 in batch

  2. Epigenetic Regulation of Placental "NR3C1": Mechanism Underlying Prenatal Programming of Infant Neurobehavior by Maternal Smoking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Laura R.; Papandonatos, George D.; Salisbury, Amy L.; Phipps, Maureen G.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Niaura, Raymond; Padbury, James F.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Lester, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of the placental glucocorticoid receptor gene ("NR3C1") was investigated as a mechanism underlying links between maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) and infant neurobehavior in 45 mother-infant pairs (49% MSDP-exposed; 52% minorities; ages 18-35). The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Network Neurobehavioral…

  3. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II Type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Erick A; Stedenfeld, Kristen A; Sved, Alan F; Speth, Robert C

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of (125)I-sarcosine(1), isoleucine(8) Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10 %) reduction in AT1-receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia.

  4. Palladium-gold catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to C1-C5 hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortlever, R.; Peters, I; Balemans, C; Kas, Recep; Kwon, Y; Mul, Guido; Koper, M.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Copper is a unique electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction, since it is one of the few catalysts able to produce methane, ethylene and ethane from CO2 with decent faradaic efficiencies. Here we report on the design and synthesis of a new non-copper-containing catalyst able to reduce CO2 to C1 to C5

  5. Structural Differences between the Streptococcus agalactiae Housekeeping and Pilus-Specific Sortases: SrtA and SrtC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, B.; Krishnan, V.; Rajashankar, K.R.; I-Hsiu, H.; Xin, M.; Ton-That, H.; Narayana, S.V. (Texas-HSC); (Cornell); (UAB)

    2011-10-21

    The assembly of pili on the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria requires transpeptidase enzymes called sortases. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the PI-1 pilus island of strain 2603V/R encodes two pilus-specific sortases (SrtC1 and SrtC2) and three pilins (GBS80, GBS52 and GBS104). Although either pilus-specific sortase is sufficient for the polymerization of the major pilin, GBS80, incorporation of the minor pilins GBS52 and GBS104 into the pilus structure requires SrtC1 and SrtC2, respectively. The S. agalactiae housekeeping sortase, SrtA, whose gene is present at a different location and does not catalyze pilus polymerization, was shown to be involved in cell wall anchoring of pilus polymers. To understand the structural basis of sortases involved in such diverse functions, we determined the crystal structures of S. agalactiae SrtC1 and SrtA. Both enzymes are made of an eight-stranded beta-barrel core with variations in their active site architecture. SrtA exhibits a catalytic triad arrangement similar to that in Streptococcus pyogenes SrtA but different from that in Staphylococcus aureus SrtA. In contrast, the SrtC1 enzyme contains an N-terminal helical domain and a 'lid' in its putative active site, which is similar to that seen in Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus-specific sortases, although with subtle differences in positioning and composition. To understand the effect of such differences on substrate recognition, we have also determined the crystal structure of a SrtC1 mutant, in which the conserved DP(W/F/Y) motif was replaced with the sorting signal motif of GBS80, IPNTG. By comparing the structures of WT wild type SrtA and SrtC1 and the 'lid' mutant of SrtC1, we propose that structural elements within the active site and the lid may be important for defining the role of specific sortase in pili biogenesis.

  6. Anti-C1q autoantibodies as markers of renal involvement in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Cécile; Lega, Jean-Christophe; Ranchin, Bruno; Cochat, Pierre; Cabrera, Natalia; Fabien, Nicole; Belot, Alexandre

    2017-03-25

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is rare, and considered more severe than its adult-onset counterpart. Lupus nephritis (LN) occurs more frequently in children, accounting for higher long-term morbidity and mortality compared with adults. Thus, reliable biological markers are needed to predict disease course. This study aimed to investigate the capacity of anti-C1q autoantibodies (Abs) to predict renal flare and global disease activity in cSLE patients, and association with disease activity and kidney involvement. Twenty-eight patients with cSLE including 19 patients (68%) with a history of LN were included retrospectively. Anti-C1q Abs were analysed by ELISA at renal flare-up or in the quiescent phase of disease and compared with Farr dsDNA assay. Thirty-one flares occurred during follow-up: anti-C1q Abs were positive in 26 (84%), strongly associated with active disease status (p < 0.0001), and correlated with global disease activity score (p < 0.0001) and anti-dsDNA Abs presence (p < 0.0001). The specificity of anti-C1q Abs was higher than anti-dsDNA (73% vs 19%) in discriminating LN patients, whereas the receiver operating characteristic curves were not statistically different (0.83 ± 0.06 vs 0.78 ± 0.08 respectively), similar to C3 dosage. The presence of anti-C1q Abs at diagnosis was not predictive for global or renal flare. Introduction of a modified SLEDAI score excluding dsDNA Abs, demonstrated a stronger correlation of anti-C1q Abs titres with SLEDAI score in comparison with the Farr test. Anti-C1q Abs seem very specific to flares, including LN in children, and their role in daily practice compared with the Farr dsDNA assay needs to be defined.

  7. 40 CFR Figure C-1 to Subpart C of... - Suggested Format for Reporting Test Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2 C Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-1 Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Suggested Format for Reporting Test... Difference Table C-1 spec. Pass or fail Low 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____ ppm 3 4 5 6 Medium 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____ ppm...

  8. Zebrafish slc30a10 deficiency revealed a novel compensatory mechanism of Atp2c1 in maintaining manganese homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhidan Xia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies found that mutations in the human SLC30A10 gene, which encodes a manganese (Mn efflux transporter, are associated with hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis (HMDPC. However, the relationship between Mn metabolism and HMDPC is poorly understood, and no specific treatments are available for this disorder. Here, we generated two zebrafish slc30a10 mutant lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Compared to wild-type animals, mutant adult animals developed significantly higher systemic Mn levels, and Mn accumulated in the brain and liver of mutant embryos in response to exogenous Mn. Interestingly, slc30a10 mutants developed neurological deficits in adulthood, as well as environmental Mn-induced manganism in the embryonic stage; moreover, mutant animals had impaired dopaminergic and GABAergic signaling. Finally, mutant animals developed steatosis, liver fibrosis, and polycythemia accompanied by increased epo expression. This phenotype was rescued partially by EDTA- CaNa2 chelation therapy and iron supplementation. Interestingly, prior to the onset of slc30a10 expression, expressing ATP2C1 (ATPase secretory pathway Ca2+ transporting 1 protected mutant embryos from Mn exposure, suggesting a compensatory role for Atp2c1 in the absence of Slc30a10. Notably, expressing either wild-type or mutant forms of SLC30A10 was sufficient to inhibit the effect of ATP2C1 in response to Mn challenge in both zebrafish embryos and HeLa cells. These findings suggest that either activating ATP2C1 or restoring the Mn-induced trafficking of ATP2C1 can reduce Mn accumulation, providing a possible target for treating HMDPC.

  9. Comparison of gene expression profiles of HepG2 cells exposed to Crambescins C1 and A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María R. Sánchez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Crambescins are guanidine alkaloids firstly isolated in the early 90s from the encrusting Mediterranean sponge Crambe crambe (Schmidt, 1862 (Bondu et al., 2012, Laville et al., 2009, Berlinck et al., 1990. C. crambe derivatives are divided in two families named crambescins and crambescidins (Gerlinck et al., 1992. Although data on the bioactivity of these compounds is scarce, crambescidins have recognized cytotoxic, antifungal, antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiviral activities (Buscema and Van de Vyver, 1985, Jares-Erijman., 1998, Olszewski et al., 2004, Lazaro et al., 2006, Suna et al., 2007, AOKI et al., 2004. Recently we have carefully evaluated the cytotoxic activity of C816 over several human tumor cell types and characterized some of the cellular mechanisms responsible of the anti-proliferative effect of this compound on human liver-derived tumor cells (Rubiolo et al., 2013. Taking this into account, and to better understand the mechanism of action of crambescins and their potential as therapeutic agents, we made a comparative gene expression profiling of HepG2 cells after crambescin C1 (C1 and crambescin A1 (CA1 exposures. Results have shown that C1 induces genes involved in sterol and glucose metabolisms and metabolism involving growth factors. It also down regulates genes mainly involved in cell cycle control, DNA replication, recombination and repair, and drug metabolism. Flow cytometry assays revealed that C1 produces a G0/G1 arrest in HepG2 cell cycle progression. CA1 also down-regulates genes involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA recombination and pathways related to tumor cells proliferation with lower potency when compared to C1.

  10. Comprehensive drilling of the C1-2 facets to achieve direct posterior reduction in irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke, Pravin; Sahoo, Sushanta K; Deepak, Arsikere N; Ghuman, Mandeep S; Khandelwal, Niranjan K

    2015-09-01

    The cause of irreducibility in irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) appears to be the orientation of the C1-2 facets. The current management strategies for irreducible AAD are directed at removing the cause of irreducibility followed by fusion, rather than transoral decompression and posterior fusion. The technique described in this paper addresses C1-2 facet mobilization by facetectomies to aid intraoperative manipulation. Using this technique, reduction was achieved in 19 patients with congenital irreducible AAD treated between January 2011 and December 2013. The C1-2 joints were studied preoperatively, and particular attention was paid to the facet orientation. Intraoperatively, oblique C1-2 joints were opened widely, and extensive drilling of the facets was performed to make them close to flat and parallel to each other, converting an irreducible AAD to a reducible one. Anomalous vertebral arteries (VAs) were addressed appropriately. Further reduction was then achieved after vertical distraction and joint manipulation. Adequate facet drilling was achieved in all but 2 patients, due to VA injury in 1 patient and an acute sagittal angle operated on 2 years previously in the other patient. Complete reduction could be achieved in 17 patients and partial in the remaining 2. All patients showed clinical improvement. Two patients showed partial redislocation due to graft subsidence. The fusion rates were excellent. Comprehensive drilling of the C1-2 facets appears to be a logical and effective technique for achieving direct posterior reduction in irreducible AAD. The extensive drilling makes large surfaces raw, increasing fusion rates.

  11. Zebrafish slc30a10 deficiency revealed a novel compensatory mechanism of Atp2c1 in maintaining manganese homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingniang; Wang, Jia; Li, Wenwen; Wang, Kai; Hong, Xiaoli; Zhao, Lu; Chen, Caiyong; Min, Junxia

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies found that mutations in the human SLC30A10 gene, which encodes a manganese (Mn) efflux transporter, are associated with hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis (HMDPC). However, the relationship between Mn metabolism and HMDPC is poorly understood, and no specific treatments are available for this disorder. Here, we generated two zebrafish slc30a10 mutant lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Compared to wild-type animals, mutant adult animals developed significantly higher systemic Mn levels, and Mn accumulated in the brain and liver of mutant embryos in response to exogenous Mn. Interestingly, slc30a10 mutants developed neurological deficits in adulthood, as well as environmental Mn-induced manganism in the embryonic stage; moreover, mutant animals had impaired dopaminergic and GABAergic signaling. Finally, mutant animals developed steatosis, liver fibrosis, and polycythemia accompanied by increased epo expression. This phenotype was rescued partially by EDTA- CaNa2 chelation therapy and iron supplementation. Interestingly, prior to the onset of slc30a10 expression, expressing ATP2C1 (ATPase secretory pathway Ca2+ transporting 1) protected mutant embryos from Mn exposure, suggesting a compensatory role for Atp2c1 in the absence of Slc30a10. Notably, expressing either wild-type or mutant forms of SLC30A10 was sufficient to inhibit the effect of ATP2C1 in response to Mn challenge in both zebrafish embryos and HeLa cells. These findings suggest that either activating ATP2C1 or restoring the Mn-induced trafficking of ATP2C1 can reduce Mn accumulation, providing a possible target for treating HMDPC. PMID:28692648

  12. Pump power loss and heat generation in a pivot bearing-supported Gyro centrifugal pump (C1E3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Y; Nakazawa, T; Makinouchi, K; Glueck, J; Ohara, Y; Benkowski, R J; Nosé, Y

    1996-07-01

    Pump power loss is defined as input power that is not used for the output work of the pump. Less pump power loss means a higher pump efficiency. A common opinion is that the pump power loss is closely related to heat generation of the pump, which may affect not only the endurance of pump materials, but also blood damage in a blood pump. In this study, the relationship between pump power loss and heat generation in centrifugal blood pumps was investigated using the pivot-bearing supported Gyro C1E3 pump (C1E3) and Bio-Medicus pump (BP-80) under four different total pressure heat/flow conditions. A single special torque measuring driver motor was used for operating both the C1E3 and BP-80 in the four conditions. The pump power loss was calculated from the measured motor torque and hydraulic power. The changes in blood temperature were measured while the pump was operated at room temperature (25 degrees C) to obtain the following findings: First, the C1E3 caused less pump power loss and less temperature increase in blood than the BP-80 in all clinical simulated conditions that were tested; and second, the pump power loss and heat generation had a linear correlation with temperature rise from 22 to 25 degrees C in both the C1E3 and BP-80. During this period, approximately 30% of the pump power loss was transformed to heat, independent of the centrifugal blood pump type, provided that heat conduction through the pump housing and tubing was negligible during this particular period.

  13. 26 CFR 31.6652(c)-1 - Failure of employee to report tips for purposes of the Federal Insurance Contributions Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) § 31.6652(c)-1 Failure of employee to report tips for purposes of the Federal Insurance Contributions... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure of employee to report tips for purposes of the Federal Insurance Contributions Act. 31.6652(c)-1 Section 31.6652(c)-1 Internal Revenue...

  14. The four hexamerin genes in the honey bee: structure, molecular evolution and function deduced from expression patterns in queens, workers and drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Juliana R; Nunes, Francis M F; Cristino, Alexandre S; Simões, Zilá L P; Bitondi, Márcia M G

    2010-03-26

    Hexamerins are hemocyanin-derived proteins that have lost the ability to bind copper ions and transport oxygen; instead, they became storage proteins. The current study aimed to broaden our knowledge on the hexamerin genes found in the honey bee genome by exploring their structural characteristics, expression profiles, evolution, and functions in the life cycle of workers, drones and queens. The hexamerin genes of the honey bee (hex 70a, hex 70b, hex 70c and hex 110) diverge considerably in structure, so that the overall amino acid identity shared among their deduced protein subunits varies from 30 to 42%. Bioinformatics search for motifs in the respective upstream control regions (UCRs) revealed six overrepresented motifs including a potential binding site for Ultraspiracle (Usp), a target of juvenile hormone (JH). The expression of these genes was induced by topical application of JH on worker larvae. The four genes are highly transcribed by the larval fat body, although with significant differences in transcript levels, but only hex 110 and hex 70a are re-induced in the adult fat body in a caste- and sex-specific fashion, workers showing the highest expression. Transcripts for hex 110, hex 70a and hex70b were detected in developing ovaries and testes, and hex 110 was highly transcribed in the ovaries of egg-laying queens. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that HEX 110 is located at the most basal position among the holometabola hexamerins, and like HEX 70a and HEX 70c, it shares potential orthology relationship with hexamerins from other hymenopteran species. Striking differences were found in the structure and developmental expression of the four hexamerin genes in the honey bee. The presence of a potential binding site for Usp in the respective 5' UCRs, and the results of experiments on JH level manipulation in vivo support the hypothesis of regulation by JH. Transcript levels and patterns in the fat body and gonads suggest that, in addition to their primary

  15. The four hexamerin genes in the honey bee: structure, molecular evolution and function deduced from expression patterns in queens, workers and drones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Juliana R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hexamerins are hemocyanin-derived proteins that have lost the ability to bind copper ions and transport oxygen; instead, they became storage proteins. The current study aimed to broaden our knowledge on the hexamerin genes found in the honey bee genome by exploring their structural characteristics, expression profiles, evolution, and functions in the life cycle of workers, drones and queens. Results The hexamerin genes of the honey bee (hex 70a, hex 70b, hex 70c and hex 110 diverge considerably in structure, so that the overall amino acid identity shared among their deduced protein subunits varies from 30 to 42%. Bioinformatics search for motifs in the respective upstream control regions (UCRs revealed six overrepresented motifs including a potential binding site for Ultraspiracle (Usp, a target of juvenile hormone (JH. The expression of these genes was induced by topical application of JH on worker larvae. The four genes are highly transcribed by the larval fat body, although with significant differences in transcript levels, but only hex 110 and hex 70a are re-induced in the adult fat body in a caste- and sex-specific fashion, workers showing the highest expression. Transcripts for hex 110, hex 70a and hex70b were detected in developing ovaries and testes, and hex 110 was highly transcribed in the ovaries of egg-laying queens. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that HEX 110 is located at the most basal position among the holometabola hexamerins, and like HEX 70a and HEX 70c, it shares potential orthology relationship with hexamerins from other hymenopteran species. Conclusions Striking differences were found in the structure and developmental expression of the four hexamerin genes in the honey bee. The presence of a potential binding site for Usp in the respective 5' UCRs, and the results of experiments on JH level manipulation in vivo support the hypothesis of regulation by JH. Transcript levels and patterns in the fat body

  16. N- and O-glycans of recombinant human C1 inhibitor expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koles, Kate; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Pieper, Frank R; Nuijens, Jan H; Mannesse, Maurice L M; Vliegenthart, Johannes F G; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2004-01-01

    Human C1 inhibitor (hC1INH) is a therapeutic N, O-glycoprotein with a growing number of clinical applications, but the current natural supplies are not likely to meet the clinical demands. Therefore, recombinant approaches are of interest, whereby specific attention has to be paid to the generated glycosylation patterns. Here, the N,O-glycoprotein was expressed in the mammary gland of transgenic rabbits and subjected to glycan analysis. After release of the N-glycans of recombinant-rabbit human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) by peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F, the oligosaccharides were separated from the O-glycoprotein by centrifugal filtration, then fractionated by a combination of anion-exchange, normal-phase, and high-pH anion-exchange liquid chromatography. The O-glycans, released from the O-glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment, were fractionated by anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The structures of individual components were analysed by 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy, in most cases combined with MALDI-TOF MS. In contrast to the structural data reported for native serum hC1INH, rhC1INH contained a broad array of different N-glycans, made up of oligomannose-, hybrid-, and complex-type structures. In the case of complex-type N-glycans (partially) (alpha2-6)-sialylated (N-acetylneuraminic acid only), mono- and diantennary chains were found; part of the diantennary structures were (alpha1-6)-core-fucosylated or (alpha1-3)-fucosylated in the lower or upper antenna (Lewis x). The manno-oligosaccharide pattern of part of the hybrid- and oligomannose-type structures indicates that besides the usual N-glycan processing route, also the alternative endo-mannosidase pathway is followed. The small core 1-type O-glycans showed the usual (alpha2-3)- and (alpha2-6)-sialylation pattern of O-glycoproteins of nonmucinous origin.

  17. Nebulized C1-Esterase Inhibitor does not Reduce Pulmonary Complement Activation in Rats with Severe Streptococcus Pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Friso; Lagrand, Wim; Glas, Gerie J; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; van Mierlo, Gerard; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Juffermans, Nicole P; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J

    2016-12-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement system in the lungs by repeated treatment with nebulized plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor reduces pulmonary complement activation and subsequently attenuates lung injury and lung inflammation. This was investigated in a rat model of severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Rats were intra-tracheally challenged with S. pneumoniae to induce pneumonia. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor or saline (control animals) was repeatedly administered to rats, 30 min before induction of pneumonia and every 6 h thereafter. Rats were sacrificed 20 or 40 h after inoculation with bacteria. Brochoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were obtained for measuring levels of complement activation (C4b/c), lung injury and inflammation. Induction of pneumonia was associated with pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 1.24 % [0.56-2.59] and at 40 h 2.08 % [0.98-5.12], compared to 0.50 % [0.07-0.59] and 0.03 % [0.03-0.03] in the healthy control animals). The functional fraction of C1-INH was detectable in BALF, but no effect was found on pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 0.73 % [0.16-1.93] and at 40 h 2.38 % [0.54-4.19]). Twenty hours after inoculation, nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor treatment reduced total histology score, but this effect was no longer seen at 40 h. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor did not affect other markers of lung injury or lung inflammation. In this negative experimental animal study, severe S. pneumoniae pneumonia in rats is associated with pulmonary complement activation. Repeated treatment with nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor, although successfully delivered to the lungs, does not affect pulmonary complement activation, lung inflammation or lung injury.

  18. Hemispheric Asymmetry in Transition from Equatorial Plasma Bubble to Blob as Deduced from 630.0 nm Airglow Observations at Low Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeheung; Martinis, Carlos R.; Luehr, Hermann; Pfaff, Robert F.; Kwak, Young-Sil

    2016-01-01

    Transitions from depletions to enhancements of 630.0 nm nighttime airglow have been observed at Arecibo. Numerical simulations by Krall et al. (2009) predicted that they should occur only in one hemisphere, which has not yet been confirmed observationally. In this study we investigate the hemispheric conjugacy of the depletion-to-enhancement transition using multiple instruments. We focus on one event observed in the American longitude sector on 22 December 2014: 630.0 nm airglow depletions evolved into enhancements in the Northern Hemisphere while the evolution did not occur in the conjugate location in the Southern Hemisphere. Concurrent plasma density measured by low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites and 777.4 nm airglow images support that the depletions and enhancements of 630.0 nm night time airglow reflect plasma density decreases and increases (blobs), respectively. Characteristics of the airglow depletions, in the context of the LEO satellite data, further suggest that the plasma density depletion deduced from the airglow data represents equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) rather than medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances from midlatitudes. Hence, the event in this study can be interpreted as EPB-to-blob transition.

  19. cDNA and deduced primary structure of basic phospholipase A2 with neurotoxic activity from the venom secretion of the Crotalus durissus collilineatus rattlesnake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H.R. Fagundes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To illustrate the construction of precursor complementary DNAs, we isolated mRNAs from whole venom samples. After reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, we amplified the cDNA coding for a neurotoxic protein, phospholipase A2 D49 (PLA2 D49, from the venom of Crotalus durissus collilineatus (Cdc PLA2. The cDNA encoding Cdc PLA2 from whole venom was sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of this cDNA has high overall sequence identity with the group II PLA2 protein family. Cdc PLA2 has 14 cysteine residues capable of forming seven disulfide bonds that characterize this group of PLA2 enzymes. Cdc PLA2 was isolated using conventional Sephadex G75 column chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The molecular mass was estimated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We tested the neuromuscular blocking activities on chick biventer cervicis neuromuscular tissue. Phylogenetic analysis of Cdc PLA2 showed the existence of two lines of N6-PLA2, denominated F24 and S24. Apparently, the sequences of the New World’s N6-F24-PLA2 are similar to those of the agkistrodotoxin from the Asian genus Gloydius. The sequences of N6-S24-PLA2 are similar to the sequence of trimucrotoxin from the genus Protobothrops, found in the Old World.

