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Sample records for c-s stretching modes

  1. Free carboxylate stretching modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, J.; Steill, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first IR spectroscopic observation of carboxylate stretching modes in free space, i.e., in the complete absence of solvent or counterions. Gas-phase spectra of a series of benzoate anions have been recorded and compared to condensed-phase spectra, revealing the profound influence of th

  2. Stretched horizons, quasiparticles and quasinormal modes

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, N; Lifschytz, G; Lowe, D A; Iizuka, Norihiro; Kabat, Daniel; Lifschytz, Gilad; Lowe, David A.

    2003-01-01

    We propose that stretched horizons can be described in terms of a gas of non-interacting quasiparticles. The quasiparticles are unstable, with a lifetime set by the imaginary part of the lowest quasinormal mode frequency. If the horizon arises from an AdS/CFT style duality the quasiparticles are also the effective low-energy degrees of freedom of the finite-temperature CFT. We analyze a large class of models including Schwarzschild black holes, non-extremal Dp-branes, the rotating BTZ black hole and de Sitter space, and we comment on degenerate horizons. The quasiparticle description makes manifest the relationship between entropy and area.

  3. Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Stretching KidsHealth > For Teens > Stretching Print A A A ... full range of motion of the joints. continue Stretching Stretching used to be considered the main activity ...

  4. Investigations on structural thinning in deformation machining stretching mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arshpreet; Nirala, Harish Kumar; Agrawal, Anupam

    2016-10-01

    Deformation machining is a combination of thin structure machining and single point incremental forming/bending. This process enables the creation of monolithic, complex structures and geometries, which are difficult or sometimes impossible to manufacture employing conventional manufacturing techniques. Section thinning of the formed structure is a measure of process formability and influences the strength and stiffness of the formed component. In this study, experimental and finite element investigations on structural thinning in Deformation machining stretching mode have been performed. Structural thinning was found out to be highly non uniform along the forming depth at varying forming angles. A compensation strategy in thin structure machining has been proposed for uniform section thickness in incremental forming.

  5. Mode instability in a Yb-doped stretched core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, N.; Yoo, S.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we present the theoretical study of transverse mode instability (TMI) in ytterbium (Yb)-doped rectangular core fibers with different core aspect ratios using the fast Fourier transform (FFT) beam propagation method (BPM). As expected, the rectangular core fiber with larger aspect ratio (AR.) offers more efficient heat dissipation than a circular core fiber. However, it is found that the rectangular core fiber does not benefit from the better heat dissipation to suppress the TMI when compared to the circular core counterpart. The temperature building in the rectangular core fiber decreases by up to 24.6% with a 10:1 aspect ratio core, while threshold pump power drops by up to 38.3% when compared with a circular core fiber with the same core area. Our study reveals that a smaller effective refractive index difference between modes and a weaker gain saturation effect compensate the thermal advantage from more efficient heat dissipation.

  6. Modeling the antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrational modes of aqueous carboxylate anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Catherine C R; Franks, George V; da Silva, Gabriel

    2015-01-05

    The infrared spectra of six aqueous carboxylate anions have been calculated at the M05-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory with the SMD solvent model, and validated against experimental data from the literature over the region of 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1); this region corresponds to the stretching modes of the carboxylate group, and is often interrogated when probing bonding of carboxylates to other species and surfaces. The anions studied here were formate, acetate, oxalate, succinate, glutarate and citrate. For the lowest energy conformer of each anion, the carboxylate moiety antisymmetric stretching peak was predicted with a mean signed error of only 4 cm(-1) using the SMD solvent model, while the symmetric peak was slightly overestimated. Performing calculations in vacuum and scaling was found to generally over-predict the antisymmetric vibrational frequencies and under predict the symmetric peak. Different conformers of the same anion were found to have only slightly different spectra in the studied region and the inclusion of explicit water molecules was not found to significantly change the calculated spectra when the implicit solvent model is used. Overall, the use of density functional theory in conjunction with an implicit solvent model was found to result in infra-red spectra that are the best reproduction of the features found experimentally for the aqueous carboxylate ions in the important 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1) region. The development of validated model chemistries for simulating the stretching modes of aqueous carboxylate ions will be valuable for future studies that investigate how carboxylate anions complex with multivalent metal cations and related species in solution.

  7. Vibrational relaxation of NO stretching modes in ferrous NO and ferric NO in model heme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeheung; Lee, Taegon; Lim, Manho

    2013-08-01

    Femtosecond IR-pump-IR-probe spectroscopy was used to measure the vibrational lifetimes (T1) of NO stretching modes of ferrous NO near 1600 cm-1 and ferric NO near 1900 cm-1 at room temperature. The T1 of NO bound to the heme, ranging from 3.5 to 34 ps, is much shorter in ferrous NO. The vibrational relaxation (VR) of NO was independent of solvent used and excess imidazole concentration, suggesting that intramolecular VR into the internal vibrational modes of the probed molecule may be the dominant pathway for VR of the bound NO. With estimated T1 of the bound NO, we simulated transient spectra of NO bound to ferrous hemoglobin (HbII) after photodeligation of HbIINO and discussed the influence of the hot band on the determination of the dynamics of geminate rebinding of NO to HbII using the change in the magnitude of the fundamental band.

  8. Stretching dependence of the vibration modes of a single-molecule Pt-H-2-Pt bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djukic, D.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Untiedt, C.

    2005-01-01

    isotope substitution is obtained. The stretching dependence for each of the modes allows uniquely classifying them as longitudinal or transversal modes. The interpretation of the experiment in terms of a Pt-H-2-Pt bridge is verified by density-functional theory calculations for the stability, vibrational...

  9. Widening of the hydrogen bonded OH-streching bands due to the wagging and OO-stretching modes in H 2 O·H 2 O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, Anna L.; Halonen, Lauri; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2011-09-01

    We have calculated band profiles of the hydrogen bonded OH-stretching bands in H 2O · H 2O, using a local mode Hamiltonian which includes the low-energy acceptor wagging and the high energy OH-stretching motion. We use the method previously developed for coupling of OH- and OO-stretching modes. Our current results confirms that low frequency modes will lead to wider OH-stretching bands. The spread of intensity and shape of the profile from coupling to the acceptor wagging mode is different to that found from coupling to the OO-stretching mode. Combination of both results yields an OH-stretching band profile, which is around 250 cm -1 wide in the third OH-stretching overtone.

  10. Proton tunneling: a decay channel of the O-H stretch mode in KTaO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, E J; Wen, L; Stavola, M; Boatner, L A; Feldman, L C; Tolk, N H; Lüpke, G

    2009-02-20

    The vibrational lifetimes of the O-H and O-D stretch modes in the perovskite oxide KTaO3 are measured by pump-probe infrared spectroscopy. Both stretch modes are exceptionally long lived and exhibit a large "reverse" isotope effect, due to a phonon-assisted proton-tunneling process, which involves the O-Ta-O bending motion. The excited-state tunneling rate is found to be 7 orders of magnitude larger than from the ground state in the proton conducting oxide, BaCeO3 [Phys. Rev. B 60, R3713 (1999)].

  11. Modeling Stretching Modes of Common Organic Molecules with the Quantum Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator: An Undergraduate Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnis, J. Mark; Thompson, Matthew G. K.

    2004-01-01

    An introductory undergraduate physical organic chemistry exercise that introduces the harmonic oscillator's use in vibrational spectroscopy is developed. The analysis and modeling exercise begins with the students calculating the stretching modes of common organic molecules with the help of the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator (QMHO) model.

  12. Wavelength tunable stretched-pulse mode-locked all-fiber erbium ring laser with single polarization fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenping; Chen, Xin; Kuksenkov, Dmitri V; Koh, Joohyun; Li, Ming-Jun; Zenteno, Luis A; Nolan, Daniel A

    2006-06-26

    A wavelength tunable stretched-pulse mode-locked all-fiber ring laser using single polarization fiber (SPF) was demonstrated. In this laser, a segment of SPF was used simultaneously as a polarizer and a tunable filter in the laser cavity. Self-starting mode-locking with femtosecond output pulses was demonstrated. A wavelength tuning of ~20nm was achieved by bending the SPF with different radii.

  13. Experimental force modeling for deformation machining stretching mode for aluminum alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARSHPREET SINGH; ANUPAM AGRAWAL

    2017-02-01

    Deformation machining is a hybrid process that combines two manufacturing processes—thin structure machining and single-point incremental forming. This process enables the creation of complex structures and geometries, which would be rather difficult or sometimes impossible to manufacture. A comprehensive experimental study of forces induced in deformation machining stretching mode has been performedin the present work. A table-type force dynamometer has been used to record the deforming forces in three Cartesian directions. The influence of five process parameters—floor thickness, tool diameter, wall angle,incremental step size, and floor size on the deforming forces—is investigated. Individual as well as combined empirical models of the parameters with regard to the forces have been formed. The results of this study indicatethat the average resultant force primarily depends on the floor thickness to be deformed and the incremental depth in the tool path. This could be due to the variation in local stiffness of the sheet with change in floor thickness. The effect of tool diameter, deforming wall angle, and floor size is not significant.

  14. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy Slit-Jet Cooled Hydroxymethyl Radical (CH_2OH): CH Symmetric Stretching Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxymethyl radical (CH_2OH) plays an important role in combustion and environmental chemistry as a reactive intermediate. Reisler's group published the first rotationally resolved spectroscopy of CH_2OH with determined band origins for fundamental CH symmetric stretch state, CH asymmetric stretch state and OH stretch state, respectively. Here CH_2OH was first studied via sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy in a slit-jet supersonic discharge expansion source. Rotationally resolved direct absorption spectra in the CH symmetric stretching mode were recorded. As a result of the low rotational temperature and sub-Doppler linewidths, the tunneling splittings due to the large amplitude of COH torsion slightly complicate the spectra. Each of the ground vibration state and the CH symmetric stretch state includes two levels. One level, with a 3:1 nuclear spin statistic ratio for Ka=0+/Ka=1+, is labeled as ``+". The other tunneling level, labeled as ``-", has Ka=0-/Ka=1- states with 1:3 nuclear spin statistics. Except for the Ka=0+ ← 0+ band published before, more bands (Ka=1+ ← 1+, Ka=0- ← 0- and Ka=1- ← 1-) were identified. The assigned transitions were fit to a Watson A-reduced symmetric top Hamiltonian to improve the accuracy of the band origin of CH symmetric state. The rotational parameters for both ground and CH symmetric stretch state were well determined. L. Feng, J. Wei and H. Reisler, J. Phys. Chem. A, Vol. 108. M. A. Roberts, E. N. Sharp-Williams and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 7042-7049

  15. Polarized infrared reflectance spectra of brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O) crystal investigation of the phosphate stretching modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevellec, Jean-Yves; Quillard, Sophie; Deniard, Philippe; Mekmene, Omar; Gaucheron, Frédéric; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Buisson, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Polarized infrared (IR) reflectance measurements at near-normal incidence were recorded from the ac-plane of a monoclinic brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O) crystal in the 800-1200 cm(-1) spectral range (P-O stretching modes). The adjustment of these data, on the basis of a dispersion analysis (DA) model for monoclinic case, allowed the determination of oscillators parameters for the four P-O stretching observed modes of the phosphate group.

  16. Polarized infrared reflectance spectra of brushite (CaHPO4ṡ2H2O) crystal investigation of the phosphate stretching modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevellec, Jean-Yves; Quillard, Sophie; Deniard, Philippe; Mekmene, Omar; Gaucheron, Frédéric; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Buisson, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Polarized infrared (IR) reflectance measurements at near-normal incidence were recorded from the ac-plane of a monoclinic brushite (CaHPO4ṡ2H2O) crystal in the 800-1200 cm-1 spectral range (P-O stretching modes). The adjustment of these data, on the basis of a dispersion analysis (DA) model for monoclinic case, allowed the determination of oscillators parameters for the four P-O stretching observed modes of the phosphate group.

  17. Dual binding mode in cohesin-dockerin complexes as assessed through stretching studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Michał; Cieplak, Marek

    2016-10-01

    A recent experimental study by Jobst et al. of stretching of a wild-type (WT) cohesin-dockerin complex has identified two kinds of the force-displacement patterns, with a single or double-peaked final rupture, which are termed "short" and "long" here. This duality has been interpreted as arising from the existence of two kinds of binding. Here, we analyze the separation of two cohesin-dockerin complexes of C. thermocellum theoretically. We use a coarse-grained structure-based model and the values of the pulling speeds are nearly experimental. In their native states, the two systems differ in the mutual binding orientations of the molecules in the complex. We demonstrate that the WT complex (PDB:1OHZ) unravels along two possible pathways that are qualitatively consistent with the presence of the short and long patterns observed experimentally. On the other hand, the mutated complex (PDB:2CCL) leads only to short trajectories. The short and long stretching pathways also appear in the cohesin-dockerin-Xmodule complex (PDB:4IU3, WT) of R. flavefaciens. Thus the duality in the stretching patterns need not be necessarily due to the duality in binding.

  18. Passively mode-locked stretched-pulse erbium-doped fiber ring laser with a regenerative feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Vincent; Lamonde, Martin; Babin, Francois; Piche, Michel

    2003-02-01

    A polarization additive pulse mode-locked stretched-pulse erbium-doped fiber ring laser with a regenerative feedback producing near transform-limited femtosecond pulses is reported. The regenerative feedback makes use of an intensity modulator driven at twice the fundamental repetition rate of the passively mode-locked fiber laser. The laser is self-starting for a limited range of pump power. The de-chirped pulses have a duration of 90 fs (FWHM) and a pulse time-bandwidth product of 0.44. The pulse energy amounts to 0.3 nJ. Pulses with nearly twice that energy could be obtained, though without self-starting capability. The laser RF power spectrum measurement yields an amplitude noise as low as 0.15% (rms) and a pulse timing jitter of 150 fs (rms). In addition, RF spectra show no relaxation oscillation in the self-starting regime.

  19. Redistribution of carbonyl stretch mode energy in isolated and solvated N-methylacetamide: kinetic energy spectral density analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2011-12-07

    The vibrational energy transfer from the excited carbonyl stretch mode in N-deuterated N-methylacetamide (NMA-d), both in isolation and in a heavy water cluster, is studied with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations, employing a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM∕MM) force field at the semiempirical PM3 level. The nonequilibrium ensemble of vibrationally excited NMA-d is prepared by perturbing the positions and velocities of the carbonyl C and O atoms and its NEMD trajectories are obtained with a leap-frog algorithm properly modified for the initial perturbation. In addition to the time-domain analysis of the kinetic and potential energies, a novel method for the spectral analysis of the atomic kinetic energies is developed, in terms of the spectral density of kinetic energy, which provides the time-dependent changes of the frequency-resolved kinetic energies without the complications of normal mode analysis at every MD time step. Due to the QM description of the solute electronic structure, the couplings among the normal modes are captured more realistically than with classical force fields. The energy transfer in the isolated NMA-d is found to proceed first from the carbonyl bond to other modes with time scales of 3 ps or less, and then among the other modes over 3-21 ps. In the solvated NMA-d, most of the excess energy is first transferred to other intramolecular modes within 5 ps, which is subsequently dissipated to solvent with 7-19 ps time scales. The contribution of the direct energy transfer from the carbonyl bond to solvent was only 5% with ~7 ps time scale. Solvent reorganization that leads to destabilization of the electrostatic interactions is found to be crucial in the long time relaxation of the excess energy, while the water intramolecular modes do not contribute significantly. Detailed mode-specific energy transfer pathways are deduced for the isolated and solvated NMA-d and they show that the energy transfer in NMA-d is a

  20. Sub-Doppler Slit Jet Discharge Spectroscopy of Jet Cooled Polyacetylenes: the Anti-Symmetric CH Stretch Mode of Triacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Roberts, Melanie A.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-06-01

    Growth of polyacetylenic molecules in acetylene flames is thought to play a central role in combustion chemistry and formation of soot, as well as the chemistry of gas clouds in the interstellar medium. In this talk, we present results from first sub-Doppler, high resolution infrared spectroscopic studies on triacetylene. In particular, we explore the fundamental anti-symmetric CH stretching mode (v_5) of jet-cooled triacetylene in a pulsed slit discharge, where the "{in-situ} synthesis" arises from a discharge of trace(0.1-1%) acetylene/rare gas mixtures followed by rapid CCH + HCCH chemistry in the supersonic expansion environment. The band origin of this mode is determined to be 3329.0544(2) cm^{-1}. At high resolution, a series of avoided energy level crossings arising from rotational perturbations are observed and ascribed to perpendicular Coriolis mixing with a near degenerate manifold of Π vibrational symmetry. The energy level patterns are successfully analyzed to reveal spectroscopic constants and Coriolis coupling matrix elements for the perturbing manifold. In addition, a weak Π-Π hot band progression due to thermal population in the slit jet is observed and assigned. D. McNaughton and D. N. Bruget, J. Mol. Spectrosc.150, 620 (1991) K. Matsumura, K. Kawaguchi, D. McNaughton, and D. N. Bruget, J. Mol. Spectrosc.158, 489 (1993)

  1. Unveiling the Surface Structure of Amorphous Solid Water via Selective Infrared Irradiation of OH Stretching Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Jennifer A; Fraser, Helen J; Roubin, Pascale; Coussan, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    In the quest to understand the formation of the building blocks of life, amorphous solid water (ASW) is one of the most widely studied molecular systems. Indeed, ASW is ubiquitous in the cold interstellar medium (ISM), where ASW-coated dust grains provide a catalytic surface for solid phase chemistry, and is believed to be present in the Earth's atmosphere at high altitudes. It has been shown that the ice surface adsorbs small molecules such as CO, N$_2$, or CH$_4$, most likely at OH groups dangling from the surface. Our study presents completely new insights concerning the behaviour of ASW upon selective infrared (IR) irradiation of its dangling modes. When irradiated, these surface H$_2$O molecules reorganise, predominantly forming a stabilised monomer-like water mode on the ice surface. We show that we systematically provoke "hole-burning" effects (or net loss of oscillators) at the wavelength of irradiation and reproduce the same absorbed water monomer on the ASW surface. Our study suggests that all dangl...

  2. Fourier Transform Absorption Spectroscopy of C_3 in the ν_3 Antisymmetric Stretch Mode Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervloet, Michel; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Tokaryk, Dennis W.; Pirali, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    The C_3 molecule has been detected in a variety of astrophysical objects thanks to the well-known 4050 Å (A^1Π_u-X^1Σ ^+ _g) electronic transition as well as the two IR active modes of the electronic ground state: ν_2 (˜ 63.42 cm^{-1}) and ν_3 (˜ 2040.02 cm^{-1}). Previous laboratory data in the ν_3 region, obtained using diode laser spectroscopy and the photolysis of allene to produce C_3, permitted measurement of the fundamental (0,0,1)Σ-(0,0,0)Σ as well as the hot bands: (0,1,1)Π-(0,1,0)Π; (0,2,1)Σ-(0,2,0)Σ; (0,2,1)Δ-(0,2,0)Δ and provided insights on the anharmonicity of the (0,nν_2,1) vibrational pattern. We have recorded the absorption spectrum of C_3 in the 1800-2100 cm^{-1} region (at a resolution of 0.003 cm^{-1}) using the Bruker IFS 125 Fourier Transform spectrometer at the AILES beamline of Synchrotron SOLEIL. C_3 was produced in a DC discharge of methane heavily diluted in helium. The rovibrational temperature of C_3 produced in our discharge is noticeably higher than in Ref. [4], which allowed us to extend measurements to higher J values. More interestingly, we assigned new hot bands involving higher quanta of the ν_2 bending states: (0,nν_2,1) with n ranging from 0 to 5. Despite the absence of Q branches for these bands, which results in a possible ambiguous J-assignment of P and R lines, the large variety of data considered in this work, in addition to our experimental data and including observations of comet spectra, allows confident assignments. L. Gausset, G. Herzberg, A. Lagerqvist, B. Rosen, Astrophysical Journal, 45-81 (1965); T. F. Giesen et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 551, L181-L184 (2001) K. W. Hinkle, J. J. Keady, P. F. Bernath, Science, 241, 1319-1322 (1988) K. Kawaguchi et al., J. Chem. Phys., 91, 1953-1957 (1989)

  3. Vibrational dynamics of the CN stretching mode of [Ru(CN)6]4- in D2O studied by nonlinear infrared spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jumpei; TAYAMA; Motohiro; BANNO; Kaoru; OHTA; Keisuke; TOMINAGA

    2010-01-01

    We have studied vibrational dynamics of the T1u mode of the CN stretching mode of [Ru(CN)6 ]4- in D2O by infrared(IR) nonlinear spectroscopy such as an IR three-pulse photon echo experiment and polarization-sensitive IR pump-probe spectroscopy. The isotropic component of the pump-probe signal shows a bi-exponential decay with time constants of 0.8 ps and 20.8 ps. The fast and slow components correspond to the rapid equilibration between the T1u mode and the Raman active modes of the CN stretching mode and the vibrational population relaxation from the v=1 state of the T1u mode,respectively. Anisotropy of the pump-probe signal decays with a time constant of 3.1 ps,which is due to the time evolution of the superposition states of the triply degenerate T1u modes. Three pulse photon echo measurements showed that the time correlation function of the frequency fluctuation decays bi-exponentially with time constants of 80 fs and 1.4 ps. These time constants depend only on the solute and are independent of the solvent,whereas the amplitudes depend on both the solute and solvent.

  4. N-H stretching modes around 3300 wavenumber from peptide backbones observed by chiral sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the molecular origin of the chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) signals of proteins and peptides at interfaces in the N-H stretching vibrational region. The N-H stretching can be a probe for investigating structural and functional properties of proteins, but remains technically difficult to analyze due to the overlapping with the O-H stretching of water molecules. Chiral SFG spectroscopy offers unique tools to study the N-H stretching from proteins at interfaces without interference from the water background. However, the molecular origin of the N-H stretching signals of proteins is still unclear. This work provides a justification of the origin of chiral N-H signals by analyzing the vibrational frequencies, examining chiral SFG theory, studying proton (hydrogen/deuterium) exchange kinetics, and performing optical control experiments. The results demonstrate that the chiral N-H stretching signals at ~3300 cm(-1) originate from the amide group of the protein backbones. This chiral N-H stretching signal offers an in situ, real-time, and background-free probe for interrogating the protein structures and dynamics at interfaces at the molecular level. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Stretch marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretch marks can appear when there is rapid stretching of the skin. They are often seen when ... often disappear after the cause of the skin stretching is gone. Avoiding rapid weight gain helps reduce ...

  6. Bond-stretching phonon mode in stripe ordered orthorhombic Nd1.67Sr0.33NiO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hücker, M.; Fukuda, T.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Hill, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) experiments on Nd1.67Sr0.33NiO4 have been performed to study electron-phonon interactions in this charge stripe ordered nickelate. Resurgent interest in such phenomena has been triggered by recent results on the high temperature superconductors, where a kink in the electron dispersion as well as striking anomalies in high- energy optical phonon modes have been observed. A significant softening of the bond-stretching-phonon mode for Q||[100] was also observed in the tetragonal nickelate La1.69Sr0.31NiO4 with inelastic neutron scattering. Moreover, this compound shows an apparent splitting of the bond-stretching mode along the [110] direction. Here we present first IXS results for Q||[110] on the orthorhombic compound Nd1.67Sr0.33NiO4, which is characterized by domains with unidirectional stripe order. By probing different spots on the sample with different domain distribution, a weak contrast between the phonon spectra has been observed. We discuss these differences in terms of phonons propagating parallel and perpendicular to the stripe direction, as well as the anisotropic, i.e. orthorhombic, lattice structure.

  7. Terahertz spectrum and normal-mode relaxation in pentaerythritol tetranitrate: effect of changes in bond-stretching force-field terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Andrey; Sewell, Thomas D

    2011-06-28

    Terahertz (THz) active normal-mode relaxation in crystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations for energy and density conditions corresponding to room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Two modifications to the fully flexible non-reactive force field due to Borodin et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 734 (2008)] used in a previous study of THz-active normal-mode relaxation in PETN [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014513 (2011)] were considered to assess the sensitivity of the earlier predictions to details of the covalent bond-stretching terms in the force field. In the first modification the harmonic bond-stretching potential was replaced with the Morse potential to study the effect of bond anharmonicity on the THz-region mode relaxation. In the second modification the C-H and nitro-group N-O bond lengths were constrained to constant values to mimic lower quantum occupation numbers for those high-frequency modes. The results for relaxation times of the initially excited modes were found to be insensitive to either force-field modification. Overall time scales for energy transfer to other modes in the system were essentially unaffected by the force-field modifications, whereas the detailed pathways by which the energy transfer occurs are more complicated for the Morse potential than for the harmonic-bond and fixed-bond cases. Terahertz infrared absorption spectra constructed using calculated normal-mode frequencies, transition dipoles, and relaxation times for THz-active modes were compared to the spectra obtained from the Fourier transform of the dipole-dipole time autocorrelation function (DDACF). Results from the two approaches are in near agreement with each other and with experimental results in terms of main peak positions. Both theoretical methods yield narrower peaks than observed experimentally and in addition predict a weaker peak at ω ∼ 50 cm(-1) that is weak or absent experimentally. Peaks obtained using

  8. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Aliphatic Sidegroups: Intensity Scaling for the C–H Stretching Modes and Astrophysical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. J.; Li, Aigen; Glaser, R.; Zhong, J. X.

    2017-03-01

    The so-called unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μ {{m}} ubiquitously seen in a wide variety of astrophysical regions are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Astronomical PAHs may have an aliphatic component, as revealed by the detection in many UIE sources of the aliphatic C–H stretching feature at 3.4 μ {{m}}. The ratio of the observed intensity of the 3.4 μ {{m}} feature to that of the 3.3 μ {{m}} aromatic C–H feature allows one to estimate the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers. This requires knowledge of the intrinsic oscillator strengths of the 3.3 μ {{m}} aromatic C–H stretch ({A}3.3) and the 3.4 μ {{m}} aliphatic C–H stretch ({A}3.4). Lacking experimental data on {A}3.3 and {A}3.4 for the UIE candidate materials, one often has to rely on quantum-chemical computations. Although the second-order Møller–Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory with a large basis set is more accurate than the B3LYP density functional theory, MP2 is computationally very demanding and impractical for large molecules. Based on methylated PAHs, we show here that, by scaling the band strengths computed at an inexpensive level (e.g., B3LYP/6-31G*), we are able to obtain band strengths as accurate as those computed at far more expensive levels (e.g., MP2/6-311+G(3df,3pd)). We calculate the model spectra of methylated PAHs and their cations excited by starlight of different spectral shapes and intensities. We find that {({I}3.4/{I}3.3)}{mod}, the ratio of the model intensity of the 3.4 μ {{m}} feature to that of the 3.3 μ {{m}} feature, is insensitive to the spectral shape and intensity of the exciting starlight. We derive a straightforward relation for determining the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers (i.e., the ratio of the number of C atoms in aliphatic units {N}{{C},{ali}} to that in aromatic rings {N}{{C},{aro}}) from the observed band ratios {({I}3.4/{I}3.3)}{obs}: {N

  9. High resolution spectroscopy of jet cooled phenyl radical: The ν1 and ν2 a1 symmetry C-H stretching modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-07-01

    A series of CH stretch modes in phenyl radical (C6H5) has been investigated via high resolution infrared spectroscopy at sub-Doppler resolution (˜60 MHz) in a supersonic discharge slit jet expansion. Two fundamental vibrations of a1 symmetry, ν1 and ν2, are observed and rotationally analyzed for the first time, corresponding to in-phase and out-of-phase symmetric CH stretch excitation at the ortho/meta/para and ortho/para C atoms with respect to the radical center. The ν1 and ν2 band origins are determined to be 3073.968 50(8) cm-1 and 3062.264 80(7) cm-1, respectively, which both agree within 5 cm-1 with theoretical anharmonic scaling predictions based on density functional B3LYP/6-311g++(3df,3dp) calculations. Integrated band strengths for each of the CH stretch bands are analyzed, with the relative intensities agreeing remarkably well with theoretical predictions. Frequency comparison with previous low resolution Ar-matrix spectroscopy [A. V. Friderichsen et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 1977 (2001)] reveals a nearly uniform Δν ≈ + 10-12 cm-1 blue shift between gas phase and Ar matrix values for ν1 and ν2. This differs substantially from the much smaller red shift (Δν ≈ - 1 cm-1) reported for the ν19 mode, and suggests a simple physical model in terms of vibrational mode symmetry and crowding due to the matrix environment. Finally, the infrared phenyl spectra are well described by a simple asymmetric rigid rotor Hamiltonian and show no evidence for spectral congestion due to intramolecular vibrational coupling, which bodes well for high resolution studies of other ring radicals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In summary, the combination of slit jet discharge methods with high resolution infrared lasers enables spectroscopic investigation of even highly reactive combustion and interstellar radical intermediates under gas phase, jet-cooled (Trot ≈ 11 K) conditions.

