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Sample records for c-type lectin langerin

  1. Glycosaminoglycans are interactants of Langerin: comparison with gp120 highlights an unexpected calcium-independent binding mode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Chabrol

    Full Text Available Langerin is a C-type lectin specifically expressed in Langerhans cells. As recently shown for HIV, Langerin is thought to capture pathogens and mediate their internalisation into Birbeck Granules for elimination. However, the precise functions of Langerin remain elusive, mostly because of the lack of information on its binding properties and physiological ligands. Based on recent reports that Langerin binds to sulfated sugars, we conducted here a comparative analysis of Langerin interaction with mannose-rich HIV glycoprotein gp120 and glycosaminoglycan (GAGs, a family of sulfated polysaccharides expressed at the surface of most mammalian cells. Our results first revealed that Langerin bound to these different glycans through very distinct mechanisms and led to the identification of a novel, GAG-specific binding mode within Langerin. In contrast to the canonical lectin domain, this new binding site showed no Ca(2+-dependency, and could only be detected in entire, trimeric extracellular domains of Langerin. Interestingly binding to GAGs, did not simply rely on a net charge effect, but rather on more discrete saccharide features, such as 6-O-sulfation, or iduronic acid content. Using molecular modelling simulations, we proposed a model of Langerin/heparin complex, which located the GAG binding site at the interface of two of the three Carbohydrate-recognition domains of the protein, at the edge of the a-helix coiled-coil. To our knowledge, the binding properties that we have highlighted here for Langerin, have never been reported for C-type lectins before. These findings provide new insights towards the understanding of Langerin biological functions.

  2. Tetranectin, a trimeric plasminogen-binding C-type lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtet, T L; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Clemmensen, I

    1997-01-01

    Tetranectin, a plasminogen-binding protein belonging to the family of C-type lectins, was expressed in E. coli and converted to its native form by in vitro refolding and proteolytic processing. Recombinant tetranectin-as well as natural tetranectin from human plasma-was shown by chemical cross......-linking analysis and SDS-PAGE to be a homo-trimer in solution as are other known members of the collectin family of C-type lectins. Biochemical evidence is presented showing that an N-terminal domain encoded within exons 1 and 2 of the tetranectin gene is necessary and sufficient to govern subunit trimerization....

  3. Signalling through C-type lectin receptors: shaping immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Gringhuis, Sonja I.

    2009-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed by dendritic cells are crucial for tailoring immune responses to pathogens. Following pathogen binding, CLRs trigger distinct signalling pathways that induce the expression of specific cytokines which determine T cell polarization fates. Some CLRs can induce

  4. C-type lectin receptors orchestrate antifungal immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, Brigitte A.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Gringhuis, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Fungal infections are an emerging threat for human health. A coordinated host immune response is fundamental for successful elimination of an invading fungal microbe. A panel of C-type lectin receptors expressed on antigen-presenting dendritic cells enable innate recognition of fungal cell wall

  5. Structure of a glycomimetic ligand in the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectin DC-SIGN. Structural requirements for selectivity and ligand design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépaut, Michel; Guzzi, Cinzia; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Sattin, Sara; Ribeiro-Viana, Renato; Varga, Norbert; Chabrol, Eric; Rojo, Javier; Bernardi, Anna; Angulo, Jesus; Nieto, Pedro M; Fieschi, Franck

    2013-02-20

    In genital mucosa, different fates are described for HIV according to the subtype of dendritic cells (DCs) involved in its recognition. This notably depends on the C-type lectin receptor, langerin or DC-SIGN, involved in gp120 interaction. Langerin blocks HIV transmission by its internalization in specific organelles of Langerhans cells. On the contrary, DC-SIGN enhances HIV trans-infection of T lymphocytes. Thus, approaches aiming to inhibit DC-SIGN, without blocking langerin, represent attractive anti-HIV strategies. We previously demonstrated that dendrons bearing multiple copies of glycomimetic compounds were able to block DC-SIGN-dependent HIV infection in cervical explant models. Optimization of such ligand requires detailed characterization of its binding mode. In the present work, we determined the first high-resolution structure of a glycomimetic/DC-SIGN complex by X-ray crystallography. This glycomimetic, pseudo-1,2-mannobioside, shares shape and conformational properties with Manα1-2Man, its natural counterpart. However, it uses the binding epitope previously described for Lewis X, a ligand specific for DC-SIGN among the C-type lectin family. Thus, selectivity gain for DC-SIGN versus langerin is observed with pseudo-1,2-mannobioside as shown by surface plasmon resonance analysis. In parallel, ligand binding was also analyzed by TR-NOESY and STD NMR experiments, combined with the CORCEMA-ST protocol. These studies demonstrate that the complex, defined by X-ray crystallography, represents the unique binding mode of this ligand as opposed to the several binding orientations described for the natural ligand. This exclusive binding mode and its selective interaction properties position this glycomimetic as a good lead compound for rational improvement based on a structurally driven approach.

  6. Differential regulation of C-type lectin expression on tolerogenic dendritic cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Sandra J.; van Liempt, Ellis; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2006-01-01

    Antigen presenting cells (APC) express high levels of C-type lectins, which play a major role in cellular interactions as well as pathogen recognition and antigen presentation. The C-type lectin macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), expressed by dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages, mediates

  7. Macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin receptor for DC targeting of antitumor glycopeptide vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuti, M; Zizzari, I; Napoletano, C

    2011-01-01

    e13528 Background: Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells and are employed in cancer vaccination. Several receptors are being studied in order to identif strategies to increase DCs activating capacity. The C-type lectin macrophage galactose type C-type lectin (MGL...

  8. C-type lectins do not act as functional receptors for filovirus entry into cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuno, Keita; Nakayama, Eri; Noyori, Osamu [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo (Japan); Marzi, Andrea; Ebihara, Hideki [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT (United States); Irimura, Tatsuro [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Feldmann, Heinz [Laboratory of Virology, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT (United States); Takada, Ayato, E-mail: atakada@czc.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Filovirus glycoprotein (GP) having a deficient receptor binding region were generated. {yields} Mutant GPs mediated virus entry less efficiently than wild-type GP. {yields} Mutant GPs bound to C-type lectins but not mediated entire steps of cellular entry. {yields} C-type lectins do not independently mediate filovirus entry into cells. {yields} Other molecule(s) are required for C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses. -- Abstract: Cellular C-type lectins have been reported to facilitate filovirus infection by binding to glycans on filovirus glycoprotein (GP). However, it is not clearly known whether interaction between C-type lectins and GP mediates all the steps of virus entry (i.e., attachment, internalization, and membrane fusion). In this study, we generated vesicular stomatitis viruses pseudotyped with mutant GPs that have impaired structures of the putative receptor binding regions and thus reduced ability to infect the monkey kidney cells that are routinely used for virus propagation. We found that infectivities of viruses with the mutant GPs dropped in C-type lectin-expressing cells, parallel with those in the monkey kidney cells, whereas binding activities of these GPs to the C-type lectins were not correlated with the reduced infectivities. These results suggest that C-type lectin-mediated entry of filoviruses requires other cellular molecule(s) that may be involved in virion internalization or membrane fusion.

  9. C-type Lectin Receptors for Tumor Eradication: Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Unger, Wendy W. J.; Kooyk, Yvette van, E-mail: y.vankooyk@vumc.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU University Medical Center, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-08

    Dendritic cells are key regulators in directing immune responses and therefore are under extensive research for the induction of anti-tumor responses. DCs express a large array of receptors by which they scan their surroundings for recognition and uptake of pathogens. One of the receptor-families is the C-type lectins (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures and internalize antigens upon recognition. Intracellular routing of antigen through CLR enhances loading and presentation of antigen through MHC class I and II, inducing antigen-specific CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T-cell proliferation and skewing T-helper cells. These characteristics make CLRs very interesting targets for DC-based immunotherapy. Profound research has been done on targeting specific tumor antigens to CLR using either antibodies or the natural ligands such as glycan structures. In this review we will focus on the current data showing the potency of CLR-targeting and discuss improvements that can be achieved to enhance anti-tumor activity in the near future.

  10. Targeting C-type Lectin Receptors for Cancer Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin eYan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available C-type lectin receptors (CLRs are a large family of soluble and trans-membrane pattern recognition receptors that are widely and primarily expressed on myeloid cells. CLRs are important for cell-cell communication and host defense against pathogens through the recognition of specific carbohydrate structures. Similar to a family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs, CLRs signaling are involved in the various steps for initiation of innate immune responses and promote secretion of soluble factors such as cytokines and interferons, Moreover, CLRs contribute to endocytosis and antigen-presentation, thereby fine-tune adaptive immune responses. In addition, there may also be a direct activation of acquired immunity. On the other hand, glycans, such as mannose structures, Lewis-type antigens or GalNAc are components of tumor antigens and ligate CLRs, leading to immunoregulation. Therefore agonists or antagonists of CLRs signaling are potential therapeutic reagents for cancer immunotherapy. We aim to overview the current knowledge of CLRs signaling and the application of their ligands on tumor-associating immune response.

  11. Dual function of C-type lectin-like receptors in the immune system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambi, A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding C-type lectin and lectin-like receptors play an important role in the immune system. The large family can be subdivided into subtypes according to their structural similarities and functional differences. The selectins are of major importance in mediating cell adhesion and

  12. Comparative analysis reveals selective recognition of glycans by the dendritic cell receptors DC-SIGN and Langerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla, Andrea; Skerra, Arne

    2011-09-01

    DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3 grabbing non-integrin) and Langerin are homologous C-type lectins expressed as cell-surface receptors on different populations of dendritic cells (DCs). DC-SIGN interacts with glycan structures on HIV-1, facilitating virus survival, transmission and infection, whereas Langerin, which is characteristic of Langerhans cells (LCs), promotes HIV-1 uptake and degradation. Here we describe a comprehensive comparison of the glycan specificities of both proteins by probing a synthetic carbohydrate microarray comprising 275 sugar compounds using the bacterially produced and fluorescence-labeled, monomeric carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) of DC-SIGN and Langerin. In this side-by-side study DC-SIGN was found to preferentially bind internal mannose residues of high-mannose-type saccharides and the fucose-containing blood-type antigens H, A, B, Le(a), Le(b) Le(x), Le(y), sialyl-Le(a) as well as sulfatated derivatives of Le(a) and Le(x). In contrast, Langerin appeared to recognize a different spectrum of compounds, especially those containing terminal mannose, terminal N-acetylglucosamine and 6-sulfogalactose residues, but also the blood-type antigens H, A and B. Of the Lewis antigens, only Le(b), Le(y), sialyl-Le(a) and the sialyl-Le(x) derivative with 6'-sulfatation at the galactose (sialyl-6SGal Le(x)) were weakly bound by Langerin. Notably, Ca(2+)-independent glycan-binding activity of Langerin could not be detected either by probing the glycan array or by isothermal titration calorimetry of the CRD with mannose and mannobiose. The precise knowledge of carbohydrate specificity of DC-SIGN and Langerin receptors resulting from our study may aid the future design of microbicides that specifically affect the DC-SIGN/HIV-1 interaction while not compromising the protective function of Langerin.

  13. Chicken lung lectin is a functional C-type lectin and inhibits haemagglutination by influenza A virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenkamp, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243274319; Isohadouten, N.; Reemers, S.S.N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836508; Romijn, R.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26228359X; Hemrika, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/121631362; White, M.R.; Tefsen, B.; Vervelde, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/134923391; van Eijk, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/255160216; Veldhuizen, E.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/19545264X; Haagsman, H.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069273278

    2008-01-01

    Many proteins of the calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin family have been shown to play an important role in innate immunity. They can bind to a broad range of carbohydrates, which enables them to interact with ligands present on the surface of micro-organisms.We previously reported the finding of a

  14. Antimicrobial properties of avian eggshell-specific C-type lectin-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman-Labadie, Olivier; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2008-03-05

    C-type lectin-like proteins are major components of the calcified eggshell of multiple avian species. In this study, two representative avian C-type lectin-like proteins, ovocleidin-17 and ansocalcin, were purified from decalcified chicken and goose eggshell protein extracts and investigated for carbohydrate binding activity as well as antimicrobial activity. Purified ovocleidin-17 and ansocalcin were found to bind bacterial polysaccharides, and were bactericidal against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomona aeruginosa. Bactericidal activity was found to be enhanced in the presence of calcium but was not dependent on its presence. The results suggest that avian C-type lectin-like proteins may play an important antimicrobial role in defence of the avian embryo.

  15. A C-Type Lectin from Bothrops jararacussu Venom Disrupts Staphylococcal Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Raphael Contelli; Fabres-Klein, Mary Hellen; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Feio, Renato Neves; Malouin, François; Ribon, Andréa de Oliveira Barros

    2015-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a major threat to animal health and the dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a contagious pathogen that is usually associated with persistent intramammary infections, and biofilm formation is a relevant aspect of the outcome of these infections. Several biological activities have been described for snake venoms, which led us to screen secretions of Bothrops jararacussu for antibiofilm activity against S. aureus NRS155. Crude venom was fractionated by size-exclusion chromatography, and the fractions were tested against S. aureus. Biofilm growth, but not bacterial growth, was affected by several fractions. Two fractions (15 and 16) showed the best activities and were also assayed against S. epidermidis NRS101. Fraction 15 was identified by TripleTOF mass spectrometry as a galactose-binding C-type lectin with a molecular weight of 15 kDa. The lectin was purified from the crude venom by D-galactose affinity chromatography, and only one peak was observed. This pure lectin was able to inhibit 75% and 80% of S. aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms, respectively, without affecting bacterial cell viability. The lectin also exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both bacterial biofilms. The antibiofilm activity was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. A pre-formed S. epidermidis biofilm was significantly disrupted by the C-type lectin in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, the lectin demonstrated the ability to inhibit biofilm formation by several mastitis pathogens, including different field strains of S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. chromogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Escherichia coli. These findings reveal a new activity for C-type lectins. Studies are underway to evaluate the biological activity of these lectins in a mouse mastitis model. PMID:25811661

  16. DMPD: C-type lectin receptors in antifungal immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nds Microbiol. 2008 Jan;16(1):27-32. Epub 2007 Dec 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show C-type lectin rece... 2007 Dec 21. Pathway - PNG File (.png) SVG File (.svg) HTML File (.html) CSML File (.csml) Open .csml file

  17. Structure of the C-type lectin carbohydrate recognition domain of human tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Nielsen, B B; Rasmussen, H

    1998-01-01

    Tetranectin (TN) is a C-type lectin involved in fibrinolysis, being the only endogenous ligand known to bind specifically to the kringle 4 domain of plasminogen. TN was originally isolated from plasma, but shows a wide tissue distribution. Furthermore, TN has been found in the extracellular matrix...

  18. Dusting the sugar fingerprint: C-type lectin signaling in adaptive immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, Jeroen; Gringhuis, Sonja I.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen recognition by dendritic cells (DCs) is central to the induction of adaptive immunity. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on DCs interact with pathogens, leading to signaling events that dictate adaptive immune responses. It is becoming clear that C-type lectins are important PRRs that

  19. Transmission-blocking antibodies against mosquito C-type lectins for dengue prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available C-type lectins are a family of proteins with carbohydrate-binding activity. Several C-type lectins in mammals or arthropods are employed as receptors or attachment factors to facilitate flavivirus invasion. We previously identified a C-type lectin in Aedes aegypti, designated as mosquito galactose specific C-type lectin-1 (mosGCTL-1, facilitating the attachment of West Nile virus (WNV on the cell membrane. Here, we first identified that 9 A. aegypti mosGCTL genes were key susceptibility factors facilitating DENV-2 infection, of which mosGCTL-3 exhibited the most significant effect. We found that mosGCTL-3 was induced in mosquito tissues with DENV-2 infection, and that the protein interacted with DENV-2 surface envelop (E protein and virions in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the other identified mosGCTLs interacted with the DENV-2 E protein, indicating that DENV may employ multiple mosGCTLs as ligands to promote the infection of vectors. The vectorial susceptibility factors that facilitate pathogen invasion may potentially be explored as a target to disrupt the acquisition of microbes from the vertebrate host. Indeed, membrane blood feeding of antisera against mosGCTLs dramatically reduced mosquito infective ratio. Hence, the immunization against mosGCTLs is a feasible approach for preventing dengue infection. Our study provides a future avenue for developing a transmission-blocking vaccine that interrupts the life cycle of dengue virus and reduces disease burden.

  20. C-type lectin receptors in the control of T helper cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Gringhuis, Sonja I.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen recognition by C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed by dendritic cells is important not only for antigen presentation, but also for the induction of appropriate adaptive immune responses via T helper (TH) cell differentiation. CLRs act either by themselves or in cooperation with other

  1. Modulation of the immune system by ligands of the C-type lectin DC-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzen, K.

    2007-01-01

    DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin specifically expressed on dendritic cells that recognize high-mannose and fucose glycans. This carbohydrate specificity of DC-SIGN enables recognition of a large array of ligands which include both pathogen-derived as well as endogenous glycoconjugates. Because of the wide

  2. Innate signaling by the C-type lectin DC-SIGN dictates immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunnen, den J.; Gringhuis, S.I.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Effective immune responses depend on the recognition of pathogens by dendritic cells (DCs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). These receptors induce specific signaling pathways that lead to the induction of immune responses against the pathogens. It is becoming evident that C-type lectins

  3. C-type lectin interactions with Schistosoma mansoni SEA : Molecular basis and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liempt, van P.A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Outline of this thesis The studies described in this thesis have been performed to gain more insight in the recognition of Schistosoma mansoni glycans by C-type lectins and the consequences for dendritic cell mediated immune responses. As a first approach to understand the molecular interactions

  4. Carbohydrate signaling by C-type lectin DC-SIGN affects NF-kappaB activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gringhuis, Sonja I.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen recognition is central to the induction of adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) express different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors and C-type lectins, that sense invading pathogens. Pathogens trigger a specific set of PRRs, leading to activation of

  5. Disruption of the langerin/CD207 Gene Abolishes Birbeck Granules without a Marked Loss of Langerhans Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Aït-Yahia, Smina; Clair-Moninot, Valérie; Stössel, Hella; Badell, Edgar; Bordat, Yann; Pooley, Joanne L.; Lang, Thierry; Prina, Eric; Coste, Isabelle; Gresser, Olivia; Renno, Toufic; Winter, Nathalie; Milon, Geneviève; Shortman, Ken; Romani, Nikolaus; Lebecque, Serge; Malissen, Bernard; Saeland, Sem; Douillard, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Langerin is a C-type lectin expressed by a subset of dendritic leukocytes, the Langerhans cells (LC). Langerin is a cell surface receptor that induces the formation of an LC-specific organelle, the Birbeck granule (BG). We generated a langerin−/− mouse on a C57BL/6 background which did not display any macroscopic aberrant development. In the absence of langerin, LC were detected in normal numbers in the epidermis but the cells lacked BG. LC of langerin−/− mice did not present other phenotypic alterations compared to wild-type littermates. Functionally, the langerin−/− LC were able to capture antigen, to migrate towards skin draining lymph nodes, and to undergo phenotypic maturation. In addition, langerin−/− mice were not impaired in their capacity to process native OVA protein for I-Ab-restricted presentation to CD4+ T lymphocytes or for H-2Kb-restricted cross-presentation to CD8+ T lymphocytes. langerin−/− mice inoculated with mannosylated or skin-tropic microorganisms did not display an altered pathogen susceptibility. Finally, chemical mutagenesis resulted in a similar rate of skin tumor development in langerin−/− and wild-type mice. Overall, our data indicate that langerin and BG are dispensable for a number of LC functions. The langerin−/− C57BL/6 mouse should be a valuable model for further functional exploration of langerin and the role of BG. PMID:15601833

  6. Rational-differential design of highly specific glycomimetic ligands: Targeting DC-SIGN and excluding Langerin recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkolab, Vanessa; Chabrol, Eric; Varga, Norbert; Ordanini, Stefania; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Thépaut, Michel; Garcia-Jiménez, Maria José; Girard, Eric; Nieto, Pedro M; Bernardi, Anna; Fieschi, Franck

    2017-12-22

    At the surface of dendritic cells, C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) allow the recognition of carbohydrate-based PAMPS or DAMPS (pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns respectively) and promote immune response regulation. However, some CLRs are hijacked by viral and bacterial pathogens. Thus, the design of ligands able to target specifically one CLR, to either modulate a immune response or to inhibit a given infection mechanism, has a great potential value in therapeutic design. A case study is the selective blocking of DC-SIGN, involved notably in HIV trans-infection of T lymphocytes, without interfering with Langerin-mediated HIV clearance. This is a challenging task due to their overlapping carbohydrate specificity. Towards the rational design of DC-SIGN selective ligands, we performed a comparative affinity study between DC-SIGN and Langerin with natural ligands. We found that GlcNAc is recognized by both CLRs, however, selective sulfatations are shown to increase the selectivity in favour of Langerin. With the combination of site-directed mutagenesis and X-ray structural analysis of Langerin/GlcNS6S complex, we highlighted that 6-sulfatation of the carbohydrate ligand induced Langerin specificity. Additionally, the K313 residue from Langerin was identified as a critical feature of its binding site. Using a rational and a differential approach in the study of CLR binding sites, we designed, synthetized and characterized a new glycomimetic which is highly specific for DC-SIGN vs Langerin. STD NMR, SPR and ITC characterizations show that compound 7 conserved the overall binding mode of the natural disaccharide while possessing an improved affinity and a strict specificity for DC-SIGN.

  7. Targeting of macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin (MGL) induces DC signaling and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Zizzari, Ilaria G; Rughetti, Aurelia

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) sense the microenvironment through several types of receptors recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In particular, C-type lectins, expressed by distinct subsets of DCs, recognize and internalize specific carbohydrate antigen in a Ca(2+) -dependent manner....... Targeting of these receptors is becoming an efficient strategy of delivering antigens in DC-based anticancer immunotherapy. Here we investigated the role of the macrophage galactose type C-lectin receptor (MGL), expressed by immature DCs (iDCs), as a molecular target for a-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal...

  8. Identification of a Macrobrachium nipponense C-type lectin with a close evolutionary relationship to vertebrate lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Li, Tingting; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2017-07-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are involved in the innate immune defense of vertebrates and invertebrates against invading pathogens. This study cloned and characterized a novel C-type lectin (MnCTL) of the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense. The cloned MnCTL cDNA encompasses an open reading frame of 774 nucleotides and encodes polypeptides of 257 residues. The deduced MnCTL protein contains a single carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) with an EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif in calcium-binding site 2. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MnCTL has a closer evolutionary relationship with vertebrate lectins than with invertebrate lectins. Tissue expression analysis showed that high levels of MnCTL are ubiquitously distributed in the gills and stomach of M. nipponense. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that MnCTL expression was up-regulated by bacteria or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. Knock-down of the MnCTL gene in WSSV-challenged prawns significantly decreased MnALF1 and MnALF2 transcript levels. The recombinant MnCRD (rMnCRD) agglutinated both Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus) in the presence of calcium. Furthermore, rMnCRD could bind to all the tested bacteria with different activities. The sugar-binding assay showed that rMnCRD was able to bind lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, rMnCRD could accelerate bacterial clearance. On the contrary, MnCTL silencing by dsRNA interference could weaken the bacterial clearance ability. All these findings implicated MnCTL were involved in the antiviral and antibacterial innate immunity of M. nipponense. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular cloning and analysis of a C-type lectin from silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Toufeeq; Zhan, Ming-Yue; Yang, Pei-Jin; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Rao, Xiang-Jun

    2017-07-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) play a variety of roles in plants and animals. They are involved in animal development, pathogen recognition, and the activation of immune responses. CTLs carry one or more non-catalytic carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) to bind specific carbohydrates reversibly. Here, we report the molecular cloning and functional analysis of a single-CRD CTL, named C-type lectin-S2 (BmCTL-S2) from the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae). The ORF of CTL-S2 is 666 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 221 amino acids. BmCTL-S2 is expressed in a variety of immune-related tissues, including hemocytes and fat body among others. BmCTL-S2 mRNA level in the midgut and the fat body was significantly increased by bacterial challenges. The recombinant protein (rBmCTL-S2) bound different bacterial cell wall components and bacterial cells. rBmCTL-S2 also inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, we infer that BmCTL-S2 is a pattern-recognition receptor with antibacterial activities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A novel C-type lectin identified by EST analysis in tissue migratory larvae of Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Nagayasu, Eiji; Horii, Yoichiro; Maruyama, Haruhiko

    2012-04-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are a group of proteins which bind to carbohydrate epitopes in the presence of Ca(2+), which have been described in a wide range of species. In this study, a cDNA sequence coding a putative CTL has been identified from the cDNA library constructed from the pig round worm Ascaris suum lung L3 (LL3) larvae, which was designated as A. suum C-type lectin-1 (As-CTL-1). The 510 nucleotide open reading frame of As-CTL-1 cDNA encoded the predicted 169 amino acid protein including a putative signal peptide of 23 residues and C-type lectin/C-type lectin-like domain (CLECT) at residue 26 to 167. As-CTL-1 was most similar to Toxocara canis C-type lectin-1 and 4 (Tc-CTL-1 and 4), and highly homologous to namatode CTLs and mammalian CTLs as well, such as human C-type lectin domain family 4 member G (CLECG4). In addition, As-CTL-1 was strongly expressed in tissue migrating LL3 and the L4 larvae, which were developmental larvae stages within the mammalian host. These results suggest that A. suum larvae might utilize As-CTL-1 to avoid pathogen recognition mechanisms in mammalian hosts due to it is similarity to host immune cell receptors.

  11. Regulation of C-Type Lectin Receptor-Mediated Antifungal Immunity

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    Juan Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Of all the pathogen recognition receptor families, C-type lectin receptor (CLR-induced intracellular signal cascades are indispensable for the initiation and regulation of antifungal immunity. Ongoing experiments over the last decade have elicited diverse CLR functions and novel regulatory mechanisms of CLR-mediated-signaling pathways. In this review, we highlight novel insights in antifungal innate and adaptive-protective immunity mediated by CLRs and discuss the potential therapeutic strategies against fungal infection based on targeting the mediators in the host immune system.

  12. A novel C-type lectin is involved in the innate immunity of Macrobrachium nipponense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Yunji; Wang, Yinghui; Bi, Jingxiu; Liu, Yuhan; Ning, Mingxiao; Liu, Hui; Li, Shuang; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Meng, Qingguo

    2016-03-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) play important roles in invertebrate innate immunity by recognizing and eliminating pathogens. In the present study, a low-density lipoprotein receptor class A (LDLa) domain-containing CTL was identified from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense, designated as MnCTLDcp1. The full-length cDNA of MnCTLDcp1 was composed of 1462 bp, with a 999-bp ORF encoding a 332-aa protein. An LDLa and a single C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) were found. The mRNA transcripts of MnCTLDcp1 was expressed the highest in heart. After the prawns were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila and Staphylococcus aureus, the expression level of MnCTLDcp1 in heart and hemocytes were all significantly up-regulated. Sugar binding assay revealed that the MnCTLDcp1 could bind to the glycoconjugates of bacteria surface, such as LPS, PGN and they can compete with bacterial as competitors. The recombinant MnCTLDcp1 agglutinates Gram-positive (S. aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative bacteria (A. hydrophila, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in the presence of calcium and also could bind to these bacteria. These results clearly suggested that MnCTLDcp1 functions as a pattern-recognition receptor involved in the innate immunity of M. nipponense. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. C-type lectin binds to β-integrin to promote hemocytic phagocytosis in an invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-01-24

    Phagocytosis is a conserved cellular response among metazoans. Opsonins are some molecules that label targets to increase their susceptibility to phagocytosis. Opsonins are usually captured by receptors on the surface of phagocytes. Our previous study found the C-type lectin FcLec4 from Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis might function as an opsonin to facilitate bacterial clearance. In the present study we purified the native FcLec4 protein and confirmed its opsonic activity in the near relation, kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus. The possible receptor of FcLec4 was identified as β-integrin by panning a T7 phage display library of shrimp hemocytes and then confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assay. We further proved that the interaction between FcLec4 and β-integrin did not rely on the carbohydrate recognition domain but on the N terminus of FcLec4. In addition, inhibition of FcLec4 expression using RNAi delayed bacterial clearance, and β-integrin knockdown suppressed the opsonic activity of FcLec4. This study is the first to show the direct interaction between an opsonin and its receptor in crustaceans. Our study provides new insights into invertebrate phagocytosis and the functions of C-type lectins.

  14. High Bacterial Agglutination Activity in a Single-CRD C-Type Lectin from Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Leila; Ferré, Juan; Herrero, Salvador

    2017-03-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-interacting proteins that play a pivotal role in multiple physiological and developmental aspects of all organisms. They can specifically interact with different bacterial and viral pathogens through carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRD). In addition, lectins are also of biotechnological interest because of their potential use as biosensors for capturing and identifying bacterial species. In this work, three C-type lectins from the Lepidoptera Spodoptera exigua were produced as recombinant proteins and their bacterial agglutination properties were characterized. The lowest protein concentration producing bacterial agglutination against a panel of different Gram+ and Gram- as well as their carbohydrate binding specificities was determined for the three lectins. One of these lectins, BLL2, was able to agglutinate cells from a broad range of bacterial species at an extremely low concentration, becoming a very interesting protein to be used as a biosensor or for other biotechnological applications involving bacterial capture.

  15. MCL and mincle: C-type lectin receptors that sense damaged self and pathogen associated molecular patterns

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    Mark B Richardson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available MCL (macrophage C-type lectin and mincle (macrophage inducible C-type lectin comprise part of an extensive repertoire of pattern recognition receptors with the ability to sense damage associated and pathogen associated molecular patterns. In this review we cover the discovery and molecular characterization of these C-type lectin receptors, and highlight recent advances in the understanding of their roles in orchestrating the response of the immune system to bacterial and fungal infection, and damaged self. We also discuss the identification and structure-activity relationships of activating ligands, particularly trehalose dimycolate (TDM and related mycobacterial glycolipids, which have significant potential in the development of TH1/TH17 vaccination strategies.

  16. The C-type lectin like fold in natural killer cell receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Kolenko, Petr; Kotýnková, Kristýna; Hašek, Jindřich; Man, Petr; Hanč, Pavel; Vaněk, Ondřej; Rozbeský, Daniel; Bezouška, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2012), s. 14 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /10./. 22.03.2012-24.03.2012, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB101120805; GA ČR GA303/09/0477; GA ČR GD305/09/H008; GA ČR GA305/07/1073; GA ČR GAP302/11/0855; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/10/1040 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 31220 - SPINE2-COMPLEXES Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : NK receptor * structure * C-type lectin like Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (MBU-M)

  17. The role of C-type lectin receptors in immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huimin; Ohno, Naohito; Tsuji, Noriko M

    2013-07-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are important pathogen pattern recognition molecules that recognize carbohydrate structures. Upon ligand binding, CLRs induce a variety of cellular responses, such as respiratory burst, production of cytokines and chemokines, and consequently shaping the adaptive immune responses. Recent frontier studies have demonstrated that CLRs play a significant role in development of anti-inflammatory immune responses and maintenance of host immune-homeostasis. In this review we describe the major CLRs involved in production of IL-10 by immune-related cells and functional maturation of regulatory T cells. In addition, we discuss the potential role of CLRs signaling in regulating intestinal immune-homeostasis and inflammation. Further understanding of the precise role for these receptors on immunoregulatory cells will provide unexpected opportunities for developing new therapies for inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rewiring monocyte glucose metabolism via C-type lectin signaling protects against disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Andrés, Jorge; Arts, Rob J W; Ter Horst, Rob; Gresnigt, Mark S; Smeekens, Sanne P; Ratter, Jacqueline M; Lachmandas, Ekta; Boutens, Lily; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Joosten, Leo A B; Notebaart, Richard A; Ardavín, Carlos; Netea, Mihai G

    2017-09-01

    Monocytes are innate immune cells that play a pivotal role in antifungal immunity, but little is known regarding the cellular metabolic events that regulate their function during infection. Using complementary transcriptomic and immunological studies in human primary monocytes, we show that activation of monocytes by Candida albicans yeast and hyphae was accompanied by metabolic rewiring induced through C-type lectin-signaling pathways. We describe that the innate immune responses against Candida yeast are energy-demanding processes that lead to the mobilization of intracellular metabolite pools and require induction of glucose metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and glutaminolysis, while responses to hyphae primarily rely on glycolysis. Experimental models of systemic candidiasis models validated a central role for glucose metabolism in anti-Candida immunity, as the impairment of glycolysis led to increased susceptibility in mice. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of understanding the complex network of metabolic responses triggered during infections, and unveil new potential targets for therapeutic approaches against fungal diseases.

  19. Myeloid C-Type Lectin Receptors in Viral Recognition and Antiviral Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, João T; Lepenies, Bernd

    2017-03-22

    Recognition of viral glycans by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity contributes to antiviral immune responses. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are PRRs capable of sensing glycans present in viral pathogens to activate antiviral immune responses such as phagocytosis, antigen processing and presentation, and subsequent T cell activation. The ability of CLRs to elicit and shape adaptive immunity plays a critical role in the inhibition of viral spread within the host. However, certain viruses exploit CLRs for viral entry into host cells to avoid immune recognition. To block CLR interactions with viral glycoproteins, antiviral strategies may involve the use of multivalent glycan carrier systems. In this review, we describe the role of CLRs in antiviral immunity and we highlight their dual function in viral clearance and exploitation by viral pathogens.

  20. Quantitative Expression of C-Type Lectin Receptors in Humans and Mice

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    Hans-Joachim Anders

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available C-type lectin receptors and their adaptor molecules are involved in the recognition of glycosylated self-antigens and pathogens. However, little is known about the species- and organ-specific expression profiles of these molecules. We therefore determined the mRNA expression levels of Dectin-1, MR1, MR2, DC-SIGN, Syk, Card-9, Bcl-10, Malt-1, Src, Dec-205, Galectin-1, Tim-3, Trem-1, and DAP-12 in 11 solid organs of human and mice. Mouse organs revealed lower mRNA levels of most molecules compared to spleen. However, Dec-205 and Galectin-1 in thymus, Src in brain, MR2, Card-9, Bcl-10, Src, and Dec-205 in small intestine, MR2, Bcl-10, Src, Galectin-1 in kidney, and Src and Galectin-1 in muscle were at least 2-fold higher expressed compared to spleen. Human lung, liver and heart expressed higher mRNA levels of most genes compared to spleen. Dectin-1, MR1, Syk and Trem-1 mRNA were strongly up-regulated upon ischemia-reperfusion injury in murine kidney. Tim3, DAP-12, Card-9, DC-SIGN and MR2 were further up-regulated during renal fibrosis. Murine kidney showed higher DAP-12, Syk, Card-9 and Dectin-1 mRNA expression during the progression of lupus nephritis. Thus, the organ-, and species-specific expression of C-type lectin receptors is different between mice and humans which must be considered in the interpretation of related studies.

  1. C-type lectin Mermaid inhibits dendritic cell mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabatov, Alexey A.; de Jong, Marein A. W. P.; de Witte, Lot; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in HIV-1 transmission; DCs capture invading HIV-1 through the interaction of the gp120 oligosaccharides with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and migrate to the lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is transmitted to T cells. Thus, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is an

  2. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin on dendritic cells that unveils many aspects of dendritic cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Engering, Anneke; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are present in essentially every tissue where they operate at the interface of innate and acquired immunity by recognizing pathogens and presenting pathogen-derived peptides to T cells. It is becoming clear that not all C-type lectins on DC serve as antigen receptors recognizing

  3. C-type lectins on dendritic cells and their interaction with pathogen-derived and endogenous glycoconjugates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzen, K.; Cambi, A.; Torensma, R.; Figdor, C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Human C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) characteristically bind glycosylated ligands in a Ca(2+)-dependent way via their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Their carbohydrate preference is dependent on the amino acid sequence in the CRD domain and on the ability and flexibility of the CRD domain to

  4. C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors: new points on the oncogenomics map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhalin AE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Anton G Kutikhin, Arseniy E YuzhalinDepartment of Epidemiology, Kemerovo State Medical Academy, Kemerovo, Russian FederationAbstract: The group of pattern recognition receptors includes families of Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors. They are key sensors for a number of infectious agents, some of which are oncogenic, and they launch an immune response against them, normally promoting their eradication. Inherited variations in genes encoding these receptors and proteins and their signaling pathways may affect their function, possibly modulating cancer risk and features of cancer progression. There are numerous studies investigating the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms within or near genes encoding Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, cancer risk, and features of cancer progression. However, there is an almost total absence of articles analyzing the correlation between polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors and cancer risk or progression. Nevertheless, there is some evidence supporting the hypothesis that inherited C-type lectin receptor and RIG-I-like receptor variants can be associated with increased cancer risk. Certain C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns of potentially oncogenic infectious agents, and certain polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors may have functional consequences at the molecular level that can lead to association of such single nucleotide polymorphisms with risk or progression of some diseases that may modulate cancer risk, so these gene polymorphisms may affect cancer risk indirectly. Polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors thereby may be correlated with a risk of lung, oral, esophageal, gastric, colorectal, and liver cancer, as well as nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  5. Macrophage Inducible C-Type Lectin As a Multifunctional Player in Immunity

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    Emmanuel C. Patin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle is an innate immune receptor on myeloid cells sensing diverse entities including pathogens and damaged cells. Mincle was first described as a receptor for the mycobacterial cell wall glycolipid, trehalose-6,6′-dimycolate, or cord factor, and the mammalian necrotic cell-derived alarmin histone deacetylase complex unit Sin3-associated protein 130. Upon engagement by its ligands, Mincle induces secretion of innate cytokines and other immune mediators modulating inflammation and immunity. Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the understanding of Mincle’s immune function has made significant advances in recent years. In addition to mediating immune responses to infectious agents, Mincle has been linked to promote tumor progression, autoimmunity, and sterile inflammation; however, further studies are required to completely unravel the complex role of Mincle in these distinct host responses. In this review, we discuss recent findings on Mincle’s biology with an emphasis on its diverse functions in immunity.

  6. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions.

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    Ilaria Grazia Zizzari

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the immunosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines.

  7. Rewiring monocyte glucose metabolism via C-type lectin signaling protects against disseminated candidiasis.

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    Jorge Domínguez-Andrés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes are innate immune cells that play a pivotal role in antifungal immunity, but little is known regarding the cellular metabolic events that regulate their function during infection. Using complementary transcriptomic and immunological studies in human primary monocytes, we show that activation of monocytes by Candida albicans yeast and hyphae was accompanied by metabolic rewiring induced through C-type lectin-signaling pathways. We describe that the innate immune responses against Candida yeast are energy-demanding processes that lead to the mobilization of intracellular metabolite pools and require induction of glucose metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and glutaminolysis, while responses to hyphae primarily rely on glycolysis. Experimental models of systemic candidiasis models validated a central role for glucose metabolism in anti-Candida immunity, as the impairment of glycolysis led to increased susceptibility in mice. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of understanding the complex network of metabolic responses triggered during infections, and unveil new potential targets for therapeutic approaches against fungal diseases.

  8. An EPD/WSD motifs containing C-type lectin from Argopectens irradians recognizes and binds microbes with broad spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Huan; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Liu, Rui; Yi, Qilin; Song, Linsheng

    2015-03-01

    C-type lectins are a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins consisting of at least one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), which play significant roles in nonself-recognition and clearance of invaders. The immune function of a C-type lectin (AiCTL-7) with EPD/WSD motifs from Argopectens irradians was investigated in the present study. The recombinant protein of AiCTL-7 (rAiCTL-7) could bind LPS, PGN, mannan, yeast glucan and poly I:C in vitro, and displayed a broader microbes binding spectrum towards Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Vibrio anguillarum, as well as fungi Pichia pastoris and Yarrowia lipolytica. Moreover, it could also inhibit the growth of E. coli and significantly (P EPD/WSD motifs containing lectin AiCTL-7 could serve as PRR with wider recognition spectrum, and function both as collectin and selectin participating in the immunity against invaders in scallops. It could be inferred that the diversity and complexity of motifs in Ca(2+) binding site 2 in CRDs endowed C-type lectins with comprehensive recognition spectrum and multiple immune functions against complex living environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. mosGCTL-7, a C-Type Lectin Protein, Mediates Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection in Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Qian, Yingjuan; Jung, Yong-Sam; Zhou, Bin; Cao, Ruibing; Shen, Ting; Shao, Donghua; Wei, Jianchao; Ma, Zhiyong; Chen, Puyan; Zhu, Huaimin; Qiu, Yafeng

    2017-05-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is an arthropod-borne flavivirus prevalent in Asia and the Western Pacific and is the leading cause of viral encephalitis. JEV is maintained in a transmission cycle between mosquitoes and vertebrate hosts, but the molecular mechanisms by which the mosquito vector participates in transmission are unclear. We investigated the expression of all C-type lectins during JEV infection in Aedes aegypti The C-type lectin mosquito galactose-specific C-type lectin 7 (mosGCTL-7) (VectorBase accession no. AAEL002524) was significantly upregulated by JEV infection and facilitated infection in vivo and in vitro mosGCTL-7 bound to the N-glycan at N154 on the JEV envelope protein. This recognition of viral N-glycan by mosGCTL-7 is required for JEV infection, and we found that this interaction was Ca(2+) dependent. After mosGCTL-7 bound to the glycan, mosPTP-1 bound to mosGCTL-7, promoting JEV entry. The viral burden in vivo and in vitro was significantly decreased by mosPTP-1 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) treatment, and infection was abolished by anti-mosGCTL-7 antibodies. Our results indicate that the mosGCTL-7/mosPTP-1 pathway plays a key role in JEV infection in mosquitoes. An improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying flavivirus infection in mosquitoes will provide further opportunities for developing new strategies to control viral dissemination in nature.IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus and is the primary cause of viral encephalitis in the Asia-Pacific region. Twenty-four countries in the WHO Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions have endemic JEV transmission, which exposes >3 billion people to the risks of infection, although JEV primarily affects children. C-type lectins are host factors that play a role in flavivirus infection in humans, swine, and other mammals. In this study, we investigated C-type lectin functions in JEV-infected Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens pallens mosquitoes and

  10. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea

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    Jingqun Ao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD, an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1–C6, a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp. Ca2+ binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus and guppy (Poecilia retitculata CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca2+-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish.

  11. Isolation and characterization of two novel C-type lectins from the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Yunji; Hou, Libo; Liu, Xiaoqian; Wang, Yinghui; Gu, Wei; Meng, Qingguo; Wang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    C-type lectins are a family of calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins which are believed to play important roles in the innate immunity of invertebrates. This study identified two novel C-type lectins, designated as MnCTLDcp2 and MnCTLDcp3, from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense. The full-length cDNA of MnCTLDcp2 was of 1582 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 972 bp encoding a polypeptide of 323 amino acids. The complete nucleotide sequence of MnCTLDcp3 cDNA was 583 bp, containing a 555 bp ORF encoding a putative protein of 184 deduced amino acids. The deduced MnCTLDcp2 and MnCTLDcp3 proteins both contained a single C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). Besides, MnCTLDcp2 contains a signal peptide and an low-density lipoprotein receptor class A (LDLa) domain. Reverse transcription PCR showed that MnCTLDcp2 was expressed in the heart, gill, nerve hepatopancreas and intestine; MnCTLDcp3 was expressed in the hepatopancreas, heart, nerve, gill and muscle. Their expression in the heart tissue was regulated following challenge with bacteria. The microbial agglutination assay showed that both MnCTLDcp2 and MnCTLDcp3 could agglutinated bacteria in the presence of calcium. All these results suggested that MnCTLDcp2 and MnCTLDcp3 functioned as pattern recognition receptors in the immune system of M. nipponense. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recognition of DHN-melanin by a C-type lectin receptor is required for immunity to Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappers, Mark H T; Clark, Alexandra E; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Bidula, Stefan; Reid, Delyth M; Asamaphan, Patawee; Hardison, Sarah E; Dambuza, Ivy M; Valsecchi, Isabel; Kerscher, Bernhard; Plato, Anthony; Wallace, Carol A; Yuecel, Raif; Hebecker, Betty; da Glória Teixeira Sousa, Maria; Cunha, Cristina; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Brakhage, Axel A; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Gow, Neil A R; Zanda, Matteo; Piras, Monica; Zanato, Chiara; Jaeger, Martin; Netea, Mihai G; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Lacerda, João F; Campos, António; Carvalho, Agostinho; Willment, Janet A; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Brown, Gordon D

    2018-02-28

    Resistance to infection is critically dependent on the ability of pattern recognition receptors to recognize microbial invasion and induce protective immune responses. One such family of receptors are the C-type lectins, which are central to antifungal immunity. These receptors activate key effector mechanisms upon recognition of conserved fungal cell-wall carbohydrates. However, several other immunologically active fungal ligands have been described; these include melanin, for which the mechanism of recognition is hitherto undefined. Here we identify a C-type lectin receptor, melanin-sensing C-type lectin receptor (MelLec), that has an essential role in antifungal immunity through recognition of the naphthalene-diol unit of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin. MelLec recognizes melanin in conidial spores of Aspergillus fumigatus as well as in other DHN-melanized fungi. MelLec is ubiquitously expressed by CD31 + endothelial cells in mice, and is also expressed by a sub-population of these cells that co-express epithelial cell adhesion molecule and are detected only in the lung and the liver. In mouse models, MelLec was required for protection against disseminated infection with A. fumigatus. In humans, MelLec is also expressed by myeloid cells, and we identified a single nucleotide polymorphism of this receptor that negatively affected myeloid inflammatory responses and significantly increased the susceptibility of stem-cell transplant recipients to disseminated Aspergillus infections. MelLec therefore recognizes an immunologically active component commonly found on fungi and has an essential role in protective antifungal immunity in both mice and humans.

  13. Association of a hepatopancreas-specific C-type lectin with the antibacterial response of Eriocheir sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Kun Jin

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PPRs are part of the initial step of a host defense against pathogens in detecting pathogen-associated molecular patterns. However, determinants of the specificity of this recognition by innate immune molecules of invertebrates remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential involvement of an invertebrate PRR C-type lectin in the antimicrobial response of the crustacean Eriocheir sinensis. Based on the initial expressed sequence tags (EST of a hepatopancreatic cDNA library, the full-length EsLecF cDNA was cloned and determined to contain a 477-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 158-amino-acid protein. A comparison with other reported invertebrate and vertebrate C-type lectin superfamily sequences revealed the presence of a common carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD. EsLecF transcripts in E. sinensis were mainly detected in the hepatopancreas and were inducible by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS injection. The recombinant EsLecF (rEsLecF protein produced via a prokaryotic expression system and affinity chromatography was found to have a wide spectrum of binding activities towards various microorganisms, and its microbial-binding activity was calcium-independent. Moreover, the binding of rEsLecF induced the aggregation of microbial pathogens. Results of the microorganism growth inhibitory assay and antibacterial assay revealed capabilities of rEsLecF in suppressing microorganism growth and directly killing bacteria, respectively. Furthermore, rEsLecF could enhance cellular encapsulation in vitro. Collectively, the findings presented here demonstrated the successful isolation of a novel C-type lectin in a crustacean and highlighted its critical role in the innate immunity of an invertebrate.

  14. Lymphocyte activation receptors:new structural paradigms in group V of C-type animal lectins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíček, J.; Kavan, Daniel; Pompach, Petr; Novák, Petr; Lukšan, Ondřej; Bezouška, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2004), s. 1124-1126 ISSN 0300-5127 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lectin -type receptor * ligand identification * lymphocyte Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.267, year: 2004

  15. The cartilage-specific lectin C-type lectin domain family 3 member A (CLEC3A) enhances tissue plasminogen activator-mediated plasminogen activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Daniela; Elezagic, Dzemal; Hermes, Gabriele; Mörgelin, Matthias; Wohl, Alexander P; Koch, Manuel; Hartmann, Ursula; Höllriegl, Stefan; Wagener, Raimund; Paulsson, Mats; Streichert, Thomas; Klatt, Andreas R

    2018-01-05

    C-type lectin domain family 3 member A (CLEC3A) is a poorly characterized protein belonging to the superfamily of C-type lectins. Its closest homologue tetranectin binds to the kringle 4 domain of plasminogen and enhances its association with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thereby enhancing plasmin production, but whether CLEC3A contributes to plasminogen activation is unknown. Here, we recombinantly expressed murine and human full-length CLEC3As as well as truncated forms of CLEC3A in HEK-293 Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA) cells. We analyzed the structure of recombinant CLEC3A by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot, glycan analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, size-exclusion chromatography, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and electron microscopy; compared the properties of the recombinant protein with those of CLEC3A extracted from cartilage; and investigated its tissue distribution and extracellular assembly by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence microscopy. We found that CLEC3A mainly occurs as a monomer, but also forms dimers and trimers, potentially via a coiled-coil α-helix. We also noted that CLEC3A can be modified with chondroitin/dermatan sulfate side chains and tends to oligomerize to form higher aggregates. We show that CLEC3A is present in resting, proliferating, and hypertrophic growth-plate cartilage and assembles into an extended extracellular network in cultures of rat chondrosarcoma cells. Further, we found that CLEC3A specifically binds to plasminogen and enhances tPA-mediated plasminogen activation. In summary, we have determined the structure, tissue distribution, and molecular function of the cartilage-specific lectin CLEC3A and show that CLEC3A binds to plasminogen and participates in tPA-mediated plasminogen activation. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Function of a novel C-type lectin with two CRD domains from Macrobrachium rosenbergii in innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Huang, Ying; Shi, Yan-Ru; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2015-03-01

    C-type lectins play crucial roles in innate immunity. In the present study, a novel C-type lectin gene, designated as MrCTL, was identified from Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrCTL contains 2 carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs), namely MrCRD1 and MrCRD2. The MrCRD1 contains a QEP motif and MrCRD2 contains a motif of EPD. MrCTL was mainly expressed in the hepatopancreas. The expression level of MrCTL in hepatopancreas was significantly upregulated after a challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus or White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The recombinant MrCTL, MrCRD1 and MrCRD2 have an ability to agglutinate both Gram-negative (V. parahaemolyticus) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) in a calcium dependent manner. The recombinant MrCTL, MrCRD1 and MrCRD2 bind directly to all tested microorganisms. All these results suggested that MrCTL may have important roles in immune defense against invading pathogens in prawns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lectin-Dependent Enhancement of Ebola Virus Infection via Soluble and Transmembrane C-type Lectin Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Calli; Chen, Li; Yantosca, L. Michael; Scully, Corinne; Sarraju, Ashish; Sokolovska, Anna; Zariffard, M. Reza; Eisen, Damon P.; Mungall, Bruce A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Omari, Amel; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael; Takahashi, Kazue; Stuart, Lynda; Stahl, Gregory L.; Ezekowitz, Alan B.; Spear, Gregory T.; Olinger, Gene G.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Michelow, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR) as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A) as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion during active

  18. Lectin-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection via soluble and transmembrane C-type lectin receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Brudner

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is a key soluble effector of the innate immune system that recognizes pathogen-specific surface glycans. Surprisingly, low-producing MBL genetic variants that may predispose children and immunocompromised individuals to infectious diseases are more common than would be expected in human populations. Since certain immune defense molecules, such as immunoglobulins, can be exploited by invasive pathogens, we hypothesized that MBL might also enhance infections in some circumstances. Consequently, the low and intermediate MBL levels commonly found in human populations might be the result of balancing selection. Using model infection systems with pseudotyped and authentic glycosylated viruses, we demonstrated that MBL indeed enhances infection of Ebola, Hendra, Nipah and West Nile viruses in low complement conditions. Mechanistic studies with Ebola virus (EBOV glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviruses confirmed that MBL binds to N-linked glycan epitopes on viral surfaces in a specific manner via the MBL carbohydrate recognition domain, which is necessary for enhanced infection. MBL mediates lipid-raft-dependent macropinocytosis of EBOV via a pathway that appears to require less actin or early endosomal processing compared with the filovirus canonical endocytic pathway. Using a validated RNA interference screen, we identified C1QBP (gC1qR as a candidate surface receptor that mediates MBL-dependent enhancement of EBOV infection. We also identified dectin-2 (CLEC6A as a potentially novel candidate attachment factor for EBOV. Our findings support the concept of an innate immune haplotype that represents critical interactions between MBL and complement component C4 genes and that may modify susceptibility or resistance to certain glycosylated pathogens. Therefore, higher levels of native or exogenous MBL could be deleterious in the setting of relative hypocomplementemia which can occur genetically or because of immunodepletion

  19. A population of Langerin-positive dendritic cells in murine Peyer's patches involved in sampling β-glucan microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdia De Jesus

    Full Text Available Glucan particles (GPs are 2-4 μm hollow, porous shells composed of 1,3-β-D-glucan that have been effectively used for oral targeted-delivery of a wide range of payloads, including small molecules, siRNA, DNA, and protein antigens. While it has been demonstrated that the transepithelial transport of GPs is mediated by Peyer's patch M cells, the fate of the GPs once within gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT is not known. Here we report that fluorescently labeled GPs administered to mice by gavage accumulate in CD11c+ DCs situated in Peyer's patch sub-epithelial dome (SED regions. GPs appeared in DCs within minutes after gavage and remained within the SED for days afterwards. The co-administration or sequential administration of GPs with differentially labeled GPs or poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles demonstrated that the SED DC subpopulation in question was capable of internalizing particles of different sizes and material compositions. Phenotypic analysis identified the GP-containing DCs as being CD8α- and CD11blo/-, suggesting they are the so-called myeloid and/or double negative (DN subset(s of PP DCs. A survey of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs known to be expressed by leukocytes within the intestinal mucosa revealed that GP-containing SED DCs were positive for Langerin (CD207, a CLR with specificity for β-D-glucan and that has been shown to mediate the internalization of a wide range of microbial pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and fungi. The presence of Langerin+ DCs in the SED as determined by immunofluorescence was confirmed using Langerin E-GFP transgenic mice. In summary, our results demonstrate that following M cell-mediated transepithelial transport, GPs (and other micro/nanoparticles are sampled by a population of SED DCs distinguished from other Peyer's patch DC subsets by their expression of Langerin. Future studies will be aimed at defining the role of Langerin in antigen sampling and antigen presentation within

  20. Lech, M., et al., Quantitative Expression of C-Type Lectin Receptors in Humans and Mice. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13, 10113-10131.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Joachim Anders

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors wish to add this correction on their paper published in IJMS [1]. Galectin-1 was misclassified as a C-type lectin. Galectin-1 belongs to the family of the S-type lectins, i.e., the galectins. These errors have been amended in an amended version of the manuscript, which is available from the International Journal of Molecular Sciences website. The authors and publisher apologize for the inconvenience. [...