  20. The thermal history of the Acapulco meteorite and its parent body deduced from U/Pb systematics in mineral separates and bulk rock fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpel, Christa; Manhès, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    U/Pb systematics of the Acapulco meteorite have been determined on phosphate and feldspar separates and on grain size fractions of bulk material. The latter show an enrichment of U and Th with respect to CI chondrites and a low (˜1) Th/U ratio. This is consistent with the model that the majority of U and Th was added early by a low temperature melt to the Acapulco precursor. The feldspar exhibits a Pb isotope composition that is close to the primordial Pb composition. Mineral separates and bulk fractions define a 207Pb/ 206Pb isochron. The age corresponds to 4555.9 ± 0.6 Ma. This age anchors the thermal evolution of the Acapulco parent body into an absolute time scale. Evaluation of the Hf/W and U/Pb records with the cooling rates deduced from mineralogical investigations confirms the idea that the Acapulco parent body was fragmented during its cooling. The U/Pb system precisely dates this break-up at 4556 ± 1 Ma.

  1. Convex-PL: a novel knowledge-based potential for protein-ligand interactions deduced from structural databases using convex optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadukova, Maria; Grudinin, Sergei

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel optimization approach to train a free-shape distance-dependent protein-ligand scoring function called Convex-PL. We do not impose any functional form of the scoring function. Instead, we decompose it into a polynomial basis and deduce the expansion coefficients from the structural knowledge base using a convex formulation of the optimization problem. Also, for the training set we do not generate false poses with molecular docking packages, but use constant RMSD rigid-body deformations of the ligands inside the binding pockets. This allows the obtained scoring function to be generally applicable to scoring of structural ensembles generated with different docking methods. We assess the Convex-PL scoring function using data from D3R Grand Challenge 2 submissions and the docking test of the CASF 2013 study. We demonstrate that our results outperform the other 20 methods previously assessed in CASF 2013. The method is available at http://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software/Convex-PL/.

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the gene for alkaline phosphatase of Thermus caldophilus GK24 and characteristics of the deduced primary structure of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, T; Lee, J H; Kim, H K; Hoe, H S; Kwon, S T

    1999-11-15

    The gene encoding Thermus caldophilus GK24 (Tca) alkaline phosphatase was cloned into Escherichia coli. The primary structure of Tca alkaline phosphatase was deduced from its nucleotide sequence. The Tca alkaline phosphatase precursor, including the signal peptide sequence, was comprised of 501 amino acid residues. Its molecular mass was determined to be 54¿ omitted¿760 Da. On the alignment of the amino acid sequence, Tca alkaline phosphatase showed sequence homology with the microbial alkaline phosphatases, 20% identity with E. coli alkaline phosphatase and 22% Bacillus subtilis (Bsu) alkaline phosphatases. High sequence identity was observed in the regions containing the Ser-102 residue of the active site, the zinc and magnesium binding sites of E. coli alkaline phosphatase. Comparison of Tca alkaline phosphatase and E. coli alkaline phosphatase structures suggests that the reduced activity of the Tca alkaline phosphatase, in the presence of zinc, is directly involved in some of the different metal binding sites. Heat-stable Tca alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in E. coli YK537, harboring pJRAP.

  3. Experimental and data analysis techniques for deducing collision-induced forces from photographic histories of engine rotor fragment impact/interaction with a containment ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeghiayan, R. P.; Leech, J. W.; Witmer, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis method termed TEJ-JET is described whereby measured transient elastic and inelastic deformations of an engine-rotor fragment-impacted structural ring are analyzed to deduce the transient external forces experienced by that ring as a result of fragment impact and interaction with the ring. Although the theoretical feasibility of the TEJ-JET concept was established, its practical feasibility when utilizing experimental measurements of limited precision and accuracy remains to be established. The experimental equipment and the techniques (high-speed motion photography) employed to measure the transient deformations of fragment-impacted rings are described. Sources of error and data uncertainties are identified. Techniques employed to reduce data reading uncertainties and to correct the data for optical-distortion effects are discussed. These procedures, including spatial smoothing of the deformed ring shape by Fourier series and timewise smoothing by Gram polynomials, are applied illustratively to recent measurements involving the impact of a single T58 turbine rotor blade against an aluminum containment ring. Plausible predictions of the fragment-ring impact/interaction forces are obtained by one branch of this TEJ-JET method; however, a second branch of this method, which provides an independent estimate of these forces, remains to be evaluated.

  4. Deduced sequences of the membrane fusion and attachment proteins of canine distemper viruses isolated from dogs and wild animals in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chae-Wun; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Nak-Hyung; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Choi, In-Soo

    2013-08-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes highly contagious respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological diseases in wild and domestic animal species. Despite a broad vaccination campaign, the disease is still a serious problem worldwide. In this study, six field CDV strains were isolated from three dogs, two raccoon dogs, and one badger in Korea. The full sequence of the genes encoding fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) proteins were compared with those of other CDVs including field and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis for the F and H genes indicated that the two CDV strains isolated from dogs were most closely related to Chinese strains in the Asia-1 genotype. Another four strains were closely related to Japanese strains in the Asia-2 genotype. The six currently isolated strains shared 90.2-92.1% and 88.2-91.8% identities with eight commercial vaccine strains in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the F protein, respectively. They also showed 90.1-91.4% and 87.8-90.7% identities with the same vaccine strains in their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the H protein, respectively. Different N-linked glycosylation sites were identified in the F and H genes of the six isolates from the prototype vaccine strain Onderstepoort. Collectively, these results demonstrate that at least two different CDV genotypes currently exist in Korea. The considerable genetic differences between the vaccine strains and wild-type isolates would be a major factor of the incomplete protection of dogs from CDV infections.

  5. Convex-PL: a novel knowledge-based potential for protein-ligand interactions deduced from structural databases using convex optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadukova, Maria; Grudinin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    We present a novel optimization approach to train a free-shape distance-dependent protein-ligand scoring function called Convex-PL. We do not impose any functional form of the scoring function. Instead, we decompose it into a polynomial basis and deduce the expansion coefficients from the structural knowledge base using a convex formulation of the optimization problem. Also, for the training set we do not generate false poses with molecular docking packages, but use constant RMSD rigid-body deformations of the ligands inside the binding pockets. This allows the obtained scoring function to be generally applicable to scoring of structural ensembles generated with different docking methods. We assess the Convex-PL scoring function using data from D3R Grand Challenge 2 submissions and the docking test of the CASF 2013 study. We demonstrate that our results outperform the other 20 methods previously assessed in CASF 2013. The method is available at http://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software/Convex-PL/.

  6. Reconstruction of C-1 lateral mass with titanium mesh cage after resection of an aneurysmal bone cyst of the atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Vincent Y; Deviren, Vedat; Ames, Christopher P

    2009-02-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are rare benign tumors with a prevalence of 0.14 cases per 100,000 people. A majority of cases arise during adolescence, and there is a female predominance. This lesion accounts for 1.4% of all primary bone tumors. Aneurysmal bone cysts occur mainly in the long bones, with spinal involvement in 10-30% of cases. Cervical spine ABCs account for about one-third of spinal ABCs, and atlas involvement occurs in 1% of cases. Resection of ABCs at the atlas is difficult because of the location and the lack of proper instrumentation for reconstruction of C-1. The authors present a case of an ABC at C-1 in a child who underwent resection of the lesion and reconstruction of the lateral mass with a titanium mesh cage.

  7. Size distribution and chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol formed from C1-initiated oxidation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Weijun; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Zhao, Weixiong; Wang, Zhenya; Fang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from C1-initiated oxidation of toluene was investigated in a home-made smog chamber. The size distribution and chemical composition of SOA particles were measured using aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer and the aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS), respectively. According to a large number of single aerosol diameter and mass spectra, the size distribution and chemical composition of SOA were obtained statistically. Experimental results showed that SOA particles created by C1-initiated oxidation of toluene is predominantly in the form of fine particles, which have diameters less than 2.5 microm (i.e., PM2.5), and glyoxal, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, benzoquinone, benzoic acid, benzyl hydroperoxide and benzyl methyl nitrate are the major products components in the SOA. The possible reaction mechanisms leading to these products are also proposed.

  8. ClC-1 mutations in myotonia congenita patients: insights into molecular gating mechanisms and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrici, P; Maggi, L; Mangiatordi, G F; Dinardo, M M; Altamura, C; Brugnoni, R; Alberga, D; Pinter, G Lauria; Ricci, G; Siciliano, G; Micheli, R; Annicchiarico, G; Lattanzi, G; Nicolotti, O; Morandi, L; Bernasconi, P; Desaphy, J-F; Mantegazza, R; Camerino, D Conte

    2015-09-15

    Loss-of-function mutations of the skeletal muscle ClC-1 channel cause myotonia congenita with variable phenotypes. Using patch clamp we show that F484L, located in the conducting pore, probably induces mild dominant myotonia by right-shifting the slow gating of ClC-1 channel, without exerting a dominant-negative effect on the wild-type (WT) subunit. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that F484L affects the slow gate by increasing the frequency and the stability of H-bond formation between E232 in helix F and Y578 in helix R. Three other myotonic ClC-1 mutations are shown to produce distinct effects on channel function: L198P shifts the slow gate to positive potentials, V640G reduces channel activity, while L628P displays a WT-like behaviour (electrophysiology data only). Our results provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying normal and altered ClC-1 function. Myotonia congenita is an inherited disease caused by loss-of-function mutations of the skeletal muscle ClC-1 chloride channel, characterized by impaired muscle relaxation after contraction and stiffness. In the present study, we provided an in-depth characterization of F484L, a mutation previously identified in dominant myotonia, in order to define the genotype-phenotype correlation, and to elucidate the contribution of this pore residue to the mechanisms of ClC-1 gating. Patch-clamp recordings showed that F484L reduced chloride currents at every tested potential and dramatically right-shifted the voltage dependence of slow gating, thus contributing to the mild clinical phenotype of affected heterozygote carriers. Unlike dominant mutations located at the dimer interface, no dominant-negative effect was observed when F484L mutant subunits were co-expressed with wild type. Molecular dynamics simulations further revealed that F484L affected the slow gate by increasing the frequency and stability of the H-bond formation between the pore residue E232 and the R helix residue Y578. In addition

  9. [5C + 1N] annulations: two novel routes to substituted dihydrofuro[3,2-c]pyridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Zhang, Rui; Liang, Yongjiu; Dong, Dewen

    2012-10-19

    Two novel routes based on [5C + 1N] annulations for the synthesis of 2,3-dihydrofuro[3,2-c]pyridines are described. Ammonium acetate (NH(4)OAc) is used as an ammonia source in both routes. The first route utilizes 1-acyl-1-[(dimethylamino)alkenoyl]cyclopropanes as a five-carbon 1,5-bielectrophilic species and combines the [5C + 1N] annulation and regioselective ring-enlargement of cyclopropyl ketone into one pot, whereas the second route utilizes 3-acyl-2-[(dimethylamino)alkenyl]-4,5-dihydrofurans as the five-carbon synthons, which involves a sequential intermolecular aza-addition, intramolecular aza-nucleophilic addition/elimination, and dehydration reaction.

  10. Quantum wave packet calculation of reaction probabilities, cross sections, and rate constants for the C(1D) + HD reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogtas, Fahrettin; Bulut, Niyazi; Akpinar, Sinan

    The time-dependent real wave packet method has been used to study the C(1D) + HD reaction. The state-to-state and state-to-all reactive scattering probabilities for a broad range of energies are calculated at zero total angular momentum. The probabilities for J > 0 are estimated from accurately computed J = 0 probabilities by using the J-shifting approximation. The integral cross sections for a large energy range, and thermal rate constants are calculated.

  11. Synthetic Studies Toward (−)-FR901483 Using a Conjugate Allylation to Install the C-1 Quaternary Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Gotchev, Dimitar B.; Comins, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    Two approaches to the aza-tricyclo dodecane skeleton of (−)-FR901483 are reported. Both routes utilized a Grignard addition to an N-acylpyridinium salt to establish the absolute stereochemistry at C-6 and a highly diastereoselective conjugate allylation reaction to form the quaternary center at C-1 of the natural product in excellent yield. Although the desired polysubstituted piperidine intermediates were prepared regio- and stereoselectively, the construction of the C-8/C-9 bond connectivit...

  12. Facial Nerve Recovery in KbDb and C1q Knockout Mice: A Role for Histocompatibility Complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdagli, Seden; Williams, Ryan A.; Kim, Hyun J.; Yan, Yuling; Mustapha, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding the mechanisms in nerve damage can lead to better outcomes for neuronal rehabilitation. The purpose of our study was to assess the effect of major histocompatibility complex I deficiency and inhibition of the classical complement pathway (C1q) on functional recovery and cell survival in the facial motor nucleus (FMN) after crush injury in adult and juvenile mice. Methods: A prospective blinded analysis of functional recovery and cell survival in the FMN after a unilateral facial nerve crush injury in juvenile and adult mice was undertaken between wild-type, C1q knockout (C1q−/−), and KbDb knockout (KbDb−/−) groups. Whisker function was quantified to assess functional recovery. Neuron counts were performed to determine neuron survival in the FMN after recovery. Results: After facial nerve injury, all adult wild-type mice fully recovered. Juvenile mice recovered incompletely corresponding to a greater neuron loss in the FMN of juveniles compared with adults. The C1q−/− juvenile and adult groups did not differ from wild type. The KbDb−/− adults demonstrated 50% recovery of whisker movement and decreased cell survival in FMN. The KbDb−/− juvenile group did not demonstrate any difference from control group. Conclusion: Histocompatibility complex I plays a role for neuroprotection and enhanced facial nerve recovery in adult mice. Inhibition of the classical complement pathway alone does not affect functional recovery or neuronal survival. The alternative and mannose binding pathways pose alternative means for activating the final components of the pathway that may lead to acute nerve damage. PMID:28293529

  13. Technique for direct posterior reduction in irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation: multi-planar realignment of C1-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke, Pravin; Sahoo, Sushanta; Khandelwal, N K; Ghuman, Mandeep S

    2015-04-01

    Apart from the commonly seen antero-posterior subluxation of C1 over C2, the dislocation may occur in vertical, lateral or rotational plane. Desired C1-2 realignment can be achieved by corrrecting its dislocation in all planes. We describe a technique for the same. The clinical and radiological features of 16 patients (4 – traumatic and 12 – congenital) with irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) admitted in the last 1.5 years were studied. Specific attention was paid to vertical dislocation with lateral and rotational components, apart from anterior-posterior subluxation. They were operated through direct posterior approach. The technique using a long rod holder as lever and screw head (tulip) as fulcrum was employed to achieve C1-2 realignment in all planes. The postoperative clinical and radiological data was analyzed and compared with preoperative data. Patients presented with progressive myelopathy and/or progressive worsening of neck pain. Vertical dislocation was seen in 11 patients with congenital AAD in addition to the antero-posterior subluxation seen in all. Three patients with traumatic AAD and 8 with congenital AAD had additional lateral dislocation or lateral tilt. Three patients with traumatic AAD and 7 with congenital AAD showed rotational component. Postoperatively, all patients showed clinical improvement. The antero-posterior and vertical realignment could be achieved in all except one. Similarly, rotational and lateral components could be completely corrected in 8 out of 10 patients. The technique appears to realign the C1-2 in all planes and provides good anatomical restoration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multi-kinase inhibitor C1 triggers mitotic catastrophe of glioma stem cells mainly through MELK kinase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuko Minata

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly lethal brain tumor. Due to resistance to current therapies, patient prognosis remains poor and development of novel and effective GBM therapy is crucial. Glioma stem cells (GSCs have gained attention as a therapeutic target in GBM due to their relative resistance to current therapies and potent tumor-initiating ability. Previously, we identified that the mitotic kinase maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK is highly expressed in GBM tissues, specifically in GSCs, and its expression is inversely correlated with the post-surgical survival period of GBM patients. In addition, patient-derived GSCs depend on MELK for their survival and growth both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate evidence that the role of MELK in the GSC survival is specifically dependent on its kinase activity. With in silico structure-based analysis for protein-compound interaction, we identified the small molecule Compound 1 (C1 is predicted to bind to the kinase-active site of MELK protein. Elimination of MELK kinase activity was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay in nano-molar concentrations. When patient-derived GSCs were treated with C1, they underwent mitotic arrest and subsequent cellular apoptosis in vitro, a phenotype identical to that observed with shRNA-mediated MELK knockdown. In addition, C1 treatment strongly induced tumor cell apoptosis in slice cultures of GBM surgical specimens and attenuated growth of mouse intracranial tumors derived from GSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Lastly, C1 treatment sensitizes GSCs to radiation treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that targeting MELK kinase activity is a promising approach to attenuate GBM growth by eliminating GSCs in tumors.

  15. Protection with Recombinant Clostridium botulinum C1 and D Binding Domain Subunit (Hc) Vaccines Against C and D Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-16

    lethal by erosol to nonhuman primates [J. Anderson, personal com- unication]. This information taken together supports the elief that BoNT C and D, and...vaccinations of 5 g per mouse of ither rBoNT/C1 Hc, rBoNT/D Hc, or a bivalent vaccine con- aining both antigens were challenged with 100,000 mouse D50 of

  16. Polarizations of χc1 and χc2 in prompt production at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hua-Sheng; Ma, Yan-Qing; Wang, Kai; Chao, Kuang-Ta

    2014-05-09

    Prompt χc production at hadron colliders may provide a unique test for the color-octet mechanism in nonrelativistic QCD. We present an analysis for the polarization observables of χc1 and χc2 at next-to-leading order in αS and propose to measure them at the LHC, which is expected to be important for testing the validity of nonrelativistic QCD.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of NR3C1 gene and recurrent depressive disorder in population of Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałecka, Elżbieta; Szemraj, Janusz; Bieńkiewicz, Małgorzata; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Przybyłowska-Sygut, Karolina; Gałecki, Piotr; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2013-02-01

    Depressive disorder is a disease characterized by disturbances in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. Abnormalities include the increased level of glucocorticoids (GC) and changes in sensitivity to these hormones. The changes are related to glucocorticoid receptors gene (NR3C1) variants. The NR3C1 gene is suggested to be a candidate gene affecting depressive disorder risk and management. The aim of this study was to investigate polymorphisms within the NR3C1 gene and their role in the susceptibility to recurrent depressive disorder (rDD). 181 depressive patients and 149 healthy ethnically matched controls were included in the study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms were assessed using polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Statistical significance between rDD patients and controls was observed for the allele and genotype frequencies at three loci: BclI, N363S, and ER22/23EK. The presence of C allele, CC, and GC genotype of BclI polymorphism, G allele and GA genotype for N363S and ER22/23EK variants respectively were associated with increased rDD risk. Two haplotypes indicated higher susceptibility for rDD, while haplotype GAG played a protective role with OR(dis) 0.29 [95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.13-0.64]. Data generated from this study support the earlier results that genetic variants of the NR3C1 gene are associated with rDD and suggest further consideration on the possible involvement of these variants in etiology of the disease.

  18. A new route to multifunctionalized p-terphenyls and heteroaryl analogues via [5C + 1C(N)] annulation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liang, Fushun; Cheng, Xin; Liu, Qun

    2009-01-16

    p-Terphenyls and heteroaryl analogues including bipyridines were prepared via [5C + 1C(N)] annulation of alpha-aryl-alpha-alkenoyl ketene-(S,S)-acetals (five carbon 1,5-bielectrophilic species) with nitroethane or ammonium acetate. The reaction features mild conditions, multisubstitution, and functional group tolerance and is metal catalyst free. The present protocol provides a new alternative to the conventional methodologies for the synthesis of teraryls.

  19. Human parvovirus infection: rheumatic manifestations, angioedema, C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency, ANA positivity, and possible onset of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawaz-Estrup, F

    1996-07-01

    To investigate the clinical and serological characteristics of parvovirus infection. during 1993-4, 9 adult patients presented with polyarthralgias/polyarthritis. Clinical evaluation and serological studies of antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor (RF), IgM and IgG antibodies to human parvovirus were done in all patients. Other serologies including anti-DNA, serum complement, and C1 esterase inhibitor levels were obtained in some patients. All 9 patients had polyarthralgias/polyarthritis, serological evidence of parvovirus B19 IgM and IgG antibodies, and normal sedimentation rate. All patients were seronegative for RF. Four women had positive ANA titers. In 2 of them the ANA positivity was transient. One developed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Three women had angioedema of the face and tongue; one had transient C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency and another a transient decrease in C4 levels. Parvovirus may be implicated in the development of SLE as well as other chronic arthropathies. This is the first reported case of angioedema and decreased C1 esterase inhibitor levels associated with parvovirus infection.

  20. Posterior C1-C2 screw and rod instrument for reduction and fixation of basilar invagination with atlantoaxial dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng Li; Zhou, Ding Biao; Yu, Xin Guang; Yin, Yi Heng; Qiao, Guang Yu

    2014-08-01

    To report the surgical technique and preliminary clinical results for the treatment of basilar invagination (BI) with atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) by posterior C1-C2 pedicle screw and rod instrument. Between July 2012 and August 2013, 33 patients who had BI with AAD underwent surgery at our institution. Pre and postoperative three-dimensional computed tomographic (CT) scans were performed to assess the degree of dislocation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to evaluate the compression of the medulla oblongata. For all patients, reduction of the AAD was conducted by two steps: fastening nuts and rods was performed to achieve the horizontal reduction. Distraction between C1 and C2 screws was performed to obtain the vertical reduction. No neurovascular injury occurred during surgery. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 15 months (mean 10.38 months) in 32 patients. Post-operative three-dimensional CT showed that complete horizontal reduction was obtained in 30/33 (90.9%), and complete vertical reduction was obtained in 31/33 (93.9%). The repeated three-dimensional CT and MR image demonstrated that bony fusion and the decompression of the medulla oblongata were obtained in all patients. Clinical symptoms improved significantly 3 months after surgery. This C1-C2 pedicle screw and rod instrument is a promising technique for the treatment of BI with AAD.