  10. High resolution spectroscopy of jet cooled phenyl radical: The ν1 and ν2 a1 symmetry C-H stretching modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-07-28

    A series of CH stretch modes in phenyl radical (C6H5) has been investigated via high resolution infrared spectroscopy at sub-Doppler resolution (∼60 MHz) in a supersonic discharge slit jet expansion. Two fundamental vibrations of a1 symmetry, ν1 and ν2, are observed and rotationally analyzed for the first time, corresponding to in-phase and out-of-phase symmetric CH stretch excitation at the ortho/meta/para and ortho/para C atoms with respect to the radical center. The ν1 and ν2 band origins are determined to be 3073.968 50(8) cm(-1) and 3062.264 80(7) cm(-1), respectively, which both agree within 5 cm(-1) with theoretical anharmonic scaling predictions based on density functional B3LYP/6-311g++(3df,3dp) calculations. Integrated band strengths for each of the CH stretch bands are analyzed, with the relative intensities agreeing remarkably well with theoretical predictions. Frequency comparison with previous low resolution Ar-matrix spectroscopy [A. V. Friderichsen et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 1977 (2001)] reveals a nearly uniform Δν ≈ + 10-12 cm(-1) blue shift between gas phase and Ar matrix values for ν1 and ν2. This differs substantially from the much smaller red shift (Δν ≈ - 1 cm(-1)) reported for the ν19 mode, and suggests a simple physical model in terms of vibrational mode symmetry and crowding due to the matrix environment. Finally, the infrared phenyl spectra are well described by a simple asymmetric rigid rotor Hamiltonian and show no evidence for spectral congestion due to intramolecular vibrational coupling, which bodes well for high resolution studies of other ring radicals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In summary, the combination of slit jet discharge methods with high resolution infrared lasers enables spectroscopic investigation of even highly reactive combustion and interstellar radical intermediates under gas phase, jet-cooled (Trot ≈ 11 K) conditions.

  11. Low-timing-jitter, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser with tunable repetition rate and high operation stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanshan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guofu; Zhao, Wei; Bai, Jing

    2010-09-01

    We design a low-timing-jitter, repetition-rate-tunable, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser by using a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM), a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and a tunable optical delay line in the laser configuration. Low-timing-jitter optical pulses are stably produced when a SESAM and a 0.16 m dispersion compensation fiber are employed in the laser cavity. By inserting a tunable optical delay line between NALM and SESAM, the variable repetition-rate operation of a self-starting, passively mode-locked fiber laser is successfully demonstrated over a range from 49.65 to 50.47 MHz. The experimental results show that the newly designed fiber laser can maintain the mode locking at the pumping power of 160 mW to stably generate periodic optical pulses with width less than 170 fs and timing jitter lower than 75 fs in the 1.55 µm wavelength region, when the fundamental repetition rate of the laser is continuously tuned between 49.65 and 50.47 MHz. Moreover, this fiber laser has a feature of turn-key operation with high repeatability of its fundamental repetition rate in practice.

  12. Stretch Marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to get rid of stretch marks, but the truth is that most don't work and are ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  13. Simultaneous spectral and temporal analyses of kinetic energies in nonequilibrium systems: theory and application to vibrational relaxation of O-D stretch mode of HOD in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Lim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    A time series of kinetic energies (KE) from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation contains fundamental information on system dynamics. It can also be analyzed in the frequency domain through Fourier transformation (FT) of velocity correlation functions, providing energy content of different spectral regions. By limiting the FT time span, we have previously shown that spectral resolution of KE evolution is possible in the nonequilibrium situations [Jeon and Cho, J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 135, 214504]. In this paper, we refine the method by employing the concept of instantaneous power spectra, extending it to reflect an instantaneous time-correlation of velocities with those in the future as well as with those in the past, and present a new method to obtain the instantaneous spectral density of KE (iKESD). This approach enables the simultaneous spectral and temporal resolution of KE with unlimited time precision. We discuss the formal and novel properties of the new iKESD approaches and how to optimize computational methods and determine parameters for practical applications. The method is specifically applied to the nonequilibrium MD simulation of vibrational relaxation of the OD stretch mode in a hydrated HOD molecule by employing a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potential. We directly compare the computational results with the OD band population relaxation time profiles extracted from the IR pump-probe measurements for 5% HOD in water. The calculated iKESD yields the OD bond relaxation time scale ∼30% larger than the experimental value, and this decay is largely frequency-independent if the classical anharmonicity is accounted for. From the integrated iKESD over intra- and intermolecular bands, the major energy transfer pathways were found to involve the HOD bending mode in the subps range, then the internal modes of the solvent until 5 ps after excitation, and eventually the solvent intermolecular modes. Also, strong hydrogen

  14. Enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature of MgB2 by a strain-induced bond-stretching mode softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrebnyakov, A V; Redwing, J M; Raghavan, S; Vaithyanathan, V; Schlom, D G; Xu, S Y; Li, Qi; Tenne, D A; Soukiassian, A; Xi, X X; Johannes, M D; Kasinathan, D; Pickett, W E; Wu, J S; Spence, J C H

    2004-10-01

    We report a systematic increase of the superconducting transition temperature T(c) with a biaxial tensile strain in MgB2 films to well beyond the bulk value. The tensile strain increases with the MgB2 film thickness, caused primarily by the coalescence of initially nucleated discrete islands (the Volmer-Weber growth mode.) The T(c) increase was observed in epitaxial films on SiC and sapphire substrates, although the T(c) values were different for the two substrates due to different lattice parameters and thermal expansion coefficients. We identified, by first-principles calculations, the underlying mechanism for the T(c) increase to be the softening of the bond-stretching E(2g) phonon mode, and we confirmed this conclusion by Raman scattering measurements. The result suggests that the E(2g) phonon softening is a possible avenue to achieve even higher T(c) in MgB2-related material systems.

  15. Anharmonic Bend-Stretch Coupling in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindner, Jörg; Vöhringer, Peter; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Cringus, Dan; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2006-01-01

    Following excitation of the H-O-H bending mode of water molecules in solution the stretching mode region is monitored over its entire width. The anharmonic coupling between the two modes results in a substantial change of the transient stretch absorption that decays with the bend depopulation time.

  16. Stretch Sensor Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining stretch values and movement of body parts, e.g. a foot, by analysing stretch data from a stretch sensor. By analysing data from the stretch sensor it is possible to determine stretch samples which are associated with particular motion phases....... Thereby the stretch values determined from the stretch samples have a particular physical meaning since they are associated with particular motion phases....

  17. Stretch Sensor Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining stretch values and movement of body parts, e.g. a foot, by analysing stretch data from a stretch sensor. By analysing data from the stretch sensor it is possible to determine stretch samples which are associated with particular motion phases...

  18. Stretching Safely and Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it safely and effectively. By Mayo Clinic Staff Stretching may take a back seat to your exercise routine. The main concern is exercising, not stretching, right? Not so fast. Stretching may help you: ...

  19. Transient filament stretching rheometer II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The Lagrangian sspecification is used to simulate the transient stretching filament rheometer. Simulations are performed for dilute PIB-solutions modeled as a four mode Oldroyd-B fluid and a semidilute PIB-solution modeled as a non-linear single integral equation. The simulations are compared...

  20. Based on C / S and B / S Mixed-mode Development of Meteorological Applications Software%基于C/S与B/S混合模式开发气象应用软件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周鸿奎; 谢芳; 李霞

    2011-01-01

    A meteorological application system was developed through DelPhi, SQL Server, Asp, etc. It applies in tourism meteorology, medical C/S and D/S meteorology, model and application ot traffic meteorology, sand therapy meteorology. The development methods of%通过使用C/S与B/S的混合开发模式,应用Delphi、SQL Server、Asp等关键技术,开发了一套适于本地的集旅游气象、医疗气象、交通气象、沙疗气象为一体气象服务应用系统,初步探索了气象业务应用软件的开发方法。

  1. 基于C/S模式的煤矿监控系统的应用研究%Study on application of Coalmine Monitoring System based on C/S mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁志勇; 戴胜华

    2011-01-01

    Aimed at the demand for the current development of Coalmine Monitoring System, in order to provide better compatibility and scalability, this paper introduced the design of Monitoring System based on C/S structure. This design adopted LM3S8962 microprocessor of 32-bit ARM-based, and selected the open source embedded Operating System RTThread, and used TCP/IP protocol as the method to communicate with the central computer. The result showed that it could meet the requirement of real-time monitoring and multi-tasks, ensure the rate of data transfer.%针对当前煤矿监控系统的发展要求,为了寻求更好的兼容性和可扩展性,介绍一种基于C/S结构的监控系统的设计方案.该方案采用32 bit ARM微处理器LM3S8962,选用源代码开放的RT-Thread嵌入式操作系统,并使用TCP/IP协议作为通讯协议与控制中心计算机进行网络通信.测试表明,该监控系统能满足实时性和多任务的要求,并保证数据传输速度.

  2. Four- and five-coordinate species in nickel-reconstituted hemoglobin and myoglobin: Raman identification of the nickel-histidine stretching mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelnutt, J A; Alston, K; Ho, J Y; Yu, N T; Yamamoto, T; Rifkind, J M

    1986-02-11

    Nickel(II)-reconstituted hemoglobin (NiHb) and myoglobin (NiMb) and model Ni porphyrins have been investigated by Soret-resonance Raman difference spectroscopy. Two sets of frequencies for the oxidation-state and core-size marker lines in the region from 1300 to 1700 cm-1 indicate two distinct sites in NiHb. Only one of these sites is evident in the Raman spectra of NiMb. This result is consistent with the UV-visible absorption spectrum of NiHb, which shows two Soret bands at 397 and 420 nm and one Soret at 424 nm for NiMb. Excitation at the blue Soret component of NiHb with 406.7-nm laser radiation preferentially enhances the set of Raman marker lines typical of Ni-protoporphyrin IX [Ni(ProtoP )] in noncoordinating solvents. The wavelength of the blue Soret component and the Raman spectrum indicate four-coordination for this site in NiHb. Laser excitation in the red Soret band enhances a set of lines whose frequencies are compatible with neither four- nor six-coordinate frequencies but are intermediate between the two. The red Soret band of the proteins is also considerably less red shifted than six-coordinate Ni-porphyrin models. These results suggest that Ni in the second site possesses a single axial ligand. Raman spectra of 64Ni-reconstituted and natural abundance Ni-reconstituted hemoglobins, obtained simultaneously in a Raman difference spectrometer, have identified the Ni-ligand stretch at 236 cm-1. The line shifts to 229 cm-1 for the 64Ni-reconstituted Hb. For a pure Ni-ligand stretch a 10-cm-1 shift would be predicted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopy of CH/CD Stretches in Propadiene: An Algebraic Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joydeep Choudhury; Nirmal Kumar Sarkar; Srinivasa Rao Kaxumuri; Ramendu Bhattacharjee

    2009-01-01

    Using Hamiltonian based on Lie algebraic method, the stretching vibrational modes of C3H4 and C3D4 molecules are calculated up to higher overtones. The model appears to describe C-H and C-D stretching modes with less number of parameters. The locality parameter ξ confirms the highly local behaviour of the stretching modes of these molecules.

  4. Enhanced stimulated Raman scattering of weak-gain mode C-H stretching vibration of benzene%苯C-H伸缩振动弱增益模式的受激拉曼散射

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜永恒; 孙成林; 李占龙; 曹安阳; 里佐威

    2011-01-01

    In the paper we report on the enhanced stimulated Raman scattering of the weak-gain mode of benzene. The stimulated Raman scattering of C-H stretching vibration of benzene is observed in liquid core optical fiber by mixing toluene. The result is explained by (toluene-benzene) + and (toluene-toluene) + dimmer of plasma%对苯的长拉曼振动模式C-H(3060 cm-1线)伸缩振动的一阶受激拉曼散射进行了实验研究.利用在苯溶液中加入甲苯溶液,在液芯光纤内实现了苯的全对称C-H伸缩振动3060 cm-1线的受激拉曼散射.利用等离子体解释了这一增强机理.

  5. 基于C/S模式的成像测井仪器调试台架软件系统研制%Development of the Test-bench Software System for Imaging Logging Tool Based on the C/S Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨喜峰; 鞠晓东; 吴文河

    2013-01-01

    根据微电阻率扫描测井仪调试台架软件功能需求,在对比C/S和B/S两种通讯模式基础上,确定基于C/S模式的软件通讯结构.为提高调试台架软件的可移植和扩展性,引入相应软件技术:前端机通过内核模块方法和多线程技术实现驱动程序动态管理和功能模块独立;上位机中采用MDI软件框架和组件技术实现结构开放和功能独立.微电阻率扫描测井仪调试台架软件系统设计结构扩展性强,组件功能可复用性强,方便移植到同类调试台架.%According to demand of the Micro-resistivity canning tool test-bench software demand, C/S and B/S two kinds of communication modes are contrasted, then confirms the software communication structure based on C/ S mode. In order to improve the portability and expansibility of the test-bench software, the corresponding software technology is introduced: front end machine realizes driver dynamic management and the independent function through the kernel modules method and multithread technology, main machine brings about the opening up of software structure and independent function through the MDI software framework and component technology. Based on the micro-resistivity scanning tool test-bench software system of above software technology has stronger portability and scalability, can easily transplant to other test- bench.

  6. Stretching: Does It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  7. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  8. Stretching: Does It Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  9. C-S-H凝胶对Pb(Ⅱ)的吸附固化作用%Adsorption and Solidification of Pb(Ⅱ) by C-S-H Gel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昕; 刘晶; 汪澜; 考宏涛

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the adsorption and solidification of Pb(II) , pure C-S-H gel and Pb-doped C-S-H gel were synthesized using analytical reagent grade Ca(NO3)2·4H2O、Na2SiO3·9H2O and Pb ( NO3) 2 as raw materials by the solution reaction. The results showed the C-S-H gel had good adsorption ability while soluble lead salts increased from 2% to 6% . The X-ray diffraction patterns of Pb-doped C-S-H gel changed obviously,both in peak shift and the emergence of Ca(OH)2 diffraction peaks. Infrared tests showed that Si linkage models had been changed in the way that Q2 stretching vibration shifted to lower wavenumber and Q stretching vibration peak absorption intensity increased, specially for silicon-oxide tetrahedron structure existing in Pb-doped C-S-H gel.%以分析纯Ca(NO3)2·4H2O、Na2SiO3·9H2O、Pb(NO3)2为原料,通过溶液反应法,制备纯净的C-S-H凝胶和掺杂Pb的C-S-H凝胶,研究了C-S-H凝胶在形成过程中对Pb的吸附固化作用及掺杂Pb后C-S-H凝胶的结构变化.结果表明,可溶铅盐由2%增至6%时,C-S-H凝胶对Pb均有良好的吸附固化作用,俘获Pb总量增大.XRD图谱发现掺杂Pb的C-S-H凝胶,其主峰位置发生偏移,出现明显的Ca(OH)2衍射峰.红外测试表明含Pb C-S-H凝胶硅氧四面体的链接方式发生变化,Q2伸缩振动峰向低波数方向偏移,Q1伸缩振动峰吸收强度增加.

  10. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, M

    2000-01-01

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e. the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the inter-bead elastic potential) is made explicit. Implications for the drag reduction theory are discussed.

  11. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  12. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  13. The weak fundamental NH-stretching transition in amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrøder, Sidsel D.; Hansen, Anne S.; Wallberg, Jens H.; Nielsen, Anne R.; Du, Lin; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2017-02-01

    Absolute intensities of NH-stretching fundamental and overtone transitions of gas phase aniline, methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine have been measured with long path length conventional absorption spectroscopy. To support the assignments of NH-stretching transitions, transition frequencies and intensities were calculated with the local mode model using ab initio calculated local mode parameters and dipole moment functions obtained at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 level of theory. For aniline, the absolute intensities of the NH-stretching transitions show the typical decrease of approximately an order of magnitude for each successive vibrational excitation. For methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine, the observed absolute intensities of the fundamental NH-stretching transition is weak and of similar strength or even weaker than the corresponding first overtone transition. Characteristic for the amines with a normal fundamental intensity is a conjugated double bond next to the amine group.

  14. Using Atomic Orbitals and Kinesthetic Learning to Authentically Derive Molecular Stretching Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Adam J.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Young, Nigel A.

    2013-01-01

    The stretching modes of ML[subscript "x"] complexes have the same symmetry as the atomic orbitals on M that are used to form its s bonds. In the exercise suggested here, the atomic orbitals are used to derive the form of the stretching modes without the need for formal group theory. The analogy allows students to help understand many…

  15. Using Atomic Orbitals and Kinesthetic Learning to Authentically Derive Molecular Stretching Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Adam J.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Young, Nigel A.

    2013-01-01

    The stretching modes of ML[subscript "x"] complexes have the same symmetry as the atomic orbitals on M that are used to form its s bonds. In the exercise suggested here, the atomic orbitals are used to derive the form of the stretching modes without the need for formal group theory. The analogy allows students to help understand many…

  16. Brand, Brand Stretching, and Brand Stretching Plan for JAC

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lei

    2012-01-01

    With the consistent crisis of world economic, companies are encountering problems with their expansion. Introducing all new brands for expanding is hard to be accepted due to the high level of costs and risks. Using brand stretching as companies’ expansion strategy efficiently reduces the costs and risks today. Therefore, getting clear about brand stretching seems quite important for most companies nowadays. The objectives of this thesis is introducing brand stretching theory and making a...

  17. Brand, Brand Stretching, and Brand Stretching Plan for JAC

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lei

    2012-01-01

    With the consistent crisis of world economic, companies are encountering problems with their expansion. Introducing all new brands for expanding is hard to be accepted due to the high level of costs and risks. Using brand stretching as companies’ expansion strategy efficiently reduces the costs and risks today. Therefore, getting clear about brand stretching seems quite important for most companies nowadays. The objectives of this thesis is introducing brand stretching theory and making a...

  18. Stretching cells with DEAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, S.; Rosset, S.; Shea, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    Biological cells regulate their biochemical behavior in response to mechanical stress present in their organism. Most of the available cell cultures designed to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on cells are cm2 area, far too large to monitor single cell response or have a very low throughput. We have developed two sets of high throughput single cell stretcher devices based on dielectric elastomer microactuators to stretch groups of individual cells with various strain levels in a single experiment. The first device consists of an array of 100 μm x 200 μm actuators on a non-stretched PDMS membrane bonded to a Pyrex chip, showing up to 4.7% strain at the electric field of 96 V/μm. The second device contains an array of 100 μm x 100 μm actuators on a 160% uniaxially prestretched PDMS membrane suspended over a frame. 37% strain is recorded at the nominal electric field of 114 V/μm. The performance of these devices as a cell stretcher is assessed by comparing their static and dynamic behavior.

  19. Effects of stretching on upper-body muscular performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Earlando M; Kraemer, William J; Vingren, Jakob L; Volek, Jeff S; Hatfield, Disa L; Spiering, Barry A; Ho, Jen Yu; Fragala, Maren S; Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Häkkinen, Keijo; Maresh, Carl M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the influence of upper-body static stretching and dynamic stretching on upper-body muscular performance. Eleven healthy men, who were National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I track and field athletes (age, 19.6 +/- 1.7 years; body mass, 93.7 +/- 13.8 kg; height, 183.6 +/- 4.6 cm; bench press 1 repetition maximum [1RM], 106.2 +/- 23.0 kg), participated in this study. Over 4 sessions, subjects participated in 4 different stretching protocols (i.e., no stretching, static stretching, dynamic stretching, and combined static and dynamic stretching) in a balanced randomized order followed by 4 tests: 30% of 1 RM bench throw, isometric bench press, overhead medicine ball throw, and lateral medicine ball throw. Depending on the exercise, test peak power (Pmax), peak force (Fmax), peak acceleration (Amax), peak velocity (Vmax), and peak displacement (Dmax) were measured. There were no differences among stretch trials for Pmax, Fmax, Amax, Vmax, or Dmax for the bench throw or for Fmax for the isometric bench press. For the overhead medicine ball throw, there were no differences among stretch trials for Vmax or Dmax. For the lateral medicine ball throw, there was no difference in Vmax among stretch trials; however, Dmax was significantly larger (p static and dynamic condition compared to the static-only condition. In general, there was no short-term effect of stretching on upper-body muscular performance in young adult male athletes, regardless of stretch mode, potentially due to the amount of rest used after stretching before the performances. Since throwing performance was largely unaffected by static or dynamic upper-body stretching, athletes competing in the field events could perform upper-body stretching, if enough time were allowed before the performance. However, prior studies on lower-body musculature have demonstrated dramatic negative effects on speed and power. Therefore, it is recommended that a dynamic

  20. Warm-up effects from concomitant use of vibration and static stretching after cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Wen; Liu, Chiang; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2017-04-01

    Static stretch is routinely used in traditional warm-up but impaired muscle performance. Combining vibration with static stretching as a feasible component may be an alternative to static stretching after submaximal aerobic exercise to improve jumping as well as flexibility. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of aerobic exercise, static stretching, and vibration with static stretching on flexibility and vertical jumping performance. A repeated measures experimental design was used in this study. Twelve participants randomly underwent 5 different warm-ups including cycling alone (C warm-up), static stretching alone (S warm-up), combining vibration with static stretching (VS warm-up), cycling followed by S (C+S warm-up), and cycling followed by VS (C+VS warm-up) on 5 separate days. Sit-and-reach, squat jump (SJ), and counter movement jump (CMJ) were measured for pre- and post- tests. The sit-and-reach scores after the S, VS, C+S and C+VS warm-ups were significantly enhanced (Pstretching after submaximal cycling exercise (C+VS warm-up) could be a feasible warm-up protocol to improve both flexibility and vertical jump performance, compared with the traditional warm-up (C+S warm-up).

  1. Stretching a Semiflexible Polymer in a Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runhua Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available How the statistical behavior of semiflexible polymer chains may be affected by force stretching and tube confinement is a classical unsolved problem in polymer physics. Based on the Odijk deflection theory and normal mode decomposition in terms of Fourier expansion, we have derived a new compact formula for the extension of a wormlike chain of finite length strongly confined in a tube and simultaneously stretched by an external force. We have also suggested a new deflection length, which together with the force-extension relation is valid for a very extended range of the tube-diameter/persistence-length ratio comparing to the classic Odijk theory. The newly derived formula has no adjustable fitting parameters for the whole deflection regime; in contrast, the classic Odijk length needs different prefactors to fit the free energy and average extension, respectively. Brownian dynamics simulations based on the Generalized Bead-Rod (GBR model were extensively performed, which justified the theoretical predictions.

  2. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the effect of antisymmetric stretch mode excitation on the O({sup 3}P) + CH{sub 4}(ν{sub 3} = 1) → OH + CH{sub 3} reaction on an analytical potential energy surface. Comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monge-Palacios, M.; González-Lavado, E.; Espinosa-Garcia, J., E-mail: joaquin@unex.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2014-09-07

    Motivated by a recent crossed-beam experiment on the title reaction reported by Pan and Liu [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 191101 (2014)], a detailed dynamics study was performed at three collision energies using quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations based on a full-dimensional potential energy surface recently developed by our group (PES-2014). Although theory/experiment agreement is not yet quantitative, in general the theoretical results reproduce the experimental evidence: the vibrational branching ratio of OH(v = 1)/OH(v = 0) is ∼0.8/0.2, excitation of the antisymmetric CH stretching mode in methane increases reactivity by factor 2.28–1.50, although an equivalent amount as translational energy is more efficient in promoting the reaction and, finally, product angular distribution shifts from backward in the CH{sub 4}(ν = 0) ground-state to sideways when the antisymmetric CH stretching mode is excited. These results give confidence to the PES-2014 surface, depend on the quantization procedure used, are comparable with recent QCT calculations or improve previous theoretical studies using a different surface, and demonstrate the utility of the theory/experiment collaboration.

  3. Stretching the Border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horstmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I hope to add a complementary perspective to James Scott’s recent work on avoidance strategies of subaltern mountain people by focusing on what I call the refugee public. The educated Karen elite uses the space of exile in the Thai borderland to reconstitute resources and to re......-enter Karen state in Eastern Burma as humanitarians, providing medical, educational resources and help to document human rights violations and do advocacy work. In addition, local missionaries and faith-based groups also use the corridor to spread the word of God. I argue that Karen humanitarian community......-based organizations succeed to stretch the border by establishing a firm presence that is supported by the international humanitarian economy in the refugee camps in Northwestern Thailand....

  4. Tactile spatial acuity is reduced by skin stretch at the human wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Frederick W J; Idrees, Raheel; Spilioti, Diamantina X; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2010-10-22

    The skin is an elastic organ that is continuously distorted as our limbs move. The hypothesis that the precision of human tactile localisation is reduced when the skin is stretched, with concurrent expansion of receptive fields (RFs) was tested. Locognosic acuity over the dorsal wrist area was quantified during application of background stretch by (a) Wrist-Bend (skin stretch combined with non-cutaneous proprioceptor activation) and (b) Skin-Pull (skin stretch alone). Participants identified the perceived direction (distal or proximal) of brief test stimuli, applied along a 7-point linear array, relative to a central reference locus. Performance was significantly reduced during the large amplitude compared to the small amplitude of tonic skin stretch, but there was no effect of stretch mode (Wrist-Bend, Skin-Pull), nor was the effect of stretch amplitude modulated by the mode of stretch. Locognosic acuity was poorer than baseline accuracy for the large amplitude skin stretches, for both application modes, but did not differ significantly from baseline for either of the small amplitude stretches. We interpret these observations as corroborating the long-held assumption that tactile localisation is primarily dependent upon the RF dimensions, and associated innervation densities, of regional touch units. The finding that performance was reduced to a similar extent under Skin-Pull and Wrist-Bend conditions suggests that non-cutaneous proprioceptors had rather little tonic modulatory effect.

  5. Guidelines for Stretch Flanging Advanced High Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, S.; Chintamani, J.

    2005-08-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are currently being considered for use in closure and structural panels in the automotive industry because of their high potential for affordable weight reduction and improved performance. AHSS such as dual phase steels are currently being used in some vehicle platforms. From a manufacturing perspective, stretch flanging during stamping is an important deformation mode requiring careful consideration of geometry and the die process. This paper presents some geometric and process guidelines for stretch flanging AHSS. Hole expansion experiments were conducted to determine the failure limit for a sheared edge condition. Effects of punching clearance, prestrain and prior strain path on hole expansion were explored in these experiments. In addition, dynamic explicit FE calculations using LS-DYNA were also conducted for a typical stretch flange by varying some key geometric parameters. The experimental and FEA results were then analyzed to yield process and geometric guidelines to enable successful stretch flanging of AHSS.

  6. Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ... Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin C, S- ...

  7. To stretch or not to stretch: the role of stretching in injury prevention and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, M P; Cosgrave, C H

    2010-04-01

    Stretching is commonly practiced before sports participation; however, effects on subsequent performance and injury prevention are not well understood. There is an abundance of literature demonstrating that a single bout of stretching acutely impairs muscle strength, with a lesser effect on power. The extent to which these effects are apparent when stretching is combined with other aspects of a pre-participation warm-up, such as practice drills and low intensity dynamic exercises, is not known. With respect to the effect of pre-participation stretching on injury prevention a limited number of studies of varying quality have shown mixed results. A general consensus is that stretching in addition to warm-up does not affect the incidence of overuse injuries. There is evidence that pre-participation stretching reduces the incidence of muscle strains but there is clearly a need for further work. Future prospective randomized studies should use stretching interventions that are effective at decreasing passive resistance to stretch and assess effects on subsequent injury incidence in sports with a high prevalence of muscle strains.

  8. Resonance raman spectra of metal II/IV dimer chain complexes of platinum and palladium. Analysis of the component structure to the band assigned to the symmetric XMX chain stretching mode (X = Cl or Br)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robin J. H.; Michael, David J.

    1988-10-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the linear-chain, mixed-valence, halogen-bridged complexes [Pt(pn) 2] [Pt(pn) 2X 2] (ClO 4) 4, where X = Cl or Br, and [Pd(pn) 2] [Pd(pn) 2Br 2] (ClO 4) 4 have been obtained over the range of excitation wavelengths 457.9 to 647.1 nm. Of particular interest is the symmetric metal—halogen stretch, ν 1, which has several components. The relative intensities of these components change with variation of the wavenumber of excitation within the intervalence electronic absorption. This effect and the origin of the different components are discussed.