  1. Scavenger Receptor C-Type Lectin Binds to the Leukocyte Cell Surface Glycan Lewis By a Novel Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinberg, H.; Taylor, M.E.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-10

    The scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL) is unique in the family of class A scavenger receptors, because in addition to binding sites for oxidized lipoproteins it also contains a C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) that interacts with specific glycans. Both human and mouse SRCL are highly specific for the Lewis(x) trisaccharide, which is commonly found on the surfaces of leukocytes and some tumor cells. Structural analysis of the CRD of mouse SRCL in complex with Lewis(x) and mutagenesis show the basis for this specificity. The interaction between mouse SRCL and Lewis(x) is analogous to the way that selectins and DC-SIGN bind to related fucosylated glycans, but the mechanism of the interaction is novel, because it is based on a primary galactose-binding site similar to the binding site in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Crystals of the human receptor lacking bound calcium ions reveal an alternative conformation in which a glycan ligand would be released during receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  2. The plasminogen binding site of the C-type lectin tetranectin is located in the carbohydrate recognition domain, and binding is sensitive to both calcium and lysine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Lorentsen, R H; Jacobsen, C

    1998-01-01

    Tetranectin, a homotrimeric protein belonging to the family of C-type lectins and structurally highly related to corresponding regions of the mannose-binding proteins, is known specifically to bind the plasminogen kringle 4 protein domain, an interaction sensitive to lysine. Surface plasmon...

  3. Structure of the plasminogen kringle 4 binding calcium-free form of the C-type lectin-like domain of tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielbo, Steen; Thomsen, Jens K; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2004-01-01

    Tetranectin is a homotrimeric protein containing a C-type lectin-like domain. This domain (TN3) can bind calcium, but in the absence of calcium, the domain binds a number of kringle-type protein ligands. Two of the calcium-coordinating residues are also critical for binding plasminogen kringle 4 (K...

  4. Specific glycan elements determine differential binding of individual egg glycoproteins of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni by host C-type lectin receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meevissen, M.H.J.; Driessen, N.N.; Smits, H.H.; Versteegh, R.; van Vliet, S.J.; van Kooijk, Y.; Schramm, G.; Deelder, A.M.; de Haas, H.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; Hokke, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    During infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, glycan motifs present on glycoproteins of the parasite's eggs mediate immunomodulatory effects on the host. The recognition of these glycan motifs is primarily mediated by C-type lectin receptors on dendritic cells and other cells of the

  5. The dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is a receptor for Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens and recognizes the glycan antigen Lewis x.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Die, van I.M.; Vliet, van SJ; Nyame, AK; Cummings, RD; Bank, CM; Appelmelk, B.J.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Kooijk, van Y.

    2003-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEAs) are crucially involved in modulating the host immune response to infection by S. mansoni. We report that human dendritic cells bind SEAs through the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN). Monoclonal antibodies

  6. The dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is a receptor for Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens and recognizes the glycan antigen Lewis x

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Die, Irma; van Vliet, Sandra J.; Nyame, A. Kwame; Cummings, Richard D.; Bank, Christine M. C.; Appelmelk, Ben; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2003-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEAs) are crucially involved in modulating the host immune response to infection by S. mansoni. We report that human dendritic cells bind SEAs through the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN). Monoclonal antibodies

  7. A scallop C-type lectin from Argopecten irradians (AiCTL5) with activities of lipopolysaccharide binding and Gram-negative bacteria agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Changkao; Song, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Mengqiang; Song, Linsheng; Wang, Chunlin

    2012-05-01

    C-type lectins are a family of calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins. In the present study, a C-type lectin (designated as AiCTL5) was identified and characterized from Argopecten irradians. The full-length cDNA of AiCTL5 was of 673 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 24 bp, a 3' UTR of 130 bp with a poly (A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 519 bp encoding a polypeptide of 172 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 17 amino acids. A C-type lectin-like domain (CRD) containing 6 conserved cysteines and a putative glycosylation sites were identified in the deduced amino acid sequence of AiCTL5. AiCTL5 shared 11%-27.5% identity with the previous reported C-type lectin from A. irradians. The cDNA fragment encoding the mature peptide of AiCTL5 was recombined into pET-21a (+) with a C-terminal hexa-histidine tag fused in-frame, and expressed in Escherichia coli Origami (DE3). The recombinant AiCTL5 (rAiCTL5) agglutinated Gram-negative E. coli TOP10F' and Listonella anguillarum, but did not agglutinate Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis and Micrococcus luteus, and the agglutination could be inhibited by EDTA, indicating that AiCTL5 was a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin. rAiCTL5 exhibited a significantly strong activity to bind LPS from E. coli, which conformed to the agglutinating activity toward Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, rAiCTL5 also agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes. These results indicated that AiCTL5 could function as a pattern recognition receptor to protect bay scallop from Gram-negative bacterial infection, and also provide evidence to understand the structural and functional diverse of lectin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Venom of parasitoid, Pteromalus puparum, suppresses host, Pieris rapae, immune promotion by decreasing host C-type lectin gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Fang

    Full Text Available Insect hosts have evolved immunity against invasion by parasitoids, and in co-evolutionary response parasitoids have also developed strategies to overcome host immune systems. The mechanisms through which parasitoid venoms disrupt the promotion of host immunity are still unclear. We report here a new mechanism evolved by parasitoid Pteromalus puparum, whose venom inhibited the promotion of immunity in its host Pieris rapae (cabbage white butterfly.A full-length cDNA encoding a C-type lectin (Pr-CTL was isolated from P. rapae. Quantitative PCR and immunoblotting showed that injection of bacterial and inert beads induced expression of Pr-CTL, with peaks of mRNA and Pr-CTL protein levels at 4 and 8 h post beads challenge, respectively. In contrast, parasitoid venom suppressed Pr-CTL expression when co-injected with beads, in a time and dose-dependent manner. Immunolocalization and immunoblotting results showed that Pr-CTL was first detectable in vesicles present in cytoplasm of granulocytes in host hemolymph, and was then secreted from cells into circulatory fluid. Finally, the secreted Pr-CTL bound to cellular membranes of both granulocytes and plasmatocytes. Injection of double-stranded RNA specific for target gene decreased expression of Pr-CTL, and a few other host immune-related genes. Suppression of Pr-CTL expression also down-regulated antimicrobial and phenoloxidase activities, and reducing phagocytotic and encapsulation rates in host. The inhibitory effect of parasitoid venom on host encapsulation is consistent with its effect in suppressing Pr-CTL expression. Binding assay results showed that recombinant Pr-CTL directly attached to the surface of P. puparum egges. We infer that Pr-CTL may serve as an immune signalling co-effector, first binding to parasitoid eggs, regulating expression of a set of immune-related genes and promoting host immunity.P. puparum venom inhibits promotion of host immune responses by silencing expression of host C-type

  9. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Lenormand

    Full Text Available Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs, the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER, with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These

  10. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for massive sequence variation in a Treponema diversity-generating retroelement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Coq, Johanne; Ghosh, Partho (UCSD)

    2012-06-19

    Anticipatory ligand binding through massive protein sequence variation is rare in biological systems, having been observed only in the vertebrate adaptive immune response and in a phage diversity-generating retroelement (DGR). Earlier work has demonstrated that the prototypical DGR variable protein, major tropism determinant (Mtd), meets the demands of anticipatory ligand binding by novel means through the C-type lectin (CLec) fold. However, because of the low sequence identity among DGR variable proteins, it has remained unclear whether the CLec fold is a general solution for DGRs. We have addressed this problem by determining the structure of a second DGR variable protein, TvpA, from the pathogenic oral spirochete Treponema denticola. Despite its weak sequence identity to Mtd ({approx}16%), TvpA was found to also have a CLec fold, with predicted variable residues exposed in a ligand-binding site. However, this site in TvpA was markedly more variable than the one in Mtd, reflecting the unprecedented approximate 10{sup 20} potential variability of TvpA. In addition, similarity between TvpA and Mtd with formylglycine-generating enzymes was detected. These results provide strong evidence for the conservation of the formylglycine-generating enzyme-type CLec fold among DGRs as a means of accommodating massive sequence variation.

  11. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N. (NIH)

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  12. Mechanistic insights into the role of C-type lectin receptor/CARD9 signaling in human antifungal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Drummond

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs. CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous development of persistent and severe fungal infections that primarily localize to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, mucosal surfaces and/or central nervous system (CNS. In the last few years, more than 15 missense and nonsense CARD9 mutations have been reported which associate with the development of a wide spectrum of fungal infections caused by a variety of fungal organisms. The mechanisms by which CARD9 provides organ-specific protection against these fungal infections are now emerging. In this review, we summarize recent immunological and clinical advances that have provided significant mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human CARD9 deficiency. We also discuss how genetic mutations in CARD9-coupled receptors (Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and CARD9-binding partners (MALT1, BCL10 affect human antifungal immunity relative to CARD9 deficiency, and we highlight major understudied research questions which merit future investigation.

  13. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeto Yoshida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50 of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions.

  14. C-type Lectin Mincle Recognizes Glucosyl-diacylglycerol of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Plays a Protective Role in Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler-Janbeck, Friederike; Takano, Tomotsugu; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Jonigk, Danny; Tort Tarrés, Meritxell; Fuehner, Thomas; Prasse, Antje; Welte, Tobias; Timmer, Mattie S M; Stocker, Bridget L; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Yamasaki, Sho; Maus, Ulrich A

    2016-12-01

    Among various innate immune receptor families, the role of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in lung protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) is not fully defined. We here show that Mincle gene expression was induced in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice and patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. Moreover, S. pneumoniae directly triggered Mincle reporter cell activation in vitro via its glycolipid glucosyl-diacylglycerol (Glc-DAG), which was identified as the ligand recognized by Mincle. Purified Glc-DAG triggered Mincle reporter cell activation and stimulated inflammatory cytokine release by human alveolar macrophages and alveolar macrophages from WT but not Mincle KO mice. Mincle deficiency led to increased bacterial loads and decreased survival together with strongly dysregulated cytokine responses in mice challenged with focal pneumonia inducing S. pneumoniae, all of which was normalized in Mincle KO mice reconstituted with a WT hematopoietic system. In conclusion, the Mincle-Glc-DAG axis is a hitherto unrecognized element of lung protective immunity against focal pneumonia induced by S. pneumoniae.

  15. C-type Lectin Mincle Recognizes Glucosyl-diacylglycerol of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Plays a Protective Role in Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Behler-Janbeck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Among various innate immune receptor families, the role of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs in lung protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae is not fully defined. We here show that Mincle gene expression was induced in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice and patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. Moreover, S. pneumoniae directly triggered Mincle reporter cell activation in vitro via its glycolipid glucosyl-diacylglycerol (Glc-DAG, which was identified as the ligand recognized by Mincle. Purified Glc-DAG triggered Mincle reporter cell activation and stimulated inflammatory cytokine release by human alveolar macrophages and alveolar macrophages from WT but not Mincle KO mice. Mincle deficiency led to increased bacterial loads and decreased survival together with strongly dysregulated cytokine responses in mice challenged with focal pneumonia inducing S. pneumoniae, all of which was normalized in Mincle KO mice reconstituted with a WT hematopoietic system. In conclusion, the Mincle-Glc-DAG axis is a hitherto unrecognized element of lung protective immunity against focal pneumonia induced by S. pneumoniae.

  16. A C-type lectin isolated from the skin of Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus) binds a remarkably broad range of sugars and induces blood coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Dotsuta, Yuma; Ono, Ayaka; Suzuki, Masanari; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakamura, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physiological role of skin lectins of the Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus). A skin extract was subjected to affinity chromatography using seven different sugars as ligands. Molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses indicated elution of the same protein by each of the seven respective cognate ligands from sugar affinity columns. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA of this protein [designated as H. japonicus C-type-lectin (HjCL)] identified it as a novel fish subgroup VII C-type lectin evolutionarily related to snake venom lectins. HjCL was predicted to bind to mannose because of the presence of a Glu-Pro-Asn (EPN) motif; however, haemagglutination inhibition assays and glycoconjugate microarray analysis demonstrated its binding to numerous structurally diverse sugars. Competitive sugar-binding assays using affinity chromatography indicated that HjCL bound multiple sugars via a common carbohydrate-recognition domain. The mRNA encoding HjCL was specifically detected in the skin, and immunohistochemical analysis detected its expression in uncharacterized large cells in the epidermis. HjCL agglutinated the bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella tarda and promoted immediate clotting of shark blood, indicating that HjCL is involved in host defence on the skin surface especially when the shark is injured and bleeds. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  17. A missense mutation in the aggrecan C-type lectin domain disrupts extracellular matrix interactions and causes dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stattin, Eva-Lena; Wiklund, Fredrik; Lindblom, Karin

    2010-01-01

    aggrecan (ACAN) as a prime candidate gene for the disorder. Sequence analysis of ACAN revealed heterozygosity for a missense mutation (c.6907G > A) in affected individuals, resulting in a p.V2303M amino acid substitution in the aggrecan G3 domain C-type lectin, which mediates interactions with other...... is produced and present in the tissue. Our results provide a molecular mechanism for the etiology of familial osteochondritis dissecans and show the importance of the aggrecan C-type lectin interactions for cartilage function in vivo....... proteins in the cartilage extracellular matrix. Binding studies with recombinant mutated and wild-type G3 proteins showed loss of fibulin-1, fibulin-2, and tenascin-R interactions for the V2303M protein. Mass spectrometric analyses of aggrecan purified from patient cartilage verified that V2303M aggrecan...

  18. Protein-Protein Interaction between Surfactant Protein D and DC-SIGN via C-Type Lectin Domain Can Suppress HIV-1 Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Mitchell, Daniel A; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Sonawani, Archana; Murugaiah, Valarmathy; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Nal, Béatrice; Al-Mozaini, Maha M; Kaur, Anuvinder; Madan, Taruna; Kishore, Uday

    2017-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a soluble C-type lectin, belonging to the collectin (collagen-containing calcium-dependent lectin) family, which acts as an innate immune pattern recognition molecule in the lungs at other mucosal surfaces. Immune regulation and surfactant homeostasis are salient functions of SP-D. SP-D can bind to a range of viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens and trigger clearance mechanisms. SP-D binds to gp120, the envelope protein expressed on HIV-1, through its C-type lectin or carbohydrate recognition domain. This is of importance since SP-D is secreted by human mucosal epithelial cells and is present in the female reproductive tract, including vagina. Another C-type lectin, dendritic cell (DC)-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), present on the surface of the DCs, also binds to HIV-1 gp120 and facilitates viral transfer to the lymphoid tissues. DCs are also present at the site of HIV-1 entry, embedded in vaginal or rectal mucosa. In the present study, we report a direct protein-protein interaction between recombinant forms of SP-D (rfhSP-D) and DC-SIGN via their C-type lectin domains. Both SP-D and DC-SIGN competed for binding to immobilized HIV-1 gp120. Pre-incubation of human embryonic kidney cells expressing surface DC-SIGN with rfhSP-D significantly inhibited the HIV-1 transfer to activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In silico analysis revealed that SP-D and gp120 may occupy same sites on DC-SIGN, which may explain the reduced transfer of HIV-1. In summary, we demonstrate, for the first time, that DC-SIGN is a novel binding partner of SP-D, and this interaction can modulate HIV-1 capture and transfer to CD4+ T cells. In addition, the present study also reveals a novel and distinct mechanism of host defense by SP-D against HIV-1.

  19. Birbeck Granule-Like “Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum” Resulting from the Expression of a Cytoplasmic YFP-Tagged Langerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of “Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum” (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a “double-lock” mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations

  20. A novel C-type lectin in the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon functions as a pattern recognition receptor by binding and causing bacterial agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongpanya, Ratree; Sengprasert, Panjana; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectins are pattern recognition proteins that play important roles in innate immunity in invertebrates by mediating the recognition of pathogens. In this study, a novel C-type lectin gene, PmCLec, was cloned and characterized from the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. The open reading frame of PmCLec is 657 bp in length. It encodes a predicted protein of 218 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass and an isoelectric point of 24086 Da and 4.67, respectively. Sequence analysis of PmCLec showed similarity to members of the C-type lectin gene superfamily. The deduced protein contains a single carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and four conserved cysteine residues (Cys58, Cys126, Cys141, Cys149) that are involved in the formation of disulfide bridges. PmCLec transcripts are expressed in various tiger shrimp tissues, with the highest expression in the lymphoid organ. RNAi-mediated silencing of PmCLec resulted in higher cumulative mortality of knockdown shrimp after Vibrio harveyi infection compared to the control groups. Recombinant PmCLec was successfully expressed in the E. coli system. In the presence of Ca2+, purified rPmCLec protein binds and agglutinates Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, S. hemolyticus), but only slightly binds and agglutinates E. coli and could not bind to the Gram-negative bacteria Bacillus megaterium and Vibrio harveyi. These results suggest that PmCLec functions as a pattern recognition receptor that is implicated in shrimp innate immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ophioluxin, a convulxin-like C-type lectin from Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is a powerful platelet activator via glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao-Yan; Clemetson, Jeannine M; Navdaev, Alexei; Magnenat, Edith M; Wells, Timothy N C; Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2002-09-20

    Ophioluxin, a potent platelet agonist, was purified from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra). Under nonreducing conditions it has a mass of 85 kDa, similar to convulxin, and on reduction gives two subunits with masses of 16 and 17 kDa, slightly larger than those of convulxin. The N-terminal sequences of both subunits are very similar to those of convulxin and other C-type lectins. Ophioluxin induces a pattern of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in platelets like that caused by convulxin, when using appropriate concentrations based on aggregation response, because it is about 2-4 times more powerful as agonist than the latter. Ophioluxin and convulxin induce [Ca(2+)](i) elevation both in platelets and in Dami megakaryocytic cells, and each of these C-type lectins desensitizes responses to the other. Convulxin agglutinates fixed platelets at 2 microg/ml, whereas ophioluxin does not, even at 80 microg/ml. Ophioluxin resembles convulxin more than echicetin or alboaggregin B because polyclonal anti-ophioluxin antibodies recognize both ophioluxin and convulxin, but not echicetin, and platelets adhere to and spread on ophioluxin- or convulxin-precoated surfaces in the same way that is clearly different from their behavior on an alboaggregin B surface. Immobilized ophioluxin was used to isolate the glycoprotein VI-Fcgamma complex from resting platelets, which also contained Fyn, Lyn, Syk, LAT, and SLP76. Ophioluxin is the first multiheterodimeric, convulxin-like snake C-type lectin, as well as the first platelet agonist, to be described from the Elapidae snake family.

  2. Recombinant Expression, In Vitro Refolding and Characterizing Disulfide Bonds of a Mouse Inhibitory C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor Nkrp1b

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hernychová, Lucie; Mrázek, Hynek; Ivanova, Ljubina; Kukačka, Zdeněk; Chmelík, Josef; Novák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2015 (2015), s. 85-93 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk LO1509 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : NK cell * C-type lectin -like receptor (CTLR) * Nkrp1 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  3. Evolution of the C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor Genes of the DECTIN-1 Cluster in the NK Gene Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Sattler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors are crucial in initiating and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses and often belong to families of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins. The human C-type lectin-like receptors encoded in the DECTIN-1 cluster within the NK gene complex contain prominent receptors with pattern recognition function, such as DECTIN-1 and LOX-1. All members of this cluster share significant homology and are considered to have arisen from subsequent gene duplications. Recent developments in sequencing and the availability of comprehensive sequence data comprising many species showed that the receptors of the DECTIN-1 cluster are not only homologous to each other but also highly conserved between species. Even in Caenorhabditis elegans, genes displaying homology to the mammalian C-type lectin-like receptors have been detected. In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive phylogenetic survey and give an up-to-date overview of the currently available data on the evolutionary emergence of the DECTIN-1 cluster genes.

  4. Pathogen recognition of a novel C-type lectin from Marsupenaeus japonicus reveals the divergent sugar-binding specificity of QAP motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenton, Rod Russel R; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Miyaguchi, Kohei; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2017-04-04

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins known to assist the innate immune system as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The binding specificity of CTLs lies in the motif of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the tripeptide motifs EPN and QPD bind to mannose and galactose, respectively. However, variants of these motifs were discovered including a QAP sequence reported in shrimp believed to have the same carbohydrate specificity as QPD. Here, we characterized a novel C-type lectin (MjGCTL) possessing a CRD with a QAP motif. The recombinant MjGCTL has a calcium-dependent agglutinating capability against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and its sugar specificity did not involve either mannose or galactose. In an encapsulation assay, agarose beads coated with rMjGCTL were immediately encapsulated from 0 h followed by melanization at 4 h post-incubation with hemocytes. These results confirm that MjGCTL functions as a classical CTL. The structure of QAP motif and carbohydrate-specificity of rMjGCTL was found to be different to both EPN and QPD, suggesting that QAP is a new motif. Furthermore, MjGCTL acts as a PRR binding to hemocytes to activate their adherent state and initiate encapsulation.

  5. A C-type lectin (MrLec) with high expression in intestine is involved in innate immune response of Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinling; Huang, Xin; Jin, Min; Zhang, Yi; Li, Tingting; Hui, Kaimin; Ren, Qian

    2016-12-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are pattern-recognition proteins that play an important role in innate immunity of vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, a lectin cDNA named MrLec was cloned and characterized from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachiun rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrLec was 1431 bp, which contained an open reading frame of 1041 bp that encoded a protein with 346 amino acids. MrLec was found to contain a typical signal peptide of 18 amino acids and a single carbohydrate-recognition domain with 121 amino acids. The phylogenetic analysis showed that MrLec was grouped with vertebrates and had 57% identity with C-type lectin 3 from Marsupenaeus japonicas. Tissue expression analysis showed that MrLec was ubiquitously distributed at a high level in the intestine, with lower expression levels in the hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gill and stomach. Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection induced the upregulation of MrLec in the gills and intestine. For the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, MrLec in gills was upregulated at 24, 36 and 48 h. In intestine, MrLec also went up at 36 and 48 h WSSV challenge. Recombinant MrLec can agglutinate (Ca2+-dependent) and bind both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. rMrLec could attach to lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated possible MrLec involvement in the immune response of giant freshwater prawns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lectins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharon, Nathan; Lis, H

    2003-01-01

    ... been discovered only during the last decade and the functions of several of which have been clarified, especially as to their key role in innate immunity. Another is the structure of lectins and of their combining sites. Thus, whereas at that time the three-dimensional structures of just three lectins and a few of their complexes with sugars had been elucidated, their numbers have increased to about 160 and over 200, respectively, and continue to grow unabated. Updating the information on these and other topics resulted in...

  7. Involvement of viral envelope GP2 in Ebola virus entry into cells expressing the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Katsuaki [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Matsuno, Keita; Igarashi, Manabu [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Denda-Nagai, Kaori [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Takada, Ayato [Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan); Irimura, Tatsuro, E-mail: irimura@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Molecular Immunology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} Ebola virus infection is mediated by binding to and fusion with the target cells. {yields} Structural feature of the viral glycoprotein determines the infectivity. {yields} Surface C-type lectin, MGL, of macrophages and dendritic cells mediate the infection. {yields} GP2, one of glycoprotein subunits, plays an essential role in MGL-mediated infection. {yields} There is a critical amino acid residue involved in high infectivity. -- Abstract: Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is initiated by the interaction of the viral surface envelope glycoprotein (GP) with the binding sites on target cells. Differences in the mortality among different species of the Ebola viruses, i.e., Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Reston ebolavirus (REBOV), correspond to the in vitro infectivity of the pseudo-typed virus constructed with the GPs in cells expressing macrophage galactose-type calcium-type lectin (MGL/CD301). Through mutagenesis of GP2, the transmembrane-anchored subunit of GP, we found that residues 502-527 of the GP2 sequence determined the different infectivity between VSV-ZEBOV GP and -REBOV GP in MGL/CD301-expressing cells and a histidine residue at position 516 of ZEBOV GP2 appeared essential in the differential infectivity. These findings may provide a clue to clarify a molecular basis of different pathogenicity among EBOV species.

  8. CLEC4F is an inducible C-type lectin in F4/80-positive cells and is involved in alpha-galactosylceramide presentation in liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ya Yang

    Full Text Available CLEC4F, a member of C-type lectin, was first purified from rat liver extract with high binding affinity to fucose, galactose (Gal, N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc, and un-sialylated glucosphingolipids with GalNAc or Gal terminus. However, the biological functions of CLEC4F have not been elucidated. To address this question, we examined the expression and distribution of murine CLEC4F, determined its binding specificity by glycan array, and investigated its function using CLEC4F knockout (Clec4f-/- mice. We found that CLEC4F is a heavily glycosylated membrane protein co-expressed with F4/80 on Kupffer cells. In contrast to F4/80, CLEC4F is detectable in fetal livers at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5 but not in yolk sac, suggesting the expression of CLEC4F is induced as cells migrate from yolk cells to the liver. Even though CLEC4F is not detectable in tissues outside liver, both residential Kupffer cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells surrounding liver abscesses are CLEC4F-positive upon Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes infection. While CLEC4F has strong binding to Gal and GalNAc, terminal fucosylation inhibits CLEC4F recognition to several glycans such as Fucosyl GM1, Globo H, Bb3∼4 and other fucosyl-glycans. Moreover, CLEC4F interacts with alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer in a calcium-dependent manner and participates in the presentation of α-GalCer to natural killer T (NKT cells. This suggests that CLEC4F is a C-type lectin with diverse binding specificity expressed on residential Kupffer cells and infiltrating monocytes in the liver, and may play an important role to modulate glycolipids presentation on Kupffer cells.

  9. Interactions between the breast cancer-associated MUC1 mucins and C-type lectin characterized by optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soosan Hadjialirezaei

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-protein interactions govern many crucial processes in biological systems including cell recognition events. We have used the sensitive force probe optical tweezers to quantify the interactions occurring between MGL lectins and MUC1 carrying the cancer-associated glycan antigens mucins Tn and STn. Unbinding forces of 7.6 pN and 7.1 pN were determined for the MUC1(Tn-MGL and MUC1(STn-MGL interactions, at a force loading rate of ~40 pN/s. The interaction strength increased with increasing force loading rate, to 27 and 37 pN at a force loading rate of ~ 310 pN/s. No interactions were detected between MGL and MUC1(ST, a glycoform of MUC1 also expressed by breast carcinoma cells. Interestingly, this glycan (ST can be found on proteins expressed by normal cells, although in this case not on MUC1. Additionally, GalNAc decorated polyethylene glycol displayed similar rupture forces as observed for MUC1(Tn and MUC1(STn when forced to unbind from MGL, indicating that GalNAc is an essential group in these interactions. Since the STn glycan decoration is more frequently found on the surface of carcinomas than the Tn glycan, the binding of MUC1 carrying STn to MGL may be more physiologically relevant and may be in part responsible for some of the characteristics of STn expressing tumours.

  10. Molecular basis of the differences in binding properties of the highly related C-type lectins DC-SIGN and L-SIGN to Lewis X trisaccharide and Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Liempt, Ellis; Imberty, Anne; Bank, Christine M. C.; van Vliet, Sandra J.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Die, Irma

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN functions as a pathogen receptor that recognizes Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens through its major glycan epitope Galbeta1,4(Fucalpha1,3)GlcNAc (Lex). Here we report that L-SIGN, a highly related homologue of DC-SIGN found on liver sinusoidal

  11. Molecular basis of the differences in binding properties of the highly related C-type lectins DC-SIGN and L-SIGN to Lewis X trisaccharide and Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liempt, P.A.G.; Imberty, A; Bank, CM; Vliet, van SJ; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Die, van I.M.

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN functions as a pathogen receptor that recognizes Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens through its major glycan epitope Galbeta1,4(Fucalpha1,3)GlcNAc (Lex). Here we report that L-SIGN, a highly related homologue of DC-SIGN found on liver sinusoidal

  12. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part II: combination with external radiation improves survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushchayev SV

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sergiy V Kushchayev,1 Tejas Sankar,1 Laura L Eggink,5,6 Yevgeniya S Kushchayeva,5 Philip C Wiener,1,5 J Kenneth Hoober,5,6 Jennifer Eschbacher,3 Ruolan Liu,2 Fu-Dong Shi,2 Mohammed G Abdelwahab,4 Adrienne C Scheck,4 Mark C Preul11Neurosurgery Research Laboratory, 2Neuroimmunology Laboratory, 3Department of Pathology, 4Neurooncology Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, 5School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, 6Susavion Biosciences, Inc, Tempe, AZ, USABackground: A peptide mimetic of a ligand for the galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptors (GCLR exhibited monocyte-stimulating activity, but did not extend survival when applied alone against a syngeneic murine malignant glioma. In this study, the combined effect of GCLRP with radiation was investigated.Methods: C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells. Animals were grouped based on randomized tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging on day seven. One group that received cranial radiation (4 Gy on days seven and nine only were compared with animals treated with radiation and GCLRP (4 Gy on days seven and nine combined with subcutaneous injection of 1 nmol/g on alternative days beginning on day seven. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess tumor growth and correlated with survival rate. Blood and brain tissues were analyzed with regard to tumor and contralateral hemisphere using fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: GCLRP activated peripheral monocytes and was associated with increased blood precursors of dendritic cells. Mean survival increased (P < 0.001 and tumor size was smaller (P < 0.02 in the GCLRP + radiation group compared to the radiation-only group. Accumulation of dendritic cells in both the tumoral hemisphere (P < 0.005 and contralateral tumor-free hemisphere (P< 0.01 was

  13. Vixapatin (VP12, a C-Type Lectin-Protein from Vipera xantina palestinae Venom: Characterization as a Novel Anti-angiogenic Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lazarovici

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A C-type lectin-like protein (CTL, originally identified as VP12 and lately named Vixapatin, was isolated and characterized from Israeli viper Vipera xantina palestinae snake venom. This CTL was characterized as a selective α2β1 integrin inhibitor with anti-melanoma metastatic activity. The major aim of the present study was to prove the possibility that this protein is also a potent novel anti-angiogenic compound. Using an adhesion assay, we demonstrated that Vixapatin selectively and potently inhibited the α2 mediated adhesion of K562 over-expressing cells, with IC50 of 3 nM. 3 nM Vixapatin blocked proliferation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC; 25 nM inhibited collagen I induced migration of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells; and 50 nM rat C6 glioma and human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. 1 µM Vixapatin reduced HDMEC tube formation by 75% in a Matrigel assay. Furthermore, 1 µM Vixapatin decreased by 70% bFGF-induced physiological angiogenesis, and by 94% C6 glioma-induced pathological angiogenesis, in shell-less embryonic quail chorioallantoic membrane assay. Vixapatin’s ability to inhibit all steps of the angiogenesis process suggest that it is a novel pharmacological tool for studying α2β1 integrin mediated angiogenesis and a lead compound for the development of a novel anti-angiogenic/angiostatic/anti-cancer drug.

  14. The C-type lectin receptor SIGNR3 binds to fungi present in commensal microbiota and influences immune regulation in experimental colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena eEriksson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease is a condition of acute and chronic inflammation of the gut. An important factor contributing to pathogenesis is a dysregulated mucosal immunity against commensal bacteria and fungi. Host pattern recognition receptors sense commensals in the gut and are involved in maintaining the balance between controlled responses to pathogens and overwhelming innate immune activation. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs are pattern recognition receptors recognizing glycan structures on pathogens and self-antigens. Here we examined the role of the murine CLR SIGNR3 in the recognition of commensals and its involvement in intestinal immunity. SIGNR3 is the closest murine homologue of the human DC-SIGN receptor recognizing similar carbohydrate ligands such as terminal fucose or high-mannose glycans. We discovered that SIGNR3 recognizes fungi present in the commensal microbiota. To analyze if this interaction impacts the intestinal immunity against microbiota, the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis model was employed. SIGNR3-/- mice exhibited an increased weight loss associated with more severe colitis symptoms compared to wild-type control mice. The increased inflammation in SIGNR3-/- mice was accompanied by a higher level of TNF-α in colon. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that SIGNR3 recognizes intestinal fungi and has an immune regulatory role in colitis.

  15. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  16. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes J M; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes.

  17. Purification and characterization of a novel C-type hemolytic lectin for clot lysis from the fresh water clam Villorita cyprinoides: a possible natural thrombolytic agent against myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, G R Learnal; Vincent, S G Prakash

    2014-02-01

    Villorita cyprinoides (black clam) is a fresh water clam that belongs as a bivalve to the group of mollusc. The saline extracts from the muscle reveal high titers of agglutination potency on trypsin-treated rabbit erythrocytes. With the help of affinity chromatography a hemolytic protein with lectin activity which could all be inhibited by D-galactose were isolated. The lectins were separated on DEAE-cellulose and the main component was purified after an additional step of gel filtration on sephadex G-75. The main component is a non-glycosylated protein with a molecular weight of 96,560 Da determined by MALDI-ToF, consisting of a single protein chain and characterized by the lack of polymers and intermediate disulfide bonds. The pure main lectin with clot lytic feature shows two bands at molecular weights 36,360 and 26, 520 Da. Optimal inhibition of the pure lectin is achieved by D-galactose containing oligo- and polysaccharides. The lectin activity decreased above 40 °C and was lost at 62 °C, the stability over the pH range between 7.0 and 8.0 and requires divalent cations for their activity. The novel C-type hemolytic lectin for clot lysis from the clam Villorita cyprinoides was identified and evaluated, the purified hemolytic lectin (0.35 mg/ml and 0.175 mg/ml) enhanced clot lysis activity when compared to the different concentration (5 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml) of commercial streptokinase. In the present study identified hemolytic lectin was a rapid and effective clot lytic molecule and could be developed as new drug molecule in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S Itano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  19. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itano, Michelle; Graus, Matthew; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith; Thompson, Nancy; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  20. Allelic mRNA expression imbalance in C-type lectins reveals a frequent regulatory SNP in the human surfactant protein A (SP-A) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, A K; Curtis, A; Papp, A; Webb, A; Knoell, D; Sadee, W; Schlesinger, L S

    2013-03-01

    Genetic variation in C-type lectins influences infectious disease susceptibility but remains poorly understood. We used allelic mRNA expression imbalance (AEI) technology for surfactant protein (SP)-A1, SP-A2, SP-D, dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), macrophage mannose receptor (MRC1) and Dectin-1, expressed in human macrophages and/or lung tissues. Frequent AEI, an indicator of regulatory polymorphisms, was observed in SP-A2, SP-D and DC-SIGN. AEI was measured for SP-A2 in 38 lung tissues using four marker single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and was confirmed by next-generation sequencing of one lung RNA sample. Genomic DNA at the SP-A2 DNA locus was sequenced by Ion Torrent technology in 16 samples. Correlation analysis of genotypes with AEI identified a haplotype block, and, specifically, the intronic SNP rs1650232 (30% minor allele frequency); the only variant consistently associated with an approximately twofold change in mRNA allelic expression. Previously shown to alter a NAGNAG splice acceptor site with likely effects on SP-A2 expression, rs1650232 generates an alternative splice variant with three additional bases at the start of exon 3. Validated as a regulatory variant, rs1650232 is in partial linkage disequilibrium with known SP-A2 marker SNPs previously associated with risk for respiratory diseases including tuberculosis. Applying functional DNA variants in clinical association studies, rather than marker SNPs, will advance our understanding of genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  1. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin Mincle-expressing dendritic cells contribute to control of splenic Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, Friederike; Maus, Regina; Bohling, Jennifer; Knippenberg, Sarah; Kirchhof, Gabriele; Nagata, Masahiro; Jonigk, Danny; Izykowski, Nicole; Mägel, Lavinia; Welte, Tobias; Yamasaki, Sho; Maus, Ulrich A

    2015-01-01

    The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin Mincle has recently been identified to be a pattern recognition receptor sensing mycobacterial infection via recognition of the mycobacterial cell wall component trehalose-6',6-dimycolate (TDM). However, its role in systemic mycobacterial infections has not been examined so far. Mincle-knockout (KO) mice were infected intravenously with Mycobacterium bovis BCG to mimic the systemic spread of mycobacteria under defined experimental conditions. After intravenous infection with M. bovis BCG, Mincle-KO mice responded with significantly higher numbers of mycobacterial CFU in spleen and liver, while reduced granuloma formation was observed only in the spleen. At the same time, reduced Th1 cytokine production and decreased numbers of gamma interferon-producing T cells were observed in the spleens of Mincle-KO mice relative to the numbers in the spleens of wild-type (WT) mice. The effect of adoptive transfer of defined WT leukocyte subsets generated from bone marrow cells of zDC(+/DTR) mice (which bear the human diphtheria toxin receptor [DTR] under the control of the classical dendritic cell-specific zinc finger transcription factor zDC) to specifically deplete Mincle-expressing classical dendritic cells (cDCs) but not macrophages after diphtheria toxin application on the numbers of splenic and hepatic CFU and T cell subsets was then determined. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that Mincle-expressing splenic cDCs rather than Mincle-expressing macrophages contributed to the reconstitution of attenuated splenic antimycobacterial immune responses in Mincle-KO mice after intravenous challenge with BCG. Collectively, we show that expression of Mincle, particularly by cDCs, contributes to the control of splenic M. bovis BCG infection in mice. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Langerin functions as an antiviral receptor on Langerhans cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vlist, Michiel; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) are the first dendritic cells (DC) to encounter pathogens entering the body via mucosa or skin. Equipped with pattern recognition receptors (PRR), LC are able to detect and respond to these pathogens. An important PRR, in human exclusively expressed by LC, is the C-type lectin

  4. A novel C-type lectin, Nattectin-like protein, with a wide range of bacterial agglutination activity in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changhuan; Zhang, Dongling; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-03-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are generally recognized as a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins, which serve as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity of vertebrates. In this study, the molecular characterization and immune roles of a novel CTL from Larimichthys crocea (designated as LcNTC) were investigated. LcNTC is a novel protein that shared 33%-49% homology with other teleosts CTLs. The full-length cDNA of LcNTC was composed of 859 bp with a 465 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 154 residues. LcNTC contained a single CRD with four conserved disulfide-bonded cysteine residues (Cys(57)-Cys(148), Cys(126)-Cys(140)) and EPN/AND motifs instead of invariant EPN/WND motifs required for carbohydrate-binding specificity and constructing Ca(2+)-binding sites. LcNTC mRNA was detected in all examined tissues with the most abundant in the gill. After challenged with poly I:C and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, the temporal expression of LcNTC was significantly up-regulated in the liver, spleen and head-kidney. LcNTC transcripts were also induced in the gill, skin, spleen and head-kidney post-infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. The recombinant LcNTC (rLcNTC) purified from Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) exhibited strong agglutination activity against erythrocytes from human, rabbit and large yellow croaker in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and the agglutination could be inhibited by D-Mannose, D-Glucose, D-Fructose, α-Lactose, D-Maltose and LPS. Positive microbial agglutination activities of rLcNTC were observed against all tested bacteria in the presence of Ca(2+), including Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus lysoleikticus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, V. parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus and Aeromonas hydrophila). These findings collectively indicated that LcNTC might be involved in the innate immunity of L. crocea as a PRR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  5. Lectins with Anti-HIV Activity: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouafae Akkouh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus. The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Tumor-associated Tn-MUC1 glycoform is internalized through the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin and delivered to the HLA class I and II compartments in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Rughetti, Aurelia; Agervig Tarp, Mads P

    2007-01-01

    by immature monocyte-derived DCs (iDCs). Binding required calcium and the GalNAc residue and was competed out by GalNAc polymer and Tn-MUC1 or Tn-MUC2 glycopeptides. The macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin (MGL) receptor expressed on iDCs was shown to be responsible for the binding. Confocal analysis......The type of interaction between tumor-associated antigens and specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) is critical for the type of immunity that will be generated. MUC1, a highly O-glycosylated mucin, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in several tumor histotypes...

  7. Carbohydrate and non-carbohydrate ligands for the c-type lectin-like receptors of natural killer cells a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezouška, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 64 (2004), s. 535-563 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/1045; GA ČR GA204/03/0714; GA AV ČR IAA5020403; GA AV ČR IAA7020006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : non-carbohydrate * lectin -like Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.062, year: 2004

  8. The Breast Cancer-Associated Glycoforms of MUC1, MUC1-Tn and sialyl-Tn, Are Expressed in COSMC Wild-Type Cells and Bind the C-Type Lectin MGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beatson, Richard; Maurstad, Gjertrud; Picco, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    that MUC1 carrying both Tn or STn can bind to the C-type lectin MGL and using atomic force microscopy show that they bind to MGL with a similar deadadhesion force. Tumour associated STn is associated with poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy in breast carcinomas, inhibition of DC maturation, DC...... carbohydrate binding lectins. Two glyco-epitopes that are found expressed by many carcinomas are Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr) and STn (NeuAcα2,6GalNAc-Ser/Thr). These glycans can be carried on many mucin-type glycoproteins including MUC1. We show that the majority of breast cancers carry Tn within the same cell......Aberrant glycosylation occurs in the majority of human cancers and changes in mucin-type O-glycosylation are key events that play a role in the induction of invasion and metastases. These changes generate novel cancer-specific glyco-antigens that can interact with cells of the immune system through...

  9. Enhancement of solubility and yield of a β-glucan receptor Dectin-1 C-type lectin-like domain in Escherichia coli with a solubility-enhancement tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulal, Hari Prasad; Nagae, Masamichi; Ikeda, Akemi; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-07-01

    Dectin-1 is a C-type lectin-like pattern recognition receptor for β(1-3)-glucans. It plays a crucial role in protecting against fungal invasion through binding to β-glucans which are commonly present on the fungal cell wall. To probe its ligand binding mechanism by NMR, we expressed the recombinant murine Dectin-1 C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) in E. coli using pCold vector and purified it. However, the high concentration of Dectin-1 CTLD required for NMR analysis could not be attained due to its inherent low solubility and low bacterial expression. In this study, we tried to increase expression and solubility of Dectin-1 CTLD by codon optimization and fusion of a GB1 tag (B1 domain of streptococcal Protein G). GB1 was inserted on either the N-terminal (NT) or C-terminal end as well as both terminal ends of human and mouse Dectin-1 CTLDs. A pure monomeric sample was only obtained with NT-GB1 fused mouse Dectin-1. Expression of mouse Dectin-1 CTLD yielded 0.9 ± 0.2 mg/L culture, codon optimized mouse Dectin-1 CTLD produced 1.4 ± 0.2 mg/L, and the tag-fused domain 7.1 ± 0.3 mg/L. The tag also increased solubility from 0.1 mM to 1.4 mM. The recombinant protein was correctly folded, in a monomeric state, and specifically bound β-glucan laminarin. These results indicate that fusing GB1 to the N-terminus of mouse Dectin-1 domain advantageously increases yield and solubility, allows retention of native structure, and that the site of fusion is critical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-surface glycoprotein apa as a potential adhesin to colonize target cells via the innate immune system pulmonary C-type lectin surfactant protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragas, Aude; Roussel, Lucie; Puzo, Germain; Rivière, Michel

    2007-02-23

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem, and understanding the mechanism by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) invades and colonizes its host target cells remains an important issue for the control of infection. The innate immune system C-type lectins (C-TLs), including the human pulmonary surfactant protein A (PSP-A), have been recently identified as determinant players in the early recognition of the invading pathogen and in mounting the host defense response. Although the antigenic lipoglycan mannosylated lipoarabinomannan is currently considered to be the major C-TL target on the mycobacterial surface, the recognition by some C-TLs of the only mycobacterial species composing the "Mtb complex" indicates that mannosylated lipoarabinomannan cannot account alone for this specificity. Thus, we searched for the mycobacterial molecules targeted by human PSP-A, focusing our attention on the Mtb surface glycoproteins. We developed an original functional proteomic approach based on a lectin blot assay using crude human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as a source of physiological PSP-A. Combined with selective cell-surface protein extraction and mass spectrometry peptide mapping, this strategy allowed us to identify the Apa (alanine- and proline-rich antigenic) glycoprotein as new potential target for PSP-A. This result was supported by direct binding of PSP-A to purified Apa. Moreover, EDTA addition or deglycosylation of purified Apa samples completely abolished the interaction, demonstrating that the interaction is calcium- and mannose-dependent, as expected. Finally, we provide convincing evidence that Apa, formerly considered as mainly secreted, is associated with the cell wall for a sufficiently long time to aid in the attachment of PSP-A. Because, to date, Apa seems to be restricted to the Mtb complex strains, we propose that it may account for the selective recognition of those strains by PSP-A and other immune system C-TLs containing homologous functional

  11. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part 1: stimulatory effects on blood monocytes and monocyte-derived cells of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushchayev SV

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sergiy V Kushchayev,1 Tejas Sankar,1 Laura L Eggink,4,5 Yevgeniya S Kushchayeva,5 Philip C Wiener,1,5 J Kenneth Hoober,5,6 Jennifer Eschbacher,3 Ruolan Liu,2 Fu-Dong Shi,2 Mohammed G Abdelwahab,4 Adrienne C Scheck,4 Mark C Preul11Neurosurgery Research Laboratory, 2Neuroimmunology Laboratory, 3Department of Pathology, 4Neurooncology Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, 5School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, 6Susavion Biosciences, Inc, Tempe, AZ, USAObjectives: Immunotherapy with immunostimulants is an attractive therapy against gliomas. C-type lectin receptors specific for galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (GCLR regulate cellular differentiation, recognition, and trafficking of monocyte-derived cells. A peptide mimetic of GCLR ligands (GCLRP was used to activate blood monocytes and populations of myeloid-derived cells against a murine glioblastoma.Methods: The ability of GCLRP to stimulate phagocytosis by human microglia and monocyte-derived cells of the brain (MDCB isolated from a human glioblastoma was initially assessed in vitro. Induction of activation markers on blood monocytes was assayed by flow cytometry after administration of GCLRP to naive mice. C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells and were randomized for tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging, which was also used to assess increase in tumor size. Brain tumor tissues were analyzed using flow cytometry, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with respect to tumor, peritumoral area, and contralateral hemisphere regions.Results: GCLRP exhibited strong stimulatory effect on MDCBs and blood monocytes in vitro and in vivo. GCLRP was associated with an increased percentage of precursors of dendritic cells in the blood (P = 0.003, which differentiated into patrolling macrophages in tumoral (P = 0.001 and peritumoral areas (P = 0.04, rather than into dendritic cells

  12. P17, an Original Host Defense Peptide from Ant Venom, Promotes Antifungal Activities of Macrophages through the Induction of C-Type Lectin Receptors Dependent on LTB4-Mediated PPARγ Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaddouj Benmoussa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing knowledge with regard to the immunomodulatory properties of host defense peptides, their impact on macrophage differentiation and on its associated microbicidal functions is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that the P17, a new cationic antimicrobial peptide from ant venom, induces an alternative phenotype of human monocyte-derived macrophages (h-MDMs. This phenotype is characterized by a C-type lectin receptors (CLRs signature composed of mannose receptor (MR and Dectin-1 expression. Concomitantly, this activation is associated to an inflammatory profile characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS, interleukin (IL-1β, and TNF-α release. P17-activated h-MDMs exhibit an improved capacity to recognize and to engulf Candida albicans through the overexpression both of MR and Dectin-1. This upregulation requires arachidonic acid (AA mobilization and the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ nuclear receptor through the leukotriene B4 (LTB4 production. AA/LTB4/PPARγ/Dectin-1-MR signaling pathway is crucial for P17-mediated anti-fungal activity of h-MDMs, as indicated by the fact that the activation of this axis by P17 triggered ROS production and inflammasome-dependent IL-1β release. Moreover, we showed that the increased anti-fungal immune response of h-MDMs by P17 was dependent on intracellular calcium mobilization triggered by the interaction of P17 with pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptors on h-MDMs. Finally, we also demonstrated that P17-treated mice infected with C. albicans develop less severe gastrointestinal infection related to a higher efficiency of their macrophages to engulf Candida, to produce ROS and IL-1β and to kill the yeasts. Altogether, these results identify P17 as an original activator of the fungicidal response of macrophages that acts upstream PPARγ/CLRs axis and offer new immunomodulatory therapeutic perspectives in the field of

  13. Convulxin, a C-type lectin-like protein, inhibits HCASMCs functions via WAD-motif/integrin-αv interaction and NF-κB-independent gene suppression of GRO and IL-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Chun-Ho; Chiang, Tin-Bin [Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wen-Jeng, E-mail: wjwang@mail.cgust.edu.tw [Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurological Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-15

    Convulxin (CVX), a C-type lectin-like protein (CLPs), is a potent platelet aggregation inducer. To evaluate its potential applications in angiogenic diseases, the multimeric CVX were further explored on its mode of actions toward human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). The N-terminus of β-chain of CVX (CVX-β) contains a putative disintegrin-like domain with a conserved motif upon the sequence comparison with other CLPs. Importantly, native CVX had no cytotoxic activity as examined by electrophoretic pattern. A Trp-Ala–Asp (WAD)-containing octapeptide, MTWADAEK, was thereafter synthesized and analyzed in functional assays. In the case of specific integrin antagonists as positive controls, the anti-angiogenic effects of CVX on HCASMCs were investigated by series of functional analyses. CVX showed to exhibit multiple inhibitory activities toward HCASMCs proliferation, adhesion and invasion with a dose- and integrin αvβ3-dependent fashion. However, the WAD-octapeptide exerting a minor potency could also work as an active peptidomimetic. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated both the intact CVX and synthetic peptide can specifically interact with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and CVX was shown to have a down-regulatory effect on the gene expression of CXC-chemokines, such as growth-related oncogene and interleukin-8. According to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation assay and Western blotting analysis, the NF-κB activation was not involved in the signaling events of CVX-induced gene expression. In conclusion, CVX may act as a disintegrin-like protein via the interactions of WAD-motif in CVX-β with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and it also is a gene suppressor with the ability to diminish the expression of two CXC-chemokines in a NF-κB-independent manner. Indeed, more extensive investigations are needed and might create a new avenue for the development of a novel angiostatic agent. - Highlights: • The tetrameric convulxin (CVX) with WAD

  14. An alternative function of C-type lectin comprising low-density lipoprotein receptor domain from Fenneropenaeus merguiensis to act as a binding receptor for viral protein and vitellogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwankaew, Pattamaporn; Praparatana, Rachanida; Runsaeng, Phanthipha; Utarabhand, Prapaporn

    2018-03-01

    A diversity of C-type lectins (CTLs) was coming reported and they are known to participate in invertebrate innate immunity by act as pattern recognition receptor (PRR). In the present study, a unique CTL containing low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) domain from Fenneropenaeus merguiensis (designated as FmLdlr) was cloned. Its sequence contained a single LDLR domain and one carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) with a QAP motif putative for galactose-specific binding. The expression of FmLdlr was detected only in hemocytes of healthy shrimp. Its expression was significantly up-regulated by Vibrio parahaemolyticus or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The knockdown by FmLdlr dsRNA resulted in severe gene down-regulation. The gene silencing with pathogenic co-inoculation led to reduction of the median lethal time and increasing in the cumulative mortality including the remained WSSV in WSSV co-challenge group. Recombinant proteins of FmLdlr and two domains could agglutinate various bacterial strains which LDLR domain revealed the lowest activity. Only FmLdlr and CRD could enhance phagocytosis and encapsulation by hemocytes. Both FmLdlr and CRD except LDLR domain exhibited the antibacterial activity by inhibiting the growth of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in cultured medium and disk diffusion assay. Only FmLdlr and CRD could bind to WSSV proteins, envelope VP28, tegument VP39A and also capsid VP15, which FmLdlr had the higher binding affinity than that of CRD. Altogether, we concluded that FmLdlr contributed in shrimp immune defense through the main action of CRD in capable of bacterial agglutination, enhancing the phagocytosis and encapsulation, antimicrobial activity and binding to viral proteins. Interestingly, ELISA approach revealed that LDLR domain displayed the highest binding affinity to vitellogenin than whole molecule and CRD. We signified a new function of FmLdlr that it might presumably act as a receptor for vitellogenin transportation in

  15. Sugared biomaterial binding lectins: achievements and perspectives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bojarová, Pavla; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 8 (2016), s. 1142-1160 ISSN 2047-4830 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-02578J Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : C-TYPE LECTINS * AMPHIPHILIC JANUS GLYCODENDRIMERS * BIOMEDICALLY RELEVANT LECTINS Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.210, year: 2016

  16. Mosquito C-type lectins maintain gut microbiome homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Rudian; Liu, Jianying; Liu, Qiyong; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    The long-term evolutionary interaction between the host immune system and symbiotic bacteria determines their cooperative rather than antagonistic relationship. It is known that commensal bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms to manipulate the mammalian host immune system and maintain homeostasis. However, the strategies employed by the microbiome to overcome host immune responses in invertebrates still remain to be understood. Here, we report that the gut microbiome in mosquitoes util...