  1. and Epigenetic Dysregulation in Diabetes-prone Bicongenic B6.NODC11bxC1tb Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Garrigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In Type 1 diabetic (T1D human monocytes, STAT5 aberrantly binds to epigenetic regulatory sites of two proinflammatory genes, CSF2 (encoding granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and PTGS2 (encoding prostaglandin synthase 2/cyclooxygenase 2. Bicongenic B6.NOD C11bxC1tb mice re-create this phenotype of T1D monocytes with only two nonobese diabetic (NOD Idd subloci (130.8 Mb–149.7 Mb, of Idd5 on Chr 1 and 32.08–53.85 Mb of Idd4.3 on Chr11 on C57BL/6 genetic background. These two Idd loci interact through STAT5 binding at upstream regulatory regions affecting Csf2 ( Chr 11 and Ptgs2 ( Chr 1 expression. B6.NODC11bxC1tb mice exhibited hyperglycemia and immune destruction of pancreatic islets between 8 and 30 weeks of age, with 12%–22% penetrance. Thus, B6.NODC11bxC1tb mice embody NOD epigenetic dysregulation of gene expression in myeloid cells, and this defect appears to be sufficient to impart genetic susceptibility to diabetes in an otherwise genetically nonautoimmune mouse.

  2. Neutrophils Induce Astroglial Differentiation and Migration of Human Neural Stem Cells via C1q and C3a Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Francisca; Flanagan, Lisa; Uchida, Nobuko; Anderson, Aileen J.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory processes play a key role in pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases/trauma, but the effect of immune cells and factors on neurotransplantation strategies remains unclear. We hypothesized that cellular and humoral components of innate immunity alter fate and migration of human neural stem cells (hNSC). In these experiments, conditioned media collected from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) selectively increased hNSC astrogliogenesis and promoted cell migration in vitro. PMN were shown to generate C1q and C3a; exposure of hNSC to PMN-synthesized concentrations of these complement proteins promoted astrogliogenesis and cell migration. Furthermore, in vitro, Abs directed against C1q and C3a reversed the fate and migration effects observed. In a proof-of-concept in vivo experiment, blockade of C1q and C3a transiently altered hNSC migration and reversed astroglial fate after spinal cord injury. Collectively, these data suggest that modulation of the innate/humoral inflammatory microenvironment may impact the potential of cell-based therapies for recovery and repair following CNS pathology. PMID:28687659

  3. In Vitro Toxicity of Naturally Occurring Silica Nanoparticles in C1 Coal 
in Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian LI

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective China’s Xuan Wei County in Yunnan Province have the world’s highest incidence of lung cancer in nonsmoking women-20 times higher than the rest of China. Previous studies showed, this high lung cancer incidence may be associated with the silica particles embedded in the production combustion from the C1 coal. The aim of this study is to separate the silica particles from production combustion from the C1 bituminous coal in Xuan Wei County of Yunnan Province, and study in vitro toxicity of naturally occurring silica particles on BEAS-2B. Methods ①Separating the silica particles from combustion products of C1 bituminous coal by physical method, observing the morphology by Scanning Electron Microscope, analysis elements by SEM-EDX, observed the single particle morphology by Transmission Electron Microscope, analyed its particle size distribution by Laser particle size analyzer, the surface area of silica particles were determined by BET nitrogen adsorption analysis; ②Cell viability of the experimental group (silica; naturally occurring, control group (silica; industrial produced and crystalline silica was detected by assay used the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT method, and the reactive oxygen species (ROS, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were determined after 24 h-72 h exposed to these particles. Results ①The physical method can separate silica particles from production combustion from the C1 bituminous coal, which have different size, and from 30 nm to 120 nm particles accounted for 86.8%, different morphology, irregular surface area and containing trace of aluminum, calcium and iron and other elements; ②Under the same concentration, the experiment group have higher toxicity on BEAS-2B than control groups. Conclusion ①Physical method can separate silica particles from production combustion from the C1 bituminous coal and not change the original morphology and containing trace;

  4. Artrodesis C1C2 con tornillos transarticulares en artritis reumatoidea: experiencia y revisión de la literatura Artrodese C1 C2 com parafusos transarticulares em artrite reumatoide: experiência e revisão de literatura C1 C2 arthrodesis with transarticular screws in rheumatoid arthritis: experience and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyonel Beaulieu Lalanne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Describir los resultados clínicos e imagenológicos utilizando la técnica de fijación C1 C2 con tornillos transarticulares y asas de alambre en pacientes portadores de AR en un seguimiento a largo plazo y revisar la literatura actual. MÉTODO: Entre los años 2002 y 2006, 11 pacientes (9 mujeres y 2 hombres con inestabilidad C1 C2 secundaria a AR fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente. Se realizó fijación C1 C2 con tornillos transarticulares por vía posterior más asas de alambre y aplicación de injerto óseo autólogo de cresta ilíaca. Se registró Índice de Ranawat pre y posoperatorio, Distancia Anterior Atlas Odontoides (DAAO pre y posoperatorio, tiempo operatorio, días de hospitalización, complicaciones intra y posoperatorias y tiempo de consolidación radiológica, con un seguimiento promedio de 34 meses. RESULTADOS: Todos los pacientes presentaron mejoría del Índice de Ranawat en el postoperatorio. La DAAO preoperatoria promedio fue de 11,9 mm (DS ± 2,57, rango 7 a 16, y la DAAO postoperatoria promedio fue de 3 mm (DS ± 1,20, rango 2 a 6. El tiempo quirúrgico fue de 94 minutos en promedio y el promedio de días de hospitalización fue de 7 días. No se presentaron complicaciones intraoperatorias. Un caso presentó seroma de herida operatoria que requirió tratamiento quirúrgico. El tiempo de consolidación fue en promedio 14 semanas. CONCLUSIÓN: La artrodesis atlantoaxial con tornillos y amarras es una buena alternativa para el manejo de la inestabilidad C1-C2 en pacientes portadores de AR, consiguiendo buenos resultados clínicos e imagenológicos en un seguimiento a largo plazo.OBJETIVO: Apresentar a experiência com a técnica de fixação C1-C2 com parafusos transarticulares e cerclagem de fio metálico nos pacientes portadores de AR, assim como a revisão da literatura. MÉTODO: Entre os anos 2002 e 2006, 11 pacientes (9 mulheres e 2 homens com instabilidade C1-C2 e portadores de AR foram submetidos a

  5. Molecular phylogeny of C1 inhibitor depicts two immunoglobulin-like domains fusion in fishes and ray-finned fishes specific intron insertion after separation from zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Abhishek, E-mail: akumar@bot.uni-kiel.de [Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology in Botany, Institute of Botany, Christian-Albrechts-University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Bhandari, Anita [Molecular Physiology, Zoological Institute, Christian-Albrechts-University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Sarde, Sandeep J. [Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology in Botany, Institute of Botany, Christian-Albrechts-University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Goswami, Chandan [National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar, Orissa (India)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • C1 inhibitors of fishes have two Ig domains fused in the N-terminal end. • Spliceosomal introns gain in two Ig domains of selected ray-finned fishes. • C1 inhibitors gene is maintained from 450 MY on the same locus. • C1 inhibitors gene is missing in frog and lampreys. • C1 inhibitors of tetrapod and fishes differ in the RCL region. - Abstract: C1 inhibitor (C1IN) is a multi-facet serine protease inhibitor in the plasma cascades, inhibiting several proteases, notably, regulates both complement and contact system activation. Despite huge advancements in the understanding of C1IN based on biochemical properties and its roles in the plasma cascades, the phylogenetic history of C1IN remains uncharacterized. To date, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history of C1IN. Herein, we explored phylogenetic history of C1IN gene in vertebrates. Fishes have C1IN with two immunoglobulin like domains attached in the N-terminal region. The RCL regions of CIIN from fishes and tetrapod genomes have variations at the positions P2 and P1′. Gene structures of C1IN gene from selected ray-finned fishes varied in the Ig domain region with creation of novel intron splitting exon Im2 into Im2a and Im2b. This intron is limited to ray-finned fishes with genome size reduced below 1 Gb. Hence, we suggest that genome compaction and associated double-strand break repairs are behind this intron gain. This study reveals the evolutionary history of C1IN and confirmed that this gene remains the same locus for ∼450 MY in 52 vertebrates analysed, but it is not found in frogs and lampreys.

  6. Upper Mantle Seismic Anisotropy Patterns around the La Réunion Hotspot deduced from SKS-splitting measurements: Plate, Plume and Ridges signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, John-Robert; Barruol, Guilhem; Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Mazzullo, Alessandro; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Sigloch, Karin

    2017-04-01

    We present results of upper mantle seismic anisotropy in the Southwest Indian Ocean around the hotspot of La Réunion, deduced from SKS splitting measurements using the 'SplitLab' toolbox. Data analysed in this study were recorded by 20 terrestrial and 57 ocean-bottom three-component seismometers installed in the framework of the RHUM-RUM project (www.rhum-rum.net). Broad-band and wide-band ocean-bottom instruments were deployed around the La Réunion Island and along the Central and Southwest Indian Ridges (deployment: R/V Marion Dufresne, 2012, MD192 - recovery: R/V Meteor, 2013, M101), and recorded for 8 to 13 months. We discuss the anisotropy signatures that are potentially induced by the absolute motion of the African Plate, by the spreading of the Central and Southwest Indian Mid-Ocean Ridges (CIR & SWIR), and by the interaction of the ascending plume with the overlying lithosphere and the neighbouring CIR and SWIR. The observed pattern displays a ridge-parallel anisotropy beneath the SWIR that suggests an along-axis upper mantle flow controlled by the thick and cold lithosphere on both sides of the ridge. We furthermore observe a coherent regional anisotropy pattern between La Réunion and the CIR. Both body and surface wave analysis suggest that this dominant flow is located at asthenospheric depths and could be consistent with a preserved feeding of the ridge by the mantle upwelling associated with the Réunion hotspot, as first proposed by Morgan (1978). Finally, we quantitatively compare the azimuthal anisotropy derived from SKS splitting with those from surface wave data.

  7. "-o C1) (Q

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    van Potsdam uitgereik, waarin Franse Hugenote verwelkom is. Deur vrystelling van belasting, ander toegewings, toetreding tot die gildes en die toekomstige verkryging van burgerregte het meer Hugenote na Brandenburg gekom. Byelke. Hugenote-nedersetting het 'n eie predikant. Franse dienste gelei. In Amsterdam het ...

  8. Investigation of the Herzberg (C1Σ+→A1Π) band system in 12C17O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakalla, Rafał

    2015-10-01

    The C→A (0,1), (0,2) and (0,3) rovibronic bands of the less-abundant 12C17O isotopologue are studied in high resolution using a high-accuracy dispersive optical spectroscopy in the region of 22,800-26,100 cm-1. Calibration with respect to simultaneously recorded thorium atomic lines, obtained from several overlapped orders of the spectrum in the visible range, as well as a stainless steel hollow-cathode molecular lamp with two anodes, yields an absolute accuracy of wavenumbers measurements of about 0.0025 cm-1 for the CO spectra. All 261 spectra lines of the Herzberg band system in 12C17O, up to Jmax=34, were precisely measured and rotationally analyzed. As a result, the merged rotational constants and rotational equilibrium constants for the C1Σ+ Rydberg state, as well as the band origins, the isotope shifts, the RKR turning points, Franck-Condon factors, relative intensities, and r-centroids of the C→A system in the 12C17O isotopologue were obtained. An experimental RKR potential energy curve and vibrational levels of the C1Σ+ state in 12C17O together with highly excited k3Π, c3Π, E1Π, B1Σ+ and D‧1Σ+ states lying in the region between the first dissociation limit and the ionization potential of CO were plotted. A detailed investigation of possible perturbations that should occur in the C1Σ+(υ=0) Rydberg state of less-abundant 12C17O isotopologue in the close vicinity of the k3Π(υ=1, 2) and c3Π(υ=0) states in the region 92,000 cm-1 was performed. In the A1Π, υ=3 state of 12C17O, extensive, multi-state rotational perturbations were found and analyzed. Also, a global isotopic analysis of the C1Σ+ Rydberg state was carried out in the 12C16O, 12C17O, 13C16O, 12C18O, 13C17O, and 13C18O as well as in 14C16O and 14C18O isotopologues. This analysis enabled us to determine, amongst others, the vibrational equilibrium constants in 12C17O for the C1Σ+ state, to improve these constants in the 12C16O, 13C16O, 12C18O, 13C17O, and 13C18O isotopologues and

  9. Zebrafish scube1 (signal peptide-CUB (complement protein C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1)-EGF (epidermal growth factor) domain-containing protein 1) is involved in primitive hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Ku-Chi; Tu, Cheng-Fen; Lee, Shyh-Jye; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2013-02-15

    scube1 (signal peptide-CUB (complement protein C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1)-EGF domain-containing protein 1), the founding member of a novel secreted and cell surface SCUBE protein family, is expressed predominantly in various developing tissues in mice. However, its function in primitive hematopoiesis remains unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized zebrafish scube1 and analyzed its function by injecting antisense morpholino-oligonucleotide into embryos. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that zebrafish scube1 mRNA is maternally expressed and widely distributed during early embryonic development. Knockdown of scube1 by morpholino-oligonucleotide down-regulated the expression of marker genes associated with early primitive hematopoietic precursors (scl) and erythroid (gata1 and hbbe1), as well as early (pu.1) and late (mpo and l-plastin) myelomonocytic lineages. However, the expression of an early endothelial marker fli1a and vascular morphogenesis appeared normal in scube1 morphants. Overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein (bmp) rescued the expression of scl in the posterior lateral mesoderm during early primitive hematopoiesis in scube1 morphants. Biochemical and molecular analysis revealed that Scube1 could be a BMP co-receptor to augment BMP signaling. Our results suggest that scube1 is critical for and functions at the top of the regulatory hierarchy of primitive hematopoiesis by modulating BMP activity during zebrafish embryogenesis.

  10. International consensus and practical guidelines on the gynecologic and obstetric management of female patients with hereditary angioedema caused by C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero, Teresa; Farkas, Henriette; Bouillet, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    section. Regional anesthesia is preferred to endotracheal intubation. Breast cancer: Attenuated androgens should be avoided. Antiestrogens can worsen angioedema symptoms. In these cases anastrozole might be an alternative. Other issues addressed include special features of HAE-C1-INH treatment in female...... devices, and progestins can be used. Pregnancy: Attenuated androgens are contraindicated and should be discontinued before attempting conception. Plasma-derived human C1 inhibitor concentrate (pdhC1INH) is preferred for acute treatment, short-term prophylaxis, or long-term prophylaxis. Tranexamic acid...... labor and delivery might not be clinically indicated, but pdhC1INH therapeutic doses (20 U/kg) should be available. Nevertheless, each case should be treated based on HAE-C1-INH symptoms during pregnancy and previous labors. pdhC1INH prophylaxis is advised before forceps or vacuum extraction or cesarean...

  11. Structural And Biochemical Studies of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype C1 Light Chain Protease: Implications for Dual Substrate Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R.; Sikorra, S.; Stegmann, C.M.; Pich, A.; Binz, T.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic disease botulism and tetanus. They block neurotransmitter release through specific proteolysis of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) SNAP-25, syntaxin, and synaptobrevin, which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The catalytic component of the clostridial neurotoxins is their light chain (LC), a Zn2+ endopeptidase. There are seven structurally and functionally related botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), termed serotype A to G, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). Each of them exhibits unique specificity for their target SNAREs and peptide bond(s) they cleave. The mechanisms of action for substrate recognition and target cleavage are largely unknown. Here, we report structural and biochemical studies of BoNT/C1-LC, which is unique among BoNTs in that it exhibits dual specificity toward both syntaxin and SNAP-25. A distinct pocket (S1') near the active site likely achieves the correct register for the cleavage site by only allowing Ala as the P1' residue for both SNAP-25 and syntaxin. Mutations of this SNAP-25 residue dramatically reduce enzymatic activity. The remote a-exosite that was previously identified in the complex of BoNT/A-LC and SNAP-25 is structurally conserved in BoNT/C1. However, mutagenesis experiments show that the a-exosite of BoNT/C1 plays a less stringent role in substrate discrimination in comparison to that of BoNT/A, which could account for its dual substrate specificity.

  12. Characterization of the C1 and C2 waste tanks located in the BVEST system at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    There was a major effort to sample and analyze the Active Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL which include the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST). The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, address concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data for the supernatant and sludge in the BVEST waste tanks C-1 and C-2. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) and plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) were denatured as required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In general, the sludge in tanks C1 and C2 was found to be hazardous based on RCRA characteristics and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. Additional characteristics of the C1 and C2 sludge inventory relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

  13. Spatial summation revealed in the earliest visual evoked component C1 and the effect of attention on its linearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Yu, Qing; Zhu, Ziyun; Peng, Yujia; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    In natural scenes, multiple objects are usually presented simultaneously. How do specific areas of the brain respond to multiple objects based on their responses to each individual object? Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that the activity induced by a multiobject stimulus in the primary visual cortex (V1) can be predicted by the linear or nonlinear sum of the activities induced by its component objects. However, there has been little evidence from electroencephelogram (EEG) studies so far. Here we explored how V1 responded to multiple objects by comparing the EEG signals evoked by a three-grating stimulus with those evoked by its two components (the central grating and 2 flanking gratings). We focused on the earliest visual component C1 (onset latency of ∼50 ms) because it has been shown to reflect the feedforward responses of neurons in V1. We found that when the stimulus was unattended, the amplitude of the C1 evoked by the three-grating stimulus roughly equaled the sum of the amplitudes of the C1s evoked by its two components, regardless of the distances between these gratings. When the stimulus was attended, this linear spatial summation existed only when the three gratings were far apart from each other. When the three gratings were close to each other, the spatial summation became compressed. These results suggest that the earliest visual responses in V1 follow a linear summation rule when attention is not involved and that attention can affect the earliest interactions between multiple objects. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. [Surgical treatment of acetabular type C1 acetabular fracture by posteroproximal-posteroanterior sequential reduction and internal fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shu-Hua; Zhu, Jun-Kun; Huang, Shu-Ming; Ye, Ji-Fei; Wu, Quan-Zhou; Ye, Fang; Lü, Guo-Qiang

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the operative reduction techniques and clinical results of surgical treatment of type C1 (AO/ASIF) acetabular fracture by posteroproximal-posteroanterior sequential reduction and internal fixation. From August 2004 to January 2012, 13 patients with type C1 (AO/ASIF) acetabular fracture were treated by posteroproximal-posteroanterior sequential reduction and internal fixation. Of them, 8 cases were male and 5 cases were female with an average age of 42 years years old (ranged, 18 to 64). Pelvis 3-dimentional CT reconstruction were used to confirmed the classification of fracture, and the operation were performed during from 5 to 20 days with an average of 9.5 days. Operation time, blood loss, complications and reduction were recorded and evaluated. The function of hip joint were accessed at the final follow-up. The operation time ranged from 190 to 290 min with an average of 240 min. The mean blood loss was 1 800 ml (ranged, 1 300 to 3 000 ml). One case had superficial infection and healed after 3 weeks. According to Matta reduction criteria, 8 cases obtained anatomical reduction, 4 cases got satisfied results and 1 cases got unsatisfied results. Eleven cases were followed up with an average of (24.0 +/- 8.0) months, and 2 cases were lost to follow-up. According to revised Mede d'Aubingne and Postel evaluation system, 7 cases got excellent results, 2 good, 1 moderate and 1 poor. Posteroproximal-posteroanterior sequential reduction and internal fixation for the treatment of type C1 (AO/ASIF) acetabular fracture can achieve satisfied surgical proces and operation quality.