  9. Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Isokinetic Peak Torques and Electromyographic Activities of the Antagonist Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serefoglu, Abdullah; Sekir, Ufuk; Gür, Hakan; Akova, Bedrettin

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if static and dynamic stretching exercises of the knee muscles (quadriceps and hamstring muscles) have any effects on concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torques and electromyographic amplitudes (EMG) of the antagonist muscles. Twenty healthy male athletes (age between 18-30 years) voluntarily participated in this study. All of the subjects visited the laboratory to complete the following intervention in a randomized order on 5 separate days; (a) non-stretching (control), (b) static stretching of the quadriceps muscles, (c) static stretching of the hamstring muscles, (d) dynamic stretching of the quadriceps muscles, and (e) dynamic stretching of the hamstring muscles. Static stretching exercises either for the quadriceps or the hamstring muscles were carried out at the standing and sitting positions. Subjects performed four successive repetitions of each stretching exercises for 30 seconds in both stretching positions. Similar to static stretching exercises two different stretching modes were designed for dynamic stretching exercises. Concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque for the non-stretched antagonist quadriceps or hamstring muscles at angular velocities of 60°/sec and 240°/sec and their concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activities were measured before and immediately after the intervention. Isokinetic peak torques of the non-stretched agonist hamstring and quadriceps muscles did not represent any significant (p > 0.05) differences following static and dynamic stretching of the antagonist quadriceps and hamstring muscles, respectively. Similarly, the EMG activities of the agonist muscles exhibited no significant alterations (p > 0.05) following both stretching exercises of the antagonist muscles. According to the results of the present study it is possible to state that antagonist stretching exercises either in the static or dynamic modes do not affect the isokinetic peak torques and the EMG activities

  10. Stretch-minimising stream surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Barton, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We study the problem of finding stretch-minimising stream surfaces in a divergence-free vector field. These surfaces are generated by motions of seed curves that propagate through the field in a stretch minimising manner, i.e., they move without stretching or shrinking, preserving the length of their arbitrary arc. In general fields, such curves may not exist. How-ever, the divergence-free constraint gives rise to these \\'stretch-free\\' curves that are locally arc-length preserving when infinitesimally propagated. Several families of stretch-free curves are identified and used as initial guesses for stream surface generation. These surfaces are subsequently globally optimised to obtain the best stretch-minimising stream surfaces in a given divergence-free vector field. Our algorithm was tested on benchmark datasets, proving its applicability to incompressible fluid flow simulations, where our stretch-minimising stream surfaces realistically reflect the flow of a flexible univariate object. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute Muscle Stretching and Shoulder Position Sense

    OpenAIRE

    Björklund, Martin; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Crenshaw, Albert G.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Stretching is common among athletes as a potential method for injury prevention. Stretching-induced changes in the muscle spindle properties are a suggested mechanism, which may imply reduced proprioception after stretching; however, little is known of this association.

  12. MODEL STRETCHING ENERGY LEVELS FOR SF6 MOLECULE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Jun; Cheng Yan; Chen Xiang-rong; Gou Qing-quan

    2000-01-01

    A four-parameter nonlinear model is introduced to the description of theX - Y stretching modes of XY6 octahedral molecules in the electronicground state. We here only apply it to the calculations of S--Fstretches of SF6 molecule. The model calculations appear to describethe observed data well, and predict some new vibrational bands ataccurate energies not yet observed.

  13. Anharmonic bend-stretch coupling in neat liquid water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindner, Joerg; Cringus, Dan; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Voehringer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Femtosecond mid-IR spectroscopy is used to study the vibrational relaxation dynamics in neat liquid water. By exciting the bending vibration and probing the stretching mode, it is possible to reliably determine the bending and librational lifetimes of water. The anharmonic coupling between the bendi

  14. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  15. The effect of static, ballistic, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul S; Olsen, Peter D; Portas, Matthew D

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of different modes of stretching on vertical jump performance. Eighteen male university students (age, 24.3 +/- 3.2 years; height, 181.5 +/- 11.4 cm; body mass, 78.1 +/- 6.4 kg; mean +/- SD) completed 4 different conditions in a randomized order, on different days, interspersed by a minimum of 72 hours of rest. Each session consisted of a standard 5-minute cycle warm-up, accompanied by one of the subsequent conditions: (a) control, (b) 10-minute static stretching, (c) 10-minute ballistic stretching, or (d) 10-minute proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. The subjects performed 3 trials of static and countermovement jumps prior to stretching and poststretching at 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes. Vertical jump height decreased after static and PNF stretching (4.0% and 5.1%, p ballistic stretching (2.7%, p > 0.05). However, jumping performance had fully recovered 15 minutes after all stretching conditions. In conclusion, vertical jump performance is diminished for 15 minutes if performed after static or PNF stretching, whereas ballistic stretching has little effect on jumping performance. Consequently, PNF or static stretching should not be performed immediately prior to an explosive athletic movement.

  16. Intermittent But Not Continuous Static Stretching Improves Subsequent Vertical Jump Performance In Flexibility-Trained Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Donti, Olyvia; Tsolakis, Charilaos; Smilios, Ilias; Bishop, David J

    2017-02-23

    This study examined changes in countermovement jump (CMJ) height after an intermittent or a continuous static stretching protocol of equal total duration. Sixteen male, elite-level gymnasts performed 90 s of intermittent (3 x 30 s with 30 s rest) or continuous stretching (90 s) of the quadriceps muscle. A single-leg stretching and jumping design was used, with the contra-lateral limb serving as a control. The same individuals performed both conditions with alternate legs in a randomized, counterbalanced order. One leg CMJ height was measured for the stretched and the control leg after warm-up, immediately after stretching, and at regular intervals for 10 min after stretching. Range of motion (ROM) of the hip and knee joints was measured before, after, and 10 min post-stretching. Compared to the control leg, intermittent stretching increased CMJ height by 8.1±2.0%, 4 min into recovery (+2.2±2.0 cm, 95%CI: 1.0-3.4 cm, p=0.001), while continuous stretching decreased CMJ height by 17.5±3.3% immediately after (-2.9±1.7 cm, 95%CI: -2.0 to -3.7 cm, p=0.001) and by 12.0±2.7% one min after stretching (-2.2±2.1 cm, 95%CI: -1.2 to -3.2 cm, p=0.001). The increases in hip (2.9 and 3.6, p=0.001. d=2.4) and knee joint ROM (5.1 and 6.1, p=0.001. d=0.85) after the intermittent and continuous stretching protocols were not different. The opposite effects of intermittent vs. continuous stretching on subsequent CMJ performance suggests that stretching mode is an important variable when examining the acute effects of static stretching on performance in flexibility-trained athletes.

  17. Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Isokinetic Peak Torques and Electromyographic Activities of the Antagonist Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serefoglu, Abdullah; Sekir, Ufuk; Gür, Hakan; Akova, Bedrettin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if static and dynamic stretching exercises of the knee muscles (quadriceps and hamstring muscles) have any effects on concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torques and electromyographic amplitudes (EMG) of the antagonist muscles. Twenty healthy male athletes (age between 18-30 years) voluntarily participated in this study. All of the subjects visited the laboratory to complete the following intervention in a randomized order on 5 separate days; (a) non-stretching (control), (b) static stretching of the quadriceps muscles, (c) static stretching of the hamstring muscles, (d) dynamic stretching of the quadriceps muscles, and (e) dynamic stretching of the hamstring muscles. Static stretching exercises either for the quadriceps or the hamstring muscles were carried out at the standing and sitting positions. Subjects performed four successive repetitions of each stretching exercises for 30 seconds in both stretching positions. Similar to static stretching exercises two different stretching modes were designed for dynamic stretching exercises. Concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque for the non-stretched antagonist quadriceps or hamstring muscles at angular velocities of 60°/sec and 240°/sec and their concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activities were measured before and immediately after the intervention. Isokinetic peak torques of the non-stretched agonist hamstring and quadriceps muscles did not represent any significant (p > 0.05) differences following static and dynamic stretching of the antagonist quadriceps and hamstring muscles, respectively. Similarly, the EMG activities of the agonist muscles exhibited no significant alterations (p > 0.05) following both stretching exercises of the antagonist muscles. According to the results of the present study it is possible to state that antagonist stretching exercises either in the static or dynamic modes do not affect the isokinetic peak torques and the EMG activities

  18. Atomic Stretch: Optimally bounded real-time stretching and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Nielsen, Jannik Boll

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Stretch is a plugin for your preferred Adobe video editing tool, allowing real-time smooth and optimally bounded retarget-ting from and to any aspect ratio. The plugin allows preserving of high interest pixels through a protected region, attention redirection through color-modification, co......Atomic Stretch is a plugin for your preferred Adobe video editing tool, allowing real-time smooth and optimally bounded retarget-ting from and to any aspect ratio. The plugin allows preserving of high interest pixels through a protected region, attention redirection through color...

  19. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  20. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  1. The Carry-Over Effects of Diathermy and Stretching in Developing Hamstring Flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, David O; Miner, Lisa; Knight, Kenneth L; Ricard, Mark D

    2002-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of low-load, short-duration stretching with or without high-intensity, pulsed short-wave diathermy on hamstring flexibility. DESIGN AND SETTING: We used a single-blind, repeated-measures design (pretest and posttest for all treatments) that included a placebo. The 3 independent variables were treatment mode, pretest and posttest measurements, and day. Treatment mode had 3 levels: diathermy and stretching, stretching alone, and control. The dependent variable was range of motion. Subjects were randomly assigned to the diathermy and stretching, stretching-only, or control group. Subjects were treated and tested each day (at approximately the same time) for 5 days, with a follow-up test administered 72 hours later. Hamstring flexibility was tested using a sit-and-reach box before and after each treatment. Diathermy and stretching subjects received a 15-minute diathermy treatment on the right hamstring at a setting of 7000 pulses per second, with an average pulse width of 95 μsec. Stretching-only subjects received a 15-minute sham diathermy treatment. Both diathermy and stretching and stretching-only subjects then performed three 30-second stretches (short duration) before being retested. Control subjects lay prone for 15 minutes before being retested. SUBJECTS: Thirty-seven healthy college students (11 men, 26 women, age = 20.46 +/- 1.74 years) volunteered. MEASUREMENTS: Hamstring flexibility was measured using a sit-and-reach box before and after each treatment. RESULTS: The average increases in hamstring flexibility over the 5 treatment days for the diathermy and stretching, stretching-only, and control groups were 6.06 cm (19.6%), 5.27 cm (19.7%), and 3.38 cm (10.4%), respectively. Three days later (after no treatment), the values for the diathermy and stretching, stretching-only, and control groups were 8.27 cm (26.7%), 6.83 cm (25.3%), and 4.15 cm (14.2%), respectively. No significant differences in hamstring flexibility were

  2. Effects of differential stretching protocols during warm-ups on high-speed motor capacities in professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Thomas; Williams, Alun G

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different modes of stretching within a pre-exercise warm-up on high-speed motor capacities important to soccer performance. Eighteen professional soccer players were tested for countermovement vertical jump, stationary 10-m sprint, flying 20-m sprint, and agility performance after different warm-ups consisting of static stretching, dynamic stretching, or no stretching. There was no significant difference among warm-ups for the vertical jump: mean +/- SD data were 40.4 +/- 4.9 cm (no stretch), 39.4 +/- 4.5 cm (static), and 40.2 +/- 4.5 cm (dynamic). The dynamic-stretch protocol produced significantly faster 10-m sprint times than did the no-stretch protocol: 1.83 +/- 0.08 seconds (no stretch), 1.85 +/- 0.08 seconds (static), and 1.87 +/- 0.09 seconds (dynamic). The dynamic- and static-stretch protocols produced significantly faster flying 20-m sprint times than did the no-stretch protocol: 2.41 +/- 0.13 seconds (no stretch), 2.37 +/- 0.12 seconds (static), and 2.37 +/- 0.13 seconds (dynamic). The dynamic-stretch protocol produced significantly faster agility performance than did both the no-stretch protocol and the static-stretch protocol: 5.20 +/- 0.16 seconds (no stretch), 5.22 +/- 0.18 seconds (static), and 5.14 +/- 0.17 seconds (dynamic). Static stretching does not appear to be detrimental to high-speed performance when included in a warm-up for professional soccer players. However, dynamic stretching during the warm-up was most effective as preparation for subsequent high-speed performance.

  3. Revised Atomistic Models of the Crystal Structure of C-S-H with high C/S Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Goran; Nicoleau, Luc; Nonat, André; Veryazov, Valera

    2016-09-01

    The atomic structure of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C1.67-S-Hx) has been studied. Atomistic C-S-H models suggested in our previous study have been revised in order to perform a direct comparison of energetic stability of the different structures. An extensive set of periodic structures of C-S-H with variation of water content was created, and then optimized using molecular dynamics with reactive force field ReaxFF and quantum chemical semiempirical method PM6. All models show organization of water molecules inside the structure of C-S-H. The new geometries of C-S-H, reported in this paper, show lower relative energy with respect to the geometries from the original definition of C-S-H models. Model that corresponds to calcium enriched tobermorite structure has the lowest relative energy and the density closest to the experimental values.

  4. Design of Warped Stretch Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-11-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal’s envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals.

  5. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Pierce, C. W.; Milner, T. E.

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions durin...

  6. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  7. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  8. Should Athletes Stretch before Exercise?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KarlB.Fields,MD; CraigM.Burnworth,MD; Martha Delaney·MA

    2007-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS Traditional stretching routines performed during warm-up procedures before exercise can increase flexibility for a short time, but there is little scientific evidence that such routines can improve exercise performance, reduce delayed-onset muscular soreness, or prevent injuries.

  9. Iterated Stretching of Viscoelastic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Kalaidin, Evgeny

    1999-01-01

    We examine, with asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation, the iterated stretching dynamics of FENE and Oldroyd-B jets of initial radius r(sub 0), shear viscosity nu, Weissenberg number We, retardation number S, and capillary number Ca. The usual Rayleigh instability stretches the local uniaxial extensional flow region near a minimum in jet radius into a primary filament of radius [Ca(1 - S)/ We](sup 1/2)r(sub 0) between two beads. The strain-rate within the filament remains constant while its radius (elastic stress) decreases (increases) exponentially in time with a long elastic relaxation time 3We(r(sup 2, sub 0)/nu). Instabilities convected from the bead relieve the tension at the necks during this slow elastic drainage and trigger a filament recoil. Secondary filaments then form at the necks from the resulting stretching. This iterated stretching is predicted to occur successively to generate high-generation filaments of radius r(sub n), (r(sub n)/r(sub 0)) = square root of 2[r(sub n-1)/r(sub 0)](sup 3/2) until finite-extensibility effects set in.

  10. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  11. Does Acute Static Stretching Reduce Muscle Power?

    OpenAIRE

    Francis M. Kozub; Sameer A. Gohir; Alan Donnelly

    2012-01-01

    Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the training and clinical setting. Recently, stretching in the warm-up has been shown to decrease several muscular performance variables, but the dose-response of this effect is unknown and moreover these stretching bouts are not representative of athletes during warm up procedures, as they are usually time consuming. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help spo...

  12. Analysis of a filament stretching rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1996-01-01

    A finite element analysis of the stretching filament rheometer of Tirtaadmadja and Sridhar (1993) is presenetd. Simulations of the stretching of a filament of the polymet test solution, fluid A, between two plates are shown.......A finite element analysis of the stretching filament rheometer of Tirtaadmadja and Sridhar (1993) is presenetd. Simulations of the stretching of a filament of the polymet test solution, fluid A, between two plates are shown....

  13. Polymer network stretching during electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Israel; Arinstein, Arkadii; Fezzaa, Kamel; Rafailovich, Miriam; Zussman, Eyal

    2011-03-01

    Fast X-ray phase contrast imaging is used to observe the flow of a semi-dilute polyethylene oxide solution during electrospinning. Micron-size glass particles mixed in the polymer solution allow viewing of the jet flow field, and reveal a high-gradient flow that has both longitudinal and radial components that grow rapidly along the jet. The resulting hydrodynamic forces cause substantial longitudinal stretching and transversal contraction of the polymer network within the jet, as confirmed by random walk simulation and theoretical modeling. The polymer network therefore concentrates towards the jet center, and its conformation may transform from a free state to a fully-stretched state within a short distance from the jet start. We acknowledge the financial support of the United States - Israel Bi-National Science Foundation (grant 2006061).

  14. Lamellar Thickness and Stretching Temperature Dependency of Cavitation in Semicrystalline Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaotao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Fu, Lianlian; Lu, Ying; Men, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    Polybutene-1 (PB-1), a typical semicrystalline polymer, in its stable form I shows a peculiar temperature dependent strain-whitening behavior when being stretched at temperatures in between room temperature and melting temperature of the crystallites where the extent of strain-whitening weakens with the increasing of stretching temperature reaching a minima value followed by an increase at higher stretching temperatures. Correspondingly, a stronger strain-hardening phenomenon was observed at higher temperatures. The strain-whitening phenomenon in semicrystalline polymers has its origin of cavitation process during stretching. In this work, the effect of crystalline lamellar thickness and stretching temperature on the cavitation process in PB-1 has been investigated by means of combined synchrotron ultrasmall-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques. Three modes of cavitation during the stretching process can be identified, namely “no cavitation” for the quenched sample with the thinnest lamellae where only shear yielding occurred, “cavitation with reorientation” for the samples stretched at lower temperatures and samples with thicker lamellae, and “cavitation without reorientation” for samples with thinner lamellae stretched at higher temperatures. The mode “cavitation with reorientation” occurs before yield point where the plate-like cavities start to be generated within the lamellar stacks with normal perpendicular to the stretching direction due to the blocky substructure of the crystalline lamellae and reorient gradually to the stretching direction after strain-hardening. The mode of “cavitation without reorientation” appears after yield point where ellipsoidal shaped cavities are generated in those lamellae stacks with normal parallel to the stretching direction followed by an improvement of their orientation at larger strains. X-ray diffraction results reveal a much improved crystalline orientation for samples with thinner lamellae

  15. Torsion and CO-stretching vibration interactions in methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yun-Bo; Yuan, Shuping; Wang, Rubin; Mukhopadhyay, I.

    2006-11-01

    A model Hamiltonian is constructed to investigate the vibration-torsion-rotational interaction in methanol. The model Hamiltonian is based on the formulation of reduction of Hamiltonian, in which the CO-stretching mode ν8, the large-amplitude torsion mode ν12 and the three degrees of freedom that correspond to the overall rotation of the molecule, are considered simultaneously. This Hamiltonian is used to carry out an analysis of already published data for CH 3OH with vco ⩽ 1 (the CO-stretching vibrational quantum number), vt ⩽ 4 (the torsional quantum number), and J ⩽ 5 (the overall rotational quantum number). The relative locations of the CO-stretch vibrational ground state and the fundamental state are well reproduced for torsional states with vt ⩽ 4 and J ⩽ 5. An effective potential energy surface that describes ν8 and ν12 modes is obtained from this analysis. The present analyses show that a variety of resonance interactions can affect states for energies larger than 1100 cm -1.

  16. Prophylactic stretching does not reduce cramp susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Harsen, James D; Long, Blaine C

    2017-08-10

    Some clinicians advocate stretching to prevent muscle cramps. It is unknown whether static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching increases cramp threshold frequency (TFc ), a quantitative measure of cramp susceptibility. Fifteen individuals completed this randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study. We measured passive hallux range of motion (ROM) and then performed 3 minutes of either static stretching, PNF stretching (hold-relax-with agonist contraction), or no stretching. ROM was reassessed and TFc was measured. PNF stretching increased hallux extension (pre-PNF 81 ± 11°, post-PNF 90 ± 10°; P 0.05). Static stretching increased hallux extension (pre-static 80 ± 11°, post-static 88 ± 9°; P 0.05). No ROM changes occurred with no stretching (P > 0.05). TFc was unaffected by stretching (no stretching 18 ± 7 Hz, PNF 16 ± 4 Hz, static 16 ± 5 Hz; P = 0.37). Static and PNF stretching increased hallux extension, but neither increased TFc . Acute stretching may not prevent muscle cramping. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Modified "DMC" technique for stretching DNA molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A modified "dynamic molecular combing"(DMC)technique used for stretching double-strandedDNA is reported. DNA molecules were stretched on the silanized mica surface by thistechnique, its speed being precisely controlled with a computer. This approachcombinedthe precise DNA stretching method with high resolution AFM imaging at nanometer scale,thusmaking it useful for DNA alignment manipulation and subsequent gene research.

  18. Local stretch zeroing NMO correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, N.; Siahkoohi, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method of normal move-out (NMO) correction called local stretch zeroing (LSZ) method that avoids NMO stretch. The method eliminates the theoretical curves that generate interpolated data samples responsible for NMO stretch. Pre-correction time sampling interval is preserved by reassigning and zero padding of true data samples. The optimum mute zone selection feature of the LSZ method eliminates all interfering reflection events at far offsets. The resulted stacked section from the LSZ method contains generally higher frequency components than a normal stack, and preserves most of the shallow reflectors. The LSZ method requires that zero-offset width of the time gate, i.e. zero-offset time difference between two adjacent reflections, be larger than the dominant period. The major shortcoming of the method occurs when CMP data are over- or under-NMO corrected. Both synthetic and real world examples show the efficiency of the LSZ method over the conventional NMO (CNMO) correction. The method loses its superiority when CMP data are over- or under-NMO corrected.

  19. Wrinkling instability of an inhomogeneously stretched viscous sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; Wei, Zhiyan; Mahadevan, L.

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the redrawing of hot glass into thin sheets, we investigate the shape and stability of a thin viscous sheet that is inhomogeneously stretched in an imposed nonuniform temperature field. We first determine the associated base flow by solving the long-time-scale stretching flow of a flat sheet as a function of two dimensionless parameters: the normalized stretching velocity α and a dimensionless width of the heating zone β . This allows us to determine the conditions for the onset of an out-of-plane wrinkling instability stated in terms of an eigenvalue problem for a linear partial differential equation governing the displacement of the midsurface of the sheet. We show that the sheet can become unstable in two regions that are upstream and downstream of the heating zone where the minimum in-plane stress is negative. This yields the shape and growth rates of the most unstable buckling mode in both regions for various values of the stretching velocity and heating zone width. A transition from stationary to oscillatory unstable modes is found in the upstream region with increasing β , while the downstream region is always stationary. We show that the wrinkling instability can be entirely suppressed when the surface tension is large enough relative to the magnitude of the in-plane stress. Finally, we present an operating diagram that indicates regions of the parameter space that result in a required outlet sheet thickness upon stretching while simultaneously minimizing or suppressing the out-of-plane buckling, a result that is relevant for the glass redraw method used to create ultrathin glass sheets.

  20. [Current trends in the effects of stretching: application to physical exercise in the workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Yasumasa; Ohta, Masanori; Yamato, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    A review of the Survey on the State of Employees' Health by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2008) shows that the most commonly implemented aspect as an activity of worksite health promotion is "Health counseling", and the second is "Workplace physical exercise." Physical exercise, "Taiso", is acceptable and sustainable for workers, as it is easy to do in a group or alone. Various modes of stretching are implemented for workplace physical exercise. However, articles suggesting negative or contradictory effects of stretching have increased in recent years. Several review articles have revealed that static stretching may induce impairments of muscle power performance and no stretching will prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise. There are various aims of workplace physical exercise, so we have to consider the situational method when we apply stretching to occupational health.

  1. Effects of static stretching for 30 seconds and dynamic stretching on leg extension power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Taichi; Ishii, Kojiro

    2005-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to clarify the effects of static stretching for 30 seconds and dynamic stretching on leg extension power. Eleven healthy male students took part in this study. Each subject performed static stretching and dynamic stretching on the 5 muscle groups in the lower limbs and nonstretching on separate days. Leg extension power was measured before and after the static stretching, dynamic stretching, and nonstretching. No significant difference was found between leg extension power after static stretching (1788.5 +/- 85.7 W) and that after nonstretching (1784.8 +/- 108.4 W). On the other hand, leg extension power after dynamic stretching (2022.3 +/- 121.0 W) was significantly (p < 0.01) greater than that after nonstretching. These results suggest that static stretching for 30 seconds neither improves nor reduces muscular performance and that dynamic stretching enhances muscular performance.

  2. The stretch zone of automotive steel sheets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ľ Ambriško; L Pešek

    2014-04-01

    The paper deals with an experimental determination of the stretch zone dimensions in the notch tip in thin steel sheets. The stretch zone dimensions depend on steel grade, on the rolling direction as well as on the loading rate. Stretch zones were observed and measured on three steel grades. Fracture area and stretch zones were analysed by SEM. Stable crack growth was monitored by videoextensometry techniques on CT (Compact Tension) specimens. Specimens were loaded under two loading rates by eccentric tension, whereby the deformation in the notch surrounding area was recorded using a non-contact measurement–videoextensometry technique. Linear relation between the stretch zone dimensions was determined.

  3. The Considere condition and rapid stretching of linear and branched polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKinley, Gareth H; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    to larger Hencky strains as the number of branches is increased. Numerical computations at finite Deborah numbers also show that there is an optimal range of deformation rates over which homogeneous extensions can be maintained to large strain. We also consider other rapid homogeneous stretching...... deformations, such as biaxial and planar stretching, and show that the degree of stabilization afforded by inclusion of material with long-chain branching is a sensitive function of the imposed mode of deformation....

  4. Butterflies on the Stretched Horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I return to the question of what kind of perturbations on Alice's side of an Einstein-Rosen bridge can send messages to Bob as he enters the horizon at the other end. By definition "easy" operators do not activate messages and "hard" operators do, but there are no clear criteria to identify the difference between easy and hard. In this paper I argue that the difference is related to the time evolution of a certain measure of computational complexity, associated with the stretched horizon of Alice's black hole. The arguments suggest that the AMPSS commutator argument is more connected with butterflies than with firewalls.

  5. Bending and stretching of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, E H; Hemp, W S

    1964-01-01

    The Bending and Stretching of Plates deals with elastic plate theory, particularly on small- and large-deflexion theory. Small-deflexion theory concerns derivation of basic equations, rectangular plates, plates of various shapes, plates whose boundaries are amenable to conformal transformation, plates with variable rigidity, and approximate methods. Large-deflexion theory includes general equations and some exact solutions, approximate methods in large-deflexion theory, asymptotic large-deflexion theories for very thin plates. Asymptotic theories covers membrane theory, tension field theory, a

  6. Laser therapy of stretch marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, David H

    2002-01-01

    Striae distensae, better known as stretch marks, are a common disfiguring skin disorder of significant cosmetic concern. Many sources have reported the use of lasers to diminish the appearance of striae. Controlled clinical studies of the various treatment modalities available for striae are relatively uncommon, and much of the clinical data are anecdotal. The use of lasers alone or in combination with other therapeutic modalities can provide a safe and effective reduction in the appearance of both red and white striae distensae. Many of these therapies require special measures for darker skin phototypes. This article reviews the historical use of laser therapy for this disorder and discusses current therapeutic options.

  7. Sister M. Madeleva Wolff, C.S.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, M. Loretta

    2006-01-01

    Sister M. Madeleva Wolff, C.S.C., teacher, essayist, poet, and college administrator, through her creative ability and innovative practices made possible major contributions to Catholic education in her lifetime. Without her strong personality and boundless energy, many of her dreams for an ideal college curriculum would not have come to fruition.…

  8. Fluid Stretching as a Levy Process

    CERN Document Server

    Dentz, Marco; Borgne, Tanguy Le; de Barros, Felipe P J

    2016-01-01

    We uncover deformation dynamics that lead to power-law stretching of material lines in heterogeneous flow. This evidences the existence of a broad spectrum of algebraic stretching behaviors in fluids from sub- to superlinear beyond the linear (shear flow) and exponential (chaotic flow) elongation paradigms. Formulating fluid deformation in two-dimensional steady flow in stream-line coordinates, we show that stretching results from the non-linear coupling between Lagrangian shear deformation and velocity fluctuations. Casting the stretching process in the frame of a continuous time random walk, this coupling links the magnitude of elongation events to their persistence through the transit times of material strips. As a consequence, for broad transit time distributions stretching obeys Levy dynamics. We derive explicit expressions for the mean elongation which predict a broad range of power-law stretching behaviors depending on the velocity distribution and the relation between shear rate and velocity along str...