  17. The C-type lectin macrophage galactose-type lectin impedes migration of immature APCs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Sandra J.; Paessens, Lutz C.; Broks-van den Berg, Venice C. M.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent APCs of the immune system that seed the peripheral tissues and lymphoid organs. In an immature state, DCs sample their surroundings for incoming pathogens. Upon Ag encounter, DCs mature and migrate to the lymph node to induce adaptive immune responses. The

  18. Conditional deletion of TGF-βR1 using Langerin-Cre mice results in Langerhans cell deficiency and reduced contact hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Zahner (Sonja P.); J.M. Kel (Junda); C.A.E. Martina (Cerithsa A.); I. Brouwers-Haspels (Inge); M.A. van Roon (Marian); B.E. Clausen (Bjorn)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe critical role of Langerhans cells (LC) in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) was recently questioned in studies using different LC-depletion mouse models. On one hand, inducible ablation of LC led to diminished ear swelling, suggesting functional redundancy between LC and (Langerin +)

  19. Conditional deletion of TGF-βR1 using Langerin-Cre mice results in Langerhans cell deficiency and reduced contact hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zahner, Sonja P.; Kel, Junda M.; Martina, Cerithsa A. E.; Brouwers-Haspels, Inge; van Roon, Marian A.; Clausen, Björn E.

    2011-01-01

    The critical role of Langerhans cells (LC) in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) was recently questioned in studies using different LC-depletion mouse models. On one hand, inducible ablation of LC led to diminished ear swelling, suggesting functional redundancy between LC and (Langerin(+)) dermal

  20. The Distribution of Lectins across the Phylum Nematoda: A Genome-Wide Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Bauters

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes are a very diverse phylum that has adapted to nearly every ecosystem. They have developed specialized lifestyles, dividing the phylum into free-living, animal, and plant parasitic species. Their sheer abundance in numbers and presence in nearly every ecosystem make them the most prevalent animals on earth. In this research nematode-specific profiles were designed to retrieve predicted lectin-like domains from the sequence data of nematode genomes and transcriptomes. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that play numerous roles inside and outside the cell depending on their sugar specificity and associated protein domains. The sugar-binding properties of the retrieved lectin-like proteins were predicted in silico. Although most research has focused on C-type lectin-like, galectin-like, and calreticulin-like proteins in nematodes, we show that the lectin-like repertoire in nematodes is far more diverse. We focused on C-type lectins, which are abundantly present in all investigated nematode species, but seem to be far more abundant in free-living species. Although C-type lectin-like proteins are omnipresent in nematodes, we have shown that only a small part possesses the residues that are thought to be essential for carbohydrate binding. Curiously, hevein, a typical plant lectin domain not reported in animals before, was found in some nematode species.

  1. Lectin typing of Campylobacter concisus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune Munck; Hynes, Sean O; Permin, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A total of 44 clinical isolates and the type strain of the putative pathogen Campylobacter concisus were grouped based on their reactions with plant lectins. The optimized lectin typing system used C. concisus strains proteolytically pretreated and subsequently typed by using a panel of four...... lectins. The system grouped all 45 strains into 13 lectin reaction patterns, leaving no strain untypeable due to autoagglutination. Lectin types were both stable and reproducible....

  2. Mutational analysis of affinity and selectivity of kringle-tetranectin interaction. Grafting novel kringle affinity ontp the trtranectin lectin scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Jacobsen, C; Sigurskjold, B W

    2000-01-01

    C-type lectin-like domains are found in many proteins, where they mediate binding to a wide diversity of compounds, including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. The binding of a C-type lectin-like domain to a ligand is often influenced by calcium. Recently, we have identified a site in the C-type....... This study provides further insight into molecular determinants of importance for binding selectivity and affinity of C-type lectin kringle interactions....... lectin-like domain of tetranectin, involving Lys-148, Glu-150, and Asp-165, which mediates calcium-sensitive binding to plasminogen kringle 4. Here, we investigate the effect of conservative substitutions of these and a neighboring amino acid residue. Substitution of Thr-149 in tetranectin...

  3. Nkrp1 Family, from Lectins to Protein Interacting Molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rozbeský, Daniel; Ivanova, Ljubina; Hernychová, Lucie; Grobárová, Valeria; Novák, Petr; Černý, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2015), s. 3463-3478 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : NATURAL-KILLER-CELL * C-TYPE LECTIN * CARBOHYDRATE-RECOGNITION DOMAIN Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.465, year: 2015

  4. The Roles of Direct Recognition by Animal Lectins in Antiviral Immunity and Viral Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are a group of proteins with carbohydrate recognition activity. Lectins are categorized into many families based on their different cellular locations as well as their specificities for a variety of carbohydrate structures due to the features of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD modules. Many studies have indicated that the direct recognition of particular oligosaccharides on viral components by lectins is important for interactions between hosts and viruses. Herein, we aim to globally review the roles of this recognition by animal lectins in antiviral immune responses and viral pathogenesis. The different classes of mammalian lectins can either recognize carbohydrates to activate host immunity for viral elimination or can exploit those carbohydrates as susceptibility factors to facilitate viral entry, replication or assembly. Additionally, some arthropod C-type lectins were recently identified as key susceptibility factors that directly interact with multiple viruses and then facilitate infection. Summarization of the pleiotropic roles of direct viral recognition by animal lectins will benefit our understanding of host-virus interactions and could provide insight into the role of lectins in antiviral drug and vaccine development.

  5. C-type lectin receptors on dendritic cells and Langerhans cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figdor, C.G.; Kooyk, Y. van; Adema, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells and Langerhans cells are specialized for the recognition of pathogens and have a pivotal role in the control of immunity. As guardians of the immune system, they are present in essentially every organ and tissue, where they operate at the interface of innate and acquired immunity.

  6. Mucosal dendritic cells in HIV-1 susceptibility: a critical role for C-type lectin receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertoghs, Nina; van Pul, Lisa; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual transmission is the major route of HIV-1 infection worldwide. The interaction of HIV-1 with mucosal dendritic cells (DCs) might determine HIV-1 susceptibility as well as initial antiviral immunity controlling virus in the chronic phase. Different DC subsets reside in mucosal tissues and

  7. Biochemical and ultrastructural studies of the C-type lectin bovine conglutinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, E H; Storgaard, P

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the supramolecular organization of conglutinin (BK) with its primary and tertiary structure and to gain more knowledge of functionally important regions of the molecule. BK analyzed by SDS-PAGE under standard reducing conditions (40 mM DTT) showed a major ba...

  8. The molecular puzzle of C-type lectin like natural killer cell receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Kolenko, Petr; Skálová, Tereza; Hašek, Jindřich; Vaněk, O.; Rozbeský, D.; Kotýnková, Kristýna; Novák, Petr; Bezouška, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2011), s. 15 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /9./. 24.03.2011-26.03.2011, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/09/0477; GA ČR GAP207/10/1040; GA ČR GAP302/11/0855 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 31220 - SPINE2-COMPLEXES Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : protein structure * X-ray diffraction * natural killer cell Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  9. Lectins from Mycelia of Basidiomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina E. Nikitina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are proteins of a nonimmunoglobulin nature that are capable of specific recognition of and reversible binding to the carbohydrate moieties of complex carbohydrates, without altering the covalent structure of any of the recognized glycosyl ligands. They have a broad range of biological activities important for the functioning of the cell and the whole organism and, owing to the high specificity of reversible binding to carbohydrates, are valuable tools used widely in biology and medicine. Lectins can be produced by many living organisms, including basidiomycetes. Whereas lectins from the fruit bodies of basidiomycetes have been studied sufficiently well, mycelial lectins remain relatively unexplored. Here, we review and comparatively analyze what is currently known about lectins isolated from the vegetative mycelium of macrobasidiomycetes, including their localization, properties, and carbohydrate specificities. Particular attention is given to the physiological role of mycelial lectins in fungal growth and development.

  10. Mutz-3-derived Langerhans cells are a model to study HIV-1 transmission and potential inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.W.P. de Jong (Marein); L. de Witte (Lot); S.J.A.M. Santegoets (Saskia); D. Fluitsma (Donna); M.E. Taylor (Maureen); T.D. de Gruijl (Tanja); T.B.H. Geijtenbeek (Teunis)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSexual transmission is the primary route of HIV-1 infection, and DC subsets are thought to be involved in viral dissemination to T cells. In the genital mucosa, two main subsets of DCs are present: epithelial LCs capture and degrade HIV-1 through C-type lectin Langerin, whereas

  11. The lectin pathway of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe Cecilie Diederich; Haugaard, Anna Karen; Garred, P

    2014-01-01

    The pattern recognition molecules of the lectin complement pathway are important components of the innate immune system with known functions in host-virus interactions. This paper summarizes current knowledge of how these intriguing molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL), Ficolin-1, -2...

  12. In vivo and in vitro antibacterial activity of conglutinin, a mammalian plasma lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christiansen, P; Thiel, S; Svehag, S E

    1990-01-01

    Conglutinin is a mammalian C-type lectin which agglutinates iC3b-coated erythrocytes. Ingram [13] found that euglobulin from bovine serum may confer partial protection against experimental infections in mice. We now present evidence that the protective activity in euglobulin against infections...

  13. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit C Gorakshakar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review.

  14. Lectin binding by trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P R

    1977-02-01

    Agglutination studies with 6 plant lectins indicated that the unaltered surface coat of Trypanosoma equiperdum isolated from rat blood lacks the carbohydrate molecules preferentially bound by these proteins. However, trypsin, pronase, chymopapain, or papain treatments exposed the binding sites for Concanavalin A and the phytohemagglutinins M and P and trypsinized cells were attached to Concanavalin A immobilized on agarose beads. Lipolytic, amylytic, and other proteolytic enzymes or other agents did not reduce or induce lectin agglutination and wheat germ, Anti A, and Anti H lectins did not clump the trypanosomes under any of the conditions employed. Carbohydrate residues resembling D-mannose or n-acetyl-D-galactosamine are therefore within the surface coat of T. equiperdum or on the cell membrane underneath it. The results are contrasted with the lectin induced agglutination of other parasite species and mammalian cells.

  15. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Lectin-probed western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-probed western blot analysis, the so-called lectin blot analysis, is a useful method to yield basic information on the glycan structures of glycoproteins, based on the carbohydrate-binding specificities of lectins. By lectin blot analysis, researchers can directly analyze the glycan structures without releasing the glycans from glycoproteins. Here, the author describes protocols for standard analysis, and applies analysis in combination with glycosidase digestion of blot.

  17. Purification of the lectin from Datura stramonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, D C; Yeoman, M M

    1978-01-01

    The lectin from Datura stramonium can be inhibited by oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine. This property was exploited to purify the lectin by affinity chromatography on Sepharosefetuin. The purified lectin is a glycoprotein in having subunits of 40 000 and 45 000 mol.wt. PMID:743232

  18. A novel bifunctional hybrid with marine bacterium alkaline phosphatase and Far Eastern holothurian mannan-binding lectin activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Balabanova

    Full Text Available A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa. The CmAP/MBL-AJ dimer model showed the two-subunit lectin part that is associated with two molecules of alkaline phosphatase functioning independently from each other. The highly active CmAP label genetically linked to MBL-AJ has advantaged the lectin-binding assay in its sensitivity and time. The double substitution A156N/F159K in the lectin domain of CmAP/MBL-AJ has enhanced its lectin activity by 25 ± 5%. The bifunctional hybrid holothurian's lectin could be promising tool for developing non-invasive methods for biological markers assessment, particularly for improving the MBL-AJ-based method for early detection of a malignant condition in cervical specimens.

  19. Nkrp1 Family, from Lectins to Protein Interacting Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rozbeský

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin-like receptors include the Nkrp1 protein family that regulates the activity of natural killer (NK cells. Rat Nkrp1a was reported to bind monosaccharide moieties in a Ca2+-dependent manner in preference order of GalNac > GlcNAc >> Fuc >> Gal > Man. These findings established for rat Nkrp1a have been extrapolated to all additional Nkrp1 receptors and have been supported by numerous studies over the past two decades. However, since 1996 there has been controversy and another article showed lack of interactions with saccharides in 1999. Nevertheless, several high affinity saccharide ligands were synthesized in order to utilize their potential in antitumor therapy. Subsequently, protein ligands were introduced as specific binders for Nkrp1 proteins and three dimensional models of receptor/protein ligand interaction were derived from crystallographic data. Finally, for at least some members of the NK cell C-type lectin-like proteins, the “sweet story” was impaired by two reports in recent years. It has been shown that the rat Nkrp1a and CD69 do not bind saccharide ligands such as GlcNAc, GalNAc, chitotetraose and saccharide derivatives (GlcNAc-PAMAM do not directly and specifically influence cytotoxic activity of NK cells as it was previously described.

  20. Quantum Torus Algebras and B(C)-Type Toda Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Li, Chuanzhong

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we construct a new even constrained B(C)-type Toda hierarchy and derive its B(C)-type Block-type additional symmetry. Also we generalize the B(C)-type Toda hierarchy to the N-component B(C)-type Toda hierarchy which is proved to have symmetries of a coupled \\bigotimes ^NQT_+ algebra ( N-fold direct product of the positive half of the quantum torus algebra QT).

  1. Biological role of lectins: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kiran Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins comprise a stracturally vary diverse class of proteins charecterized by their ability to selectively bind carbohydrate moieties of the glycoproteins of the cell surface. Lectins may be derived from plants, microbial or animal sources and may be soluble or membrane bound. Lectins is a tetramer made up of four nearly identical subunits. In human, lectins have been reported to cause food poisoning, hemolytic anemia, jaundice, digestive distress, protein and carbohydrate malabsorption and type I allergies. The present review focuses on the classification, structures, biological significance and application of lectins.

  2. Lectin switching during dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Webb, Andrew I; Chan, Vera; Jumnainsong, Amonrat; Davidson, Andrew; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin

    2011-06-15

    Dengue virus receptors are relatively poorly characterized, but there has been recent interest in 2 C-type lectin molecules, dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and its close homologue liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3-grabbing integrin (L-SIGN), which can both bind dengue and promote infection. In this report we have studied the interaction of dengue viruses produced in insect cells, tumor cell lines, and primary human dendritic cells (DCs) with DC-SIGN and L-SIGN. Virus produced in primary DCs is unable to interact with DC-SIGN but remains infectious for L-SIGN-expressing cells. Skin-resident DCs may thus be a site of initial infection by insect-produced virus, but DCs will likely not participate in large-scale virus replication during dengue infection. These results reveal that differential glycosylation of dengue virus envelope protein is highly dependent on cell state and suggest that studies of virus tropism using virus prepared in insect cells or tumor cell lines should be interpreted with caution.

  3. Human neutrophil migration and activation by BJcuL, a galactose binding lectin purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophil migration to an inflamed site constitutes the first line of the innate immune response against invading microorganisms. Given the crucial role of endogenous lectins in neutrophil mobilization and activation, lectins from exogenous sources have often been considered as putative modulators of leukocyte function. Lectins purified from snake venom have been described as galactoside ligands that induce erythrocyte agglutination and platelet aggregation. This study evaluated human neutrophil migration and activation by C-type lectin BJcuL purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom. Results Utilizing fluorescence microscopy, we observed that biotinylated-BJcuL was evenly distributed on the neutrophil surface, selectively inhibited by D-galactose. Lectin was able to induce modification in the neutrophil morphology in a spherical shape for a polarized observed by optical microscopy and exposure to BJcuL in a Boyden chamber assay resulted in cell migration. After 30 minutes of incubation with BJcuL we found enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst, zymozan phagocytosis and an increase in lissosomal volume. In addition, BJcuL delays late apoptosis neutrophils. Conclusion These results demonstrate that BJcuL can be implicated in a wide variety of immunological functions including first-line defense against pathogens, cell trafficking and induction of the innate immune response since lectin was capable of inducing potent neutrophil activation.

  4. Serum levels of mannan-binding lectin in chickens prior to and during experimental infection with avian infectious bronchitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, H.R.; Munch, M.; Handberg, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a glycoprotein and a member of the C-type lectin super family, the collectin family, and the acute phase protein family. The MBL exerts its function by directly binding to microbial surfaces through its carbohydrate recognition domains, followed by direct opsonization......, the highest value was found in chickens inoculated after 12 h of activity. Thus, an inverse relation exists between the MBL response and the IBV specific antibody response. The ability of MBL to activate the complement cascade was tested in a heterologous system by deposition of human C4 on the chicken MBL...

  5. Genetic variants in C-type lectin genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and clinical outcome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lu, S.; Bevier, M.; Huhn, S.; Sainz, J.; Lascorz, J.; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Novotný, J.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel; Försti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 10 (2013), s. 2325-2333 ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1585 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : CD209 * colorectal cancer * polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.007, year: 2013

  6. WITHDRAWN: C-type lectin interacting with β-integrin enhances hemocytic encapsulation in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Zhuo, Xiao-Rong; Tang, Lin; Liu, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yu-Feng; Wang, Guo-Xiu; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2017-02-14

    This article has been withdrawn at the request of the editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dendritic cells mediate herpes simplex virus infection and transmission through the C-type lectin DC-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marein A. W. P.; de Witte, Lot; Bolmstedt, Anders; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the induction of specific immune responses against invading pathogens. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a common human pathogen that causes painful but mild infections of the skin and mucosa, and which results in latency and recurrent infections. Of the two HSV

  8. Purification, subunit characterization and ultrastructure of three soluble bovine lectins: conglutinin, mannose-binding protein and the pentraxin serum amyloid P-component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Friis, P; Holm Nielsen, E

    1992-01-01

    Conglutinin and mannose-binding protein (MBP) are members of the C-type lectins which are widely present in mammalian plasma. Serum amyloid P-component (SAP) is a member of the pentraxin family with lectin properties. A scheme for the partial purification of all three lectins by carbohydrate...... affinity chromatography and selective elution was developed. The purification was monitored by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and electron microscopy. Binding of the lectins to Sephadex-iC3b, their collagenase sensitivity, and the size and antibody reactivity of their subunits was investigated....... The demonstration, by SDS-PAGE, of 25-kDa subunits, which were unaffected by collagenase treatment but bound to Sephadex-iC3b and antibodies to human SAP, indicated the existence of bovine SAP. Bovine conglutinin (BK) also showed calcium-dependent binding to Sephadex-iC3b, whereas bovine MBP did not. The binding...

  9. Lectin binding patterns and immunohistochemical antigen detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... the effect of infection with Brucella abortus on the pattern of lectin binding in bovine fetal lungs (n=6) and bovine placentas (n=5). Fetal lungs and placenta from heifers experimentally inoculated with B. abortus, strain 2308 were examined by histological, lectin-histochemical, immunohistochemical and ...

  10. Crosstalk between innate and adaptive immune responses to infectious bronchitis virus after vaccination and challenge of chickens varying in serum mannose-binding lectin concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, Helle R.; Norup, Liselotte R.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a C-type collectin with structural similarities to C1q, is an innate pattern-recognition molecule that is sequestered to sites of inflammation and infections. MBL selectively binds distinct chemical patterns, including carbohydrates expressed on all kinds of pathogens...

  11. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  12. Assessing biosafety of GM plants containing lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Pedersen, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    of the lectins that are potentially useful for insect resistance will pose no health risk in genetically modified (GM) plants. Since some lectins are known for their toxicity to humans, the insertion of lectin genes in food crop plants will have to be assessed carefully. It is expected that in some cases......The introduction of genetic engineering has already shown its benefits in transferring genes into crop plants and conferring resistance towards pests. Most of these crop plants on the market have been transformed with the cry genes from Bacillus species, conferring resistance towards certain...... insects. However, since the cry genes are not active against all insects, e.g. sap-sucking insects, other genes coding for proteins such as lectins show promise of complementing the cry genes for insect resistance. As with other novel plants, lectin-expressing plants will need to be assessed...

  13. The question of histidine content in c-type cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanovich, M A; Meyer, T; Tedro, S M; Kamen, M D

    1971-03-01

    Reports that histidine may not occur in heme peptides derived from c-type cytochromes isolated from chloroplasts of Euglena gracilis and Porphyra sp. have not been substantiated in the present investigation, in which the amino acid composition and a partial sequence were determined for a heme peptide derived from the c-type cytochromes of a strain of Euglena closely related to that used in the previous studies. It is concluded that no evidence exists to challenge the generalization that histidine is always present vicinal to the hemebinding site in c-type cytochromes.

  14. Galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine lectin: the coordinator of host cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This killing involves the amoebic surface protein referred to as the Gal/GalNAc lectin. The Gal/GalNAc lectin binds galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine allowing the adherence of amoebas to host cells. Involvement of the lectin in the pathogenesis of E. histolytica infection will be reviewed in this paper. The lectin has been ...

  15. Lectin microarray technology identifies specific lectins related to lymph node metastasis of advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Keishi; Kuno, Atsushi; Matsuda, Atsushi; Ikehata, Yuzuru; Katada, Natsuya; Hirabayashi, Jun; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Although various molecular profiling technologies have the potential to predict specific tumor phenotypes, the comprehensive profiling of lectin-bound glycans in human cancer tissues has not yet been achieved. We examined 242 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients without or with lymph node metastasis-N0 (n = 62) or N+ (n = 180)-by lectin microarray, and identified the specific lectins highly associated with AGC phenotypes. In seven gastric cancer cell lines, in contrast to expressed-in-cancer lectins, not-expressed-in-cancer (NEC) lectins were tentatively designated by lectin microarray. Binding signals of the specific lectins were robustly reduced in AGC patients with N+ status as compared with those with N0 status. The receiver operating characteristic curve determined the optimal cutoff value to differentiate N0 status from N+ status, and subsequent profiling of NEC lectins identified Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) association with the significant other lectins involved in lymph node metastasis. VVA reaction was clearly found on cancer cells, suggesting that it may result from carcinoma-stroma interaction in primary AGC, because VVA is an NEC lectin. Most intriguingly, VVA reaction was remarkably attenuated in the tumor cells of the metastatic lymph nodes, even if it was recognized in primary AGC. In AGC, histological type was strongly associated with soybean agglutinin and Bauhinia purpurea lectin, whereas p53 mutation was the best correlated with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II. Lectin microarrays can be used to very accurately quantify the reaction of glycans with tumor tissues, and such profiles may represent the specific phenotypes, including N+ status, histological type, or p53 mutation of AGC.

  16. Recent Progress in Lectin-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent progress in the development of lectin-based biosensors used for the determination of glucose, pathogenic bacteria and toxins, cancer cells, and lectins. Lectin proteins have been widely used for the construction of optical and electrochemical biosensors by exploiting the specific binding affinity to carbohydrates. Among lectin proteins, concanavalin A (Con A is most frequently used for this purpose as glucose- and mannose-selective lectin. Con A is useful for immobilizing enzymes including glucose oxidase (GOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP on the surface of a solid support to construct glucose and hydrogen peroxide sensors, because these enzymes are covered with intrinsic hydrocarbon chains. Con A-modified electrodes can be used as biosensors sensitive to glucose, cancer cells, and pathogenic bacteria covered with hydrocarbon chains. The target substrates are selectively adsorbed to the surface of Con A-modified electrodes through strong affinity of Con A to hydrocarbon chains. A recent topic in the development of lectin-based biosensors is a successful use of nanomaterials, such as metal nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, for amplifying output signals of the sensors. In addition, lectin-based biosensors are useful for studying glycan expression on living cells.

  17. Chicken mannose-binding lectin function in relation to antibacterial activity towards Salmonella enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich-Lynge, Sofie Louise; Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann

    2015-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a C-type serum lectin of importance in innate immunity. Low serum concentrations of MBL have been associated with greater susceptibility to infections. In this study, binding of purified chicken MBL (cMBL) to Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (S. enterica......) serotypes B, C1 and D was investigated by flow cytometry, and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was used for comparison. For S. enterica the C1 serotypes were the only group to exhibit binding to cMBL. Furthermore, functional studies of the role of cMBL in phagocytosis and complement activation were...... performed. Spiking with cMBL had a dose-dependent effect on the HD11 phagocytic activity of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Montevideo, and a more pronounced effect in a carbohydrate competitive assay. This cMBL dose dependency of opsonophagocytic activity by HD11 cells was not observed for S. aureus...

  18. Mannose-Binding Lectin Binds to Amyloid Protein and Modulates Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykol Larvie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a soluble factor of the innate immune system, is a pattern recognition molecule with a number of known ligands, including viruses, bacteria, and molecules from abnormal self tissues. In addition to its role in immunity, MBL also functions in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. We present evidence here that MBL binds to amyloid β peptides. MBL binding to other known carbohydrate ligands is calcium-dependent and has been attributed to the carbohydrate-recognition domain, a common feature of other C-type lectins. In contrast, we find that the features of MBL binding to Aβ are more similar to the reported binding characteristics of the cysteine-rich domain of the unrelated mannose receptor and therefore may involve the MBL cysteine-rich domain. Differences in MBL ligand binding may contribute to modulation of inflammatory response and may correlate with the function of MBL in processes such as coagulation and tissue homeostasis.

  19. Legume Lectins: Proteins with Diverse Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarda-Diaz, Irlanda; Guzman-Partida, Ana Maria; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are a diverse class of proteins distributed extensively in nature. Among these proteins; legume lectins display a variety of interesting features including antimicrobial; insecticidal and antitumor activities. Because lectins recognize and bind to specific glycoconjugates present on the surface of cells and intracellular structures; they can serve as potential target molecules for developing practical applications in the fields of food; agriculture; health and pharmaceutical research. This review presents the current knowledge of the main structural characteristics of legume lectins and the relationship of structure to the exhibited specificities; provides an overview of their particular antimicrobial; insecticidal and antitumor biological activities and describes possible applications based on the pattern of recognized glyco-targets. PMID:28604616

  20. Lectin Complement Pathway Proteins in Healthy Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Anne; Hansen, Annette Gudmann; Hansen, Søren W K

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the lectin pathway of complement activation, numerous clinical cohorts have been examined for one or more of the proteins, with the intention of uncovering the functions of the proteins or with the aim of discovering new biomarkers or diagnostic tools. To unveil the abnormal......, it is pivotal to know the normal. Our aim was to describe the concentrations of the eleven known proteins of the lectin pathway in serum and plasma and to uncover possible gender differences, age and diurnal variations, which must be taken into account for investigations in different cohorts. We examined...... the concentrations of all lectin pathway proteins (mannan-binding lectin (MBL), H-ficolin, L-ficolin, M-ficolin, collectin-K1, collectin-L1, MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2), MASP-3, MBL associated protein of 44 kDa (MAp44) and MAp19 in 300 Danish blood donors in serum and EDTA plasma in established assays...

  1. The impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the small bowel mucosa of children with celiac disease and atopic dermatitis in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Ress, Krista; Luts, Katrin; Uibo, Oivi; Uibo, Raivo

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we aimed to evaluate the impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of children with celiac disease (CD) and atopic dermatitis (AD) in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGD). Seventy-five children (37 male, mean age 8.4 ± 4.8 years), who randomly underwent small bowel biopsy, were studied. The CD was diagnosed in 14 children, including five persons with concomitant AD (all positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies and with small bowel atrophy). Normal small bowel mucosa was found in eight patients with AD and in 53 patients with FGD. The sera of all patients were tested for total and specific IgE antibodies to food allergen panels. Staining for CD11c+, langerin (CD207+) DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of bioptates using immunohistochemistry. The density of CD11c+ DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was higher in the CD patients compared to the AD and FGD patients (p = 0.02; p = 0.001). In AD, significantly higher density of CD11c+ DCs was detected in patients positive for specific IgE to food allergen panels (p = 0.02). The FGD patients with elevated total IgE had increased density of langerin (CD207)+ DCs compared to the patients with normal total IgE levels (p = 0.01). The increased density of FOXP3+ Treg cells, CD4+, cells and CD11c+ DCs was associated with CD but not with AD. The elevated level of total IgE or specific IgE to food allergens was associated with more pronounced expression of DCs, indicating a possible link between the presence of these cells in small bowel mucosa with elevated level of serum IgE. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Biocompatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Garred, Peter

    2015-01-01

    activation, the coagulation system and the complement system. The complement system is an important part of the initial immune response and consists of fluid phase molecules in the blood stream. Three different activation pathways can initiate the complement system, the lectin, the classical...... been broadly documented. However, the specific role of lectin pathway and the pattern recognition molecules initiating the pathway has only been transiently investigated. Here we review the current data on the field....

  3. Carbopol-lectin conjugate coated liposomes for oral peptide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Martin; Makhlof, Abdallah; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2010-03-01

    Within the current study, a delivery system based on a novel polymer-lectin conjugate (carbopol-lectin) was evaluated for the oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. It was demonstrated that covalent attachment of lectin to carbopol does neither decrease nor abolish the specific binding properties of lectin. Bioadhesion studies revealed that liposomes coated with carbopol lectin are more bioadhesive than liposomes coated with unmodified carbopol. Finally, the in vivo data suggest that carbopol-lectin conjugate coated liposomes are effective oral peptide delivery systems which are capable of increasing the pharmacological effect of orally administered calcitonin.

  4. C-type natriuretic peptide and its precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej; Iversen, Peter; Brasso, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Seminal plasma offer a more organ-specific matrix for markers in prostatic disease. We hypothesized that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) expression may constitute such a new target. METHODS: Patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, clinically localized and metastatic prostate cancer were...

  5. Lectin interactions with alpha-galactosylated xenoantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Moe, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    alpha-Galactosylated xenoantigens (Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1 and Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-3Galbeta1-4Glc) are often detected with the alpha-Gal specific lectin Griffonia simplicifolia 1 isolectin B4 (GS1 B4). However, this lectin exhibits a broad and variable specificity......-galactophilic lectins to alpha-galactosylated neoglycoproteins. The lectins were: Euonymus europaeus agglutinin (EEA), Griffonia simplicifolia 1 isolectin B4 (GS1 B4), Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MPA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa agglutinin (PA-IL). Although both GS1 B4 and MPA strongly bound glycoconjugates terminating...... in Gal there seems to be some differentiation in their sugar binding preferences. MPA was the only lectin that showed high affinity for the pentasaccharide Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-3Galbeta1-4Glc and for the Galalpha-glycans on non-primate thyroglobulin. The length of the xenoantigenic...

  6. Identification and characterization of a novel legume-like lectin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    logical research (Pinto et al. 2009). Many lectins are useful for viral inhibitors, such as N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectin extracted from the stinging nettle root of Urtica dioica, which has displayed pronounced antiviral properties (Shibuya et al. 1986). Also, mannose-binding lectins, such as cyanovirin-N derived from the ...

  7. A chitotetrose specific lectin from Luffa acutangula: Physico ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    chemical properties and the assignment of orientation of sugars in the lectin binding site. VELLAREDDY .... The macromolecular properties of the lectin are listed in table 1. The sedimentation equilibrium ... specific lectins such as wheat germ, (Allen, 1973) Datura stramonium and Solanum tuberosum (Desai et al., 1981) ...

  8. Unfolding energetics and stability of banana lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Garima; Sinha, Sharmistha; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-08-01

    The unfolding pathway of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca was determined by isothermal denaturation induced by the chaotrope GdnCl. The unfolding was found to be a reversible process. The data obtained by isothermal denaturation provided information on conformational stability of banana lectin. The high values of DeltaG of unfolding at various temperatures indicated the strength of intersubunit interactions. It was found that banana lectin is a very stable and denatures at high chaotrope concentrations only. The basis of the stability may be attributed to strong hydrogen bonds of the order 2.5-3.1 A at the dimeric interface along with the presence of water bridges. This is perhaps very unique example in proteins where subunit association is not a consequence of the predominance of hydrophobic interactions. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Lectins offer new perspectives in the development of macrophage-targeted therapies for COPD/emphysema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet R Mukaro

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the defective ability of alveolar macrophages (AM to phagocytose apoptotic cells ('efferocytosis' in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema (COPD could be therapeutically improved using the C-type lectin, mannose binding lectin (MBL, although the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. An S-type lectin, galectin-3, is also known to regulate macrophage phenotype and function, via interaction with its receptor CD98. We hypothesized that defective expression of galectin/CD98 would be associated with defective efferocytosis in COPD and that mechanisms would include effects on cytoskeletal remodeling and macrophage phenotype and glutathione (GSH availability. Galectin-3 was measured by ELISA in BAL from controls, smokers and current/ex-smokers with COPD. CD98 was measured on AM using flow cytometry. We assessed the effects of galectin-3 on efferocytosis, CD98, GSH, actin polymerisation, rac activation, and the involvement of PI3K (using β-actin probing and wortmannin inhibition in vitro using human AM and/or MH-S macrophage cell line. Significant decreases in BAL galectin-3 and AM CD98 were observed in BAL from both current- and ex-smoker COPD subjects vs controls. Galectin 3 increased efferocytosis via an increase in active GTP bound Rac1. This was confirmed with β-actin probing and the role of PI3K was confirmed using wortmannin inhibition. The increased efferocytosis was associated with increases in available glutathione and expression of CD98. We provide evidence for a role of airway lectins in the failed efferocytosis in COPD, supporting their further investigation as potential macrophage-targeted therapies.

  10. Cholesterol Crystals Activate the Lectin Complement Pathway via Ficolin-2 and Mannose-Binding Lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilely, Katrine; Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol crystals (CC) play an essential role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. CC activate the classical and the alternative complement pathways, but the role of the lectin pathway is unknown. We hypothesized that the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) from the lectin pathway bind...... CC and function as an upstream innate inflammatory signal in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We investigated the binding of the PRMs mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3, the associated serine proteases, and complement activation products to CC in vitro using...... recombinant proteins, specific inhibitors, as well as deficient and normal sera. Additionally, we examined the deposition of ficolin-2 and MBL in human carotid plaques by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the lectin pathway was activated on CC by binding of ficolin-2...

  11. Rapid identification of Mycobacterium species by lectin agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athamna, Abed; Cohen, Dani; Athamna, Muhammad; Ofek, Itzhak; Stavri, Henriette

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the possibility that plant lectins can be used for the development of rapid and inexpensive technique for differentiation of mycobacterial species. The method is based on interaction between mycobacteria and lectins as visualized by agglutination in a microtiter plate. We employed 18 mycobacterium species and determined the minimal lectin concentration (MLC) of 23 different lectins. For some of the bacteria as a high as 1000 microg/ml of one or more lectins were required to induce agglutination, while for other strains as low as 1.95 microg/ml of the lectin were needed. A unique pattern of agglutination was observed for each species over a range of 62-1000 microg/ml lectin concentrations. There were little or no variations in MLC within strains (intraspecies) of each of two species tested. In contrast, there were marked interspecies variations in MLC. Analysis of the MLC showed that the highest score of interspecies differences with 23 lectins was obtained at 125 microg/ml lectin concentration. At this concentration it was found that the pattern of agglutinations with only two lectins was sufficient to differentiate mycobacterium species from each other. Because the bacteria-lectin interaction is adaptable to various methods of visualization, our findings may set the stage for developing a rapid and reliable tool to differentiate mycobacterium species.

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF LECTINS OF ZEA MAYS RAW MATERIAL AND THE STUDY OF LECTIN ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpiuk UV

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aime of the study was to identify lectins in the Zea mays raw material: roots, stems, heads, leaves and corn silk and study their activity. Lectins activity has been studied using the biological method of ratuserytroagglutination. This method is based on formation of aggregates of lectins and rats erythrocytes. The activity unit was the floor amount of lectins that agglutinate erythrocytes. The protein nature of extracts that agglutinate has been determined using Bradford method. The lectins activity of Zea mays roots was 6,21±0,11 unit/mg of protein; of heads – 2,61±0,17 unit/mg of protein; of leaves – 0,62 ±0,05 unit/mg of protein; of corn silk – 1,06±0,08 unit/mg of protein; of stems – 0,97±0,09 unit/mg of protein. The greatest lectins activity was in leaves, stems and corn silk.

  13. Développement de ligands multivalents de nature glycomimétiques dirigés contre les récepteurs lectines de type-C

    OpenAIRE

    Porkolab, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    The innate and acquired immunity components work together to provide efficient protection of organisms. Dendritic cells, sentinel cells of the immunity, are able to capture pathogens through their receptors on the surface and they can present the antigens to lymphocytes T in order to stimulate specific adaptive immune responses. Among these receptors, there is a family named C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), which has an important role in the recognition of pathogenic oligosaccharide motifs. CL...

  14. Animal lectins: potential receptors for ginseng polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Hee Loh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng Meyer, belonging to the genus Panax of the family Araliaceae, is known for its human immune system-related effects, such as immune-boosting effects. Ginseng polysaccharides (GPs are the responsible ingredient of ginseng in immunomodulation, and are classified as acidic and neutral GPs. Although GPs participate in various immune reactions including the stimulation of immune cells and production of cytokines, the precise function of GPs together with its potential receptor(s and their signal transduction pathways have remained largely unknown. Animal lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that are highly specific for sugar moieties. Among many different biological functions in vivo, animal lectins especially play important roles in the immune system by recognizing carbohydrates that are found exclusively on pathogens or that are inaccessible on host cells. This review summarizes the immunological activities of GPs and the diverse roles of animal lectins in the immune system, suggesting the possibility of animal lectins as the potential receptor candidates of GPs and giving insights into the development of GPs as therapeutic biomaterials for many immunological diseases.

  15. Peanut lectin crystallography and macromolecular structural studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 6. Peanut lectin crystallography and macromolecular structural studies in India. M Vijayan. Perspectives Volume 32 Issue 6 September 2007 pp 1059-1066. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Lectin status, protein contents and ammonium assimilating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Lectin status, protein contents and ammonium assimilating enzymatic activity of two indigenous cultivars of mulberry species, Morus alba and Morus nigra. Muhammad Zahoor*, Zakia Javaid, Muhammad Ali, Saleem Khan, Farhad Ali and Zahoor A. Swati. Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, ...

  17. Structural comparison of the lectin from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) with concanavalin A and other D-mannose specific lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, N M; Williams, R E; Roy, C; Yaguchi, M

    1982-01-01

    The D-mannose specific lectin from sainfoin was prepared by affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and its circular dichroism (CD), metal content, antigenic character, and N-terminal amino acid sequence were compared with those of four lectins from Vicieae plants and concanavalin A. The sainfoin lectin was only slightly more closely related to these other D-mannose specific lectins, than to lectins of leguminous plants in general. The CD and antigenic experiments also confirmed the close relationship of the four Vicieae lectins. The N-terminal sequence showed sainfoin has two isolectins, differing in sequence at residue four. The sequence was homologous to N-terminal sequences of several other lectins; hence, despite some structural and specificity similarities, the sainfoin lectin does not show the circular permutation of sequence unique to concanavalin A. This region also contained the sole cysteine residue, at position 33. The carbohydrate-binding properties of the sainfoin lectin were studied by gradient affinity chromatography. Its apparent Ka for methyl alpha-D-glucoside was approximately 10(3) M-1, close to the Ka of the pea lectin. However, in the relative binding behaviour of methyl alpha-D-mannoside, maltose, and methyl alpha-D-glucoside, it resembled concanavalin A more than the pea lectin.

  18. The search for lectin isolated from the mycelial cultures of Laetiporus sulphureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Końska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proved the presence of lectin in mycelial cultures of Laetiporus sulphureus. Lectin was excreted into the medium and its erythroagglutinating activity was not high. No active lectin was detected in hyphae using both extraction and immunofluorescence method. Comparative studies based on immunological methods indicate~ that the lectin synthesised in vitro differed from the lectin produced in fruit-bodies.

  19. Purification and Characterization of Griffonia simplicifolia Leaf Lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, J E; Shibata, S; Goldstein, I J

    1983-04-01

    Leaves from mature Griffonia simplicifolia plants were examined for the presence of leaf lectins possessing sugar binding specificities similar to the four known seed lectins (GS-I, GS-II, GS-III, GS-IV). Three (GS-I, -II, -IV) of the four known G. simplicifolia seed lectins were present in the leaves. Leaf G. simplicifolia lectins I and IV were similar to the respective seed lectins. Leaf GS-II, however, was composed of two types of subunits (M(r) = 33,000 and 19,000), whereas the seed lectin consists of only one type of subunit (M(r) 32,500). Seed and leaf GS-II lectins also had different isoelectric points. All leaf and seed lectins were similar with respect to their hemagglutination and glycoconjugate precipitation properties and all subunits contained covalently bound carbohydrate. Leaf GS-IV appeared slightly under-glycosylated compared to seed GS-IV.The fate of GS-I and GS-II seed lectins in aging cotyledons was investigated. GS-I isolectins usually contain isolectin subtypes associated with each main isolectin. Upon inbibition and germination, these GS-I isolectin subtypes disappeared. Over time, GS-II lectin did not change its disc gel electrophoretic properties.

  20. Purification and Characterization of Griffonia simplicifolia Leaf Lectins 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Jamie E.; Shibata, Satoaki; Goldstein, Irwin J.

    1983-01-01

    Leaves from mature Griffonia simplicifolia plants were examined for the presence of leaf lectins possessing sugar binding specificities similar to the four known seed lectins (GS-I, GS-II, GS-III, GS-IV). Three (GS-I, -II, -IV) of the four known G. simplicifolia seed lectins were present in the leaves. Leaf G. simplicifolia lectins I and IV were similar to the respective seed lectins. Leaf GS-II, however, was composed of two types of subunits (Mr = 33,000 and 19,000), whereas the seed lectin consists of only one type of subunit (Mr 32,500). Seed and leaf GS-II lectins also had different isoelectric points. All leaf and seed lectins were similar with respect to their hemagglutination and glycoconjugate precipitation properties and all subunits contained covalently bound carbohydrate. Leaf GS-IV appeared slightly under-glycosylated compared to seed GS-IV. The fate of GS-I and GS-II seed lectins in aging cotyledons was investigated. GS-I isolectins usually contain isolectin subtypes associated with each main isolectin. Upon inbibition and germination, these GS-I isolectin subtypes disappeared. Over time, GS-II lectin did not change its disc gel electrophoretic properties. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16662923

  1. C-type natriuretic peptide in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Soeren Junge; Iversen, Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2009-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is expressed in the male reproductive organs in pigs. To examine whether the human prostate also expresses the CNP gene, we measured CNP and N-terminal proCNP in prostate cancer tissue extracts and performed immunohistochemical biopsy staining. Additionally, pro......CNP-derived peptides were quantitated in plasma from patients with prostate cancer. Blood was collected from healthy controls and patients before surgery for localized prostate cancer. Tissue extracts were prepared from tissue biopsies obtained from radical prostatectomy surgery. N-terminal proCNP, proCNP (1...... demonstrated the presence of the peptides in prostatic epithelial cells. The N-terminal proCNP concentrations in plasma were marginally lower in patients with localized prostate cancer compared with control subjects [13.8 pmol/l (11.0-17.2) vs. 15.1 pmol/l (10.4-23.2), p=0.002] but not enough to justify...

  2. [C-type scaphoid fracture in a elite power lifting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, A; Lahoda, L U; Alkandari, Q; Vogt, P M; Knobloch, K

    2008-06-01

    Power lifting injuries most often involve shoulder injuries with an injury rate of 0.57 to 0.71/1000 hours of power lifting. Wrist injuries are less common in power lifters with 0.05/1000 hours exposure vs. 0.23/1000 h in elite weight lifting men. Often, two contributing factors causing wrist injuries are encountered: a) loss of balance causing the barbell to drift back behind the head of the power lifter, which hyperextends the wrist and b) the maximal weight. We report on an elite power lifting athlete preparing for the World Masters Bench press championships suffering two months of persisting pain during bench press exercise and rest in the snuff-box area following a loss of balance of the bar-bell during bench press with 280 kg load. Following prolonged presentation 2 months after the initial injury with training in the meantime, CT-scan was performed revealing a C-type scaphoid fracture. Surgery was performed as Herbert screw fixation and bone grafting according to the technique of Matti-Russe, followed by an immobilisation of twelve weeks with a plaster. We recommended ending the athletes' power lifting career, however he further exercised with the plaster with consecutive re-operation 3months later and 2nd Matti-Russe and Herbert screw re-do. One year later he became national champion with 240 kg bench pressing. Given the limited scaphoid blood supply and the high complication rate especially among C-type scaphoid fractures, a surgical procedure with bone grafting, Herbert screw fixation and sufficient plaster immobilisation is advocated in scaphoid fractures in elite athletes.

  3. Production, purification, and capsid stability of rhinovirus C types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Theodor F; Bochkov, Yury A; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Palmenberg, Ann C; Gern, James E

    2015-06-01

    The rhinovirus C (RV-C) were discovered in 2006 and these agents are an important cause of respiratory morbidity. Little is known about their biology. RV-C15 (C15) can be produced by transfection of recombinant viral RNA into cells and subsequent purification over a 30% sucrose cushion, even though yields and infectivity of other RV-C genotypes with this protocol are low. The goal of this study was to determine whether poor RV-C yields were due to capsid instability, and moreover, to develop a robust protocol suitable for the purification of many RV-C types. Capsid stability assays indicated that virions of RV-C41 (refractory to purification) have similar tolerance for osmotic and temperature stress as RV-A16 (purified readily), although C41 is more sensitive to low pH. Modification to the purification protocol by removing detergent increased the yield of RV-C. Addition of nonfat dry milk to the sucrose cushion increased the virus yield but sacrificed purity of the viral suspension. Analysis of virus distribution following centrifugation indicated that the majority of detectable viral RNA (vRNA) was found in pellets refractory to resuspension. Reduction of the centrifugal force with commiserate increase in spin-time improved the recovery of RV-C for both C41 and C2. Transfection of primary lung fibroblasts (WisL cells) followed by the modified purification protocol further improved yields of infectious C41 and C2. Described herein is a higher yield purification protocol suitable for RV-C types refractory to the standard purification procedure. The findings suggest that aggregation-adhesion problems rather than capsid instability influence RV-C yield during purification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lessons learned from mice deficient in lectin complement pathway molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genster, Ninette; Takahashi, Minoru; Sekine, Hideharu

    2014-01-01

    The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when the pattern-recognition molecules, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins or collectin-11, bind to invading pathogens or damaged host cells. This leads to activation of MBL/ficolin/collectin-11 associated serine proteases (MASPs), which...... in turn activate downstream complement components, ultimately leading to elimination of the pathogen. Mice deficient in the key molecules of lectin pathway of complement have been generated in order to build knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the lectin pathway in health and disease. Despite...... differences in the genetic arrangements of murine and human orthologues of lectin pathway molecules, the knockout mice have proven to be valuable models to explore the effect of deficiency states in humans. In addition, new insight and unexpected findings on the diverse roles of lectin pathway molecules...

  5. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  6. Subunit heterogeneity in the lima bean lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D D; Etzler, M E; Goldstein, I J

    1982-08-10

    Three forms of lectin (components I, II, and III) from lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) have been purified on an affinity support containing the synthetic type A blood group trisaccharide alpha-D-GalNAc-(1 leads to 3)-[alpha-L-Fuc-(1 leads to 2)]-beta-D-Gal-(1 leads to). Conversion of components I and II to component III has been achieved by reduction in 10(-2) M dithiothreitol. Isoelectric focusing of lima bean lectin in the presence of 8 M urea and beta-mercaptoethanol revealed charge heterogeneity of the lectin subunits. Three major subunit classes of apparent pI 7.05, 6.65, and 6.45, designated alpha, beta, and alpha', respectively, were identified; they occur in a relative abundance of 2:5:3. Green lima beans harvested before maturity lacked the alpha' subunit (pI 6.45) which appears to accumulate during seed maturation. The three subunits are glycoproteins of identical size and immunochemical reactivity. Identical NH2-terminal sequences were found for the three subunits. Amino acid analysis and tryptic peptide mapping indicated that the observed charge heterogeneity is probably due to differences in the primary structure of the subunits. Studies of subunit composition of charge isolectins provided evidence of nonrandom subunit assembly. A model is proposed involving pairing of a pI 6.65 subunit with either a pI 7.06 or 6.45 subunit to form dimeric units. Possible roles for subunit heterogeneity and ordered subunit assembly in determining the metal and sugar binding properties of lima bean lectin are discussed.

  7. Lectin complement pathway proteins in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troldborg, A; Hansen, A; Hansen, S W K; Jensenius, J C; Stengaard-Pedersen, K; Thiel, S

    2017-04-01

    Since the discovery of the lectin pathway of complement activation, numerous clinical cohorts have been examined for one or more proteins, with the intention of uncovering the functions of the proteins or with the aim of discovering new biomarkers or diagnostic tools. To unveil the abnormal, it is pivotal to know the normal. Our aim was to describe the concentrations of the 11 known proteins of the lectin pathway in serum and plasma and to uncover possible gender differences, age and diurnal variations, which must be taken into account for investigation in different cohorts. We examined the concentrations of all lectin pathway proteins mannan-binding lectin (MBL), H-ficolin, L-ficolin, M-ficolin, collectin-K1, collectin-L1, MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2), MASP-3, MBL-associated protein of 44 kDa (MAp44) and MAp19 in 300 Danish blood donors in serum and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma in established assays, and we further developed a new assay to measure MASP-1 in the same samples. We found significant differences in concentrations between serum and plasma for all proteins except for MBL and MASP-3. H-ficolin, M-ficolin and MAp19 displayed convincing diurnal variation. H-ficolin, in particular, halved from morning to the middle of the night. There were gender differences for most proteins, whereas age did not seem to influence concentration. The present study underlines the necessity of considering which material to use, correct matching and a trial design that takes the nature of the protein into account in order for the outcome of cohort studies to have significant relevance. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  8. Are Vicilins Another Major Class of Legume Lectins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Ribeiro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Legume lectins comprise a structurally related, Ca/Mn-dependent, widespread, abundant and well characterized lectin family when compared to the large number of lectins from other sources described in the literature. Strangely enough, no specific function has been assigned to them aside from a possible role in storage and/or defense. Using a recent and fine-tuned methodology capable of specific lectin identification, β-conglutin, Vicia faba vicilin and β-lathyrin, the vicilin storage globulins from Lupinus albus, V. faba and Lathyrus sativus, respectively, were shown to be capable of affinity binding to thoroughly washed erythrocyte membranes and of specific elution with appropriate sugars. Based on this evidence and on sparse data published in the literature, a second family of legume lectins is proposed: the 7S family of storage proteins from leguminous seeds, or family II of legume lectins. These lectins are also structurally related, widespread and well characterized. In addition, they self-aggregate in a Ca/Mg, electrostatic dependent manner and are even more abundant than the family I of legume lectins. Using the same evidence, reserve and defense roles may be attributed to family II of legume lectins.

  9. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  10. Application of lectins to tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1986-11-01

    We investigated the in vitro binding of /sup 125/I-lectins to Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells and in vivo uptake of /sup 125/I-lectins in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) bearing mice. In in vitro binding assays, phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA), pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and concanavalia agglutinin (Con A) showed a high affinity for EAT cells. The in vivo biodistribution of /sup 125/I-lectins showed /sup 125/I-PSA to be significantly taken up into EST tissues 24 h postinjection. After IV injection of /sup 125/I-PSA, uptake of the radioactivity into the tumor tissues reached a maximum at 6 h, and thereafter decreased. Rapid disappearance of the radioactivity from blood and its excretion into kidney soon after injection of /sup 125/I-PSA were observed. When compared with the biodistribution of /sup 67/Ga-citrate in EST bearing mice 24 h postinjection, tumor to liver (T/B), tumor to muscle (T/M), and tumor to blood (T/B) ratios were superior for /sup 125/I-PSA. At 6 h postinjection, the T/B-ratio of /sup 125/I-PSA was 2.5, and this value may be sufficient to enable discernable diagnostic images. Our results suggest that PSA might be a useful tumor imaging radiopharmaceutical.

  11. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Amie J; Khambata, Rayomand S; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J; Baliga, Reshma S; Lumsden, Natalie G; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J; Simone, Michela I; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J; MacAllister, Raymond J; Selwood, David L; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders.

  12. C-type natriuretic peptide in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Soeren Junge; Iversen, Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2009-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is expressed in the male reproductive organs in pigs. To examine whether the human prostate also expresses the CNP gene, we measured CNP and N-terminal proCNP in prostate cancer tissue extracts and performed immunohistochemical biopsy staining. Additionally, pro......CNP-derived peptides were quantitated in plasma from patients with prostate cancer. Blood was collected from healthy controls and patients before surgery for localized prostate cancer. Tissue extracts were prepared from tissue biopsies obtained from radical prostatectomy surgery. N-terminal proCNP, proCNP (1......-50) and CNP were measured in plasma and tissue extracts. Biopsies were stained for CNP-22 and N-terminal proCNP. Tissue extracts from human prostate cancer contained mostly N-terminal proCNP [median 5.3 pmol/g tissue (range 1.0-12.9)] and less CNP [0.14 pmol/g tissue (0.01-1.34)]. Immunohistochemistry...

  13. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Amie J.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Lumsden, Natalie G.; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J.; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J.; Simone, Michela I.; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F.; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J.; MacAllister, Raymond J.; Selwood, David L.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor–C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25105365

  14. A comparison of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin with its deglycosylated derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, D C; Graham, C; Urbaniak, S J; Jeffree, C E; Allen, A K

    1984-06-15

    A deglycosylated derivative of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin was prepared with the use of trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Its properties were generally similar to those of the native lectin, but differences were evident in terms of relative agglutinating activity towards sheep, (untreated) human and trypsin-treated human erythrocytes. The two forms of tomato lectin were used in conjunction with a battery of specific antisera to investigate structural relatedness among solanaceous lectins. Immunological cross-reactivity between tomato, potato and Datura lectins depends on the integrity of the glycosylated region of those lectins; that between Datura lectin and other seed lectins, however, has a separate structural basis.

  15. Musa acuminata (Del Monte banana) lectin is a fructose-binding lectin with cytokine-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Allen H K; Wong, Jack H; Ng, T B

    2009-06-01

    A homodimeric, fructose-binding lectin was isolated from Del Monte bananas by using a protocol that involved ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. Not only fructose, but also glucose, mannose, rhamnose and glucosamine could inhibit the lectin. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of its identical 15-kDa subunits was similar to lectins from other Musa species except for the deletion of the N-terminal glycine residue in Del Monte banana lectin. The hemagglutinating activity was stable up to 80 degrees C and also stable in the range pH 1-13. However, the hemagglutinating activity dwindled to an undetectable level at 90 degrees C. The lectin was capable of eliciting a mitogenic response in murine splenocytes and inducing the expression of the cytokines interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-2 in splenocytes. The lectin also inhibited proliferation of leukemia (L1210) cells and hepatoma (HepG2) cells and the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. The additional information obtained in the present study includes demonstration of fructose-binding activity and cytokine-inducing activity of Del Monte banana lectin. Fructose binding is an unusual characteristic of plant lectins. It is possible that the banana lectin can be developed into a useful anti-HIV, immunopotentiating and antitumor agent in view of its trypsin stability and thermostability.