  15. C1 lateral mass screw placement in occipitalization with atlantoaxial dislocation and basilar invagination: a report of 146 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yi-heng; Yu, Xin-guang; Qiao, Guang-yu; Guo, Sheng-li; Zhang, Jian-ning

    2014-11-15

    Retrospective study of 146 patients with the diagnosis of occipitalization, atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and basilar invagination, using a novel surgical treatment strategy. To introduce a novel fixation and reduction technique. Atlas occipitalization associated with basilar invagination often result in fixed AAD that need reduction and occipitocervical fixation. The widely used occipitocervical fixation with suboccipital screws has several limitations such as the poor screw purchase in maldevelopment of the occipital bone, limited area available for implants in previous suboccipital craniectomy. The placement of occipitalized C1 lateral mass screw is an alternative option. From June 2007 to June 2013, 146 patients of occipitalized atlas with fixed AAD and basilar invagination, underwent fixation and reduction via C1 lateral mass and C2 pars/pedicle screw. A total of 143 patients achieved the follow-up in the range from 6 months to 4 years (average, 30 mo). Neurological improvement was seen in all the 143 patients, with the averaged Japanese Orthopedic Association scores increasing from 11.6 to 15.5. Radiographical evaluation showed that solid bony fusion was achieved in all patients, and complete reduction was attained in 95 patients, and partial reduction (>60%) in 40 patients, and no effective reduction in 8 patients who had additional transoral decompression. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the ventral cervicomedullary compression was relieved in all patients. Although technically demanding, the C1 lateral mass placement in occipitalization is very useful in the rescue situation where more conventional stabilization alternatives are not technically possible, or as routine occipitocervical stabilization. It provides firm stabilization offering an optimum situation for bony fusion, and meanwhile the effective reduction of fixed AAD and basilar invagination. An extremely high fusion rate can be expected with minimal complications and minimal

  16. High prevalence of hepatitis B virus genotype C/C1 in the Minangkabau ethnic group in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siburian Marlinang D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Minangkabau is one of the major ethnic groups in Indonesia. Previous studies with a limited number of samples have shown a different prevalence of HBV/C in the Minangkabau compared to the Indonesian population in general. The aim of this study was to assess the HBV genotype distribution pattern and the prevalence of pre-S, T1753V and A1762T/G1764A mutations among the Minangkabau HBV carriers. The samples were collected from Padang, West Sumatera and from western Java. Mixed primers for specific genotypes were used to determine the HBV genotype. Pre-S or S genes were amplified, sequenced and aligned with reference sequences from GenBank to derive a phylogenetic tree for subgenotyping. Pre-S genes were also analyzed for mutations. The basal core promoter (BCP region was amplified and directly sequenced to analyze T1753V and A1762T/G1764A mutations. Results The predominant HBV genotype among the Minangkabau HBV carriers (n=117 was C (72.6% followed by B (24.8% and co-infection with B and C (2.6%. The prevalence of pre-S mutations, including both the pre-S deletion and pre-S2 start codon mutation, was 41.0%, and the T1753V and A1762T/G1764A mutations were found in 51.9% and 71.2% respectively. HBV/C1 was the predominant HBV subgenotype in the Minangkabau HBV carriers, and was found in 66.2%, followed by B3, B7, C8, B2, B9, C2, and C10 (18.3%, 7.0%, 2.8%, 1.4%, 1.4%, 1.4%, and 1.4% respectively. From samples that were found to be co-infected with HBV B and C, two samples were successfully cloned and subgenotyped, including one with mixed subgenotypes of B3 and C1, and another one with mixed subgenotypes of B7, C1, putative intergenotypic of B/A, and C/A. Furthermore, three samples from donors of non-Minangkabau ethnicity from Padang were found to be infected with an intragenotypic recombination form, including a putative recombinant of B8/B3 and B9/B7. Conclusion HBV/C with subgenotype C1 was the predominant HBV genotype among

  17. Bacterial populations active in metabolism of C1 compounds in the sediment of Lake Washington, a freshwater lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nercessian, Olivier; Noyes, Emma; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Lidstrom, Mary E; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2005-11-01

    Active members of the bacterial community in the sediment of Lake Washington, with special emphasis on C1 utilizers, were identified by employing two complementary culture-independent approaches: reverse transcription of environmental mRNA and 16S rRNA combined with PCR (RT-PCR) and stable-isotope probing (SIP) of DNA with the 13C-labeled C1 substrates methanol, methylamine, formaldehyde, and formate. Analysis of RT-PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA-encoding genes revealed that gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs belonging to Methylobacter and Methylomonas dominate the active methylotroph population, while only one other known methylotrophic lineage, Methylophilaceae, was detected via this approach. Analysis of RT-PCR-amplified functional genes, pmoA and fae, allowed detection of alphaproteobacterial (Methylosinus) and gammaproteobacterial (Methylobacter, Methylomonas, and Methylomicrobium) methanotrophs, methylotrophs of the genus Methylobacterium, and yet-unidentified proteobacteria. SIP experiments allowed detection of a broad variety of groups actively metabolizing C1 compounds. Comparisons between 16S rRNA gene pools amplified from [13C]DNA and from [12C]DNA revealed that the proportion of Methylophilus-related sequences increased in the presence of [13C]methanol, [13C]methylamine, and [13C]formaldehyde; Novosphingobium-related sequences were enriched in the presence of [13C]methanol; Gemmatimonadaceae-related sequences were enriched in the presence of [13C]formaldehyde and [13C]formate; and Xanthomonadaceae-related sequences were enriched in the presence of [13C]formate. Analysis of fae genes amplified from [13C]DNAs isolated from different microcosms revealed specific shifts in populations in response to a specific C1 compound: Methylosinus sequences dominated the [13C]methanol microcosm pool, and beta- and gammaproteobacterial sequences dominated the [13C]methylamine microcosm pool. The [13C]formaldehyde microcosm was dominated by betaproteobacterial

  18. Insights into the Utility of the Focal Adhesion Scaffolding Proteins in the Anaerobic Fungus Orpinomyces sp. C1A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelby Calkins

    Full Text Available Focal adhesions (FAs are large eukaryotic multiprotein complexes that are present in all metazoan cells and function as stable sites of tight adhesion between the extracellular matrix (ECM and the cell's cytoskeleton. FAs consist of anchor membrane protein (integrins, scaffolding proteins (e.g. α-actinin, talin, paxillin, and vinculin, signaling proteins of the IPP complex (e.g. integrin-linked kinase, α-parvin, and PINCH, and signaling kinases (e.g. focal adhesion kinase (FAK and Src kinase. While genes encoding complete focal adhesion machineries are present in genomes of all multicellular Metazoa; incomplete machineries were identified in the genomes of multiple non-metazoan unicellular Holozoa, basal fungal lineages, and amoebozoan representatives. Since a complete FA machinery is required for functioning, the putative role, if any, of these incomplete FA machineries is currently unclear. We sought to examine the expression patterns of FA-associated genes in the anaerobic basal fungal isolate Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A under different growth conditions and at different developmental stages. Strain C1A lacks clear homologues of integrin, and the two signaling kinases FAK and Src, but encodes for all scaffolding proteins, and the IPP complex proteins. We developed a protocol for synchronizing growth of C1A cultures, allowing for the collection and mRNA extraction from flagellated spores, encysted germinating spores, active zoosporangia, and late inactive sporangia of strain C1A. We demonstrate that the genes encoding the FA scaffolding proteins α-actinin, talin, paxillin, and vinculin are indeed transcribed under all growth conditions, and at all developmental stages of growth. Further, analysis of the observed transcriptional patterns suggests the putative involvement of these components in alternative non-adhesion-specific functions, such as hyphal tip growth during germination and flagellar assembly during zoosporogenesis. Based on these

  19. Green laser light (532nm) activates a chloride current in the C1 neuron of Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Peter J; Dholakia, Kishan; Thomas, Roger C; Cottrell, Glen A

    2008-03-15

    Five hundred and thirty-two nanometers laser light evokes neuron-specific electrical responses in identified neurons of Helix ganglia. Such responses are intensity-dependent over the range 25-1500 mW, readily reversible and repeatable. Detailed experiments on the C1 neuron, which is inhibited by 532 nm light, showed that inhibition results from a selective increase in transmembrane Cl(-) ion conductance. Experiments with calcium-sensitive microelectrodes suggest that the response does not result from an increase in [Ca(2+)](i). The change in Cl(-) ion conductance probably occurs in the extensive plasmalemma infoldings of the proximal axon.

  20. Cu (II-Catalyzed Asymmetric Henry Reaction with a Novel C1-Symmetric Aminopinane-Derived Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila Filippova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel C1-symmetric dinitrogen ligand was synthesized in high yield from commercially available (1R,2R,3R,5S-(−-isopinocampheylamine and 1-methyl-2-imidazolecarboxaldehyde. In combination with Cu(OAc2H2O, this new ligand promote the reaction between nitromethane and aliphatic aldehydes with high yields (up to 97% and moderate enantioselectivities (up to 67% ee. The reactions with benzaldehyde required prolonged reaction time that resulted in diminished yields, but accompanied with ee-values in the 55%–76% range.

  1. Distribution of Prochlorococcus Ecotypes in the Red Sea Basin Based on Analyses of rpoC1 Sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Shibl, Ahmed A.

    2016-06-25

    The marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus represent a significant fraction of the global pelagic bacterioplankton community. Specifically, in the surface waters of the Red Sea, they account for around 91% of the phylum Cyanobacteria. Previous work suggested a widespread presence of high-light (HL)-adapted ecotypes in the Red Sea with the occurrence of low-light (LL)-adapted ecotypes at intermediate depths in the water column. To obtain a more comprehensive dataset over a wider biogeographical scope, we used a 454-pyrosequencing approach to analyze the diversity of the Prochlorococcus rpoC1 gene from a total of 113 samples at various depths (up to 500 m) from 45 stations spanning the Red Sea basin from north to south. In addition, we analyzed 45 metagenomes from eight stations using hidden Markov models based on a set of reference Prochlorococcus genomes to (1) estimate the relative abundance of Prochlorococcus based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, and (2) identify and classify rpoC1 sequences as an assessment of the community structure of Prochlorococcus in the northern, central and southern regions of the basin without amplification bias. Analyses of metagenomic data indicated that Prochlorococcus occurs at a relative abundance of around 9% in samples from surface waters (25, 50, 75 m), 3% in intermediate waters (100 m) and around 0.5% in deep-water samples (200–500 m). Results based on rpoC1 sequences using both methods showed that HL II cells dominate surface waters and were also present in deep-water samples. Prochlorococcus communities in intermediate waters (100 m) showed a higher diversity and co-occurrence of low-light and high-light ecotypes. Prochlorococcus communities at each depth range (surface, intermediate, deep sea) did not change significantly over the sampled transects spanning most of the Saudi waters in the Red Sea. Statistical analyses of rpoC1 sequences from metagenomes indicated that the vertical distribution of Prochlorococcus in the water

  2. DMPD: Adipose tissue as an immunological organ: Toll-like receptors, C1q/TNFs andCTRPs. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17681884 Adipose tissue as an immunological organ: Toll-like receptors, C1q/TNFs an...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Adipose tissue as an immunological organ: Toll-like receptors, C1q/TNFs andC...TRPs. PubmedID 17681884 Title Adipose tissue as an immunological organ: Toll-like receptors, C1q/TNF

  3. Transient transcriptional regulation of the CYS-C1 gene and cyanide accumulation upon pathogen infection in the plant immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2013-08-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system.

  4. Integral experiments on in-vessel coolability and vessel creep: results and analysis of the FOREVER-C1 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Karbojian, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas Vaeg., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the FOREVER (Failure Of REactor VEssel Retention) experimental program, which is currently underway at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS). The objectives of the FOREVER experiments are to obtain data and develop validated models (i) on the melt coolability process inside the vessel, in the presence of water (in particular, on the efficacy of the postulated gap cooling to preclude vessel failure); and (ii) on the lower head failure due to the creep process in the absence of water inside and/or outside the lower head. The paper presents the experimental results and analysis of the first FOREVER-C1 test. During this experiment, the 1/10th scale pressure vessel, heated to about 900degC and pressurized to 26 bars, was subjected to creep deformation in a non-stop 24-hours test. The vessel wall displacement data clearly shows different stages of the vessel deformation due to thermal expansion, elastic, plastic and creep processes. The maximum displacement was observed at the lowermost region of the vessel lower plenum. Information on the FOREVER-C1 measured thermal characteristics and analysis of the observed thermal and structural behavior is presented. The coupled nature of thermal and mechanical processes, as well as the effect of other system conditions (such as depressurization) on the melt pool and vessel temperature responses are analyzed. (author)

  5. Athletic training in badminton players modulates the early C1 component of visual evoked potentials: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Xu, Guiping; Zhang, John X; Ye, Zuoer; Wang, Shufang; Zhao, Lun; Lin, Chong-De; Mo, Lei

    2010-12-01

    One basic question in brain plasticity research is whether individual life experience in the normal population can affect very early sensory-perceptual processing. Athletes provide a possible model to explore plasticity of the visual cortex as athletic training in confrontational ball games is quite often accompanied by training of the visual system. We asked professional badminton players to watch video clips related to their training experience and predict where the ball would land and examined whether they differed from non-player controls in the elicited C1, a visual evoked potential indexing V1 activity. Compared with controls, the players made judgments significantly more accurately, albeit not faster. An early ERP component peaking around 65 ms post-stimulus with a scalp topography centering at the occipital pole (electrode Oz) was observed in both groups and interpreted as the C1 component. With comparable latency, amplitudes of this component were significantly enhanced for the players than for the non-players, suggesting that it can be modulated by long-term physical training. The results present a clear case of experience-induced brain plasticity in primary visual cortex for very early sensory processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. HvPap-1 C1A Protease Participates Differentially in the Barley Response to a Pathogen and an Herbivore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; Santamaria, M. Estrella; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Co-evolutionary processes in plant–pathogen/herbivore systems indicate that protease inhibitors have a particular value in biotic interactions. However, little is known about the defensive role of their targets, the plant proteases. C1A cysteine proteases are the most abundant enzymes responsible for the proteolytic activity during different processes like germination, development and senescence in plants. To identify and characterize C1A cysteine proteases of barley with a potential role in defense, mRNA and protein expression patterns were analyzed in response to biotics stresses. A barley cysteine protease, HvPap-1, previously related to abiotic stresses and grain germination, was particularly induced by flagellin or chitosan elicitation, and biotic stresses such as the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae or the phytophagous mite Tetranychus urticae. To elucidate the in vivo participation of this enzyme in defense, transformed barley plants overexpressing or silencing HvPap-1 encoding gene were subjected to M. oryzae infection or T. urticae infestation. Whereas overexpressing plants were less susceptible to the fungus than silencing plants, the opposite behavior occurred to the mite. This unexpected result highlights the complexity of the regulatory events leading to the response to a particular biotic stress. PMID:28955371

  7. HvPap-1 C1A Protease Participates Differentially in the Barley Response to a Pathogen and an Herbivore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Diaz-Mendoza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-evolutionary processes in plant–pathogen/herbivore systems indicate that protease inhibitors have a particular value in biotic interactions. However, little is known about the defensive role of their targets, the plant proteases. C1A cysteine proteases are the most abundant enzymes responsible for the proteolytic activity during different processes like germination, development and senescence in plants. To identify and characterize C1A cysteine proteases of barley with a potential role in defense, mRNA and protein expression patterns were analyzed in response to biotics stresses. A barley cysteine protease, HvPap-1, previously related to abiotic stresses and grain germination, was particularly induced by flagellin or chitosan elicitation, and biotic stresses such as the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe oryzae or the phytophagous mite Tetranychus urticae. To elucidate the in vivo participation of this enzyme in defense, transformed barley plants overexpressing or silencing HvPap-1 encoding gene were subjected to M. oryzae infection or T. urticae infestation. Whereas overexpressing plants were less susceptible to the fungus than silencing plants, the opposite behavior occurred to the mite. This unexpected result highlights the complexity of the regulatory events leading to the response to a particular biotic stress.

  8. Local invariant manifolds for delay differential equations with state space in $C^1((-\\infty,0],\\mathbb{R}^n$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Otto Walther

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Consider the delay differential equation $x'(t=f(x_t$ with the history $x_t:(-\\infty,0]\\to\\mathbb{R}^n$ of $x$ at 'time' $t$ defined by $x_t(s=x(t+s$. In order not to lose any possible entire solution of any example we work in the Fréchet space $C^1((-\\infty,0],\\mathbb{R}^n$, with the topology of uniform convergence of maps and their derivatives on compact sets. A previously obtained result, designed for the application to examples with unbounded state-dependent delay, says that for maps $f$ which are slightly better than continuously differentiable the delay differential equation defines a continuous semiflow on a continuously differentiable submanifold $X\\subset C^1$ of codimension $n$, with all time-t-maps continuously differentiable. Here continuously differentiable for maps in Fréchet spaces is understood in the sense of Michal and Bastiani. It implies that $f$ is of locally bounded delay in a certain sense. Using this property - and a related further mild smoothness hypothesis on $f$ - we construct stable, unstable, and center manifolds of the semiflow at stationary points, by means of transversality and embeddings.

  9. AKR1C1 as a Biomarker for Differentiating the Biological Effects of Combustible from Non-Combustible Tobacco Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsoon Woo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Smoking has been established as a major risk factor for developing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, but less attention has been paid to the effects of smokeless tobacco products. Our objective is to identify potential biomarkers to distinguish the biological effects of combustible tobacco products from those of non-combustible ones using oral cell lines. Normal human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC, non-metastatic (101A and metastatic (101B OSCC cell lines were exposed to different tobacco product preparations (TPPs including cigarette smoke total particulate matter (TPM, whole-smoke conditioned media (WS-CM, smokeless tobacco extract in complete artificial saliva (STE, or nicotine (NIC alone. We performed microarray-based gene expression profiling and found 3456 probe sets from 101A, 1432 probe sets from 101B, and 2717 probe sets from HGEC to be differentially expressed. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA revealed xenobiotic metabolism and steroid biosynthesis were the top two pathways that were upregulated by combustible but not by non-combustible TPPs. Notably, aldo-keto reductase genes, AKR1C1 and AKR1C2, were the core genes in the top enriched pathways and were statistically upregulated more than eight-fold by combustible TPPs. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR results statistically support AKR1C1 as a potential biomarker for differentiating the biological effects of combustible from non-combustible tobacco products.

  10. X(3872), IG(JPC) = 0+(1++), as the χc1(2P) charmonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achasov, N. N.; Rogozina, E. V.

    2015-09-01

    Contrary to almost standard opinion that the X(3872) resonance is the D∗0D¯0 + c.c. molecule or the qcq¯c¯ four-quark state, we discuss the scenario where the X(3872) resonance is the cc¯ = χc1(2P) charmonium which “sits on” the D∗0D¯0 threshold. We explain the shift of the mass of the X(3872) resonance with respect to the prediction of a potential model for the mass of the χc1(2P) charmonium by the contribution of the virtual D∗D¯ + c.c. intermediate states into the self energy of the X(3872) resonance. This allows us to estimate the coupling constant of the X(7872) resonance with the D∗0D¯0 channel, the branching ratio of the X(3872) → D∗0D¯0 + c.c. decay, and the branching ratio of the X(3872) decay into all non-D∗0D¯0 + c.c. states. We predict a significant number of unknown decays of X(3872) via two gluon: X(3872) →gluon gluon →hadrons. We suggest a physically clear program of experimental researches for verification of our assumption.

  11. Deducing corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 signaling networks from gene expression data by usage of genetic algorithms and graphical Gaussian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trümbach, Dietrich; Graf, Cornelia; Pütz, Benno; Kühne, Claudia; Panhuysen, Marcus; Weber, Peter; Holsboer, Florian; Wurst, Wolfgang; Welzl, Gerhard; Deussing, Jan M

    2010-11-19

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a hallmark of complex and multifactorial psychiatric diseases such as anxiety and mood disorders. About 50-60% of patients with major depression show HPA axis dysfunction, i.e. hyperactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation. The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptor type 1 (CRHR1) are key regulators of this neuroendocrine stress axis. Therefore, we analyzed CRH/CRHR1-dependent gene expression data obtained from the pituitary corticotrope cell line AtT-20, a well-established in vitro model for CRHR1-mediated signal transduction. To extract significantly regulated genes from a genome-wide microarray data set and to deduce underlying CRHR1-dependent signaling networks, we combined supervised and unsupervised algorithms. We present an efficient variable selection strategy by consecutively applying univariate as well as multivariate methods followed by graphical models. First, feature preselection was used to exclude genes not differentially regulated over time from the dataset. For multivariate variable selection a maximum likelihood (MLHD) discriminant function within GALGO, an R package based on a genetic algorithm (GA), was chosen. The topmost genes representing major nodes in the expression network were ranked to find highly separating candidate genes. By using groups of five genes (chromosome size) in the discriminant function and repeating the genetic algorithm separately four times we found eleven genes occurring at least in three of the top ranked result lists of the four repetitions. In addition, we compared the results of GA/MLHD with the alternative optimization algorithms greedy selection and simulated annealing as well as with the state-of-the-art method random forest. In every case we obtained a clear overlap of the selected genes independently confirming the results of MLHD in combination with a genetic algorithm. With two unsupervised algorithms

  12. Deducing corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 signaling networks from gene expression data by usage of genetic algorithms and graphical Gaussian models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holsboer Florian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is a hallmark of complex and multifactorial psychiatric diseases such as anxiety and mood disorders. About 50-60% of patients with major depression show HPA axis dysfunction, i.e. hyperactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation. The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH and its receptor type 1 (CRHR1 are key regulators of this neuroendocrine stress axis. Therefore, we analyzed CRH/CRHR1-dependent gene expression data obtained from the pituitary corticotrope cell line AtT-20, a well-established in vitro model for CRHR1-mediated signal transduction. To extract significantly regulated genes from a genome-wide microarray data set and to deduce underlying CRHR1-dependent signaling networks, we combined supervised and unsupervised algorithms. Results We present an efficient variable selection strategy by consecutively applying univariate as well as multivariate methods followed by graphical models. First, feature preselection was used to exclude genes not differentially regulated over time from the dataset. For multivariate variable selection a maximum likelihood (MLHD discriminant function within GALGO, an R package based on a genetic algorithm (GA, was chosen. The topmost genes representing major nodes in the expression network were ranked to find highly separating candidate genes. By using groups of five genes (chromosome size in the discriminant function and repeating the genetic algorithm separately four times we found eleven genes occurring at least in three of the top ranked result lists of the four repetitions. In addition, we compared the results of GA/MLHD with the alternative optimization algorithms greedy selection and simulated annealing as well as with the state-of-the-art method random forest. In every case we obtained a clear overlap of the selected genes independently confirming the results of MLHD in combination with a genetic

  13. Metabolic and evolutionary insights into the closely-related species Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans deduced from high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Marcus

    2010-12-01

    deduce that S. lividans 66 and TK24, both deficient in the glyoxylate bypass, possess an alternative metabolic mechanism for the assimilation of C2 compounds. Given that streptomycetes generally display high genetic instability it is envisaged that these high-density arrays will find application for rapid assessment of genome content (particularly amplifications/deletions in mutational studies of S. coelicolor and related species.

  14. A C1q domain containing protein from scallop Chlamys farreri serving as pattern recognition receptor with heat-aggregated IgG binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The C1q domain containing (C1qDC proteins refer to a family of all proteins that contain the globular C1q (gC1q domain, and participate in a series of immune responses depending on their gC1q domains to bind a variety of self and non-self binding ligands. METHODOLOGY: In the present study, the mRNA expression patterns, localization, and activities of a C1qDC protein from scallop Chlamys farreri (CfC1qDC were investigated to understand its possible functions in innate immunity. The relative expression levels of CfC1qDC mRNA in hemocytes were all significantly up-regulated after four typical PAMPs (LPS, PGN, β-glucan and polyI:C stimulation. During the embryonic development of scallop, the mRNA transcripts of CfC1qDC were detected in all the stages, and the expression level was up-regulated from D-hinged larva and reached the highest at eye-spot larva. The endogenous CfC1qDC was dominantly located in the hepatopancreas, gill, kidney and gonad of adult scallop through immunofluorescence. The recombinant protein of CfC1qDC (rCfC1qDC could not only bind various PAMPs, such as LPS, PGN, β-glucan as well as polyI:C, but also enhance the phagocytic activity of scallop hemocytes towards Escherichia coli. Meanwhile, rCfC1qDC could interact with human heat-aggregated IgG, and this interaction could be inhibited by LPS. CONCLUSIONS: All these results indicated that CfC1qDC in C. farreri not only served as a PRR involved in the PAMPs recognition, but also an opsonin participating in the clearance of invaders in innate immunity. Moreover, the ability of CfC1qDC to interact with immunoglobulins provided a clue to understand the evolution of classical pathway in complement system.

  15. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Up-Regulates AKR1C1 Expression Through Nuclear Factor-Y in Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Ding, Shijia; Chen, Ke; Qin, Dongdong; Qu, Jialin; Wang, Sen; Sheng, Yanrui; Zou, Chengcheng; Chen, Limin; Tang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein has long been recognized as an important transcriptional transactivator of several genes. Human aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1 (AKR1C1), a member of the family of AKR1CS, is significantly increased in HBx-expressed cells. This study aimed to investigate the possible mechanism of HBx in regulating AKR1C1 expression in HepG2.2.15 cells and the role of AKR1C1 for HBV-induced HCC. RT-PCR was performed to detect AKR1C1 expression on mRNA level in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cell. The promoter activity of AKR1C1 was assayed by transient transfection and Dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The AKR1C1 promoter sequence was screened using the TFSEARCH database and the ALIBABA 2.0 software. The potential transcription factors binding sites were identified using 5' functional deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis. In this study, we found that HBx promoted AKR1C1 expression in HepG2.2.15 cells. Knockdown of HBx inhibited AKR1C1 activation. The role of HBx expression in regulating the promoter activity of human AKR1C1 gene was analyzed. The 5'functional deletion analysis identified that the region between -128 and -88 was the minimal promoter region of HBx to activate AKR1C1 gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) plays an important role in this HBx-induced AKR1C1 activation. In HepG2.2.1.5 cell, HBx can promote AKR1C1 promoter activity and thus activates the basal transcription of AKR1C1 gene. This process is mediated by the transcription factor NF-Y. This study explored the mechanism for the regulation of HBV on AKR1C1 expression and has provided a new understanding of HBV-induced HCC.