  9. Investigating the Microstructure of Slenderized Wool Fibers at Different Stretching Ratios by Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-ling; YU Wei-dong; ZHANG Yue-ting

    2005-01-01

    The molecular conformation and the microstructure of the slenderized wool fibers have been studied by the Raman spectroscopy. The typical bands analyzed in this paper include the amideⅠand amide Ⅲ regions, the C-C skeletal vibration region, and the S-S and C-S bond vibration regions. The experimental results show that ⅰ) the Raman spectroscopy can reveal the secondary structural transformation from α-helical to β-pleated sheet begin at the early stage of stretching; ⅱ) the stretching mechanism of wool fibers can be divided into two different mechanisms, I.e. The secondary structural transformation and the slippage of the polypeptide chain; and ⅲ) the stretching leads to the increasing of the amount of the disordered conformation and the decreasing of the amount of S-S bonds.

  10. Stretching Folding Instability and Nanoemulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chon U

    2009-01-01

    Here we show a folding-stretching instability in a microfluidic flow focusing device using silicon oil (100cSt) and water. The fluid dynamics video demonstrates an oscillating thread of oil focused by two co-flowing streams of water. We show several high-speed sequences of these oscillations with 30,000 frames/s. Once the thread is decelerated in a slower moving pool downstream an instability sets in and water-in-oil droplets are formed. We reveal the details of the pinch-off with 500,000 frames/s. The pinch-off is so repeatable that complex droplet patterns emerge. Some of droplets are below the resolution limit, thus smaller than 1 micrometer in diameter.

  11. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, Ariel; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations -- cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measu...

  12. C.S.Lewis: The Chronicles of Narnia and imagination

    OpenAIRE

    Gojkošek, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The thesis entitled C. S. Lewis: The Chronicles of Narnia and imagination primarily focuses on the term fantastic novel, its development in Slovene literature and the definition of the term itself which changed during time. Since J. J. Kenda places The Chronicles of Narnia among fantasy literature a special emphasis is also given to the latter term. The second part of the thesis deals with the stories of The Chronicles of Narnia and the circumstances of their origin. An important part of the...

  13. Deviation from fluctuation-dissipation relation for driven superdiffusion: Polymer stretching as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takuya

    2017-09-01

    We discuss a deviation of the fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) in a driven superdiffusive system as exemplified by polymer stretching. The superdiffusion is found by monitoring momentum transfer to a tracer, which is a conjugate observable with the position. Molecular-dynamics simulation demonstrates that the FDR deviates during the nonequilibrium transient process. We then propose nonequilibrium mode analysis for superdiffusion, which is a counterpart to that for driven subdiffusion. The mode analysis yields results that are in qualitative agreement with the simulation results, suggesting that the fluctuations of the stiffness in the system from initial equilibrium to stretching account for the FDR deviation.

  14. CALCULATIONS OF STRETCHING VIBRATIONAL ENERGYLEVELS OF THE CH3I MOLECULE BY A NONLINEAR MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU JUN; GOU QING-QUAN

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear model, i.e. the quantized discrete self-trapping equation, is applied to calculate the highly excited CH stretching vibrational energy levels of the CH3I molecule in the liquid phase at the electronic ground state up to n=8. The obtained results agree well with the experimental data and with those obtained from local mode model calculations. We note that the dominant feature of the methyl CH stretching vibrational energy levels of the CH3I molecule is a pattern of local mode pairs. When n > 7, all the vibrational energy of the CH3 group can nearly be localized on a single CH bond.

  15. $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ As the Lightest $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ State

    CERN Document Server

    Lebed, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    The state $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ has recently been demoted by the Particle Data Group from its previous status as the conventional $c\\bar c$ $2 {}^3P_0$ state, largely due to the absence of expected $D\\bar D$ decays. We propose that $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ is actually the lightest $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ state, and calculate the spectrum of such states using the diquark model, identifying many of the observed charmoniumlike states that lack open-charm decay modes as $c\\bar c s \\bar s$. Among other results, we argue that $Y(4140)$ is a $J^{PC} = 1^{++}$ $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ state that has been not been seen in two-photon fusion largely as a consequence of the Landau-Yang theorem.

  16. Eliminating electromechanical instability in dielectric elastomers by employing pre-stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Betts, Anthony; Kennedy, David; Jerrams, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Electromechanical instability (EMI) is one of most common failure modes for dielectric elastomers (DEs). It has been reported that pre-stretching a DE sample can suppress EMI due to strain stiffening taking place for larger strains and a higher elastic modulus are achieved at high stretch ratios when a voltage is applied to the material. In this work, the influence of equi-biaxial stretch on DE secant modulus was studied using VHB 4910 and silicone rubber (SR) composites containing barium titanate (BaTiO3, BT) particles and also dopamine coated BT (DP-BT) particles. The investigation of equi-biaxial deformation and EMI failure for VHB 4910 was undertaken by introducing a voltage-stretch function. The results showed that EMI was suppressed by equi-biaxial pre-stretch for all the DEs fabricated and tested. The stiffening properties of the DE materials were also studied with respect to the secant modulus. Furthermore, a voltage-induced strain of above 200% was achieved for the polyacrylate film by applying a pre-stretch ratio of 2.0 without EMI occurring. However, a maximum voltage-induced strain in the polyacrylate film of 78% was obtained by the SR/20 wt% DP-BT composite for a lower applied pre-stretch ratio of 1.6 and again EMI was eliminated.

  17. Alkyl CH Stretch Vibrations as a Probe of Conformational Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, Edwin L. Sibert, Iii; Buchanan, Evan G.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2013-06-01

    Theoretical IR spectra of 1,2-diphenoxyethane (C_6H_5-O-CH_2-CH_2-O-C_6H_5 DPOE) and 1,2-diphenylethane (C_6H_5-CH_2-CH_2-C_6H_5 DPE) are presented and compared to results of single-conformation spectroscopy of jet cooled molecules. The theoretical transition energies and intensites are obtained from a model based on a local mode Hamiltonian that includes all local cubic stretch-bend couplings that are then projected onto the normal modes. The model parameters are obtained from density functional theory methods. Full dimensional calculations are compared to those of reduced dimensions that include anharmonic CH streches Fermi coupled to scissor modes. Excellent agreement is found. Scale factors of select terms in the reduced dimensional Hamiltonian are determined by fitting the theoretical Hamiltonian to the anti DPE spectrum. Using the same scaling, Hamiltonians for other conformers of the above molecules are generated and used to predict structures by comparing to experimentally determined spectra in the alkyl CH stretch region. The level patterns in the resulting spectra are elucidated in terms of the model parameters. The model results are extended to interpret the spectra of more complicated macrocycles containing multiple -CH_2CH_2- ethano bridges such as the dibenzo-15-crown-5 ether and 2,2,2-paracyclophane.

  18. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue.

  19. STRETCHING IMPACTS INFLAMMATION RESOLUTION IN CONNECTIVE TISSUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J.; Colas, Romain A.; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N.; Langevin, Helene M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 minutes twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, two weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch vs. no stretch for 48 hours, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue. PMID:26588184

  20. Absolute intensities of NH-stretching transitions in dimethylamine and pyrrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin J; Du, Lin; Steel, Thomas J; Paul, Allanah J; Södergren, A Helena; Lane, Joseph R; Henry, Bryan R; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2012-01-12

    Vibrational spectra of vapor-phase dimethylamine (DMA) and pyrrole have been recorded in the 1000 to 13000 cm(-1) region using long path conventional spectroscopy techniques. We have focused on the absolute intensities of the NH-stretching fundamental and overtone transitions; Δν(NH) = 1-4 regions for DMA and the Δν(NH) = 1-3 regions for pyrrole. In the Δν(NH) = 1-3 regions for DMA, evidence of tunneling splitting associated with the NH-wagging mode is observed. For DMA, the fundamental NH-stretching transition intensity is weaker than the first NH-stretching overtone. Also, the fundamental NH-stretching transition in DMA is much weaker than the fundamental transition in pyrrole. We have used an anharmonic oscillator local mode model with ab initio calculated local mode parameters and dipole moment functions at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level to calculate the NH-stretching intensities and explain this intensity anomaly in DMA.

  1. Capillary stretching of elastic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protiere, Suzie; Stone, Howard A.; Duprat, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Fibrous media consisting of constrained flexible fibers can be found in many engineered systems (membranes in filters, woven textile, matted paper). When such materials interact with a liquid, the presence of liquid/air interfaces induces capillary forces that deform the fibers. To model this interaction we study the behaviour of a finite volume of liquid deposited on two parallel flexible fibers clamped at both ends. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We show that the system undergoes various morphological changes as the interfiber distance, the elasticity and the tension of the fibers are varied. For a certain range of parameters, the liquid spreads along the fibers and pulls them together, leading to the ``zipping'' of the fibers. This capillary adhesion can then be enhanced or reduced by changing the tension within the fibers. We will show that balancing stretching and capillary forces allows the prediction of this transition as well as the conditions for which detachment of the fibers occurs. These results may be used to prevent the clogging of fibrous membranes or to optimize the capture of liquids.

  2. Does Acute Static Stretching Reduce Muscle Power?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis M. Kozub

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the training and clinical setting. Recently, stretching in the warm-up has been shown to decrease several muscular performance variables, but the dose-response of this effect is unknown and moreover these stretching bouts are not representative of athletes during warm up procedures, as they are usually time consuming. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help sportsmen, coaches, physiotherapist and clinicians make decisions for integrating stretching as a part of warm up or rehabilitation treatment plan.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to examine whether acute static stretching is responsible for losses in isokinetic peak torque production and if it does, than which time of stretching effect muscle peak torque?Design: Randomized, counterbalanced, within-subjects experimental design.Setting: A university human project laboratory.Methods: Twenty (n=20 light to moderate young exercisers, male and female, from University of Limerick community, with an average age of 22.1±3.6 years, height of 175.6±5 cm, and weight of 73.1±9.9 kg, were randomly selected to take part in the study. Prior to the main study, volunteers attended the lab on two occasions to be familiarized with the knee extension protocol on the Con - trex isokinetic system and with the static stretching protocol. All participants than performed five additional static stretching protocols randomly, in non-consecutive training session. The stretching protocols were 0, 60,120, 180 and 180 with alternative pattern.Results: The results of the statistical analysis (P > 0.05 indicated that peak torque remained unchanged following the static stretching for 0-180 sec at 60 & 180° s−1 angular velocities.Conclusion: The findings suggest that an athletic stretching (shorter duration ranging from 0-180 sec does not produce decreases in peak torque. Athletes

  3. Stretching micropatterned cells on a PDMS membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-22

    Mechanical forces exerted on cells and/or tissues play a major role in numerous processes. We have developed a device to stretch cells plated on a PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) membrane, compatible with imaging. This technique is reproducible and versatile. The PDMS membrane can be micropatterned in order to confine cells or tissues to a specific geometry. The first step is to print micropatterns onto the PDMS membrane with a deep UV technique. The PDMS membrane is then mounted on a mechanical stretcher. A chamber is bound on top of the membrane with biocompatible grease to allow gliding during the stretch. The cells are seeded and allowed to spread for several hours on the micropatterns. The sample can be stretched and unstretched multiple times with the use of a micrometric screw. It takes less than a minute to apply the stretch to its full extent (around 30%). The technique presented here does not include a motorized device, which is necessary for applying repeated stretch cycles quickly and/or computer controlled stretching, but this can be implemented. Stretching of cells or tissue can be of interest for questions related to cell forces, cell response to mechanical stress or tissue morphogenesis. This video presentation will show how to avoid typical problems that might arise when doing this type of seemingly simple experiment.

  4. Stretching and injury prevention: an obscure relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witvrouw, Erik; Mahieu, Nele; Danneels, Lieven; McNair, Peter

    2004-01-01

    It is generally accepted that increasing the flexibility of a muscle-tendon unit promotes better performances and decreases the number of injuries. Stretching exercises are regularly included in warm-up and cooling-down exercises; however, contradictory findings have been reported in the literature. Several authors have suggested that stretching has a beneficial effect on injury prevention. In contrast, clinical evidence suggesting that stretching before exercise does not prevent injuries has also been reported. Apparently, no scientifically based prescription for stretching exercises exists and no conclusive statements can be made about the relationship of stretching and athletic injuries. Stretching recommendations are clouded by misconceptions and conflicting research reports. We believe that part of these contradictions can be explained by considering the type of sports activity in which an individual is participating. Sports involving bouncing and jumping activities with a high intensity of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) [e.g. soccer and football] require a muscle-tendon unit that is compliant enough to store and release the high amount of elastic energy that benefits performance in such sports. If the participants of these sports have an insufficient compliant muscle-tendon unit, the demands in energy absorption and release may rapidly exceed the capacity of the muscle-tendon unit. This may lead to an increased risk for injury of this structure. Consequently, the rationale for injury prevention in these sports is to increase the compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Recent studies have shown that stretching programmes can significantly influence the viscosity of the tendon and make it significantly more compliant, and when a sport demands SSCs of high intensity, stretching may be important for injury prevention. This conjecture is in agreement with the available scientific clinical evidence from these types of sports activities. In contrast, when the type

  5. Stretch due to Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Baten

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year old patient presented to the emergency department with stretch, due to impossible deflation of the penile prosthesis, 4 years after successful implant. A CT-scan showed migration of the reservoir to the left rectus abdominis muscle. Refilling of the reservoir was inhibited by muscular compression, causing stretch. Removal and replacement of the reservoir was performed, after which the prosthesis was well-functioning again. Migration of the penile prosthesis reservoir is extremely rare but can cause several complications, such as stretch.

  6. Springback Prediction and Optimization of Variable Stretch Force Trajectory in Three-dimensional Stretch Bending Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Fei; ZHANG Wanxi; LIANG Jicai; GAO Song

    2015-01-01

    Most of the existing studies use constant force to reduce springback while researching stretch force. However, variable stretch force can reduce springback more efficiently. The current research on springback prediction in stretch bending forming mainly focuses on artificial neural networks combined with the finite element simulation. There is a lack of springback prediction by support vector regression (SVR). In this paper, SVR is applied to predict springback inthe three-dimensional stretch bending forming process,and variable stretch force trajectory is optimized. Six parameters of variable stretch force trajectory are chosen as the input parameters of the SVR model. Sixty experiments generated by design of experiments (DOE) are carried out to train and test the SVR model. The experimental results confirm that the accuracy of the SVR model is higher than that of artificial neural networks. Based on this model, an optimization algorithm of variable stretch force trajectory using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed. The springback amount is used as the objective function. Changes of local thickness are applied as the criterion of forming constraints. The objection and constraints are formulated by response surface models. The precision of response surface models is examined. Six different stretch force trajectories are employed to certify springback reduction in the optimum stretch force trajectory, which can efficiently reduce springback. This research proposes a new method of springback prediction using SVR and optimizes variable stretch force trajectory to reduce springback.

  7. Static Versus Dynamic Stretching Effect on Agility Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Troumbley, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effects of static and dynamic stretching on explosive agility movements, and to examine the effect of the interaction of dynamic and static stretching prior to explosive agility movements. Fourteen men and 10 women performed the different warm-up protocols, including no warm-up (NWU), static stretching (SS), dynamic stretching (DS), and dynamic stretching with static stretching (DS+SS). The T-Drill was used to assess agility. The results indicated n...

  8. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  9. Time-Stretch Accelerated Processor for Real-time, In-service, Signal Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonappan, Cejo K.; Buckley, Brandon W.; Adam, Jost

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate real-time, in-service, digital signal analysis of 10 Gbit/s data using a 1.2 Tbit/s burst-mode digital processor. The processor comprises a time-stretch front-end and a custom data acquisition and real-time signal processing back- end. Experimental demonstration of real-time, in...

  10. Bias of purine stretches in sequenced chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Soumpasis, Dikeos Mario; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We examined more than 700 DNA sequences (full length chromosomes and plasmids) for stretches of purines (R) or pyrimidines (Y) and alternating YR stretches; such regions will likely adopt structures which are different from the canonical B-form. Since one turn of the DNA helix is roughly 10 bp, we...... measured the fraction of each genome which contains purine (or pyrimidine) tracts of lengths of 10 by or longer (hereafter referred to as 'purine tracts'), as well as stretches of alternating pyrimidines/purine ('pyr/pur tracts') of the same length. Using this criteria, a random sequence would be expected......, in eukaryotes there is an abundance of long stretches of purines or alternating purine/pyrimidine tracts, which cannot be explained in this way; these sequences are likely to play an important role in eukaryotic chromosome organisation....

  11. C-S bond cleavage by a polyketide synthase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Lohman, Jeremy R; Liu, Tao; Shen, Ben

    2015-08-18

    Leinamycin (LNM) is a sulfur-containing antitumor antibiotic featuring an unusual 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety that is spiro-fused to a thiazole-containing 18-membered lactam ring. The 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety is essential for LNM's antitumor activity, by virtue of its ability to generate an episulfonium ion intermediate capable of alkylating DNA. We have previously cloned and sequenced the lnm gene cluster from Streptomyces atroolivaceus S-140. In vivo and in vitro characterizations of the LNM biosynthetic machinery have since established that: (i) the 18-membered macrolactam backbone is synthesized by LnmP, LnmQ, LnmJ, LnmI, and LnmG, (ii) the alkyl branch at C-3 of LNM is installed by LnmK, LnmL, LnmM, and LnmF, and (iii) leinamycin E1 (LNM E1), bearing a thiol moiety at C-3, is the nascent product of the LNM hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthase (PKS). Sulfur incorporation at C-3 of LNM E1, however, has not been addressed. Here we report that: (i) the bioinformatics analysis reveals a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent domain, we termed cysteine lyase (SH) domain (LnmJ-SH), within PKS module-8 of LnmJ; (ii) the LnmJ-SH domain catalyzes C-S bond cleavage by using l-cysteine and l-cysteine S-modified analogs as substrates through a PLP-dependent β-elimination reaction, establishing l-cysteine as the origin of sulfur at C-3 of LNM; and (iii) the LnmJ-SH domain, sharing no sequence homology with any other enzymes catalyzing C-S bond cleavage, represents a new family of PKS domains that expands the chemistry and enzymology of PKSs and might be exploited to incorporate sulfur into polyketide natural products by PKS engineering.

  12. Asymmetric Bessel modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, V V; Kovalev, A A; Soifer, V A

    2014-04-15

    We propose a new, three-parameter family of diffraction-free asymmetric elegant Bessel modes (aB-modes) with an integer and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The aB-modes are described by the nth-order Bessel function of the first kind with complex argument. The asymmetry degree of the nonparaxial aB-mode is shown to depend on a real parameter c≥0: when c=0, the aB-mode is identical to a conventional radially symmetric Bessel mode; with increasing c, the aB-mode starts to acquire a crescent form, getting stretched along the vertical axis and shifted along the horizontal axis for c≫1. On the horizontal axis, the aB-modes have a denumerable number of isolated intensity zeros that generate optical vortices with a unit topological charge of opposite sign on opposite sides of 0. At different values of the parameter c, the intensity zeros change their location on the horizontal axis, thus changing the beam's OAM. An isolated intensity zero on the optical axis generates an optical vortex with topological charge n. The OAM per photon of an aB-mode depends near-linearly on c, being equal to ℏ(n+cI1(2c)/I0(2c)), where ℏ is the Planck constant and In(x) is a modified Bessel function.

  13. Comparison of two stretching methods and optimization of stretching protocol for the piriformis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Brett M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry; Harrysson, Ola L A; Osborne, Jason A; Baxter, Blaise

    2014-02-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis for a non-discogenic form of sciatica whose treatment has traditionally focused on stretching the piriformis muscle (PiM). Conventional stretches include hip flexion, adduction, and external rotation. Using three-dimensional modeling, we quantified the amount of (PiM) elongation resulting from two conventional stretches and we investigated by use of a computational model alternate stretching protocols that would optimize PiM stretching. Seven subjects underwent three CT scans: one supine, one with hip flexion, adduction, then external rotation (ADD stretch), and one with hip flexion, external rotation, then adduction (ExR stretch). Three-dimensional bone models were constructed from the CT scans. PiM elongation during these stretches, femoral neck inclination, femoral head anteversion, and trochanteric anteversion were measured. A computer program was developed to map PiM length over a range of hip joint positions and was validated against the measured scans. ExR and ADD stretches elongated the PiM similarly by approximately 12%. Femoral head and greater trochanter anteversion influenced PiM elongation. Placing the hip joints in 115° of hip flexion, 40° of external rotation and 25° of adduction or 120° of hip flexion, 50° of external rotation and 30° of adduction increased PiM elongation by 30-40% compared to conventional stretches (15.1 and 15.3% increases in PiM muscle length, respectively). ExR and ADD stretches elongate the PiM similarly and therefore may have similar clinical effectiveness. The optimized stretches led to larger increases in PiM length and may be more easily performed by some patients due to increased hip flexion.

  14. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yutetsu; Naito, Hisashi; Ogura, Yuji; Katamoto, Shizuo; Aoki, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate and compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and static stretching on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Thirteen male university students (age, 20 ± 1 years; height, 172.2 ± 4.6 cm; weight, 68.4 ± 6.7 kg; mean ± SD) completed 3 different conditions on 3 nonconsecutive days in randomized order: static stretching (SS), PNF stretching (PNF), and no stretching (control, CON). Each condition consisted of a 5-minute rest accompanied by one of the following activities: (a) control, (b) SS, or (c) PNF stretching. The hip flexion range of motion (ROM) was evaluated immediately before and after the activity. The MVC of knee flexion was then measured. Surface electromyography was recorded from the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles during MVC tests and stretching. Although increases in ROM were significantly greater after PNF than after SS (p stretching increases ROM more than SS, PNF stretching and SS is detrimental to isometric maximal strength.

  15. Analysis of ultra-relativistic charged particle beam and stretched wire measurement interactions with cylindrically symmetric structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibele, C. E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The beam impedance and wakefield are quantities which describe the stability of charged particles in their trajectory within an accelerator. The stretched wire measurement technique is a method which estimates the beam impedance and wakefield. Definitions for the beam impedance, the wakefield, and the stretched wire measurement are presented. A pillbox resonator with circular beampipes is studied for its relatively simple profile and mode structure. Theoretical predictions and measurement data are presented for the interaction of various charged particle beams and center conductor geometries between the cavity and beampipe. Time domain predictions for the stretched wire measurement and wakefield are presented and are shown to be a linear interaction.

  16. An Analysis of Individual Stretching Programs of Intercollegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael; And Others

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate individual stretching programs of intercollegiate athletes, 238 athletes (164 male, 74 female) in ten sports were surveyed about their stretching practices. Almost all of the athletes stretched, but to varying degrees. Muscle groups stretched by the fewest athletes were the adductors, plantar flexors, hips, and neck. (Author/MT)

  17. Stretch-activated channels in stretch-induced muscle damage: role in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ella W; Allen, David G

    2004-08-01

    1. Stretch-induced muscle injury results in the damage that causes reduced force and increased membrane permeability. This muscle damage is caused, in part, by ionic entry through stretch-activated channels and blocking these channels with Gd3+ or streptomycin reduces the force deficit associated with damage. 2. Dystrophin-deficient muscles are more susceptible to stretch-induced muscle injury and the recovery from injury can be incomplete. We have found that Na+ entry associated with stretch-induced injury is enhanced in dystrophin-deficient muscles and that blockers of stretch-activated channels are capable of preventing ionic entry and reducing muscle damage. 3. A model is presented that proposes links between stretch-induced injury, opening of stretch-activated channels, increased levels of intracellular ions and various forms of muscle damage. Although changes in Na+ accompany stretch-induced muscle injury, we believe that changes in Ca2+ probably have a more central role in the damage process.

  18. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  19. Movement and stretching imagery during flexibility training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergeer, Ineke; Roberts, Jenny

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of movement and stretching imagery on increases in flexibility. Thirty volunteers took part in a 4 week flexibility training programme. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) movement imagery, where participants imagined moving the limb they were stretching; (2) stretching imagery, where participants imagined the physiological processes involved in stretching the muscle; and (3) control, where participants did not engage in mental imagery. Active and passive range of motion around the hip was assessed before and after the programme. Participants provided specific ratings of vividness and comfort throughout the programme. Results showed significant increases in flexibility over time, but no differences between the three groups. A significant relationship was found, however, between improved flexibility and vividness ratings in the movement imagery group. Furthermore, both imagery groups scored significantly higher than the control group on levels of comfort, with the movement imagery group also scoring significantly higher than the stretching imagery group. We conclude that the imagery had stronger psychological than physiological effects, but that there is potential for enhancing physiological effects by maximizing imagery vividness, particularly for movement imagery.

  20. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  1. Charge-sensitive vibrations in p-chloranil: the strange case of the C=C antisymmetric stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzieri, Paolo; Masino, Matteo; Girlando, Alberto

    2007-11-08

    We have combined DFT calculations with single-crystal polarized infrared spectra to reinvestigate the assignment of the C=C antisymmetric stretching mode b(2u)nu(18) of p-chloranil (CA). The frequency of this mode indeed seems to display a nonlinear dependence on the average charge on the CA molecule (rho), at variance with the behavior of the antisymmetric C=O stretching frequency. The DFT calculations show that the origin of the problem is a drastic, 2 orders of magnitude decrease of the infrared intensity of the C=C antisymmetric stretching upon electron addition. Therefore, no infrared band can be easily associated to this mode in charge-transfer (CT) solids with rho approximately > 0.5. On the other hand, a linear relationship between rho and the b(2u)nu(18) frequency is found in quasi-neutral CT complexes of CA.

  2. Homologous pairing in stretched supercoiled DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, T. R.; Croquette, V.; Bensimon, D.

    1998-01-01

    By using elastic measurements on single DNA molecules, we show that stretching a negatively supercoiled DNA activates homologous pairing in physiological conditions. These experiments indicate that a stretched unwound DNA locally denatures to alleviate the force-driven increase in torsional stress. This is detected by hybridization with 1 kb of homologous single-stranded DNA probes. The stretching force involved (≈2 pN) is small compared with those typically developed by molecular motors, suggesting that this process may be relevant to DNA processing in vivo. We used this technique to monitor the progressive denaturation of DNA as it is unwound and found that distinct, stable denaturation bubbles formed, beginning in A+T-rich regions. PMID:9724746

  3. Binary-phase compression of stretched pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Nairat, Muath; Dantus, Marcos

    2017-10-01

    Pulse stretching and compression are essential for the energy scale-up of ultrafast lasers. Here, we consider a radical approach using spectral binary phases, containing only two values (0 and π) for stretching and compressing laser pulses. We numerically explore different strategies and present results for pulse compression of factors up to a million back to the transform limit and experimentally obtain results for pulse compression of a factor of one hundred, in close agreement with numerical calculations. Imperfections resulting from binary-phase compression are addressed by considering cross-polarized wave generation filtering, and show that this approach leads to compressed pulses with contrast ratios greater than ten orders of magnitude. This new concept of binary-phase stretching and compression, if implemented in a multi-layer optic, could eliminate the need for traditional pulse stretchers and more importantly expensive compressors.

  4. Lattice stretching bistability and dynamic heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Savin, A. V.; Zolotaryuk, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional lattice model is suggested to describe the experimentally observed plateau in force-stretching diagrams for some macromolecules. This chain model involves the nearest-neighbor interaction of a Morse-like potential (required to have a saturation branch) and a harmonic second......-neighbor coupling. Under an external stretching applied to the chain ends, the intersite Morse-like potential results in the appearance of a double-well potential within each chain monomer, whereas the interaction between the second neighbors provides a homogeneous bistable (degenerate) ground state, at least...... stretched bonds with a double-well potential. This case allows us to explain the existence of a plateau in the force-extension diagram for DNA and α-helix protein. Finally, the soliton dynamics are studied in detail....

  5. COMPUTER SIMULATION SYSTEM OF STRETCH REDUCING MILL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Y. Sun; S.J. Yuan

    2007-01-01

    The principle of the stretch reducing process is analyzed and three models of pass design areestablished. The simulations are done about variables, such as, stress, strain, the stretches betweenthe stands, the size parameters of the steel tube, and the roll force parameters. According to itsproduct catalogs the system can automatically divide the pass series, formulate the rolling table,and simulate the basic technological parameters in the stretch reducing process. All modules areintegrated based on the developing environment of VB6. The system can draw simulation curvesand pass pictures. Three kinds of database including the material database, pass design database,and product database are devised using Microsoft Access, which can be directly edited, corrected,and searched.