  16. C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Analog as Therapy for Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is an important regulator of bone formation. Gain-of-function mutations in the FGFR3 gene result in chondrodysplasias which include achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of dwarfism, in which skull, appendicular and axial skeletons are affected. The skeletal phenotype of patients with ACH showed defective proliferation and differentiation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage. Both endochondral and membranous ossification processes are disrupted during development. At cellular level, Fgfr3 mutations induce increased phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor FGFR3, which correlate with an enhanced activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Potential therapeutic strategies have emerged for ACH. Several preclinical studies have been conducted such as the C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) analog (BMN111), intermittent parathyroid hormone injections, soluble FGFR3 therapy, and meclozine and statin treatments. Among the putative targets to antagonize FGFR3 signaling, CNP (or BMN111) is one of the most promising strategies. BMN111 acts as a key regulator of longitudinal bone growth by downregulating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, which is activated as a result of a FGFR3 gain-of-function mutation. Preclinical studies showed that BMN111 treatment led to a large improvement in skeletal parameters in Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice mimicking ACH. In 2014, a clinical trial (phase 2) of BMN111 in pediatric patients with ACH has started. This first clinical trial marks the first big step towards real treatment for these patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Comparative analysis by frontal affinity chromatography of oligosaccharide specificity of GlcNAc-binding lectins, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin-II (GSL-II) and Boletopsis leucomelas lectin (BLL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Kominami, Junko; Kamei, Masugu; Koyama, Yu; Suzuki, Takuji; Isemura, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2006-08-01

    Lectin-based structural glycomics requires a search for useful lectins and their biochemical characterization to profile complex features of glycans. In this paper, two GlcNAc-binding lectins are reported with their detailed oligosaccharide specificity. One is a classic plant lectin, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin-II (GSL-II), and the other is a novel fungal lectin, Boletopsis leucomelas lectin (BLL). Their sugar-binding specificity was analyzed by frontal affinity chromatography using 146 glycans (125 pyridylaminated and 21 p-nitrophenyl saccharides). As a result, it was found that both GSL-II and BLL showed significant affinity toward complex-type N-glycans, which are either partially or completely agalactosylated. However, their branch-specific features differed significantly: GSL-II strongly bound to agalacto-type, tri- or tetra-antennary N-glycans with its primary recognition of a GlcNAc residue transferred by GlcNAc-transferase IV, while BLL preferred N-glycans with fewer branches. In fact, the presence of a GlcNAc residue transferred by GlcNAc-transferase V abolishes the binding of BLL. Thus, GSL-II and BLL forms a pair of complementally probes to profile a series of agalacto-type N-glycans.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of lectin receptor-like kinases in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongil; Labbé, Jessy; Muchero, Wellington; Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara S; Kennedy, Megan; Johnson, Jenifer; Sreedasyam, Avinash; Schmutz, Jeremy; Tuskan, Gerald A; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2016-09-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) belong to a large protein family with over 600 members in Arabidopsis and over 1000 in rice. Among RLKs, the lectin receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) possess a characteristic extracellular carbohydrate-binding lectin domain and play important roles in plant development and innate immunity. There are 75 and 173 LecRLKs in Arabidopsis and rice, respectively. However, little is known about LecRLKs in perennial woody plants. Here we report the genome-wide analysis of classification, domain architecture and expression of LecRLKs in the perennial woody model plant Populus. We found that the LecRLK family has expanded in Populus to a total of 231, including 180 G-type, 50 L-type and 1 C-type LecRLKs. Expansion of the Populus LecRLKs (PtLecRLKs) occurred partially through tandem duplication. Based on domain architecture and orientation features, we classified PtLecRLKs into eight different classes. RNA-seq-based transcriptomics analysis revealed diverse expression patterns of PtLecRLK genes among leaves, stems, roots, buds and reproductive tissues and organs. This study offers a comprehensive view of LecRLKs in the perennial woody model plant Populus and provides a foundation for functional characterization of this important family of receptor-like kinases.

  19. In vivo and in vitro antibacterial activity of conglutinin, a mammalian plasma lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christiansen, P; Thiel, S; Svehag, S E

    1990-01-01

    Conglutinin is a mammalian C-type lectin which agglutinates iC3b-coated erythrocytes. Ingram [13] found that euglobulin from bovine serum may confer partial protection against experimental infections in mice. We now present evidence that the protective activity in euglobulin against infections...... of BALB/c mice with Salmonella typhimurium is mediated by conglutinin. Conglutinin also demonstrated antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. typhimurium in vitro. The expression of this activity required the presence of heat-labile serum factors and peritoneal exudate or spleen cells......, but not antibodies to the bacteria. Antibacterial activity was also demonstrated when the bacteria were pretreated with serum at 37 degrees C before incubation with conglutinin and cells. The activity of conglutinin was not observed when factor I-deficient or EDTA-treated serum was used instead of normal serum...

  20. Comparing mannose binding lectin genetic diversity in intracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-05

    Sep 5, 2007 ... Human mannose binding lectin is derived from a single gene on chromosome 10 (Sastry et al., 1989); the normal structural mannose binding lectin allele is named A, while the common designation for the 3 variant structural alleles. B (mutation in codon 54, Gly to ASP), C (mutation in codon 57, Gly to Glu), ...

  1. Mannan-binding lectin activates C3 and the

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, B.; Martensson, U.; Weintraub, A.

    2006-01-01

    Lectin pathway activation of C3 is known to involve target recognition by mannan-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins and generation of classical pathway C3 convertase via cleavage of C4 and C2 by MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2). We investigated C3 activation in C2-deficient human sera...

  2. Mannose-binding lectin genetics: from A to Z

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, Peter

    2008-01-01

    MBL (mannose-binding lectin) is primarily a liver-derived collagen-like serum protein. It binds sugar structures on micro-organisms and on dying host cells and is one of the four known mediators that initiate activation of the complement system via the lectin pathway. Common variant alleles...

  3. Lectins, Mitogenicity and Seed Germination: A Comparative Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr J. T. Ekanem

    2007-05-24

    May 24, 2007 ... day respectively for T. occidentalis, C. papaya and A. communis) was preceded, 24 hours earlier, by the appearance of lectin in the developing tissues. The data suggest that the mitogenic lectins: Telfairia occidentalis Agglutinin (TOA) and Artocarpin accelerates the process of germination relative to that ...

  4. Activation of the lectin complement pathway on human renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to investigate the roles of high glucose and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) on the activation of the lectin complement pathway (LCP) on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis, immunofluorescence staining and Western blot were used to detect the cell surface ...

  5. Porifera Lectins: Diversity, Physiological Roles and Biotechnological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Gardères

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An overview on the diversity of 39 lectins from the phylum Porifera is presented, including 38 lectins, which were identified from the class of demosponges, and one lectin from the class of hexactinellida. Their purification from crude extracts was mainly performed by using affinity chromatography and gel filtration techniques. Other protocols were also developed in order to collect and study sponge lectins, including screening of sponge genomes and expression in heterologous bacterial systems. The characterization of the lectins was performed by Edman degradation or mass spectrometry. Regarding their physiological roles, sponge lectins showed to be involved in morphogenesis and cell interaction, biomineralization and spiculogenesis, as well as host defense mechanisms and potentially in the association between the sponge and its microorganisms. In addition, these lectins exhibited a broad range of bioactivities, including modulation of inflammatory response, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, as well as anticancer and neuromodulatory activity. In view of their potential pharmacological applications, sponge lectins constitute promising molecules of biotechnological interest.

  6. Antiproliferative activity of cytotoxic tuber lectins from Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty (20) kDa chitin-binding lectins from Solanum tuberosum tubers, STL-S and STL-D were purified through ion-exchange and affinity chromatographic methods, hemagglutinating activity and blood group specificity of the lectins were checked whereas the cytotoxicity was determined using brine shrimp (Artemia salina ...

  7. An alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of thermostable lectin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of thermostable lectin protein from Archidendron jiringa Nielsen seeds. ... A novel GI lectin was enriched from the seeds of the Djenkol bean, A. jiringa, to apparent homogeneity by 90% saturation ammonium sulfate precipitation and Con A-Sepharose affinity column chromatography.

  8. Current status of lectin-based cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fohona S. Coulibaly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are carbohydrate recognizing proteins originating from diverse origins in nature, including animals, plants, viruses, bacteria and fungus. Due to their exceptional glycan recognition property, they have found many applications in analytical chemistry, biotechnology and surface chemistry. This manuscript explores the current use of lectins for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Moreover, novel drug delivery strategies aiming at improving lectin’s stability, reducing their undesired toxicity and controlling their non-specific binding interactions are discussed. We also explore the nanotechnology application of lectins for cancer targeting and imaging. Although many investigations are being conducted in the field of lectinology, there is still a limited clinical translation of the major findings reported due to lectins stability and toxicity concerns. Therefore, new investigations of safe and effective drug delivery system strategies for lectins are warranted in order to take full advantage of these proteins.

  9. Use of amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to differentiate cervical dysplasia (CIN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaella-Verdejo, Arturo; Gallegos, Belem; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro; Zenteno, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    Alterations in O-glycosylation of proteins in cell surfaces can originate disorder in cellular function, as well as in cell transformation and tumoral differentiation. In this work, we investigate changes in O-glycosylation in cervical intraepithelial dysplasia (CIN) at different stages of differentiation (CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III) using lectins specific for O-glycosidically linked glycans. Twenty cases with CIN I, CIN II, and CIN III dysplasias each, and 20 normal cases were studied by lectin histochemistry and evaluated under optical microscopy. The lectins from Glycine max and Griffonia simplicifolia showed no differences in their recognition pattern among the different CIN stages and normal tissue. Dolichos Biflorus lectin recognized CIN I dysplasia. Lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus showed increased reactivity in the presence of CIN II dysplasia, compared with CIN I and CIN III. These results suggest that subtle modifications in the O-glycosylation pattern could be considered in diagnosis or prognosis of cervical precancerous stages.

  10. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjeeta Bhari

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to D-ribose, L-fucose, D-glucose, L-arabinose, D-mannitol, D-galactosamine hydrochloride, D-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age.

  11. Lectins identify distinct populations of coelomocytes in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yun Liao

    Full Text Available Coelomocytes represent the immune cells of echinoderms, but detailed knowledge about their roles during immune responses is very limited. One major challenge for studying coelomocyte biology is the lack of reagents to identify and purify distinct populations defined by objective molecular markers rather than by morphology-based classifications that are subjective at times. Glycosylation patterns are known to differ significantly between cell types in vertebrates, and furthermore they can vary depending on the developmental stage and activation states within a given lineage. Thus fluorescently labeled lectins that recognize distinct glycan structures on cell surface proteins are routinely used to identify discrete cell populations in the vertebrate immune system. Here we now employed a panel of fifteen fluorescently-labeled lectins to determine differences in the glycosylation features on the surface of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus coelomocytes by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Eight of the lectins (succinylated wheat germ agglutinin, Len culinaris lectin, Pisum sativum agglutinin, Saphora japonica agglutinin, Solanum tuberosum lectin, Lycopersicon esculentum lectin, Datura stramonium lectin, Vicia villosa lectin showed distinct binding patterns to fixed and live cells of three major coelomocyte classes: phagocytic cells, red spherule cells, and vibratile cells. Importantly, almost all lectins bound only to a subgroup of cells within each cell type. Lastly, we established fluorescently-labeled lectin-based fluorescence activated cell sorting as a strategy to purify distinct S. purpuratus coelomocyte (sub-populations based on molecular markers. We anticipate that this will become a routine approach in future studies focused on dissecting the roles of different coelomocytes in echinoderm immunity.

  12. Genetic influences on mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, GL; Petersen, I; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    The lectin pathway of the complement system is activated when Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in complex with MASP-2 binds microorganisms. Polymorphisms in both genes are responsible for low serum levels, which associate with increased risk of infection and autoimmune disease. The present study...

  13. Genetic influences on Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and Mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Petersen, Inge; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    The lectin pathway of the complement system is activated when Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in complex with MASP-2 binds microorganisms. Polymorphisms in both genes are responsible for low serum levels, which associate with increased risk of infection and autoimmune disease. The present study...

  14. Molecular characterization of a saline-soluble lectin from a parasitic fungus: Extensive sequence similarities between fungal lectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosén, S.; Kata, M.; Persson, Y.; Lipniunas, P.H.; Wikström, M.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Brink, J.M. van den; Rask, L.; Hedén, L.O.; Tunlid, A.

    1996-01-01

    It has been proposed that the interactions between several parasite and pathogenic fungi and their hosts are mediated by soluble lectins present in the fungus. We have cloned and analyzed a gene encoding such a lectin (AOL) from the nematophagous fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora (deuteromycete). The

  15. The concentration of the C-type lectin, mannan-binding protein, in human plasma increases during an acute phase response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, S; Holmskov, U; Hviid, L

    1992-01-01

    Two ELISAs for estimating mannan-binding protein (MBP) were constructed and the concentration of MBP in plasma was followed in patients undergoing major surgery and in patients having a malarial attack. In both cases increases of MBP in the plasma were observed. The relative increase and the kine...

  16. The C-Type Lectin OCILRP2 Costimulates EL4 T Cell Activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP Kinase Pathway: e113218

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qiang Lou; Wei Zhang; Guangchao Liu; Yuanfang Ma

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability...

  17. The C-type lectin OCILRP2 costimulates EL4 T cell activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP kinase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lou

    Full Text Available OCILRP2 is a typical Type-II transmembrane protein that is selectively expressed in activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and B cells and functions as a novel co-stimulator of T cell activation. However, the signaling pathways underlying OCILRP2 in T cell activation are still not completely understood. In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability and IL-2 production, inhibit Raf1, MAPK3, and MAPK8 activation, and impair NFAT and NF-κB transcriptional activities. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation results indicated that OCILRP2 could interact with the DAP12 protein, an adaptor containing an intracellular ITAM motif that can transduce signals to induce MAP kinase activation for T cell activation. Our data reveal that after binding with DAP12, OCILRP2 activates the Raf-MAP kinase pathways, resulting in T cell activation.

  18. The C-type lectin OCILRP2 costimulates EL4 T cell activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP kinase pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lou, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guangchao; Ma, Yuanfang

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability...

  19. The C-type lectin OCILRP2 costimulates EL4 T cell activation via the DAP12-Raf-MAP kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guangchao; Ma, Yuanfang

    2014-01-01

    OCILRP2 is a typical Type-II transmembrane protein that is selectively expressed in activated T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and B cells and functions as a novel co-stimulator of T cell activation. However, the signaling pathways underlying OCILRP2 in T cell activation are still not completely understood. In this study, we found that the knockdown of OCILRP2 expression with shRNA or the blockage of its activity by an anti-OCILRP2 antagonist antibody reduced CD3/CD28-costimulated EL4 T cell viability and IL-2 production, inhibit Raf1, MAPK3, and MAPK8 activation, and impair NFAT and NF-κB transcriptional activities. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation results indicated that OCILRP2 could interact with the DAP12 protein, an adaptor containing an intracellular ITAM motif that can transduce signals to induce MAP kinase activation for T cell activation. Our data reveal that after binding with DAP12, OCILRP2 activates the Raf-MAP kinase pathways, resulting in T cell activation.

  20. Innate immunity mediated longevity and longevity induced by germ cell removal converge on the C-type lectin domain protein IRG-7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Yunger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In C. elegans, removal of the germline triggers molecular events in the neighboring intestine, which sends an anti-aging signal to the rest of the animal. In this study, we identified an innate immunity related gene, named irg-7, as a novel mediator of longevity in germlineless animals. We consider irg-7 to be an integral downstream component of the germline longevity pathway because its expression increases upon germ cell removal and its depletion interferes with the activation of the longevity-promoting transcription factors DAF-16 and DAF-12 in germlineless animals. Furthermore, irg-7 activation by itself sensitizes the animals' innate immune response and extends the lifespan of animals exposed to live bacteria. This lifespan-extending pathogen resistance relies on the somatic gonad as well as on many genes previously associated with the reproductive longevity pathway. This suggests that these genes are also relevant in animals with an intact gonad, and can affect their resistance to pathogens. Altogether, this study demonstrates the tight association between germline homeostasis and the immune response of animals, and raises the possibility that the reproductive system can act as a signaling center to divert resources towards defending against putative pathogen attacks.

  1. Chicken C-type lectin-like receptor B-NK, expressed on NK and T cell subsets, binds to a ligand on activated splenocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viertiboeck, B.C.; Wortmann, A.; Schmitt, R.; Plachý, Jiří; Gobel, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2008), s. 1398-1404 ISSN 0161-5890 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Chicken NK cell receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.555, year: 2008

  2. Targeting of C-type lectin-like receptor 2 or P2Y12 for the prevention of platelet activation by immunotherapeutic CpG oligodeoxynucleotides: comment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flierl, U; Nero, T L; Lim, B; Andrews, R K; Parker, M W; Gardiner, E E; Peter, K

    2017-10-20

    We read with great interest the article by Delierneux et al. [1] in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. The authors elegantly describe a mechanism of platelet activation by CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) through CLEC-2 mediated binding and uptake. This is the second platelet activation mechanism to be attributed to CpG ODNs, the first being the one described by our group involving platelet-specific collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) [2]. CpG ODNs are short single-stranded DNA molecules resembling bacterial DNA and they were developed as potential drug candidates, largely due to their immunostimulatory properties via activation of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) [3]. These CpG ODNs often have a phosphorothioate (PS) backbone modification, where non-bridging oxygen atoms are replaced with sulfur to prevent rapid degradation by cellular and/or plasma nucleases [4]. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Lectin domains at the frontiers of plant defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nausicaä eLANNOO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants are under constant attack from pathogens and herbivorous insects. To protect and defend themselves, plants evolved a multi-layered surveillance system, known as the innate immune system. Plants sense their encounters upon perception of conserved microbial structures and damage-associated patterns using cell-surface and intracellular immune receptors. Plant lectins and proteins with one or more lectin domains represent a major part of these receptors. The whole group of plant lectins comprises an elaborate collection of proteins capable of recognizing and interacting with specific carbohydrate structures, either originating from the invading organisms or from damaged plant cell wall structures. Due to the vast diversity in protein structures, carbohydrate recognition domains and glycan binding specificities, plant lectins constitute a very diverse protein superfamily. In the last decade, new types of nucleocytoplasmic plant lectins have been identified and characterized, in particular lectins expressed inside the nucleus and the cytoplasm of plant cells often as part of a specific plant response upon exposure to different stress factors or changing environmental conditions. In this review, we provide an overview on plant lectin motifs used in the constant battle against pathogens and predators during plant defenses.

  4. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a lectin from Annona muricata seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, D C S; Freire, M G M; Gomes, V M; Toyama, M H; Marangoni, S; Novello, J C; Macedo, M L R

    2003-11-01

    A lectin with a high affinity for glucose/mannose was isolated from Annona muricata seeds (Annonaceae) by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE SP-5 PW column, and molecular exclusion on a Protein Pak Glass 300 SW column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) yielded two protein bands of approximately 14 kDa and 22 kDa. However, only one band was seen in native PAGE. The Mr of the lectin estimated by fast-performance liquid chromatography-gel filtration on Superdex 75 was 22 kDa. The lectin was a glycoprotein with 8% carbohydrate (neutral sugar) and required divalent metal cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+) for full activity. Amino acid analysis revealed a large content of Glx, Gly, Phe, and Lys. The lectin agglutinated dog, chicken, horse, goose, and human erythrocytes and inhibited the growth of the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Colletotrichum musae.

  6. Antiproliferative activity of cytotoxic tuber lectins from Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-09

    tumor potential against experimentally induced Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in Swiss albino mice was evaluated. Twenty. (20) kDa chitin-binding lectins from Solanum tuberosum tubers, STL-S and STL-D were purified through.

  7. Antiproliferative activity of cytotoxic tuber lectins from Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-09

    Apr 9, 2014 ... 2Laboratory of Glycobiology and Marine Biochemistry, Department of Life and Environmental System ... Plant lectins have been widely studied for pharmaco- ... hevein domains, the type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins.

  8. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Montezuma Barbosa Monteiro Tínel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe, D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL. Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania.

  9. Identification and characterization of a novel legume-like lectin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A legume-type lectin (L-lectin) gene of the red algae Gracilaria fisheri (GFL) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of GFL was 1714 bp and contained a 1542 bp open reading frame encoding 513 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 56.5 kDa. Analysis of the putative ...

  10. "Click" saccharide/beta-lactam hybrids for lectin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Claudio; Aizpurua, Jesus M; Balentová, Eva; Azcune, Itxaso; Santos, J Ignacio; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Cañada, Javier; Miranda, José Ignacio

    2008-06-05

    Hybrid glycopeptide beta-lactam mimetics designed to bind lectins or carbohydrate recognition domains in selectins have been prepared according to a "shape-modulating linker" design. This approach was implemented using the azide-alkyne "click" cycloaddition reaction, and as shown by NMR/MD experiments, binding of the resulting mimetics to Ulex Europaeus Lectin-1 (UEL-1) occurred after a "bent-to-extended" conformational change around a partially rotatable triazolylmethylene moiety.

  11. Probing lectin-mucin interactions by isothermal titration microcalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Tarun K; Brewer, C Fred

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) can directly determine the thermodynamic binding parameters of biological molecules including affinity constant, binding stoichiometry, and heat of binding (enthalpy) and indirectly the entropy and free energy of binding. ITC has been extensively used to study the binding of lectins to mono- and oligosaccharides, but limited applications to lectin-glycoprotein interactions. Inherent experimental challenges to ITC include sample precipitation during the experiment and relative high amount of sample required, but careful design of experiments can minimize these problems and allow valuable information to be obtained. For example, the thermodynamics of binding of lectins to multivalent globular and linear glycoproteins (mucins) have been described. The results are consistent with a dynamic binding mechanism in which lectins bind and jump from carbohydrate to carbohydrate epitope in these molecules leading to increased affinity. Importantly, the mechanism of binding of lectins to mucins appears similar to that for a variety of protein ligands binding to DNA. Recent results also show that high affinity lectin-mucin cross-linking interactions are driven by favorable entropy of binding that is associated with the bind and jump mechanism. The results suggest that the binding of ligands to biopolymers, in general, may involve a common mechanism that involves enhanced entropic effects that facilitate binding interactions.

  12. Structural analysis of Centrolobium tomentosum seed lectin with inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Alysson Chaves; Osterne, Vinicius Jose da Silva; Santiago, Mayara Queiroz; Pinto-Junior, Vanir Reis; Silva-Filho, Jose Caetano; Lossio, Claudia Figueiredo; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino; Almeida, Ricardo Patricio Honorato; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Delatorre, Plinio; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-04-15

    A glycosylated lectin (CTL) with specificity for mannose and glucose has been detected and purified from seeds of Centrolobium tomentosum, a legume plant from Dalbergieae tribe. It was isolated by mannose-sepharose affinity chromatography. The primary structure was determined by tandem mass spectrometry and consists of 245 amino acids, similar to other Dalbergieae lectins. CTL structures were solved from two crystal forms, a monoclinic and a tetragonal, diffracted at 2.25 and 1.9 Å, respectively. The carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), metal-binding site and glycosylation site were characterized, and the structural basis for mannose/glucose-binding was elucidated. The lectin adopts the canonical dimeric organization of legume lectins. CTL showed acute inflammatory effect in paw edema model. The protein was subjected to ligand screening (dimannosides and trimannoside) by molecular docking, and interactions were compared with similar lectins possessing the same ligand specificity. This is the first crystal structure of mannose/glucose native seed lectin with proinflammatory activity isolated from the Centrolobium genus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Outer Membrane Permeabilization Is an Essential Step in the Killing of Gram-Negative Bacteria by the Lectin RegIII?

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuyoshi Miki; Wolf-Dietrich Hardt

    2013-01-01

    The C-type lectin RegIIIβ can kill certain Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The susceptibility of S. Typhimurium depends on the bacterial growth phase, i.e., bacteria from the logarithmic growth phase do bind RegIIIβ and are subsequently killed. Lipid A is one of the bacterial targets for RegIIIβ. However, at the molecular level, it is not understood how RegIIIβ interacts with and kills Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we show that RegIIIβ interacts with Gram-negative bacteria in two di...

  14. Collectin-11/MASP complex formation triggers activation of the lectin complement pathway--the fifth lectin pathway initiation complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Collectins and ficolins are important in the clearance of endogenous and exogenous danger materials. A new human collectin-11 was recently identified in low concentration in serum in complex with mannose-binding lectin (MBL)/ficolin-associated serine proteases. Collectin-11 binds to carbohydrate...... residues present on various microorganisms. Thus, we hypothesized that collectin-11 could be a novel initiation molecule in the lectin pathway of complement. We can show that collectin-11 associates with all the known MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3) as well as the lectin...... complement complex on C. albicans. Moreover, spiking collectin-11-depleted serum, which did not mediate complement activation, with recombinant collectin-11 restored the complement activation capability. These results define collectin-11 as the fifth recognition molecule in the lectin complement pathway...

  15. [Effect of exogenous lectin on the endogenous lectin and antioxidant enzymes activity and flavonoid content in wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruhova, O D; Mandrovs'ka, N M; Kyrychenko, O V

    2006-01-01

    The presawing treatment of wheat seeds by lectin specific to the plant and its compositions with gapten and nitrogen fixation bacteria on the change in enzyme activity of antioxidant system of plant protection (peroxydase and katalase), endogenous lectin activity and flavonoid content in wheat leaves was studied in vegetation experiments. It is shown, that different biochemical links of protection plant system are activated, i.e. lectin activity in leaves increases 1.3 to 1.5 times, peroxydase activity and katalase activity rises 1.5 times and 5.0 to 8.0 times respectively and flavonoide content in leaves of vegetating plants increases under normal conditions of plant growth at the influence of factors of lectin nature.

  16. Genome-wide identification and domain organization of lectin domains in cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-11-01

    Lectins are ubiquitous proteins in plants and play important roles in a diverse set of biological processes, such as plant defense and cell signaling. Despite the availability of the Cucumis sativus L. genome sequence since 2009, little is known with respect to the occurrence of lectins in cucumber. In this study, a total of 146 putative lectin genes belonging to 10 different lectin families were identified and localized in the cucumber genome. Domain architecture analysis revealed that most of these lectin gene sequences contain multiple domains, where lectin domains are linked with other domains, as such creating chimeric lectin sequences encoding proteins with dual activities. This study provides an overview of lectin motifs in cucumber and will help to understand their potential biological role(s). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Trp flipping on carbohydrate binding in lectins. An example on Aleuria aurantia lectin AAL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Houser

    Full Text Available Protein-carbohydrate interactions are very often mediated by the stacking CH-π interactions involving the side chains of aromatic amino acids such as tryptophan (Trp, tyrosine (Tyr or phenylalanine (Phe. Especially suitable for stacking is the Trp residue. Analysis of the PDB database shows Trp stacking for 265 carbohydrate or carbohydrate like ligands in 5 208 Trp containing motives. An appropriate model system to study such an interaction is the AAL lectin family where the stacking interactions play a crucial role and are thought to be a driving force for carbohydrate binding. In this study we present data showing a novel finding in the stacking interaction of the AAL Trp side chain with the carbohydrate. High resolution X-ray structure of the AAL lectin from Aleuria aurantia with α-methyl-l-fucoside ligand shows two possible Trp side chain conformations with the same occupation in electron density. The in silico data shows that the conformation of the Trp side chain does not influence the interaction energy despite the fact that each conformation creates interactions with different carbohydrate CH groups. Moreover, the PDB data search shows that the conformations are almost equally distributed across all Trp-carbohydrate complexes, which would suggest no substantial preference for one conformation over another.

  18. Mannose-binding lectin inhibits monocyte proliferation through transforming growth factor-β1 and p38 signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a plasma C-type lectin, plays an important role in innate immunity. However, the interaction, and the consequences of it, between MBL and the immune system remain ill defined. We have investigated the contributing mechanisms and effects of MBL on the proliferation of human monocytes. At lower concentrations (≤4 μg/ml MBL was shown to partially enhance monocyte proliferation. By contrast, at higher concentrations (8-20 μg/ml of MBL, cell proliferation was markedly attenuated. MBL-induced growth inhibition was associated with G0/G1 arrest, down-regulation of cyclin D1/D3, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk 2/Cdk4 and up-regulation of the Cdk inhibitory protein Cip1/p21. Additionally, MBL induced apoptosis, and did so through caspase-3 activation and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage. Moreover, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 levels increased in the supernatants of MBL-stimulated monocyte cultures. We also found that MBL-dependent inhibition of monocyte proliferation could be reversed by the TGF-β receptor antagonist SB-431542, or by anti-TGF-β1 antibody, or by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors specific for p38 (SB203580, but not ERK (U0126 or JNK (SP600125. Thus, at high concentrations, MBL can affect the immune system by inhibiting monocyte proliferation, which suggests that MBL may exhibit anti-inflammatory effects.

  19. Lectin Activity in Gut Extract of Culex pipiens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Koosha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of lectins is important in interaction between pathogens and mosquito vectors. This study was performed to identify agglutinin activities of protein molecules on the midgut of Culex pipiens.Culex pipiens was reared in insectray condition and the midguts of males and females (blood fed and unfed were dissected separately in Tris-HCl buffer. The extracts of midguts were applied for hemagglutinin assay against red blood cells of rabbit, mouse, rat, dog, horse, sheep, guinea pig, cow, human (A, B, AB, O groups. Then, the RBCs with relatively high agglutinin activity were chosen for carbohydrate inhibition assay. D (+ glucose, D (+ galactose, D (+ mannose, D (- fructose, D (- arabinose, L (- fucose, lactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid were used to specify carbohydrate binding lectin.The highest agglutinin activities were found against sheep and rabbits RBCs. Sexual diversity of agglutinin activities was observed among midgut extraction of males and females. In addition, variation in agglutinin activity of blood fed and unfed female mosquitoes were detected. The lectin activity was inhibited highly with glucose, galactose, fucose and fructose but less inhibitor activities was observed by arabinose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, n-acetyl-d-glucosamine, lactose and mannose.The secretion of hemagglutinins (lectins or lectin-like molecules in the digestive system depends on the type of food in the gut. This suggests that emptying of the gut in preparation for protein rich food probably starts the secretion of hemagglutinins.

  20. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-07-01

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well-studied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Further screening of Aspergillus species for occurrence of lectins and their partial characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Bhari, Ranjeeta; Rai, Jyoti

    2010-02-01

    Fifteen species of Aspergillus were screened for occurrence of lectins. Nine of them (A. sydowii, A. candidus, A. allahabadi, A. terricola, A. ficuum, A. sparsus, A. carneus, A. pulvinus and A. aculeatus) were found to possess lectin activity. None of the species elaborated lectin in culture supernatant. All the lectins agglutinated rat, pig and rabbit erythrocytes. A. sydowii, A. candidus, A. allahabadi, A. terricola, A. ficuum, A. sparsus, A. carneus and A. aculeatus lectins agglutinated all human type erythrocytes equally, while A. pulvinus lectin specifically agglutinated human type A and O erythrocytes. Neuraminidase and protease treatment to erythrocytes substantially augmented lectin titres manyfold. Lectins showed specificity to mucin and asialofetuin and all of them were specific to L-arabinose except that of A. carneus. Lectins from A. sydowii, A. ficuum, A. sparsus and A. carneus displayed remarkable specificities to D-xylose. Maximum lectin activity was expressed by 11 day old cultures of A. sydowii (titre 32), A. ficuum (titre 64) and A. sparsus (titre 1024). Lectins from A. aculeatus, A. candidus and A. terricola were expressed by 7-10 days, 6-9 days and 5-11 days old cultures, respectively. A. allahabadi cultures exhibited maximum lectin activity (titre 32) after 8-10 days of cultivation. A. carneus and A. pulvinus expressed optimal titres of 32 and 8, respectively on the 9th day.

  2. Lectins binding during alloxan-induced diabetes in rat soleus muscle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Membrane structural changes of soleus muscle of alloxan-diabetic rats were detected with a panel of six biotinylated lectins. Samples of muscles were obtained from normal and diabetic rats. The biotinylated lectins in staining were detected by avidin-peroxidase complex. Lectin stainning of soleus muscle cryostat sections ...

  3. Marine Sponge Lectins: Actual Status on Properties and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Mascena Gomes Filho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are primitive metazoans that produce a wide variety of molecules that protect them against predators. In studies that search for bioactive molecules, these marine invertebrates stand out as promising sources of new biologically-active molecules, many of which are still unknown or little studied; thus being an unexplored biotechnological resource of high added value. Among these molecules, lectins are proteins that reversibly bind to carbohydrates without modifying them. In this review, various structural features and biological activities of lectins derived from marine sponges so far described in the scientific literature are discussed. From the results found in the literature, it could be concluded that lectins derived from marine sponges are structurally diverse proteins with great potential for application in the production of biopharmaceuticals, especially as antibacterial and antitumor agents.

  4. Isolation and Biochemical Characterization of Apios Tuber Lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Kenmochi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apios tuber lectin, named ATL, was isolated from Apios americana Medikus by two chromatography steps, hydrophobic chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography. The minimum concentration required for the hemagglutination activity toward rabbit erythrocytes of ATL was 4 μg/mL. ATL was composed of a homodimer of 28.4 kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of ATL was similar to those of other legume lectins. The lectin showed moderate stability toward heating and acidic pH, and the binding affinity against several monosaccharides, such as D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine. ATL also bound to desialylated or agalactosylated glycoproteins such as asialo and agalacto transferrin. ATL decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting the effect on the tight junction-mediated paracellular transport.

  5. Ferromagnetic Levan Composite: An Affinity Matrix to Purify Lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Angeli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and inexpensive procedure used magnetite and levan to synthesize a composite recovered by a magnetic field. Lectins from Canavalia ensiformis (Con A and Cratylia mollis (Cramoll 1 and Cramoll 1,4 did bind specifically to composite. The magnetic property of derivative favored washing out contaminating proteins and recovery of pure lectins with glucose elution. Cramoll 1 was purified by this affinity binding procedure in two steps instead of a previous three-step protocol with ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion exchange chromatography through a CM-cellulose column.

  6. Carbohydrate Analogue Microarrays for Identification of Lectin-Selective Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Ji Young; Park, Cheol Wan; Liu, Yanna; Kwon, Daeun; Park, Seong-Hyun; Park, Sungjin; Pai, Jaeyoung; Shin, Injae

    2017-06-19

    Fifty-five mono- and disaccharide analogues were prepared and used for the construction of microarrays to uncover lectin-selective ligands. The microarray study showed that two disaccharide analogues, 28' and 44', selectively bind to Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), respectively. Cell studies indicated that 28' and 44' selectively block the binding of STL and WGA to mammalian cells, unlike the natural ligand LacNAc, which suppresses binding of both STL and WGA to cells. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  8. The galactophilic lectin (PA-IL, gene LecA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Its binding requirements and the localization of lectin receptors in various mouse tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Hansen, Axel K; d'Apice, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    . It is concluded that the carbohydrate recognizing site of the lectin can have a binding requirement of only one saccharide. Lectin histochemistry was performed on sections from wild type mice and from knock-out mice, which lack function of the alpha.1,3-galactosyltransferase gene. All assays with the P....... aeruginosa lectin were compared with the results obtained using an isolectin from the legume shrub Griffonia simplicifolia: the GSI-134 isolectin, which is highly specific for glycans terminating in Ga1 alpha 1-R. In the wild-type mice, lectin histochemistry showed a strong capillary reaction in heart...... was observed, it seems that, in the mouse, the Pseudomonas lectin adheres to the Gal alpha l-3Ga4 beta 1-G1cNAc carbohydrate on endothelial cells in most organs and tissues. Finally, lectin staining of the basement membrane of the acini in the exocrine pancreas suggests the presence of Ga1 alpha 1-3Gal...

  9. Mannan-binding lectin and healing of a radiation-induced chronic ulcer--a case report on mannan-binding lectin replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaløe, Nanna; Bonde, C; Laursen, I

    2011-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin is an important component of innate immunity, and insufficiency is associated with several clinical disorders. Recently, experimental replacement therapy with plasma-derived mannan-binding lectin has become an option. The current article presents the case of a patient...... with an insufficient level of mannan-binding lectin and a chronic radiation-induced ulcer following the treatment of breast cancer. After 15 months of initially conservative treatment and thereafter plastic surgery, the healing was still impaired with necrosis in the periphery of the ulcer. Immunological work......-up of the patient revealed pronounced insufficiency of mannan-binding lectin. Following a 6-week experimental intravenous treatment with mannan-binding lectin purified from human plasma, that is, 0.2-0.3 mg mannan-binding lectin per kg body weight twice a week, the defect was completely healed. We suggest...

  10. Genetic influences on mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Petersen, Inge; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    The lectin pathway of the complement system is activated when Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in complex with MASP-2 binds microorganisms. Polymorphisms in both genes are responsible for low serum levels, which associate with increased risk of infection and autoimmune disease. The present study...... includes 1215 MBL measurements and 1214 MASP-2 activity measurements in healthy Danish adult twins. Total MASP-2 activity was estimated by C4 cleaving activity of samples diluted in an excess of MBL. Twin-twin correlations were higher in monozygotic (MZ) than in dizygotic (DZ) twins for both traits...

  11. Comparative study of hemagglutination and lectin activity in Australian medicinal mushrooms (higher Basidiomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; Krahl, Anja; Maes, Karen; Spaan, Lina; Wolf, Stefan; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen Australian mushroom species (higher Basidiomycetes) were assessed for hemagglutination and lectin activity. Hemagglutination activity was evaluated using both neuraminidase treated and untreated rabbit and human A, B, and O erythrocytes. Lectin activity was determined by the ability of various mono- and oligosaccharides to inhibit hemagglutination activity. Of the mushrooms evaluated, seven contained lectin activity. However, five (Agaricus bitorquis, Chlorophyllum brunneum, Coprinus comatus, Cortinarius sp. TWM 1710, and Omphalotus nidiformis) expressed lectin activity in only one of two collections tested. The two remaining lectin active mushroom species (Phlebopus marginatus and Psathyrella asperospora) possessed lectin activity with the same sugar specificity in both collections. Although lectins were identified with diverse specificity, lactose-specific lectin activity was most frequently identified, being present in Agaricus bitorquis, Copronus comatus, Omphalotus nidiformis, and Phlebopus marginatus. In contrast, Psathyrella asperospora, Cortinarius sp. TWM 1710, and Chlorophyllum brunneum were found to possess lectin activity specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, galactose, and N-acetyl-neurammic acid, respectively. Significantly, the galactose-specific lectin activity identified in Cortinarius sp. TWM 1710 and the lactose-specific lectin activity in Phlebopus marginatus have not been previously reported.

  12. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  13. Purification and characterization of a new type lactose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1991-02-01

    A new type lactose-binding lectin was purified from extracts of Ulex europaeus seeds by affinity chromatography on a column of galactose-Sepharose 4B, followed by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. This lectin, designated as Ulex europaeus lectin III (UEA-III), was found to be inhibited by lactose. The dimeric lectin is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 70,000 Da; it consists of two apparently identical subunits of a molecular mass of 34,000 Da. Compositional analysis showed that this lectin contains 30% carbohydrate and a large amount of aspartic acid, serine and valine, but no sulfur-containing amino acids. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I) and di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II), both of which we have already purified and characterized, and that of UEA-III were determined and compared.

  14. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  15. Lectin from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia scop.). Complete amino acid sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchalakos, R N; Bates, O J; Bradshaw, R A; Hapner, K D

    1984-04-10

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lectin from sainfoin ( Onobrychis viciifolia Scop . var. Eski ) has been determined by sequential Edman analyses of the intact protein and peptides derived from digests with trypsin and thermolysin. Peptides were purified by pH fractionation, by gel filtration, and by cation-exchange and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Seven segments of continuous sequence, accounting for the entire protein, were aligned through sequence comparison with several homologous leguminous lectins to give the final structure. Sainfoin lectin monomer, a glycoprotein which contains a single polypeptide chain of 236 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 26 509, has amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of alanine and threonine, respectively. A single residue of cysteine, located at position 33, is the only sulfur-containing amino acid present. Asparagine-118 is the single oligosaccharide attachment site. At least two apparent allelomorphic forms of the protein, having valine or isoleucine at position 49 in equal amounts, were detected. The amino acid sequence of sainfoin lectin exhibits circular permutation relative to that of the homologous protein concanavalin A.

  16. Lectins, Mitogenicity and Seed Germination: A Comparative Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fate of lectins contained in the seeds of T. occidentalis, C. papaya and A. communis have been followed during the germinative process. Under the same culture conditions, the emergence of both the radicle and the plumule (the 3rd and 5th day; 18th and 20th and 12th and the 15th day respectively for T. occidentalis, C.

  17. Narcissus tazetta lectin shows strong inhibitory effects against ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    early stem and progenitor cells, and expansion of lineage- committed cells in prolonged culture could be developed for clinical expansion of CD34+ cells for transplantation and use of these cells for other cell therapy strategies. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of a novel mannose- binding lectin isolated ...

  18. 21 CFR 864.9550 - Lectins and protectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... proteins derived from plants and lower animals that cause cell agglutination in the presence of certain... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lectins and protectins. 864.9550 Section 864.9550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...

  19. Lectins as possible candidates towards anti-microbial defense in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this regard, lectins have been implicated as pattern recognition molecules serving as biosensors for detecting carbohydrate components on the microbial cells, thus triggering signaling cascade for immune activation. Understanding of such silkworm agglutinins, most specifically their binding specificities and pattern of ...

  20. Cereal n-glycoproteins enrichment by lectin affinity monolithic chromatography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flodrová, Dana; Bobálová, Janette; Laštovičková, Markéta

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 2 (2016), s. 286-297 ISSN 0133-3720 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP503/12/P395 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : barley * wheat * glycoprotein * mass spectrometry * lectin chromatography Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.496, year: 2016

  1. Clinical manifestations of mannan-binding lectin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Steffen; Frederiksen, Pernille Dorthea; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2006-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a plasma protein of the innate immune system with the ability to initiate antimicrobial and inflammatory actions. MBL deficiency is common. More than 10% of the general population may, depending on definition, be classified as MBL deficient, underlining the redundancy...

  2. Mannan-binding lectin in astma and allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, S.; Thiel, Steffen; Sarma, P.U.

    2006-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a vital and versatile component of innate immunity. It is present in serum and may bind to a plethora of microbial pathogens and mediate opsonization of these by complement-dependent and/or independent mechanisms. Low-MBL levels in serum, attributed to certain genetic...

  3. Cancer Biomarker Discovery: Lectin-Based Strategies Targeting Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Clark

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker discovery can identify molecular markers in various cancers that can be used for detection, screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease progression. Lectin-affinity is a technique that can be used for the enrichment of glycoproteins from a complex sample, facilitating the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers associated with a disease state.

  4. Mitogenic Properties Of Lectin From Mucuna Sloanei Seed Extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitogenic properties of lectin from mucuna sloanei seed extracts were studied. The seeds of mucuna sloanie were shelled and ground using an electric grinder. The powder meal was then defatted with petroleum ether, and adjusted to 10 %( w/v) in potassium inorganic phosphates k-pi (A) buffer (pH 7.5). The suspension ...

  5. Presenting Precision Glycomacromolecules on Gold Nanoparticles for Increased Lectin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Boden

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles have great potential as biosensors and as inhibitors due to their increased binding to carbohydrate-recognizing receptors such as the lectins. Here we apply previously developed solid phase polymer synthesis to obtain a series of precision glycomacromolecules that allows for straightforward variation of their chemical structure as well as functionalization of gold nanoparticles by ligand exchange. A novel building block is introduced allowing for the change of spacer building blocks within the macromolecular scaffold going from an ethylene glycol unit to an aliphatic spacer. Furthermore, the valency and overall length of the glycomacromolecule is varied. All glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles show high degree of functionalization along with high stability in buffer solution. Therefore, a series of measurements applying UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS and surface plasmon resonance (SPR were performed studying the aggregation behavior of the glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles in presence of model lectin Concanavalin A. While the multivalent presentation of glycomacromolecules on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs showed a strong increase in binding compared to the free ligands, we also observed an influence of the chemical structure of the ligand such as its valency or hydrophobicity on the resulting lectin interactions. The straightforward variation of the chemical structure of the precision glycomacromolecule thus gives access to tailor-made glyco-gold nanoparticles (glyco-AuNPs and fine-tuning of their lectin binding properties.

  6. Mannose-Binding Lectin Deficiency Is Associated with Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vengen, Inga Thorsen; Madsen, Hans O; Garred, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins activate the complement cascade, which is involved in atherogenesis. Based on a pilot study, we hypothesized that functional polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) leading to dysfunctional protein are related to development of myocardial infarction (MI...

  7. Multivalent carbohydrate inhibitors of bacterial lectins and toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, O.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria and their toxins often carry proteins on their surface binding to specific components of tissue cells or the extracellular matrix. In many cases the components are carbohydrate structures. The adhesion of these carbohydrate-binding proteins, named lectins, to human glycoconjugates is a

  8. Lectin Activity in Gut Extract of Culex Pipiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Koosha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of lectins is important in interaction between pathogens and mosquito vectors. This study was performed to identify agglutinin activities of protein molecules on the midgut of Culex pipiens. Methods: Culex pipiens was reared in insectray condition and the midguts of males and females (blood fed and un­fed were dissected separately in Tris-HCl buffer. The extracts of midguts were applied for hemagglutinin assay against red blood cells of rabbit, mouse, rat, dog, horse, sheep, guinea pig, cow, human (A, B, AB, O groups. Then, the RBCs with relatively high agglutinin activity were chosen for carbohydrate inhibition assay. D (+ glucose, D (+ galactose, D (+ mannose, D (- fructose, D (- arabinose, L (- fucose, lactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid were used to specify carbohydrate binding lectin.Results: The highest agglutinin activities were found against sheep and rabbits RBCs. Sexual diversity of agglutinin activities was observed among midgut extraction of males and females. In addition, variation in agglutinin activity of blood fed and unfed female mosquitoes were detected. The lectin activity was inhibited highly with glucose, galactose, fucose and fructose but less inhibitor activities was observed by arabinose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, n-acetyl-d-glucosamine, lactose and mannose.Conclusion: The secretion of hemagglutinins (lectins or lectin-like molecules in the digestive system depends on the type of food in the gut. This suggests that emptying of the gut in preparation for protein rich food probably starts the secretion of hemagglutinins.

  9. Microvessel changes in hypertension measured by Griffonia simplicifolia I lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, A S; Lombard, J H; Cowley, A W; Hansen-Smith, F M

    1990-06-01

    Commonly used methods for assessing reductions in microvascular density (rarefaction) in hypertension detect only perfused microvessels. In the present study, samples of cremaster and spinotrapezius muscles were taken from rats with chronic (4-week) reduced renal mass hypertension and normotensive sham-operated control rats, as well as from 12-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats and their normotensive Wistar-Kyoto control strain. Mean arterial pressure was 149 +/- 8 mm Hg in the rats with reduced renal mass hypertension, 114 +/- 7 mm Hg in sham-operated rats, 177 +/- 9 mm Hg in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and 95 +/- 4 mm Hg in Wistar-Kyoto rats. Muscle samples were incubated with rhodamine-labeled Griffonia simplicifolia I lectin, which identifies both perfused and nonperfused microvessels. Microvascular density was assessed by counting intersections with a 20-microns grid. Microvessel density was significantly reduced in cremaster muscles of both spontaneously hypertensive and reduced renal mass hypertensive rats, and in the spinotrapezius muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats, compared with their respective normotensive controls. Further studies in the reduced renal mass rats on low salt diets indicated that lectin binding was also decreased as salt intake was increased, independent of blood pressure. This change was not due to an alteration in lectin-binding affinity. These studies indicate that lectin binding can be a useful tool for assessing microvessel density that does not depend on the perfusion state of the vessels and that rarefaction due to hypertension is not evenly distributed in all vascular beds. These results also provide evidence that dietary salt intake alone can influence microvessel density, as measured by the lectin technique.

  10. Prevalence of the F-type lectin domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Ritika; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Ramya, T N C

    2015-08-01

    F-type lectins are fucolectins with characteristic fucose and calcium-binding sequence motifs and a unique lectin fold (the "F-type" fold). F-type lectins are phylogenetically widespread with selective distribution. Several eukaryotic F-type lectins have been biochemically and structurally characterized, and the F-type lectin domain (FLD) has also been studied in the bacterial proteins, Streptococcus mitis lectinolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae SP2159. However, there is little knowledge about the extent of occurrence of FLDs and their domain organization, especially, in bacteria. We have now mined the extensive genomic sequence information available in the public databases with sensitive sequence search techniques in order to exhaustively survey prokaryotic and eukaryotic FLDs. We report 437 FLD sequence clusters (clustered at 80% sequence identity) from eukaryotic, eubacterial and viral proteins. Domain architectures are diverse but mostly conserved in closely related organisms, and domain organizations of bacterial FLD-containing proteins are very different from their eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting unique specialization of FLDs to suit different requirements. Several atypical phylogenetic associations hint at lateral transfer. Among eukaryotes, we observe an expansion of FLDs in terms of occurrence and domain organization diversity in the taxa Mollusca, Hemichordata and Branchiostomi, perhaps coinciding with greater emphasis on innate immune strategies in these organisms. The naturally occurring FLDs with diverse domain organizations that we have identified here will be useful for future studies aimed at creating designer molecular platforms for directing desired biological activities to fucosylated glycoconjugates in target niches. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a highly thermostable lectin from Trichosanthes dioica and comparison with other Trichosanthes lectins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharkar, Poorva D.; Anuradha, P.; Gaikwad, Sushama M.; Suresh, C. G., E-mail: cg.suresh@ncl.res.in [Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India)

    2006-03-01

    A lectin from Trichosanthes dioica seeds has been purified and crystallized using 25%(w/v) PEG 2K MME, 0.2 M ammonium acetate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 50 µl 0.5%(w/v) n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside as thick needles belonging to hexagonal space group P6{sub 4}. A lectin from Trichosanthes dioica seeds has been purified and crystallized using 25%(w/v) PEG 2K MME, 0.2 M ammonium acetate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 50 µl 0.5%(w/v) n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside as thick needles belonging to hexagonal space group P6{sub 4}. Unit-cell parameters were a = b = 167.54, c = 77.42 Å. The crystals diffracted to a Bragg spacing of 2.8 Å. Both the structures of abrin-a and T. kirilowii lectin could be used as a model in structure determination using the molecular-replacement method; however, T. kirilowii lectin coordinates gave better values of reliability and correlation parameters. The thermal, chemical and pH stability of this lectin have also been studied. When heated, its haemagglutination activity remained unaffected up to 363 K. Other stability studies show that 4 M guanidinium hydrochloride (Gdn–HCl) initiates unfolding and that the protein is completely unfolded at 6 M Gdn–HCl. Treatment with urea resulted in a total loss of activity at higher concentrations of denaturant with no major structural changes. The protein remained stable over a wide pH range, from pH 6 to pH 12, except for partial unfolding at extremely alkaline pH. The role of disulfide bonds in the protein stability was found to be insignificant. Rayleigh light-scattering studies showed no molecular aggregation in any of the extreme treated conditions. The unusual stability of this lectin resembles that of type II ribosome-inactivating proteins (type II RIPs), which is also supported by structure determination. The structural features observed in a preliminary electron-density map were compared with the other two available Trichosanthes lectin structures.

  12. Processing-independent analysis for pro-C-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Gøtze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is expressed in several human tissues. We designed a specific processing-independent assay for proCNP-derived products and quantitated the concentrations in human seminal plasma from normal and vasectomized men. Antibodies were raised against the N-terminus of human...

  13. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenberg, Melanie; Fritz, Eva-Corrina; Schulz, Christian; Kaufmann, Tobias; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors ("synthetic lectins") constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  14. Visualizing the dental biofilm matrix by means of fluorescence lectin-binding analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawakoli, Pune N; Neu, Thomas R; Busck, Mette M; Kuhlicke, Ute; Schramm, Andreas; Attin, Thomas; Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a poorly studied, yet important component of dental biofilms. Fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) is a powerful tool to characterize glycoconjugates in the biofilm matrix. This study aimed to systematically investigate the ability of 75 fluorescently labeled lectins to visualize and quantify extracellular glycoconjugates in dental biofilms. Lectin binding was screened on pooled supragingival biofilm samples collected from 76 subjects using confocal microscopy. FLBA was then performed with 10 selected lectins on biofilms grown in situ for 48 h in the absence of sucrose. For five lectins that proved particularly suitable, stained biovolumes were quantified and correlated to the bacterial composition of the biofilms. Additionally, combinations of up to three differently labeled lectins were tested. Of the 10 lectins, five bound particularly well in 48-h-biofilms: Aleuria aurantia (AAL), Calystega sepiem (Calsepa), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA), Morniga-G (MNA-G) and Helix pomatia (HPA). No significant correlation between the binding of specific lectins and bacterial composition was found. Fluorescently labeled lectins enable the visualization of glycoconjugates in the dental biofilm matrix. The characterization and quantification of glycoconjugates in dental biofilms require a combination of several lectins. For 48-h-biofilms grown in absence of sucrose, AAL, Calsepa, HPA, LEA, and MNA-G are recommendable.