  16. Deficiency of ATP2C1, a golgi ion pump, induces secretory pathway defects in endoplasmic reticulum ( ER)-associated degradation and sensitivity to ER stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos-Castaneda, J; Park, YN; Liu, M; Hauser, K; Rudolph, H; Shull, GE; Jonkman, MF; Mori, K; Ikeda, S; Ogawa, H; Arvan, P

    2005-01-01

    Relatively few clues have been uncovered to elucidate the cell biological role(s) of mammalian ATP2C1 encoding an inwardly directed secretory pathway Ca2+/Mn2+ pump that is ubiquitously expressed. Deficiency of ATP2C1 results in a human disease ( Hailey-Hailey), which primarily affects

  17. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 101. Alcohols + Hydrocarbons + Water. Part 2. C1-C3 Alcohols + Aliphatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oracz, Paweł; Góral, Marian; Wiśniewska-Gocłowska, Barbara; Shaw, David G.; Mączyński, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The mutual solubilities and related liquid-liquid equilibria for 37 ternary systems of C1-C3 alcohols with aliphatic hydrocarbons and water are exhaustively and critically reviewed. Reports of experimental determination of solubility that appeared in the primary literature prior to the end of 2012 are compiled. For 14 systems, sufficient data are available (two or more independent determinations) to allow critical evaluation. All data are expressed as mass percent and mole fraction as well as the originally reported units. In addition to the standard evaluation criteria used throughout the Solubility Data Series, an additional criterion was used for each of the evaluated systems. These systems include one binary miscibility gap in the hydrocarbon + water subsystem and another one can be in the methanol + hydrocarbon subsystem. The binary tie lines were compared with the recommended values published previously.

  18. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 101. Alcohols + Hydrocarbons + Water Part 3. C1-C3 Alcohols + Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oracz, Paweł; Góral, Marian; Wiśniewska-Gocłowska, Barbara; Shaw, David G.; Mączyński, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The mutual solubilities and related liquid-liquid equilibria for 11 ternary systems of C1-C3 alcohols with aromatic hydrocarbons and water are exhaustively and critically reviewed. Reports of experimental determination of solubility that appeared in the primary literature prior to the end of 2012 are compiled. For nine systems, sufficient data are available (two or more independent determinations) to allow critical evaluation. All new data are expressed as mass percent and mole fraction as well as the originally reported units. In addition to the standard evaluation criteria used throughout the Solubility Data Series, an additional criterion was used for each of the evaluated systems. These systems include one binary miscibility gap in the hydrocarbon + water subsystem. The binary tie lines were compared with the recommended values published previously.

  19. Occult cervical (C1-2) dural tear causing bilateral recurrent subdural hematomas and repaired with cervical epidural blood patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvanendran, Asokumar; Byrne, Richard W; Kari, Maruti; Kroin, Jeffrey S

    2008-11-01

    The authors report the case of a 56-year-old previously healthy man who presented with a 4-month history of postural headache accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The results of initial imaging studies of the brain were normal. Repeated MR imaging demonstrated bilateral subdural hematomas which were drained and reaccumulated over a period of time. Spinal myelography revealed a cerebrospinal fluid leak at the C1-2 level. A cervical epidural blood patch, with repeated injections of 10 ml autologous blood at the site of the leak, dramatically improved the headache within 24 hours and eliminated the recurrent subdural hematomas. The results of follow-up computed tomography of the brain at 1, 4, 8, and 16 weeks were normal, and at 1-year follow-up the patient was completely free of symptoms and working.

  20. Direct synthesis of highly substituted 2-cyclohexenones and sterically hindered benzophenones based on a [5C + 1C] annulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhenqian; Wang, Mang; Dong, Ying; Liu, Jun; Liu, Qun

    2009-08-21

    The regiospecific [5C + 1C] annulation of readily available alpha-alkenoyl ketene (S,S)-acetals 1 with aryl methyl ketones 2, the less active methylene compounds, has been developed. Upon treatment of 1 with 2 in the presence of t-BuOK in DMF at room temperature, highly substituted 2-cyclohexenones 3 were synthesized in high to excellent diastereoselectivities with high yields. On the basis of this strategy, sterically hindered benzophenones 4 were conveniently prepared via the iodonation-aromatization of 2-cyclohexenones 3 with I(2) in MeONa/MeOH basic medium. Furthermore, benzophenones 4 were also obtained directly from 1 and 2 following a sequential [5 + 1] annulation-iodonation-aromatization procedure in a one-pot operation.

  1. A comparison C1-C2 transarticular screw placement after self-education and mentored education of orthopaedic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, John S

    2012-08-01

    Prospective randomized trial. This study will provide preliminary data on whether residents can be "self-taught" and to what extent a lecture, demonstration, and coaching can improve skills and knowledge. Practice-based learning is an essential competency in Accreditation Council for graduate Medical Education-accredited residencies. Little has been done to demonstrate whether residents can be self-taught or benefit from mentoring in understanding and performing difficult surgical tasks. A written test was given to orthopedic residents on C1-C2 transarticular screw placement. They were then provided reading on C1-C2 transarticular screw placement. Residents were then divided into a "self-directed learning" group and a "mentored learning" group. All residents then performed the technique on models, with the "mentored" group receiving a lecture and coaching from the mentor. The models were analyzed for technique errors and the previous test was administered again as a posttest. The test and screw placement were repeated 4 months later. Residents without mentoring had an average improvement of 4.5 points, those with mentoring had average improvement of 8.6 points (P=0.0068). The screw placement technique error rate for the nonmentored group (n=8) was 2.55, and for the mentored group (n=9) was 1.47 (P=0.004). Sixteen residents completed the delayed test, 7 from the nonmentored groups and 8 from the mentored group. Nine residents were able to repeat the screw placement technique 4 months after the initial test and screw placement, 3 nonentored, and 6 mentored. Although there were some trends toward the mentored group having better retention, neither knowledge nor skill was statistically different. This preliminary trial seems to indicate that residents provided a lecture and guided technical instruction will obtain knowledge and perform procedures better than those that do not. Conclusions based upon Post Graduate year, motivation, and interest in spine surgery could

  2. PrP-C1 fragment in cattle brains reveals features of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy associated PrPsc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Fabienne; Müller, Joachim; Gray, John; Lüthi, Ramona; Dudas, Sandor; Czub, Stefanie; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2017-03-15

    Three different types of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are known and supposedly caused by distinct prion strains: the classical (C-) BSE type that was typically found during the BSE epidemic, and two relatively rare atypical BSE types, termed H-BSE and L-BSE. The three BSE types differ in the molecular phenotype of the disease associated prion protein, namely the N-terminally truncated proteinase K (PK) resistant prion protein fragment (PrP res ). In this study, we report and analyze yet another PrP res type (PrP res-2011 ), which was found in severely autolytic brain samples of two cows in the framework of disease surveillance in Switzerland in 2011. Analysis of brain tissues from these animals by PK titration and PK inhibitor assays ruled out the process of autolysis as the cause for the aberrant PrP res profile. Immunochemical characterization of the PrP fragments present in the 2011 cases by epitope mapping indicated that PrP res-2011 corresponds in its primary sequence to the physiologically occurring PrP-C1 fragment. However, high speed centrifugation, sucrose gradient assay and NaPTA precipitation revealed biochemical similarities between PrP res-2011 and the disease-associated prion protein found in BSE affected cattle in terms of detergent insolubility, PK resistance and PrP aggregation. Although it remains to be established whether PrP res-2011 is associated with a transmissible disease, our results point out the need of further research on the role the PrP-C1 aggregation and misfolding in health and disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Dynamic stereochemistry of erigeroside by measurement of 1H- 1H and 13C- 1H coupling constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazzoli, Mohsen; Ghiasi, Mina; Moridi, Mahdi

    2008-07-01

    Erigeroside was extracted from Satureja khuzistanica Jamzad (Marzeh Khuzistani in Persian, family of lamiaceae), and 1H, 13C, 13C{ 1H}, 1H- 1H COSY, HMQC and J-HMBC were obtained to identify this compound and determine a complete set of J-coupling constants ( 1JC-H, 2JC-H, 3JC-H and 3JH-H) values within the exocyclic hydroxymethyl group (CH 2OH) and anomeric center. In parallel, density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional and split-valance 6-311++G** basis set has been used to optimized the structures and conformers of erigeroside. In all calculations solvent effects were considered using a polarized continuum (overlapping spheres) model (PCM). The dependencies of 1J, 2J and 3J involving 1H and 13C on the C 5'-C 6' ( ω), C 6'-O 6' ( θ) and C 1'-O 1' ( φ) torsion angles in erigeroside were computed using DFT method. Complete hyper surfaces for 1JC1',H1', 2JC5',H6'R, 2JC5',H6'S, 2JC6',H5', 3JC4',H6'R, 3JC4',H6'S and 2JH6'R-H5'S as well as 3JH5',H6'R were obtained and used to derive Karplus equations to correlate these couplings to ω, θ and φ. These calculated J-couplings are in agreement with experimental values. These results confirm the reliability of DFT calculated coupling constants in aqueous solution.

  4. Mitochondrial genome sequencing in Mesolithic North East Europe Unearths a new sub-clade within the broadly distributed human haplogroup C1.

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    Clio Der Sarkissian

    Full Text Available The human mitochondrial haplogroup C1 has a broad global distribution but is extremely rare in Europe today. Recent ancient DNA evidence has demonstrated its presence in European Mesolithic individuals. Three individuals from the 7,500 year old Mesolithic site of Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov, Western Russia, could be assigned to haplogroup C1 based on mitochondrial hypervariable region I sequences. However, hypervariable region I data alone could not provide enough resolution to establish the phylogenetic relationship of these Mesolithic haplotypes with haplogroup C1 mitochondrial DNA sequences found today in populations of Europe, Asia and the Americas. In order to obtain high-resolution data and shed light on the origin of this European Mesolithic C1 haplotype, we target-enriched and sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of one Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov C1 individual. The updated phylogeny of C1 haplogroups indicated that the Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov haplotype represents a new distinct clade, provisionally coined "C1f". We show that all three C1 carriers of Yuzhnyy Oleni Ostrov belong to this clade. No haplotype closely related to the C1f sequence could be found in the large current database of ancient and present-day mitochondrial genomes. Hence, we have discovered past human mitochondrial diversity that has not been observed in modern-day populations so far. The lack of positive matches in modern populations may be explained by under-sampling of rare modern C1 carriers or by demographic processes, population extinction or replacement, that may have impacted on populations of Northeast Europe since prehistoric times.

  5. Complement Protein C1q Interacts with DC-SIGN via Its Globular Domain and Thus May Interfere with HIV-1 Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pednekar, Lina; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Paudyal, Basudev; Kaur, Anuvinder; Al-Mozaini, Maha Ahmed; Kouser, Lubna; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Mitchell, Daniel A; Madan, Taruna; Kishore, Uday

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells capable of priming naïve T-cells. Its C-type lectin receptor, DC-SIGN, regulates a wide range of immune functions. Along with its role in HIV-1 pathogenesis through complement opsonization of the virus, DC-SIGN has recently emerged as an adaptor for complement protein C1q on the surface of immature DCs via a trimeric complex involving gC1qR, a receptor for the globular domain of C1q. Here, we have examined the nature of interaction between C1q and DC-SIGN in terms of domain localization, and implications of C1q-DC-SIGN-gC1qR complex formation on HIV-1 transmission. We first expressed and purified recombinant extracellular domains of DC-SIGN and its homologue DC-SIGNR as tetramers comprising of the entire extra cellular domain including the α-helical neck region and monomers comprising of the carbohydrate recognition domain only. Direct binding studies revealed that both DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR were able to bind independently to the recombinant globular head modules ghA, ghB, and ghC, with ghB being the preferential binder. C1q appeared to interact with DC-SIGN or DC-SIGNR in a manner similar to IgG. Mutational analysis using single amino acid substitutions within the globular head modules showed that TyrB175 and LysB136 were critical for the C1q-DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR interaction. Competitive studies revealed that gC1qR and ghB shared overlapping binding sites on DC-SIGN, implying that HIV-1 transmission by DCs could be modulated due to the interplay of gC1qR-C1q with DC-SIGN. Since C1q, gC1qR, and DC-SIGN can individually bind HIV-1, we examined how C1q and gC1qR modulated HIV-1-DC-SIGN interaction in an infection assay. Here, we report, for the first time, that C1q suppressed DC-SIGN-mediated transfer of HIV-1 to activated pooled peripheral blood mononuclear cells, although the globular head modules did not. The protective effect of C1q was negated by the addition of gC1qR. In fact, gC1qR enhanced DC

  6. Impact delivery of organic matter on the acapulcoite-lodranite parent-body deduced from C, N isotopes and nanostructures of carbon phases in Acapulco and Lodran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, E.; Aléon, J.; Rouzaud, J.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Lodran. Carbon phases in Lodran would have been formed by the secondary carbonization of hydrocarbon fluids released during the primary carbonization of IOM. In the framework of this model, the C isotopic compositions can be reproduced using Rayleigh distillation at each carbonization step and the N isotopic compositions can be understood as resulting from the variable loss and preservation of 15N-rich nitriles (δ15N ∼ +800‰) and 15N-poor pyrroles (δ15N = -140‰) during carbonization. The combined interpretation of the temperatures deduced from this model, petrographic cooling rates, and thermochronological indicators suggest that the CI-CM IOM could have been introduced in the parent-body by an impact, about 10 Myr after solar system formation.

  7. Artrodese Cervical C1-C2 pelas técnicas de Harms e Magerl Artrodesis cervical C1-C2 por las técnicas de Harms y Magerl Harms and Magerl types of C1-C2 cervical artrodesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Maria Varino Sousa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A instabilidade atlantoaxial pode resultar em alterações neurológicas, dor e limitação da mobilidade cervical. É uma situação grave pelo risco de tetraparésia ou morte súbita. Na literatura estão descritas várias técnicas de estabilização cirúrgica C1-C2 e neste artigo foram comentadas com maior ênfase as técnicas de Harms e Magerl, as mais utilizadas em nossa instituição. OBJETIVO: Descrever a casuística das artrodeses atlantoaxiais realizadas nos últimos cinco anos no Centro Hospitalar do Porto, particularmente, taxa de consolidações, complicações observadas, reintervenções e comparação com os estudos publicados. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo, com cinco anos, dos doentes submetidos a artrodese atlantoaxial no Centro Hospitalar do Porto. RESULTADOS: Foram operados 11 doentes no período do estudo, a maioria com instabilidade de causa traumática. O método de artrodese mais utilizado foi o descrito por Magerl. Não foram observadas lesões vasculares. Foram registradas complicações infecciosas em quatro doentes, sendo que essas infecções foram mais comuns em doentes com patologias inflamatórias de base. Obteve-se uma taxa de consolidação da artrodese de 100%; não foram necessárias cirurgias de revisão. CONCLUSÃO: Em nossa série, as artrodeses posteriores pelas técnicas de Harms e de Magerl resultaram em um ótimo controle da instabilidade C1-C2. Doentes com indicação de artrodese por instabilidade reumática apresentaram alta taxa de complicações infecciosas.INTRODUCCIÓN: la inestabilidad atlantoaxial puede resultar en alteraciones neurológicas, dolor y limitación de la movilidad cervical. Es una situación grave por el riesgo de tetraparesia o muerte súbita. En la literatura están descritas varias técnicas de estabilización quirúrgica C1-C2 y en este artículo serán comentadas con mayor énfasis las técnicas de Harms y Magerl, las más utilizadas en nuestra instituci

  8. Avaliação de série de pacientes com artrodese C1-C2 Evaluación de diferentes casos con artrodesis C1-C2 Evaluation of different cases with C1-C2 arthrodesis

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    Cesar Salge Ghilardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Análise retrospectiva de prontuários de pacientes com instabilidade C1-C2 de causas traumáticas e não-traumáticas, submetidos à artrodese C1-C2. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada análise retrospectiva de prontuários de 20 pacientes do ambulatório de coluna do IOT-HCFMUSP com idades entre 7 e 83 anos (média de 43 anos, de ambos os sexos. Os parâmetros radiográficos para instabilidade foram baseados na medida do intervalo atlanto-axial superior a 3 mm em adultos e a 5 mm em crianças, utilizando-se medidas obtidas através de radiografia simples analisada no perfil. RESULTADOS: Foram operados 20 pacientes com instabilidade cervical alta, a maioria de origem traumática. A técnica cirúrgica mais utilizada foi a artrodese descrita por Magerl. Não foram observadas lesões vasculares. Foi registrada complicação infecciosa em dois pacientes. Obteve-se uma taxa de consolidação da artrodese de 85% e não foram necessárias cirurgias de revisão. CONCLUSÃO: Todas as técnicas utilizadas produziram a consolidação óssea satisfatória e foram excelentes para controlar a instabilidade atlanto-axial.OBJETIVO: Estudio retrospectivo de fichas depacientes con inestabilidad C1-C2, de causas traumáticas y no traumáticas, quienes se sometieron a artrodesis C1-C2. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un análisis retrospectivo de los historiales clínicos de 20 pacientes externos de la columna en el IOT-HC.FM.USP de edades comprendidas entre 07 y 83 años (promedio de 43 años de ambos sexos. Los parámetros radiológicos de inestabilidad se basaron en la medición del intervalo atlantoaxial superior a 3 mm en adultos y a 5 mm en niños, utilizándose medidas obtenidas a partir de radiografías simples analizadas en el perfil. RESULTADOS: Se operaron 20 pacientes con inestabilidad cervical alta, la mayoría con inestabilidad de origen traumático. La técnica quirúrgica más utilizada fue la artrodesis descrita por Magerl. No se observaron lesiones

  9. Existence of different but overlapping IgG- and IgM-binding sties on the globular domain of human C1q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatarova, A.S.; Rouseva, M.; Roumenina, L.T.

    2006-01-01

    C1q is the first subcomponent of the classical complement pathway that binds antigen-bound IgG or IgM and initiates complement activation via association of serine proteases C1r and C1s. The globular domain of C1q (gC1q), which is the ligand-recognition domain, is a heterotrimeric structure...... composed of the C-terminal regions of A (ghA), B (ghB), and C (ghC) chains. The expression and functional characterization of ghA, ghB, and ghC modules have revealed that each chain has some structural and functional autonomy. Although a number of studies have tried to identify IgG-binding sites on the gC1......q domain, no such attempt has been made to localize IgM-binding site. On the basis of the information available via the gC1q crystal structure, molecular modeling, mutational studies, and bioinformatics, we have generated a series of substitution mutants of ghA, ghB, and ghC and examined...

  10. Binding of complement proteins C1q and C4bp to serum amyloid P component (SAP) in solid contra liquid phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Nielsen, EH; Andersen, Ove

    1996-01-01

    that firm binding of C1q and C4bp to SAP requires that SAP is presented on a solid phase, that C1q and C4bp react with sites distinct from the heparin binding site, and that C1q and collagen I share binding sites on SAP. Immobilized native SAP, aggregated SAP and SAP-heparansulphate complexes induced....... Binding of these proteins to SAP was demonstrated when SAP was immobilized using F(ab')2 anti-SAP, but not when SAP reacted with these proteins in liquid phase; thus the binding to human SAP was markedly phase state dependent. Presaturation of solid phase SAP with heparin, which binds SAP with high...... affinity, did not interfere with the subsequent binding of C4bp or C1q to SAP. In contrast, collagen I and IV showed partial competition with the binding of C1q to SAP. Using fresh serum, immobilized native SAP bound C4bp whereas binding of C1q/C1 could not be demonstrated. Altogether the results indicate...

  11. Phase 1 trial of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel plus CPG 7909: an asexual blood-stage vaccine for Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory E D Mullen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1, a polymorphic merozoite surface protein, is a leading blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate. This is the first reported use in humans of an investigational vaccine, AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel, with the novel adjuvant CPG 7909.A phase 1 trial was conducted at the University of Rochester with 75 malaria-naive volunteers to assess the safety and immunogenicity of the AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+CPG 7909 malaria vaccine. Participants were sequentially enrolled and randomized within dose escalating cohorts to receive three vaccinations on days 0, 28 and 56 of either 20 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+564 microg CPG 7909 (n = 15, 80 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel (n = 30, or 80 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+564 microg CPG 7909 (n = 30.Local and systemic adverse events were significantly more likely to be of higher severity with the addition of CPG 7909. Anti-AMA1 immunoglobulin G (IgG were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and the immune sera of volunteers that received 20 microg or 80 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+CPG 7909 had up to 14 fold significant increases in anti-AMA1 antibody concentration compared to 80 microg of AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel alone. The addition of CPG 7909 to the AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel vaccine in humans also elicited AMA1 specific immune IgG that significantly and dramatically increased the in vitro growth inhibition of homologous parasites to levels as high as 96% inhibition.The safety profile of the AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel+CPG 7909 malaria vaccine is acceptable, given the significant increase in immunogenicity observed. Further clinical development is ongoing.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00344539.