  6. Filament stretching rheometer: inertia compensation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-01-01

    The necessary inertia compensation used in the force balance for the filament stretching rheometer is derived for an arbitrary frame of reference. This enables the force balance to be used to extract correctly the extensional viscosity from measurements of the tensile force at either end of the e......The necessary inertia compensation used in the force balance for the filament stretching rheometer is derived for an arbitrary frame of reference. This enables the force balance to be used to extract correctly the extensional viscosity from measurements of the tensile force at either end...

  7. Stretching and folding mechanism in foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, Alberto [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Pedrosa Biscaia Tufaile, Adriana [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-13

    We have described the stretching and folding of foams in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing air and a surfactant solution, from a sequence of upside-down flips. Besides the fractal dimension of the foam, we have observed the logistic growth for the soap film length. The stretching and folding mechanism is present during the foam formation, and this mechanism is observed even after the foam has reached its respective maximum fractal dimension. Observing the motion of bubbles inside the foam, large bubbles present power spectrum associated with random walk motion in both directions, while the small bubbles are scattered like balls in a Galton board.

  8. Depicting Vortex Stretching and Vortex Relaxing Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符松; 李启兵; 王明皓

    2003-01-01

    Different from many existing studies on the paranetrization of vortices, we investigate the effectiveness of two new parameters for identifying the vortex stretching and vortex relaxing mechanisms. These parameters are invariants and identify three-dimensional flow structures only, i.e. they diminish in two-dimensional flows. This is also unlike the existing vortex identification approaches which deliver information in two-dimensional flows. The present proposals have been successfully applied to identify the stretching and relaxing vortices in compressible mixing layers and natural convection flows.

  9. Viscous Swirling Flow over a Stretching Cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiegang FANG; ShanshanYAO

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a viscous How over a cylinder with stretching and torsional motion. There is an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and there exists a unique solution for all the given values of the flow Reynolds number. The results show that velocity decays faster for a higher Reynolds number and the How penetrates shallower into the ambient Huid. All the velocity proHles decay algebraically to the ambient zero velocity.%We investigate a viscous flow over a cylinder with stretching and torsional motion.There is an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and there exists a unique solution for all the given values of the flow Reynolds number.The results show that velocity decays faster for a higher Reynolds number and the flow penetrates shallower into the ambient fluid.All the velocity profiles decay algebraically to the ambient zero velocity.Exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations play important roles in the development of fluid mechanics.In the review articles,[1,2] Wang summarized the available exact solutions of the unsteady state and of the steady-state NS equations.Swirl flows have important engineering applications in many fields such as the cyclone for separation of solid,liquid and gas,swirl atomizers,swirl combustion devices,heat transfer enhancement and others.[3,4] A famous example of flows involving rotation or swirl is the rotating disk problem studied by von Karman.[5-8] The flow induced by a stretching boundary is also important in the extrusion processes in plastic and metal industries.[9-11] Crane[12] presented an exact solution of the two-dimensional NS equations for a stretching sheet problem with a closed analytical form.The stretching wall problem was extended by Wang[13]to a three-dimensional setting.The flow between two stretching disks was studied by Fang and Zhang recently.[14] The combined effects of disk stretching and rotation on the von Karman flow was investigated by Fang.[15] The flow inside a channel or a

  10. Effects of static and dynamic stretching on sprint and jump performance in boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisis, Giorgos P; Pappas, Panagiotis T; Theodorou, Apostolos S; Zacharogiannis, Elias G; Skordilis, Emmanouil K; Smirniotou, Athanasia S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of static (SS) and dynamic stretching (DS) on explosive power, flexibility, and sprinting ability of adolescent boys and girls and to report possible gender interactions. Forty-seven active adolescent boys and girls were randomly tested after SS and DS of 40 seconds on quadriceps, hamstrings, hip extensors, and plantar flexors; no stretching was performed at the control condition. Pretreatment and posttreatment tests examined the effects of stretching on 20-m sprint run (20 m), countermovement jump (CMJ) height, and sit and reach flexibility test. In terms of performance, SS hindered 20 m and CMJ in boys and girls by 2.5 and 6.3%, respectively. Dynamic stretching had no effect on 20 m in boys and girls but impaired CMJ by 2.2%. In terms of flexibility, both SS and DS improved performance with SS being more beneficial (12.1%) compared with DS (6.5%). No gender interaction was found. It can therefore be concluded that SS significantly negates sprinting performance and explosive power in adolescent boys and girls, whereas DS deteriorates explosive power and has no effect on sprinting performance. This diversity of effects denotes that the mode of stretching used in adolescent boys and girls should be task specific.

  11. Bond-Stretching Phonons in a Stripe-Ordered Nickelate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J. M.; Nakajima, K.; Braden, M.; Pintschovius, L.; Reichardt, W.; McQueeney, R.

    2001-03-01

    We have used neutron scattering at the Orphée Reactor, LLB, to study the bond-stretching optical phonons in a stripe-ordered single crystal of La_2-xSr_xNiO4 with x≈0.32. The stripes run along a [110] direction, at 45^circ to the Ni-O bond direction. We have measured the dispersion of the highest-energy Σ1 mode; because of twinning of the stripe domains in the tetragonal structure, we simultaneously sample phonons in directions parallel and perpendicular to the stripes. At zone center, a single strong peak appears at 21 THz (87 meV); however, on moving across the zone the mode appears to split, with half of the weight staying near 20 THz and the other half softening to ~17.5 THz at the zone boundary. The splitting is strong at the ordering wave vector, but changes little from there to the zone boundary. In the [100] direction, the Δ1 mode shows a similar softening but with no splitting. Comparisons with the cuprates will be discussed. This work supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886, and the U.S.-Japan Cooperative Research Program on Neutron Scattering.

  12. Neutron Compton scattering studies of stretched polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrys, B J; Mayers, J; Kalhoro, M S

    2002-01-01

    The mean kinetic energy of hydrogen and carbon atoms in unstretched and stretched polyethylene samples has been measured by neutron Compton scattering. The vibrational frequencies of the ground state and torsional energies have been calculated and compared with the existing data and calculations. The results obtained on deuterated and non-deuterated samples are compared. (orig.)

  13. Linear viscoelastic characterization from filament stretching rheometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    viscoelasticity well into the nonlinear regime. Therefore at present, complete rheological characterization of a material requires two apparatuses: a shear and an extensional rheometer. This work is focused on developing a linear viscoelastic protocol for the filament stretching rheometer (FSR) in order...

  14. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  15. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  16. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  17. Acute Effects of Static vs. Ballistic Stretching on Strength and Muscular Fatigue Between Ballet Dancers and Resistance-Trained Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Camila D; Brown, Lee E; Wong, Megan A; Leyva, Whitney D; Pinto, Ronei S; Cadore, Eduardo L; Ruas, Cassio V

    2016-11-01

    Lima, CD, Brown, LE, Wong, MA, Leyva, WD, Pinto, RS, Cadore, EL, and Ruas, CV. Acute effects of static vs. ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue between ballet dancers and resistance-trained women. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3220-3227, 2016-Stretching is used to increase joint range of motion, but the acute effects can decrease muscle strength. However, this may depend on the population or mode of stretching. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of static vs. ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue between ballet dancers and resistance-trained women. Fifteen resistance-trained women (age 23.8 ± 1.80 years, mass 67.47 ± 7.77 kg, height 168.30 ± 5.53 cm) and 12 ballet dancers (age 22.8 ± 3.04 years, mass 58.67 ± 5.65 kg, height 168.00 ± 7.69 cm) performed 5 days of testing. The first day was control (no stretching), whereas the other 4 days were static or ballistic stretching in a counterbalanced order. Range of motion, strength, and fatigue tests were also performed. Both groups demonstrated a significant decrease in hamstrings strength after static (102.71 ± 2.67 N·m) and ballistic stretching (99.49 ± 2.61 N·m) compared with control (113.059 ± 3.25 N·m), with no changes in quadriceps strength. For fatigue, only ballet dancers demonstrated a decrease from control (71.79 ± 4.88%) to ballistic (65.65 ± 8.19%), but no difference with static (65.01 ± 12.29%). These findings suggest that stretching decreases hamstrings strength similarly in ballet dancers and resistance-trained women, with no differences between modes of stretching. However, ballistic stretching only decreased muscular fatigue in ballet dancers, but not in resistance-trained women. Therefore, no stretching should be performed before strength performance. However, ballistic stretching may decrease acute muscular fatigue in ballet dancers.

  18. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a mega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies.

  19. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in amega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead......, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA......-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies....

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF PNF STRETCHING AND CYCLIC STRETCHING OF CALF TIGHTNESS ON COLLEGE GOING GIRLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlesha Sirari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flexibility helps with injury prevention, the reduction of soreness following a workout, and a general sense of well-being. There are different stretching techniques and protocols for improvements in calf extensibility and flexibility. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of two techniques i.e. CYCLIC and PNF stretching which improves calf flexibility. This study was done to find the effectiveness of calf Cyclic and PNF stretching technique to improve calf flexibility. Methods: 30 subjects with age group 21-22 years were randomly allocated to 2 groups equally. Group 1(n=15 were given CYCLIC and group 2(n=15 were given PNF stretching technique. Plantar flexion was used to measure the calf tightness which was done before and after the treatment. Treatment was given for 7 days and on the 7th day the calf tightness was again measured. Results: The mean difference of the CYCLIC is 4.6 and mean difference of PNF is 4.7 which indicate that CYCLIC and PNF both are effective to improve calf flexibility but PNF is more effective than CYCLIC to improve calf flexibility. Conclusion: The neurophysiological basis of PNF, stating that the excitatory efficient of the neuromuscular spindle or the inhibitory afferent of the Golgi tendon organ (GTO or both are responsible for the effects. During PNF stretch and isometric contraction of stretched agonists for extended period may cause activation of its neuromuscular spindle. The increase in tension created during the isometric contraction of the pre – lengthened agonist contracts concentrically. Both the fascia & the spindle of the agonist adjust to the nearly lengthened position. These impulses travel via causing post synaptic inhibition of the motor neuron to agonist increasing the tension from the GTO. These impulses can override the impulses coming from the neuromuscular spindles arousing the muscle to reflexly resist to the change in length, thus helping in lengthening

  1. Time-Stretch Accelerated Processor for Real-time, In-service, Signal Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonappan, Cejo K.; Buckley, Brandon W.; Adam, Jost

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate real-time, in-service, digital signal analysis of 10 Gbit/s data using a 1.2 Tbit/s burst-mode digital processor. The processor comprises a time-stretch front-end and a custom data acquisition and real-time signal processing back- end. Experimental demonstration of real-time, in-service......, signal integrity analysis of streaming video packets at 10 Gbit/s is presented....

  2. The role of stretching in tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witvrouw, E; Mahieu, N; Roosen, P; McNair, P

    2007-04-01

    The function of tendons can be classified into two categories: tensile force transmission, and storage and release of elastic energy during locomotion. The action of tendons in storing and releasing energy is mainly seen in sports activities with stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs). The more intense the SSC movements are (jumping-like activities), the more frequently tendon problems are observed. High SSC movements impose high loads on tendons. Consequently, tendons that frequently deal with high SSC motion require a high energy-absorbing capacity to store and release this large amount of elastic energy. As the elasticity of tendon structures is a leading factor in the amount of stored energy, prevention and rehabilitation programmes for tendon injuries should focus on increasing this tendon elasticity in athletes performing high SSC movements. Recently, it has been shown that ballistic stretching can significantly increase tendon elasticity. These findings have important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of tendon injuries.

  3. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  4. How the Cloud Stretches the SOA Scope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmanan G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we will describe how the enterprise serviceoriented-architecture (SOA scope is stretched with the advent of cloud computing. With the help of the case study of a fictitious global retailer, we will demonstrate the process for identifying cloud scenarios. Also, we will come across an emerging breed of distributed applications—both on-premise and in the Cloud—and discuss the integration considerations for building them.

  5. N-H Stretching Excitations in Adenosine-Thymidine Base Pairs in Solution: Base Pair Geometries, Infrared Line Shapes and Ultrafast Vibrational Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Christian; Preketes, Nicholas K.; Fidder, Henk; Costard, Rene; Koeppe, Benjamin; Heisler, Ismael A.; Mukamel, Shaul; Temps, Friedrich; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We explore the N-H stretching vibrations of adenosine-thymidine base pairs in chloroform solution with linear and nonlinear infrared spectroscopy. Based on estimates from NMR measurements and ab initio calculations, we conclude that adenosine and thymidine form hydrogen bonded base pairs in Watson-Crick, reverse Watson-Crick, Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen configurations with similar probability. Steady-state concentration- and temperature dependent linear FT-IR studies, including H/D exchange experiments, reveal that these hydrogen-bonded base pairs have complex N-H/N-D stretching spectra with a multitude of spectral components. Nonlinear 2D-IR spectroscopic results, together with IR-pump-IR-probe measurements, as also corroborated by ab initio calculations, reveal that the number of N-H stretching transitions is larger than the total number of N-H stretching modes. This is explained by couplings to other modes, such as an underdamped low-frequency hydrogen-bond mode, and a Fermi resonance with NH2 bending overtone levels of the adenosine amino-group. Our results demonstrate that modeling based on local N-H stretching vibrations only is not sufficient and call for further refinement of the description of the N-H stretching manifolds of nucleic acid base pairs of adenosine and thymidine, incorporating a multitude of couplings with fingerprint and low-frequency modes. PMID:23234439

  6. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  7. Laser treatment of stretch marks: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Leonardo; Piccinetti, A. L.; Monache, G. D.; Botta, G.; Mancini, S.

    2000-06-01

    The best treatment of these stretch mark is still unknown. Some authors proposed the treatment with flash-lamp-pumped dye laser 585 nm, with fluence over 8 J/cm2. Reviewing our experiences on no-surgical effects of lasers in the various phases of the wound healing, including the re- epithelization, we would like to apply the no-surgical laser therapy treating the stretch marks of breast, abdomen and lumbo-sacral region. The goal is to inhibit the fibrous tissue metabolism, encouraging the destruction of the collagen fibers with inflammatory mechanism, and increasing the reconstitution of the superficial dermis layers. We treated five cases of stretch marks in women 22-35 years old, since May 1999, with a cycle of applications of double lasers, 511 and 577 nm, with energy of 20 Joule for spot, respecting the maximum thermal relaxation times of the skin. We waited two weeks interval between the applications. Results obtained after five applications are very positive, and we are encouraged to continue this experimentation.

  8. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  9. Experimental Characterization of Stretch-Bending Formability of AHSS Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitting, Daniela; Ofenheimer, Aldo; Pauli, Heinrich; Till, Edwin T.

    2011-05-01

    Deformation conditions of combined stretching and bending are known to enhance material formability compared to forming conditions without bending (e.g. in-plane stretching). These phenomena can be observed for most conventional steel grades but is even more pronounced for Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets. Consequently, there is an urgent need in industry to quantify the phenomena of enhanced material formability due to bending effects. In this work new stretch-bend test setups are presented which can be used in addition to the conventional Angular Stretch Bend Test to systematically investigate the influence of various stretch-bending deformation conditions on the formability of AHSS sheets.

  10. EFFECT OF ICE BAG, DYNAMIC STRETCHING AND COMBINED TREATMENTS ON THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF DELAY ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warin Krityakiarana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of ice bag, dynamic stretching, combined ice and dynamic stretching, and control (non-treated on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS in biceps muscle. Subjects: Fifty-five participants (aged 18 to 25 years were engaged in this study and randomly assigned into four groups (control group (non-treated (CG, n = 13; ice bag, n = 14; dynamic stretching, n = 14; and combined treatment, n = 14. Method: Before inducing DOMS, the range of motion (ROM and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC were measured. The dynamic stretching was performed before inducing DOMS. Subjects performed biceps eccentric exercise at 110% of the predicted one-repetition maximum (1-RM, for each subject, to induce muscle soreness. Pain, ROM and MVC were assessed at 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after induction of DOMS. Results: These non-significant results for mode of treatment and time interaction showed that combined treatment, ice bag, or dynamic stretching alone is not effective at significantly reducing the symptoms of DOMS. Conclusion: These results are non-significant, the pattern of the data showed that the combined treatment may be contraindicated in the prevention of DOMS and ice bag or dynamic stretching might be the best choice of treatment. Further investigation is strongly recommended.

  11. Does residual force enhancement increase with increasing stretch magnitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisey, Brandon; Leonard, Tim R; Herzog, Walter

    2009-07-22

    It is generally accepted that force enhancement in skeletal muscles increases with increasing stretch magnitudes. However, this property has not been tested across supra-physiological stretch magnitudes and different muscle lengths, thus it is not known whether this is a generic property of skeletal muscle, or merely a property that holds for small stretch magnitudes within the physiological range. Six cat soleus muscles were actively stretched with magnitudes varying from 3 to 24 mm at three different parts of the force-length relationship to test the hypothesis that force enhancement increases with increasing stretch magnitude, independent of muscle length. Residual force enhancement increased consistently with stretch amplitudes on the descending limb of the force-length relationship up to a threshold value, after which it reached a plateau. Force enhancement did not increase with stretch amplitude on the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. Passive force enhancement was observed for all test conditions, and paralleled the behavior of the residual force enhancement. Force enhancement increased with stretch magnitude when stretching occurred at lengths where there was natural passive force within the muscle. These results suggest that force enhancement does not increase unconditionally with increasing stretch magnitude, as is generally accepted, and that increasing force enhancement with stretch appears to be tightly linked to that part of the force-length relationship where there is naturally occurring passive force.

  12. The Relevance of Stretch Intensity and Position: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos eApostolopoulos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stretching exercises to increase the range of motion (ROM of joints have been used by sports coaches and medical professionals for improving performance and rehabilitation. The ability of connective and muscular tissues to change their architecture in response to stretching is important for their proper function, repair and performance. Given the dearth of relevant data in the literature, this review examined two key elements of stretching: stretch intensity and stretch position; and their significance to ROM, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, and inflammation in different populations. A search of three databases, Pub-Med, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews, identified 152 articles, which were subsequently categorized into four groups; athletes (n = 24, clinical (n = 29, elderly (n = 12, and general population (n = 87. The use of different populations facilitated a wider examination of the stretching components and their effects. All 152 articles incorporated information regarding duration, frequency and stretch position, whereas only 79 referred to the intensity of stretching and 22 of these 79 studies were deemed high quality. It appears that the intensity of stretching is relatively under-researched, and the importance of body position and its influence on stretch intensity, is largely unknown. In conclusion, this review has highlighted areas for future research, including stretch intensity and position and their effect on musculo-tendinous tissue, in relation to the sensation of pain, delayed onset muscle soreness, inflammation, as well as muscle health and performance

  13. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19-21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity.

  14. 基于"Stretching"技术的QPSO算法%QPSO Algorithm Based on Stretching Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于敏; 孙俊; 须文波; 江家宝

    2006-01-01

    基于量子行为的粒子群优化算法(QPSO)是一种随机的全局优化搜索新方法.文章系统的介绍了PSO算法、QPSO算法和"Stretching"技术.在对QPSO算法和基于"Stretching"技术的PSO算法分析的基础上,提出了基于"Stretch-ing"技术的QPSO算法.然后用标准测试函数对新算法进行了实验.实验结果表明,新算法在解的收敛性和稳定性等方面优于基于"Stretching"技术的PSO算法.

  15. Microstructure-Based RVE Approach for Stretch-Bending of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng; He, ChunFeng; Zhao, YiXi

    2016-03-01

    Fracture behavior and micro-failure mechanism in stretch-bending of dual-phase (DP) steels are still unclear. Representative volume elements (RVE) have been proved to be an applicable approach for describing microstructural deformation in order to reveal the micro-failure mechanism. In this paper, 2D RVE models are built. The deformation behavior of DP steels under stretch-bending is investigated by means of RVE models based on the metallographic graphs with particle geometry, distribution, and morphology. Microstructural failure modes under different loading conditions in stretch-bending tests are studied, and different failure mechanisms in stretch-bending are analyzed. The computational results and stress-strain distribution analysis indicate that in the RVE models, the strain mostly occurs in ferrite phase, while martensite phase undertakes most stress without significant strain. The failure is the results of the deformation inhomogeneity between martensite phase and ferrite phase. The various appearance and growth of initial voids are different depending on the bending radius.

  16. Human plantarflexor stiffness to multiple single-stretch trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanpied, P; Smidt, G L

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of different stretch velocities, different rates of pre-stretch force development, and different pre-stretch muscle lengths on the intrinsic stiffness exhibited by the quasi-statically contracting active human plantarflexors during multiple single-stretch trials at 20-60% of maximum isometric contraction. Subjects were positioned prone, with the knee flexed 1.57 rad(90 degrees), shank stabilized, and foot secured in a hard plastic orthotic. Slowly increasing isometric plantarflexion force was produced until the plantarflexors were stretched by a rapid 0.2 rad (12 degrees) dorsiflexion movement. Plantarflexion forces and ankle positions were determined during these stretches as well as during resting stretches when the muscle was inactive. Resting forces were subtracted from the active trials, forces converted to torques, and stiffnesses determined for the first 62 ms of the stretch. The slope of the stiffness vs pre-stretch torque relationship averaged 4.30 +/- 0.34 Nm rad-1 Nm-1. Little difference was found between stiffness determined through the single-stretch method and the results of previous studies employing different mechanical inputs. Differences in stiffnesses with different stretching velocities were caused by computational artifact rather than by differences in intrinsic muscular reaction. Faster rates of pre-stretch force increase prior to the stretch resulted in slightly lower stiffnesses. Different pre-stretch muscle lengths apparently did not result in different stiffnesses. The shape of the torque vs displacement curve was remarkably insensitive to the planned manipulations of the testing conditions, responding in a stereotypical manner.

  17. SHORT DURATIONS OF STATIC STRETCHING WHEN COMBINED WITH DYNAMIC STRETCHING DO NOT IMPAIR REPEATED SPRINTS AND AGILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del P. Wong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA and change of direction (COD. Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s. Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total. Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p < 0.001. However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (< 90 s static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments

  18. Optical stretching on chip with acoustophoretic prefocusing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoury Arvelo, Maria; Laub Busk, L.; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    in the microchannel. Trapping and manipulation is demonstrated for dielectric beads. In addition, we show trapping, manipulation and stretching of red blood cells and vesicles, whereby we extract the elastic properties of these objects. Our design points towards the construction of a low-cost, high-throughput lab-on-a-chip...... prefocusing. This focusing mechanism aims for target particles to always ow in the correct height relative to the optical stretcher, and is induced by a piezo-electric ultrasound transducer attached underneath the chip and driven at a frequency leading to a vertical standing ultrasound wave...

  19. CONFORMATIONAL PROPERTIES OF STRETCHED POLYETHYLENE CHAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-xi Zhang; De-lu Zhao

    2000-01-01

    When polyethylene chains are stretched, the chains are regarded as being confined in an infinite cylinder with decreasing diameter. The conformational properties of polyethylene chains confined in an infinite cylinder are investigated by using rotational isomeric state model. Using the average conformational energy and entropy and the average length, we can determine the elastic force f, or the fraction of the energy term to the total force fe/f, where fe=(б)/(б)/(б). Comparisons with experimental data are also made. The results of these microscopic calculations are discussed in terms of the macroscopic phenomena of rubber elasticity.

  20. Viscous flows stretching and shrinking of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Mehmood, Ahmer

    2017-01-01

    This authored monograph provides a detailed discussion of the boundary layer flow due to a moving plate. The topical focus lies on the 2- and 3-dimensional case, considering axially symmetric and unsteady flows. The author derives a criterion for the self-similar and non-similar flow, and the turbulent flow due to a stretching or shrinking sheet is also discussed. The target audience primarily comprises research experts in the field of boundary layer flow, but the book will also be beneficial for graduate students.

  1. To Stretch and Search for Better Ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    There's a lot to do to get each issue of this Journal ready for publication, and there's a lot that can go awry during that process. We the editorial staff do our utmost to make certain that each issue is the best it can possibly be, but, of necessity, a lot of our effort is focused on solving problems, correcting errors, and avoiding pitfalls. It is not surprising that we sometimes lose sight of the bigger picture--all of the things that came out as well as or better than we hoped they would. Therefore it gives us great pleasure when a reader applauds (and thereby rewards) our efforts. One such communication inspired this editorial. I have appreciated the extra effort put forward by the staff to make the Journal really come alive. The high quality of the Journal serves as an incentive to chemical educators to stretch and search for better ways to inspire our students. I fervently hope that we do encourage you "to stretch and search for better ways", not only to inspire students but in everything you do. Stretching and searching for better ways is what life, science, chemistry, and teaching are all about, and it is a wonderfully stimulating and exciting way to approach anything and everything. Sometimes, though, one's ability to stretch is akin to that of a rubber band exposed too long to sunlight. Change becomes a threat or a burden instead of an opportunity. This often happens in one area but not others, as in the case of someone doing original research but whose lecture notes are yellow with age, or someone who experiments with new teaching approaches but neglects the latest chemical discoveries. Whatever its manifestation, failure to stretch and search for better ways is a great loss, both for the individual directly involved and for others. Fortunately there are many who continually stretch and search, often in conjunction with JCE. For example, some time ago the Chair of the Board of Publication, Jerry Bell, challenged Journal readers to become Journal

  2. Finite stretching of an annular plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biricikoglu, V.; Kalnins, A.

    1971-01-01

    The problem of the finite stretching of an annular plate which is bonded to a rigid inclusion at its inner edge is considered. The material is assumed to be isotropic and incompressible with a Mooney-type constitutive law. It is shown that the inclusion of the effect of the transverse normal strain leads to a rapid variation in thickness which is confined to a narrow edge zone. The explicit solutions to the boundary layer equations, which govern the behavior of the plate near the edges, are presented.

  3. Wind effects on a stretched membrane heliostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienkiewicz, B. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    Wind effects on stretched membrane heliostat were investigated in a boundary layer wind tunnel. The membrane response was measured at stow and representative operational conditions. It was found that both at the stow and operational conditions the mean response was much higher than the rms response. At stow conditions the largest response occurred near the leading edge of the membrane, while the rms response was the largest at the membrane center point. For the operational conditions, the largest mean and rms responses were found at the membrane centerpoint. The membrane response was significantly reduced by the membrane focusing induced through the internal underpressure.

  4. Polarized actin structural dynamics in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lawrence; Helmke, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) alignment to directional flow or stretch supports anti-inflammatory functions, but mechanisms controlling polarized structural adaptation in response to physical cues remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether factors associated with early actin edge ruffling implicated in cell polarization are prerequisite for stress fiber (SF) reorientation in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch. Time-lapse analysis of EGFP-actin in confluent ECs showed that onset of either cyclic uniaxial or equibiaxial stretch caused a non-directional increase in edge ruffling. Edge activity was concentrated in a direction perpendicular to the stretch axis after 60 min, consistent with the direction of SF alignment. Rho-kinase inhibition caused reorientation of both stretch-induced edge ruffling and SF alignment parallel to the stretch axis. Arp2/3 inhibition attenuated stretch-induced cell elongation and disrupted polarized edge dynamics and microtubule organizing center reorientation, but it had no effect on the extent of SF reorientation. Disrupting localization of p21-activated kinase (PAK) did not prevent stretch-induced SF reorientation, suggesting that this Rac effector is not critical in regulating stretch-induced cytoskeletal remodeling. Overall, these results suggest that directional edge ruffling is not a primary mechanism that guides SF reorientation in response to stretch; the two events are coincident but not causal. PMID:25821527

  5. Rounded stretched exponential for time relaxation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powles, J G; Heyes, D M; Rickayzen, G; Evans, W A B

    2009-12-01

    A rounded stretched exponential function is introduced, C(t)=exp{(tau(0)/tau(E))(beta)[1-(1+(t/tau(0))(2))(beta/2)]}, where t is time, and tau(0) and tau(E) are two relaxation times. This expression can be used to represent the relaxation function of many real dynamical processes, as at long times, t>tau(0), the function converges to a stretched exponential with normalizing relaxation time, tau(E), yet its expansion is even or symmetric in time, which is a statistical mechanical requirement. This expression fits well the shear stress relaxation function for model soft soft-sphere fluids near coexistence, with tau(E)Cole-Cole plots for dielectric and shear stress relaxation (both the modulus and viscosity forms). It is shown that both the dielectric spectra and dynamic shear modulus imaginary parts approach the real axis with a slope equal to 0 at high frequency, whereas the dynamic viscosity has an infinite slope in the same limit. This indicates that inertial effects at high frequency are best discerned in the modulus rather than the viscosity Cole-Cole plot. As a consequence of the even expansion in time of the shear stress relaxation function, the value of the storage modulus derived from it at very high frequency exceeds that in the infinite frequency limit (i.e., G(infinity)).