  15. Microbial F-type lectin domains with affinity for blood group antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Sonal; Khairnar, Aasawari; Bishnoi, Ritika; Ramya, T N C

    2017-09-23

    F-type lectins are fucose binding lectins with characteristic fucose binding and calcium binding motifs. Although they occur with a selective distribution in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes, most biochemical studies have focused on vertebrate F-type lectins. Recently, using sensitive bioinformatics search techniques on the non-redundant database, we had identified many microbial F-type lectin domains with diverse domain organizations. We report here the biochemical characterization of F-type lectin domains from Cyanobium sp. PCC 7001, Myxococcus hansupus and Leucothrix mucor. We demonstrate that while all these three microbial F-type lectin domains bind to the blood group H antigen epitope on fucosylated glycans, there are fine differences in their glycan binding specificity. Cyanobium sp. PCC 7001 F-type lectin domain binds exclusively to extended H type-2 motif, Myxococcus hansupus F-type lectin domain binds to B, H type-1 and Lewis(b) motifs, and Leucothrix mucor F-type lectin domain binds to a wide range of fucosylated glycans, including A, B, H and Lewis antigens. We believe that these microbial lectins will be useful additions to the glycobiologist's toolbox for labeling, isolating and visualizing glycans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunolocalization and functional role of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in development of fungus by interaction with its endogenous receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Bale M; Bhat, Anuradha G; Hegde, Ganapati V; Naik, Ramachandra S; Kulkarni, Srikanth; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2004-11-01

    Many fungi are known to secrete lectins, but their functional roles are not clearly understood. Sclerotium rolfsii, a soilborne plant pathogenic fungus capable of forming fruiting bodies called sclerotial bodies, secrete a cell wall-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-specific lectin. To understand the functional role of this lectin, we examined its occurrence and expression during development of the fungus. Furthermore, putative endogenous receptors of the lectin were examined to substantiate the functional role of the lectin. Immunolocalization studies using FITC-labeled lectin antibodies revealed discrete distribution of lectin sites at the branching points of the developing mycelia and uniformly occurring lectin sites on the mature sclerotial bodies. During development of the fungus the lectin is expressed in small amounts on the vegetative mycelia and reaching very high levels in mature sclerotial bodies with a sudden spurt in secretion at the maturation stage. Capping of the lectin sites on the sclerotial bodies by lectin antibodies or haptens inhibit strongly the germination of these bodies, indicating functional significance of the lectin. At the maturation stage the lectin interacts with the cell wall-associated putative endogenous receptor leading to the aggregation of mycelium to form sclerotial bodies. The lectin-receptor complex probably acts as signaling molecule in the germination process of sclerotial bodies. Using biotinylated lectin, the receptors were identified by determining the specific lectin binding to lipid components, extracted from sclerotial bodies, and separated on thin-layer chromatograms. Preliminary characterization studies indicated that the receptors are glycosphingolipids and resemble inositolphosphoceramides. These findings together demonstrate the importance of lectin-receptor interactions to explain hitherto speculated functional role of the lectins and also the glycosphingolipids of fungi.

  17. PO-20 - Crosstalk between the lectin pathway and haemostasis in patients with pulmonary cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J B; Christensen, T D; Hvas, C L

    2016-01-01

    types of cancer. The exact role of the complement system in cancer is currently discussed. However, one possible consequence of the increased complement activation could be contribution to the increased thrombosis risk which cancer patients experience. Proteins of the lectin pathway can activate......INTRODUCTION: Recent research has focused on the complement system in cancer, including the lectin pathway of complement activation. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a key activator of the lectin pathway, can bind to tumor cell surfaces in vitro, and lectin pathway activation is increased in several...... coagulation and impair fibrinolysis in vitro, but the significance of this in a clinical setting is not well understood. AIM: We aim to investigate associations between lectin pathway and haemostatic activation in patients with lung cancer undergoing thoracoscopic surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients...

  18. Isolation and characterization of three Ca2+-dependent beta-galactoside-specific lectins from snake venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, T K; Ogilvie, M L

    1984-01-01

    Three lactose-inhibited lectins from the venoms of the snakes Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix (southern copperhead), Ancistrodon piscivorous leukostoma (western cottonmouth moccasin) and Crotalus atrox (western diamondback rattlesnake) have been isolated and newly characterized. The three lectins are similar to thrombolectin, a lectin isolated from the venom of Bothrops atrox (fer-de-lance) (Gartner, Stocker & Williams, 1980), with regard to sugar specificity, Mr, Ca2+ requirements and sensitivity to reducing agents. Each lectin is a dimer (Mr 28 000) consisting of monomers (Mr 14 000) indistinguishable on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Haemagglutination activity is dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and is inhibited by reducing agents. The lectins are not identical and can be distinguished on the basis of relative affinities for inhibiting sugars, isoelectric points and immunoprecipitation assays using anti-(cottonmouth lectin) serum. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6391472

  19. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  20. Electronic Detection of Lectins Using Carbohydrate Functionalized Nanostructures: Graphene versus Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanan; Vedala, Harindra; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Audfray, Aymeric; Cecioni, Samy; Imberty, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Star, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Here we investigated the interactions between lectins and carbohydrates using field-effect transistor (FET) devices comprised of chemically converted graphene (CCG) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Pyrene- and porphyrin-based glycoconjugates were functionalized noncovalently on the surface of CCG-FET and SWNT-FET devices, which were then treated with 2 µM of nonspecific and specific lectins. In particular, three different lectins (PA-IL, PA-IIL and ConA) and three carbohydrate epitopes (galactose, fucose and mannose) were tested. The responses of 36 different devices were compared and rationalized using computer-aided models of carbon nanostructure/glycoconjugate interactions. Glycoconjugates surface coverage in addition to one-dimensional structures of SWNTs resulted in optimal lectin detection. Additionally, lectin titration data of SWNT- and CCG-based biosensors were used to calculate lectin dissociation constants (Kd) and compare them to the values obtained from the isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) technique. PMID:22136380

  1. The glycosyl moiety of lectin from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia, Scop.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namen, A E; Hapner, K D

    1979-09-29

    A lectin isolated from the seeds of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia, Scop. var Eski) has been shown to be a glycoprotein containing 2.6% (w/w) neutral carbohydrate and 1.6% (w/w) glucosamine (Hapner, K.D. and Robbins, J.E. (1979) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 580, 186--197) A homogeneous glycopeptide accounting for 70% of the original glycoprotein carbohydrate was isolated from pronase digests of the lectin by gel filtration chromatography. Gas-liquid chromatographic and amino acid analyses showed the glycosyl portion to contain glucosamine, mannose, xylose and fucose in molar ratio to glycopeptide of 1.8 : 1.8 : 0.7 : 0.9. The amino acid sequence was determined as H2N-Ser-Asn(glycosyl)-glu-Thr-COOH. The glycosyl moiety was attached to the peptide through N-glycosidic linkage between asparagine and glucosamine.

  2. Plant Lectins as Medical Tools against Digestive System Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Martínez, Laura Elena; Moreno-Celis, Ulisses; Cervantes-Jiménez, Ricardo; Ferriz-Martínez, Roberto Augusto; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro; García-Gasca, Teresa

    2017-07-03

    Digestive system cancers-those of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon-rectum, liver, and pancreas-are highly related to genetics and lifestyle. Most are considered highly mortal due to the frequency of late diagnosis, usually in advanced stages, caused by the absence of symptoms or masked by other pathologies. Different tools are being investigated in the search of a more precise diagnosis and treatment. Plant lectins have been studied because of their ability to recognize and bind to carbohydrates, exerting a variety of biological activities on animal cells, including anticancer activities. The present report integrates existing information on the activity of plant lectins on various types of digestive system cancers, and surveys the current state of research into their properties for diagnosis and selective treatment.

  3. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Lusvarghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Griffithsin (GRFT, an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin.

  4. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. © 2013 The Authors. Microbiology Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wy Ching Ng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific and adaptive (specific components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV. Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease.

  6. A comparison of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin with its deglycosylated derivative.

    OpenAIRE

    Kilpatrick, D C; GRAHAM, C.; Urbaniak, S J; Jeffree, C. E.; Allen, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    A deglycosylated derivative of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) lectin was prepared with the use of trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Its properties were generally similar to those of the native lectin, but differences were evident in terms of relative agglutinating activity towards sheep, (untreated) human and trypsin-treated human erythrocytes. The two forms of tomato lectin were used in conjunction with a battery of specific antisera to investigate structural relatedness among solanaceous le...

  7. Comparison of hemolytic activity of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar lectins

    OpenAIRE

    Kentaro Kato; Takashi Makiuchi; Xunjia Cheng; Hiroshi Tachibana

    2017-01-01

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in rodent models of amoebiasis. Recently, the intermediate subunit of the lectin, Igl1, of E. histolytica has been shown to have hemolytic activity. However, the corresponding lectin is also expressed in a non-virulent species, Entamoeba dispar, and another subunit, Igl2, is expressed in the protozoa. Therefore, in this study, we compared the activ...

  8. Glycoproteins of axonal transport: affinity chromatography on fucose-specific lectins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, S.; Ohlson, C.; Karlsson, J.O.

    1982-03-01

    Rapidly transported fucose-labeled glycoproteins from axons of rabbit retinal ganglion cells were solubilized with nonionic detergents. The solubilized components were subjected to affinity chromatography on three different fucose-specific lectins. A recently characterized fucose-specific lectin from Aleuria aurantia bound reversibly approximately 60% of the applied protein-bound radioactivity. The lectins from Lotus tetragonolobus and Ulex europaeus bound are very small proportions of the labeled rapidly transported glycoproteins.

  9. Visualizing the dental biofilm matrix by means of fluorescence lectin-binding analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tawakoli, Pune N.; Neu, Thomas R.; Busck, Mette M.; Kuhlicke, Ute; Schramm, Andreas; Attin, Thomas; Wiedemeier, Daniel B.; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extracellular matrix is a poorly studied, yet important component of dental biofilms. Fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) is a powerful tool to characterize glycoconjugates in the biofilm matrix. This study aimed to systematically investigate the ability of 75 fluorescently labeled lectins to visualize and quantify extracellular glycoconjugates in dental biofilms. Lectin binding was screened on pooled supragingival biofilm samples collected from 76 subjects using confocal...

  10. -Glucosidase inhibitory activity of thermostability lectin protein from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personal

    2012-05-24

    May 24, 2012 ... sulfate precipitation and Con A-Sepharose affinity column chromatography. This lectin had an IC50 value for GI activity of 0.031 ± 0.02 mg/ml, an estimated molecular mass of 35.7 kDa, of which 15.8% was carbohydrate, was thermostable up to 80°C for 70 min, showed an optimum activity within the pH ...

  11. Identification and characterisation of lectins in several tick species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěrba, J.; Dupejová, J.; Fišer, M.; Golovchenko, Maryna; Rudenko, Natalia; Grubhoffer, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, S1 (2009), s. 88-88 ISSN 1742-464X. [34th FEBS Congress: Life's Molecular Interactions. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600960906; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : lectin s * hemagglutination acitvity * fibrinogen- related domain Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  12. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: affinity chromatography on Crotalaria juncea lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Lopez, J; Kristiansen, T; Kårsnas, P

    1981-04-01

    Attempts were made to purify bovine viral diarrhea virus by chromatography on Crotalaria juncea lectin coupled to Sepharose 2B. A recovery of abut 65% of viral infectivity after desorption was obtained. Electron microscopy revealed mostly de-enveloped particles, rather uniform in appearance but differing in size. Immunodiffusion tests with immune calf sera showed precipitation lines of identity between the desorbed virus and extracts from infected cell cultures.

  13. A glycobiology review: carbohydrates, lectins, and implications in cancer therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazarian, Haike; Idoni, Brian; Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    This review is intended for general readers who would like a basic foundation in carbohydrate structure and function, lectin biology and the implications of glycobiology in human health and disease, particularly in cancer therapeutics. These topics are among the hundreds included in the field of glycobiology and are treated here because they form the cornerstone of glycobiology or the focus of many advances in this rapidly expanding field. PMID:20199800

  14. Occurrence and transmission efficiencies of Borrelia burgdorferi ospC types in avian and mammalian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Holly B; Canham, Charles D; Fonseca, Dina M; Brisson, Dustin; Morin, Peter J; Smouse, Peter E; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2014-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., the bacterium that causes Lyme disease in North America, circulates among a suite of vertebrate hosts and their tick vector. The bacterium can be differentiated at the outer surface protein C (ospC) locus into 25 genotypes. Wildlife hosts can be infected with a suite of ospC types but knowledge on the transmission efficiencies of these naturally infected hosts to ticks is still lacking. To evaluate the occupancy and detection of ospC types in wildlife hosts, we adapted a likelihood-based species patch occupancy model to test for the occurrence probabilities (ψ - "occupancy") and transmission efficiencies (ε - "detection") of each ospC type. We detected differences in ospC occurrence and transmission efficiencies from the null models with HIS (human invasive strains) types A and K having the highest occurrence estimates, but both HIS and non-HIS types having high transmission efficiencies. We also examined ospC frequency patterns with respect to strains known to be invasive in humans across the host species and phylogenetic groups. We found that shrews and to a lesser extent, birds, were important host groups supporting relatively greater frequencies of HIS to non-HIS types. This novel method of simultaneously assessing occurrence and transmission of ospC types provides a powerful tool in assessing disease risk at the genotypic level in naturally infected wildlife hosts and offers the opportunity to examine disease risk at the community level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimal C-type Filter for Harmonics Mitigation and Resonance Damping in Industrial Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel Aleem, SHE; Zobaa, AF

    2016-01-01

    Single-tuned passive filters offer reasonable mitigation for harmonic distortion at a specific harmonic frequency with a high filtering percentage, but resonance hazards exist. Traditional damped filters offer high-pass filtering for the high-frequency range, but suffer from extra ohmic losses. C-type filters may operate in a manner similar to the tuned filters with low damping losses and marginal resonance damping capabilities. Also, they can be designed as damped filters with increased reso...

  16. Modification of C-type inactivating Shaker potassium channels by chloramine-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlief, T; Schönherr, R; Heinemann, S H

    1996-02-01

    Shaker potassium channels undergo a slow C-type inactivation which can be hastened dramatically by single-point mutations in or near the pore region. We found that the oxidizing agent chloramine-T (Chl-T) causes an irreversible loss of current for those mutants which show C-type inactivation. For several mutants at position T449, which show a wide spectrum of inactivation time constants, the time constant of current rundown induced by Chl-T correlated with the speed of inactivation. Rundown was accelerated when the channels were in the inactivated state but rundown also occurred when channels were not opened or inactivated. Apparently, only those channels which can undergo C-type inactivation are accessible to Chl-T. In order to gain information about the target amino-acid residue for the action of Chl-T and the structural rearrangements occurring during C-type inactivation, several mutant channel proteins were compared with respect to their response to Chl-T. Since Chl-T can oxidize cysteine and methionine residues, we mutated the possible targets in and close to the pore region, namely C462 to A, and M440 and M448 to I. While the residues M440 and C462 were not important for channel rundown, mutation of M448 to I made the channels more resistant to Chl-T by about one order of magnitude. While inactivation was accelerated upon application of Chl-T in most mutants, mutation of M448 to I abolished this effect on the time course of inactivation, indicating that M448 is one of the target residues for Chl-T.

  17. Prenatal diagnosis of methymalonic aciduria and homocystinuria cblC type using DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Zappu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA and homocystinuria, cblC type is the most frequent inborn error of vitamin B12. CblC patients present with a heterogeneous clinical picture.To date, the early prenatal diagnosis of MMA and homocystinuria, cblC type is performed by determination of methylmalonic acid and total homocysteine (Hcy in amniotic fluid supernatant. In this paper we report a case of prenatal diagnosis, using genetic analysis, of MMA and homocystinuria, cblC type in an at risk couple. Direct sequencing analysis of the amplified products of chorionic villi biopsy extracted DNA showed normal sequence in the fetal DNA. Mutation analysis of the MMACHC gene is more cost-effective and less time-consuming than the biochemical approach. Early prenatal treatment may have an impact on the long-term complications associated with cblC disease. Future studies with the aim of determining the long-term benefits of daily parenteral OHCbl started soon after conception in at risk mothers should be considered. In this context early prenatal diagnosis could determine whether therapy needs to be continued.

  18. Characterization of a new lectin involved in the protoplast regeneration of Bryopsis hypnoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce; Lü, Fang; Zhou, Baicheng; Peng, Guang

    2009-09-01

    A group of coenocytic marine algae differs from higher plants, whose totipotency depends on an intact cell (or protoplast). Instead, this alga is able to aggregate its extruded protoplasm in sea water and generate new mature individuals. It is thought that lectins play a key role in the aggregation process. We purified a lectin associated with the aggregation of cell organelles in Bryopsis hypnoides. The lectin was ca. 27 kDa with a pI between pH 5 and pH 6. The absence of carbohydrate suggested that the lectin was not a glycoprotein. The hemagglutinating activity (HA) of the lectin was not dependent on the presence of divalent cations and was inhibited by N-Acetylgalactosamine, N-Acetylglucosamine, and the glycoprotein bovine submaxillary mucin. The lectin preferentially agglutinated Gram-negative bacterium. The HA of this lectin was stable between pH 4 to pH 10. Cell organelles outside the cytoplasm were agglutinated by the addition of lectin solution (0.5 mg ml-1). Our results suggest that the regeneration of B. hypnoides is mediated by this lectin. We also demonstrated that the formation of cell organelle aggregates was inhibited by nigericin in natural seawater (pH 8.0). Given that nigericin dissipates proton gradients across the membrane, we hypothesize that the aggregation of cell organelles was proton-gradient dependent.

  19. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Rauschenberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors (“synthetic lectins” constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA, β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  20. Detection, purification and characterization of a lectin from freshwater green algae Spirogyra spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTÔNIA S. DE OLIVEIRA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Freshwater algae are rich sources of structurally biologically active metabolites, such as fatty acids, steroids, carotenoids and polysaccharides. Among these metabolites, lectins stand out. Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins of non-immune origin which bind to carbohydrates or glycoconjugates, without changing ligand structure. Many studies have reported on the use of Spirogyra spp. as effective bioindicators of heavy metals; however, reports on Spirogyra molecular bioprospecting are quite limited. Therefore, this study aimed to detect, isolate, purify and characterize a lectin present in the freshwater green algae Spirogyra. Presence of the lectin protein in the extract was detected by hemagglutination assays. Subsequently, the protein extract was subjected to a sugar inhibition assay to identify the lectin-specific carbohydrate. Following this, the extract was applied to a guar gum column to afford the pure lectin. The lectin was inhibited by N-acetyl-glucosamine and N-acetyl-beta-D-mannose, but more strongly by D-galactose. The apparent molecular mass of the purified lectin was evaluated by Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE. Electrophoretic analysis revealed a single protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 56 kDa. Thus, it could be concluded that a lectin was purified from Spirogyra spp.

  1. Toxicity and Binding Profile of Lectins from the Genus Canavalia on Brine Shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa Arruda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins.

  2. A simple fibril and lectin model for cyst walls of Entamoeba and perhaps Giardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, John; Robbins, Phillips

    2010-01-01

    Cyst walls of Entamoeba and Giardia protect them from environmental insults, stomach acids, and intestinal proteases. Each cyst wall contains a sugar homopolymer: chitin in Entamoeba and a unique N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) homopolymer in Giardia. Entamoeba cyst wall proteins include Jacob lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) that cross-link chitin, chitinases that degrade chitin, and Jessie lectins that make walls impermeable. Giardia cyst wall proteins are also lectins that bind fibrils of the GalNAc homopolymer. While many of the details remain to be determined for the Giardia cyst wall, current data suggests a relatively simple fibril and lectin model for the Entamoeba cyst wall. PMID:20934911

  3. Cell surface lectin array: parameters affecting cell glycan signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landemarre, Ludovic; Cancellieri, Perrine; Duverger, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Among the "omics", glycomics is one of the most complex fields and needs complementary strategies of analysis to decipher the "glycan dictionary". As an alternative method, which has developed since the beginning of the 21st century, lectin array technology could generate relevant information related to glycan motifs, accessibility and a number of other valuable insights from molecules (purified and non-purified) or cells. Based on a cell line model, this study deals with the key parameters that influence the whole cell surface glycan interaction with lectin arrays and the consequences on the interpretation and reliability of the results. The comparison between the adherent and suspension forms of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, showed respective glycan signatures, which could be inhibited specifically by neoglycoproteins. The modifications of the respective glycan signatures were also revealed according to the detachment modes and cell growth conditions. Finally the power of lectin array technology was highlighted by the possibility of selecting and characterizing a specific clone from the mother cell line, based on the slight difference determination in the respective glycan signatures.

  4. Development of gastrointestinal surface. VIII. Lectin identification of carbohydrate differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, K.Y.; Bresson, J.L.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-05-01

    Binding of microvillus membranes (MVM) from newborn and adult rats by concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus (UEA I), Dolichos bifluorus (DBA), and Triticum vulgaris (WGA) was examined to determine the availability of carbohydrate-containing sites for these lectins on the intestinal surface during development. Consistent patterns of differences in the reaction of MVM with these lectins were found. Con A and UEA had much higher reactivities to MVM of adult than newborn rats. /sup 125/I-labeled-UEA gel overlay experiments revealed the abundance of UEA-binding sites in MVM of adult rat in contrast to the two binding sites in MVM of a newborn rat. DBA bound only to MVM of the adults, and very few binding sites were found in immature MVM. In contrast to these lectins, WGA binding was much higher in MVM of the newborns and decreased with maturation. Additional experiments on the age dependence of UEA and DBA reactivities revealed that the most striking changes occur in animals from 2 to 2 wk of age. In MVM from 2-wk-old rats, there were only 13.9% and < 0.2% of the adult binding capacities for UEA and DBA, respectively. By the time the animals were 4 wk old, the binding capacity for UEA had attained close to the level of the adults, whereas for DBA it reached 71.3% of the adult value. These results provide definite evidence of changes in the intestinal surface during perinatal development.

  5. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  6. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  7. Single CRD containing lectin from Macrobrachium rosenbergii (MrLec) participates in innate immunity against pathogen infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Li, Wen; Jin, Min; Ma, Fu-Tong; Huang, Ying; Shi, Yan-Ru; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Feng, Jin-Ling; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2016-04-01

    As a type of pattern-recognition proteins, lectins perform important functions in the innate immunity of crustaceans, including prawns. Although several reports showed that C-type lectin domain family (CLEC) importantly functions in host-pathogen interactions, limited research has focused on CLEC in Macrobrachium rosenbergii. In the present study, a new single CRD containing CLEC (designated as MrLec) was reported in freshwater prawns, M. rosenbergii. The full-length cDNA of MrLec consisted of 1027 bp with an open reading frame of 801 bp, which encoded a peptide of 266 amino acid residues. Genomic sequence for MrLec was also obtained from the M. rosenbergii, which contain 4 exons and 3 introns. MrLec was found to contain a single carbohydrate-recognition domain with an EPN motif. MrLec was ubiquitously distributed in various tissues of a normal prawn, particularly in the hepatopancreas and gills. MrLec expression in the gills was significantly upregulated after a challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and downregulated at 24 h after MrLec RNA interference (MrLec-RNAi). The expression levels of some AMPs, including antilipopolysaccharide factor 1 (Alf1) and lysozyme 2 (Lyso2), also markedly decreased after MrLec-RNAi. Recombinant MrLec can agglutinate (Ca(2+)-dependent) and bind both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Results suggested that MrLec participates in the recognition of invading pathogens and functions in the immune response of prawn against pathogen infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation of a ß-galactoside-binding lectin from cat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Franco-Fraguas

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A lectin from cat liver has been identified and purified by affinity chromatography on asialofetuin-Sepharose. One hundred micrograms of lectin was obtained from one cat liver with a purification factor of 1561. The lectin agglutinates trypsin-treated rabbit and cow erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was inhibited only by saccharides containing ß-galactosyl residues, of which the 1-amine-1-deoxy-ß-D-galactose was the most potent one by inhibiting hemagglutination at a concentration of 12.5 mM, followed by melibiose, trehalose and galactose. The lectin has a subunit molecular mass of 14.4 kDa determined by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions and a pI of 4.85. Compared with the composition of lectins from calf heart and porcine heart, cat liver lectin contains approximately the same amount of cysteine, half the amount of glycine, twice as much arginine and threonine, and three times the amounts of tyrosine and methionine. Cat liver lectin contains four cysteine residues per subunit, all of them in the reduced form. Their lack of reactivity towards thiol-reactive supports suggests they are not exposed on the lectin surface. The protein apparently has a blocked N-terminus. The purified lectin was stable for up to 20 months stored at +4ºC in buffer supplemented with 4 mM ß-mercaptoethanol. Results indicated that this lectin belongs to the family of soluble ß-galactoside-binding lectins, also known as galectins, which are expressed in a wide range of vertebrate tissues.

  9. The Macrophage Galactose-Type Lectin-1 (MGL1 Recognizes Taenia crassiceps Antigens, Triggers Intracellular Signaling, and Is Critical for Resistance to This Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Montero-Barrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1 recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1−/− mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1−/− macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1−/− mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1−/− mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1−/− macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.

  10. DIFFERENT ORIGINS OR DIFFERENT EVOLUTIONS? DECODING THE SPECTRAL DIVERSITY AMONG C-TYPE ASTEROIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernazza, P.; Marsset, M.; Groussin, O.; Lamy, P.; Jorda, L.; Mousis, O.; Delsanti, A. [Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, LAM, Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille (France); Castillo-Rogez, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Beck, P. [UJF-Grenoble 1, CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d’Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), UMR 5274, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Emery, J. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Planetary Geosciences Institute, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1410 (United States); Brunetto, R.; Djouadi, Z.; Dionnet, Z. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, UMR-8617, Université Paris-Sud, bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Delbo, M.; Carry, B. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UNS-CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, Boulevard de l’Observatoire-CS 34229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Marchis, F. [Carl Sagan Center at the SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Zanda, B. [IMCCE, Observatoire de Paris, 77 avenue Denfert-Rochereau, F-75014 Paris Cedex (France); Borondics, F., E-mail: pierre.vernazza@lam.fr [SMIS Beamline, Soleil Synchrotron, BP48, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2017-02-01

    Anhydrous pyroxene-rich interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have been proposed as surface analogs for about two-thirds of all C-complex asteroids. However, this suggestion appears to be inconsistent with the presence of hydrated silicates on the surfaces of some of these asteroids, including Ceres. Here, we report the presence of enstatite (pyroxene) on the surface of two C-type asteroids (Ceres and Eugenia) based on their spectral properties in the mid-infrared range. The presence of this component is particularly unexpected in the case of Ceres, because most thermal evolution models predict a surface consisting of hydrated compounds only. The most plausible scenario is that Ceres’ surface has been partially contaminated by exogenous enstatite-rich material, possibly coming from the Beagle asteroid family. This scenario questions a similar origin for Ceres and the remaining C-types, and it possibly supports recent results obtained by the Dawn mission (NASA) that Ceres may have formed in the very outer solar system. Concerning the smaller D  ∼ 200 km C-types such as Eugenia, both their derived surface composition (enstatite and amorphous silicates) and low density (<1.5 g cm{sup −3}) suggest that these bodies accreted from the same building blocks, namely chondritic porous, pyroxene-rich IDPs and volatiles (mostly water ice), and that a significant volume fraction of these bodies has remained unaffected by hydrothermal activity likely implying a late accretion. In addition, their current heliocentric distance may best explain the presence or absence of water ice at their surfaces. Finally, we raise the possibility that CI chondrites, Tagish-Lake-like material, or hydrated IDPs may be representative samples of the cores of these bodies.

  11. [Surgical treatment for Tile C type pelvis fracture through posterior approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Yang, Le-zhong; Liu, Chun-lei

    2011-02-01

    To study the clinical results of surgical treatment for Tile C type pelvis fractures with internal fixation by posterior approach. From January 2005 to June 2009, 12 patients with Tile C type pelvis fracture were treated by open reduction through posterior approach. There were 8 males and 4 females, with an average age of 39.5 years ranging from 25 to 58 years. The time from injury to operation was ranged from 7 to 10 days with an average of 9.5 days. All the patients were given X-ray, 3-D CT examinations before operation. The fracture were classified by Tile classification: Type C1 in 5 cases, Type C2 in 2 cases, Type C1 and Type C2 in 4 cases, Type C3 in 1 case. All the posterior rings were fixed by re-establishing steel board without anterior ring fixation after stabilization of body condition. All the patients were treated with skin traction for 3 weeks after operation. All 12 patients were followed up for 6 months to 24 months with an average of 12.6 months. All the incisions healed well, and the fractures got union. No pelvic malunion, low back pain or leg length discrepancy was found. According to Majeed criteria for the evaluation of therapeutic effect, 10 patients were excellent, and 2 were good. In the management of the Tile C type pelvis fractures, a stable pelvis can be reconstructed by fixing posterior ring simply through the posterior approach, so that further sequelae can be reduced.

  12. Processing-independent analysis for pro-C-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Gøtze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is expressed in several human tissues. We designed a specific processing-independent assay for proCNP-derived products and quantitated the concentrations in human seminal plasma from normal and vasectomized men. Antibodies were raised against the N-terminus of human......-933 pmol/L, age 18-25 years); gel chromatography suggested the presence of several molecular forms. Parameters associated to male fertility, proCNP concentrations in blood plasma and time of abstinence did not correlate to the seminal proCNP concentrations. Measurement in vasectomized men disclosed seminal...

  13. Artefacts induced on c-type haem proteins by electrode surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Patrícia M. Paes de; Pauleta, Sofia R.; Gonçalves, M. Lurdes Simões; Pettigrew, Graham W.; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J. G.; Santos, Margarida M. Correia dos

    2011-01-01

    J Biol Inorg Chem (2011) 16:209–215 DOI 10.1007/s00775-010-0717-z In this work it is demonstrated that the characterization of c-type haem containing proteins by electrochemical techniques needs to be cautiously performed when using pyrolytic graphite electrodes. An altered form of the cytochromes, which has a redox potential 300 mV lower than that of the native state and displays peroxidatic activity, can be induced by interaction with the pyrolytic graphite electrode. Proper control e...

  14. Serine protease immunohistochemistry and lectin histochemistry in the small intestine of weaned and unweaned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Wells, M

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of goblet cells containing serine protease and of those binding the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) in the pig small intestine is altered during the period after weaning. Goblet cells exhibiting binding of other lectins were not altered. These alterations and other cha...

  15. Macroporous silica particles derivatized for enhanced lectin affinity enrichment of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Benjamin F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter details procedures for (1) functionalizing macroporous silica particles with lectins, a class of proteins that have affinity for the glycan moieties on glycoproteins, and (2) utilizing the lectin-silica material for high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) to enrich glycoproteins from small volumes of biological sample materials.

  16. Purification and Characterization of a Lectin from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. (Anasazi Beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arishya Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A lectin has been isolated from seeds of the Phaseolus vulgaris cv. “Anasazi beans” using a procedure that involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC-ion exchange chromatography on Mono S, and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 200. The lectin was comprised of two 30-kDa subunits with substantial N-terminal sequence similarity to other Phaseolus lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was stable within the pH range of 1–14 and the temperature range of 0–80∘C. The lectin potently suppressed proliferation of MCF-7 (breast cancer cells with an IC50 of 1.3 μM, and inhibited the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 7.6 μM. The lectin evoked a mitogenic response from murine splenocytes as evidenced by an increase in [3H-methyl]-thymidine incorporation. The lectin had no antifungal activity. It did not stimulate nitric oxide production by murine peritoneal macrophages. Chemical modification results indicated that tryptophan was crucial for the hemagglutinating activity of the lectin.

  17. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and the risk of arterial thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhlenschlaeger, Tommy; Garred, Peter; Madsen, Hans O

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene are associated with SLE as well as with severe atherosclerosis. We determined whether mannose-binding lectin variant alleles were associated...

  18. Mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms and susceptibility to infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, P; Madsen, H O; Halberg, P

    1999-01-01

    To determine whether variant alleles in the coding portion of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene are associated with increased susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and concomitant infections.......To determine whether variant alleles in the coding portion of the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene are associated with increased susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and concomitant infections....

  19. Preparation of Ulex europaeus lectin-gliadin nanoparticle conjugates and their interaction with gastrointestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezpeleta, I; Arangoa, M A; Irache, J M; Stainmesse, S; Chabenat, C; Popineau, Y; Orecchioni, A M

    1999-11-25

    One approach to improve the bioavailability and efficiency of drugs consists of the association of a ligand (i.e. lectins), showing affinity for biological structures located on the mucosa surfaces, to nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. In this context, Ulex europaeus lectin-gliadin nanoparticle conjugates (UE-GNP) were prepared with the aim of evaluating their in vitro bioadhesive properties. The lectin was fixed by a covalent procedure to gliadin nanoparticles by a two-stage carbodiimide method. Typically, the amount of bound lectin was calculated to be approximately 15 microg lectin/mg nanoparticle, which represented a coupling efficiency of approximately 16% of the initial lectin concentration. In addition, the activity of these conjugates was tested with bovine submaxillary gland mucin (BSM) and the level of binding to this mucin was always much greater with UE-GNP than with controls (gliadin nanoparticles). However, the presence of 50 micromol fucose, which is the reported specific sugar for U. europaeus lectin, specifically inhibited the activity of these conjugates and, therefore, the UE-GNP binding to BSM was attenuated by 70%. These results clearly showed that the activity and specificity of U. europaeus lectin was preserved after covalent coupling to these biodegradable carriers.

  20. An Ixodes ricinus Tick Salivary Lectin Pathway Inhibitor Protects Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato from Human Complement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemakers, Alex; Coumou, Jeroen; Schuijt, Tim J.; Oei, Anneke; Nijhof, Ard M.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom; Bins, Adriaan D.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified tick salivary lectin pathway inhibitor (TSLPI) in Ixodes scapularis, a vector for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) in North America. TSLPI is a salivary protein facilitating B. burgdorferi s.s. transmission and acquisition by inhibiting the host lectin complement

  1. Rapid bead-based immunoassay for measurement of mannose-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, J T; Garred, P

    2009-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum protein, which functions as an opsonin and initiator of the lectin pathway of complement. The serum concentration of MBL shows great interindividual variation because of common polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. Although several quantitative MBL immunoassays...

  2. Serum levels, ontogeny and heritability of chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S.B.; Hedemand, J.E.; Nielsen, O.L.

    1998-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum lectin found in mammals and recently also in birds. It is thought to play an important role in the innate immune defence through binding to surface carbohydrates on micro-organisms followed by complement activation via the MBL pathway. This results...

  3. An assay for the mannan-binding lectin pathway of complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen Vang; Thiel, S; Jensen, L

    2001-01-01

    The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation has been established as the third pathway of complement activation. MBL is a carbohydrate-binding serum protein, which circulates in complex with serine proteases known as mannan-binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASPs...

  4. The Lectin Frontier Database (LfDB), and data generation based on frontal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Tateno, Hiroaki; Shikanai, Toshihide; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2015-01-08

    Lectins are a large group of carbohydrate-binding proteins, having been shown to comprise at least 48 protein scaffolds or protein family entries. They occur ubiquitously in living organisms-from humans to microorganisms, including viruses-and while their functions are yet to be fully elucidated, their main underlying actions are thought to mediate cell-cell and cell-glycoconjugate interactions, which play important roles in an extensive range of biological processes. The basic feature of each lectin's function resides in its specific sugar-binding properties. In this regard, it is beneficial for researchers to have access to fundamental information about the detailed oligosaccharide specificities of diverse lectins. In this review, the authors describe a publicly available lectin database named "Lectin frontier DataBase (LfDB)", which undertakes the continuous publication and updating of comprehensive data for lectin-standard oligosaccharide interactions in terms of dissociation constants (Kd's). For Kd determination, an advanced system of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) is used, with which quantitative datasets of interactions between immobilized lectins and >100 fluorescently labeled standard glycans have been generated. The FAC system is unique in its clear principle, simple procedure and high sensitivity, with an increasing number (>67) of associated publications that attest to its reliability. Thus, LfDB, is expected to play an essential role in lectin research, not only in basic but also in applied fields of glycoscience.

  5. Characterization of the carbohydrate binding specificity and kinetic parameters of lectins by using surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Haseley, S.R.; Talaga, P.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    An accurate, rapid, and sensitive method for characterizing the carbohydrate binding properties of lectins using a BIAcore apparatus and the detection method of surface plasmon resonance is described. As a model study, the sialic acid binding lectins from Sambucus nigra and Maackia amurensis, which

  6. Isolation and characterization of a new mannose-binding lectin gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we report the cloning and characterization of the first mannose-binding lectin gene from a gymnosperm plant species, Taxus media. ... Phylogenetic tree analyses showed that TMA belonged to the structurally and evolutionarily closely related monocot mannose-binding lectin superfamily. This study ...

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray structure analysis of the banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D D; Saikrishnan, K; Kumar, Prashant; Dauter, Z; Sekar, K; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2004-11-01

    The banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca, MW 29.4 kDa, has been isolated, purified and crystallized. The trigonal crystals contain one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement to a resolution of 3 A. The structure of the subunit is similar to that of jacalin-like lectins.

  8. Inhibition of protein synthesis in vitro by a lectin from Momordica charantia and by other haemagglutinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, L; Lorenzoni, E; Stirpe, F

    1979-08-15

    Protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate is inhibited by the haemagglutinating lectins from Momordica charantia and Crotalaria juncea seeds and from the roe of Rutilus rutilus, and by a commercial preparation of the mitogenic lectin from Phytolacca americana. The haemagglutinins from the seeds of Ricinus communis and of Vicia cracca acquired inhibitory activity after their reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol.

  9. Quaternary association in β-prism I fold plant lectins: Insights from X ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimeric banana lectin and calsepa, tetrameric artocarpin and octameric heltuba are mannose-specific -prism I fold lectins of nearly the same tertiary structure. MD simulations on individual subunits and the oligomers provide insights into the changes in the structure brought about in the protomers on oligomerization, ...

  10. Mitogenic activity of new lectins from seeds of wild Artocarpus species from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, E; Ngoc, L D; Aucouturier, P; Preud'Homme, J L; Barra, A

    1996-05-01

    Proliferative response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated by new lectins purified from seeds of differents Artocarpus species from Vietnam (A. asperulus, A. heterophyllus, A. masticata, A. melinoxylus, A. parva and A. petelotii) was studied and compared to those of the lectin jacalin purified from jackfruit (A. heterophyllus) seeds collected in the island La Réunion. All lectins stimulated human PBMC to proliferate, with a variable efficiency of the mitogenic activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells recovered after 7 day-cultures showed that these lectins mostly stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. These results suggest that these lectins from different Artocarpus species are similar in terms of their mitogenic activity although their structural features are not identical.

  11. LECTIN PROSPECTING IN COLOMBIAN LABIATAE. A SYSTEMATIC-ECOLOGICAL APPROACH - II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PÉREZ GERARDO

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the second study of lectin and mucilage detection in Labiatae nutlets fromColombia. It was carried out on 31 taxa belonging to 7 genera in which no previousstudies have been carried out in this field. A differential response was observedin the group of genera and species studied in terms of mucilage presence as wellas lectin activity which consistently increased following extract treatment withPectinex. Lectin activity was detected in 28 species, being important (greater than60% activity in at least 75% of them. Genera such as Hyptis, Scutellaria, Aegiphilaand Lepechinia, whilst not presenting mucilage, did present lectin activity, havinghigh activity in most cases. By contrast, Salvia (in all sections studied presentedmucilage and important lectin activity.

  12. Visualizing the dental biofilm matrix by means of fluorescence lectin-binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawakoli, Pune Nina; Neu, Thomas R; Busck, Mette Marie

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a poorly studied, yet important component of dental biofilms. Fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) is a powerful tool to characterize glycoconjugates in the biofilm matrix. This study aimed to systematically investigate the ability of 75 fluorescently labeled...... lectins to visualize and quantify extracellular glycoconjugates in dental biofilms. Lectin binding was screened on pooled supragingival biofilm samples collected from 76 subjects using confocal microscopy. FLBA was then performed with 10 selected lectins on biofilms grown in situ for 48 h in the absence...... in the dental biofilm matrix. The characterization and quantification of glycoconjugates in dental biofilms require a combination of several lectins. For 48-h-biofilms grown in absence of sucrose, AAL, Calsepa, HPA, LEA, and MNA-G are recommendable....

  13. Small unilamellar vesicles as reagents: a chemically defined, quantitative assay for lectins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rando, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    Samll unilamellar vesicles containing synthetic glycolipids can be prepared. These vesicles are aggregated by the appropriate lectin (Orr et al., 1979; Rando and Bangerter, 1979; Slama and Rando, 1980). It is shown here that extent of aggregation of these vesicles as measured by light scattering at 360 nm, is, under certain conditions, linear with amount of lectin added. This forms the basis of a rapid and simple quantitative assay for lectins using the modified vesicles as a defined chemical substrate. The assay is sensitive to lectin concentrations in the low ..mu..g range. The assay is applied here to studies on concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin and the ..cap alpha..-fucosyl binding lectin from Ulex europaeus (Type I).

  14. Complement-mediated neutralization of dengue virus requires mannose-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avirutnan, Panisadee; Hauhart, Richard E; Marovich, Mary A

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key soluble pathogen recognition protein of the innate immune system that binds specific mannose-containing glycans on the surfaces of microbial agents and initiates complement activation via the lectin pathway. Prior studies showed that MBL...... deficient in different complement components, we showed that inhibition of infection by insect cell- and mammalian cell-derived DENV was primarily dependent on the lectin pathway. Human MBL also bound to DENV and neutralized infection of all four DENV serotypes through complement activation...... hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Four serotypes of DENV exist, and severe illness is usually associated with secondary infection by a different serotype. Here, we show that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule that initiates the lectin pathway of complement activation...

  15. Evolutionary conservation of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in bony fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walter; Sørensen, Rasmus Reng; Koch, Claus

    2010-01-01

    characterized in the rainbow trout but so far no molecules of the lectin pathway have been identified. Based on the generally accepted idea of complement evolution, which predicts that the alternative pathway predates the two other pathways, and that the lectin pathway developed before the classical, we set out...... to characterize members of the lectin pathway in fish. We identified and characterized three homologues of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) with a bona fide collectin structure. By means of RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies we found that they were synthesized in the spleen, the anterior...... intestine and the liver. In the liver, we saw co-expression with mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease (MASP). The MBL homologues 2 and 3 (MBL-H2,3) were also found in the vascular system of the rainbow trout. By means of gel size exclusion chromatography of serum we found that MBL-H2...

  16. Developmental changes in the distribution of cecal lectin-binding sites of Balb-c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehrn, S; Breipohl, W; Lierse, W; Romaniuk, K; Young, W

    1992-01-01

    The existence of lectin-binding sites was investigated in the cecum of Balb-c mice at seven developmental stages ranging from 18 days post conception (p.c.) to 8 weeks after birth. Nine horseradish-peroxidase-conjugated lectins (concanavalin A, Triticum vulgaris, Dolichus biflorus, Helix pomatia, Arachis hypogaea, Glycine maximus, Lotus tetragonolobus, Ulex europaeus, Limulus polyphemus) were applied to 5- to 7-microns thin paraffin sections of Bouin-fixed tissue. After DAB staining the sections were evaluated by light microscopy. It was shown that each lectin exhibits a unique developmental pattern. The adult binding patterns were established at the age of 3-4 weeks with only minor changes occurring thereafter. Considerable differences in binding patterns occurred not only between lectins of different groups but also between lectins with the same nominal monosaccharide specificity.

  17. Lectin binding studies on murine peritoneal cells: physicochemical characterization of the binding of lectins from Datura stramonium, Evonymus europaea, and Griffonia simplicifolia to murine peritoneal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryniak, J; Huard, T K; Nordblom, G D; Goldstein, I J

    1986-01-01

    Purified 125I-labeled lectins from Datura stramonium, Evonymus europaea, and Griffonia simplicifolia (I-B4 isolectin) were used to analyze changes in the expression of carbohydrates on the surface of resident (PC) and thioglycollate-stimulated murine (C57B/6J) peritoneal exudate cells (PEC). The lectins from D. stramonium, E. europaea, and G. simplicifolia I-B4 bind specifically to PEC with relatively high affinity (Kd = 5.65 +/- 1.08 X 10(-7) M, 1.08 +/- 0.12 X 10(-8) M, and 1.33 +/- 0.15 X 10(-7) M, respectively). Assuming a single lectin molecule binds to each cell surface saccharide, the number of receptor sites per cell ranged for different cell samples from 22.3 to 50.0 X 10(6), from 3.8 to 4.8 X 10(6), and from 2.0 to 16.8 X 10(6) for D. stramonium, E. europaea, and G. simplicifolia I-B4 lectins, respectively. There were approximately 3- to 7-fold, 16- to 20-fold, and 2- to 20-fold increases in binding capacity for D. stramonium, E. europaea and G. simplicifolia I-B4, respectively, compared to the binding to resident, peritoneal cells. Scatchard plots of the binding of all three lectins to PEC were linear, suggesting that the receptor sites for these lectins are homogeneous and noninteracting. The binding capacity of these lectins to PEC was unchanged after trypsin digestion of cells. The expression of carbohydrates on the surface of PEC was also monitored by an agglutination assay. PEC were agglutinated by all three lectins whereas PC either were not agglutinated or were agglutinated only at high lectin concentrations. On the basis of our knowledge of the carbohydrate binding specificity of the D. stramonium and G. simplicifolia I-B4 lectins, we postulate that, parallel with thioglycolate stimulation, there is an increase in the number of N-acetyllactosamine residues and terminal alpha-D-galactosyl end groups. The blood group B, and H type 1 determinants--DGa1 alpha 1,3[LFuc alpha 1,2]DGa1 beta 1,3(or 4)DGlcNAc and LFuc alpha 1,2DGa1 beta 1,3DG1c

  18. Crystalline and structural properties of acid-modified lotus rhizome C-type starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jinwen; Cai, Canhui; Man, Jianmin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Fengmin; Wei, Cunxu

    2014-02-15

    The crystalline and structural properties of acid-modified C-type starch from lotus rhizomes were investigated using a combination of techniques. The degradation of granule during hydrolysis began from the end distant from the hilum and then propagated into the center of granule, accompanied by loss of birefringence. The crystallinity changed from C-type to A-type via CA-type during hydrolysis. At the early stage of hydrolysis, the amylose content substantially reduced, the peak and conclusion gelatinization temperatures increased, and the enthalpy decreased. During hydrolysis, the double helix content gradually increased and the amorphous component decreased, the lamellar peak intensity firstly increased and then decreased accompanied by hydrolysis of amorphous and crystalline regions. This study elucidated that B-type allomorph was mainly arranged in the distal region of eccentric hilum, A-type allomorph was mainly located in the periphery of hilum end, and the center of granule was a mixed distribution of A- and B-type allomorphs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Re-examining the proposed lectin properties of IL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Giuseppe A; Rini, James M

    2008-03-01

    Early work examining the interactions of IL-2 and the urinary glycoprotein uromodulin led to the suggestion that IL-2 was a lectin with specificity for high-mannose and mannan ligands. Subsequent studies have attributed various roles to these properties, some critical to the cell proliferative activity of IL-2. In an attempt to verify the reported interaction between IL-2 and mannose containing carbohydrate ligands we studied two biologically active forms of IL-2 using various techniques including affinity chromatography, equilibrium dialysis, and NMR methods. Despite previous reports we have not been able to demonstrate that IL-2 possesses the ability to bind carbohydrate.

  20. Immunologically related lectins from stems and roots of developing seedlings of Cucurbita ficifolia: purification and some properties of root and stem lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Lorenc-Kubis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemagglutinating activity has been found in acetate extracts from roots and stems of squash seedlings (Cucurbita ficifolia. The hemaglutinating activity changes during seeds germination and seedling development. Dot blot and Western blot techniques have shown that proteins from these vegetative tissues cross-reacted with antibodies raised against endogenous cotyledons lectin CLBa and Con A.Lectins were isolated from stems and roots of 6-day old seedlings by precipitation with ethanol, affinity chromatography on Con A-Sepharose, gel filtration on Bio-gel P100 and separated by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel. Three purified lectins (RLA1, RLA2, RLA3 were obtained from roots and four from stems (SLA1, SLA2, SLA3, SLA4. The purified lectins from roots and stems agglutinated all human red blood cells, but sheep erythrocytes were most sensitive to agglutination. The hemagglutination of the root lectins RLA2 and RLA3 was inhibited by a very low concentration of arabinose, while RLA1, of xylose and Ga1NAc. Arabinose and Xylose were also found to be the most effective inhibitors of all stem lectins.

  1. Extraction and Purification of a Lectin from Red Kidney Bean and Preliminary Immune Function Studies of the Lectin and Four Chinese Herbal Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufang Hou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4–6, back extraction at pH 9–11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4–6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity.

  2. A novel lectin domain-containing protein (LvCTLD) associated with response of the whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei to yellow head virus (YHV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkunlo, Kingkamon; Prachumwat, Anuphap; Tangprasittipap, Amornrat; Senapin, Saengchan; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Flegel, Timothy W; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2012-07-01

    When using mRNA from gills of normal whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei as the tester and mRNA from yellow head virus (YHV)-infected shrimp as the driver, subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH) revealed that a novel EST clone of 198 bp with a putative C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) was downregulated in YHV-infected shrimp. The clone nucleotide sequence had 99% identity with one contig MGID1052359 (1,380 bp) reported in an EST database of P. vannamei, and the presence of this target in normal shrimp was confirmed by RT-PCR using primers designed from the MGID1052359 sequence. Analysis of the primary structure of the deduced amino acid (a.a.) sequence of the contig revealed a short portion (40 a.a. residues) at its N-terminus with high similarity to a low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) class A domain and another 152 a.a. residues at its C-terminus with high similarity to a C-type lectin domain. Thus, the clone was named LvCTLD and three recombinant proteins (LvCTLD, the LDLR domain and the CTLD domain) were synthesized in a bacterial system based on its sequence. An in vitro encapsulation assay revealed that Sepharose 4B beads coated with rLvCTLD were encapsulated by shrimp hemocytes and that melanization followed by 24 h post-encapsulation. The encapsulation activity of rLvCTLD was inhibited by 100 mM galactose, but not mannose or EDTA. In vivo injection of rLvCTLD or rLvCTLD plus YHV resulted in a significant elevation of PO activity in the hemolymph of the challenged shrimp when compared to shrimp injected with buffer, suggesting that rLvCTLD could activate the proPO system. An ELISA test revealed that rLvCTLD could bind to YHV particles in the presence of shrimp hemolymph. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the LvCTLD sequence was more closely related to an antiviral gene found in Penaeus monodon (PmAV) than to other reported shrimp lectins. Taken together, we conclude that a novel shrimp LvCTLD is a host recognition molecule involved in

  3. The lectin from leaves of Japanese cycad, Cycas revoluta Thunb. (gymnosperm) is a member of the jacalin-related family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Fumio; Iwaya, Toshinobu; Haraguchi, Tomokazu; Goldstein, Irwin J

    2002-09-01

    A novel lectin was isolated from leaves of the Japanese cycad, Cycas revoluta Thunb. (gymnosperm), and its characteristics including amino acid composition, molecular mass, carbohydrate binding specificity and partial amino acid sequences were examined. The inhibition analysis of hemagglutinating activity with various sugars showed that the lectin has a carbohydrate-binding specificity similar to those of mannose recognizing, jacalin-related lectins. Partial amino acid sequences of the lysylendopeptic peptides shows that the lectin might have a repeating structure and belong to the jacalin-related lectin family.

  4. Importance of c-Type cytochromes for U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leang Ching

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to study the mechanism of U(VI reduction, the effect of deleting c-type cytochrome genes on the capacity of Geobacter sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI with acetate serving as the electron donor was investigated. Results The ability of several c-type cytochrome deficient mutants to reduce U(VI was lower than that of the wild type strain. Elimination of two confirmed outer membrane cytochromes and two putative outer membrane cytochromes significantly decreased (ca. 50–60% the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI. Involvement in U(VI reduction did not appear to be a general property of outer membrane cytochromes, as elimination of two other confirmed outer membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcC, had very little impact on U(VI reduction. Among the periplasmic cytochromes, only MacA, proposed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane to the periplasm, appeared to play a significant role in U(VI reduction. A subpopulation of both wild type and U(VI reduction-impaired cells, 24–30%, accumulated amorphous uranium in the periplasm. Comparison of uranium-accumulating cells demonstrated a similar amount of periplasmic uranium accumulation in U(VI reduction-impaired and wild type G. sulfurreducens. Assessment of the ability of the various suspensions to reduce Fe(III revealed no correlation between the impact of cytochrome deletion on U(VI reduction and reduction of Fe(III hydroxide and chelated Fe(III. Conclusion This study indicates that c-type cytochromes are involved in U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The data provide new evidence for extracellular uranium reduction by G. sulfurreducens but do not rule out the possibility of periplasmic uranium reduction. Occurrence of U(VI reduction at the cell surface is supported by the significant impact of elimination of outer membrane cytochromes on U(VI reduction and the lack of correlation between periplasmic uranium accumulation and the capacity for uranium

  5. Carbohydrate specificity of lectin, purified from the fruiting bodies of Mycena pura /Fr./ Kumm. and its use in histochemical investigation

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    Ambarova N. O.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of this investigation was to research carbohydrate specificity of a new lectin from fruiting body of Mycena pura and possibilities of its application in histochemical studies. Methods. The lectin has been purified by affinity chromatography on «îvomucine». The lectin carbohydrate specificity has been determined by a reaction of inhibiting haemagglutination by haptens. Histological materials were fixed in 4 % neutral formalin solution. Alkaline phosphatase was revealed in the cryostat unfixed microscopical sections. Results. The lectin yield from fresh fruit bodies of raw material was 9 mg/kg. Mol. mass of the lectin is 40 kDa. The lectin poorly interacted with D-glucose and D-mannose in contrast to lectins from Pisum sativum and Leucojum vernum. The peculiarity of this lectin is its strong interaction with alkaline phosphatase, the highest among twenty tested lectins. However, the receptors for Mycena lectin binding in mammalian tissues are not limited by this enzyme being presented also by glycoconjugates of another structure, as it was shown for fetus calf small intestine and kidney of rat. Conclusions. An important role in the lectin interaction with glycoproteins probably belongs to the disaccharide links of GlcNAcb(1-2Mana(1-6 or GlcNAcb(1- 2Mana(1-2, which not necessarily are terminal

  6. Cardiac C-type natriuretic peptide gene expression and plasma concentrations in neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst Hansen, Lasse; Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a member of the natriuretic peptide family. Cardiac ANP and BNP expressions are firmly established, whereas CNP expression in the mammalian heart remains controversial. In the present report, we used a porcine model of the neonatal period with high...... expressions of cardiac ANP and BNP in order to elucidate the cardiac CNP expression profile. METHODS: Plasma and cardiac tissue were obtained from newborn piglets during the first 72 h of life. The chamber-specific CNP mRNA contents were quantified by real-time PCR analysis. The proCNP concentrations...... in the newborn piglets (n=44) were exceedingly low compared to proANP concentrations (5.3 pmol/L (3.2-8.6) vs. 3438 pmol/L (2790-5418), pANP (130 pmol/g (101-159)) and atrial proANP...