  12. IgE-binding proliferative responses and skin test reactivity to Cop c 1, the first recombinant allergen from the basidiomycete Coprinus comatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, K A; Borbély, P; Crameri, R; Pichler, W J; Helbling, A

    1999-09-01

    Basidiomycetes spores are ubiquitously distributed, found throughout the year in outdoor and indoor air, and represent relevant sources of aeroallergens associated with allergy and asthma. Cloning and characterization of Coprinus comatus (shaggy cap mushroom) allergens is essential to elucidate their molecular characteristics and to improve the diagnosis of allergy. A complementary DNA (cDNA) library of C comatus displayed on phage surface was screened with sera of basidiomycete-sensitized individuals. Subcloning and high-level expression of one of the enriched cDNAs allowed the isolation of a [His](6)-tagged recombinant protein formally termed rCop c 1. The allergenic properties of rCop c 1 were investigated in vitro by ELISA, inhibition experiments, immunoblots, and proliferation assays and in vivo by skin tests. The rCop c 1-encoding cDNA spans 435 bp and contains an open reading frame of 246 bp, predicting a protein of 8.96 kd without significant sequence homology to known proteins. Immunoblots with [His](6)-rCop c 1 fusion protein show a background free IgE-binding band of the expected size that can be completely inhibited by crude C comatus extracts in ELISA. rCop c 1 induced specific proliferative responses in PBMCs of C comatus-sensitized individuals. The incidence of sensitization to rCop c 1 among 92 sera of basidiomycete-sensitized individuals tested in ELISA was 25%, indicating that Cop c 1 is an intermediate allergen. However, prick tests showed that less than 2 pmol of the rCop c 1 protein was able to induce strong specific skin reactions in sensitized individuals. rCop c 1, the first cloned allergen from the genus Coprinus, fulfills all the criteria required to be classified as a clinically relevant allergen. The data demonstrate at the molecular level the presence of sensitizing molecules among Basidiomycetes, the most important source contributing to the total spore load in the outdoor air.

  13. YidC1 and YidC2 are functionally distinct proteins involved in protein secretion, biofilm formation and cariogenicity of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sara R; Crowley, Paula J; Oli, Monika W; Ruelf, M Adam; Michalek, Suzanne M; Brady, L Jeannine

    2012-07-01

    The cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans has two paralogues of the YidC/Oxa1/Alb3 family of membrane protein insertases/chaperones. Disruption of yidC2 results in loss of genetic competence, decreased membrane-associated ATPase activity and stress sensitivity (acid, osmotic and oxidative). Elimination of yidC1 has less severe effects, with little observable effect on growth or stress sensitivity. To examine the respective roles of YidC1 and YidC2, a conditional expression system was developed allowing simultaneous elimination of both endogenous YidCs. The function of the YidC C-terminal tails was also investigated and a chimeric YidC1 protein appended with the C terminus of YidC2 enabled YidC1 to complement a ΔyidC2 mutant for stress tolerance, ATP hydrolysis activity and extracellular glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity. Elimination of yidC1 or yidC2 affected levels of extracellular proteins, including GtfB, GtfC and adhesin P1 (AgI/II, PAc), which were increased without YidC1 but decreased in the absence of YidC2. Both yidC1 and yidC2 were shown to contribute to S. mutans biofilm formation and to cariogenicity in a rat model. Collectively, these results provide evidence that YidC1 and YidC2 contribute to cell surface biogenesis and protein secretion in S. mutans and that differences in stress sensitivity between the ΔyidC1 and ΔyidC2 mutants stem from a functional difference in the C-termini of these two proteins.

  14. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. Transient Transcriptional Regulation of the CYS-C1 Gene and Cyanide Accumulation upon Pathogen Infection in the Plant Immune Response1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  16. Genome-wide scan identifies TNIP1, PSORS1C1, and RHOB as novel risk loci for systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Allanore

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an orphan, complex, inflammatory disease affecting the immune system and connective tissue. SSc stands out as a severely incapacitating and life-threatening inflammatory rheumatic disease, with a largely unknown pathogenesis. We have designed a two-stage genome-wide association study of SSc using case-control samples from France, Italy, Germany, and Northern Europe. The initial genome-wide scan was conducted in a French post quality-control sample of 564 cases and 1,776 controls, using almost 500 K SNPs. Two SNPs from the MHC region, together with the 6 loci outside MHC having at least one SNP with a P<10(-5 were selected for follow-up analysis. These markers were genotyped in a post-QC replication sample of 1,682 SSc cases and 3,926 controls. The three top SNPs are in strong linkage disequilibrium and located on 6p21, in the HLA-DQB1 gene: rs9275224, P = 9.18×10(-8, OR = 0.69, 95% CI [0.60-0.79]; rs6457617, P = 1.14×10(-7 and rs9275245, P = 1.39×10(-7. Within the MHC region, the next most associated SNP (rs3130573, P = 1.86×10(-5, OR = 1.36 [1.18-1.56] is located in the PSORS1C1 gene. Outside the MHC region, our GWAS analysis revealed 7 top SNPs (P<10(-5 that spanned 6 independent genomic regions. Follow-up of the 17 top SNPs in an independent sample of 1,682 SSc and 3,926 controls showed associations at PSORS1C1 (overall P = 5.70×10(-10, OR:1.25, TNIP1 (P = 4.68×10(-9, OR:1.31, and RHOB loci (P = 3.17×10(-6, OR:1.21. Because of its biological relevance, and previous reports of genetic association at this locus with connective tissue disorders, we investigated TNIP1 expression. A markedly reduced expression of the TNIP1 gene and also its protein product were observed both in lesional skin tissue and in cultured dermal fibroblasts from SSc patients. Furthermore, TNIP1 showed in vitro inhibitory effects on inflammatory cytokine-induced collagen production. The genetic signal of

  17. Targeting Atp6v1c1 Prevents Inflammation and Bone Erosion Caused by Periodontitis and Reveals Its Critical Function in Osteoimmunology.

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    Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects a majority of adult Americans and is associated with other systemic diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this pervasive and destructive disease. In this study, we utilized novel adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown gene therapy to treat bone erosion and inflammatory caused by periodontitis in mouse model. Atp6v1c1 is a subunit of the V-ATPase complex and regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex. We demonstrated previously that Atp6v1c1 has an essential function in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. We hypothesized that Atp6v1c1 may be an ideal target to prevent the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis. To test the hypothesis, we employed AAV RNAi knockdown of Atp6v1c1 gene expression to prevent bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously. We found that lesion-specific injection of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 into the periodontal disease lesions protected against bone erosion (>85% and gingival inflammation caused by P. gingivalis W50 infection. AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown dramatically reduced osteoclast numbers and inhibited the infiltration of dendritic cells and macrophages in the bacteria-induced inflammatory lesions in periodontitis. Silencing of Atp6v1c1 expression also prevented the expressions of osteoclast-related genes and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Our data suggests that AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 treatment can significantly attenuate the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis, indicating the dual function of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 as an inhibitor of bone erosion mediated by osteoclasts, and as an inhibitor of inflammation through down-regulation of pro

  18. Technical Note: Reactivity of C1 and C2 organohalogens formation – from plant litter to bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available C1/C2 organohalogens (organohalogens with one or two carbon atoms can have significant environmental toxicity and ecological impact, such as carcinogenesis, ozone depletion and global warming. Natural halogenation processes have been identified for a wide range of natural organic matter, including soils, plant and animal debris, algae, and fungi. Yet, few have considered these organohalogens generated from the ubiquitous bacteria, one of the largest biomass pools on earth. Here, we report and confirm the formation of chloroform (CHCl3 dichloro-acetonitrile (CHCl2CN, chloral hydrate (CCl3CH(OH2 and their brominated analogues by direct halogenation of seven strains of common bacteria and nine cellular monomers. Comparing different major C stocks during litter decomposition stages in terrestrial ecosystems, from plant litter, decomposed litter, to bacteria, we found increasing reactivity for nitrogenous organohalogen yield with decreasing C/N ratio. Our results raise the possibility that natural halogenation of bacteria represents a significant and overlooked contribution to global organohalogen burdens. As bacteria are decomposers that alter the C quality by transforming organic matter pools from high to low C/N ratio and constitute a large organic N pool, the bacterial activity is expected to affect the C, N, and halogen cycling through natural halogenation reactions.

  19. Cholesterol supply and SREBPs modulate transcription of the Niemann-Pick C-1 gene in steroidogenic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gévry, Nicolas; Schoonjans, Kristina; Guay, Fréderic; Murphy, Bruce D

    2008-05-01

    We tested whether sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) mediate sterol-regulated transactivation of the Niemann-Pick C-1 (NPC-1) gene. Loading granulosa cells with 22- or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased NPC-1 mRNA, whereas culturing in cholesterol-depleted medium or inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis increased NPC-1 promoter activity and NPC-1 mRNA abundance. Cotransfection of SREBP1a, SREBP1c, and SREBP2 and the NPC-1 promoter-luciferase reporter into granulosa cell lines increased the transcriptional activity of porcine, human, and mouse NPC-1 promoters. Deletion analysis of the 5' flanking region of the pig NPC-1 gene demonstrated significant promoter activity between fragments -934 and -636 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. Sequence analysis revealed three sterol-regulatory elements (SREs) clustered between -558 and -650 bp. Each site, along with E-box sequences, bound recombinant SREBP in electromobility shift assays. Mutation of all three sites attenuated the SREBP induction of promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that cholesterol depletion enriched the association of both SREBP and acetylated histone H3 with the NPC-1 promoter fragment containing the three SREs. ChIP analysis confirmed that SREBP's association with SRE and the E-box was enriched in cells cultured in cholesterol-depleted medium. We conclude that NPC-1 is sterol-regulated, achieved by SREBP acting via SRE and the E-box sequences.

  20. Lycopene reduces cholesterol absorption through the downregulation of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Feng, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Elevated blood cholesterol is an important risk factor associated with atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Tomato lycopene has been found to have a hypocholesterolemic effect, and the effect was considered to be related to inhibition of cholesterol synthesis. However, since plasma cholesterol levels are also influenced by the absorption of cholesterol in the gut, the present study is to investigate whether lycopene affects cholesterol absorption in the intestinal Caco-2 cells. The Caco-2 cells were pretreated with lycopene at different concentrations for 24 h and then incubated with radioactive micellar cholesterol for 2 h. The absorption of radioactive cholesterol was quantified by liquid scintillation. The expression of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and liver X receptor α (LXRα) was analyzed by Western blot and qPCR. We found that lycopene dose dependently inhibited cholesterol absorption and the expression of NPC1L1 protein and NPC1L1 mRNA. The inhibitory effects of lycopene on cholesterol absorption and NPC1L1 expression could be prevented by blockade of the LXRα pathway. This study provides the first evidence that lycopene inhibits cholesterol absorption in the intestinal cells and this inhibitory effect of lycopene is mediated, at least in part, by LXRα-NPC1L1 signaling pathway. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Unraveling the (3 ×3)-SiC(1 1 1) reconstruction and its role as an interface structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Lydia; Lazarevic, Florian; Rinke, Patrick; Blum, Volker; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    To refine the growth quality of epitaxial graphene on the C-side of SiC and improving the resulting electronic character of these films, it is important to understand the atomic and electronic-structure of the interface. A phase mixture of different surface phases is observed just when surface graphitization first sets in. However, the atomic structure of some of the competing surface phases as well as of the SiC-graphene interface is unknown. We performed a density functional theory study on the C-side of the polar SiC(1 1 1) surface using the all-electron numeric atom-centered basis function code FHI-aims. The formation energy of different reconstructions and model systems for the interface is presented within the thermodynamically allowed range. The surface energies of the known (2 ×2) phase is compared with several structural models of the (3 ×3) phase proposed in the literature. Inorian comparison all the previously suggested (3 ×3) models are higher in energy than the known (2 ×2) phase. We present a new model for the (3 ×3) reconstruction. Its formation energy crosses that of the (2 ×2) phase just at the carbon rich limit of the chemical potential, which explains the observed phase mixture. Present address: AQcomputare GmbH, Business Unit MATcalc, Annabergerstr. 240, 09125 Chemnitz, Germany.

  2. Polyglutamylated Tubulin Binding Protein C1orf96/CSAP Is Involved in Microtubule Stabilization in Mitotic Spindles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ohta

    Full Text Available The centrosome-associated C1orf96/Centriole, Cilia and Spindle-Associated Protein (CSAP targets polyglutamylated tubulin in mitotic microtubules (MTs. Loss of CSAP causes critical defects in brain development; however, it is unclear how CSAP association with MTs affects mitosis progression. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of CSAP with mitotic spindles. Loss of CSAP caused MT instability in mitotic spindles and resulted in mislocalization of Nuclear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA, with defective MT dynamics. Thus, CSAP overload in the spindles caused extensive MT stabilization and recruitment of NuMA. Moreover, MT stabilization by CSAP led to high levels of polyglutamylation on MTs. MT depolymerization by cold or nocodazole treatment was inhibited by CSAP binding. Live-cell imaging analysis suggested that CSAP-dependent MT-stabilization led to centrosome-free MT aster formation immediately upon nuclear envelope breakdown without γ-tubulin. We therefore propose that CSAP associates with MTs around centrosomes to stabilize MTs during mitosis, ensuring proper bipolar spindle formation and maintenance.

  3. AUNIP/C1orf135 directs DNA double-strand breaks towards the homologous recombination repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jiangman; Chen, Hongxia; Han, Jinhua; He, Hanqing; Huen, Michael S Y; Feng, Xin-Hua; Liu, Ting; Huang, Jun

    2017-10-17

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are mainly repaired by either homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Here, we identify AUNIP/C1orf135, a largely uncharacterized protein, as a key determinant of DSB repair pathway choice. AUNIP physically interacts with CtIP and is required for efficient CtIP accumulation at DSBs. AUNIP possesses intrinsic DNA-binding ability with a strong preference for DNA substrates that mimic structures generated at stalled replication forks. This ability to bind DNA is necessary for the recruitment of AUNIP and its binding partner CtIP to DSBs, which in turn drives CtIP-dependent DNA-end resection and HR repair. Accordingly, loss of AUNIP or ablation of its ability to bind to DNA results in cell hypersensitivity toward a variety of DSB-inducing agents, particularly those that induce replication-associated DSBs. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which DSBs are recognized and channeled to the HR repair pathway.DNA double strand breaks can be repaired by homology-independent or homology-directed mechanisms. The choice between these pathways is a key event for genomic stability maintenance. Here the authors identify and characterize AUNIP, as a factor involved in tilting the balance towards homology repair.

  4. Role of Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Prognostication and Treatment Monitoring in Niemann-Pick Disease Type C1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghann W. Lau

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Disease, type C1 (NPC1 is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cholesterol sequestration within late endosomes and lysosomes, for which no reliable imaging marker exists for prognostication and management. Cerebellar volume deficits are found to correlate with disease severity and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI of the corpus callosum and brainstem, which has shown that microstructural disorganization is associated with NPC1 severity. This study investigates the utility of cerebellar DTI in clinical severity assessment. We hypothesize that cerebellar volume, fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD negatively correlate with NIH NPC neurological severity score (NNSS and motor severity subscores. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was obtained for thirty-nine NPC1 subjects, ages 1–21.9 years (mean = 11.1, SD = 6.1. Using an atlas-based automated approach, the cerebellum of each patient was measured for FA, MD and volume. Additionally, each patient was given an NNSS. Decreased cerebellar FA and volume, and elevated MD correlate with higher NNSS. The cognition subscore and motor subscores for eye movement, ambulation, speech, swallowing, and fine motor skills were also statistically significant. Microstructural disorganization negatively correlated with motor severity in subjects. Additionally, Miglustat therapy correlated with lower severity scores across ranges of FA, MD and volume in all regions except the inferior peduncle, where a paradoxical effect was observed at high FA values. These findings suggest that DTI is a promising prognostication tool.

  5. Reduction of VLDL secretion decreases cholesterol excretion in niemann-pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Marshall

    Full Text Available An effective way to reduce LDL cholesterol, the primary risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is to increase cholesterol excretion from the body. Our group and others have recently found that cholesterol excretion can be facilitated by both hepatobiliary and transintestinal pathways. However, the lipoprotein that moves cholesterol through the plasma to the small intestine for transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE is unknown. To test the hypothesis that hepatic very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL support TICE, antisense oligonucleotides (ASO were used to knockdown hepatic expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, which is necessary for VLDL assembly. While maintained on a high cholesterol diet, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic (L1Tg mice, which predominantly excrete cholesterol via TICE, and wild type (WT littermates were treated with control ASO or MTP ASO. In both WT and L1Tg mice, MTP ASO decreased VLDL triglyceride (TG and cholesterol secretion. Regardless of treatment, L1Tg mice had reduced biliary cholesterol compared to WT mice. However, only L1Tg mice treated with MTP ASO had reduced fecal cholesterol excretion. Based upon these findings, we conclude that VLDL or a byproduct such as LDL can move cholesterol from the liver to the small intestine for TICE.

  6. Association of circulating C1q/TNF-related protein 1 levels with coronary artery disease in men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Yuasa

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Recent evidence demonstrates that dysregulation of fat-derived hormones, also known as adipokines, is linked with the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders including coronary artery disease (CAD. Here, we investigated whether circulating level of an adipokine C1q/TNF-related protein (CTRP 1 is associated with the prevalence of CAD. METHODS AND RESULTS: Consecutive 76 male CAD patients were enrolled from inpatients that underwent coronary angiography. Sixty four healthy male subjects served as controls. Plasma CTRP1 concentration was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CTRP1 levels were correlated positively with systolic blood pressure (BP and triglyceride levels, and negatively with HDL cholesterol levels in all subjects. Plasma levels of CTRP1 were significantly higher in CAD patients than in control subjects (CAD: 443.3±18.6 ng/ml, control: 307.8±21.5 ng/ml, p<0.001. Multiple logistic regression analysis with body mass index, systolic BP, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, adiponectin and CTRP1 revealed that CTRP1 levels, together with systolic BP and HDL cholesterol, correlated with CAD. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate the close association of high CTRP1 levels with CAD prevalence, suggesting that CTRP1 represents a novel biomarker for CAD.

  7. O-GlcNAc Transferase/Host Cell Factor C1 Complex Regulates Gluconeogenesis by Modulating PGC-1α Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hai-Bin; Han, Xuemei; Li, Min-Dian; Singh, Jay Prakash; Qian, Kevin; Azarhoush, Sascha; Zhao, Lin; Bennett, Anton M.; Samuel, Varman T.; Wu, Jing; Yates, John R.; Yang, Xiaoyong

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A major cause of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients is inappropriate hepatic gluconeogenesis. PGC-1α is a master regulator of gluconeogenesis, and its activity is controlled by various post-translational modifications. A small portion of glucose metabolizes through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which leads to O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins. Using a proteomic approach, we identified a broad variety of proteins associated with O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), among which host cell factor C1 (HCF-1) is highly abundant. HCF-1 recruits OGT to O-GlcNAcylate PGC-1α and O-GlcNAcylation facilitates the binding of the deubiquitinase BAP1, thus protecting PGC-1α from degradation and promoting gluconeogenesis. Glucose availability modulates gluconeogenesis through the regulation of PGC-1α O-GlcNAcylation and stability by the OGT/HCF1 complex. Hepatic knockdown of OGT and HCF-1 improves glucose homeostasis in diabetic mice. These findings define the OGT/HCF-1 complex as a glucose sensor and key regulator of gluconeogenesis, shedding light on new strategies for treating diabetes. PMID:22883232

  8. The Effect of Nitrogen Enrichment on C1-Cycling Microorganisms and Methane Flux in Salt Marsh Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Catherine Irvine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 flux from ecosystems is driven by C1-cycling microorganisms – the methanogens and the methylotrophs. Little is understood about what regulates these communities, complicating predictions about how global change drivers such as nitrogen enrichment will affect methane cycling. Using a nitrogen addition gradient experiment in three Southern California salt marshes, we show that sediment CH4 flux increased linearly with increasing nitrogen addition (1.23 µg CH4 m-2 d-1 for each g N m-2 yr-1 applied after seven months of fertilization. To test the reason behind this increased CH4 flux, we conducted a microcosm experiment altering both nitrogen and carbon availability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis appeared to be both nitrogen and carbon (acetate limited. N and C each increased methanogenesis by 18%, and together by 44%. In contrast, methanotrophy was stimulated by carbon (methane addition (830%, but was unchanged by nitrogen addition. Sequence analysis of the sediment methylotroph community with the methanol dehydrogenase gene (mxaF revealed three distinct clades that fall outside of known lineages. However, in agreement with the microcosm results, methylotroph abundance (assayed by qPCR and composition (assayed by T-RFLP did not vary across the experimental nitrogen gradient in the field. Together, these results suggest that nitrogen enrichment to salt marsh sediments increases methane flux by stimulating the methanogen community.

  9. Platinum nanocatalysts prepared with different surfactants for C1-C3 alcohol oxidations and their surface morphologies by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertan, Salih; Sen, Fatih, E-mail: fsen@mit.edu; Sen, Selda; Goekagac, Guelsuen, E-mail: ggulsun@metu.edu.tr [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey)

    2012-06-15

    In this study, platinum nanoparticle catalysts have been prepared using PtCl{sub 4} as a starting material and 1-octanethiol, 1-decanethiol, 1-dodecanethiol, and 1-hexadecanethiol as surfactants for methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol oxidation reactions. The structure, particle sizes, and surface morphologies of the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD and TEM results indicate that all prepared catalysts have a face-centered cubic structure and are homogeneously dispersed on the carbon support with a narrow size distribution (2.0-1.3 nm). X-ray photoelectron spectra of the catalysts were examined and it is found that platinum has two different oxidation states, Pt (0) and Pt(IV), oxygen and sulfur compounds are H{sub 2}O{sub ads} and OH{sub ads}, bound and unbound thiols. The electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of these catalysts were investigated with respect to C1-C3 alcohol oxidations by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The highest electrocatalytic activity was obtained from catalyst I which was prepared with 1-octanethiol. This may be attributed to a decrease in the ratio of bound to unbound thiol species increase in Pt (0)/Pt(IV), H{sub 2}O{sub ads}/OH{sub ads} ratios, electrochemical surface area, CO tolerance and percent platinum utility.

  10. DEPLOYMENT OF METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES (N-ALKANES C1-C5) IN GAS SAMPLES AT LOW CONCENTRATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    LAURA JULIANA ROZO MORALES

    2011-01-01

    A concentração e composição isotópica Delta13C dos n-alcanos C1-C5, tem-se mostrado como uma ferramenta poderosa na interpretação de processos de interesse nas áreas de exploração de hidrocarbonetos, estudo de mudanças climáticas, biodegradação de óleos e elucidação do ciclo global de carbono. Neste contexto, os estudos sobre análise de metano (C1) tem-se destacado e multiplicado devido à importância do C1 na indústria energética e ao potencial do C1 como gás de efeito estufa. A análise de am...

  11. Role of physiological ClC-1 Cl- ion channel regulation for the excitability and function of working skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Riisager, Anders; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    temporal resolution in action potential firing muscle fibers. These and other techniques have revealed that ClC-1 function is controlled by multiple cellular signals during muscle activity. Thus, onset of muscle activity triggers ClC-1 inhibition via protein kinase C, intracellular acidosis, and lactate...... permeability for Cl- ions. Thus, in resting human muscle, ClC-1 Cl- ion channels account for ∼80% of the membrane conductance, and because active Cl- transport is limited in muscle fibers, the equilibrium potential for Cl- lies close to the resting membrane potential. These conditions—high membrane conductance...... ions. This inhibition is important for preserving excitability of working muscle in the face of activity-induced elevation of extracellular K+ and accumulating inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Furthermore, during prolonged activity, a marked ClC-1 activation can develop that compromises...