  6. Dispersion-managed semiconductor mode-locked ring laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resan, Bojan; Archundia, Luis; Delfyett, Peter J; Alphonse, Gerard

    2003-08-01

    A novel breathing-mode external sigma-ring-cavity semiconductor mode-locked laser is developed. Intracavity pulse compression and stretching produce linearly chirped pulses with an asymmetric exponential temporal profile. External dispersion compensation reduces the pulse duration to 274 fs (within 10% of the bandwidth limit).

  7. Probing cell structure responses through a shear and stretching mechanical stimulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Robert L; Cheng, Chao-Min; Wang, Danny L; LeDuc, Philip R

    2010-04-01

    Cells are complex, dynamic systems that respond to various in vivo stimuli including chemical, mechanical, and scaffolding alterations. The influence of mechanics on cells is especially important in physiological areas that dictate what modes of mechanics exist. Complex, multivariate physiological responses can result from multi-factorial, multi-mode mechanics, including tension, compression, or shear stresses. In this study, we present a novel device based on elastomeric materials that allowed us to stimulate NIH 3T3 fibroblasts through uniaxial strip stretching or shear fluid flow. Cell shape and structural response was observed using conventional approaches such as fluorescent microscopy. Cell orientation and actin cytoskeleton alignment along the direction of applied force were observed to occur after an initial 3 h time period for shear fluid flow and static uniaxial strip stretching experiments although these two directions of alignment were oriented orthogonal relative to each other. This response was then followed by an increasingly pronounced cell and actin cytoskeleton alignment parallel to the direction of force after 6, 12, and 24 h, with 85% of the cells aligned along the direction of force after 24 h. These results indicate that our novel device could be implemented to study the effects of multiple modes of mechanical stimulation on living cells while probing their structural response especially with respect to competing directions of alignment and orientation under these different modes of mechanical stimulation. We believe that this will be important in a diversity of fields including cell mechanotransduction, cell-material interactions, biophysics, and tissue engineering.

  8. Rietveld refinement of the structures of 1.0 C-S-H and 1.5 C-S-H

    KAUST Repository

    Battocchio, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Low-Q region Rietveld analyses were performed on C-S-H synchrotron XRD patterns, using the software MAUD. Two different crystal structures of tobermorite 11 Å were used as a starting model: monoclinic ordered Merlino tobermorite, and orthorhombic disordered Hamid tobermorite. Structural modifications were required to adapt the structures to the chemical composition and the different interlayer spacing of the C-S-H samples. Refinement of atomic positions was done by using special constraints called fragments that maintain interatomic distances and orientations within atomic polyhedra. Anisotropic crystallite size refinement showed that C-S-H has a nanocrystalline disordered structure with a preferred direction of elongation of the nanocrystallites in the plane of the Ca interlayer. The quality of the fit showed that the monoclinic structure gives a more adequate representation of C-S-H, whereas the disordered orthorhombic structure can be considered a more realistic model if the lack of long-range order of the silica chain along the c-direction is assumed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  10. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study's methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC.

  11. Stretching and bending dynamics in triatomic ultralong-range Rydberg molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Fey, Christian; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate polyatomic ultralong-range Rydberg molecules consisting of three ground state atoms bound to a Rydberg atom via $s$- and $p$-wave interactions. By employing the finite basis set representation of the unperturbed Rydberg electron Green's function we reduce the computational effort to solve the electronic problem substantially. This method is subsequently applied to determine the potential energy surfaces of triatomic systems in electronic $s$- and $p$-Rydberg states. Their molecular geometry and resulting vibrational structure are analyzed within an adiabatic approach that separates the vibrational bending and stretching dynamics. This procedure yields information on the radial and angular arrangement of the nuclei and indicates in particular that kinetic couplings between bending and stretching modes induce a linear structure in triatomic $l=0$ ultralong-range Rydberg molecules.

  12. Dynamics of soft filaments that can stretch, shear, bend and twist

    CERN Document Server

    Gazzola, Mattia; McCormick, Andrew G; Mahadevan, L

    2016-01-01

    Soft slender structures are ubiquitous in natural and artificial systems and can be observed at scales that range from the nanometric to the kilometric, from polymers to space tethers. We present a general numerical approach to simulate the dynamics of filaments that, at every cross-section, can undergo all six possible modes of deformation, allowing the filament to bend, twist, shear and stretch, consistent with dynamics on the full Euclidean group SE(3). Additionally, we also account for the interaction of an active filament with itself and the environment via self-contact, surface friction and hydrodynamics. We examine the accuracy of our energy preserving and second order spatio-temporal method by means of a number of benchmark problems with known analytic solutions. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of our approach both on passive physical problems related to solenoid and plectoneme formation in twisted, stretched filaments, and active biophysical problems in the context of limbless locomotion on ...

  13. Stretching and bending dynamics in triatomic ultralong-range Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Christian; Kurz, Markus; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We investigate polyatomic ultralong-range Rydberg molecules consisting of three ground-state atoms bound to a Rydberg atom via s - and p -wave interactions. By employing the finite basis set representation of the unperturbed Rydberg electron Green's function we reduce the computational effort to solve the electronic problem substantially. This method is subsequently applied to determine the potential energy surfaces of triatomic systems in electronic s - and p -Rydberg states. Their molecular geometry and resulting vibrational structure are analyzed within an adiabatic approach that separates the vibrational bending and stretching dynamics. This procedure yields information on the radial and angular arrangement of the nuclei and indicates in particular that kinetic couplings between bending and stretching modes induce a linear structure in triatomic l =0 ultralong-range Rydberg molecules.

  14. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 ti...

  15. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19–21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slo...

  16. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva; Anderson Luiz Bezerra da Silveira; Fabrízio Di Masi; Cláudio Melibeu Bentes; Maria do Socorro Cirilo de Sousa; Jefferson da Silva Novaes

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4025/actascihealthsci.v36i1.15581 This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on the static muscle strength (SMS). Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a) hand grip without stretching; b) hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexor...

  17. The Process Analysis of the Roller Stretching for Wool Slenderization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪玲; 于伟东; 章悦庭

    2003-01-01

    A theoretical estimation for the multiple-drawing has been derived under the consideration of fiber length distribution for the wool fiber stretching system. The functions of the roller drawing system and the parameters in stretching process have also been analyzed. The theoretical algorithms have been verified by the experimental results and can be used for the estimation of fiber length and its distribution after the stretching.

  18. Effects of three different stretching techniques on vertical jumping performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizigil, Berkiye; Ozcaldiran, Bahtiyar; Colakoglu, Muzaffer

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 3 different flexibility techniques: (a) ballistic stretching (BS), (b) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) + BS, and (c) PNF + static stretching (SS) on vertical jump (VJ) performance and to determine the most appropriate stretching method during warm-up period before explosive force disciplines. One hundred voluntary male athletes participated in this study. All subjects performed aerobic warm-up (5-minute jog) followed by BS (5 seconds for each stretching exercise), PNF + BS (PNF performed followed by 5 seconds of BS), and PNF + SS (PNF performed followed by 30 seconds of SS) treatment protocol, respectively in the same day. Each stretching treatment was applied for 4 sets bilaterally. In all stretching treatments, lumbar extensor, gluteus maximus, and hamstring muscles were stretched with a single stretching exercise. After a 2-minute brief rest period, participants performed 3 trials of VJ test followed by one of the treatment protocols. Vertical jump performance was evaluated by countermovement jump (CMJ). Participants were divided into 3 groups according to their flexibility and prejump performances after warm-up. For each individual group and the whole group, after all treatments, differences in CMJ values were obtained (p ≤ 0.05). Ballistic stretching increased the VJ performance in the groups with low and average flexibility, poor prejumping performance, and also in the whole group (p ≤ 0.05). Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching + BS affected VJ performance in the group of participants with high flexibility (p ≤ 0.05). Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation + SS decreased VJ performance in groups of participants with high flexibility, moderate, and high prejumping performance and in whole group (p ≤ 0.05). Ballistic stretching method increased VJ height, therefore seems to be more suitable than PNF + SS and PNF + BS before events that rely on explosive power as a part

  19. High-Pressure Balloon-Assisted Stretching of the Coracohumeral Ligament to Determine the Optimal Stretching Positions: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sora; Lee, Kyu Jin; Kim, Keewon; Han, Seung-Ho; Lee, U-Young; Lee, Kun-Jai; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-10-01

    The coracohumeral ligament (CHL) is a thick capsular structure and markedly thickened when affected by adhesive capsulitis. Therapeutic stretching is the most commonly applied treatment for adhesive capsulitis, but optimal stretching postures for maximal therapeutic effects on the CHL have not been fully investigated. To investigate the most effective stretching direction for the CHL by measuring the stretching intensity in 5 different directions and to determine whether the stretching intervention resulted in loosening of the ligament by comparing the changes of CHL tightness before and after stretching. Biomechanical cadaver study. Academic institution cadaver laboratory. Nine fresh frozen cadaveric shoulders. A high-pressure balloon catheter inserted under the CHL and intraballoon pressure was measured, to evaluate CHL tightness without ligament damage as well as to augment and monitor stretching intensity. To find the optimal stretching direction, the glenohumeral joint was stretched from the neutral position into 5 directions sequentially under pressure-monitoring: flexion, extension [EX], external rotation [ER], EX+ER, and EX+ER+adduction [AD] directions. CHL tightness was determined by a surrogate parameter, the additional pressure created by the overlying CHL. The pressure increase (ΔPstr) by a specific directional stretch was considered as the stretching intensity. ΔPstr by the 5 directions were mean (standard deviation) values of 0.03 ± 0.07 atm, 0.87 ± 1.31 atm, 1.13 ± 1.36 atm, 1.49 ± 1.32 atm, and 2.10 ± 1.70 atm, respectively, revealing the highest ΔPstr by the EX+ER+AD stretch (P stretching manipulation. EX+ER+AD of the glenohumeral joint resulted in the greatest increase in balloon pressure, implying that it could be the most effective stretching direction. A series of stretching manipulations assisted with an underlying pressure balloon were capable of decreasing CHL tightness. With further development and modification, high

  20. 600 Volt Stretched Lens Array for Solar Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ENTECH, Auburn, NASA, and others have recently developed a new space photovoltaic array called the Stretched Lens Array (SLA), offering unprecedented performance...

  1. LABOR GYMNASTICS: STRETCHING EXERCISE X FLEXIONAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Amorin Anchieta Borges da Silva, Isabel Cristina Taranto e Fernanda Piasecki

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there are many opportunities for the society to live a healthful and long life. At the same time, never people was so sedentary and without harmony. Without a healthy body and with “an occupied mind” the human loses exactly what more it needs: the disposal to produce, to coexist and to live a good life. In this context, the present research aimed to revise some terms related to labor gymnastics, which is focused in the prevention of risks related to hours of working and in the reduction of muscular tension levels that may be originated during a day of work. Thus, the present study will make a differentiation between the use of stretching and flexionament during labor gymnastic sessions.

  2. Modeling Aftershocks as a Stretched Exponential Relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Considered the second most fundamental empirical law after the Gutenberg-Richter relationship, the power law paradigm has rarely been challenged by the seismological community. By taking a view of aftershock research not biased by prior conceptions of Omori power law decay and by applying statistical methods recommended in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simpler relaxation process than originally thought, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  3. EFFECTIVENESS OF PNF STRETCHING VERSUS STATIC STRETCHING ON PAIN AND HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY FOLLOWING MOIST HEAT IN INDIVIDUALS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena .V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease and one of the major public health problem that causesfunctional impairment and reduced quality of life. To compare the effectiveness of PNF Hold relax stretching versus Static stretching on pain and flexibility of hamstring following moist heat in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Hamstring tightness is the major problem in knee osteoarthritis individuals. Therefore the need of study is comparing the effectiveness of PNF Hold relax stretching versus static stretching on pain and flexibility of hamstrings following moist heat in knee osteoarthritis participants. Determining the effects of PNF Hold relax stretching versus Static stretching along with moist heat on pain and hamstring flexibility by VAS and Active knee extension range of motion in knee osteoarthritis individuals. Methods: 30 subjects with symptoms of knee osteoarthritis were randomly distributed into 2 groups 15 in each group. PNF Hold relax stretching along with moist heat is compared to Static stretching along with moist heat. Pain was measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and hamstring flexibility by Active knee Extension Range of Motion (AKEROM by universal goniometer. Measurements are taken pre and post intervention. Results: The results indicated PNF Hold relax stretching along with moist heat showed a statistically significant improvement in pain (p<0.05 and improvement in hamstring flexibility (p<0.05 when compared to Static stretching along with moist heat. Conclusion: Subjects with PNF Hold relax stretching along with moist heat showed significant improvement in pain reduction and improving hamstring flexibility than Static stretching along with moist heat.

  4. EFFICACY OF MODIFIED PROPRIOCEPTIVE NEUROMUSCULAR FACILITATION STRETCHING WITH CRYOTHERAPY OVER MANUAL PASSIVE STRETCHING WITH CRYOTHERAPY ON HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamik Bhattacharjee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthy individuals, to ease and accomplish their activities of daily living they need flexible body without any tightness in the muscles, particularly those used for a definite function. Cooling soft tissues in a lengthened position after stretching has been shown to promote more lasting increases in soft tissue length and minimize post stretch muscle soreness. There are less documented studies which compared modified proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF stretch over passive manual stretch with cold application commonly after the interventions. Methods: Thirty high school going healthy students were divided into two groups- Group I received Passive Manual stretching (n=15 and Group II received modified PNF stretching (n=15 and both groups received cold application after the interventions for 10 minutes commonly for 5 days. ROM was taken on day 1, day 5 and day 7. Results: After day 7, Group II with Modified PNF stretching along with cold application showed a significant increase in range of motion tested with active knee extension test (AKET. Conclusion: Modified PNF stretching is considered to be the effective intervention in increasing and maintaining ROM in AKET over passive manual stretching with cold applications commonly after the interventions.

  5. DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes aligned in stretched gelatin films: Polarized resonance Raman and absorption spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glamazda, A. Yu.; Plokhotnichenko, A. M.; Leontiev, V. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present the study of DNA-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) embedded in the stretched gelatin film by the polarized resonance Raman spectroscopy and visible-NIR optical absorption. The polarized dependent absorption spectra taken along and normal to the stretching direction demonstrate a comparatively high degree of the alignment of isolated SWNTs in the gelatin matrix. The analysis of Raman spectra of isolated SWNTs in the gelatin stretched films showed that the degree of the alignment of carbon nanotubes along the stretching direction is about 62%. The dependence of the peak position of G+-band in Raman spectra on the polarization angle θ between the polarization of the incident light and the direction of the stretching of films was revealed. This shift is explained by the different polarization dependence of the most intensive A and E1 symmetry modes within the G+-band. The performed studies of embedded DNA-wrapped nanotubes in the gelatin film show the simple method for obtaining the controlled ordered biocompatible nanotubes inside a polymer matrix. It can be used for manufacturing sizable flexible self-transparent films with integrated nanoelectrodes.

  6. Computational Material Modeling of Hydrated Cement Paste Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Chemistry Structure - Influence of Magnesium Exchange on Mechanical Stiffness: C-S-H Jennite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    material chemistry structure are studied following a molecular dynamics (MD) computational modeling methodology. Calcium ions are replaced with... chemistry structure. Conference Name: 1st Pan-American Conference on Computational Mechanics Conference Date: April 27, 2015 1st Pan-American Congress on...MODELING OF C-S-H Material chemistry level modeling following the principles and techniques commonly grouped under Computational Material Science is

  7. A Variable-Resolution Stretched-Grid General Circulation Model and Data Assimilation System with Multiple Areas of Interest: Studying the Anomalous Regional Climate Events of 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Takacs, Lawrence; Govindaraju, Ravi C.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The new stretched-grid design with multiple (four) areas of interest, one at each global quadrant, is implemented into both a stretched-grid GCM (general circulation model) and a stretched-grid data assimilation system (DAS). The four areas of interest include: the U.S./Northern Mexico, the El Nino area/Central South America, India/China, and the Eastern Indian Ocean/Australia. Both the stretched-grid GCM and DAS annual (November 1997 through December 1998) integrations are performed with 50 km regional resolution. The efficient regional down-scaling to mesoscales is obtained for each of the four areas of interest while the consistent interactions between regional and global scales and the high quality of global circulation, are preserved. This is the advantage of the stretched-grid approach. The global variable resolution DAS incorporating the stretched-grid GCM has been developed and tested as an efficient tool for producing regional analyses and diagnostics with enhanced mesoscale resolution. The anomalous regional climate events of 1998 that occurred over the U.S., Mexico, South America, China, India, African Sahel, and Australia are investigated in both simulation and data assimilation modes. Tree assimilated products are also used, along with gauge precipitation data, for validating the simulation results. The obtained results show that the stretched-grid GCM and DAS are capable of producing realistic high quality simulated and assimilated products at mesoscale resolution for regional climate studies and applications.

  8. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail , and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  9. Chaperones in Polyglutamine Aggregation : Beyond the Q-Stretch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, E. F. E.; de Mattos, Eduardo P.; Jardim, Laura B.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Bergink, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in at least nine unrelated proteins lead to inherited neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. The expansion size in all diseases correlates with age at onset (AO) of disease and with polyQ protein aggregation, indicating that the expanded polyQ stretch is the

  10. Does Postexercise Static Stretching Alleviate Delayed Muscle Soreness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buroker, Katherine C.; Schwane, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Because many experts recommend stretching after exercise to relieve muscle soreness, 23 subjects performed a 30-minute step test to induce delayed muscle soreness. There was neither temporary relief of pain immediately after stretching nor a reduction in pain during the 3-day postexercise period. (Author/SM)

  11. Acute nerve stretch and the compound motor action potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfe Jacob

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, the acute changes in the compound motor action potential (CMAP during mechanical stretch were studied in hamster sciatic nerve and compared to the changes that occur during compression. In response to stretch, the nerve physically broke when a mean force of 331 gm (3.3 N was applied while the CMAP disappeared at an average stretch force of 73 gm (0.73 N. There were 5 primary measures of the CMAP used to describe the changes during the experiment: the normalized peak to peak amplitude, the normalized area under the curve (AUC, the normalized duration, the normalized velocity and the normalized velocity corrected for the additional path length the impulses travel when the nerve is stretched. Each of these measures was shown to contain information not available in the others. During stretch, the earliest change is a reduction in conduction velocity followed at higher stretch forces by declines in the amplitude of the CMAP. This is associated with the appearance of spontaneous EMG activity. With stretch forces Multiple means of predicting when a change in the CMAP suggests a significant stretch are discussed and it is clear that a multifactorial approach using both velocity and amplitude parameters is important. In the case of pure compression, it is only the amplitude of the CMAP that is critical in predicting which changes in the CMAP are associated with significant compression.

  12. Bruxism: Is There an Indication for Muscle-Stretching Exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouw, Simone; de Wijer, Anton; Creugers, Nico Hj; Kalaykova, Stanimira I

    Bruxism is a common phenomenon involving repetitive activation of the masticatory muscles. Muscle-stretching exercises are a recommended part of several international guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders and may be effective in management of the jaw muscle activity that gives rise to bruxism. However, most studies of muscle-stretching exercises have mainly focused on their influence on performance (eg, range of motion, coordination, and muscle strength) of the limb or trunk muscles of healthy individuals or individuals with sports-related injuries. Very few have investigated stretching of the human masticatory muscles and none muscle-stretching exercises in the management of (sleep) bruxism. This article reviews the literature on muscle-stretching exercises and their potential role in the management of sleep bruxism or its consequences in the musculoskeletal system.

  13. Stretching and injury prevention in football: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic, Marko D; Ostojic, Sergej M

    2011-04-01

    Stretching exercises are regularly recommended as a part of football-training sessions and in preparation for competition. There is little sound empirical evidence, however, to substantiate the role of stretching exercises and consequently increased flexibility on injury prevention in football. Furthermore, in the last decade or so, fundamental research has shed some light on the biomechanical adaptation of the muscle-tendon unit following different stretching protocols, improving knowledge about the topic and enabling better understanding of the stretching-injury relationship. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature on the role of stretching and/or increased flexibility on injury prevention in football, with presented results analyzed in the context of the up-to-date basic science research evidence.

  14. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF on the static muscle strength (SMS. Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a hand grip without stretching; b hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexors muscles; c hand grip preceded by PNF stretching of wrist flexors muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test verified the normality of data, and a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures, followed by Tukey’s post hoc test, evaluated the differences between the groups. The significance was set at p 0.05. In conclusion, both stretching methods had caused negative effects on isometric strength, reducing its levels.

  15. Linear and nonlinear buckling analysis of a locally stretched plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilardj, Madina; Ikhenzzen, Ghania [University of Sciences and Technology Houari Boumediene (U.S.T.H.B), Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Merssager, Tanguy; Kanit, Toufik [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille Universite Lille 1, Cite ScientifiqueVilleneuve d' Ascq cedex (France)

    2016-08-15

    Uniformly stretched thin plates do not buckle unless they are in special boundary conditions. However, buckling commonly occurs around discontinuities, such as cracks, cuts, narrow slits, holes, and different openings, of such plates. This study aims to show that buckling can also occur in thin plates that contain no defect or singularity when the stretching is local. This specific stability problem is analyzed with the finite element method. A brief literature review on stretched plates is presented. Linear and nonlinear buckling stress analyses are conducted for a partially stretched rectangular plate, and various load cases are considered to investigate the influence of the partial loading expanse on the critical tensile buckling load. Results are summarized in iso-stress areas, tables and graphs. Local stretching on one end of the plate induces buckling in the thin plate even without geometrical imperfection.

  16. Pre-exercise stretching does not impact upon running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Philip R; Walker, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Pre-exercise stretching has been widely reported to reduce performance in tasks requiring maximal or near-maximal force or torque. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different pre-exercise stretching routines on running economy. Seven competitive male middle and long-distance runners (mean +/- SD) age: 32.5 +/- 7.7 years; height: 175.0 +/- 8.8 cm; mass: 67.8 +/- 8.6 kg; V(.-)O2max: 66.8 +/- 7.0 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) volunteered to participate in this study. Each participant completed 4 different pre-exercise conditions: (a) a control condition, (b) static stretching, (c) progressive static stretching, and (d) dynamic stretching. Each stretching routine consisted of 2 x 30-second stretches for each of 5 exercises. Dependent variables measured were sit and reach test before and after each pre-exercise routine, running economy (ml x kg(-1) x km(-1)), and steady-state oxygen uptake (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), which were measured during the final 3 minutes of a 10-minute run below lactate threshold. All 3 stretching routines resulted in an increase in the range of movement (p = 0.008). There was no change in either running economy (p = 0.915) or steady-state V(.-)O2 (p = 0.943). The lack of change in running economy was most likely because it was assessed after a period of submaximal running, which may have masked any effects from the stretching protocols. Previously reported reductions in performance have been attributed to reduced motor unit activation, presumably IIX. In this study, these motor units were likely not to have been recruited; this may explain the unimpaired performance. This study suggests that pre-exercise stretching has no impact upon running economy or submaximal exercise oxygen cost.

  17. Influence of concentration on distribution properties of stretched-DNA in the MEC studied with fluorescence imaging and drop shape analyzing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mengjiao; Sun, Dan; Wang, Shuang; Wu, Jianguo; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Kaige; He, Qingli; Wang, Guiren; Bai, Jintao

    2017-03-01

    Stretching and manipulating DNA efficiently is significant for exploring the properties and applications of single DNA molecules. Here, the influence of concentrations of buffer and DNA on properties of stretched DNA molecules in the molecular evaporation combing (MEC) is investigated systematically with the single molecule fluorescence imaging microscopy and the high-precision drop shape analyzing technology. The stretched degree and uniformity of combed DNA molecules decrease as the buffer concentration are increased from 7 to 20mM. When the buffer concentration changes from 12 to 15mM, the stretched DNA molecules are apt to form a ringlike pattern. During the MEC process, there exist two kinds of evaporation modes, i.e., the constant contact angle mode and the constant contact radius mode. The former only takes effect in the lower concentration of buffer and DNA, enabling the uniform stretching. While the latter plays the leading role in the higher concentration, promoting the formation of the ringlike pattern of DNA molecules.

  18. Acute effects of different stretching durations on passive torque, mobility, and isometric muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Shingo; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Iwata, Masahiro; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji; Tsuchida, Wakako; Inoue, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    Static stretching is widely applied in various disciplines. However, the acute effects of different durations of stretching are unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the acute effects of different stretching durations on muscle function and flexibility, and provide an insight into the optimal duration of static stretching. This randomized crossover trial included 24 healthy students (17 men and 7 women) who stretched their right hamstrings for durations of 20, 60, 180, and 300 seconds in a random order. The following outcomes were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer as markers of lower-limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), dynamic passive torque (DPT), stiffness, straight leg raise (SLR), and isometric muscle force. Static passive torque was significantly decreased after all stretching durations (p stretching compared with that after 20-second stretching, and stiffness decreased significantly after 180- and 300-second stretching (p stretching (p stretching durations (p stretching than after 20-second stretching and higher after 300-second stretching than after 60-second stretching (p stretching durations (p stretching is associated with a decrease in SPT but an increase in SLR. Over 180 seconds of stretching was required to decrease DPT and stiffness, but isometric muscle force decreased regardless of the stretching duration. In conclusion, these results indicate that longer durations of stretching are needed to provide better flexibility.

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Orthosis Augmented by Either Stretching or Stretching and Strengthening for Stage II Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Jeff; Neville, Christopher; Tome, Josh; Flemister, Adolph

    2015-09-01

    The value of strengthening and stretching exercises combined with orthosis treatment in a home-based program has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of augmenting orthosis treatment with either stretching or a combination of stretching and strengthening in participants with stage II tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction (TPTD). Participants included 39 patients with stage II TPTD who were recruited from a medical center and then randomly assigned to a strengthening or stretching treatment group. Excluding 3 dropouts, there were 19 participants in the strengthening group and 17 in the stretching group. The stretching treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with stretching exercises. The strengthening treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with the stretching and strengthening exercises. The main outcome measures were self-report (ie, Foot Function Index and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment) and isometric deep posterior compartment strength. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test for differences between groups at 6 and 12 weeks after starting the exercise programs. Both groups significantly improved in pain and function over the 12-week trial period. The self-report measures showed minimal differences between the treatment groups. There were no differences in isometric deep posterior compartment strength. A moderate-intensity, home-based exercise program was minimally effective in augmenting orthosis wear alone in participants with stage II TPTD. Level I, prospective randomized study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Universal Linear Motor Driven Leg Press Dynamometer and Concept of Serial Stretch Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Paper deals with backgrounds and principles of universal linear motor driven leg press dynamometer and concept of serial stretch loading. The device is based on two computer controlled linear motors mounted to the horizontal rails. As the motors can keep either constant resistance force in selected position or velocity in both directions, the system allows simulation of any mode of muscle contraction. In addition, it also can generate defined serial stretch stimuli in a form of repeated force peaks. This is achieved by short segments of reversed velocity (in concentric phase) or acceleration (in eccentric phase). Such stimuli, generated at the rate of 10 Hz, have proven to be a more efficient means for the improvement of rate of the force development. This capability not only affects performance in many sports, but also plays a substantial role in prevention of falls and their consequences. Universal linear motor driven and computer controlled dynamometer with its unique feature to generate serial stretch stimuli seems to be an efficient and useful tool for enhancing strength training effects on neuromuscular function not only in athletes, but as well as in senior population and rehabilitation patients. PMID:26913159

  1. Universal linear motor driven Leg Press Dynamometer and concept of Serial Stretch Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Hamar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Paper deals with backgrounds and principles of universal linear motor driven leg press dynamometer and concept of serial stretch loading. The device is based on two computer controlled linear motors mounted to the horizontal rails. As the motors can keep either constant resistance force in selected position or velocity in both directions, the system allows simulation of any mode of muscle contraction. In addition, it also can generate defined serial stretch stimuli in a form of repeated force peaks. This is achieved by short segments of reversed velocity (in concentric phase or acceleration (in eccentric phase. Such stimuli, generated at the rate of 10 Hz, have proven to be a more efficient means for the improvement of rate of the force development. This capability not only affects performance in many sports, but also plays a substantial role in prevention of falls and their consequences. Universal linear motor driven and computer controlled dynamometer with its unique feature to generate serial stretch stimuli seems to be an efficient and useful tool for enhancing strength training effects on neuromuscular function not only in athletes, but as well as in senior population and rehabilitation patients.