  7. Modeling the differentiation of A- and C-type baroreceptor firing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdy, Jacob; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Olufsen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    of their axons and their distinct firing patterns elicited in response to specific pressure stimuli. This study has developed a comprehensive model of the afferent baroreceptor discharge built on physiological knowledge of arterial wall mechanics, firing rate responses to controlled pressure stimuli, and ion...... channel dynamics within the baroreceptor neurons. With this model, we were able to predict firing rates observed in previously published experiments in both A- and C-type neurons. These results were obtained by adjusting model parameters determining the maximal ion-channel conductances. The observed...... basal firing, whereas a tenfold higher mechanosensitive conductance is responsible for the greater firing rate observed in A-type neurons. A better understanding of the difference between the two neuron types can potentially be used to gain more insight into the underlying pathophysiology facilitating...

  8. Isolation and characterization of two Korean mistletoe lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Bong; Song, Seong Kyu; Yoon, Taek Joon; Yoo, Yung Choon; Lee, Kwan Hee; Her, Erk; Kim, Jong Bae

    2007-11-30

    Two isolectins (KML-IIU and the KML-IIL) were individually isolated from the previously reported Korean mistletoe lectin, KML-C, by using an immunoaffinity column. Molecular weights of the KML-IIU and the KML-IIL were 64 kDa and 60 kDa respectively. Both of the lectins were composed of heterogeneous A and B subunits linked with a disulfide bond, and showed the same carbohydrate-binding specificities for Gal and GalNAc. However, they are different not only in biophysical properties (glycosylation and amino acid compositions) but also bioactivities (cell killing and cytokine induction). The KML-IIL showed 17-145 times stronger in cytotoxicities to various human and mouse cancer cell lines than the KML-IIU. The KML-IIL also induced TNF-alpha secretion from mouse peritoneal macrophages 4.5 times better than the KML-IIU. The results demonstrated isolectins in Korean mistletoe were varied in bioactivities and the KML-IIL may be developed as an anti-cancer agent.

  9. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a New C-type Lysozyme Gene from Yak Mammary Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Feng Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Milk lysozyme is the ubiquitous enzyme in milk of mammals. In this study, the cDNA sequence of a new chicken-type (c-type milk lysozyme gene (YML, was cloned from yak mammary gland tissue. A 444 bp open reading frames, which encodes 148 amino acids (16.54 kDa with a signal peptide of 18 amino acids, was sequenced. Further analysis indicated that the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences identities between yak and cow milk lysozyme were 89.04% and 80.41%, respectively. Recombinant yak milk lysozyme (rYML was produced by Escherichia coli BL21 and Pichia pastoris X33. The highest lysozyme activity was detected for heterologous protein rYML5 (M = 1,864.24 U/mg, SD = 25.75 which was expressed in P. pastoris with expression vector pPICZαA and it clearly inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Result of the YML gene expression using quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the YML gene was up-regulated to maximum at 30 day postpartum, that is, comparatively high YML can be found in initial milk production. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the amino acid sequence was similar to cow kidney lysozyme, which implied that the YML may have diverged from a different ancestor gene such as cow mammary glands. In our study, we suggest that YML be a new c-type lysozyme expressed in yak mammary glands that plays a role as host immunity.

  10. Lectin typing of Campylobacter jejuni using a novel quartz crystal microbalance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovleva, Maria E., E-mail: maria.yakovleva@gmail.com [Department of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology, Lund University, 223 62 Lund (Sweden); Moran, Anthony P. [Department of Microbiology, School of Natural Sciences, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Safina, Gulnara R. [Department of Analytical and Marine Chemistry, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Wadstroem, Torkel [Department of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology, Lund University, 223 62 Lund (Sweden); Danielsson, Bengt [Acromed Invest AB, Magistratsvaegen 10, 226 43 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-05-23

    Seven Campylobacter jejuni strains were characterised by a lectin typing assay. The typing system was based on a quartz crystal microbalance technique (QCM) with four commercially available lectins (wheat germ agglutinin, Maackia amurensis lectin, Lens culinaris agglutinin, and Concanavalin A), which were chosen for their differing carbohydrate specificities. Initially, the gold surfaces of the quartz crystals were modified with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid followed by lectin immobilisation using a conventional amine-coupling technique. Bacterial cells were applied for lectin typing without preliminary treatment, and resonant frequency and dissipation responses were recorded. The adhesion of microorganisms on lectin surfaces was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Scanning was performed in the tapping mode and the presence of bacteria on lectin-coated surfaces was successfully demonstrated. A significant difference in the dissipation response was observed for different C. jejuni strains which made it possible to use this parameter for discriminating between bacterial strains. In summary, the QCM technique proved a powerful tool for the recognition and discrimination of C. jejuni strains. The approach may also prove applicable to strain discrimination of other bacterial species, particularly pathogens.

  11. Structure of Dioclea virgata lectin: relations between carbohydrate binding site and nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delatorre, P.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Santi-Gadelha, T. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Nobrega, R.B.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nascimento, K.S.; Naganao, C.S.; Sampaio, A.H.; Cavada, B.S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Pires, A.F.; Assreuy, A.M.S. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara (UECE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. By binding to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface, lectins participate in a range of cellular processes without changing the properties of the carbohydrates involved. The lectin of Dioclea virgata (DvirL), both native and complexed with X-man, was submitted to X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystal structure was compared to that of other Diocleinae lectins in order to better understand differences in biological proper- ties, especially with regard to the ability of lectins to induce nitric oxide (NO) production. The DvirL diffraction analysis revealed that both the native crystal and the X-Man-complexed form are orthorhombic and belong to space group I222. The cell parameters were: a=65.4 , b=86.6 and c=90.2 (native structure), and a=61.89 , b=87.67 and c=88.78 (X-Man-complexed structure). An association was observed between the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the ability to induce NO production and the relative positions of Tyr12, Arg228 and Leu99. Thus, differences in biological activity induced by Diocleinae lectins are related to the configuration of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate binding site and to the structural conformation of subsequent regions capable of influencing site-ligand interactions. In conclusion, the ability of Diocleinae lectins to induce NO production depends on CRD configuration. (author)

  12. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I; Imholz, Nicole C E; Verhoeven, Tine L A; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J M; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections.

  13. Effective inhibition of melanosome transfer to keratinocytes by lectins and niacinamide is reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatens, Amanda; Hakozaki, Tomohiro; Koshoffer, Amy; Epstein, Howard; Schwemberger, Sandy; Babcock, George; Bissett, Donald; Takiwaki, Hirotsugu; Arase, Seiji; Wickett, R Randall; Boissy, Raymond E

    2005-07-01

    Skin pigmentation results in part from the transfer of melanized melanosomes synthesized by melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes. Plasma membrane lectins and their glycoconjugates expressed by these epidermal cells are critical molecules involved in this transfer process. In addition, the derivative of vitamin B(3), niacinamide, can inhibit melanosome transfer and induce skin lightening. We investigated the effects of these molecules on the viability of melanocytes and keratinocytes and on the reversibility of melanosome-transfer inhibition induced by these agents using an in vitro melanocyte-keratinocyte coculture model system. While lectins and neoglycoproteins could induce apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner to melanocytes or keratinocytes in monoculture, similar dosages of the lectins, as opposed to neoglycoproteins, did not induce apoptosis to either cell type when treated in coculture. The dosages of lectins and niacinamide not affecting cell viability produced an inhibitory effect on melanosome transfer, when used either alone or together in cocultures of melanocytes-keratinocytes. Cocultures treated with lectins or niacinamide resumed normal melanosome transfer in 3 days after removal of the inhibitor, while cocultures treated with a combination of lectins and niacinamide demonstrated a lag in this recovery. Subsequently, we assessed the effect of niacinamide on facial hyperpigmented spots using a vehicle-controlled, split-faced design human clinical trial. Topical application of niacinamide resulted in a dose-dependent and reversible reduction in hyperpigmented lesions. These results suggest that lectins and niacinamide at concentrations that do not affect cell viability are reversible inhibitors of melanosome transfer.

  14. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  15. A novel L-fucose-binding lectin from Fenneropenaeus indicus induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Biji; Ghosh, Krishna; Yadav, Nitin; Kanade, Santosh R

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are omnipresent in almost all life forms, being the proteins which specifically bind to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface; they have been explored for their anti-tumour activities. In this study, we purified a fucose specific-lectin (IFL) from Fenneropenaeus indicus haemolymph using fucose-affinity column and characterized for its haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, dependency on cations and cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The lectin showed non-specificity against human erythrocytes. It was a Ca2+-dependent lectin which remained stable over wide pH and temperature ranges. The lectin showed effective dose dependent cytotoxicity against different human cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as evidenced by DNA ladder assay and PARP cleavage in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, an increased p21 level corresponding to cyclin D downregulation in response to IFL treatment was observed which might work as probable factors to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. Therefore, we report a novel lectin from the prawn haemolymph with high specificity for L-fucose and antiproliferative towards human cancer cells. However, further establishment of the modus operandi of this lectin is required to enable its biotechnological applications. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectin isolated from the seeds of Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng-Hsu; Kung, Yen-Lun; Lee, Min-Hsiung; Su, Nan-Wei

    2011-04-27

    N-Acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectins are of great interest because they have been reported to detect tumor-associated antigens of malignant cells. We isolated a novel lectin from Carica papaya seeds, named C. papaya lectin (CPL). Purification of the lectin involved ammonium sulfate fractionation and DEAE anion exchange and repeated gel filtration chromatography. Inhibition of CPL causing hemagglutination on human erythrocytes showed that the lectin shows specificity to GalNAc and lactose. Surface plasmon resonance further revealed that the lectin possesses high specificity toward GalNAc with a dissociation constant of 5.5 × 10(-9) M. The lectin is composed of 38- and 40-kDa subunits with a molecular mass of ∼804 kDa estimated by size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography. Incubation of CPL with Jurkat T cells showed significant induction of IL-2 cytokine, which suggests that CPL has potent immunomodulatory effects on immune cells.

  17. Comparative Study of Lectin Domains in Model Species: New Insights into Evolutionary Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Van Holle

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are present throughout the plant kingdom and are reported to be involved in diverse biological processes. In this study, we provide a comparative analysis of the lectin families from model species in a phylogenetic framework. The analysis focuses on the different plant lectin domains identified in five representative core angiosperm genomes (Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Cucumis sativus, Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and Oryza sativa ssp. indica. The genomes were screened for genes encoding lectin domains using a combination of Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST, hidden Markov models, and InterProScan analysis. Additionally, phylogenetic relationships were investigated by constructing maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees. The results demonstrate that the majority of the lectin families are present in each of the species under study. Domain organization analysis showed that most identified proteins are multi-domain proteins, owing to the modular rearrangement of protein domains during evolution. Most of these multi-domain proteins are widespread, while others display a lineage-specific distribution. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analyses reveal that some lectin families evolved to be similar to the phylogeny of the plant species, while others share a closer evolutionary history based on the corresponding protein domain architecture. Our results yield insights into the evolutionary relationships and functional divergence of plant lectins.

  18. The Lectin Frontier Database (LfDB, and Data Generation Based on Frontal Affinity Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hirabayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are a large group of carbohydrate-binding proteins, having been shown to comprise at least 48 protein scaffolds or protein family entries. They occur ubiquitously in living organisms—from humans to microorganisms, including viruses—and while their functions are yet to be fully elucidated, their main underlying actions are thought to mediate cell-cell and cell-glycoconjugate interactions, which play important roles in an extensive range of biological processes. The basic feature of each lectin’s function resides in its specific sugar-binding properties. In this regard, it is beneficial for researchers to have access to fundamental information about the detailed oligosaccharide specificities of diverse lectins. In this review, the authors describe a publicly available lectin database named “Lectin frontier DataBase (LfDB”, which undertakes the continuous publication and updating of comprehensive data for lectin-standard oligosaccharide interactions in terms of dissociation constants (Kd’s. For Kd determination, an advanced system of frontal affinity chromatography (FAC is used, with which quantitative datasets of interactions between immobilized lectins and >100 fluorescently labeled standard glycans have been generated. The FAC system is unique in its clear principle, simple procedure and high sensitivity, with an increasing number (>67 of associated publications that attest to its reliability. Thus, LfDB, is expected to play an essential role in lectin research, not only in basic but also in applied fields of glycoscience.

  19. Tissue and subcellular distribution of the lectin from Datura stramonium (thorn apple).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, D C; Yeoman, M M; Gould, A R

    1979-01-01

    Plants of Datura stramonium (thorn-apple) were dissected into their component tissues and examined for the presence of the Datura lectin. This lectin was easily detected in seeds and in various parts of the flowers of adult plants. Traces were also found in green (emerged) cotyledons and roots of seedlings. The specific lectin activity in seeds contained within the fruits increased as the seeds matured. Mature seeds were homogenized in sucrose and separated by differential centrifugation into four fractions, three of which were clearly of distinct composition. Most of the lectin activity sedimented with the low-speed (cell-wall/protein-body) pellet, but a similar specific activity was recovered from the other fractions. However, if EDTA was included in the homogenization medium, three or four times more lectin activity was recovered in the soluble fraction. Immunofluorescent staining of formaldehyde-fixed sections showed that the lectin was localized in the cytoplasm, with little associated with cell walls. The possible relevance of these results to the function of the lectin in plant cells is discussed. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:393254

  20. Lectin-based food poisoning: a new mechanism of protein toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Miyake

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ingestion of the lectins present in certain improperly cooked vegetables can result in acute GI tract distress, but the mechanism of toxicity is unknown. In vivo, gut epithelial cells are constantly exposed to mechanical and other stresses and consequently individual cells frequently experience plasma membrane disruptions. Repair of these cell surface disruptions allows the wounded cell to survive: failure results in necrotic cell death. Plasma membrane repair is mediated, in part, by an exocytotic event that adds a patch of internal membrane to the defect site. Lectins are known to inhibit exocytosis. We therefore tested the novel hypothesis that lectin toxicity is due to an inhibitory effect on plasma membrane repair. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Repair of plasma membrane disruptions and exocytosis of mucus was assessed after treatment of cultured cell models and excised segments of the GI tract with lectins. Plasma membrane disruptions were produced by focal irradiation of individual cells, using a microscope-based laser, or by mechanical abrasion of multiple cells, using a syringe needle. Repair was then assessed by monitoring the cytosolic penetration of dyes incapable of crossing the intact plasma membrane. We found that cell surface-bound lectins potently inhibited plasma membrane repair, and the exocytosis of mucus that normally accompanies the repair response. CONCLUSIONS: Lectins potently inhibit plasma membrane repair, and hence are toxic to wounded cells. This represents a novel form of protein-based toxicity, one that, we propose, is the basis of plant lectin food poisoning.

  1. Lectin Histochemical Study of Cell Surface Glycoconjugate in Gastric Carcinoma Using Helix Pomatia Agglutinin

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    Mohammad Reza Arab

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nAltered glycosylation of proteins in cancer cells is one of the main processes responsible for anaplasia, invasion and metastatic potential of neoplastic cells. Lectins are nonimmunogenetic compounds which specifically detect certain terminal sugars of glycoconjugates. The aim of the present study was to identify the N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNac containing glycoconjugates in cancer cells in all grades of gastric carcinoma. Paraffin blocks belong to 30 patients of gastric carcinoma (10 cases from each grade was collected from pathology file of Ali-Ebn-Abitaleb Hospital in Zahedan during 2005-2007. Prepared sections (5-7μm in thickness were stained by Alcian Blue, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA conjugated lectin. Lectin diluted up to 10μg/ml in PBS (0.1M, pH=6.8. Lectin reactivity was visualized by 0.03% diaminobenzidine (DAB solution. Sections were graded according to staining intensity to lectin (0-4+. Although there was some difference for lectin staining intensity between cancer cells in different grades of gastric carcinoma, statistical analysis showed that there was only a significant difference for cancer cells reactivity between histopathological grades of II and III. The pattern of reactivity to HPA lectin were also different from all histopathological grades. It seems that in cancer cells, the amount and distribution of GalNac containing glycoconjugate differ from neoplastic cells of different histopathological grades in gastric carcinoma.

  2. Studies of hemolytical and antimicrobical action of Amanita virosa Secr. and Mycena pura /Fr./ Kumm. poisonous mushrooms lectins

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    Danileuchenko V. V.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study hemolytical and antimicrobical action of two new lectins, obtained from fruit bodies of poisonous basidial mushrooms of A. virosa Secr. and M. pura /Fr./ Kumm. Methods. Research on hemolytical action of lectins was conducted on the erythrocytes of human and animals. The experiments on osmotic protection of erythrocytes were performed in the presence of polyethylenglycols of different molecular mass (in a range from 400 to 4000 Da. Antimicrobical activity of lectins was studied by determination of area delay of growth of culture of different types of microorganisms on the Petri dish in an agaric media. Results. Both lectins hemolyse the erythrocytes of rabbit, human, rat and dog and do not hemolyse the erythrocytes of cow and ship in concentration of 1 mg/ml. The rabbit erythrocytes are most sensitive to hemolytical action of lectins, while hemolytic ability of A. virosa lectin is higher. Hemolysis was not observed in the presence of PEG of molecular mass over 1,350 Da. Action of lectins on 10 types of microorganisms was investigated. Lectins inhibited mainly growth of grammpositive microorganisms and protey. For most tested microorganisms antimicrobial action of Mycena lectin is stronger comparing with A. virosa lectin. Conclusions. Two new hemolytical lectins are found in the fruit bodies of mushrooms-basidiomycetes. The lectin formed ion-permeable pores in membrane of erythrocytes with the hydrodynamic diameter smaller than 2.3 nm and larger than 1.6 nm. These lectins displays also antimicrobial activity and by the sum of these features are similar to the cytolytic lectins of lower invertebrates.

  3. Evolutionary history and stress regulation of the lectin superfamily in higher plants

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    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lectins are a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins. They play roles in various biological processes. However, little is known about their evolutionary history and their functions in plant stress regulation. The availability of full genome sequences from various plant species makes it possible to perform a whole-genome exploration for further understanding their biological functions. Results Higher plant genomes encode large numbers of lectin proteins. Based on their domain structures and phylogenetic analyses, a new classification system has been proposed. In this system, 12 different families have been classified and four of them consist of recently identified plant lectin members. Further analyses show that some of lectin families exhibit species-specific expansion and rapid birth-and-death evolution. Tandem and segmental duplications have been regarded as the major mechanisms to drive lectin expansion although retrogenes also significantly contributed to the birth of new lectin genes in soybean and rice. Evidence shows that lectin genes have been involved in biotic/abiotic stress regulations and tandem/segmental duplications may be regarded as drivers for plants to adapt various environmental stresses through duplication followed by expression divergence. Each member of this gene superfamily may play specialized roles in a specific stress condition and function as a regulator of various environmental factors such as cold, drought and high salinity as well as biotic stresses. Conclusions Our studies provide a new outline of the plant lectin gene superfamily and advance the understanding of plant lectin genes in lineage-specific expansion and their functions in biotic/abiotic stress-related developmental processes.

  4. [Preparation of grapheme oxide based immobilized lectin and its application to efficient glycoprotein/glycopeptide enrichment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhaomei; Fan, Chao; Huang, Junjie; Bai, Haihong; Qin, Weijie; Cai, Yun; Qian, Xiaohong

    2015-02-01

    Protein glycosylation in eukaryotic cells regulates a variety of physiological processes including cell recognition, cell adhesion, migration, and immune response. It is also closely related with the occurrence and development of many critical diseases. Therefore, large scale identification of protein glycosylation not only provides important information for the study of basic biological mechanisms, but also is crucial for the discovery of new diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Due to the low abundance of glycoprotein/glycopeptide in real biological samples, enrichment before mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is an essential step for achieving deep glycosylation site coverage. Lectin enrichment, as an effective method for glycoproteins/glycopeptides enrichment, has been utilized widely in glycoproteomics research. To solve the problems of low lectin loading and limited enrichment efficiency of existing lectin functional materials, we prepared two kinds of new graphene oxide ( GO) immobilized lectin. Besides good dispersion in aqueous solution as well as good chemical stability, GO has extremely large specific surface area and also carries high density of functional groups on its surface, which is especially benelicial for achieving high lectin loading amount. As a result, lectin loading as high as 1. 90 mg/mg was achieved for GO-lectin (GO-ConA 2. 073 mg/mg, RSD = 1. 0%; GO-WGA 1. 908 mg/mg, RSD = 0.14%). One milligram GO-lectin can adsorb more than 200 µg glycoprotein each experiment in two weeks. The GO-lectin was successfully applied in glycoproteins/glycopeptides enrichment with high efficiency and selectivity, indicating its good application potential in glycoproteomics research.

  5. Physicochemical properties and oxidative inactivation of soluble lectin from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sabika; Banu, Naheed

    2008-03-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins present in a wide variety of plants and animals, which serve various important physiological functions. A soluble beta-galactoside binding lectin has been isolated and purified to homogeneity from buffalo brain using ammonium sulphate precipitation (40-70%) and gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G50-80 column. The molecular weight of buffalo brain lectin (BBL) as determined by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions was 14.2 kDa, however, with gel filtration it was 28.5 kDa, revealing the dimeric form of protein. The neutral sugar content of the soluble lectin was estimated to be 3.3%. The BBL showed highest affinity for lactose and other sugar moieties in glycosidic form, suggesting it to be a beta-galactoside binding lectin. The association constant for lactose binding as evidenced by Scatchard analysis was 6.6 x 10(3) M(-1) showing two carbohydrate binding sites per lectin molecule. A total inhibition of lectin activity was observed by denaturants like guanidine HCl, thiourea and urea at 6 M concentration. The treatment of BBL with oxidizing agent destroyed its agglutination activity, abolished its fluorescence, and shifted its UV absorption maxima from 282 to 250 nm. The effect of H2O2 was greatly prevented by lactose indicating that BBL is more stable in the presence of its specific ligand. The purified lectin was investigated for its brain cell aggregation properties by testing its ability to agglutinate cells isolated from buffalo and goat brains. Rate of aggregation of buffalo brain cells by purified protein was more than the goat brain cells. The data from above study suggests that the isolated lectin may belong to the galectin-1 family but is glycosylated unlike those purified till date.

  6. Differential activity of a lectin from Solieria filiformis against human pathogenic bacteria

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    M.L. Holanda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A lectin isolated from the red alga Solieria filiformis was evaluated for its effect on the growth of 8 gram-negative and 3 gram-positive bacteria cultivated in liquid medium (three independent experiments/bacterium. The lectin (500 µg/mL stimulated the growth of the gram-positive species Bacillus cereus and inhibited the growth of the gram-negative species Serratia marcescens, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus sp, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 1000 µg/mL but the lectin (10-1000 µg/mL had no effect on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and B. subtilis, or on the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The purified lectin significantly reduced the cell density of gram-negative bacteria, although no changes in growth phases (log, exponential and of decline were observed. It is possible that the interaction of S. filiformis lectin with the cell surface receptors of gram-negative bacteria promotes alterations in the flow of nutrients, which would explain the bacteriostatic effect. Growth stimulation of the gram-positive bacterium B. cereus was more marked in the presence of the lectin at a concentration of 1000 µg/mL. The stimulation of the growth of B. cereus was not observed when the lectin was previously incubated with mannan (125 µg/mL, its hapten. Thus, we suggest the involvement of the binding site of the lectin in this effect. The present study reports the first data on the inhibition and stimulation of pathogenic bacterial cells by marine alga lectins.

  7. Calcium modulates protease resistance and carbohydrate binding of a plant defense legume lectin, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Hammen, Philip K; Salzman, Ron A; Koiwa, Hisashi; Bressan, Ray A; Murdock, Larry L; Hasegawa, Paul M

    2002-06-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis previously identified the residues responsible for the biological activity of the plant defense legume lectin, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII) [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, (1998) 15123-15128]. However, these results were inconclusive as to whether these residues function as direct defense determinants through carbohydrate binding, or whether substantial changes of the protein structure had occurred in mutated proteins, with this structural disruption actually causing the loss of biochemical and biological functions. Evidence shown here supports the former explanation: circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra showed that mutations at carbohydrate-binding residues of GSII do not render it dysfunctional because of substantial secondary or tertiary structure modifications; and trypsin treatment confirmed that rGSII structural integrity is retained in these mutants. Reduced biochemical stability was observed through papain digestion and urea denaturation in mutant versions that had lost carbohydrate-binding ability, and this was correlated with lower Ca(2+) content. Accordingly, the re-addition of Ca(2+) to demetalized proteins could recover resistance to papain in the carbohydrate-binding mutant, but not in the non-binding mutant. Thus, both carbohydrate binding (presumably to targets in the insect gut) and biochemical stability to proteolytic degradation in situ indeed contribute to anti-insect activity, and these activities are Ca(2+)-dependent.

  8. A sperm-agglutinating lectin from seeds of Jack fruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namjuntra, P; Muanwongyathi, P; Chulavatnatol, M

    1985-04-30

    A lectin specific for N-acetylgalactosamine was isolated from seed extract of Jack fruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) by ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by affinity chromatography on a Affigel-galactosamine-agarose column. The lectin possessed agglutinating activities for human and rat sperm as well as human red blood cells. It was found to have Mr = 62,000 consisting of two dissimilar subunits of Mr = 18,000 and 13,000. It also cross-reacted with an antibody against the lectin of Osage Orange (Maclura pomifera).

  9. Purification of a N-acetyl-D-galactosamine specific lectin from the orchid Laelia autumnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, R; Chávez, R; Portugal, D; Páez, A; Lascurain, R; Zenteno, E

    1995-10-01

    From the pseudobulbs of the orchid L. autumnalis a lectin was purified on immobilized porcine mucin with A + H blood group substance. This lectin is a dimeric glycoprotein of M(r) 12,000 with an Sw,20 of 2.2, showing haemagglutinating activity directed mainly to human A1 desialylated erythrocytes. The lectin possesses sugar specificity for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and also shows high specificity for glycoproteins containing the T (galactose beta 1,3GA1NAc alpha 1,0 Ser/Thr) or the Tn antigen (GalNAc alpha 1,0 Ser/Thr).

  10. Monolithic silica capillary columns having immobilized lectins and surface bound polar functionalities for lectin affinity and normal phase nano-LC and CEC of glycoconjugates, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hengwen; El Rassi, Ziad

    2009-05-01

    In this report, monolithic silica-based capillary columns were produced by the sol-gel process and subsequently silanized with gamma-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to form on the surface of the monolith a reactive gamma-glycidoxypropylsilyl sublayer to which an interactive top layer can be covalently attached. The interactive top layer consisted of either an immobilized lectin or polar cyano functions to perform lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) of glycoproteins or normal phase chromatography (NPC) of glycans, respectively. Two lectins were immobilized, namely Con A and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) due to their utility in LAC of a wide range of glycoconjugates. On the other hand, 1H-imidazole-4,5-dicarbonitrile was covalently attached to the silica monolith to yield polar silica monolith referred to as 2CN-OH monolith. The two lectin monolithic columns were evaluated in Nano-LC with standard glycoproteins over a wide range of conditions and proved useful in capturing the glycoforms bearing the pertinent saccharidic motifs for interaction with the given lectin. The 2CN-OH monolithic columns were effective in the profiling of glycans derived from glycoproteins in both NP-CEC and NP-Nano-LC with NP-CEC offering enhanced separation when compared to NP-Nano-LC.

  11. A comparative study of lectin affinity based plant N-glycoproteome profiling using tomato fruit as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-May, Eliel; Hucko, Simon; Howe, Kevin J; Zhang, Sheng; Sherwood, Robert W; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) can provide a valuable front-end enrichment strategy for the study of N-glycoproteins and has been used to characterize a broad range eukaryotic N-glycoproteomes. Moreover, studies with mammalian systems have suggested that the use of multiple lectins with different affinities can be particularly effective. A multi-lectin approach has also been reported to provide a significant benefit for the analysis of plant N-glycoproteins; however, it has yet to be determined whether certain lectins, or combinations of lectins are optimal for plant N-glycoproteome profiling; or whether specific lectins show preferential association with particular N-glycosylation sites or N-glycan structures. We describe here a comparative study of three mannose-binding lectins, concanavalin A, snowdrop lectin, and lentil lectin, to profile the N-glycoproteome of mature green stage tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit pericarp. Through coupling lectin affinity chromatography with a shotgun proteomics strategy, we identified 448 putative N-glycoproteins, whereas a parallel lectin affinity chromatography plus hydrophilic interaction chromatography analysis revealed 318 putative N-glycosylation sites on 230 N-glycoproteins, of which 100 overlapped with the shotgun analysis, as well as 17 N-glycan structures. The use of multiple lectins substantially increased N-glycoproteome coverage and although there were no discernible differences in the structures of N-glycans, or the charge, isoelectric point (pI) or hydrophobicity of the glycopeptides that differentially bound to each lectin, differences were observed in the amino acid frequency at the -1 and +1 subsites of the N-glycosylation sites. We also demonstrated an alternative and complementary in planta recombinant expression strategy, followed by affinity MS analysis, to identify the putative N-glycan structures of glycoproteins whose abundance is too low to be readily determined by a shotgun approach, and

  12. Assessment of C-Type Darrieus Wind Turbine Under Low Wind Speed Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaran, M. S.; Rahman, Md. M.; Muzammil, W. K.; Ismail, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    Harvesting wind energy in in a low wind speed region is deem un-economical if not daunting task. Study shows that a minimum cut in speed of 3.5 m/s is required to extract a meaningful wind energy for electricity while a mean speed of 6 m/s is preferred. However, in Malaysia the mean speed is at 2 m/s with certain potential areas having 3 m/s mean speed. Thus, this work aims to develop a wind turbine that able to operate at lower cut-in speed and produce meaningful power for electricity generation. A C-type Darrieus blade is selected as it shows good potential to operate in arbitrary wind speed condition. The wind turbine is designed and fabricated in UMS labs while the performance of the wind turbine is evaluated in a simulated wind condition. Test result shows that the wind turbine started to rotate at 1 m/s compared to a NACA 0012 Darrieus turbine that started to rotate at 3 m/s. The performance of the turbine shows that it have good potential to be used in an intermittent arbitrary wind speed condition as well as low mean wind speed condition.

  13. Urinary C-Type Natriuretic Peptide: An Emerging Biomarker for Heart Failure and Renal Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Rosita; Burnett, John C.; Sangaralingham, S. Jeson

    2015-01-01

    The public health and economic burden of heart failure (HF) is staggering and the need for relevant pathophysiologic and clinical biomarkers to advance the field and improve HF therapy remains high. Renal dysfunction is common among HF patients and is associated with increased HF hospitalization and mortality. It is widely recognized that mechanisms contributing to HF pathogenesis include a complex bidirectional interaction between the kidney and heart, encompassed by the term cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Among a new wave of urinary biomarkers germane to CRS, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has emerged as an innovative biomarker of renal structural and functional impairment in HF and chronic renal disease states. CNP is a hormone, synthesized in the kidney, and is an important regulator of cell proliferation and organ fibrosis. Hypoxia, cytokines and fibrotic growth factors, which are inherent to both cardiac and renal remodeling processes, are among the recognized stimuli for CNP production and release. In this review we aim to highlight current knowledge regarding the biology and pathophysiologic correlates of urinary CNP, and its potential clinical utility as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in HF and renal disease states. PMID:25512164

  14. Role of C-type natriuretic peptide in the function of normal human sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP is a newly discovered type of local regulatory factor that mediates its biological effects through the specific, membrane-bound natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B. Recent studies have established that CNP is closely related to male reproductive function. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of CNP/NPR-B in human ejaculated spermatozoa through different methods (such as immunolocalization, real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot, and then to evaluate the influence of CNP on sperm function i n vitro, such as motility and acrosome reaction. Human semen samples were collected from consenting donors who met the criteria of the World Health Organization for normozoospermia. Our results show that the specific receptor NPR-B of CNP is localized in the acrosomal region of the head and the membrane of the front-end tail of the sperm, and there is no signal of CNP in human sperm. Compared with the control, CNP can induce a significant dose-dependent increase in spermatozoa motility and acrosome reaction. In summary, CNP/NPR-B can affect sperm motility and acrosome reaction, thus regulating the reproductive function of males. CNP may be a new key factor in regulating sperm function.

  15. B and C types natriuretic peptides modify norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat adrenal medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M F; Bianciotti, L G; Rodriguez-Fermepin, M; Ambros, R; Fernandez, B E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) modulates adrenomedullar norepinephrine (NE) metabolism. On this basis, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) on the uptake, intracellular distribution and release of 3H-NE. Experiments were carried out in rat adrenal medulla slices incubated "in vitro." Results showed that 100 nM of both, CNP and BNP, enhanced total and neuronal NE uptake. Both peptides (100 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake during the first minute, which was sustained for 60 min. NE intracellular distribution was only modified by CNP (100 nM), which increased the granular fraction and decreased the cytosolic pool. On the other hand, spontaneous as well as evoked (KCl) NE release, was decreased by BNP and CNP (50 and 100 nM for spontaneous release and 1, 10, 50 and 100 nM for evoked output). The present results suggest that BNP and CNP may regulate catecholamine secretion and modulate adrenomedullary biological actions mediated by catecholamines, such as blood arterial pressure, smooth muscle tone, and metabolic activities.

  16. Biodiversity of mannose-specific lectins within Narcissus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Susanna; Codina, Carlos; Bastida, Jaume; Viladomat, Francesc; Davidson, Elaine; Stewart, Derek

    2002-04-24

    Mannose-specific lectins (MSLs) were isolated from the bulbs of 27 species of wild Spanish Narcissi and compared to the commercially available MSL from daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus, NPA). Molecular weight analysis showed the monomers of all the MSLs were at, or around, 12.5 kD. Haemagglutination assays showed that the MSLs exhibited activities at up to four times greater than that displayed by NPA and other MSLs derived from other species such as Galanthus nivalus (snowdrop) and Allium ursinum (ramson). Elution profiles from ion exchange chromatography exhibited similarities for species within the same taxonomic section suggesting that this method could aid in species classification. Further analysis by isoelectric focusing showed many isolectins are present in vivo and that even within a single peak from ion exchange chromatography there are numerous isolectins present. The basis of the isolectin heterogeneity is suggested to reside in the tetraploidy (sometime triploidy) nature of Narcissus genes.

  17. Lectin Histochemical Study of Vasculogenesis During Rat Pituitary Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Ebrahimzadeh Bideskan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s The aim of this study was to investigate glycoconjugates distribution patterns as well as their changes during the course of pituitary portal vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.Materials and MethodsFormalin fixed paraffin sections of 10 to 20 days of Sprague Dawly rat fetuses were processed for histochemical studies using four different horseradish peroxidase (HRP conjugated lectins. Orange peel fungus (OFA, Vicica villosa (VVA, Glycine max (SBA and Wistaria floribunda (WFA specific for α-L-Fucose, D-Gal, α, ß-D-GalNAc and D- GalNAc terminal sugars of glycoconjugates respectively.ResultsOur finding indicated that adenohypophysal cells reacted with OFA on gestational day 10 (E10 and increased progressively to E14. Staining intensity did not change from days 14 to17, then after increased following days to E20 significantly (P< 0.05. A few cells around Rathke’s pouch reacted with VVA on E13, increased to E14 and decreased significantly afterward (P< 0.05. Reaction of some cells around Rathke’s pouch reacted with SBA on E14. This visible reaction was the same as E18 and decreased later (P< 0.05. Many cells around Rathke’s pouch reacted with WFA on E13 and increased on E 14 and E15 and decreased thereafter (P< 0.05.ConclusionReactions of OFA and other tested lectins with endothelial cells around Rathke’s pouch and developing pars distalis were different. These results suggest that embryonic origin of hypophiseal pituitary portal (HPP system endothelial cells are not the same and our finding also indicated that glycoconjugates with terminal sugars α-L-Fucose, D-Gal, α, ß-D-GalNAc may play critical role(s in cell interactions and tissue differentiations such as vasculogensis and angiogenesis as well as other developmental precursors in formation of the pituitary gland.

  18. Novel hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Yahata, Kazuhide; Gopal Dhoubhadel, Bhim; Fujii, Yoshito; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2015-09-10

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica, a common protozoan parasite, has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in mouse models of amoebiasis. The lectin consists of heavy (Hgl), light (Lgl), and intermediate (Igl) subunits. Hgl has lectin activity and Lgl does not, but little is known about the activity of Igl. In this study, we assessed various regions of Igl for hemagglutinating activity using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. We identified a weak hemagglutinating activity of the protein. Furthermore, we found novel hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the lectin, which resided in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein. Antibodies against Igl inhibited the hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. This is the first report showing hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of an amoebic molecule, Igl.

  19. Complementary Roles of the Classical and Lectin Complement Pathways in the Defense against Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    , lectin, and alternative pathways under both immunocompetent and immunocompromised conditions to provide a relevant dual-perspective on the response against A. fumigatus. Conidia (spores) from a clinical isolate of A. fumigatus were combined with various human serum types (including serum deficient...... of various complement components and serum from umbilical cord blood). We also combined this with inhibitors against C1q, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), and ficolin-2 before complement activation products and phagocytosis were detected by flow cytometry. Our results showed that alternative pathway amplified...... complement on A. fumigatus, but required classical and/or lectin pathway for initiation. In normal human serum, this initiation came primarily from the classical pathway. However, with a dysfunctional classical pathway (C1q-deficient serum), lectin pathway activated complement and mediated opsonophagocytosis...

  20. Single step synthesis of carbohydrate monolithic capillary columns for affinity chromatography of lectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.; Chen, B.; Visser, G.M.; Beek, van T.A.

    2007-01-01

    Carbohydrate monolithic beds were synthesized in a single step in capillary columns to study affinity chromatography of lectins. In this method, carbohydrates (-galactose, -glucose, and -mannose) with an easy to synthesize alkene terminated tetraethylene glycol spacer were used as functional

  1. [Carbohydrate-binding proteins--lectins and glycosidases in plants of Anthurium genus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, V I; Datskiv, M Z; Lutsyk, M D

    1993-01-01

    The content of lectins and activity of glycosidases have been estimated in seeds and vegetative organs of 5 strains of plants of Anthurium genus. In seeds of all the investigated strains lectins were detected with the selectivity toward the N-acetyl-galactosamine (minimal inhibitory concentration of sugar was 0.1-0.2 mM) and an anti-A blood group specificity. Lectins of Anthuriums selectively bound O-type glycosidic chains and revealed high affinity toward mucins (salivary or ovary cysts origin). Lectins were not detected in vegetative parts of Anthuriums. In seeds of plants the following glycosidases were detected in the diminishing activity order: alpha-galactosidase, alpha-mannosidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosaminidase.

  2. A journey through the lectin pathway of complement-MBL and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, Peter; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin-10, collectin-11, and the ficolins (ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3) are soluble pattern recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. These proteins act as mediators of host defense and participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis...... of these molecules is their ability to interact with a set of serine proteases named MASPs (MASP-1, MASP-2, and MASP-3). MASP-1 and -2 trigger the activation of the lectin pathway and MASP-3 may be involved in the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. Furthermore, MASPs mediate processes related......, and Carnevale) embryonic development syndrome originates from rare mutations affecting either collectin-11 or MASP-3, indicating a broader functionality of the complement system than previously anticipated. This review summarizes the characteristics of the molecules in the lectin pathway....

  3. Genotyping of mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) codon 54 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    binding lectin and are associated with infectious conditions. Acute respiratory tract infections are among the most prevalent infections in childhood with the highest incidence among children younger than 2 years. This study aimed at correlation ...

  4. Mannan binding lectin : a two-faced regulator of renal allograft injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Seelen, Marc A.

    Complement activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of renal allograft injury after kidney transplantation. There are three known pathways of complement activation, namely, classical, alternative, and lectin pathways. In renal allograft injury, contradictory results were reported about

  5. Opsonic function of sialic acid specific lectin in freshwater crab Paratelphusa jacquemontii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Denis, Maghil; Thayappan, Karthigayani; Ramasamy, Sivakumar Mullivanam; Munusamy, Arumugam

    2015-01-01

    The sialic acid specific humoral lectin, Pjlec of the freshwater crab Paratelphusa jacquemontii was investigated for its opsonin function with rabbit erythrocyte as target cell for phagocytosis by the crab’s hemocyte...

  6. Lectins binding during alloxan-induced diabetes in rat soleus muscle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... Key words: Diabetes, alloxan, Wistar rat, soleus muscle, lectin staining. ... betes mellitus on skeletal muscle of rats were examined by several authors ..... diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus and its complication.

  7. Secretory Expression and Characterization of Chinese Narcissus GNA-Like Lectin in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Zhang, Pengpeng; Zhang, Ning; Liang, Xiao; Wang, Wenya; Yuan, Qipeng; Li, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Narcissus tazetta lectin (NTL) is a GNA-like lectin, which has a wide potential application in medicine, agriculture, and glycobiology. In the present paper, the codon-optimized ntl gene was transformed into the yeast Pichia pastoris; SDS-PAGE gel and western blotting analysis revealed that the recombinant lectin was expressed successfully in Pichia yeast. The similarity between the recombinant NTL and the native NTL was confirmed by circular dichroism (CD) and hemagglutination assay further. In the 5-L scale fermentator, the protein yield was as high as 1.2 g/L after fermentation for 96 h. In addition, the effect of metal ions (K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Cu2+), acid, and alkaline on hemagglutinating activity of NTL was tested, which provided biochemical characterizations of the mannose-binding lectin from Chinese Narcissus.

  8. Interaction indole-3-acetic acid IAA with lectin Canavalia maritima seeds reveal new function of lectins in plant physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Filho, J.C.; Santi-Gadelha, T.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Delatorre, P. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Teixeira, C.S.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nobrega, R.B.; Alencar, K.L.L.; Cavada, B.S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lectins are a class of proteins of non-immune origin characterized by its capability in interacts specifically and reversibly to mono and oligosaccharides. In plant several possible roles have been suggested including their function in seed maturation, cell wall assembly, defense mechanisms, or rhizobial nodulation of legume roots. Nearly all application and proposed of the plant lectins are based on their specific carbohydrate binding. However, it has been reported that lectins from legumes, might interact with other molecules, such as non proteic amino acids and hydrophobic compounds. This study show the first the crystal structure based on molecular replacement of the Canavalia maritima (CML) complexed with IAA correlated with possible role in plant development. Purified CML was dissolved in 20 mMTrisHCl pH 7.6 containing 5 mM IAA, the suitable co-crystals from CML-IAA complex grew in condition 4 of screen I (0.1 M TrisHCl pH 8.5 and 2.0 M ammonium sulfate). This crystal belong to the orthorhombic space group I222 with unit-cell parameters a = 67.1 ; b = 70.7 , c = 97.7 , The structure was refined at 2.1 of resolution to a final R factor of 20.63 % and an R free of 22.54 %. To check the relative position of the IAA molecule in relation to the biological assemble of the CML, the tetrameric structure was generate by crystallographic symmetry. IAA molecules are positioned in the central cavity. The IAA is stabilized by interacting through hydrogen bounds and Van der Waals forces with the amino acids residues Ser 108 and Asn131, and two water molecules. The hydrophilic interactions occur between IAA and side chains of Ser 108, Asn131 and water molecules 26 and 31 by H-bonds. The OG oxygen from Ser108 display H-bonds with O2 and O3 oxygen atoms from IAA, 3.1 and 2.8 respectively. The tetrameric structure of CML complexed with IAA revels which this protein can act during the seedling in plant development. (author)

  9. Differential effect of plant lectins on mast cells of different origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. Lopes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Histamine release induced by plant lectins was studied with emphasis on the carbohydrate specificity, external calcium requirement, metal binding sites, and mast cell heterogeneity and on the importance of antibodies bound to the mast cell membrane to the lectin effect. Peritoneal mast cells were obtained by direct lavage of the rat peritoneal cavity and guinea pig intestine and hamster cheek pouch mast cells were obtained by dispersion with collagenase type IA. Histamine release was induced with concanavalin A (Con A, lectins from Canavalia brasiliensis, mannose-specific Cymbosema roseum, Maackia amurensis, Parkia platycephala, Triticum vulgaris (WGA, and demetallized Con A and C. brasiliensis, using 1-300 µg/ml lectin concentrations applied to Wistar rat peritoneal mast cells, peaking on 26.9, 21.0, 29.1, 24.9, 17.2, 10.7, 19.9, and 41.5%, respectively. This effect was inhibited in the absence of extracellular calcium. The lectins were also active on hamster cheek pouch mast cells (except demetallized Con A and on Rowett nude rat (animal free of immunoglobulins peritoneal mast cells (except for mannose-specific C. roseum, P. platycephala and WGA. No effect was observed in guinea pig intestine mast cells. Glucose-saturated Con A and C. brasiliensis also released histamine from Wistar rat peritoneal mast cells. These results suggest that histamine release induced by lectins is influenced by the heterogeneity of mast cells and depends on extracellular calcium. The results also suggest that this histamine release might occur by alternative mechanisms, because the usual mechanism of lectins is related to their binding properties to metals from which depend the binding to sugars, which would be their sites to bind to immunoglobulins. In the present study, we show that the histamine release by lectins was also induced by demetallized lectins and by sugar-saturated lectins (which would avoid their binding to other sugars. Additionally, the lectins

  10. Quaternary association in β-prism I fold plant lectins: Insights from X ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are obtained when the free banana lectin subunit and the two subunits in the banana lectin dimer are used in the superposition. The rms deviations in C α positions on superposition of the most probable structure of the free subunit of artocarpin on those of the tetramer are somewhat higher in the range of 1.20 Å to 1.60 Å, ...

  11. Interaction of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli with lectins and blood group antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, K H; Skelton, S K; Feeley, J C

    1985-01-01

    Lectins and blood group antibodies were used to probe the surface structures of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Of the 29 strains tested, there were distinct reaction patterns. The lectin-reactive and blood group antibody-reactive sites on the bacterial surface were distinguishable from the heat-stable (lipopolysaccharide) antigenic determinants. The interactions were strain specific. The reactive sites were stable with respect to culture media and passage and may be useful as ad...

  12. Stability of Curcuma longa rhizome lectin: Role of N-linked glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Himadri; Chattopadhyaya, Rajagopal

    2016-04-01

    Curcuma longa rhizome lectin, a mannose-binding protein of non-seed portions of turmeric, is known to have antifungal, antibacterial and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. We studied the role of complex-type glycans attached to asparagine (Asn) 66 and Asn 110 to elucidate the role of carbohydrates in lectin activity and stability. Apart from the native lectin, the characteristics of a deglycosylated Escherichia coli expressed lectin, high-mannose oligosaccharides at both asparagines and its glycosylation mutants N66Q and N110Q expressed in Pichia pastoris, were compared to understand the relationship between glycosylation and activity. Far UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra, fluorescence emission maximum, hemagglutination assay show no change in secondary or tertiary structures or sugar-binding properties between wild-type and aforementioned recombinant lectins under physiological pH. But reduced agglutination activity and loss of tertiary structure are observed in the acidic pH range for the deglycosylated and the N110Q protein. In thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnCl)-induced unfolding, the wild-type and high-mannose lectins possess higher stability compared with the deglycosylated recombinant lectin and both mutants, as measured by a higher Tm of denaturation or a greater free energy change, respectively. Reversibility experiments after thermal denaturation reveal that deglycosylated proteins tend to aggregate during thermal inactivation but the wild type shows a much greater recovery to the native state upon refolding. These results suggest that N-glycosylation in turmeric lectin is important for the maintenance of its proper folding upon changes in pH, and that the oligosaccharides help in maintaining the active conformation and prevent aggregation in unfolded or partially folded molecules. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Differentiation of Bacillus Anthracis and Other Bacillus Species by Use of Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-18

    cNAc = -D-GlcNAc Helix Aspersa (HMA) ci-D-GalNAc = ca-D-GlcNkc Helix pomatia (lHPA) ci-D-GalNAc > cx-D-GlcNAc a-D-Gal Limulus polyphemus (LPA) sialic...mycoides) were strongly reactive with the lectin from Helix pomatia and weakly reactive with the Glycine max lectin. The differential interactions between

  14. Developmental Alterations of α-Fetoprotein Sugar Chain in Amniotic Fluids Analyzed by Lectin Affinity Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, Masahiro; Kawahara, Nobuaki; Liu, Miao; Taketa,Kazuhisa; Kudo, Takafumi; Taga, Hiroko

    1998-01-01

    Affinity electrophoresis of human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in amniotic fluid from pregnant women between 6 to 42 weeks of gestation and in the serum of a yolk sac tumor was performed with concanavalin A (Con A), lentil lectin (LCA), erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (E-PHA) and Allomyrina dichotoma lectin (allo A). Separated AFP bands were detected by sensitive antibody-affinity blotting. In the first trimester, amniotic fluid AFP showed elevated percentages of Con A-nonreacting AFP (AFP...

  15. Helicobacter pylori CagA triggers expression of the bactericidal lectin REG3γ via gastric STAT3 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Syin Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most of what is known about the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori cytotoxin, CagA, pertains to a much-vaunted role as a determinant of gastric inflammation and cancer. Little attention has been devoted to potential roles of CagA in the majority of H. pylori infected individuals not showing oncogenic progression, particularly in relation to host tolerance. Regenerating islet-derived (REG3γ encodes a secreted C-type lectin that exerts direct bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria in the intestine. Here, we extend this paradigm of lectin-mediated innate immunity, showing that REG3γ expression is triggered by CagA in the H. pylori-infected stomach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In human gastric mucosal tissues, REG3γ expression was significantly increased in CagA-positive, compared to CagA-negative H. pylori infected individuals. Using transfected CagA-inducible gastric MKN28 cells, we recapitulated REG3γ induction in vitro, also showing that tyrosine phosphorylated, not unphosphorylated CagA triggers REG3γ transcription. In concert with induced REG3γ, pro-inflammatory signalling downstream of the gp130 cytokine co-receptor via the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3 and transcription of two cognate ligands, interleukin(IL-11 and IL-6, were significantly increased. Exogenous IL-11, but not IL-6, directly stimulated STAT3 activation and REG3γ transcription. STAT3 siRNA knockdown or IL-11 receptor blockade respectively abrogated or subdued CagA-dependent REG3γ mRNA induction, thus demonstrating a requirement for uncompromised signalling via the IL-11/STAT3 pathway. Inhibition of the gp130-related SHP2-(Ras-ERK pathway did not affect CagA-dependent REG3γ induction, but strengthened STAT3 activation as well as augmenting transcription of mucosal innate immune regulators, IL-6, IL-8 and interferon-response factor (IRF1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support a model of CagA-directed REG3

  16. The use of monoclonal antibodies anti-lectin from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (DeMan, 1879) in the recognition of protein with lectin activity in Decapod's hemolymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Ali; Agundis, Concepcion; Barrera, Baltazar; Alpuche, Juan; Sierra, Claudia; Zenteno, Roberto; Zenteno, Edgar; Vazquez, Lorena

    2009-01-01

    We determined the cross-reactivity of a monoclonal antibody against the Macrobrachium rosenbergii lectin with proteins in the hemolymph from Procambarus clarkii (Pc), Procambarus americanus (Pa), Litopenaeus setiferus (Ls), and Pseudothelphusa americana (Psa). Crustaceans' hemolymph agglutinated erythrocytes from rat, mouse, guinea pig, and rabbit. Decapods' hemolymph hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by N-acetylated carbohydrates as well as by antibodies. Western blot assays indicated that the antibodies recognized two main proteins of 97.5 and 80.9 kDa in all hemolymphs studied; moreover, ELISA assays indicated that, in PSa, 7.2% of total proteins showed crossreactivity with antibodies in Pa, Pc, and Lc hemolymphs represented 4.2, 3.1%, and 2.5%, respectively. Our results suggested that antibodies recognize the lectin active site in the crustacean species tested; we propose the use of antibodies as an immunological marker for lectin identification and quantification among crustaceans.