  12. The effects of embryonic knockdown of the candidate dyslexia susceptibility gene homologue Dyx1c1 on the distribution of GABAergic neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, T A; Etchegaray, M A; Haight, J L; Galaburda, A M; Rosen, G D

    2011-01-13

    Developmental dyslexia is a language-based learning disability, and a number of candidate dyslexia susceptibility genes have been identified, including DYX1C1, KIAA0319, and DCDC2. Knockdown of function by embryonic transfection of small hairpin RNA (shRNA) of rat homologues of these genes dramatically disrupts neuronal migration to the cerebral cortex by both cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous effects. Here we sought to investigate the extent of non-cell autonomous effects following in utero disruption of the candidate dyslexia susceptibility gene homolog Dyx1c1 by assessing the effects of this disruption on GABAergic neurons. We transfected the ventricular zone of embryonic day (E) 15.5 rat pups with either Dyx1c1 shRNA, DYX1C1 expression construct, both Dyx1c1 shRNA and DYX1C1 expression construct, or a scrambled version of Dyx1c1 shRNA, and sacrificed them at postnatal day 21. The mothers of these rats were injected with BrdU at either E13.5, E15.5, or E17.5. Neurons transfected with Dyx1c1 shRNA were bi-modally distributed in the cerebral cortex with one population in heterotopic locations at the white matter border and another migrating beyond their expected location in the cerebral cortex. In contrast, there was no disruption of migration following transfection with the DYX1C1 expression construct. We found untransfected GABAergic neurons (parvalbumin, calretinin, and neuropeptide Y) in the heterotopic collections of neurons in Dyx1c1 shRNA treated animals, supporting the hypothesis of non-cell autonomous effects. In contrast, we found no evidence that the position of the GABAergic neurons that made it to the cerebral cortex was disrupted by the embryonic transfection with any of the constructs. Taken together, these results support the notion that neurons within heterotopias caused by transfection with Dyx1c1 shRNA result from both cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous effects, but there is no evidence to support non-cell autonomous disruption of

  13. Structural Basis of Semaphorin-Plexin Recognition and Viral Mimicry from Sema7A and A39R Complexes with PlexinC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Heli; Juo, Z. Sean; Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Focia, Pamela J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Garcia, K. Christopher; He, Xiaolin (Stanford-MED); (NWU)

    2010-10-18

    Repulsive signaling by Semaphorins and Plexins is crucial for the development and homeostasis of the nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems. Sema7A acts as both an immune and a neural Semaphorin through PlexinC1, and A39R is a Sema7A mimic secreted by smallpox virus. We report the structures of Sema7A and A39R complexed with the Semaphorin-binding module of PlexinC1. Both structures show two PlexinC1 molecules symmetrically bridged by Semaphorin dimers, in which the Semaphorin and PlexinC1 {beta} propellers interact in an edge-on, orthogonal orientation. Both binding interfaces are dominated by the insertion of the Semaphorin's 4c-4d loop into a deep groove in blade 3 of the PlexinC1 propeller. A39R appears to achieve Sema7A mimicry by preserving key Plexin-binding determinants seen in the mammalian Sema7A complex that have evolved to achieve higher affinity binding to the host-derived PlexinC1. The complex structures support a conserved Semaphorin-Plexin recognition mode and suggest that Plexins are activated by dimerization.

  14. Antibodies against C1q Are a Valuable Serological Marker for Identification of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients with Active Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Chi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. An early diagnosis of lupus nephritis (LN has an important clinical implication in guiding treatments of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in clinical settings. In this study, the diagnostic values of circulating autoantibodies to C1q alone or in combination with other markers for accessing active SLE and LN were evaluated. Methods. The diagnostic value of anti-C1q autoantibodies for identification of patients with active SLE disease and LN was evaluated by analyzing the level of anti-C1q antibodies in sera from 95 SLE patients, 40 non-SLE patients, and 34 healthy cohorts. Results. The prevalence of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in patients with SLE (50/95, 52.6%, active SLE (40/51, 78.4%, and LN (30/35, 85.7% in comparison with non-SLE patient controls, patients with inactive SLE, and non-LN, respectively. A combination of anti-C1q with anti-dsDNA and/or levels of complements C3 and C4 exhibited an increased specificity but a decreased sensitivity for identification of patients with active SLE and LN diseases relative to each of these markers alone. Conclusion. Anti-C1q antibodies were strongly associated with disease activity and LN in SLE patients, suggesting that it may be a reliable serological marker for identification of SLE patients with active LN and active SLE disease.

  15. Centrosomal localisation of the cancer/testis (CT antigens NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 is regulated by proteasome activity in tumour cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pagotto

    Full Text Available The Cancer/Testis (CT antigen family of genes are transcriptionally repressed in most human tissues but are atypically re-expressed in many malignant tumour types. Their restricted expression profile makes CT antigens ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. As little is known about whether CT antigens may be regulated by post-translational processing, we investigated the mechanisms governing degradation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 in selected cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of proteasome-mediated degradation induced the partitioning of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 into a detergent insoluble fraction. Moreover, this treatment also resulted in increased localisation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 at the centrosome. Despite their interaction, relocation of either NY-ESO-1 or MAGE-C1 to the centrosome could occur independently of each other. Using a series of truncated fragments, the regions corresponding to NY-ESO-1(91-150 and MAGE-C1(900-1116 were established as important for controlling both stability and localisation of these CT antigens. Our findings demonstrate that the steady state levels of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 are regulated by proteasomal degradation and that both behave as aggregation-prone proteins upon accumulation. With proteasome inhibitors being increasingly used as front-line treatment in cancer, these data raise issues about CT antigen processing for antigenic presentation and therefore immunogenicity in cancer patients.

  16. Centrosomal localisation of the cancer/testis (CT) antigens NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 is regulated by proteasome activity in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Anna; Caballero, Otavia L; Volkmar, Norbert; Devalle, Sylvie; Simpson, Andrew J G; Lu, Xin; Christianson, John C

    2013-01-01

    The Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen family of genes are transcriptionally repressed in most human tissues but are atypically re-expressed in many malignant tumour types. Their restricted expression profile makes CT antigens ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. As little is known about whether CT antigens may be regulated by post-translational processing, we investigated the mechanisms governing degradation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 in selected cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of proteasome-mediated degradation induced the partitioning of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 into a detergent insoluble fraction. Moreover, this treatment also resulted in increased localisation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 at the centrosome. Despite their interaction, relocation of either NY-ESO-1 or MAGE-C1 to the centrosome could occur independently of each other. Using a series of truncated fragments, the regions corresponding to NY-ESO-1(91-150) and MAGE-C1(900-1116) were established as important for controlling both stability and localisation of these CT antigens. Our findings demonstrate that the steady state levels of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 are regulated by proteasomal degradation and that both behave as aggregation-prone proteins upon accumulation. With proteasome inhibitors being increasingly used as front-line treatment in cancer, these data raise issues about CT antigen processing for antigenic presentation and therefore immunogenicity in cancer patients.

  17. Two novel proteins expressed by the venom glands of Apis mellifera and Nasonia vitripennis share an ancient C1q-like domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, D C; Brunain, M; Scharlaken, B; Peiren, N; Devreese, B; Ebo, D G; Stevens, W J; Desjardins, C A; Werren, J H; Jacobs, F J

    2010-02-01

    An in-depth proteomic study of previously unidentified two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis spots of honey bee (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera) venom revealed a new protein with a C1q conserved domain (C1q-VP). BlastP searching revealed a strong identity with only two proteins from other insect species: the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera), and the green pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera). In higher organisms, C1q is the first subcomponent of the classical complement pathway and constitutes a major link between innate and acquired immunity. Expression of C1q-VP in a variety of tissues of honey bee workers and drones was demonstrated. In addition, a wide spatial and temporal pattern of expression was observed in N. vitripennis. We suggest that C1q-VP represents a new member of the emerging group of venom trace elements. Using degenerate primers the corresponding gene was found to be highly conserved in eight hymenopteran species, including species of the Aculeata and the Parasitica groups (suborder Apocrita) and even the suborder Symphyta. A preliminary test using recombinant proteins failed to demonstrate Am_C1q-VP-specific immunoglobulin E recognition by serum from patients with a documented severe bee venom allergy.

  18. Strong correlation of high EBNA-1-IgG levels with edematous attacks involving upper airway mucosa in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette; Füst, George

    2012-01-01

    Elevated level of IgG-type antibodies against Type 1 nuclear antigen (anti-EBNA-1-IgG) of the Epstein-Barr virus is a strong risk factor for certain autoimmune diseases. We measured anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in 107 patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH). In the sera from 33 longitudinally tested patients, we found a very strong correlation (R>0.75, p=0.0005) between anti-EBNA-1-IgG titers measured in 2004 and 2010, respectively. High (>200 U/ml) anti-EBNA-1 levels were strongly correlated with the frequency of upper airway attacks (p=0.003) and the dose requirement of C1-inhibitor concentrate (p=0.008), while no significant association with the frequency of subcutaneous and abdominal attacks was found. These novel findings indicate that the underlying/triggering mechanisms of upper airway attacks in HAE-C1-INH may differ from that of other types of attacks and measurement of the anti-EBNA-1 IgG levels may be suitable for the prediction of upper airway attacks and C1-inhibitor concentrate requirement in HAE-C1-INH patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced combustion mechanism for C1-C4 hydrocarbons and its application in computational fluid dynamics flare modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodara, Vijaya; Chen, Daniel H; Lou, Helen H; Rasel, Kader M A; Richmond, Peyton; Wang, Anan; Li, Xianchang

    2017-05-01

    Emissions from flares constitute unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), soot, and other partially burned and altered hydrocarbons along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. Soot or visible smoke is of particular concern for flare operators/regulatory agencies. The goal of the study is to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model capable of predicting flare combustion efficiency (CE) and soot emission. Since detailed combustion mechanisms are too complicated for (CFD) application, a 50-species reduced mechanism, LU 3.0.1, was developed. LU 3.0.1 is capable of handling C4 hydrocarbons and soot precursor species (C2H2, C2H4, C6H6). The new reduced mechanism LU 3.0.1 was first validated against experimental performance indicators: laminar flame speed, adiabatic flame temperature, and ignition delay. Further, CFD simulations using LU 3.0.1 were run to predict soot emission and CE of air-assisted flare tests conducted in 2010 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, using ANSYS Fluent software. Results of non-premixed probability density function (PDF) model and eddy dissipation concept (EDC) model are discussed. It is also noteworthy that when used in conjunction with the EDC turbulence-chemistry model, LU 3.0.1 can reasonably predict volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well. A reduced combustion mechanism containing 50 C1-C4 species and soot precursors has been developed and validated against experimental data. The combustion mechanism is then employed in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of modeling of soot emission and combustion efficiency (CE) of controlled flares for which experimental soot and CE data are available. The validated CFD modeling tools are useful for oil, gas, and chemical industries to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mandate to achieve smokeless flaring with a high CE.

  20. C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein 3 inhibits oxidative stress during intracerebral hemorrhage via PKA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Shaohua; Yu, Shanshan; Chen, Yanlin; Li, Linyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yong

    2017-02-15

    C1q/tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related proteins (CTRPs) have been confirmed to be adiponectin (APN) paralogs and some share APN's metabolic regulatory functions. Oxidative stress contributes to brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and APN can inhibit oxidative stress injury during ICH. Thus, we addressed the role of a specific CTRP-CTRP 3-after experimental ICH and studied post-ICH oxidative stress injury and the pathway involved. ICH was induced in rats via intracerebral infusion of autologous blood, and the effects of exogenous CTRP3 (lentivirus or recombinant CTRP3) replenishment on ICH injury were investigated. Rats received an intracerebral injection of H89 (a PKA inhibitor) with recombinant CTRP3 (rCTRP 3) or dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP, a PKA activator) without rCTRP 3. Then, oxidative stress, CTRP 3, PKA, and NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX 2) were assessed, as were functional outcomes, cerebral edema, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability at 24h. We found that treatment with recombinant or lentivirus CTRP3 reduced cerebral edema and BBB damage and improved neurological functions as well as reduced post-ICH elevated reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde and increased reduced glutathione and the ratio of oxidized to reduced glutathione. CTRP 3 applied 30min after ICH increased PKA, reduced NOX 2 expression, and decreased oxidative stress. A PKA-inhibitor abolished CTRP 3-induced protective effects and increased NOX 2 expression. We conclude from our results that CTRP 3 may regulate oxidative stress injury via PKA signaling and may provide a new therapeutic strategy for ICH. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Collaborative Development of 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin for the Treatment of Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Elizabeth A.; Kao, Mark L.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Yanjanin, Nicole; Shankar, Roopa Kanakatti; Janssen, Marjo; Brewster, Marcus; Scott, Ilona; Xu, Xin; Cradock, Jim; Terse, Pramod; Dehdashti, Seameen; Marugan, Juan; Zheng, Wei; Portilla, Lili; Hubbs, Alan; Pavan, William J.; Heiss, John; Vite, Charles H.; Walkley, Steven U.; Ory, Daniel S.; Silber, Steven A.; Porter, Forbes D.; Austin, Christopher P.; McKew, John C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) established the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program within the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS), which was created to stimulate drug discovery and development for rare and neglected tropical diseases through a collaborative model between the NIH, academic scientists, nonprofit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This paper describes one of the first TRND programs, the development of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) for the treatment of Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1). NPC is a neurodegenerative, autosomal recessive rare disease caused by a mutation in either the NPC1 (about 95% of cases) or the NPC2 gene (about 5% of cases). These mutations affect the intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids, which leads to a progressive accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in the CNS and visceral organs. Affected individuals typically exhibit ataxia, swallowing problems, seizures, and progressive impairment of motor and intellectual function in early childhood, and usually die in adolescence. There is no disease modifying therapy currently approved for NPC1 in the US. A collaborative drug development program has been established between TRND, public and private partners that has completed the pre-clinical development of HP-β-CD through IND filing for the current Phase I clinical trial that is underway. Here we discuss how this collaborative effort helped to overcome scientific, clinical and financial challenges facing the development of new drug treatments for rare and neglected diseases, and how it will incentivize the commercialization of HP-β-CD for the benefit of the NPC patient community. PMID:24283970

  2. C1q/TNF-related protein 6 (CTRP6) links obesity to adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xia; Seldin, Marcus M; Little, Hannah C; Choy, Nicholas; Klonisch, Thomas; Wong, G William

    2017-09-08

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, and metabolic regulators linking obesity to inflammation have therefore received much attention. Secreted C1q/TNF-related proteins (CTRPs) are one such group of regulators that regulate glucose and fat metabolism in peripheral tissues and modulate inflammation in adipose tissue. We have previously shown that expression of CTRP6 is up-regulated in leptin-deficient mice and, conversely, down-regulated by the anti-diabetic drug rosiglitazone. Here, we provide evidence for a novel role of CTRP6 in modulating both inflammation and insulin sensitivity. We found that in obese and diabetic humans and mouse models, CTRP6 expression was markedly up-regulated in adipose tissue and that stromal vascular cells, such as macrophages, are a major CTRP6 source. Overexpressing mouse or human CTRP6 impaired glucose disposal in peripheral tissues in response to glucose and insulin challenge in wild-type mice. Conversely, Ctrp6 gene deletion improved insulin action and increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure in diet-induced obese mice. Mechanistically, CTRP6 regulates local inflammation and glucose metabolism by targeting macrophages and adipocytes, respectively. In cultured macrophages, recombinant CTRP6 dose-dependently up-regulated the expression and production of TNF-α. Conversely, CTRP6 deficiency reduced circulating inflammatory cytokines and pro-inflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue. CTRP6-overexpressing mice or CTRP6-treated adipocytes had reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. In contrast, loss of CTRP6 enhanced insulin-stimulated Akt activation in adipose tissue. Together, these results establish CTRP6 as a novel metabolic/immune regulator linking obesity to adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. MicroRNA-661 Enhances TRAIL or STS Induced Osteosarcoma Cell Apoptosis by Modulating the Expression of Cytochrome c1

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    Lin Fan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Osteosarcoma (OS is an aggressive bone malignancy that affects rapidly growing bones and is associated with a poor prognosis. Our previous study showed that cytochrome c1 (CYC1, a subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III of the mitochondrial electron chain, is overexpressed in human OS tissues and cell lines and its silencing induces apoptosis in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying the modulation of CYC1 expression in OS and its role in the resistance of OS to apoptosis. Methods: qRT-PCR, luciferase reporter assay, western blotting, fow cytometry, and animal experiments were performed in this study. Results: MicroRNA (miR-661 was identified as a downregulated miRNA in OS tissues and cells and shown to directly target CYC1. Ectopically expressed miR-661 inhibited OS cell growth, promoted apoptosis, and reduced the activity of mitochondrial complex III. miR-661 overexpression enhanced TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis and promoted the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, which induced caspase-9 activation, and these effects were abolished by a caspase-3 inhibitor. Overexpression of CYC1 rescued the effects of miR-661 on sensitizing OS cells to TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis, indicating that the antitumor effect of miR-661 is mediated by the downregulation of CYC1. In vivo, miR-661 overexpression sensitized tumors to TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis in a xenograft mouse model, and these effects were attenuated by co-expression of CYC1. Conclusion: Taken together, our results indicate that miR-661 plays a tumor suppressor role in OS mediated by the downregulation of CYC1, suggesting a potential mechanism underlying cell death resistance in OS.

  4. Systemic AAV9 gene therapy improves the lifespan of mice with Niemann-Pick disease, type C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Randy J; Williams, Ian M; Gibson, Alana L; Davidson, Cristin D; Incao, Arturo A; Hubbard, Brandon T; Porter, Forbes D; Pavan, William J; Venditti, Charles P

    2017-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a heritable lysosomal storage disease characterized by a progressive neurological degeneration that causes disability and premature death. A murine model of NPC1 disease (Npc1-/-) displays a rapidly progressing form of NPC1 disease which is characterized by weight loss, ataxia, increased cholesterol storage, loss of cerebellar Purkinje neurons and early lethality. To test the potential efficacy of gene therapy for NPC1, we constructed adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors to deliver the NPC1 gene under the transcriptional control of the neuronal-specific (CamKII) or a ubiquitous (EF1a) promoter. The Npc1-/- mice that received a single dose of AAV9-CamKII-NPC1 as neonates (2.6 × 1011GC) or at weaning (1.3 × 1012GC), and the mice that received a single dose of AAV9-EF1a-NPC1 at weaning (1.2 × 1012GC), exhibited an increased life span, characterized by delayed weight loss and diminished motor decline. Cholesterol storage and Purkinje neuron loss were also reduced in the central nervous system of AAV9 treated Npc1-/- mice. Treatment with AAV9-EF1a-NPC1, as compared to AAV9-CamKII-NPC1, resulted in significantly increased survival (mean survival increased from 69 days to 166 and 97 days, respectively) and growth, and reduced hepatic-cholesterol accumulation. Our results provide the first demonstration that gene therapy may represent a therapeutic option for NPC1 patients and suggest that extraneuronal NPC1 expression can further augment the lifespan of the Npc1-/- mice after systemic AAV gene delivery. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Characterization of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrins used in the treatment of Niemann-Pick Disease type C1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred L Yergey

    Full Text Available 2-Hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD has gained recent attention as a potential therapeutic intervention in the treatment of the rare autosomal-recessive, neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick Disease Type C1 (NPC1. Notably, HPβCD formulations are not comprised of a single molecular species, but instead are complex mixtures of species with differing degrees of hydroxypropylation of the cyclodextrin ring. The degree of substitution is a critical aspect of the complex mixture as it influences binding to other molecules and thus could potentially modulate biological effects. VTS-270 (Kleptose HPB and Trappsol® Cyclo™ are HPβCD products under investigation as novel treatments for NPC1. The purpose of the present work is to compare these two different products; analyses were based on ion distribution and abundance profiles using mass spectrometry methodology as a means for assessing key molecular distinctions between products. The method incorporated electrospray ionization and analysis with a linear low-field ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight instrument. We observed that the number of hydroxypropyl groups (the degrees of substitution are substantially different between the two products and greater in Trappsol Cyclo than in VTS-270. The principal ions of both samples are ammonium adducts. Isotope clusters for each of the major ions show doubly charged homodimers of the ammonium adducts. In addition, both products show doubly charged homodimers from adduction of both a proton and ammonium. Doubly charged heterodimers are also present, but are more intense in Trappsol Cyclo than in VTS-270. Based on the analytical differences observed between VTS-270 and Trappsol Cyclo with respect to the degree of substitution, the composition and fingerprint of the complex mixture, and the impurity profiles, these products cannot be considered to be the same; the potential biological and clinical implications of these differences

  6. Sustained Systemic Glucocerebrosidase Inhibition Induces Brain α-Synuclein Aggregation, Microglia and Complement C1q Activation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Emily M; Smith, Gaynor A; Park, Eric; Cao, Hongmei; Graham, Anne-Renee; Brown, Eilish; McLean, Jesse R; Hayes, Melissa A; Beagan, Jonathan; Izen, Sarah C; Perez-Torres, Eduardo; Hallett, Penelope J; Isacson, Ole

    2015-08-20

    Loss-of-function mutations in GBA1, which cause the autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, Gaucher disease (GD), are also a key genetic risk factor for the α-synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies. GBA1 encodes for the lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase and reductions in this enzyme result in the accumulation of the glycolipid substrates glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine. Deficits in autophagy and lysosomal degradation pathways likely contribute to the pathological accumulation of α-synuclein in PD. In this report we used conduritol-β-epoxide (CBE), a potent selective irreversible competitive inhibitor of glucocerebrosidase, to model reduced glucocerebrosidase activity in vivo, and tested whether sustained glucocerebrosidase inhibition in mice could induce neuropathological abnormalities including α-synucleinopathy, and neurodegeneration. Our data demonstrate that daily systemic CBE treatment over 28 days caused accumulation of insoluble α-synuclein aggregates in the substantia nigra, and altered levels of proteins involved in the autophagy lysosomal system. These neuropathological changes were paralleled by widespread neuroinflammation, upregulation of complement C1q, abnormalities in synaptic, axonal transport and cytoskeletal proteins, and neurodegeneration. A reduction in brain GCase activity has been linked to sporadic PD and normal aging, and may contribute to the susceptibility of vulnerable neurons to degeneration. This report demonstrates that systemic reduction of GCase activity using chemical inhibition, leads to neuropathological changes in the brain reminiscent of α-synucleinopathy. These data reveal a link between reduced glucocerebrosidase and the development of α-synucleinopathy and pathophysiological abnormalities in mice, and support the development of GCase therapeutics to reduce α-synucleinopathy in PD and related disorders.