  2. Molecular chain stretch is a multiaxial failure criterion for conventional and highly crosslinked UHMWPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, J S; Rimnac, C M; Kurtz, S M

    2005-03-01

    The development of accurate theoretical failure, fatigue, and wear models for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is an important step towards better understanding the micromechanisms of the surface damage that occur in load bearing orthopaedic components and improving the lifetime of joint arthoplasties. Previous attempts to analytically predict the clinically observed damage, wear, and fatigue failure modes have met with limited success due to the complicated interaction between microstructural deformations and continuum level stresses. In this work, we examined monotonic uniaxial and multiaxial loading to failure of UHMWPE using eight failure criteria (maximum principal stress, Mises stress, Tresca stress, hydrostatic stress, Coulomb stress, maximum principal strain, Mises strain, and chain stretch). The quality of the predictions of the different models was assessed by comparing uniaxial tension and small punch test data at different rates with the failure model predictions. The experimental data were obtained for two conventional (unirradiated and gamma radiation sterilized in nitrogen) and two highly crosslinked (150kGy, remelted and annealed) UHMWPE materials. Of the different failures models examined, the chain stretch failure model was found to capture uniaxial and multiaxial failure data most accurately for all of the UHMWPE materials. In addition, the chain stretch failure criterion can readily be calculated for contemporary UHMWPE materials based on available uniaxial tension data. These results lay the foundation for future developments of damage and wear models capable of predicting multiaxial failure under cyclic loading conditions.

  3. Three-dimensional ab initio dipole moment surfaces and stretching vibrational band intensities of the XH3 molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu An-Wen; Hu Shui-Ming; Ding Yun; Zhu Qing-Shi

    2005-01-01

    Stretching vibrational band intensities of XH3 (X=N, Sb) molecules are investigated employing three-dimensional dipole moment surfaces combined with the local mode Hamiltonian model. The dipole moment surfaces of NH3 and SbH3 are calculated with the density functional theory and at the correlated MP2 level, respectively. The calculated band intensities are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The contribution to the band intensities from the different terms in the polynomial expansion of the dipole moments of four group V hydrides (NH3, PH3, AsH3 and SbH3) are discussed. It is concluded that the breakdown of the bond dipole approximation must be considered.The intensity "borrowing" effect due to the wave function mixing among the stretching vibrational states is found to be less significant for the molecules that reach the local mode limit.

  4. Wavelet stretch correction%子波拉伸校正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文锋; 李宏兵; 姚逢昌; 李国平; 张佳佳

    2011-01-01

    依赖于偏移距的反射波调谐是AVO分析的不利因素.无论动校正还是偏移,都会引起子波拉伸、频谱向低频移动.在频率域对动校正或偏移后的地震数据进行反拉伸校正是本文消除子波拉伸采用的方法.从射线参数时距方程出发推导的地震映射压缩因子与反射角存在较精确的余弦关系.角度道中动校正或偏移子波拉伸因子是反射角余弦的倒数.用无拉伸子波频谱除以拉伸子波频谱得到反频谱压缩算子,对动校正或偏移后存在子波拉伸的角度道应用反频谱压缩算子,操作简单易行.薄层模型试验和实际地震资料处理表明角度道校正方法能够消除子波拉伸畸变,展宽频谱,补偿地震资料动校正或偏移过程中丢失的高频成分,提高大角度的分辨率和保真度,改善AVO分析.%Offset-dependent tuning includes seismic imaging tuning, NMO stretch, and migration stretch. Seismic imaging tuning caused by compression of reflectivity inheres in seismic record. Either NMO stretch or migration stretch is the wavelet stretch which arises in the seismic processing. They are adverse factors for AVO analysis. The goal of dynamic correction or migration is to modify the time difference measured at the mid- and the far-offset trace to that at the near-offset trace. Either dynamic correction or migration stretches the compressed reflectivity, but brings wavelet stretch and corresponding spectral compression at the same time. The method of removing wavelet stretch proposed in this article is to do anti-stretch correction on the seismic data after dynamic correction or migration in frequency domain. The compression factor of seismic imaging tuning deduced from the parametric ray equations is related closely to the cosine of the refection angle. In offset traces after dynamic correction or migration, the wavelet stretch factor which varies with time and velocity is nonstationary. The shallow reflection at the far

  5. Does the parental stretching programs improve metatarsus adductus in newborns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamsobhana, Perajit; Rojjananukulpong, Karn; Ariyawatkul, Thanase; Chotigavanichaya, Chatupon; Kaewpornsawan, Kamolporn

    2017-01-01

    Metatarsus adductus (MA) is a common pediatric foot deformity. Current recommendations suggest observation until 4-6 months, then casting if the deformity persists. Based on our review of the literatures, no randomized controlled trial has been conducted to study the effectiveness of parental stretching in the correction of MA in newborn. Ninety-four newborn feet that were diagnosed as MA by clinical examination were enrolled. Feet were randomized into two groups: observation group and stretching group. Outcome measurements were performed to compare success rate between groups. According to Pearson's χ(2) test, there were no statistically significant differences between groups with regard to the overall success of the parental stretching program ( p = 0.191). There was also no significant difference between groups for mild degree or moderate-to-severe degree ( p = 0.134, p = 0.274, respectively). A more rapid success rate was observed in the stretching group at the first month follow-up, but rate of improvement then decreased. The stretching group tended to have a lower success rate compared to the observation group in moderate-to-severe feet, but the difference was not statistically significant. Parental stretching program found no benefit over observation group in this study. Parental stretching program should not be applied for newborn babies with moderate-to-severe MA as the result from the study appeared to have lower success rate compared to observation group. Observe until 4-6 months, then corrective casting for the persisting deformity is recommended.

  6. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M.; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1–5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01–10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  7. STRETCH FABRICS IN LEATHER MANUFACTURING: PERFORMANCE PROPERTIES OF STRECH LEATHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ORK Nilay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Product variability of manufactured leather goods such as garment leathers could be closely related to the wear comfort because each material forming the garments are affected the comfort properties of the products. Considering the significant demand to elastic woven stretch fabrics and the advantages provided to leather goods like allowing easy body movements, well-fitting and keeping the shape make the use of stretch fabrics focus in interest. In this study, the performance properties of stretch leathers, leathers and spandex fabrics were presented and the differences between the characteristic properties of the leathers were described. For this purpose, physical characteristics of leathers were investigated in terms of thickness, weight, drape ability, stiffness, bending stiffness, air and water vapor permeability. The drape ability, stiffness and bending stiffness properties were significantly affected by the stretch fabrics laminated on the suede side of the leathers. The drape ability, stiffness and bending values were increased due to the implementation of stretch fabrics. There was no significant difference between the air permeability values of the leathers prior and after the implementation of stretch fabrics in contrast to water vapor permeability. The results of this study showed that the aesthetic behavior of clothing materials such as drape and stiffness properties as well as water vapor permeability was mainly affected from the implementation of the stretch fabrics.

  8. Radio Supernovae: Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I.) of Supernova Progenitor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-24

    ar X iv :0 90 2. 40 59 v1 [ as tr o- ph .H E ] 2 4 Fe b 20 09 Radio Supernovae : Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I.) of Supernova Progenitor...FEB 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radio Supernovae : Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I...of Supernova Progenitor Stars 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  9. Thruster-Assisted Position Mooring of C/S Inocean Cat I Drillship

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørnø, Jon

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of a new research foundation into the Marine Cybernetic Laboratory, the C/S Inocean Cat I Drillship. This is a 1:90 scaled model of an Arctic drillship design by Inocean for Statoil. The C/S Inocean Cat I Drillship model is equipped with six Aero-naut Precision Schottel azimuth thrusters which are driven by six O.S. OMA-2820-950 motors and six Dynamixel MX-106R servo motors. To control the model a real time controller, CompactRIO, from National Instrum...

  10. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry L; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Re(λ)=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  11. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Joong-chul; Lee, Sung-wan; Yeo, Yun-ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects...

  12. A SEP Mission to Jupiter Using the Stretched Lens Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Henry W.; Rodiek, Julie A.; Ferguson, Dale C.; O'Neill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F.; Oleson, Steve

    2008-01-01

    As space exploration continues to be a primary focus of NASA, solar electric propulsion (SEP) becomes a forerunner in the mode of transportation to reach other planets in our solar system. Several critical issues emerge as potential barriers to this approach such as reducing solar array radiation damage, operating the array at high voltage (>300 V) for extended times for Hall or ion thrusters, and designing an array that will be resistant to micrometeoroid impacts and the differing environmental conditions as the vehicle travels further into space. It is also of great importance to produce an array that is light weight to preserve payload mass fraction and to do this at a cost that is lower than today's arrays. This paper will describe progress on an array that meets all these requirements and will detail its use in a solar electric mission to Jupiter. From 1998-2001, NASA flew the Deep Space 1 mission that validated the use of ion propulsion for extended space missions. This highly successful two-year mission also used a novel SCARLET solar array that concentrated sunlight eight-fold onto small area solar cells. This array performed flawlessly and within 2% of its projected performance over the entire mission. That design has evolved into the Stretched Lens Array (SLA) shown in figure 1. The primary difference between SCARLET and the SLA is that no additional glass cover is used over the silicone lens. This has led to significant mass, cost and complexity reductions. The module shown in figure 1 is the latest version of the design. This design leads to a specific power exceeding 300 W/kg at voltages exceeding 300 V. In addition, this module has been tested to voltages over 1000 V while under hypervelocity particle impact in a plasma environment with no arcing. Furthermore array segments are under test for corona breakdown that can become a critical issue for long term, high voltage missions.

  13. DNA analysis by single molecule stretching in nanofluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abad, E.; Juarros, A.; Retolaza, A.

    2011-01-01

    Stretching single DNA molecules by confinement in nanofluidic channels has attracted a great interest during the last few years as a DNA analysis tool. We have designed and fabricated a sealed micro/nanofluidic device for DNA stretching applications, based on the use of the high throughput Nano......-DNA stained with the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 were stretched in the nanochannel array and the experimental results were analysed to determine the extension factor of the DNA in the chip and the geometrical average of the nanochannel inner diameter. The determination of the extension ratio of the chip provides...

  14. Energy Method in Stretch Reducing Process of Steel Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fang-ping; SUN Bin-yu; WANG Jian-mei

    2008-01-01

    According to the theories for stretch reducing process and steel tube plastic deformation,the energy method was used To mesh the rolled deformation zone of the steel tube into the upper limit elements,and an admissible velocity field was constructed to deduce a series of formulas of the inner virtual power consumption of deformed bodies.The rolling force during the stretch reducing process could be obtained by optimizing the upper limit power,which could provide guidelines for a proper choice of the stretch reducing process and devices for steel tube companies,as well as new products and devices.

  15. Temperature Field for Improving Internal Quality of Stretched Round Billet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Ping; XIAO Hong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the rigid-plastic theory, using a coupled thermomechanieal model, the stretching process of a cir-cular section billet is simulated by means of FEM software Deform-2D. Through the distribution of internal stress fields of stretched round billet, it is found that the shear stress field is the main factor to induce Mannesmann's effect. The simulation results show that a reasonable distribution of the temperature field may improve the internal quality of the circular section billet in the stretching process.

  16. Structural Transitions in Supercoiled Stretched DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    v, Croquette

    1998-03-01

    Using magnetic micromanipulation techniques [Strick 96]( uc(T.R.) Strick, J.-F. Allemand, D. Bensimon, A. Bensimon) and uc(V.) Croquette, "The elasticity of a single supercoiled DNA molecule", Science, 271, 1835 (1996)., we have studied the mechanical properties (force versus extension) of single DNA molecules under a wide range of torsional stresses (supercoiling). We show that unwinding the DNA double helix leads to a phase separation between regular B-DNA and denaturation bubbles. The fraction of denatured molecule increases linearly with the degree of unwinding, beginning at a value of 1% unwinding. We have confirmed this denatured state by hybridization of homologous single-stranded DNA probes and by a chemical attack of the exposed bases. Surprisingly, when we overwind the molecule, the elasticity curves we obtain may also be interpreted by the coexistence of two phases, B-DNA and a new phase which we note P-DNA. The fraction of this new phase increases smoothly with overwinding, beginning at 3 % and continuing up to 300 %. Our results indicate that this new phase is four times more twisted that the standard B-DNA and is 1.75 times longer. Although the structure of this phase is not yet known, such a high twisting can only be attained if the sugar-phosphate backbones of the two strands are twisted closely while the bases are expelled outside of the molecule's core, in a structure reminiscent of the one proposed by Pauling. Indeed we have shown that this new phase is sensitive to chemical attack whereas the B-DNA is not. This new phase begins to appear on a molecule overwound by 3 % and stretched by a force of 5 pN, conditions typically encountered in vivo during gene transcription. This new phase may thus play a biological role biophysique-ADN>(for more details).

  17. AI-augmented time stretch microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire L.; Lin, Jiahao; Jalali, Bahram

    2017-02-01

    Cell reagents used in biomedical analysis often change behavior of the cells that they are attached to, inhibiting their native signaling. On the other hand, label-free cell analysis techniques have long been viewed as challenging either due to insufficient accuracy by limited features, or because of low throughput as a sacrifice of improved precision. We present a recently developed artificial-intelligence augmented microscope, which builds upon high-throughput time stretch quantitative phase imaging (TS-QPI) and deep learning to perform label-free cell classification with record high-accuracy. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images simultaneously by frequency multiplexing, extracts multiple biophysical features of the individual cells from these images fused, and feeds these features into a supervised machine learning model for classification. The enhanced performance of our system compared to other label-free assays is demonstrated by classification of white blood T-cells versus colon cancer cells and lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production, which is as much as five-fold reduction in inaccuracy. This system obtains the accuracy required in practical applications such as personalized drug development, while the cells remain intact and the throughput is not sacrificed. Here, we introduce a data acquisition scheme based on quadrature phase demodulation that enables interruptionless storage of TS-QPI cell images. Our proof of principle demonstration is capable of saving 40 TB of cell images in about four hours, i.e. pictures of every single cell in 10 mL of a sample.

  18. Effects of contract-relax vs static stretching on stretch-induced strength loss and length-tension relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balle, S S; Magnusson, S P; McHugh, M P

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of contract-relax stretching (CRS) vs static stretching (SS) on strength loss and the length-tension relationship. We hypothesized that there would be a greater muscle length-specific effect of CRS vs SS. Isometric hamstring strength was measured in 20 healthy people at four knee joint angles (90°, 70°, 50°, 30°) before and after stretching. One leg received SS, the contralateral received CRS. Both stretching techniques resulted in significant strength loss, which was most apparent at short muscle lengths [SS: P = 0.025; stretching × angle P stretching × angle P stretch-induced strength loss was greater (P = 0.015) after CRS (11.7%) vs SS (3.7%). The muscle length effect on strength loss was not different between CRS and SS (stretching × angle × stretching technique P = 0.43). Contrary to the hypothesis, CRS did not result in a greater shift in the length-tension relationship, and in fact, resulted in greater overall strength loss compared with SS. These results support the use of SS for stretching the hamstrings.

  19. They Walked Together: Owen Barfield, Walter O. Field, Cecil Harwood, C.S. Lewis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hipolito Jane

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For C. S. Lewis, the walks that he took each Eastertide with Owen Barfield, Walter O. Field, and Cecil Harwood epitomized friendship. Although they were distinctly unlike in personality and were not all interested in the same things, the four “cretaceous perambulators” shared core ideals and aspirations. Their writings evidence the wonderful strengths of their friendship.

  20. Os diagramas de C. S. Peirce para as dez classes de signos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Lena Farias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uma seção da Gramática Especulativa de C.S.Peirce - Dez classes de signos - recebeu, a partir de 1903, um importante tratamento diagramático. Neste artigo, são apresentados e discutidos dois diagramas desenvolvidos por Peirce para as dez classes, incluindo esboços desses modelos.

  1. Volatile sulphur compounds-forming abilities of lactic acid bacteria: C-S lyase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Irene; Martínez-Bartolomé, Miguel A; Achemchem, Fouad; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa; Martínez-Cuesta, M Carmen

    2011-08-01

    Volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) are of prime importance in the overall aroma of cheese and make a significant contribution to their typical flavours. Thus, the control of VSCs formation offers considerable potential for industrial applications. Here, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from different ecological origins were screened for their abilities to produce VSCs from L-methionine. From the data presented, VSC-forming abilities were shown to be strain-specific and were correlated with the C-S lyase enzymatic activities determined using different approaches. High VSCs formation were detected for those strains that were also shown to possess high thiol-producing abilities (determined either by agar plate or spectrophotometry assays). Moreover, differences in C-S lyase activities were shown to correspond with the enzymatic potential of the strains as determined by in situ gel visualization. Therefore, the assessment of the C-S lyase enzymatic potential, by means of either of these techniques, could be used as a valuable approach for the selection of LAB strains with high VSC-producing abilities thus, representing an effective way to enhance cheese sulphur aroma compounds synthesis. In this regard, this study highlights the flavour forming potential of the Streptococcus thermophilus STY-31, that therefore could be used as a starter culture in cheese manufacture. Furthermore, although C-S lyases are involved in both biosynthetic and catabolic pathways, an association between methionine and cysteine auxotrophy of the selected strains and their VSCs-producing abilities could not be found.

  2. C. S. Peirce's Complementary and Transdisciplinary Conception of Science and Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2012-01-01

    C. S. Peirce was very mathematical, logical and empirical in the foundations of his thinking and he saw no principal limits to the knowledge obtainable by science. But the transdisciplinary view he developed differs substantially from the unity science of logical positivism in that he worked...

  3. Unusual nickel-mediated C-S cleavage of alkyl and aryl sulfoxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Thomas; Backes, Marc; Radius, Udo

    2007-05-28

    The first examples of transition metal mediated C-S cleavage of sulfoxides containing sp2- and sp3-hybridized carbon bonds attached to the sulfur atom and the first example of a structurally characterized complex featuring an oxygen-bound sulfinyl ligand are presented.

  4. An Integrated Perspective of Humanism and Supernaturalism for Education: C. S. Lewis's Version of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Chun

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores some theoretical reflections on the connection between C. S. Lewis's thoughts on the purpose and process of education and his understanding of supernatural human nature which has been relatively little explored. An introduction about Lewis's career as a college teacher blends into the background of this paper. It is followed by…

  5. Dorothy L. Sayers and C. S. Lewis: Christian Postmodernism beyond Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    Modern critics do not consider science fiction and mystery novels to be "serious reading", but Dorothy L. Sayers and C. S. Lewis questioned the boundaries between "popular" and "serious" literature. Both Christian writers critically discuss the spiritual crisis of the modern world in each fiction genre. This paper…

  6. An Integrated Perspective of Humanism and Supernaturalism for Education: C. S. Lewis's Version of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Chun

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores some theoretical reflections on the connection between C. S. Lewis's thoughts on the purpose and process of education and his understanding of supernatural human nature which has been relatively little explored. An introduction about Lewis's career as a college teacher blends into the background of this paper. It is followed by…

  7. Oral Interpretation of C.S. Lewis'"Narnia Tales": A Refracting of "Pictures."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Carolyn

    "The Chronicles of Narnia" are a series of seven fairy tales written by C.S. Lewis that have become popular with both children and adults. Lewis points to five aspects of the fairy tale form that made the form suitable for expressing the images he saw. The aspects are: (1) no love interest; (2) no close psychology; (3) severe restraints…

  8. Paradise Lost and Found: Obedience, Disobedience, and Storytelling in C.S. Lewis and Philip Pullman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Considers how in the fantasy series "The Chronicles of Narnia" and "His Dark Materials," by C.S. Lewis and Philip Pullman respectively, the authors use symbols and themes from "Paradise Lost." Notes that each author's narrative choice uses his view of cosmic order to persuade readers that obedience should be…

  9. Oral Interpretation of C.S. Lewis'"Narnia Tales": A Refracting of "Pictures."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Carolyn

    "The Chronicles of Narnia" are a series of seven fairy tales written by C.S. Lewis that have become popular with both children and adults. Lewis points to five aspects of the fairy tale form that made the form suitable for expressing the images he saw. The aspects are: (1) no love interest; (2) no close psychology; (3) severe restraints…

  10. Paradise Lost and Found: Obedience, Disobedience, and Storytelling in C.S. Lewis and Philip Pullman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Considers how in the fantasy series "The Chronicles of Narnia" and "His Dark Materials," by C.S. Lewis and Philip Pullman respectively, the authors use symbols and themes from "Paradise Lost." Notes that each author's narrative choice uses his view of cosmic order to persuade readers that obedience should be…

  11. EMG and peak force responses to PNF stretching and the relationship between stretching-induced force deficits and bilateral deficits

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of an interaction between stretching induced deficit (SFD) and bilateral deficits (BLD) during maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion under PNF stretch and no-stretch conditions through measurement of EMG and force production. [Subjects and Methods] Ten physically active male Caucasian students (age, 24.1±2.38 years; body mass, 79.48±11.40 kg; height, 174.15±0.8 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. EMG and fo...

  12. Damage percolation during stretch flange forming of aluminum alloy sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zengtao; Worswick, Michael J.; Keith Pilkey, A.; Lloyd, David J.

    2005-12-01

    A multi-scale finite element (FE)-damage percolation model was employed to simulate stretch flange forming of aluminum alloys AA5182 and AA5754. Material softening and strain gradients were captured using a Gurson-based FE model. FE results were then fed into the so-called damage percolation code, from which the damage development was modelled within measured microstructures. The formability of the stretch flange samples was predicted based upon the onset of catastrophic failure triggered by profuse void coalescence within the measured second-phase particle field. Damage development is quantified in terms of crack and void areal fractions, and compared to metallographic results obtained from interrupted stretch flange specimens. Parametric study is conducted on the effect of void nucleation strain in the prediction of formability of stretch flanges to "calibrate" proper nucleation strains for both alloys.

  13. Optimal stretching of fluid for enhancing reaction growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Thomas; Kelley, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    When a biological or chemical scalar grows in flowing fluid, the resulting reacted region is dependent on both the details of the flow, and the reaction kinetics. We simultaneously film reaction state and flow in a laboratory model of reactive mixing in order to examine reactive mixing in physical, time-dependent flows. Using the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, we find an optimal stretching range in which the flow enhances reaction, but larger stretching causes reaction blowout. We observe the transition from flow mostly helping to mostly blowout is not associated with the transition to turbulence, and that stretching fields (closely related to finite-time Lyapunov exponents) inside the optimal range appear to have a large effect on reaction growth rate locally. We also present estimates of the optimal stretching for BZ, and hypothesize that it is a feature exclusive to excitable reactions.

  14. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W.; Freiwald, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University biomechanics laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into

  15. 600 Volt Stretched Lens Array for Solar Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past six years, ENTECH, Auburn, NASA, and other organizations have developed a new space photovoltaic array called the Stretched Lens Array (SLA), which...

  16. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W.; Freiwald, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University biomechanics laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into

  17. STUDIES ON ENHANCED CONDUCTIVITY OF STRETCHED CONDUCTING POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Meixiang

    1995-01-01

    A physical model of series of the conductivity on chain and the interchain conductivity between chains is proposed to explain enhanced conductivity of stretched conducting polymers.This model suggests that the enhanced conductivity for stretched conducting polymers might be due to increasing of the interchain conductivity between chains along the elongation direction after drawing processes if the conductivity on chain is assumed much larger than that of the interchain conductivity between chains. According to this model, it is expected that the temperature dependence of conductivity measured by four-probe method for stretched conducting polymers is controlled by a variation of the interchain conductivity between chains with temperature, which can be used to explain that a metallic temperature dependence of conductivity for stretched conducting polymers is not observed although the conductivity along the elongation direction is enhanced by two or three orders of magnitude.

  18. Measurement of Reversed Extension Flow using the Filament Stretch Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Nielsen, Jens Kromann;

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of material functions with reversed extension flow is demonstrated using the Filament Stretching Rheometer (FSR). This includes startup of uniaxial elongational flow (potentially until steady state) followed by biaxial squeezing, and large amplitude oscillatory elongation (LAOE). ...

  19. Saturation of Zeldovich stretch-twist-fold map dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Amit; Bhat, Pallavi; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2015-10-01

    > value is determined by the relative importance of the increased diffusion versus the reduced stretching. These saturation properties are akin to the range of possibilities that have been discussed in the context of fluctuation dynamos.

  20. Myoelectric silence following unopposed passive stretch in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, R W; Waxman, S G; Kocsis, J D

    1980-08-01

    The response to unopposed passive muscle stretch applied during sustained contraction was studied in normal man. When the subject did not resist the stretching force, the initial response was a brief cessation of EMG activity in the elongated muscle. The myoelectric silence was observed repeatedly in muscles of the upper and lower limbs. The response to passive stretch is discussed in relation to the lengthening reaction and the inverse myotatic reflex. The silent period observed under these experimental conditions is unlikely to be caused by Renshaw inhibition, a pause in spindle afferent discharge, or activity of the group II afferent reflex pathway. Possible mechanisms include autogenetic inhibition and a stretch-evoked decrease of fusimotor activity.

  1. A New Tool to Assess the Perception of Stretching Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Gomes, Luis; Silvestre, Rui; Hilário, Edgar; Cordeiro, Nuno; Carnide, Filomena; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable scale to assess the perception of stretching intensity below and above the maximal range of motion. Experiments were conducted through a passive leg extension angle-torque assessment to healthy population (n = 90). In the study's first phase, the visual, numerical, and description of the stretching intensity scale (SIS) components were developed. The visual analog scale (VAS) score, absolute magnitude estimation (AME) score, and verbal stretching intensity symptom descriptors were assessed for different stretching intensities. In the second phase, the SIS was tested for validity, reliability, scale production, and estimation properties as well as responsiveness to stretching. In the first phase, a high correlation was found between SIS score and range of motion (ROM), as well as SIS and torque in both submaximal (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.89-0.99, r = 0.88-0.99) and supramaximal (ICC = 0.75-0.86, r = 0.68-0.88) stretching intensities. The AME and VAS scores fitted well in an exponential model for submaximal stretching intensities (y = 14.829e, ICC = 0.97 [0.83-0.99], r = 0.98), and in a linear model for supramaximal stretching intensities (y = 0.7667x - 25.751, ICC = 0.97 [0.89-0.99], r = 0.9594). For the second phase, a high correlation was found between SIS score and ROM (r = 0.70-0.76, ICC = 0.76-0.85), as well as SIS and torque (r = 0.62-0.88, ICC = 0.57-0.85). The interday reliability was high to produce (r = 0.70, ICC = 0.70 [0.50-0.83]) or estimate (r = 0.89, ICC = 0.89 [0.82-0.93]) stretching intensities. The acute stretching effects on ROM and passive torque were detectable using the SIS. It is expected a high application in assessing the stretch intensity using the SIS in future studies and practical interventions.

  2. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT REDUCE VARIABILITY, JUMP AND SPEED PERFORMANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fábio Carlos Lucas; Rama, Luís Manuel Pinto Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Stretching is often part of the warm-up routine prior to athletic participation; however, controversial evidence exists on the effects of stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint performance. Additionally, analysis of variability between repeated tasks is useful for monitoring players, to analyze factors that could affect the performance, and to guide clinical decisions for training strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine whether static stretching (SS) prior to CMJ and 20-meter (20-m) sprint would affect performance, and to investigate whether SS affects an athlete's ability to perform these tasks consistently. Twenty-two trained healthy athletes (23.2 ± 5.0 years) attended, randomly, two testing sessions, separated by 48 hours. At session one, all participants underwent 10 minutes of dynamic running warm-up followed by the experimental tasks (three CMJ and three 20-m sprint), whereas five minutes of stretching was added after the warm-up routine at session two. All participants performed the same experimental tasks in both sessions. The stretching protocol consisted of five stretching exercises for each lower limb. The paired-samples t-test revealed no significant differences between the stretching protocol condition and no stretching condition for the 20-m sprint (t(21)=.920; p=.368) and CMJ (t(21)=.709; p=.486). There were no significant differences in trial-by-trial variability on 20-m sprint (t(21)=1.934; p=.067) and CMJ scores (t(21)=.793; p=.437) as result of SS. The SS protocol did not modify jumping and running ability in trained healthy athletes. The SS prior to training or competition may not cause detrimental effects to athletic performance. Level III, Nonrandomized controlled trial.