  17. Structural mechanism governing the quaternary organization of monocot mannose-binding lectin revealed by the novel monomeric structure of an orchid lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Na; Ding, Jingjin; Huang, Ren-huai; Hu, Zhong; Wang, Da-Cheng

    2005-04-15

    Two isoforms of an antifungal protein, gastrodianin, were isolated from two subspecies of the orchid Gastrodia elata, belonging to the protein superfamily of monocot mannose-specific lectins. In the context that all available structures in this superfamily are oligomers so far, the crystal structures of the orchid lectins, both at 2.0 A, revealed a novel monomeric structure. It resulted from the rearrangement of the C-terminal peptide inclusive of the 12th beta-strand, which changes from the "C-terminal exchange" into a "C-terminal self-assembly" mode. Thus, the overall tertiary scaffold is stabilized with an intramolecular beta-sheet instead of the hybrid observed on subunit/subunit interface in all known homologous dimeric or tetrameric lectins. In contrast to the constrained extended conformation with a cis peptide bond between residues 98 and 99 commonly occurring in oligomers, a beta-hairpin forms from position 97 to 101 with a normal trans peptide bond at the corresponding site in gastrodianin, which determines the topology of the C-terminal peptide and thereby its unique fold pattern. Sequence and structure comparison shows that residue replacement and insertion at the position where the beta-hairpin occurs in association with cis-trans inter-conversion of the specific peptide bond (97-98) are possibly responsible for such a radical structure switch between monomers and oligomers. Moreover, this seems to be a common melody controlling the quaternary states among bulb lectins through studies on sequence alignment. The observations revealed a structural mechanism by which the quaternary organization of monocot mannose binding lectins could be governed. The mutation experiment performed on maltose-binding protein-gastrodianin fusion protein followed by a few biochemical detections provides direct evidence to support this conclusion. Potential carbohydrate recognition sites and biological implications of the orchid lectin based on its monomeric state are also

  18. Advances in lectin microarray technology: Optimized protocols for piezoelectric print conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilobello, Kanoelani T.; Agrawal, Praveen; Rouse, Richard; Mahal, Lara K.

    2015-01-01

    Lectin microarray technology has been used to profile the glycosylation of a multitude of biological and clinical samples, leading to new clinical biomarkers and advances in glycobiology. Lectin microarrays, which include over 90 plant lectins, recombinant lectins, and selected antibodies, are used to profile N-linked, O-linked, and glycolipid glycans. The specificity and depth of glycan profiling depends upon the carbohydrate-binding proteins arrayed. Our current set targets mammalian carbohydrates including fucose, high mannose, branched and complex N-linked, α- and β- Galactose and GalNAc, α-2,3- and α-2,6- sialic acid, LacNAc and Lewis X epitopes. In previous protocols, we have described the use of a contact microarray printer for lectin microarray manufacture. Herein, we present an updated protocol using a non-contact, piezoelectric printer, which leads to increased lectin activity on the array. We describe optimization of print conditions and sample hybridization, and methods of analysis. PMID:23788322

  19. Legume Lectins Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 2 Infection by Interfering with the Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles O’Brien

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Three lectins with different sugar binding specificities were investigated for anti-viral activity against human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV-2. The lectins, concanavalin A (Con A, lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA and peanut agglutinin (PNA, inhibited cell fusion and hemadsorption induced by hPIV-2. Virus nucleoprotein (NP gene synthesis was largely inhibited, but fusion (F and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN gene syntheses were not. An indirect immunofluorescence study showed that Con A inhibited virus NP, F and HN protein syntheses, but LCA did not completely inhibit them, and that PNA inhibited only NP protein synthesis. Using a recombinant green fluorescence protein-expressing hPIV-2, without matrix protein (rghPIV-2ΔM, it was found that virus entry into the cells was not completely prevented. The lectins considerably reduced the number of viruses released compared with that of virus infected cells. The lectins bound to cell surface within 10 min, and many aggregates were observed at 30 min. Con A and LCA slightly disrupted actin microfilaments and microtubules, but PNA had almost no effect on them. These results indicated that the inhibitory effects of the lectins were caused mainly by the considerable prevention of virus adsorption to the cells by the lectin binding to their receptors.

  20. Identification of lectin counter-receptors on cell membranes by proximity labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Nagala, Manjula; Crocker, Paul R

    2017-09-01

    Lectin-glycan interactions play important roles in many biological systems, but the nature of glycoprotein counter-receptors expressed on cell membranes is often poorly understood. To help overcome this problem, we developed a method based on proximity labeling technology. Using a peroxidase-coupled lectin, addition of H2O2 and tyramide-biotin substrates leads to generation of short-range biotin radicals that biotinylate proteins in the immediate vicinity of the bound lectin, which can subsequently be identified. As a proof-of-principle, sialoadhesin-horseradish peroxidase-human IgG1 Fc recombinant protein constructs were precomplexed with anti-Fc antibodies, bound to human erythrocytes and reacted with H2O2 and tyramide-SS-biotin. The erythrocyte membrane protein with strongest biotinylation was identified as glycophorin A, in agreement with early studies using lectin overlay and reglycosylation approaches. As a further test of the method, the plant lectin MAL II was conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and used in proximity labeling of human erythrocytes. Glycophorin A was again selectively labeled, which is consistent with previous reports that MAL II has high affinity for glycophorin. This method could be applied to other lectins to identify their membrane counter-receptors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Dexamethasone stimulates expression of C-type Natriuretic Peptide in chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beier Frank

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth of endochondral bones is regulated through the activity of cartilaginous growth plates. Disruption of the physiological patterns of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation – such as in endocrine disorders or in many different genetic diseases (e.g. chondrodysplasias – generally results in dwarfism and skeletal defects. For example, glucocorticoid administration in children inhibits endochondral bone growth, but the molecular targets of these hormones in chondrocytes remain largely unknown. In contrast, recent studies have shown that C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP is an important anabolic regulator of cartilage growth, and loss-of-function mutations in the human CNP receptor gene cause dwarfism. We asked whether glucocorticoids could exert their activities by interfering with the expression of CNP or its downstream signaling components. Methods Primary mouse chondrocytes in monolayer where incubated with the synthetic glucocorticoid Dexamethasone (DEX for 12 to 72 hours. Cell numbers were determined by counting, and real-time PCR was performed to examine regulation of genes in the CNP signaling pathway by DEX. Results We show that DEX does influence expression of key genes in the CNP pathway. Most importantly, DEX significantly increases RNA expression of the gene encoding CNP itself (Nppc. In addition, DEX stimulates expression of Prkg2 (encoding cGMP-dependent protein kinase II and Npr3 (natriuretic peptide decoy receptor genes. Conversely, DEX was found to down-regulate the expression of the gene encoding its receptor, Nr3c1 (glucocorticoid receptor, as well as the Npr2 gene (encoding the CNP receptor. Conclusion Our data suggest that the growth-suppressive activities of DEX are not due to blockade of CNP signaling. This study reveals a novel, unanticipated relationship between glucocorticoid and CNP signaling and provides the first evidence that CNP expression in chondrocytes is regulated by endocrine

  2. C-type natriuretic peptide in complicated pregnancy: increased secretion precedes adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Rosemary A; Prickett, Timothy C R; Pullar, Barbra E; Darlow, Brian A; Gullam, Joanna E; Espiner, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), a vasoactive product of the endothelium, is markedly increased during placentation in ovine pregnancy and is further stimulated by nutrient restriction. Whether CNP products change in human pregnancy is unknown. The objective of the study was to compare serial changes in maternal plasma CNP peptides during normal pregnancy with changes in pregnancy complicated by adverse events and relate these to fetal growth and placental CNP content. This was a prospective observational study undertaken in a tertiary care center. We studied changes in maternal plasma aminoterminal proCNP (NTproCNP) and CNP at monthly intervals, fetal growth, and placental and umbilical plasma CNP peptides in 51 women, 28 of whom experienced an adverse event and 23 were uneventful. Age matched healthy nonpregnant women served as a reference range for NTproCNP. Compared with nonpregnant women, maternal plasma NTproCNP in an uneventful pregnancy was significantly reduced from first sampling (16 wk gestation) until 36 weeks. In contrast, in complicated pregnancy, levels did not decline and were significantly higher (P pregnancy from 20 weeks. Highest values occurred in women later developing hypertension and fetal growth disorders. Placental concentration of NTproCNP was unrelated to maternal NTproCNP but strongly correlated with cord plasma levels. Maternal NTproCNP is significantly raised in women who later exhibit a range of obstetric adverse events. Lack of association with placental concentrations suggests that these changes represent an adaptive response within the maternal circulation to a threatened nutrient supply to the fetus.

  3. Orthogonal plating of Vancouver B1 and C-type periprosthetic femur fracture nonunions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Christopher E; Blankstein, Michael; Chlebeck, Jesse D; Bartlett Rd, Craig S

    2017-11-21

    Periprosthetic femoral shaft fractures are a significant complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Plate osteosynthesis has been the mainstay of treatment around well-fixed stems. Nonunions are a rare and challenging complication of this fixation method. We report the outcomes of a novel orthogonal plating surgical technique for Vancouver B1 and C-type periprosthetic fractures that previously failed open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). A retrospective review identified all patients with Vancouver B1/C THA periprosthetic femoral nonunions from 2010 to 2015. Exclusion criteria included open fractures and periprosthetic infections. The technique utilised a mechanobiologic strategy of atraumatic exposure, resection of necrotic tissue, bone grafting with adjuvant bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and revision open reduction internal fixation with orthogonal plate osteosynthesis. 6 Vancouver B1/C periprosthetic femoral nonunions were treated. 5 patients were female with an average age of 80.3 years (range 72-91 years). The fractures occurred at a mean of 5.8 years (range 1-10 years) from their initial arthroplasty procedure. No patients underwent further revision surgery; there were no perioperative complications. All patients had a minimum of 11 months follow-up (mean 18.6, range 11-36 months). All fractures achieved osseous union, defined as solid bridging callus over at least 2 cortices and pain free, independent ambulation, at an average of 24.4 weeks (range 6.1-39.7 weeks). This is the 1st series describing orthogonal locked compression plating using modern implants for periprosthetic femoral nonunions. This technique should be considered in periprosthetic femur fracture nonunions around a well-fixed stem.

  4. Dexamethasone increases production of C-type natriuretic peptide in the sheep brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michele O; McNeill, Bryony A; Barrell, Graham K; Prickett, Timothy C R; Espiner, Eric A

    2017-10-01

    Although C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has high abundance in brain tissues and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the source and possible factors regulating its secretion within the central nervous system (CNS) are unknown. Here we report the dynamic effects of a single IV bolus of dexamethasone or saline solution on plasma, CSF, CNS and pituitary tissue content of CNP products in adult sheep, along with changes in CNP gene expression in selected tissues. Both CNP and NTproCNP (the amino-terminal product of proCNP) in plasma and CSF showed dose-responsive increases lasting 12-16 h after dexamethasone, whereas other natriuretic peptides were unaffected. CNS tissue concentrations of CNP and NTproCNP were increased by dexamethasone in all of the 12 regions examined. Abundance was highest in limbic tissues, pons and medulla oblongata. Relative to controls, CNP gene expression (NPPC) was upregulated by dexamethasone in 5 of 7 brain tissues examined. Patterns of responses differed in pituitary tissue. Whereas the abundance of CNP in both lobes of the pituitary gland greatly exceeded that of brain tissues, neither CNP nor NTproCNP concentration was affected by dexamethasone, despite an increase in NPPC expression. This is the first report of enhanced production and secretion of CNP in brain tissues in response to a corticosteroid. Activation of CNP secretion within CNS tissues by dexamethasone, not exhibited by other natriuretic peptides, suggests an important role for CNP in settings of acute stress. Differential findings in pituitary tissues likely relate to altered processing of proCNP storage and secretion. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. Thermal Infrared Imaging Experiments of C-Type Asteroid 162173 Ryugu on Hayabusa2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tatsuaki; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Taguchi, Makoto; Imamura, Takeshi; Arai, Takehiko; Senshu, Hiroki; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Demura, Hirohide; Kitazato, Kohei; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kouyama, Toru; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Wada, Takehiko; Takita, Jun; Sakatani, Naoya; Horikawa, Yamato; Endo, Ken; Helbert, Jörn; Müller, Thomas G.; Hagermann, Axel

    2017-07-01

    The thermal infrared imager TIR onboard Hayabusa2 has been developed to investigate thermo-physical properties of C-type, near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu. TIR is one of the remote science instruments on Hayabusa2 designed to understand the nature of a volatile-rich solar system small body, but it also has significant mission objectives to provide information on surface physical properties and conditions for sampling site selection as well as the assessment of safe landing operations. TIR is based on a two-dimensional uncooled micro-bolometer array inherited from the Longwave Infrared Camera LIR on Akatsuki (Fukuhara et al., 2011). TIR takes images of thermal infrared emission in 8 to 12 μm with a field of view of 16 × 12° and a spatial resolution of 0.05° per pixel. TIR covers the temperature range from 150 to 460 K, including the well calibrated range from 230 to 420 K. Temperature accuracy is within 2 K or better for summed images, and the relative accuracy or noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) at each of pixels is 0.4 K or lower for the well-calibrated temperature range. TIR takes a couple of images with shutter open and closed, the corresponding dark frame, and provides a true thermal image by dark frame subtraction. Data processing involves summation of multiple images, image processing including the StarPixel compression (Hihara et al., 2014), and transfer to the data recorder in the spacecraft digital electronics (DE). We report the scientific and mission objectives of TIR, the requirements and constraints for the instrument specifications, the designed instrumentation and the pre-flight and in-flight performances of TIR, as well as its observation plan during the Hayabusa2 mission.

  6. B and C types natriuretic peptides modulate norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M; Bianciotti, L G; Zarrabeitia, V; Fernández, B E

    1996-09-16

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) regulates catecholamine metabolism in the central nervous system. ANF, B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) also play a regulatory role in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular activity and hormonal and neuro-hormonal secretions. The aim of the present work was to investigate BNP and CNP effects on the uptake and release of norepinephrine (NE) in rat hypothalamic slices incubated in vitro. Results showed that BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM) enhanced total and neuronal [3H]NE uptake but did not modify non-neuronal uptake. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake (1 min), which was sustained for 60 min. BNP (100 nM) did not modify the intracellular distribution of NE; however, 1 nM CNP increased the granular store and decreased the cytosolic pool of NE. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM), diminished spontaneous NE release. In addition, BNP (1, 10, 100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 pM, as well as 1, 10 and 100 nM) reduced NE output induced by 25 mM KCl. These results suggest that BNP and CNP may be involved in the regulation of several central as well as peripheral physiological functions through the modulation of noradrenergic neurotransmission at the presynaptic neuronal level. Present results provide evidence to consider CNP as the brain natriuretic peptide since physiological concentrations of this peptide (pM) diminished NE evoked release.

  7. c-Type cytochrome-dependent formation of U(IV nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Marshall

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, are essential for the reduction of U(VI and formation of extracellular UO(2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM decaheme cytochrome MtrC (metal reduction, previously implicated in Mn(IV and Fe(III reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI. Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI reduction rate relative to wild-type MR-1. Similar to the wild-type, the mutants accumulated UO(2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS. In wild-type cells, this UO(2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties and contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme-containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO(2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA (outer membrane cytochrome. This is the first study to our knowledge to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO(2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO(2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O(2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  8. Re-evaluation of the involvement of NK cells and C-type lectin-like NK receptors in modulation of immune responses by multivalent GlcNAc-terminated oligosaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grobárová, Valeria; Benson, Veronika; Rozbeský, Daniel; Novák, Petr; Černý, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 156, 1-2 (2013), s. 110-117 ISSN 0165-2478 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Anti-tumor immunity * Carbohydrate dendrimer * NK cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.367, year: 2013

  9. LECTIN PROSPECTING IN COLOMBIAN LABIATAE. A SYSTEMATIC-ECOLOGICAL APPROACH – III. MAINLY EXOTIC SPECIES (CULTIVATED OR NATURALISED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Alonso José Luis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the third study of lectin and mucilage detection in Labiatae nutlets fromColombia. It was carried out on 30 taxa; 15 of them belonging to 14 genera inwhich no previous studies have been carried out in this fi eld, the other 15 belongingto previously studied genera. A differential response was observed in the group ofgenera and species studied in terms of mucilage presence as well as lectin activitywhich consistently increased after extract treatment with Pectinex. Lectin activity wasdetected in 26 species, being important (more than 60% activity in at least 75% ofthem. Genera such as Aegiphila, Agastache, Ballota, Mentha and Origanum, whilstnot presenting mucilage, did present lectin activity, with high activity in most cases.This is the fi rst time that a lectin has been reported in these genera. Salvia (in all butSalvia sections studied presented mucilage and important lectin activity.

  10. [Effect of Azospirillum lectins on the Activity of Proteolytic Enzymes and Their Inhibitors in Wheat Seedling Roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alen'kina, S A; Nikitina, V E

    2015-01-01

    The lectins of associative nitrogen-fixing strains Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and Sp245 were shown to exerte a multidirectional effect on the activity of acidic (pH 3.5), neutral (6.8), and alkaline (pH 7.8) proteinases. The lectin of the epiphytic A. brasilense Sp7 decreased proteolytic activity at all pH values, whereas the lectin of the endophytic A. brasilense Sp245 activated neutral and alkaline proteinases, while not affecting the alkaline ones. Experiments with protease inhibitors made it possible to conclude that the lectins of the studied A. brasilense strains alter the ratio between the activities of different protease types in germinating seeds. The activity of trypsin inhibitors in wheat seedling roots was found to increase in the presence of the lectins. Our results indicate a broader spectrum of effects of azospirilla lectins on the host plant organism.

  11. Isolation of a homodimeric lectin with antifungal and antiviral activities from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X Y; Ng, T B; Tsang, P W; Wang, J

    2001-07-01

    A homodimeric lectin adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-Sepharose and possessing a molecular weight of 67 kDa was isolated from red kidney beans. The hemagglutinating activity of this lectin was inhibited by glycoproteins but not by simple sugars. The lectin manifested inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase and alpha-glucosidase. The N-terminal sequence of the lectin exhibited some differences from previously reported lectins from Phaseolus vulgaris but showed some similarity to chitinases. It exerted a suppressive effect on growth of the fungal species Fusarium oxysporum, Coprinus comatus, and Rhizoctonia solani. The lectin had low ribonuclease and negligible translation-inhibitory activities.

  12. Detection of Cytotoxic Activity of Lectin on Human Colon Adenocarcinoma (Sw480 and Epithelial Cervical Carcinoma (C33-A

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    Mirandeli Bautista

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lectins comprise a heterogeneous class of proteins that recognize the carbohydrate moieties of glycoconjugates with high specificity. Numerous studies have shown that lectins are capable of recognizing specific carbohydrate moieties displayed by malignant cells or tissues. The present work was performed to investigate the effects of tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius lectins on proliferation, colony formation, and alteration of DNA synthesis of human malignant cells. Tepary bean lectin showed dose dependent  effects on the inhibition of viability as well as on colony formation in two human malignant cells lines (C33-A, Sw480; By contrast, tepary bean lectin only showed significant effects on DNA synthesis on Sw480 cells. Our results provide evidence of the anti- proliferative and cytotoxic effects of the tepary bean lectins on C33-A and Sw480 cells lines.

  13. EFFECT OF PLANT LECTINS ON HUMAN BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS WITH SPECIAL FOCUS ON PLANT FOODS AND JUICES

    OpenAIRE

    B. Venkata Raman; B. Sravani; P. Phani Rekha; K.V.N. Lalitha; B. Narasimha Rao

    2012-01-01

    Different plant lectins have been studied for lectin binding activity on ABO blood group system individually to study their suitability for consumption. 45% of plants were found to show blood group agglutination activity against A, B, AB and O groups. These results showed more suitability for consumption of investigated plants and their products to entire human population. Data also alarming human to be more careful about the plant lectins reacting with blood groups as the similar reactions ...

  14. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Lectin Analysis of the Surface of the Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense by Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Yagoda-Shagam, Janet; Barton, Larry L.; Reed, William P.; Chiovetti, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface of Azospirillum brasilense was probed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectins, with binding determined by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. Cells from nitrogen-fixing or ammonium-assimilating cultures reacted similarly to FITC-labeled lectins, with lectin binding in the following order: Griffonia simplicifolia II agglutinin > Griffonia simplicifolia I agglutinin > Triticum vulgaris agglutinin > Glycine max agglutinin > Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin >...

  15. Enhancement of anti-Aeromonas salmonicida activity in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) macrophages by a mannose-binding lectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, C.A.; Johnson, S.C.; Ewart, K.V.; Brown, L.L.; Ross, N.W.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a calcium-dependent mannose-binding lectin isolated from the serum of Atlantic salmon on Aeromonassalmonicida viability and the anti-A. salmonicida activity of Atlantic salmon macrophages. In the absence of other factors, binding of this lectin at concentrations of 0.8, 4.0 and 20.0 ng ml−1 to virulent A. salmonicida failed to significantly reduce (P>0.05) cell viability. However, binding of the lectin to A. salmonicida did result in significant (P≤0.05) dose-dependent increases in phagocytosis, and bactericidal activity. Significant increases (P≤0.05) were also observed in phagocyte respiratory burst activity within the lectin concentration range of 4.0–20.0 ng ml−1 but the stimulation was not dose dependent at these lectin concentrations. At the lowest lectin concentration tested (0.32 ng ml−1), a significant decrease (P≤0.05) in respiratory burst was observed. The structure and activity of this lectin are similar to that of mammalian mannose-binding lectins, which are known to play a pivotal role in innate immunity. The presence of this lectin may be an important defense mechanism against Gram-negative bacteria such as A. salmonicida.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of HML, a lectin from the red marine alga Hypnea musciformis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Celso S.; Gallego del Sol, Francisca [Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Cavada, Benildo S.; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago Do [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE 60451-970 (Brazil); Nunes, Eudismar Vale; Sampaio, Alexandre H. [Laboratorio de Bioquímica Marinha, Departamento de Engenharia de Pesca, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE 60451-970 (Brazil); Calvete, Juan J., E-mail: jcalvete@ibv.csic.es [Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-11-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a red marine alga lectin isolated from H. musciformis is reported. HML, a lectin from the red marine alga Hypnea musciformis, defines a novel lectin family. Orthorhombic crystals of HML belonging to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} grew within three weeks at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A complete data set was collected at 2.4 Å resolution. HML is the first marine alga lectin to be crystallized.

  17. C-type natriuretic peptide ameliorates pulmonary fibrosis by acting on lung fibroblasts in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toru; Nojiri, Takashi; Hino, Jun; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Miura, Koichi; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Zenitani, Masahiro; Takabatake, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2016-02-19

    Pulmonary fibrosis has high rates of mortality and morbidity; however, no effective pharmacological therapy has been established. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), a member of the natriuretic peptide family, selectively binds to the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase (GC)-B receptor and exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects in various organs through vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts that have a cell-surface GC-B receptor. Given the pathophysiological importance of fibroblast activation in pulmonary fibrosis, we hypothesized that the anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of exogenous CNP against bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis were exerted in part by the effect of CNP on pulmonary fibroblasts. C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups, CNP-treated (2.5 μg/kg/min) and vehicle, to evaluate BLM-induced (1 mg/kg) pulmonary fibrosis and inflammation. A periostin-CNP transgenic mouse model exhibiting CNP overexpression in fibroblasts was generated and examined for the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of CNP via fibroblasts in vivo. Additionally, we assessed CNP attenuation of TGF-β-induced differentiation into myofibroblasts by using immortalized human lung fibroblasts stably expressing GC-B receptors. Furthermore, to investigate whether CNP acts on human lung fibroblasts in a clinical setting, we obtained primary-cultured fibroblasts from surgically resected lungs of patients with lung cancer and analyzed levels of GC-B mRNA transcription. CNP reduced mRNA levels of the profibrotic cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, as well as collagen deposition and the fibrotic area in lungs of mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, similar CNP effects were observed in transgenic mice exhibiting fibroblast-specific CNP overexpression. In cultured-lung fibroblasts, CNP treatment attenuated TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2 and increased mRNA and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin and SM22

  18. Langerhans Cells Prevent Autoimmunity via Expansion of Keratinocyte Antigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Y. Kitashima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cells (LCs are antigen-presenting cells in the epidermis whose roles in antigen-specific immune regulation remain incompletely understood. Desmoglein 3 (Dsg3 is a keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion molecule critical for epidermal integrity and an autoantigen in the autoimmune blistering disease pemphigus. Although antibody-mediated disease mechanisms in pemphigus are extensively characterized, the T cell aspect of this autoimmune disease still remains poorly understood. Herein, we utilized a mouse model of CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmunity against Dsg3 to show that acquisition of Dsg3 and subsequent presentation to T cells by LCs depended on the C-type lectin langerin. The lack of LCs led to enhanced autoimmunity with impaired Dsg3-specific regulatory T cell expansion. LCs expressed the IL-2 receptor complex and the disruption of IL-2 signaling in LCs attenuated LC-mediated regulatory T cell expansion in vitro, demonstrating that direct IL-2 signaling shapes LC function. These data establish that LCs mediate peripheral tolerance against an epidermal autoantigen and point to langerin and IL-2 signaling pathways as attractive targets for achieving tolerogenic responses particularly in autoimmune blistering diseases such as pemphigus.

  19. Diagnosis of myocardial infarction based on lectin-induced erythrocyte agglutination: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsi, József; Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Reichert, Thomas; Laffers, Wiebke; Marecka, Monika; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Piltz, Joachim; Esche, Hans-Jürgen; Wolf, Günther; Dähnert, Ingo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is an acute life-threatening disease with a high incidence worldwide. Aim of this study was to test lectin-carbohydrate binding-induced red blood cell (RBC) agglutination as an innovative tool for fast, precise and cost effective diagnosis of MI. Five lectins (Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA), Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA), Artocarpus agglutinin (ArA), Triticum agglutinin (TA)) were tested for ability to differentiate between agglutination characteristics in patients with MI (n = 101) or angina pectoris without MI (AP) (n = 34) and healthy volunteers (HV) as control (n =68) . RBC agglutination was analyzed by light absorbance of a stirred RBC suspension in the green to red light spectrum in an agglutimeter (amtec, Leipzig, Germany) for 15 min after lectin addition. Mean cell count in aggregates was estimated from light absorbance by a mathematical model. Each lectin induced RBC agglutination. RCA led to the strongest RBC agglutination (~500 RBCs/aggregate), while the others induced substantially slower agglutination and lead to smaller aggregate sizes (5-150 RBCs/aggregate). For all analyzed lectins the lectin-induced RBC agglutination of MI or AP patients was generally higher than for HV. However, only PHA induced agglutination that clearly distinguished MI from HV. Variance analysis showed that aggregate size after 15 min. agglutination induced by PHA was significantly higher in the MI group (143 RBCs/ aggregate) than in the HV (29 RBC-s/aggregate, p = 0.000). We hypothesize that pathological changes during MI induce modification of the carbohydrate composition on the RBC membrane and thus modify RBC agglutination. Occurrence of carbohydrate-lectin binding sites on RBC membranes provides evidence about MI. Due to significant difference in the rate of agglutination between MI > HV the differentiation between these groups is possible based on PHA-induced RBC-agglutination. This novel assay

  20. Lectin binding to extracellularly melanized microfilariae of Brugia malayi from the hemocoel of Anopheles quadrimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, J K; Mikarts, L L; Chikilian, M L; Knight, J W; Bradley, T J

    1995-11-01

    Binding patterns of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)- and gold-conjugated lectins to extracellularly melanized sheathed and exsheathed microfilariae of subperiodic Brugia malayi, isolated from and in situ in the abdominal hemocoel of Anopheles quadrimaculatus 72-hr postinfection, were examined. Five FITC-conjugated lectins [Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Arachis hypogaea (peanut agglutinin-PNA), Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin-WGA), Lens culinaris (lentil-LCH), and Concanavalin A (Con A)] with specificities for different carbohydrate moieties were tested for binding to isolated melanized microfilariae and observed with transmitted light and fluorescence microscopy. All five FITC-lectins bound strongly to the acellular material accompanying the melanin deposits on the surface of isolated melanized microfilariae. Significant inhibition of FITC-lectin binding occurred when lectins were preincubated with their complementary carbohydrates before testing. H. pomatia agglutinin binding was totally inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Other lectins were partially inhibited, such as PNA by galactose and lactose; WGA by N-acetylneuraminic acid; LCH by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, mannose, glucose, and methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside; and Con A by mannose and methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside. Three gold-conjugated lectins (HPA, PNA, and Con A), examined by using transmission electron microscopy, bound to the outer surface of the acellular material associated with the melanin deposits on isolated melanized microfilarial sheaths and melanized microfilariae and to the remnants of lysed hemocytes found in the proximity of the melanized deposits. Con A in the presence of gold-labeled horseradish peroxidase, examined by using transmission electron microscopy, showed random binding within the melanized capsule formed around the microfilarial sheath in situ. These results indicate that the acellular material accompanying melanin deposits on melanized

  1. Proteins with an Euonymus lectin-like domain are ubiquitous in Embryophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ongenaert Maté

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cloning of the Euonymus lectin led to the discovery of a novel domain that also occurs in some stress-induced plant proteins. The distribution and the diversity of proteins with an Euonymus lectin (EUL domain were investigated using detailed analysis of sequences in publicly accessible genome and transcriptome databases. Results Comprehensive in silico analyses indicate that the recently identified Euonymus europaeus lectin domain represents a conserved structural unit of a novel family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins, which will further be referred to as the Euonymus lectin (EUL family. The EUL domain is widespread among plants. Analysis of retrieved sequences revealed that some sequences consist of a single EUL domain linked to an unrelated N-terminal domain whereas others comprise two in tandem arrayed EUL domains. A new classification system for these lectins is proposed based on the overall domain architecture. Evolutionary relationships among the sequences with EUL domains are discussed. Conclusion The identification of the EUL family provides the first evidence for the occurrence in terrestrial plants of a highly conserved plant specific domain. The widespread distribution of the EUL domain strikingly contrasts the more limited or even narrow distribution of most other lectin domains found in plants. The apparent omnipresence of the EUL domain is indicative for a universal role of this lectin domain in plants. Although there is unambiguous evidence that several EUL domains possess carbohydrate-binding activity further research is required to corroborate the carbohydrate-binding properties of different members of the EUL family.

  2. Role of aromatic amino acids in carbohydrate binding of plant lectins : Laser photo chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization study of hevein domain-containing lectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebert, HC; vonderLieth, CW; Kaptein, R; Beintema, JJ; Dijkstra, K; vanNuland, N; Soedjanaatmadja, UMS; Rice, A; Vliegenthart, JFG; Wright, CS; Gabius, HJ

    Carbohydrate recognition by lectins often involves the side chains of tyrosine, tryptophan, and histidine residues. These moieties are able to produce chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) signals after laser irradiation in the presence of a suitable radical pair-generating dye.

  3. Adjuvant effects of mannose-binding lectin ligands on the immune response to infectious bronchitis vaccine in chickens with high or low serum mannose-binding lectin concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærup, Rikke Munkholm; Dalgaard, Tina Sørensen; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a major role in the immune response as a soluble pattern-recognition receptor. MBL deficiency and susceptibility to different types of infections have been subject to extensive studies over the last decades. In humans and chickens, several studies have shown tha...... chickens receiving vaccine and FOS makes FOS a potential adjuvant candidate in an IBV vaccine....

  4. A lectin with highly potent inhibitory activity toward breast cancer cells from edible tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. nagaimo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yau Sang Chan

    Full Text Available A 70-kDa galactose-specific lectin was purified from the tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. nagaimo. The purification involved three chromatographic steps: anion exchange chromatography on a Q-Sepharose column, FPLC-anion exchange chromatography on a Mono Q column, and FPLC-gel filtration on a Superdex 75 column. The purified nagaimo lectin presented as a single 35-kDa band in reducing SDS-PAGE while it exhibited a 70-kDa single band in non-reducing SDS-PAGE suggesting its dimeric nature. Nagaimo lectin displayed moderate thermostability, retaining full hemagglutinating activity after heating up to 62°C for 30 minutes. It also manifested stability over a wide pH range from pH 2 to 13. Nagaimo lectin was a galactose-specific lectin, as evidenced by binding with galactose and galactose-containing sugars such as lactose and raffinose. The minimum concentration of galactose, lactose and raffinose required to exert an inhibitory effect on hemagglutinating activity of nagaimo lectin was 20 mM, 5 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Nagaimo lectin inhibited the growth of some cancer cell lines including breast cancer MCF7 cells, hepatoma HepG2 cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells, with IC(50 values of 3.71 µM, 7.12 µM and 19.79 µM, respectively, after 24 hour treatment with nagaimo lectin. The induction of phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization indicated that nagaimo lectin evoked apoptosis in MCF7 cells. However, the anti-proliferative activity of nagaimo lectin was not blocked by application of galactose, signifying that the activity was not related to the carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin.

  5. Terminal N-Acetylgalactosamine-Specific Leguminous Lectin from Wisteria japonica as a Probe for Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Keisuke; Teruya, Futaba; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Millettia japonica was recently reclassified into the genus Wisteria japonica based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences. Because the seed of Wisteria floribunda expresses leguminous lectins with unique N-acetylgalactosamine-binding specificity, we purified lectin from Wisteria japonica seeds using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis demonstrated that unlike Wisteria floribunda and Wisteria brachybotrys lectins, which bind to both terminal N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose residues, Wisteria japonica lectin (WJA) specifically bound to both α- and β-linked terminal N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose residues on oligosaccharides and glycoproteins. Further, frontal affinity chromatography using more than 100 2-aminopyridine-labeled and p-nitrophenyl-derivatized oligosaccharides demonstrated that the ligands with the highest affinity for Wisteria japonica lectin were GalNAcβ1-3GlcNAc and GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, with Ka values of 9.5 × 104 and 1.4 × 105 M-1, respectively. In addition, when binding was assessed in a variety of cell lines, Wisteria japonica lectin bound specifically to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells while other Wisteria lectins bound equally to all of the cell lines tested. Wisteria japonica lectin binding to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells was dramatically decreased in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose, mannose, or N-acetylglucosamine, and was completely abrogated by β-hexosaminidase-digestion of these cells. These results clearly demonstrate that Wisteria japonica lectin binds to terminal N-acetylgalactosamine but not galactose. In addition, histochemical analysis of human squamous cell carcinoma tissue sections demonstrated that Wisteria japonica lectin specifically bound to differentiated cancer tissues but not normal tissue. This novel binding characteristic of Wisteria japonica lectin has the potential to become a powerful tool for clinical applications. PMID:24349556

  6. Terminal N-acetylgalactosamine-specific leguminous lectin from Wisteria japonica as a probe for human lung squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Soga

    Full Text Available Millettia japonica was recently reclassified into the genus Wisteria japonica based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences. Because the seed of Wisteria floribunda expresses leguminous lectins with unique N-acetylgalactosamine-binding specificity, we purified lectin from Wisteria japonica seeds using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis demonstrated that unlike Wisteria floribunda and Wisteria brachybotrys lectins, which bind to both terminal N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose residues, Wisteria japonica lectin (WJA specifically bound to both α- and β-linked terminal N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose residues on oligosaccharides and glycoproteins. Further, frontal affinity chromatography using more than 100 2-aminopyridine-labeled and p-nitrophenyl-derivatized oligosaccharides demonstrated that the ligands with the highest affinity for Wisteria japonica lectin were GalNAcβ1-3GlcNAc and GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, with K(a values of 9.5 × 10(4 and 1.4 × 10(5 M(-1, respectively. In addition, when binding was assessed in a variety of cell lines, Wisteria japonica lectin bound specifically to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells while other Wisteria lectins bound equally to all of the cell lines tested. Wisteria japonica lectin binding to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells was dramatically decreased in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose, mannose, or N-acetylglucosamine, and was completely abrogated by β-hexosaminidase-digestion of these cells. These results clearly demonstrate that Wisteria japonica lectin binds to terminal N-acetylgalactosamine but not galactose. In addition, histochemical analysis of human squamous cell carcinoma tissue sections demonstrated that Wisteria japonica lectin specifically bound to differentiated cancer tissues but not normal tissue. This novel binding characteristic of Wisteria japonica lectin has the potential to become a powerful tool for clinical applications.

  7. Entamoeba histolytica: Adhesins and Lectins in the Trophozoite Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Aguirre García

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amebiasis in humans and is responsible for 100,000 deaths annually, making it the third leading cause of death due to a protozoan parasite. Pathogenesis appears to result from the potent cytotoxic activity of the parasite, which kills host cells within minutes. Although the mechanism is unknown, it is well established to be contact-dependent. The life cycle of the parasite alternates with two forms: the resistant cyst and the invasive trophozoite. The adhesive interactions between the parasite and surface glycoconjugates of host cells, as well as those lining the epithelia, are determinants for invasion of human tissues, for its cytotoxic activity, and finally for the outcome of the disease. In this review we present an overview of the information available on the amebic lectins and adhesins that are responsible of those adhesive interactions and we also refer to their effect on the host immune response. Finally, we present some concluding remarks and perspectives in the field.

  8. Carbohydrate-binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.) bulb lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, H; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Goldstein, I J

    1990-06-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus; NPA) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.; HHA) lectins, isolated from extracts of their bulbs by affinity chromatography on immobilized mannose, was studied by quantitative precipitation, sugar hapten inhibition, and affinity chromatography on the immobilized lectins. These lectins gave strong precipitation reactions with several yeast mannans, but did not precipitate with alpha-D-glucans (e.g., dextrans and glycogen). Interestingly, both lectins reacted strongly with yeast galactomannans having multiple nonreducing terminal alpha-D-galactosyl groups, a synthetic linear alpha-1,6-mannan, and an alpha-1,3-mannan (DP = 30). Treatment of the linear alpha-1,3-mannan with periodate, resulting in oxidation of the terminal, nonreducing mannosyl group, did not reduce its reactivity with NPA or HHA. Taken together, these observations suggest that NPA and HHA react not only with terminal but also with internal alpha-D-mannosyl residues. Sugar hapten inhibition studies showed these lectins to possess the greatest specific activity for alpha-D-mannosyl units whereas D-Glc and D-GlcNAc did not inhibit either lectin precipitation system. Of the oligosaccharides tested, the best inhibitor of NPA interaction was alpha-1,6-linked mannotriose, which was twice as good an inhibitor as Man alpha 1,6Man alpha-O-Me and 10 times better than methyl alpha-D-mannoside. On the other hand, oligosaccharides containing either 1,3- or 1,6-linked mannosyl units were good inhibitors of the HHA-mannan precipitation system (6- to 20-fold more active than D-Man). These results indicate that both lectins appear to possess an extended binding site(s) complementary to at least three 1,6-linked alpha-mannosyl units. Various glycosylasparagine glycopeptides which contain alpha-1,6-Man units were retarded on the immobilized NPA column. On the other hand, those containing either alpha-1,3- or alpha-1,6-mannosyl residues were

  9. Reducing Macro- and Microheterogeneity of N-Glycans Enables the Crystal Structure of the Lectin and EGF-Like Domains of Human L-Selectin To Be Solved at 1.9 Å Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedepohl, Stefanie; Dernedde, Jens; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Tauber, Rudolf; Saenger, Wolfram; Bulut, Haydar

    2017-07-04

    L-Selectin, a cell-adhesion receptor on the surface of most leukocytes, contains seven N-glycosylation sites. In order to obtain the crystal structure of human L-selectin, we expressed a shortened version of L-selectin comprising the C-type lectin and EGF-like domains (termed LE) and systematically analysed mutations of the three glycosylation sites (Asn22, Asn66 and Asn139) in order to reduce macroheterogeneity. After we further removed microheterogeneity, we obtained crystals that diffracted X-rays up to 1.9 Å from a variant (LE010) with exchanges N22Q and N139Q and one GlcNAc2 Man5 N-glycan chain attached to Asn66. Crystal-structure analysis showed that the terminal mannose of GlcNAc2 Man5 of one LE010 molecule was coordinated to Ca(2+) in the binding site of a symmetry-related LE010. The orientation of the lectin and EGF-like domain was similar to the described "bent" conformation of E- and P-selectins. The Ca(2+) -binding site reflects the binding mode seen in E- and P-selectin structures co-crystallised with ligands. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Isolation and properties of a lectin from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia, Scop.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapner, K D; Robbins, J E

    1979-09-29

    A glycoprotein capable of binding simple carbohydrates and causing hemagglutination has been isolated from seeds of the legume plant sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia, Scop. var Eski). The phytolectin was prepared by affinity chromatography of pH 7.0 sodium phosphate extracts on columns of Sepharose-4B containing covalently attached D-mannose. Molecular weight determinations showed the lectin to be a dimer consisting of 26 000 dalton, non-covalently associated monomers. Amino acid analyses indicated high amounts of aspartate, glutamate, threonine and serine which accounted for 41% of all amino acids. One residue of cysteine was present and methionine was totally absent. The lectin contained 2.6% (w/w) neutral carbohydrate and two residues of N-acetylglucosamine/monomer. Carbohydrate-binding specificity was directed toward D-mannose and D-glucose and their alpha-glycosidic derivatives. The purified protein agglutinated cat erythrocytes at 5 micrograms/ml. Antiserum to seed lectin showed a single common immunoprecipitation line in Ouchterlony double diffusion against both the seed and root antigen. Lectin isolated from sainfoin seedling roots showed molecular weight, amino acid and carbohydrate values similar to that of the seed lectin.

  11. Sub 2-μm macroporous silica particles derivatized for enhanced lectin affinity enrichment of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Benjamin F; Mann, Amanda K P; Skrabalak, Sara E; Novotny, Milos V

    2013-02-05

    A new, mechanically stable silica microparticle with macrosized internal pores (1.6 μm particles with 100 nm pores) has been developed for chromatography. The particles are characterized by an extensive network of interconnected macropores with a high intraparticle void volume, as observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They are synthesized by an aerosol assembly technique called ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP). The particles have a high surface area for a macroporous material, ∼200 m(2)/g, making them suitable for large biomolecular separations. To demonstrate their potential for bioseparations, they have been functionalized with lectins for affinity enrichment of glycoproteins. The material was derivatized with two lectins, Concanavalin A (Con A) and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), and binding properties were tested with standard glycoproteins. The columns exhibited excellent binding capacities for microaffinity enrichment: Con A was able to bind 75 μg of a standard glycoprotein in a 50 × 1 mm column. Following initial tests, the lectin microcolumns were utilized for enrichment of glycoproteins from 1 μL volumes of blood serum samples, performed in triplicate for each lectin. The enriched serum fractions were subjected to side-by-side glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling analyses with mass spectrometry to show that the new particles offer excellent sensitivity for microscale analyses of precious biological sample materials. The unique combination of the macroporous architecture and small particle diameter suggests the material may have advantages for conventional modes of chromatographic separation of macromolecules in an ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) format.

  12. PLecDom: a program for identification and analysis of plant lectin domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridhar, Smriti; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Yadav, Gitanjali

    2009-07-01

    PLecDom is a program for detection of Plant Lectin Domains in a polypeptide or EST sequence, followed by a classification of the identified domains into known families. The web server is a collection of plant lectin domain families represented by alignments and profile Hidden Markov Models. PLecDom was developed after a rigorous analysis of evolutionary relationships between available sequences of lectin domains with known specificities. Users can test their sequences for potential lectin domains, catalog the identified domains into broad substrate classes, estimate the extent of divergence of new domains with existing homologs, extract domain boundaries and examine flanking sequences for further analysis. The high prediction accuracy of PLecDom combined with the ease with which it handles large scale input, enabled us to apply the program to protein and EST data from 48 plant genome-sequencing projects in various stages of completion. Our results represent a significant enrichment of the currently annotated plant lectins, and highlight potential targets for biochemical characterization. The search algorithm requires input in fasta format and is designed to process simultaneous connection requests from multiple users, such that huge sets of input sequences can be scanned in a matter of seconds. PLecDom is available at http://www.nipgr.res.in/plecdom.html.

  13. Purification of a lectin from Eugenia uniflora L. seeds and its potential antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M D L; Andrade, C A S; Santos-Magalhães, N S; Coelho, L C B B; Teixeira, J A; Carneiro-da-Cunha, M G; Correia, M T S

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the antimicrobial properties of a purified lectin from Eugenia uniflora L. seeds. The E. uniflora lectin (EuniSL) was isolated from the seed extract and purified by ion-exchange chromatography in DEAE-Sephadex with a purification factor of 11.68. The purified lectin showed a single band on denaturing electrophoresis, with a molecular mass of 67 kDa. EuniSL agglutinated rabbit and human erythrocytes with a higher specificity for rabbit erythrocytes. The haemagglutination was not inhibited by the tested carbohydrates but glycoproteins exerted a strong inhibitory action. The lectin proved to be thermo resistant with the highest stability at pH 6.5 and divalent ions did not affect its activity. EuniSL demonstrated a remarkable nonselective antibacterial activity. EuniSL strongly inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella sp. with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 1.5 microg ml(-1), and moderately inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus sp. and Escherichia coli with a MIC of 16.5 microg ml(-1). EuniSL was found to be effective against bacteria. The strong antibacterial activity of the studied lectin indicates a high potential for clinical microbiology and therapeutic applications.

  14. Inhibition of Pasteurella multocida Adhesion to Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium Using Lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Patricia Carrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a panel of lectins to inhibit the ability of Pasteurella multocida to adhere to and affect the rabbit respiratory epithelium. Nasal septa from rabbit fetuses were cultured with various lectins before the addition of P. multocida. The percentage of bacteria adhering to the epithelium was evaluated semiquantitatively by indirect immunoperoxidase (IIP staining. The goblet cells (GCs were counted in semithin sections stained with toluidine blue and served as the main morphological criterion to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the lectins. The lectins PNA, WGA, RCA120, and DBA significantly inhibited the adhesion of P. multocida to the ciliated epithelium P<0.05 and prevented the pathogen-induced increase in the number of GCs P<0.05 compared with those of positive control tissues. In addition, VVA, SJA, UEA I, DSL, SBA, and ECL significantly inhibited the increase in GCs compared with that of the control tissues. The results suggest that less aggressive therapeutic strategies, such as treatment with lectins, may represent alternative approaches to control bacterial respiratory infections.

  15. Characterization and cloning of GNA-like lectin from the mushroom Marasmius oreades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Fukudome, Ayako; Yamashita, Ryoko; Minami, Yuji; Yagi, Fumio; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2012-10-01

    A new mannose-recognizing lectin (MOL) was purified on an asialofetuin-column from fruiting bodies of Marasmius oreades grown in Japan. The lectin (MOA) from the fruiting bodies of the same fungi is well known to be a ribosome-inactivating type lectin that recognizes blood-group B sugar. However, in our preliminary investigation, MOA was not found in Japanese fruiting bodies of M. oreades, and instead, MOL was isolated. Gel filtration showed MOL is a homodimer noncovalently associated with two subunits of 13 kDa. The N-terminal sequence of MOL was blocked. The sequence of MOL was determined by cloning from cDNA and by protein sequencing of enzyme-digested peptides. The sequence shows mannose-binding motifs of bulb-type mannose-binding lectins from plants, and similarity to the sequences. Analyses of sugar-binding specificity by hemagglutination inhibition revealed the preference of MOL toward mannose and thyroglobulin, but asialofetuin was the strongest inhibitor of glycoproteins tested. Furthermore, glycan-array analysis showed that the specificity pattern of MOL was different from those of typical mannose-specific lectins. MOL preferred complex-type N-glycans rather than high-mannose N-glycans.

  16. Mannose-binding lectin impairs Leptospira activity through the inhibitory effect on the motility of cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Guo, Yijie; Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Tomioka, Rintaro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2015-02-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays key role in lectin pathway of innate immunity, and shows the ability of triggering opsonization intermediately. Substantial increase in the serum level of MBL has been confirmed during leptospirosis, which caused by a pathogenic spirochete, Leptospira. Leptospira has a fascinating locomotion pattern, which simultaneously gyrating and swimming forward, such motility enables that Leptospira is difficult to be captured by immune cells if without any assistance. In this study, the effect of mannose-binding lectin to Leptospira was quantitatively investigated by measuring some kinematic parameters, to discover the mechanism behind MBL-mediated immune responses during leptospiral infection. The results showed that mannose-binding lectin is capable of inhibiting the motility of Leptospira by transforming free swimming cells to tumbled rotating cells, resulted in the increase number of rotating cells. Otherwise, decrease in rotation rate of rotating cell has been observed. However, the swimming speed of swimming Leptospira cells showed no observable change under the effect of MBL. The inhibitory effect were only valid in a relatively short period, Leptospira cells regained their original motility after 2 h. This raises an interesting topic that Leptospira is somehow able to escape from the inhibitory effect of MBL by dragging such unfavorable molecules toward to the cell end and eventually throwing it out. The inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of Leptospira is expected to provide a new insight into lectin pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Receptors of garlic (Allium sativum) lectins and their role in insecticidal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Santosh K; Singh, Pradhyumna K

    2012-08-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) lectins are promising candidate molecules for the protection against chewing (lepidopteran) as well as sap sucking (homopteran) insect pests. Molecular mechanism of toxicity and interaction of lectins with midgut receptor proteins has been described in many reports. Lectins show its effect right from sensory receptors of mouth parts by disrupting the membrane integrity and food detection ability. Subsequently, enter into the gut lumen and interact with midgut glycosylated proteins like alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aminopeptidase-N (APN), cadherin-like proteins, polycalins, sucrase, symbionin and others. These proteins play critical role in life cycle of insect directly or indirectly. Lectins interfere with the activity of these proteins and causes physiological disorders leading to the death of insects. Lectins further transported across the insect gut, accumulated in various body parts (like haemolymph and ovary) and interact with intracellular proteins like symbionin and cytochrome p450. Binding with cytochrome p450 (which involve in ecdysone synthesis) might interfere in the development of insects, which results in growth retardation and pre-mature death.

  18. Targeting the Immune System with Plant Lectins to Combat Microbial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannyson J. B. Jandú

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The arsenal of drugs available to treat infections caused by eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbes has been declining exponentially due to antimicrobial resistance phenomenon, leading to an urgent need to develop new therapeutic strategies. Host-directed immunotherapy has been reported as an attractive option to treat microbial infections. It consists in the improvement of host defenses by increasing the expression of inflammatory mediators and/or controlling of inflammation-induced tissue injury. Although the in vitro antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities of lectins have been extensively demonstrated, few studies have evaluated their in vivo effects on experimental models of infections. This review aims to highlight the experimental use of immunomodulatory plant lectins to improve the host immune response against microbial infections. Lectins have been used in vivo both prophylactically and therapeutically resulting in the increased survival of mice under microbial challenge. Other studies successfully demonstrated that lectins could be used in combination with parasite antigens in order to induce a more efficient immunization. Therefore, these plant lectins represent new candidates for management of microbial infections. Furthermore, immunotherapeutic studies have improved our knowledge about the mechanisms involved in host–pathogen interactions, and may also help in the discovery of new drug targets.

  19. Lectin characterization of gonococci from an outbreak caused by penicillin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalla, W O; Rice, R J; Biddle, J W; Jeanlouis, Y; Larsen, S A; Whittington, W L

    1985-01-01

    A total of 40 Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, representing 19 penicillin-resistant isolates (from 8 heterosexual patients and 11 homosexual patients) and 21 penicillin-susceptible isolates (from 15 heterosexual patients and 6 homosexual patients) and obtained from the same geographic area, were examined. Lectin agglutination patterns were based on the reactivity of the isolates with the following 14 lectins: concanavalin A, Lens culinaris, Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, Arachis hypogeae (peanut agglutinin), Glycine max (soybean agglutinin), Dolichos bifloris, Griffonia simplicifolia II, Solanum tuberosum (potato starch agglutinin), Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin), Limax flavus, Phaseolus vulgaris, Ulex europaeus I, and Lotus tetragonolobus. All isolates were serotyped with monoclonal antibodies specific for gonococcal outer membrane protein I and auxotyped, and the plasmid content was determined. Resistant patient isolates were selected for their decreased penicillin susceptibility, and control isolates were selected for their penicillin susceptibility. Even though the patient isolates demonstrated resistance to penicillin, no phenotypic differences in lectin-grouping patterns were demonstrated between the two study groups; i.e., two predominant lectin groups were observed. No resistance-associated plasmids were detected. All patient isolates were serogroup IB (serovars IB-1, IB-2, and IB-4), whereas 12 of 21 control isolates were serogroup IA (P less than 0.05). Isolates obtained from different anatomical sites in the same patient (cervical and rectal) agreed with regard to lectin patterns and serovars but not auxotypes. PMID:3935658

  20. Inhibition of Pasteurella multocida Adhesion to Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium Using Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Magda Patricia; Martinez, Nhora María; Patiño, María del Pilar; Iregui, Carlos Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a panel of lectins to inhibit the ability of Pasteurella multocida to adhere to and affect the rabbit respiratory epithelium. Nasal septa from rabbit fetuses were cultured with various lectins before the addition of P. multocida. The percentage of bacteria adhering to the epithelium was evaluated semiquantitatively by indirect immunoperoxidase (IIP) staining. The goblet cells (GCs) were counted in semithin sections stained with toluidine blue and served as the main morphological criterion to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the lectins. The lectins PNA, WGA, RCA120, and DBA significantly inhibited the adhesion of P. multocida to the ciliated epithelium (P < 0.05) and prevented the pathogen-induced increase in the number of GCs (P < 0.05) compared with those of positive control tissues. In addition, VVA, SJA, UEA I, DSL, SBA, and ECL significantly inhibited the increase in GCs compared with that of the control tissues. The results suggest that less aggressive therapeutic strategies, such as treatment with lectins, may represent alternative approaches to control bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:25810949

  1. Structural studies and nociceptive activity of a native lectin from Platypodium elegans seeds (nPELa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Araripe, David Alencar; Silva, Ivanice Bezerra; Pinto-Junior, Vanir Reis; Osterne, Vinicius Jose Silva; Neco, Antonio Hadson Bastos; Laranjeira, Eva Pollyanna Peixe; Lossio, Claudia Figueiredo; Correia, Jorge Luis Almeida; Pires, Alana Freitas; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago

    2018-02-01

    A native lectin (nPELa), purified from seeds of the species Platypodium elegans, Dalbergieae tribe, was crystallized and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction crystallography and bioinformatics tools. The obtained crystals diffracted to 1.6Å resolution, and nPELa structure were solved through molecular substitution. In addition, nPELa has a metal binding site and a conserved carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) similar to other Dalbergieae tribe lectins, such as PAL (Pterocarpus angolensis) and CTL (Centrolobium tomentosum). Molecular docking analysis indicated high affinity of this lectin for different mannosides, mainly trimannosides, formed by α-1,3 or α-1,6 glycosidic bond, as evidenced by the obtained scores. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to demonstrate the structural behavior of nPELa in aqueous solution. In solution, nPELa was highly stable, and structural modifications in its carbohydrate recognition site allowed interaction between the lectin and the different ligands. Different modifications were observed during simulations for each one of the glycans, which included different hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions through changes in the relevant residues. In addition, nPELa was evaluated for its nociceptive activity in mice and was reported to be the first lectin of the Dalbergieae tribe to show CRD-dependent hypernociceptive activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Lectins from bulbs of the Chinese daffodil Narcissus tazetta (family Amaryllidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, L S; Ng, T B; Geng, Y; Ooi, V E

    2000-01-01

    The isolation of three lectins with similar N-terminal amino acid sequences from the bulbs of the Chinese daffodil Narcissus tazetta was achieved. The isolation protocol involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on mannose-agarose, and fast protein liquid chromatography-gel filtration on Superose 12. The lectins were all adsorbed on mannose-agarose and demonstrated a single band with a molecular weight of 13 kDa in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a single 26 kDa peak in gel filtration, indicating that they were mannose-binding, dimeric proteins. The lectins differed in hemagglutinating activity, with the magnitude of the activity correlating with the ionic strength of the buffer required to elute the lectin from the DEAE-cellulose column. The bulb lectin did not exert potent cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines or fetal bovine lung cells but inhibited syncytium formation in, and reinstated viability of, fetal bovine lung cells infected with bovine immunodeficiency virus.