  7. 3-Nitrobenzanthrone and 3-aminobenzanthrone induce DNA damage and cell signalling in Hepa1c1c7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landvik, N.E. [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 404 Torshov N-4303 Oslo (Norway); Arlt, V.M.; Nagy, E. [Section of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Institute of Cancer Research, Brookes Lawley Building, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Solhaug, A. [Section for Toxicology, Department of Feed and Food Safety, National Veterinary Institute Pb 750 Sentrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Tekpli, X. [EA SeRAIC, Equipe labellisee Ligue contre le Cancer, IFR 140, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Schmeiser, H.H. [Research Group Genetic Alteration in Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Refsnes, M. [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 404 Torshov N-4303 Oslo (Norway); Phillips, D.H. [Section of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Institute of Cancer Research, Brookes Lawley Building, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Lagadic-Gossmann, D. [EA SeRAIC, Equipe labellisee Ligue contre le Cancer, IFR 140, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Holme, J.A., E-mail: jorn.holme@fhi.no [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 404 Torshov N-4303 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-02-03

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental pollutant found in diesel exhaust and urban air pollution. In the present work we have characterised the effects of 3-NBA and its metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA) on cell death and cytokine release in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells. These effects were related to induced DNA damage and changes in cell signalling pathways. 3-NBA resulted in cell death and caused most DNA damage as judged by the amount of DNA adducts ({sup 32}P-postlabelling assay), single strand (ss)DNA breaks and oxidative DNA lesions (comet assay) detected. An increased phosphorylation of H2AX, chk1, chk2 and partly ATM was observed using flow cytometry and/or Western blotting. Both compounds increased phosphorylation of p53 and MAPKs (ERK, p38 and JNK). However, only 3-NBA caused an accumulation of p53 in the nucleus and a translocation of Bax to the mitochondria. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha inhibited 3-NBA-induced apoptosis, indicating that cell death was a result of the triggering of DNA signalling pathways. The highest phosphorylation of Akt and degradation of I{kappa}B-{alpha} (suggesting activation of NF-{kappa}B) were also seen after treatment with 3-NBA. In contrast 3-ABA increased IL-6 release, but caused little or no toxicity. Cytokine release was inhibited by PD98059 and curcumin, suggesting that ERK and NF-{kappa}B play a role in this process. In conclusion, 3-NBA seems to have a higher potency to induce DNA damage compatible with its cytotoxic effects, while 3-ABA seems to have a greater effect on the immune system.

  8. Suppression of methylation-mediated transcriptional gene silencing by βC1-SAHH protein interaction during geminivirus-betasatellite infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuling Yang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression and represses endogenous transposons and invading DNA viruses. As a counter-defense, the geminiviruses encode proteins that inhibit methylation and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS. Some geminiviruses have acquired a betasatellite called DNA β. This study presents evidence that suppression of methylation-mediated TGS by the sole betasatellite-encoded protein, βC1, is crucial to the association of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV with its betasatellite (TYLCCNB. We show that TYLCCNB complements Beet curly top virus (BCTV L2⁻ mutants deficient for methylation inhibition and TGS suppression, and that cytosine methylation levels in BCTV and TYLCCNV genomes, as well as the host genome, are substantially reduced by TYLCCNB or βC1 expression. We also demonstrate that while TYLCCNB or βC1 expression can reverse TGS, TYLCCNV by itself is ineffective. Thus its AC2/AL2 protein, known to have suppression activity in other geminiviruses, is likely a natural mutant in this respect. A yeast two-hybrid screen of candidate proteins, followed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis, revealed that βC1 interacts with S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH, a methyl cycle enzyme required for TGS. We further demonstrate that βC1 protein inhibits SAHH activity in vitro. That βC1 and other geminivirus proteins target the methyl cycle suggests that limiting its product, S-adenosyl methionine, may be a common viral strategy for methylation interference. We propose that inhibition of methylation and TGS by βC1 stabilizes geminivirus/betasatellite complexes.

  9. Identification of functional elements of the GDP-fucose transporter SLC35C1 using a novel Chinese hamster ovary mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peiqing; Haryadi, Ryan; Chan, Kah Fai; Teo, Gavin; Goh, John; Pereira, Natasha Ann; Feng, Huatao; Song, Zhiwei

    2012-07-01

    The GDP-fucose transporter SLC35C1 critically regulates the fucosylation of glycans. Elucidation of its structure-function relationships remains a challenge due to the lack of an appropriate mutant cell line. Here we report a novel Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant, CHO-gmt5, generated by the zinc-finger nuclease technology, in which the Slc35c1 gene was knocked out from a previously reported CHO mutant that has a dysfunctional CMP-sialic acid transporter (CST) gene (Slc35a1). Consequently, CHO-gmt5 harbors double genetic defects in Slc35a1 and Slc35c1 and produces N-glycans deficient in both sialic acid and fucose. The structure-function relationships of SLC35C1 were studied using CHO-gmt5 cells. In contrast to the CST and UDP-galactose transporter, the C-terminal tail of SLC35C1 is not required for its Golgi localization but is essential for generating glycans that are recognized by a fucose-binding lectin, Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), suggesting an important role in the transport activity of SLC35C1. Furthermore, we found that this impact can be independently contributed by a cluster of three lysine residues and a Glu-Met (EM) sequence within the C terminus. We also showed that the conserved glycine residues at positions 180 and 277 of SLC35C1 have significant impacts on AAL binding to CHO-gmt5 cells, suggesting that these conserved glycine residues are required for the transport activity of Slc35 proteins. The absence of sialic acid and fucose on Fc N-glycan has been independently shown to enhance the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effect. By combining these features into one cell line, we postulate that CHO-gmt5 may represent a more advantageous cell line for the production of recombinant antibodies with enhanced ADCC effect.

  10. Expression of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1c1 and monocarboxylate transporter 8 in the rat placental barrier and the compensatory response to thyroid dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-na Sun

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones (THs must pass from mother to fetus for normal fetal development and require the expression of placental TH transporters. We investigate the compensatory effect of placental organic anion transporting polypeptide 1c1 (Oatp1c1 and monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8 on maternal thyroid dysfunction. We describe the expressions of these two transporters in placental barriers and trophoblastic cell populations in euthyroidism and thyroid dysfunction resulting from differential iodine nutrition at gestation day (GD 16 and 20, that is, before and after the onset of fetal thyroid function. Immunohistochemistry revealed that in the blood-placenta barrier, these two TH transporters were strongly expressed in the villous interstitial substance and were weakly expressed in trophoblast cells. Levels of Oatp1c1 protein obviously increased in the placental fetal portion during maternal thyroid deficiency at GD16. Under maternal thyroid deficiency after the production of endogenous fetal TH, quantitative PCR analysis revealed down-regulation of Oatp1c1 occurred along with up-regulation of Mct8 in trophoblast cell populations isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM; this was consistent with the protein levels in the fetal portion of the placenta. In addition, decreased D3 mRNA at GD16 and increased D2 mRNA on two gestational days were observed in trophoblast cells with thyroid dysfunction. However, levels of Oatp1c1 mRNA at GD16 and D3 mRNA at GD20 were too low to be detectable in trophoblast cells. In conclusion, placental Oatp1c1 plays an essential compensatory role when the transplacental passage of maternal THs is insufficient at the stage before the fetal TH production. In addition, the coordinated effects of Oatp1c1, Mct8, D2 and D3 in the placental barrier may regulate both transplacental TH passage and the development of trophoblast cells during thyroid dysfunction throughout the pregnancy.

  11. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi [University of Patras, 26505 Rio, Patras (Greece); Perrakis, Anastassis, E-mail: a.perrakis@nki.nl [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-31

    The GemC1 coiled-coil structure has subtle differences compared with its homologues Geminin and Idas. Co-expression experiments in cells and biophysical stability analysis of the Geminin-family coiled coils suggest that the GemC1 coiled coil alone is unstable. GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin–Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  12. Statins and fenofibrate affect skeletal muscle chloride conductance in rats by differently impairing ClC-1 channel regulation and expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierno, S; Camerino, GM; Cippone, V; Rolland, J-F; Desaphy, J-F; De Luca, A; Liantonio, A; Bianco, G; Kunic, JD; George, AL; Camerino, D Conte

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Statins and fibrates can produce mild to life-threatening skeletal muscle damage. Resting chloride channel conductance (gCl), carried by the ClC-1 channel, is reduced in muscles of rats chronically treated with fluvastatin, atorvastatin or fenofibrate, along with increased resting cytosolic calcium in statin-treated rats. A high gCl, controlled by the Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC), maintains sarcolemma electrical stability and its reduction alters muscle function. Here, we investigated how statins and fenofibrate impaired gCl. Experimental approach: In rats treated with fluvastatin, atorvastatin or fenofibrate, we examined the involvement of PKC in gCl reduction by the two intracellular microelectrodes technique and ClC-1 mRNA level by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. Direct drug effects were tested by patch clamp analysis on human ClC-1 channels expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Key results: Chelerythrine, a PKC inhibitor, applied in vitro on muscle dissected from atorvastatin-treated rats fully restored gCl, suggesting the involvement of this enzyme in statin action. Chelerythrine partially restored gCl in muscles from fluvastatin-treated rats but not in those from fenofibrate-treated rats, implying additional mechanisms for gCl impairment. Accordingly, a decrease of ClC-1 channel mRNA was found in both fluvastatin-and fenofibrate-treated rat muscles. Fenofibric acid, the in vivo metabolite of fenofibrate, but not fluvastatin, rapidly reduced chloride currents in HEK 293 cells. Conclusions and implications: Our data suggest multiple mechanisms underlie the effect of statins and fenofibrate on ClC-1 channel conductance. While statins promote Ca2+-mediated PKC activation, fenofibrate directly inhibits ClC-1 channels and both fluvastatin and fenofibrate impair expression of mRNA for ClC-1. PMID:19220292

  13. Impact of Starting Point and Bicortical Purchase of C1 Lateral Mass Screws on Atlantoaxial Fusion: Meta-Analysis and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Robert E; Tanweer, Omar; Smith, Michael L; Frempong-Boadu, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Structured review of literature and application of meta-analysis statistical techniques. Review published series describing clinical and radiographic outcomes of patients treated with C1 lateral mass screws (C1LMS), specifically analyzing the impact of starting point and bicortical purchase on successful atlantoaxial arthrodesis. Biomechanical studies suggest posterior arch screws and C1LMS with bicortical purchase are stronger than screws placed within the center of the lateral mass or those with unicortical purchase. Online databases were searched for English-language articles between 1994 and 2012 describing posterior atlantal instrumentation with C1LMS. Thirty-four studies describing 1247 patients having posterior atlantoaxial fusion with C1LMS met inclusion criteria. All studies provided class III evidence. Arthrodesis was quite successful regardless of technique (99.0% overall). Meta-analysis and multivariate regression analyses showed that neither posterior arch starting point nor bicortical screw purchase translated into a higher rate of successful arthrodesis. There were no complications from bicortical screw purchase. The Goel-Harms technique is a very safe and successful technique for achieving atlantoaxial fusion, regardless of minor variations in C1LMS technique. Although biomechanical studies suggest markedly increased rigidity of bicortical and posterior arch C1LMS, the significance of these findings may be minimal in the clinical setting of atlantoaxial fixation and fusion with modern techniques. The decision to use either technique must be made after careful review of the preoperative multiplanar computed tomography imaging, assessment of the unique anatomy of each patient, and the demands of the clinical scenario such as bone quality.

  14. C1-C2 Pedicle Screw Fixation for Atlantoaxial Dislocation in Pediatric Patients Younger than 5 Years: A Case Series of 15 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue-Hui; Shao, Jiang; Chou, Dean; Wu, Jian-Feng; Song, Jia; Zhang, Jing

    2017-12-01

    C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation has become popular for providing excellent bony purchase and avoiding neurovascular complications. However, it may be technically challenging in children. The objective of this study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation for atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) in pediatric patients younger than 5 years and to evaluate the preliminary clinical and radiographic results. During a 7-year period, 15 patients with a mean age of 3.4 years (range, 2-5 years) underwent C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation for AAD; at least 1 C1 pedicle screw was incorporated as part of the posterior atlantoaxial fusion construct. The cause, surgical technique, instrumentation, and clinical and radiographic results were analyzed. Five patients had preoperative neurologic deficits and no neurovascular injury occurred during surgery. Anterior release using a retropharyngeal approach was performed in 4 cases. Fixation of 55 C1 and C2 pedicle screws was performed successfully without neurovascular complications. Anatomic and partial reductions occurred in 12 and 3 cases, respectively. Solid fusion was achieved in 14 patients (96.9%) during a mean follow-up of 37.6 months (range, 12-111 months). Two patients (13%) experienced complications: one had prolonged immobilization for a loose C1 pedicle screw, and one had unintended fusion caused by allograft absorption. All patients showed radiographic stability and symptom resolution. C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation for AAD is safe and effective even in children younger than 5 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional analysis of C1 family cysteine peptidases in the larval gut of Тenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N; Perkin, Lindsey; Oppert, Brenda

    2015-02-14

    Larvae of the tenebrionids Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum have highly compartmentalized guts, with primarily cysteine peptidases in the acidic anterior midgut that contribute to the early stages of protein digestion. High throughput sequencing was used to quantify and characterize transcripts encoding cysteine peptidases from the C1 papain family in the gut of tenebrionid larvae. For T. castaneum, 25 genes and one questionable pseudogene encoding cysteine peptidases were identified, including 11 cathepsin L or L-like, 11 cathepsin B or B-like, and one each F, K, and O. The majority of transcript expression was from two cathepsin L genes on chromosome 10 (LOC659441 and LOC659502). For cathepsin B, the major expression was from genes on chromosome 3 (LOC663145 and LOC663117). Some transcripts were expressed at lower levels or not at all in the larval gut, including cathepsins F, K, and O. For T. molitor, there were 29 predicted cysteine peptidase genes, including 14 cathepsin L or L-like, 13 cathepsin B or B-like, and one each cathepsin O and F. One cathepsin L and one cathepsin B were also highly expressed, orthologous to those in T. castaneum. Peptidases lacking conservation in active site residues were identified in both insects, and sequence analysis of orthologs indicated that changes in these residues occurred prior to evolutionary divergence. Sequences from both insects have a high degree of variability in the substrate binding regions, consistent with the ability of these enzymes to degrade a variety of cereal seed storage proteins and inhibitors. Predicted cathepsin B peptidases from both insects included some with a shortened occluding loop without active site residues in the middle, apparently lacking exopeptidase activity and unique to tenebrionid insects. Docking of specific substrates with models of T. molitor cysteine peptidases indicated that some insect cathepsins B and L bind substrates with affinities similar to human cathepsin L, while

  16. Roles of receptor for activated protein kinase C1 for modulating immune responses in white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhong-Wen; Chang, Chin-Chyuan

    2015-10-01

    Complementary (c)DNA encoding a receptor for activated protein kinase C1 (RACK1) messenger (m)RNA of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, designated LvRACK1, consisted a 1136-bp cDNA containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 954 bp, a 111-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and a 71-bp 3'-UTR, which is a 36 kDa cytosolic protein, belonging to the Trp-Asp40 (WD40) family of proteins, characterized by containing seven highly conserved Trp-Asp40 (WD40) internal repeats, and a poly A tail. The WD repeat of LvRACK1 can be predicted to form a seven-bladed propeller structure with each WD repeat composed of four antiparallel β-sheets. The WD40 domains have been implicated in protein-protein interactions. A comparison of amino acid sequences showed that LvRACK1 was closely related to arthropods RACK1. LvRACK1 cDNA was synthesized in all tested tissues detected with real-time PCR including haemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, muscles, subcuticular epithelium, intestines, abdominal nervous ganglia, thoracic nervous ganglia, lymphoid organ, stomach, heart, and antennal gland, especially in subcuticular epithelium and gill. LvRACK1 mRNA transcription in haemocytes of L. vannamei injected with Vibrio alginolyticus decreased. The depletion of LvRACK1 of haemocytes in L. vannamei received its dsRNA revealed the increased respiratory bursts per haemocyte, superoxide dismutase (SOD), activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and clotting time, but showed the decreased total haemocyte count (THC), hyaline cells (HCs), phagocytic activity, and transglutaminase (TG) activity. LvRACK1 silenced shrimp showed the upregulated gene expressions of cyMnSOD, mtMnSOD, peroxinectin (PE), and TGI, and showed the downregulated α2-macroglobulin (α2-M), clottable protein (CP), lysozyme, and crustin gene expressions. It is therefore concluded that LvRACK1 is involved in immune defense and signaling transduction in haemocytes of L. vannamei infected with V. alginolyticus. Copyright © 2015

  17. Cross-sectional study of the neural ossification centers of vertebrae C1-S5 in the human fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpinda, Michał; Baumgart, Mariusz; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna

    2013-10-01

    An understanding of the normal evolution of the spine is of great relevance in the prenatal detection of spinal abnormalities. This study was carried out to estimate the length, width, cross-sectional area and volume of the neural ossification centers of vertebrae C1-S5 in the human fetus. Using the methods of CT (Biograph mCT), digital-image analysis (Osirix 3.9) and statistics (the one-way ANOVA test for paired data, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Levene's test, Student's t test, the one-way ANOVA test for unpaired data with post hoc RIR Tukey comparisons) the size for the neural ossification centers throughout the spine in 55 spontaneously aborted human fetuses (27 males, 28 females) at ages of 17-30 weeks was studied. The neural ossification centers were visualized in the whole pre-sacral spine, in 74.5 % for S1, in 61.8 % for S2, in 52.7 % for S3, and in 12.7 % for S4. Neither male-female nor right-left significant differences in the size of neural ossification centers were found. The neural ossification centers were the longest within the cervical spine. The maximum values referred to the axis on the right, and to C5 vertebra on the left. There was a gradual decrease in length for the neural ossification centers of T1-S4 vertebrae. The neural ossification centers were the widest within the proximal thoracic spine and narrowed bi-directionally. The growth dynamics for CSA of neural ossification centers were found to parallel that of volume. The largest CSAs and volumes of neural ossification centers were found in the C3 vertebra, and decreased in the distal direction. The neural ossification centers show neither male-female nor right-left differences. The neural ossification centers are characterized by the maximum length for C2-C6 vertebrae, the maximum width for the proximal thoracic spine, and both the maximum cross-sectional area and volume for C3 vertebra. There is a sharp decrease in size of the neural ossification centers along the sacral spine. A

  18. Functional role of tlyC1 encoding a hemolysin-like protein from Bifidobacterium longum BBMN68 in bile tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; An, Haoran; Zhang, Jingsheng; Zhou, Hui; Ren, Fazheng; Hao, Yanling

    2014-11-01

    Bifidobacteria are normal inhabitants of the human gut, and members of which are generally considered to be probiotic. Before exerting their beneficial properties, they must survive and persist in the physiological concentrations (0.05-2%) of bile in the gut. In this work, the functional role of tlyC1 encoding a hemolysin-like protein from Bifidobacterium longum BBMN68 in bile tolerance was tested. Analysis using the program TMHMM and homologous alignment indicated that TlyC1 is a nontransporter membrane protein and is conserved in many bifidobacteria. Heterologous expression of tlyC1 in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 was shown to confer 45-fold higher tolerance to 0.15% ox-bile. Notably, the recombinant strains showed threefold higher survival when exposed to sublethal concentration of TCA and TDCA, while no significant change was observed when exposed to GCA and GDCA. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that the transcription of tlyC1 was up-regulated c. 2.5- and 2.7-fold in B. longum BBMN68 exposed to sublethal concentration of TCA and TDCA, while no significant change was observed with GCA and GDCA challenges. This study indicated that tlyC1 was specifically induced by tauroconjugates, which provided enhanced resistance to sodium taurocholate and sodium taurodeoxycholate. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Binding of complement proteins C1q and C4bp to serum amyloid P component (SAP) in solid contra liquid phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Nielsen, EH; Andersen, Ove

    1996-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP), a member of the conserved pentraxin family of plasma proteins, binds calcium dependently to its ligands. The authors investigated SAPs interaction with the complement proteins C4b binding protein (C4bp) and C1q by ELISA, immunoelectrophoresis and electron microscopy....... Binding of these proteins to SAP was demonstrated when SAP was immobilized using F(ab')2 anti-SAP, but not when SAP reacted with these proteins in liquid phase; thus the binding to human SAP was markedly phase state dependent. Presaturation of solid phase SAP with heparin, which binds SAP with high...... affinity, did not interfere with the subsequent binding of C4bp or C1q to SAP. In contrast, collagen I and IV showed partial competition with the binding of C1q to SAP. Using fresh serum, immobilized native SAP bound C4bp whereas binding of C1q/C1 could not be demonstrated. Altogether the results indicate...

  20. Edible Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Rice T1C-1 for Sprague Dawley Rats through Horizontal Gene Transfer, Allergenicity and Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Ren, Fangfang; Han, Fangting; Liu, Qiwen; Wu, Guogan; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Xiao; Wang, Jinbin; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Lv, Jianjun; Zhao, Xiao; Tang, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, assessment of the safety of transgenic rice T1C-1 expressing Cry1C was carried out by: (1) studying horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in Sprague Dawley rats fed transgenic rice for 90 d; (2) examining the effect of Cry1C protein in vitro on digestibility and allergenicity; and (3) studying the changes of intestinal microbiota in rats fed with transgenic rice T1C-1 in acute and subchronic toxicity tests. Sprague Dawley rats were fed a diet containing either 60% GM Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) rice T1C-1 expressing Cry1C protein, the parental rice Minghui 63, or a basic diet for 90 d. The GM Bt rice T1C-1 showed no evidence of HGT between rats and transgenic rice. Sequence searching of the Cry1C protein showed no homology with known allergens or toxins. Cry1C protein was rapidly degraded in vitro with simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The expressed Cry1C protein did not induce high levels of specific IgG and IgE antibodies in rats. The intestinal microbiota of rats fed T1C-1 was also analyzed in acute and subchronic toxicity tests by DGGE. Cluster analysis of DGGE profiles revealed significant individu