  3. Antibody-mediated activation of the classical pathway of complement may compensate for mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Anja; Garred, Peter; Wildenberg, Manon E.; Lynch, Nicholas J.; Munoz, Jeric R.; Zuiverloon, Tahlita C. M.; Bouwman, Lee H.; Schlagwein, Nicole; Fallaux van den Houten, Francien C.; Faber-Krol, Maria C.; Madsen, Hans O.; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Daha, Mohamed R.

    2004-01-01

    Deficiency of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a recognition molecule of the lectin pathway of complement, is associated with increased susceptibility to infections. The high frequency of MBL deficiency suggests that defective MBL-mediated innate immunity can be compensated by alternative defense

  4. Chicken Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene variants with influence on MBL serum concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærup, Rikke Munkholm; Norup, Liselotte Rothmann; Skjødt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a major role in the innate immune defence by activating the lectin complement pathway or by acting as an opsonin. Two forms of MBL have been characterised from several species, but for humans and chickens, only one form of functional MBL has been described...

  5. Extreme High Prevalence of a Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin (MBL2) Genotype in Native South American West Andean Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown tha...

  6. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayron Alves Vasconcelos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL, Vatairea macrocarpa (VML, Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL, Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL, and Hypnea musciformis (HML showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units. The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins.

  7. Biochemical characterisation of lectin from Indian hyacinth plant bulbs with potential inhibitory action against human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sanjay; Rawat, Ravindra Singh; Khandai, Santripti; Kumar, Mukesh; Jena, Sidhartha S; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A; Kumar, Sanjit

    2017-12-01

    This work describes purification and characterisation of a monocot mannose-specific lectin from Hyacinth bulbs. The purified lectin has a molecular mass of ∼30kDa in reducing as well as in non-reducing SDS-PAGE. In hydrodynamic studies by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) showed that purified lectin was monomeric in nature with a molecular size of 2.38±0.03nm. Agglutination activity of purified lectin was confirmed by rabbit erythrocytes and its agglutination activity was inhibited by d-mannose and a glycoprotein (ovalbumin). Glycoprotein nature of purified lectin was confirmed by Periodic Acid Schiff's (PAS) stain. Purified lectin showed moderate pH and thermal stability by retaining hemagglutination activity from pH 6-8 and temperature up to 60°C. It also suppressed the growth of human colon cancer cells (Caco-2) and cervical cancer cells (HeLa) with IC50 values of 127μg/mL and 158μg/mL respectively, after 24-h treatment. Morphological studies of treated cells (Caco-2 and HeLa) with hyacinth lectin by AO/EB dual staining indicated that purified lectin is capable of inducing apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Lectin Binding Patterns Identify Distinct Heart Regions in Giant Danio (Devario aequipinnatus) and Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Trina; May, Adam; Quinn, Joshua; Lafontant, Dominique S.; Shifatu, Olubusola; He, Wei; Gonzalez-Rosa, Juan M.; Burns, Geoffrey C.; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, Alan R.; Lafontant, Pascal J.

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins commonly used as biochemical and histochemical tools to study glycoconjugate (glycoproteins, glycolipids) expression patterns in cells, tissues, including mammalian hearts. However, lectins have received little attention in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and giant danio (Devario aequipinnatus) heart studies. Here, we sought to determine the binding patterns of six commonly used lectins—wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin, Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin (BS lectin), concanavalin A (Con A), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA I), and Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin)—in these hearts. Con A showed broad staining in the myocardium. WGA stained cardiac myocyte borders, with binding markedly stronger in the compact heart and bulbus. BS lectin, which stained giant danio coronaries, was used to measure vascular reconstruction during regeneration. However, BS lectin reacted poorly in zebrafish. RCA I stained the compact heart of both fish. Tomato lectin stained the giant danio, and while low reactivity was seen in the zebrafish ventricle, staining was observed in their transitional cardiac myocytes. In addition, we observed unique staining patterns in the developing zebrafish heart. Lectins’ ability to reveal differential glycoconjugate expression in giant danio and zebrafish hearts suggests they can serve as simple but important tools in studies of developing, adult, and regenerating fish hearts. PMID:27680670

  9. Lectin complement pathway gene profile of the donor and recipient does not influence graft outcome after kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Kok, Julian L.; Snieder, Harold; Leuvenink, Henri G.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; van Dijk, Marcory C.; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Reznichenko, Anna; van den Born, Jaap; de Borst, Martin H.; Bakker, Stephan J.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Seelen, Marc A.

    In kidney transplantation, complement activation was found to be induced by donor brain death, renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and allograft rejection. There are three known pathways of complement activation: the classical, lectin and the alternative pathway. The lectin complement pathway can be

  10. Mannan-binding lectin is involved in the protection against renal ischemia/ reperfusion injury by dietary restriction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shushimita; P. van der Pol (Pieter); R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); C. van Kooten (Cees); F.J.M.F. Dor (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPreoperative fasting and dietary restriction offer robust protection against renal ischemia/ reperfusion injury (I/RI) in mice.We recently showed that Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), the initiator of the lectin pathway of complement activation, plays a pivotal role in renal I/RI. Based on

  11. Lectin from Phaseolus acutifolius var. escumite: chemical characterization, sugar specificity, and effect on human T-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Villanueva, Adriana; Caballero-Ortega, Heriberto; Abdullaev-Jafarova, Fikrat; Garfias, Yonathan; del Carmen Jiménez-Martínez, Maria; Bouquelet, Stéphane; Martínez, Gisela; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Zenteno, Edgar

    2007-07-11

    Purification of the lectin from Phaseolus acutifolius var. escumite was achieved by affinity chromatography on a column containing glutaraldehyzed membranes from blood group O erythrocytes. The lectin is a tetrameric glycoprotein of 121 kDa with 10% of sugar by weight composed by four subunits of 30 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE. The lectin is composed of four isolectins as determined by ion-exchange chromatography on a mono-S column. The lectin and its isolectins showed identical NH2 terminal residues (ANDLSFNFQR FNETN) with homology to the PHA leucoagglutinin-precursor. Peptide mass fingerprint from each lectin isoform determined from tryptic peptides by MALDI-TOF (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight) showed differences among subunits, thus suggesting microheterogeneity in their amino acid sequences or different glycosylation patterns. The lectin and its four isolectins agglutinated erythrocytes without serological specificity and showed mitogenic activity on human leukocytes; moreover, the main effect was rather toward CD8+ than to CD4+ human peripheral lymphocytes. The lectin from escumite was not inhibitable by simple sugars; however, the specificity of the lectin and its isoforms was mainly addressed toward galactose residues present in bi- or triantennary N-acetyllactosamine-type glycans.

  12. Salivary agglutinin is the major component in human saliva that modulates the lectin pathway of the complement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunput, S.T.G.; Wouters, D.; Nazmi, K.; Cukkemane, N.; Brouwer, M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Saliva interacts with blood after mucosal damage or leakage of gingival crevicular fluid. Surface-adsorbed salivary agglutinin (SAG) activates the lectin pathway (LP) of the complement system via mannose-binding lectin, while SAG in solution inhibits complement activation. In the present study we

  13. Differential lectin labelling of circulating hemocytes from Biomphalaria glabrata and Biomphalaria tenagophila resistant or susceptible to Schistosoma mansoni infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RL Martins-Souza

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Lectins/carbohydrate binding can be involved in the Schistosoma mansoni recognition and activation of the Biomphalaria hemocytes. Therefore, expression of lectin ligands on Biomphalaria hemocytes would be associated with snail resistance against S. mansoni infection. To test this hypothesis, circulating hemocytes were isolated from B. glabrata BH (snail strain highy susceptible to S. mansoni, B. tenagophila Cabo Frio (moderate susceptibility, and B. tenagophila Taim (completely resistant strains, labelled with FITC conjugated lectins (ConA, PNA, SBA, and WGA and analyzed under fluorescence microscopy. The results demonstrated that although lectin-labelled hemocytes were detected in hemolymph of all snail species tested, circulating hemocytes from both strains of B. tenagophila showed a larger number of lectin-labelled cells than B. glabrata. Moreover, most of circulating hemocytes of B. tenagophila were intensively labelled by lectins PNA-FITC and WGA-FITC, while in B. glabrata small hemocytes were labeled mainly by ConA. Upon S. mansoni infection, lectin-labelled hemocytes almost disappeared from the hemolymph of Taim and accumulated in B. glabrata BH. The role of lectins/carbohydrate binding in resistance of B. tengophila infection to S. mansoni is still not fully understood, but the data suggest that there may be a correlation to its presence with susceptibility or resistance to the parasite.

  14. Serum mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 levels in colorectal cancer: relation to recurrence and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Thiel, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) is a plasma protein involved in inflammatory processes. MASP-2 circulates in complex with the protein mannan-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins, and is activated to recruit the complement system when MBL binds to its targets...

  15. Lectin complement pathway gene profile of the donor and recipient does not influence graft outcome after kidney transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, J.; Kok, J.L.; Snieder, H.; Leuvenink, H.G.; Goor, H. van; Hillebrands, J.L.; Dijk, M.C.R.F. van; Hepkema, B.G.; Reznichenko, A.; Born, J. van den; Borst, M.H. de; Bakker, S.J.; Navis, G.J.; Ploeg, R.J.; Seelen, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    In kidney transplantation, complement activation was found to be induced by donor brain death, renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and allograft rejection. There are three known pathways of complement activation: the classical, lectin and the alternative pathway. The lectin complement pathway can be

  16. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) and ficolin-2 (FCN2) polymorphisms in patients on peritoneal dialysis with staphylococcal peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijvis, Sabine C. A.; Herpers, Bjorn L.; Endeman, Henrik; de Jong, Ben; van Hannen, Erik; van Velzen-Blad, Heleen; Krediet, Raymond T.; Struijk, Dirk G.; Biesma, Douwe H.; Bos, Willem Jan W.

    Background. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolin-2 (FCN) are activators of the lectin pathway of complement and act as primary defences against infection. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBL2 and FCN2 genes influence the functionality of the proteins. Both proteins are capable of

  17. Modulation of ovomucoid-specific oral tolerance in mice fed plant extracts containing lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Tanja; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of feeding extracts of four different legumes (red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), soyabean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum) on the specific immune response against a food protein. Mice were fed ovomucoid and the specific immune response...... was evaluated. Ovomucoid fed alone resulted in oral tolerance induction measured as both a reduced ovomucoid-pecific spleen cell proliferation and antibody response. Feeding kidney-bean extract prevented induction of oral tolerance to ovomucoid measured as spleen cell proliferation in vitro. Pure kidney......-bean lectin also prevented oral tolerance induction, suggesting that lectin in the kidney-bean extract caused inhibition of oral tolerance. Parenteral administration (intravenous and intraperitoneal) of pure kidney-bean lectin had no significant influence on oral tolerance induction. Soyabean extract also...

  18. Evidence of gene conversion in genes encoding the Gal/GalNac lectin complex of Entamoeba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth D Weedall

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica, uses a lectin complex on its cell surface to bind to mucin and to ligands on the intestinal epithelia. Binding to mucin is necessary for colonisation and binding to intestinal epithelia for invasion, therefore blocking this binding may protect against amoebiasis. Acquired protective immunity raised against the lectin complex should create a selection pressure to change the amino acid sequence of lectin genes in order to avoid future detection. We present evidence that gene conversion has occurred in lineages leading to E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS and E. dispar strain SAW760. This evolutionary mechanism generates diversity and could contribute to immune evasion by the parasites.

  19. Toward a structure-based comprehension of the lectin pathway of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels R; Thiel, Steffen; Andersen, Gregers R

    2013-01-01

    To initiate the lectin pathway of complement pattern recognition molecules bind to surface-linked carbohydrates or acetyl groups on pathogens or damaged self-tissue. This leads to activation of the serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2 resulting in deposition of C4 on the activator and assembly...... concerning the lectin pathway proteins and derive overall models for their glycan bound complexes. These models are used to discuss cis- versus trans-activation of MASP proteases and the geometry of C4 deposition occurring on glycans in the lectin pathway...... of the C3 convertase. In addition MASP-3 and the non-catalytic MAp19 and MAp44 presumably play regulatory functions, but the exact function of the MASP-3 protease remains to be established. Recent functional studies have significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular events occurring...

  20. Soybean Lectin Enhances Biofilm Formation by Bradyrhizobium japonicum in the Absence of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Pérez-Giménez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean lectin (SBL purified from soybean seeds by affinity chromatography strongly bound to Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 cell surface. This lectin enhanced biofilm formation by B. japonicum in a concentration-dependent manner. Presence of galactose during biofilm formation had different effects in the presence or absence of SBL. Biofilms were completely inhibited in the presence of both SBL and galactose, while in the absence of SBL, galactose was less inhibitory. SBL was very stable, since its agglutinating activity of B. japonicum cells as well as of human group A+ erythrocytes was resistant to preincubation for one week at 60°C. Hence, we propose that plant remnants might constitute a source of this lectin, which might remain active in soil and thus favor B. japonicum biofilm formation in the interval between soybean crop seasons.

  1. Antifungal activity of Microgramma vacciniifolia rhizome lectin on genetically distinct Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Lidiane Pereira de; Santana, Giselly Maria de Sá; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Silva, Márcia Vanusa da; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici races 1, 2, and 3 deteriorate tomato crops since they cause a vascular wilt. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with hemagglutinating and antifungal activities. This work reports that Microgramma vacciniifolia rhizome lectin (MvRL) inhibits F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 growth (61 %) more intensely than of races 1 (55 %) and 2 (45 %). The hemagglutinating activity of MvRL was inhibited by glycoprotein preparations from mycelia of races 1, 2, and 3, and these data indicate that lectin carbohydrate-binding sites recognized glycosylated molecules from races. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker system showed that race 3 is genetically distinct from races 1 and 2, and thus the highest sensitiveness of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 to MvRL may be due to molecular characteristics of this race.

  2. Solid phase measurements of antibody and lectin binding to xenogenic carbohydrate antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2004-01-01

    a naturally occurring subfraction from human serum, to Galalpha containing neoglycoproteins and mouse laminin that were immobilized on microtiter plates. RESULTS: Galalpha reactive antibodies with similar monosaccharide specificity have distinct structural preference for sugar ligands. Laminin...... and neoglycoproteins were treated with alpha-galactosidase and subsequently incubated with antibodies and lectins. The enzyme treatment was more deleterious on antibody binding than on lectin binding. CONCLUSION: Antibodies and lectins may bind to different galactose determinants on the glycoproteins. Two anti......-Galalpha1 antibodies that both have been raised against glycans on rabbit red blood cells may recognize Galalpha-antigens with varying specificities. Binding results obtained after digestion with alpha-galactosidase indicate that some xenoreactive Galalpha groups are not directly accessible for removal...

  3. Morphological Specifications of the Bird Schistosome Cercariae and Surface Carbohydrates as Receptors for Lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Moebedi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine the morphological specifications of the bird schistosomes cercaria from Lymnaea gedrosiana and to detect the surface carbohydrates as receptors for host lectins in the host-parasite relationship systems such as avian schistosomiasis and human cercarial dermatitis. Methods: One hundred ninety two snails collected from Dezful areas in Khuzestan Province, in the south west of Iran, during 2005-2006 were examined for cercariae using shedding and crushing methods. In addition, surface carbohydrates on the cercariae were detected by lentil (Lens culinaris lectins. Results: From the total number of Lymnaea gedrosiana, which examined for bird schistosomes cercaria, 9(4% snails were found to be infected with furcocercus cercaria of the bird schistosomes (probably Gigantobilharzia sp.. Mannose monosaccharide CH2OH (CHOH4CHO as surface carbohydrate was also detected on the cercariae. Conclusion: Mannose carbohydrate on these cercariae may be used as receptor by lectins.

  4. Epidemiology of chronic wound patients and relation to serum levels of mannan-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, Mikael; Laursen, Inga; Engel, Anne-Mari

    2009-01-01

    consecutive patients with chronic foot and leg ulcers. A clinical classification of wound- aetiology was performed, and mannan-binding lectin was measured in the sera of patients and healthy controls. The patients presented with 639 wounds altogether; diabetic foot ulcers (309), venous leg ulcers (188......), arterial ulcers (109), and vasculitis (33). The mannan-binding lectin levels of patients with venous leg ulcer, alone or in combination with other types of wounds, differed significantly from the control group, and the frequency of values ulcer...... patients the frequency of values >or= 3000 ng/ml was significantly higher than that of the control group. This suggests a role for the innate immunity in the pathology of venous leg ulcers, and indicates different roles for mannan-binding lectin in the development of ulcers with different aetiologies...

  5. Lectin and alliinase are the predominant proteins in nectar from leek (Allium porrum L.) flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, W J; Smeets, K; Van Nerum, K; Van Leuven, F; Van Damme, E J

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of nectar from leek (Allium porrum) flowers by SDS-PAGE revealed the presence of two major polypeptide bands of 50 kDa and 13 kDa, respectively. Using a combination of agglutination tests, enzyme assays and N-terminal sequencing, the polypeptides have been identified as subunits of alliin lyase (alliinase, EC 4.4.1.4) and mannose-binding lectin, respectively. The latter protein is particularly abundant since it represents about 75% of the total nectar protein. Honey produced by bees foraging on flowering leek plants still contains biologically active lectin and alliinase. However, the levels of both proteins are strongly reduced as compared to those in the original nectar. It is evident, therefore, that the lectin as well as the alliinase are inactivated/degraded during the conversion of nectar into honey.

  6. Lectins Labelled with Digoxin as a Novel Tool to Study Glycoconjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerka Dumić

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years it has become clear that carbohydrate portions of glycoconjugates are performing numerous vital physiological functions in higher organisms. However, since glycobiology is a relatively new science, and carbohydrate structures are highly complex, the continuous development of novel analytical techniques is necessary to support the process of understanding the intricate nature of glycoconjugate structure and function. The introduction of digoxin as a novel tag for labelling of lectins that are being used to analyse glycoconjugates in immunoassay-like techniques is described. Lectins labelled with digoxin have significant advantages over biotin- or digoxigenin-labelled lectins and will hopefully prove to be a useful addition to the repertoire of glycobiological tools.

  7. A histochemical study of the microglial cells in the brain of Salamandra salamandra by lectin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, V; Ciani, F

    1992-01-01

    Seven biotinylated lectins were utilized as histochemical markers for the study of microglial cells in the brain of Salamandra salamandra. It has been demonstrated that SBA, BSA-I, BSA-I-B4 and RCA120 label the microglial cells and, on the basis of the binding selectivity of the single lectins for specific carbohydrates, it was found that alpha-galactosyl residues are present in high density on the microglial membrane of S. salamandra. The reaction was localized not only to the ramified microglial cells, but also to other round cells without extensions, interpreted as ameboid microglial cells. The results show that lectin binding is a reliable molecular probe for identifying microglial cells in urodels.

  8. Structural characterization of coagulant Moringa oleifera Lectin and its effect on hemostatic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Luciana de Andrade; Silva, Mariana Cristina Cabral; Ferreira, Rodrigo da Silva; Santana, Lucimeire Aparecida; Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire Aparecida; Mentele, Reinhard; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Paiva, Patricia Maria Guedes; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso

    2013-07-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate recognition proteins. cMoL, a coagulant Moringa oleifera Lectin, was isolated from seeds of the plant. Structural studies revealed a heat-stable and pH resistant protein with 101 amino acids, 11.67 theoretical pI and 81% similarity with a M. oleifera flocculent protein. Secondary structure content was estimated as 46% α-helix, 12% β-sheets, 17% β-turns and 25% unordered structures belonging to the α/β tertiary structure class. cMoL significantly prolonged the time required for blood coagulation, activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT) and prothrombin times (PT), but was not so effective in prolonging aPTT in asialofetuin presence. cMoL acted as an anticoagulant protein on in vitro blood coagulation parameters and at least on aPTT, the lectin interacted through the carbohydrate recognition domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Community-based network study of protein-carbohydrate interactions in plant lectins using glycan array data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Malik

    Full Text Available Lectins play major roles in biological processes such as immune recognition and regulation, inflammatory responses, cytokine signaling, and cell adhesion. Recently, glycan microarrays have shown to play key roles in understanding glycobiology, allowing us to study the relationship between the specificities of glycan binding proteins and their natural ligands at the omics scale. However, one of the drawbacks in utilizing glycan microarray data is the lack of systematic analysis tools to extract information. In this work, we attempt to group various lectins and their interacting carbohydrates by using community-based analysis of a lectin-carbohydrate network. The network consists of 1119 nodes and 16769 edges and we have identified 3 lectins having large degrees of connectivity playing the roles of hubs. The community based network analysis provides an easy way to obtain a general picture of the lectin-glycan interaction and many statistically significant functional groups.

  10. Determination of terminal sugars in transferrin by radio-lectin immunoassay (RLIA)-a new microanalytical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervén, C; Stibler, H; Borg, S

    1981-01-01

    A new method for the determination of terminal sugars in immunologically defined glycoproteins with microheterogeneity in the sugar residue has been developed. The method has been elaborated for transferrin and involves the following three steps: 1. Binding of antitransferrin antibodies to cyanogen bromide activated Sepharose. 2. Adsorption to the antitransferrin gel of transferrin from serum or from standard solutions of defined composition of terminal glycoprotein sugars. 3. Adsorption of a 125I - labelled lectin to the Sepharose-antitransferrin-transferrin complex. A galactose-binding lectin from Crotalaria juncea and a sialic acid-binding lectin from Limulus polyphemus have been successfully labelled with the Bolton-Hunter reagent and used in the radio-lectin immunoassay determinations. Care must be taken that significant amounts of lectins are not lost from the transferrin complex during washing. The resolving power of the method was at best 20 pmoles of asialotransferrin, a figure that probably can be improved significantly by optimizing the assay conditions.

  11. Molecular characterization, expression and antimicrobial activities of two c-type lysozymes from manila clam Venerupis philippinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dinglong; Wang, Qing; Cao, Ruiwen; Chen, Lizhu; Liu, Yongliang; Cong, Ming; Wu, Huifeng; Li, Fei; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin

    2017-08-01

    Lysozymes play an important role in the innate immune responses with which mollusks respond to bacterial invasion through its lytic activity. In the present study, two c-type lysozymes (designed as VpCLYZ-1 and VpCLYZ-2, respectively) were identified and characterized from the manila clam Venerupis philippinarum. The full-length cDNA of VpCLYZ-1 and VpCLYZ-2 was of 629 and 736 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 156 and153 amino acid residues, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of VpCLYZs showed high similarity to other known invertebrate c-type lysozymes. Multiple alignments and phylogenetic relationship strongly suggested that VpCLYZ-1 and VpCLYZ-2 belonged to the c-type lysozyme family. Both VpCLYZ-1 and VpCLYZ-2 transcripts were constitutively expressed in a wide range of tissues with different levels. The VpCLYZ-1 transcript was dominantly expressed in hepatopancreas and hemocytes, while VpCLYZ-2 transcript was mainly expressed in the tissues of hepatopancreas and gills. Both the mRNA expression of VpCLYZ-1 and VpCLYZ-2 was significantly up-regulated at 12 h post Vibrio anguillarum challenge. The recombinant VpCLYZ-1 and VpCLYZ-2 (designed as rVpCLYZ-1 and rVpCLYZ-2) exhibited lytic activity against all tested bacteria, and rVpCLYZ-1 showed higher activities than rVpCLYZ-2 in killing Micrococcus luteus and V. anguillarum. Overall, our results suggested that VpCLYZ-1 and VpCLYZ-2 belonged to the c-type lysozyme family, and played important roles in the immune responses of manila clam, especially in the elimination of pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  13. A novel core fucose-specific lectin from the mushroom Pholiota squarrosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Tateno, Hiroaki; Dohra, Hideo; Moriwaki, Kenta; Miyoshi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Jun; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2012-10-05

    Fucα1-6 oligosaccharide has a variety of biological functions and serves as a biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma because of the elevated presence of fucosylated α-fetoprotein (AFP) in this type of cancer. In this study we purified a novel Fucα1-6-specific lectin from the mushroom Pholiota squarrosa by ion-exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography on thyroglobulin-agarose. The purified lectin was designated as PhoSL (P. squarrosa lectin). SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicate that PhoSL has a molecular mass of 4.5 kDa and consists of 40 amino acids (NH(2)-APVPVTKLVCDGDTYKCTAYLDFGDGRWVAQWDTNVFHTG-OH). Isoelectric focusing of the lectin showed bands near pI 4.0. The lectin activity was stable between pH 2.0 and 11.0 and at temperatures ranging from 0 to 100 °C for incubation times of 30 min. When PhoSL was investigated with frontal affinity chromatography using 132 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, it was found that the lectin binds only to core α1-6-fucosylated N-glycans and not to other types of fucosylated oligosaccharides, such as α1-2-, α1-3-, and α1-4-fucosylated glycans. Furthermore, PhoSL bound to α1-6-fucosylated AFP but not to non-fucosylated AFP. In addition, PhoSL was able to demonstrate the differential expression of α1-6 fucosylation between primary and metastatic colon cancer tissues. Thus, PhoSL will be a promising tool for analyzing the biological functions of α1-6 fucosylation and evaluating Fucα1-6 oligosaccharides as cancer biomarkers.

  14. Further characterization of the combining sites of Bandeiraea (Griffonia) simplicifolia lectin-I, isolectin A(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A M; Wu, J H; Chen, Y Y; Song, S C; Kabat, E A

    1999-11-01

    Bandeiraea (Griffonia) simplicifolia lectin-I, isolectin A(4)(GS I-A(4)), which is cytotoxic to the human colon cancer cell lines, is one of two lectin families derived from its seed extract. It contains only a homo-oligomer of subunit A, and is most specific for GalNAcalpha1-->. In order to elucidate the GS I-A(4)-glycoconjugate interactions in greater detail, the combining site of this lectin was further characterized by enzyme linked lectino-sorbent assay (ELLSA) and by inhibition of lectin-glycoprotein interactions. This study has demonstrated that the Tn-containing glycoproteins tested, consisting of mammalian salivary glycoproteins (armadillo, asialo-hamster sublingual, asialo-ovine, -bovine, and -porcine submandibular), are bound strongly by GS I-A(4.)Among monovalent inhibitors so far tested, p-NO2-phenylalphaGalNAc is the most potent, suggesting that hydrophobic forces are important in the interaction of this lectin. GS I-A(4)is able to accommodate the monosaccharide GalNAc at the nonreducing end of oligosaccharides. This suggests that the combining site of the lectin is a shallow cavity. Among oligosaccharides and monosaccharides tested as inhibitors of the binding of GS I-A(4), the hierarchy of potencies are: GalNAcalpha1-->3GalNAcbeta1-->3Galalpha1-->4Galbeta 1-->4Glc (Forssman pentasaccharide) > GalNAcalpha1-->3(LFucalpha1-->2)Gal (blood group A)()> GalNAc > Galalpha1-->4Gal > Galalpha1-->3Gal (blood group B-like)> Gal.

  15. Cellular heterogeneity in the membrana granulosa of developing rat follicles: assessment by flow cytometry and lectin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerketze, K; Blaschuk, O W; Farookhi, R

    1996-07-01

    The hormone-mediated maturation of ovarian follicles is apparently accompanied by position-specific differentiation of cells of the membrana granulosa. We have assessed the extent of this cellular heterogeneity by flow cytometry using a variety of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins as probes. Follicular development was stimulated in immature rats by treatment with either diethylstilbestrol (DES) or equine CG (eCG). Lectin binding to monodispersed rat granulosa cells was then analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that there are two distinct populations of small (4-7 microM) and large (9-12 microM) granulosa cells in follicles from DES- and eCG-treated animals. Both populations appear to be mitotically active and show specific lectin-binding characteristics. Six lectins (canavalia ensiforms, triticum vulgaris, maclura pomifera, erythrina cristagalli, jacalin, and vicia villosa) bind equally to both small and large granulosa cells from the DES- and eCG-treated rats. In contrast, no binding to either cell population was detected with six other lectins (dolichos biflorus, griffonia simplicifolia-II, lycopersicon esculentum, datura stramonium, solanum tuberosum, and ulex europaeus). Furthermore, four galactose-binding lectins (bauhinia purpurea, glysine maximus, griffonia simplicifolia-I, and arachis hypogaea) were found to identify specific subsets of granulosa cells. Three of these lectins (bauhinia purpurea, glysine maximus, and griffonia simplicifolia-I) bind to only small granulosa cells from either DES- or eCG- treated immature rats. The fourth lectin (arachis hypogaea) identifies subpopulations of both small and large granulosa cells. Application of the four galactose-specific lectins to fixed sections of frozen ovaries demonstrated binding to the perioocyte and cumulus granulosa cells. We conclude that cellular heterogeneity exists within the follicular epithelium at various stages-specific lectin-binding sites.

  16. Influence of major surgery on the mannan-binding lectin pathway of innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, H.; Christensen, I.J.; Basse, L.

    2006-01-01

    The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation is important in host defence against pathogens and possibly against cancer. We investigated the effect of major surgery on two central components of the MBL pathway; MBL and the MBL-associated serine protease MASP-2, and for compari......The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation is important in host defence against pathogens and possibly against cancer. We investigated the effect of major surgery on two central components of the MBL pathway; MBL and the MBL-associated serine protease MASP-2...

  17. Inactivation and fragmentation of lectin from Bothrops leucurus snake venom by gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, E. S.; Souza, M. A. A.; Vaz, A. F. M.; Coelho, L. C. B. B.; Aguiar, J. S.; Silva, T. G.; Guarnieri, M. C.; Melo, A. M. M. A.; Oliva, M. L. V.; Correia, M. T. S.

    2012-04-01

    Gamma radiation alters the molecular structure of biomolecules and is able to mitigate the action of snake venoms and their isolated toxins. The effect of γ-radiation on the folding of Bothrops lecurus venom lectin was measured by a hemagglutinating assay, intrinsic and bis-ANS fluorescence. Intrinsic and bis-ANS fluorescence analyses indicated that irradiation caused unfolding followed by aggregation of the lectin. Our results suggest that irradiation can lead to significant changes in the protein structure, which may promote the loss of its binding property and toxic action.

  18. Lectin-binding sites in the epithelium of normal human appendix vermiformis and in acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinck, U; Bosbach, R; Korabiowska, M; Schauer, A; Gabius, H J

    1995-01-01

    By using histochemical methods, the binding pattern of various lectins in the epithelium of normal human appendix vermiformis was assessed. In addition to plant and invertebrate sugar receptors with nominal monosaccharide specificity for alpha-L-Fuc (UEA-I), alpha-D-Man and alpha-D-Gluc (Con A), alpha-D-GalNAc (DBA), D-GalNAc (SBA, HPA) beta-D-Gal (RCA-I) and D-Gal (VAA), a mammalian beta-galactoside-specific lectin (MW, 14 kDa) was included in the applied panel. The apical surface of enterocytes presented binding sites for RCA-I on all cells, binding sites of UEA-I, DBA, SBA, HPA and VAA heterogeneously and no binding sites of Con A and 14 kDa. Binding sites of DBA, SBA, HPA, VAA and RCA-I within enterocytes were located primarily focally in a supranuclear position, whereas Con A and 14 kDa bound to the cytoplasm both in apical and basal cell parts. In the follicle-associated epithelium more enterocytes expressed SBA- and VAA-binding sites than in the crypt epithelium. No differences between the lectin-binding pattern of M-cells and enterocytes were found in the follicle-associated epithelium. Intraepithelial macrophages were heterogeneously positive for the full panel of applied lectins. In contrast, intraepithelial lymphatic cells expressed binding sites only for RCA-I and less prominently for Con A, VAA and 14 kDa. Goblet cell mucus contained lectin-binding sites in a heterogeneous manner: binding sites for Con A were not detected in goblet cells for DBA, SBA, VAA and 14 kDa in less than 20%, for UEA-I in 20-40%, for HPA in 40-60% and for RCA-I in 60-100% of the goblet cells. Secreted mucus differed in its lectin-binding capacity from intracellular goblet cell mucus selectively by an increase of UEA-I, SBA- and RCA-I-binding sites and a lack of 14 kDa-binding sites. Comparative study of lectin binding to goblet cell mucin in another region of the large intestine, namely the rectosigmoid, demonstrated that DBA, SBA and 14 kDa bound mainly to the distal colon

  19. Lectin Domains of Polypeptide GalNAc Transferases Exhibit Glycopeptide Binding Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G

    2011-01-01

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide a-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection of glycosylat......UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide a-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection...

  20. Lectin binding profiles of SSEA-4 enriched, pluripotent human embryonic stem cell surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Soojung

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have the potential to form every cell type in the body. These cells must be appropriately characterized prior to differentiation studies or when defining characteristics of the pluripotent state. Some developmentally regulated cell surface antigens identified by monoclonal antibodies in a variety of species and stem cell types have proven to be side chains of membrane glycolipids and glycoproteins. Therefore, to examine hESC surfaces for other potential pluripotent markers, we used a panel of 14 lectins, which were chosen based on their specificity for a variety of carbohydrates and carbohydrate linkages, along with stage specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4, to determine binding quantitation by flow cytometry and binding localization in adherent colonies by immunocytochemistry. Results Enriching cells for SSEA-4 expression increased the percentage of SSEA-4 positive cells to 98–99%. Using enriched high SSEA-4-expressing hESCs, we then analyzed the binding percentages of selected lectins and found a large variation in binding percentages ranging from 4% to 99% binding. Lycopersicon (tomatoesculetum lectin (TL, Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA, and Concanavalin A (Con A bound to SSEA-4 positive regions of hESCs and with similar binding percentages as SSEA-4. In contrast, we found Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA and Lotus tetragonolobus lectin (LTL did not bind to hESCs while Phaseolus vulgaris leuco-agglutinin (PHA-L, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA, Phaseolus vulgaris erythro-agglutinin (PHA-E, and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA bound partially to hESCs. These binding percentages correlated well with immunocytochemistry results. Conclusion Our results provide information about types of carbohydrates and carbohydrate linkages found on pluripotent hESC surfaces. We propose that TL, RCA and Con A may be used as markers that are associated with the

  1. Ficolin-3-mediated lectin complement pathway activation in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanier, Elisa R; Zangari, Rosalia; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the involvement of ficolin-3, the main initiator of the lectin complement pathway (LCP), in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) pathology and outcome. METHODS: In this preliminary exploratory study, plasma concentration of ficolin-3 and of ficolin-3-mediated functional LCP activity...... was measured, along with that of other LCP initiators (mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, and ficolin-1), C3 activation products, and soluble C5b-9 terminal complex, in a prospective cohort of 39 patients with SAH and 20 healthy controls. The following parameters were recorded: SAH severity, assessed using...

  2. An insecticidal N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectin gene from Griffonia simplicifolia (Leguminosae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, K; Huesing, J E; Shade, R E; Bressan, R A; Hasegawa, P M; Murdock, L L

    1996-01-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia II, an N-acetylglucosamine-specific legume lectin, has insecticidal activity when fed to the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). A cDNA clone encoding G. simplicifolia II was isolated from a leaf cDNA library, sequenced, and expressed in a bacterial expression system. The recombinant protein exhibited N-acetylglucosamine-binding and insecticidal activity against cowpea weevil, indicating that glycosylation and multimeric structure are not required for these properties. These results support the hypothesis that genes of the legume lectin gene family encode proteins that function in plant defense against herbivores.

  3. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infectivity with a broad range of lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Vestergaard, B F

    1991-01-01

    Five lectins with specificity for N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 and HSV-1 infectivity in vitro. HIV-1 isolate HTLVIIIB was preincubated with lectin and subsequently inoculated onto MT-4 cells. Lectins specific for N-linked oligosaccharides blocked HIV infe......-1 infection, the most potent inhibition was found with the lectin HPA. These results indicate that lectins may have a broad antiviral effect on enveloped viruses only limited by types of oligosaccharides present on individual viruses....

  4. Comparisons of labeling efficiency, biological activity and biodistribution among /sup 125/I, /sup 67/Ga-DTPA- and /sup 67/Ga-DFO-lectins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1987-10-01

    The labeling efficiency, biological activity and biodistribution of /sup 125/I labeled and /sup 67/Ga chelating agent conjugated lectins were investigated. Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) and Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCH) were efficiently labeled with /sup 67/Ga using bifunctional chelating agents such as diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and deferoxamine (DFO), whereas labeling with /sup 125/I was significantly less efficient. The agglutinating activity of these lectins towards Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells was retained on conjugation with DFO, but not with DTPA. The in vitro binding ratio of /sup 67/Ga-DFO-lectins for EAT cells was almost the same as that of /sup 125/I-lectins. However, the value was significantly decreased in the case of /sup 67/Ga-DTPA-lectins. In the biodistribution study of radiolabeled lectins in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) bearing mice, the accumulation of radioactivity in tumor tissue was very much less with /sup 67/Ga-DTPA-lectins than with /sup 125/I-lectins. However, the concentration was significantly elevated in the case of /sup 67/Ga-DFO-lectins. While, these lectins accumulated in liver, spleen, lung, and kidney to a greater extent than /sup 67/Ga citrate, the tumor to organ ratios became very low. These low tumor to organ ratios, in contrast to /sup 67/Ga citrate, will certainly inhibit the tumor delineation, and therefore it seems that in spite of a high accumulation ratio of /sup 67/Ga-DFO-lectins in tumor tissue, these agents are not useful in tumor detection.

  5. Knowledge-based modeling of a legume lectin and docking of the carbohydrate ligand: the Ulex europaeus lectin I and its interaction with fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohier, A; Espinosa, J F; Jimenez-Barbero, J; Carrupt, P A; Pérez, S; Imberty, A

    1996-12-01

    Ulex europaeus isolectin I is specific for fucose-containing oligosaccharide such as H type 2 trisaccharide alpha-L-Fuc (1-->2) beta-D-Gal (1-->4) beta-D-GlcNAc. Several legume lectins have been crystallized and modeled, but no structural data are available concerning such fucose-binding lectin. The three-dimensional structure of Ulex europaeus isolectin I has been constructed using seven legume lectins for which high-resolution crystal structures were available. Some conserved water molecules, as well as the structural cations, were taken into account for building the model. In the predicted binding site, the most probable locations of the secondary hydroxyl groups were determined using the GRID method. Several possible orientations could be determined for a fucose residue. All of the four possible conformations compatible with energy calculations display several hydrogen bonds with Asp-87 and Ser-132 and a stacking interaction with Tyr-220 and Phe-136. In two orientations, the O-3 and O-4 hydroxyl groups of fucose are the most buried ones, whereas two other, the O-2 and O-3 hydroxyl groups are at the bottom of the site. Possible docking modes are also studied by analysis of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces for both the ligand and the protein. The SCORE method allows for a quantitative evaluation of the complementarity of these surfaces, on the basis of molecular lipophilicity calculations. The predictions presented here are compared with known biochemical data.

  6. Elevated levels of serum antibodies to the lectin wheat germ agglutinin in celiac children lend support to the gluten-lectin theory of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fälth-Magnusson, K; Magnusson, K E

    1995-05-01

    Lectins recognize carbohydrate moities of glycoproteins and glycolipids, and can elicit several biological effects, including cell agglutination, cell activation and mitogenesis. According to the gluten-lectin theory, celiac lesions represent a response to a toxic lectin, putatively wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). In this study we compared the serum antibody levels IgA, IgG and IgM to WGA and to gliadin in children under investigation for celiac disease (CD), as compared to reference children. We found that the levels of IgA and IgG to WGA as well as gliadin were significantly higher in celiac children on a gluten-containing diet, compared to children on gluten-free diet and reference children. These findings lend support to the concept that WGA is a biologically significant component of gluten. Since WGA can mimic the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) at the cellular level, we hypothesize that the crypt hyperplasia seen in celiac children could be due to a mitogenic response induced by WGA.

  7. A Galactose-Binding Lectin Isolated from Aplysia kurodai (Sea Hare Eggs Inhibits Streptolysin-Induced Hemolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaj Hasan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A specific galactose-binding lectin was shown to inhibit the hemolytic effect of streptolysin O (SLO, an exotoxin produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Commercially available lectins that recognize N-acetyllactosamine (ECA, T-antigen (PNA, and Tn-antigen (ABA agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, but had no effect on SLO-induced hemolysis. In contrast, SLO-induced hemolysis was inhibited by AKL, a lectin purified from sea hare (Aplysia kurodai eggs that recognizes α-galactoside oligosaccharides. This inhibitory effect was blocked by the co-presence of d-galactose, which binds to AKL. A possible explanation for these findings is that cholesterol-enriched microdomains containing glycosphingolipids in the erythrocyte membrane become occupied by tightly stacked lectin molecules, blocking the interaction between cholesterol and SLO that would otherwise result in penetration of the membrane. Growth of S. pyogenes was inhibited by lectins from a marine invertebrate (AKL and a mushroom (ABA, but was promoted by a plant lectin (ECA. Both these inhibitory and promoting effects were blocked by co-presence of galactose in the culture medium. Our findings demonstrate the importance of glycans and lectins in regulating mechanisms of toxicity, creation of pores in the target cell membrane, and bacterial growth.

  8. Common skate (Raja kenojei) secretes pentraxin into the cutaneous secretion: The first skin mucus lectin in cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Motoki; Hirasawa, Ai; Nakamura, Osamu; Watanabe, Tasuku

    2009-08-01

    A lactose-specific lectin with a molecular mass of about 25 kDa was purified from the skin mucus of a cartilaginous fish-the common skate (Raja kenojei). The complementary DNA sequence of the lectin was 1540 bp long and contained a reading frame encoding 226 amino acids, which showed approximately 38% identity to pentraxins of mammals and teleosts. Gene expression was observed in the skin, gill, stomach and intestine in the healthy skate. We also identified an isotype gene from the liver whose deduced amino-acid sequence shared 69.0% identity with the skin type gene. The antiserum detected protein in the skin, where the lectin is localized in the epidermal cells, and in the blood plasma. The lectin genes are multicopied in the common skate genome. Although pentraxins are acute phase proteins, mRNAs of both the isotypes were not upregulated after the in vivo challenge with formalin-killed Escherichia coli, which suggests that they are constantly present in the skin mucus and blood plasma to protect against pathogenic invasion. This lectin is the fifth type of lectin found in the cutaneous secretions of fish, demonstrating that skin mucus lectins have evolved with marked molecular diversity in fish.

  9. Lectin-binding patterns of small lymphocytes in bone marrow, thymus and spleen: Demonstration of lymphocyte subsets by quantitaive radioautography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saveriano, N.; Drinnan, M.; Santer, V.; Osmond, D.G.

    1981-11-01

    Cells from mouse bone marrow, thymus and spleen were exposed to /sup 125/I-labeled concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris lectin (LCL), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Hignoreomatia agglutinin (HPA), phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P), peanut agglutinin (PNA), or wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) in a range of concentrations and examined radioautographically. Small lymphocytes in the three organs differed in the minimal concentration of each lectin which gave detectable surface labeling, while at optimal lectin concentrations, their labeling intensity profiles differed markedly. Inhibition by sugars demonstrated the labeling specificity. Major populations of bone marrow small lymphocytes bound WGA strongly, while Con A, SBA, HPA, PHA-P and LCL were bound only weakly, and PNA binding was lacking. Most thymus cells bound Con A, SBA, HPA, PHA-P and PNA strongly. WGA and LCL weakly. Subsets of bone marrow and thymus small lymphocytes differed from the major populations in their lectin-binding intensities. Spleen small lymphocytes were heterogeneous in the binding of each lectin. However, a major population bound LCL exceptionally strongly, while few cells bound PNA. Using a panel of lectins under standardized conditions, these studies show distinctive lectin-binding patterns for small lymphocytes in the bone marrow, thymus and spleen, resepctively. Major and minor cell populations are distinguishable in each organ, providing an approach to discriminating lymphocyte lineages, subtypes and differentiation stages.

  10. Unusual sugar specificity of banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca and its probable evolutionary origin. Crystallographic and modelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D D; Saikrishnan, K; Kumar, Prashant; Surolia, A; Sekar, K; Vijayan, M

    2005-10-01

    The crystal structure of a complex of methyl-alpha-D-mannoside with banana lectin from Musa paradisiaca reveals two primary binding sites in the lectin, unlike in other lectins with beta-prism I fold which essentially consists of three Greek key motifs. It has been suggested that the fold evolved through successive gene duplication and fusion of an ancestral Greek key motif. In other lectins, all from dicots, the primary binding site exists on one of the three motifs in the three-fold symmetric molecule. Banana is a monocot, and the three motifs have not diverged enough to obliterate sequence similarity among them. Two Greek key motifs in it carry one primary binding site each. A common secondary binding site exists on the third Greek key. Modelling shows that both the primary sites can support 1-2, 1-3, and 1-6 linked mannosides with the second residue interacting in each case primarily with the secondary binding site. Modelling also readily leads to a bound branched mannopentose with the nonreducing ends of the two branches anchored at the two primary binding sites, providing a structural explanation for the lectin's specificity for branched alpha-mannans. A comparison of the dimeric banana lectin with other beta-prism I fold lectins, provides interesting insights into the variability in their quaternary structure.

  11. Use of Aleuria alantia Lectin Affinity Chromatography to Enrich Candidate Biomarkers from the Urine of Patients with Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Ambrose

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing a urine test to detect bladder tumours with high sensitivity and specificity is a key goal in bladder cancer research. We hypothesised that bladder cancer-specific glycoproteins might fulfill this role. Lectin-ELISAs were used to study the binding of 25 lectins to 10 bladder cell lines and serum and urine from bladder cancer patients and non-cancer controls. Selected lectins were then used to enrich glycoproteins from the urine of bladder cancer patients and control subjects for analysis by shotgun proteomics. None of the lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cancer cell lines over normal urothlelial cell lines or for urinary glycans from bladder cancer patients over those from non-cancer controls. However, several lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cell line glycans over serum glycans and are potentially useful for enriching glycoproteins originating from the urothelium in urine. Aleuria alantia lectin affinity chromatography and shotgun proteomics identified mucin-1 and golgi apparatus protein 1 as proteins warranting further investigation as urinary biomarkers for low-grade bladder cancer. Glycosylation changes in bladder cancer are not reliably detected by measuring lectin binding to unfractionated proteomes, but it is possible that more specific reagents and/or a focus on individual proteins may produce clinically useful biomarkers.

  12. In vitro and in vivo interaction of Entamoeba histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin with various target cells: an immunocytochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Judith; Shibayama, Mineko; Campos, Rafael; Beck, David L; Houpt, Erick; Petri, William A; Tsutsumi, Víctor

    2004-03-01

    The Gal/GalNAc lectin of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites plays an important role in adhesion. The distribution and final destiny of the lectin during the interaction with host cells are poorly understood. Using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the lectin we studied by immunocytochemistry the in vitro and in vivo interaction of E. histolytica trophozoites with human and hamster hepatocytes. We also analyzed the presence and distribution of the lectin in a mouse model of intestinal amoebiasis. In all cases, trophozoites were highly labeled by anti-lectin antibodies. Cultured human and hamster hepatocytes in contact with, or localized at the vicinity of parasites were also labeled by anti-lectin antibodies. Most of the labeled hepatocytes showed variable degrees of cell damage. Hepatocytes distantly localized from the parasites were also stained with the anti-lectin antibodies. Immunolabeling of tissue sections from different stages of the development of experimental amoebic liver abscess in hamsters showed inflammatory foci containing lectin-labeled trophozoites, hepatocytes, and sinusoidal and inflammatory cells. Lectin-containing hepatocytes had vacuolated cytoplasm with some nuclei with a condensed appearance. Damaged intestinal epithelium also was labeled with anti-lectin antibodies in a mouse model of intestinal amoebiasis. Electron microscopy of axenically cultured trophozoites using gold-labeled monoclonal and polyclonal anti-lectin antibody showed that plasma membrane, vacuole membranes and areas of cell cytosol were labeled. Higher deposits of gold particles in plasma membrane suggestive of cell secretion were observed. Our results demonstrated that Gal/GalNAc lectin was bound and captured by different target cells, and that host cells containing the lectin showed signs of cell damage. The contribution of lectin transfer to host cells in adherence and cell injury remains to be determined.

  13. Association of mannose-binding lectin genotype with cardiovascular abnormalities in Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biezeveld, Maarten H.; Kuipers, Irene M.; Geissler, Judy; Lam, Jan; Ottenkamp, Jaap J.; Hack, C. Erik; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2003-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute vasculitis of possible infectious cause, which in particular affects the coronary arteries. Young children rely mostly on their innate immune system for protection against invading microorganisms, of which mannose-binding lectin is an important component. We aimed to

  14. Influence of major surgery on the mannan-binding lectin pathway of innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, H; Christensen, I J; Basse, L

    2006-01-01

    The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation is important in host defence against pathogens and possibly against cancer. We investigated the effect of major surgery on two central components of the MBL pathway; MBL and the MBL-associated serine protease MASP-2, and for compari...

  15. Isolation and characterization of a new mannose-binding lectin gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and is a kind of valuable medicinal plant of family Tax- aceae in gymnosperms. Up to now, there is no report on the molecular cloning of lectin gene from T. .... important role in sugar-binding activity and thus are pre- served in evolution. As shown in figure 3B, it was very noteworthy that β-sheets occurred predominantly and ...

  16. Lectin microarrays: a powerful tool for glycan-based biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu-Min; Cheng, Li; Guo, Shu-Juan; Zhu, Heng; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2011-09-01

    Cell surfaces, especially mammalian cell surfaces, are heavily coated with complex poly- and oligosaccharides, and these glycans have been implicated in many functions, such as cell-to-cell communication, host-pathogen interactions and cell matrix interactions. Not surprisingly then, the aberrations of glycosylation are usually indicative of the onset of specific diseases, such as cancer. Therefore, glycans are expected to serve as important biomarkers for disease diagnosis and/or prognosis. Recent development of the lectin microarray technology has allowed researchers to profile the glycans in complex biological samples in a high throughput fashion. This relatively new tool is highly suitable for both live cell and cell lysate analyses and has the potential for rapid discovery of glycan-based biomarkers. In this review, we will focus on the basic concepts and the latest advances of lectin microarray technology. We will also emphasize the application of lectin microarrays for biomarker discovery, and then discuss the challenges faced by this technology and potential future directions. Based on the tremendous progress already achieved, it seems apparent that lectin microarrays will soon become an indispensible tool for glycosylation biomarker discovery.

  17. Effects of mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms on irinotecan-induced febrile neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van der Bol (Jessica); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); R.H.N. van Schaik (Ron); A. Sparreboom (Alex); M.A. van Fessem (Marianne); F.E. Geijn (Fleur); P.L.A. van Daele (Paul); J. Verweij (Jaap); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is important in the innate immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms affect MBL expression, and genotypes yielding low MBL levels have been associated with an elevated risk for infections in hematological cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  18. Phaseolus vulgaris leuco-agglutinin immunohistochemistry. A comparison between autoradiographic and lectin tracing of neuronal efferents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, G.J. ter; Karst, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1984-01-01

    The autoradiographic pattern of anterograde labeling as a result from injections with tritiated amino acids is compared to the labeling of efferents with Phaseolus vulgaris leuco-agglutinin after lectin injections in the same nucleus visualized by immunohistochemical methods. This comparison is made

  19. A survey of domestic species of Basidiomycetes fungi for the presence of lectins inn their carpophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Końska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary investigations were conducted to determine the presence of active lectins in carpophores of fungi from the class Basidiomycetes, collected from natural localities in southern and south-eastern Poland. The degree of agglutination activity (expressed as the titre of agglutination of aqueous extracts was determined at room temperature (18-20°C and at +4°C in respect to human and animal erythrocytes suspended in physiological saline, part of which were additionally treated with proteolytic enzymes. From among the 104 tested species, extracts from 41 of them showed agglutination activity, among which 18 were high. In six cases, specific activity against human ABH group antigens was found. Extracts from 5 species agglutinated only animal erythrocytes, with pigeon erythrocytes being exceptionally sensitive to the lectins. Extracts from two species had distinctly higher agglutination activity at 4°C, which suggests that lectins of the "cold" agglutinin type are present in these species. Analysis of extracts from caps and stems showed that caps had a higher lectin content.

  20. Mannose-binding lectin genotypes and susceptibility to epstein-barr virus infection in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friborg, Jeppe T; Jarrett, Ruth F; Koch, Anders

    2010-01-01

    In a cohort study of children <4 years of age in Greenland, mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotypes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels were determined. EBV seropositivity was significantly lower and time to seroconversion increased in MBL-insufficient compared with MBL-sufficient childr...