  3. A closer examination of the coupling between ionic hydrogen bond (IHB) stretching and flanking group motions in (CH3OH)2H(+): the strong isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jake A; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2016-06-07

    The intermode coupling between shared proton (O-H(+)-O) fundamental stretching and flanking modes in (CH3OH)2H(+) was revisited in the following contexts: (1) evaluation of Hamiltonian matrix elements represented in a "pure state" (PS) basis and (2) tuning of coupling strengths using H/D isotopic substitution. We considered four experimentally accessible isotopologues for this study. These are: (CH3OH)2H(+), (CD3OH)2H(+), (CH3OD)2D(+), and (CD3OD)2D(+). Potential energy surfaces (PESs), as well as dipole moment surfaces (DMSs), were constructed at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. Multidimensional vibrational calculations were conducted by solving a reduced dimensional Schrödinger equation using a discrete variable representation (DVR). We found that vibrational states in (CH3OH)2H(+) and (CD3OH)2H(+) are much more heavily mixed than those in (CH3OD)2D(+) and (CD3OD)2D(+). Furthermore, each isotopologue chooses to strongly couple between out-of-phase in-plane CH3 rocking and its out-of-plane counterpart. Lastly, the interaction between O-O stretching and O-H(+)-O stretching was explored. We found that between the first overtone of O-O stretching and its combination tone with O-H(+)-O fundamental stretching, only the second couples with O-H(+)-O fundamental stretching. We hope that our isotopologue calculations would motivate experimentalists to measure them in the future.

  4. Pectoral stretching program for women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T S; Kilbreath, S L; Refshauge, K M; Pendlebury, S C; Beith, J M; Lee, M J

    2007-05-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy commonly cause adverse musculoskeletal problems, particularly loss of strength and range of motion, in the upper quadrant of breast cancer patients. Few well-designed studies have investigated whether these impairments can be prevented. Stretching is an effective technique for increasing range of motion, hence the aim of this study was to investigate whether a stretching program reduced acute musculoskeletal impairments in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-four women were recruited prior to commencement of radiotherapy following breast cancer surgery. Participants were randomised to either a control or stretch group. Participants in both groups were reviewed by the physical therapist on a weekly basis for approximately 6 weeks, and were given general information about skin care and lymphedema. The control group received no advice about exercise. The stretch group received instruction on low-load, prolonged pectoral stretches, which were to be performed daily and were checked at weekly visits. Shoulder range of motion, strength, arm circumference, and quality of life measurements were taken prior to, and at completion of radiotherapy, and at 7 months after radiotherapy. There was no difference in any outcome between groups. Breast symptoms increased for both groups during radiotherapy, without loss of strength or range of movement. The incidence of lymphedema during the study was low for both groups and did not differ between groups. The pectoral stretching program did not influence the outcomes measured because the symptoms reported by patients were not a consequence of contracture.

  5. Efficacy of hamstring stretching programs in schoolchildren. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos-Alberto BECERRA FERNANDEZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present review was to examine the scientific literature on the effects of physical education-based stretching programs on hamstring extensibility in schoolchildren aged 6-11 years. For this purpose relevant studies were searched from ten electronic databases dated up through May 2015. Of the 25 potentially relevant articles identified and retrieved for more detailed evaluation, only eight studies were included in the present review because they met the inclusion criteria. The overall results showed that incorporating hamstring stretching as a part of physical education classes produces a significant improvement in the scores of the tests: straight leg raise and classic sit-and-reach, for the experimental groups, but not for control groups. Stretching programs can be included in Physical Education classes, specifically during the warm-up and the cool down periods in order to improve hamstring extensibility. Although it seems that the stretching exercises in the warm-up period could be less effective in gaining flexibility in school children. Studies that use a stretching volume between 4 and 7 minutes per session and 2-4 training classes per week, obtain statistically significant improvements on the levels of hamstring flexibility in the experimental groups. However, after a five-week detraining period, children revert back to their initial flexibility levels. Therefore, it seems appropriate that physical education teachers should implement stretching programs to improve the students´ flexibility during the Physical Education classes.

  6. A model of cytoskeletal reorientation in response to substrate stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazopoulos K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Living adherent cells change their orientation in response to substrate stretching such that their cytoskeletal components reorganize in a new direction. To study this phenomenon, we model the cytoskeleton as a planar system of elastic cables and struts both pinned at their endpoints to a flat flexible substrate. Tensed (pre-strained cables represent acting stress fibers, whereas compression-bearing struts represent microtubules. We assume that in response to uniaxial substrate stretching the model reorients and deforms into a new configuration that minimizes its total potential energy. Using the Maxwell's global stability criterion, we find global minima configurations during static extension and compression of the substrate. Based on these results, we predict reorientation during cyclic stretching of the substrate. We find that in response to cyclic stretching cells either reorient transversely to the direction of stretching, or exhibit multiple configurations symmetrically distributed relative to the direction of stretching. These predictions are consistent with experimental data on living cells from the literature.

  7. Unsteady Viscous Flow over an Expanding Stretching Cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方铁钢; 章骥; 钟永芳; 陶华

    2011-01-01

    We study the viscous How over an expanding stretching cylinder. The solution is exact to the Navier-Stokes equations. The stretching velocity of the cylinder is proportional to the axial distance from the origin and decreases with time. There exists a unique solution for the How with all the studied values of Reynolds number and the unsteadiness parameter. Reversal Hows exist for an expanding stretching cylinder. The velocity decays faster for a larger Reynolds number and a more rapidly expanding cylinder.%We study the viscous flow over an expanding stretching cylinder.The solution is exact to the Navier-Stokes equations.The stretching velocity of the cylinder is proportional to the axial distance from the origin and decreases with time.There exists a unique solution for the flow with all the studied values of Reynolds number and the unsteadiness parameter.Reversal flows exist for an expanding stretching cylinder.The velocity decays faster for a larger Reynolds number and a more rapidly expanding cylinder.

  8. Effects of Stretching Exercise on Heart Rate Variability During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jeongok G; Yeo, SeonAe

    Little evidence exists for effects of low-intensity exercises such as stretching on cardiovascular health in pregnant women. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 20-minute stretching exercise on heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) in healthy pregnant women. In 15 pregnant women with a mean (SD) age of 29.47 (4.07) years and mean (SD) gestational weeks of 26.53 (8.35), HRV, and BP were measured before and after the 20-minute stretching exercise. Compared with before the stretching exercise, standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals, total variability of heart rate, increased by 7.40 milliseconds (t = -2.31, P = .04) and root mean square of successive differences, a surrogate measure of parasympathetic outflow, also increased by 11.68 milliseconds (Z = -2.04, P = .04) after the stretching exercise. Diastolic BP and HR decreased by 2.13 mm Hg (t = 1.93, P = .07) and 3.31 bpm (t = 2.17, P = .05), respectively, but they did not reach statistical significance. These preliminary data suggest that 20 minutes of stretching exercise may promote cardiovascular health by attenuating the loss of parasympathetic tone associated with pregnancy.

  9. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCluskey, Matthew D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  10. New approach to Tolman's electronic parameter based on local vibrational modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2014-01-06

    Tolman's electronic parameter (TEP) derived from the A1-symmetrical CO stretching frequency of nickel-phosphine-tricarbonyl complexes, R3PNi(CO)3, is brought to a new, improved level by replacing normal with local vibrational frequencies. CO normal vibrational frequencies are always flawed by mode-mode coupling especially with metal-carbon stretching modes, which leads to coupling frequencies as large as 100 cm(-1) and can become even larger when the transition metal and the number of ligands is changed. Local TEP (LTEP) values, being based on local CO stretching force constants rather than normal mode frequencies, no longer suffer from mode coupling and mass effects. For 42 nickel complexes of the type LNi(CO)3, it is shown that LTEP values provide a different ordering of ligand electronic effects as previously suggested by TEP and CEP values. The general applicability of the LTEP concept is demonstrated.

  11. The relation between stretched-exponential relaxation and the vibrational density of states in glassy disordered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bingyu; Milkus, Rico; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-02-01

    Amorphous solids or glasses are known to exhibit stretched-exponential decay over broad time intervals in several of their macroscopic observables: intermediate scattering function, dielectric relaxation modulus, time-dependent elastic modulus, etc. This behaviour is prominent especially near the glass transition. In this Letter we show, on the example of dielectric relaxation, that stretched-exponential relaxation is intimately related to the peculiar lattice dynamics of glasses. By reformulating the Lorentz model of dielectric matter in a more general form, we express the dielectric response as a function of the vibrational density of states (DOS) for a random assembly of spherical particles interacting harmonically with their nearest-neighbours. Surprisingly we find that near the glass transition for this system (which coincides with the Maxwell rigidity transition in this model), the dielectric relaxation is perfectly consistent with stretched-exponential behaviour with Kohlrausch exponents 0.56 stretched-exponential relaxation can be traced back to soft modes (boson-peak) in the DOS.

  12. The effect of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in previously injured subjects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warm-up and stretching are suggested to increase hamstring flexibility and reduce the risk of injury. This study examined the short-term effects of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in individuals with previous hamstring injury and uninjured controls. METHODS: A randomised crossover study design, over 2 separate days. Hamstring flexibility was assessed using passive knee extension range of motion (PKE ROM). 18 previously injured individuals and 18 uninjured controls participated. On both days, four measurements of PKE ROM were recorded: (1) at baseline; (2) after warm-up; (3) after stretch (static or dynamic) and (4) after a 15-minute rest. Participants carried out both static and dynamic stretches, but on different days. Data were analysed using Anova. RESULTS: Across both groups, there was a significant main effect for time (p < 0.001). PKE ROM significantly increased with warm-up (p < 0.001). From warm-up, PKE ROM further increased with static stretching (p = 0.04) but significantly decreased after dynamic stretching (p = 0.013). The increased flexibility after warm-up and static stretching reduced significantly (p < 0.001) after 15 minutes of rest, but remained significantly greater than at baseline (p < 0.001). Between groups, there was no main effect for group (p = 0.462), with no difference in mean PKE ROM values at any individual stage of the protocol (p > 0.05). Using ANCOVA to adjust for the non-significant (p = 0.141) baseline difference between groups, the previously injured group demonstrated a greater response to warm-up and static stretching, however this was not statistically significant (p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Warm-up significantly increased hamstring flexibility. Static stretching also increased hamstring flexibility, whereas dynamic did not, in agreement with previous findings on uninjured controls. The effect of warm-up and static stretching on flexibility was greater in those with reduced

  13. Effect of stretching-induced changes in hydrodynamic screening on coil-stretch hysteresis of unentangled polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Sasmal, Chandi; Nguyen, Duc At; Sridhar, Tam; Prakash, J. Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Extensional rheometry and Brownian dynamics simulations of flexible polymer solutions confirm predictions based on blob concepts that coil-stretch hysteresis in extensional flows increases with concentration, reaching a maximum at the critical overlap concentration c* before progressively vanishing in the semidilute regime. These observations demonstrate that chain stretching strengthens intermolecular hydrodynamic screening in dilute solutions, but weakens it in semidilute solutions. Flow can thus strongly modify the concentration dependence of viscoelastic properties of polymer solutions.

  14. Cardiovascular Responses to Skeletal Muscle Stretching: "Stretching" the Truth or a New Exercise Paradigm for Cardiovascular Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Nicholas T; Scheuermann, Barry W

    2017-08-05

    Stretching is commonly prescribed with the intended purpose of increasing range of motion, enhancing muscular coordination, and preventing prolonged immobilization induced by aging or a sedentary lifestyle. Emerging evidence suggests that acute or long-term stretching exercise may modulate a variety of cardiovascular responses. Specifically, at the onset of stretch, the mechanical deformation of the vascular bed coupled with stimulation of group III muscle afferent fibers initiates a cascade of events resulting in both peripheral vasodilation and a heart rate-driven increase in cardiac output, blood pressure, and muscle blood flow. This potential to increase shear stress and blood flow without the use of excessive muscle energy expenditure may hold important implications for future therapeutic vascular medicine and cardiac health. However, the idea that a cardiovascular component may be involved in human skeletal muscle stretching is relatively new. Therefore, the primary intent of this review is to highlight topics related to skeletal muscle stretching and cardiovascular regulation and function. The current evidence suggests that acute stretching causes a significant macro- and microcirculatory event that alters blood flow and the relationship between oxygen availability and oxygen utilization. These acute vascular changes if performed chronically may result in improved endothelial function, improved arterial blood vessel stiffness, and/or reduced blood pressure. Although several mechanisms have been postulated, an increased nitric oxide bioavailability has been highlighted as one promising candidate for the improvement in vessel function with stretching. Collectively, the evidence provided in this review suggests that stretching acutely or long term may serve as a novel and alternative low intensity therapeutic intervention capable of improving several parameters of vascular function.

  15. The effect of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in previously injured subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Warm-up and stretching are suggested to increase hamstring flexibility and reduce the risk of injury. This study examined the short-term effects of warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on hamstring flexibility in individuals with previous hamstring injury and uninjured controls. Methods A randomised crossover study design, over 2 separate days. Hamstring flexibility was assessed using passive knee extension range of motion (PKE ROM. 18 previously injured individuals and 18 uninjured controls participated. On both days, four measurements of PKE ROM were recorded: (1 at baseline; (2 after warm-up; (3 after stretch (static or dynamic and (4 after a 15-minute rest. Participants carried out both static and dynamic stretches, but on different days. Data were analysed using Anova. Results Across both groups, there was a significant main effect for time (p 0.05. Using ANCOVA to adjust for the non-significant (p = 0.141 baseline difference between groups, the previously injured group demonstrated a greater response to warm-up and static stretching, however this was not statistically significant (p = 0.05. Conclusion Warm-up significantly increased hamstring flexibility. Static stretching also increased hamstring flexibility, whereas dynamic did not, in agreement with previous findings on uninjured controls. The effect of warm-up and static stretching on flexibility was greater in those with reduced flexibility post-injury, but this did not reach statistical significance. Further prospective research is required to validate the hypothesis that increased flexibility improves outcomes. Trial Registration ACTRN12608000638336

  16. Stretching Rubber, Stretching Minds: a polymer physics lab for teaching entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Brzinski, Theodore A

    2015-01-01

    Entropy is a difficult concept to teach using real-world examples. Unlike temperature, pressure, volume, or work, it's not a quantity which most students encounter in their day-to-day lives. Even the way entropy is often qualitatively described, as a measure of disorder, is incomplete and can be misleading. In an effort to address these obstacles, we have developed a simple laboratory activity, the stretching of an elastic rubber sheet, intended to give students hands-on experience with the concepts of entropy, temperature and work in both adiabatic and quasistatic processes. We present two versions of the apparatus: a double-lever system, which may be reproduced with relatively little cost, and a commercial materials testing system, which provides students experience with scientific instrumentation that is used in research.

  17. The bispectrum of single-field inflationary trajectories with $c_{s} \

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, Jonathan S

    2015-01-01

    The bispectrum of single-field inflationary trajectories in which the speed of sound of the inflationary trajectories $c_s$ is constant but not equal to the speed of light $c=1$ is explored. The trajectories are generated as random realisations of the Hubble Slow-Roll (HSR) hierarchy and the bispectra are calculated using numerical techniques that extends previous work. This method allows for out-of-slow-roll models with non-trivial time dependence and arbitrarily low $c_s$. The ensembles obtained using this method yield distributions for the shape and scale-dependence of the bispectrum and their relations with the standard inflationary parameters such as scalar spectral tilt $n_s$ and tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. The distributions demonstrate the squeezed-limit consistency relations for arbitrary single-field inflationary models.

  18. Progression of articular cartilage degeneration after application of muscle stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Carolina Náglio Kalil; Renner, Adriana Frias; dos Santos, Anderson Amaro; Vasilceac, Fernando Augusto; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the progression of the ankle articular cartilage alterations after a post-immobilization muscle stretching. Twenty-nine Wistar rats were separated into five groups: C--control, S--stretched, SR--stretch recovery, IS--immobilized and stretched, and ISR--immobilized stretched recovery. The immobilization was maintained for 4 weeks and the left ankle was then stretched manually through a full dorsal flexion for 10 times for 60 s with a 30 s interval between each 60 s period, 7 days/week for 3 weeks. The recovery period was of 7 weeks. At the end of the experiment, the left ankles were removed, processed in paraffin, and stained in hematoxylin-eosin and safranin O. Two blinded observers evaluated the articular cartilage using the Mankin grading system (cellularity, chondrocyte cloning, and proteoglycan content) through light microscopy, and performed the morphometry (cellularity, total thickness, non-calcified thickness, and calcified thickness measures). Both the Mankin grading system and the morphometric analysis showed that the ISR group presented the most increased cellularity among the groups. The IS and SR groups showed the highest proteoglycan loss, and the ISR group showed the same content of proteoglycan observed in the C group. No significant differences were found in the chondrocyte cloning, the total cartilage thickness, the non-calcified cartilage thickness, and the calcified cartilage thickness among the groups. The results suggest that the cartilage can recover the proteoglycan loss caused by immobilization and stretching, probably because of the increased chondrocyte density. Therefore, the ankle articular cartilage responded as to repair the metabolic deficits.

  19. Mechanical stretch triggers rapid epithelial cell division through Piezo1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudipaty, S A; Lindblom, J; Loftus, P D; Redd, M J; Edes, K; Davey, C F; Krishnegowda, V; Rosenblatt, J

    2017-03-02

    Despite acting as a barrier for the organs they encase, epithelial cells turn over at some of the fastest rates in the body. However, epithelial cell division must be tightly linked to cell death to preserve barrier function and prevent tumour formation. How does the number of dying cells match those dividing to maintain constant numbers? When epithelial cells become too crowded, they activate the stretch-activated channel Piezo1 to trigger extrusion of cells that later die. However, it is unclear how epithelial cell division is controlled to balance cell death at the steady state. Here we show that mammalian epithelial cell division occurs in regions of low cell density where cells are stretched. By experimentally stretching epithelia, we find that mechanical stretch itself rapidly stimulates cell division through activation of the Piezo1 channel. To stimulate cell division, stretch triggers cells that are paused in early G2 phase to activate calcium-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, thereby activating the cyclin B transcription that is necessary to drive cells into mitosis. Although both epithelial cell division and cell extrusion require Piezo1 at the steady state, the type of mechanical force controls the outcome: stretch induces cell division, whereas crowding induces extrusion. How Piezo1-dependent calcium transients activate two opposing processes may depend on where and how Piezo1 is activated, as it accumulates in different subcellular sites with increasing cell density. In sparse epithelial regions in which cells divide, Piezo1 localizes to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm, whereas in dense regions in which cells extrude, it forms large cytoplasmic aggregates. Because Piezo1 senses both mechanical crowding and stretch, it may act as a homeostatic sensor to control epithelial cell numbers, triggering extrusion and apoptosis in crowded regions and cell division in sparse regions.

  20. Effects of glass fiber modified with calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H(I)) reinforced cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, M.; Zhang, L.; Ge, S.; Cheng, X.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H(I)) and glass fiber modified with C-S-H(I) (SiF) at ambient temperature were synthesized. SiF and untreated fiber (OF) were incorporated into cement paste. Phase composition of C-S-H(I), SiF and OF was characterized by XRD. The surface morphologies were characterized by SEM. Flexural performance of fiber reinforced cement (FRC) at different curing ages was investigated. Results indicated that both SiF and OF could reinforce cement paste. SiF had a more positive effect on improving the flexural performance of FRC than OF. The strength of SiF reinforced cement was 11.48MPa after 28 days curing when fiber volume was 1.0%, 12.55% higher than that of OF reinforced cement. The flexural strength increased with the addition of fiber volume. However, the large dosage of fiber might cause a decrease in flexural strength of FRC.

  1. Structural basis for the discrepancy of spectral behavior in C-H stretching band between steroids and long chain hydrocarbon compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐怡庄; 陶靖; 许振华; 翁诗甫; 徐建平; 吴瑾光; 徐端夫; 徐光宪

    1999-01-01

    The discrepancies of the spectral behavior for the C-H stretching band between some long chain hydrocarbon compounds and steroids were investigated. At low temperature, the C-H stretching bands exhibit complex fine structure in steroids but remain simple in long chain hydrocarbon compounds. MM3 molecular mechanics calculation indicates that, for long chain hydrocarbon compounds, the C-H groups vibrate with large scale coupling. There exist a few bands where the C-H groups vibrate in synchronous and inphase mode. Thus the variations of dipole moment for these bands are enhanced and the intensities are obviously stronger than others and cover other band in the spectra. This is just the reason why the C-H stretching bands are simple even at low temperature environment. Nevertheless, for the steroids, the C-H stretching bands vibrate with local coupling mode. The synchronous enhancement effect does not occur, the differences of intensities for various modes are not as large as those in long chain hydrocarbo

  2. Neural effects of muscle stretching on the spinal reflexes in multiple lower-limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugi, Yohei; Obata, Hiroki; Inoue, Daisuke; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2017-01-01

    While previous studies have shown that muscle stretching suppresses monosynaptic spinal reflex excitability in stretched muscles, its effects on non-stretched muscles is still largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of muscle stretching on monosynaptic spinal reflex in non-stretched muscles. Ten healthy male subjects participated in this study. Muscle stretching of the right triceps surae muscle was performed using a motor torque device for 1 minute. Three different dorsiflexion torques (at approximately 5, 10, and 15 Nm) were applied during muscle stretching. Spinal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded in both the lower-limb muscles before, during, and at 0 and 5 min following muscle stretching. The amplitudes of the spinal reflexes in both the stretched and non-stretched muscles in the right (ipsilateral) leg were smaller during stretching compared to before, and at 0 and 5 min after stretching. Furthermore, the degree of reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes in the right (ipsilateral) leg muscles increased significantly as the dorsiflexion torque (i.e., stretching of the right triceps surae muscles) increased. In contrast, reduction in the amplitude of the spinal reflexes with increasing dorsiflexion torque was not seen in the left (contralateral) leg muscles. Our results clearly indicate that muscle stretching has inhibitory effects on monosynaptic spinal reflexes, not only in stretched muscles, but also in non-stretched muscles of the ipsilateral leg.

  3. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis.

  4. Stretch-sensitive paresis and effort perception in hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinti, Maria; Bayle, Nicolas; Hutin, Emilie; Burke, David; Gracies, Jean-Michel

    2015-08-01

    In spastic paresis, stretch applied to the antagonist increases its inappropriate recruitment during agonist command (spastic co-contraction). It is unknown whether antagonist stretch: (1) also affects agonist recruitment; (2) alters effort perception. We quantified voluntary activation of ankle dorsiflexors, effort perception, and plantar flexor co-contraction during graded dorsiflexion efforts at two gastrocnemius lengths. Eighteen healthy (age 41 ± 13) and 18 hemiparetic (age 54 ± 12) subjects performed light, medium and maximal isometric dorsiflexion efforts with the knee flexed or extended. We determined dorsiflexor torque, Root Mean Square EMG and Agonist Recruitment/Co-contraction Indices (ARI/CCI) from the 500 ms peak voluntary agonist recruitment in a 5-s maximal isometric effort in tibialis anterior, soleus and medial gastrocnemius. Subjects retrospectively reported effort perception on a 10-point visual analog scale. During gastrocnemius stretch in hemiparetic subjects, we observed: (1) a 25 ± 7 % reduction of tibialis anterior voluntary activation (maximum reduction 98 %; knee extended vs knee flexed; p = 0.007, ANOVA); (2) an increase in dorsiflexion effort perception (p = 0.03, ANCOVA). Such changes did not occur in healthy subjects. Effort perception depended on tibialis anterior recruitment only (βARI(TA) = 0.61, p hemiparesis, voluntary ability to recruit agonist motoneurones is impaired--sometimes abolished--by antagonist stretch, a phenomenon defined here as stretch-sensitive paresis. In addition, spastic co-contraction increases effort perception, an additional incentive to evaluate and treat this phenomenon.

  5. Experimental study of the dynmamics of a stretched vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjeans, Philippe; Bottausci, Frederic; Maurel, Agnes

    2001-11-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulent flows as well as real experiments indicates that a large part of vorticity in generic velocity fields is concentrated in localized regions in the form of filaments. The creation of such structures can be accounted for by the action of stretching on vorticity field, e.g. secondary instability mechanism in stretched vortex sheets. An experiment is performed in order to create a single stretched vortex that is supposed to have the same dynamics than these filaments of vorticity. The initial vorticity comes from a laminar boundary layer flow in a low velocity water channel, and the stretching is produced by succion through two holes located on the lateral walls of the channel. When the stretching is strong enough, a vortex is created that remains at its location attached to the succion holes. Recent results on the charateristics of this vortex will be presented. Instabilities of such a structure may produce the explosion of the vortex as a turbulent spot. This behaviour will be described and characterized.

  6. Stretch-regulated Exocytosis/Endocytosis in Bladder Umbrella Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truschel, Steven T.; Wang, Edward; Ruiz, Wily G.; Leung, Som-Ming; Rojas, Raul; Lavelle, John; Zeidel, Mark; Stoffer, David; Apodaca, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    The epithelium of the urinary bladder must maintain a highly impermeable barrier despite large variations in urine volume during bladder filling and voiding. To study how the epithelium accommodates these volume changes, we mounted bladder tissue in modified Ussing chambers and subjected the tissue to mechanical stretch. Stretching the tissue for 5 h resulted in a 50% increase in lumenal surface area (from ∼2900 to 4300 μm2), exocytosis of a population of discoidal vesicles located in the apical cytoplasm of the superficial umbrella cells, and release of secretory proteins. Surprisingly, stretch also induced endocytosis of apical membrane and 100% of biotin-labeled membrane was internalized within 5 min after stretch. The endocytosed membrane was delivered to lysosomes and degraded by a leupeptin-sensitive pathway. Last, we show that the exocytic events were mediated, in part, by a cyclic adenosine monophosphate, protein kinase A-dependent process. Our results indicate that stretch modulates mucosal surface area by coordinating both exocytosis and endocytosis at the apical membrane of umbrella cells and provide insight into the mechanism of how mechanical forces regulate membrane traffic in nonexcitable cells. PMID:11907265

  7. THE EFFECTS OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STRETCHING ON AGILITY PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergun MERİÇ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols on agility performance in warm-up sessions. Twenty-three football players (mean ± SD age = 15,04± 0,77 years; weight = 62,35± 6,48kg; height = 1,73± 0,06cm participated to this study from Kocaeli Amateur Football League. Three different warm-up protocols were applied to the players every 48 hours. The first protocol was a general warm-up consisting of 5 minutes jogging with no stretching (GWU+NS, the second protocol was GWU with dynamic stretching (GWU+DS and the third protocol was GWU with static stretching (GWU+SS respectively. In the GWU+DS and GWU+SS protocols, 10 different movements were worked out with 12-15 repetitions in 30 seconds for each muscle group. Following each protocols, the players applied an agility performance test. SPSS (17.0 program used to compare the data obtained from 3 protocols and between two of them. In result, there were no statistically differences between NS and SS protocols (p>0.05. However, statistically difference was seen between DS and SS protocols and between DS and NS protocols (p<0.05. The warm up protocols consist of dynamic stretching exercises before agility activities should be preferred to have better performance.

  8. Cβ-H stretching vibration as a new probe for conformation of n-propanol in gaseous and liquid states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanqin; Wang, Yuxi; Hu, Naiyin; Lin, Ke; Zhou, Xiaoguo; Liu, Shilin

    2016-04-21

    The development of potential probes to identify molecular conformation is essential in organic and biological chemistry. In this work, we investigated a site-specific C-H stretching vibration as a conformational probe for a model compound, 1,1,3,3,3-deuterated n-propanol (CD3CH2CD2OH), using stimulated photoacoustic Raman spectroscopy in the gas phase and conventional spontaneous Raman spectroscopy in the liquid state. Along with quantum chemistry calculations, the experiment shows that the CH2 symmetric stretching mode at the β-carbon position is very sensitive to the conformational structure of n-propanol and can serve as a new probe for all five of its conformers. Compared with the O-H stretching vibration, a well-established conformational sensor for n-propanol, the Cβ-H stretching vibration presented here shows better conformational resolution in the liquid state. Furthermore, using this probe, we investigated the conformational preference of n-propanol in pure liquid and in dilute water solution. It is revealed that in pure liquid, n-propanol molecules prefer the trans-OH conformation, and in dilute water solution, this preference is enhanced, indicating that the water molecules play a role of further stabilizing the trans-OH n-propanol conformers. This leads to conformational evolution that n-propanol molecules with gauche-OH structure are transferred to the trans-OH structure upon diluting with water. These results not only provide important information on structures of n-propanol in different environments, but also demonstrate the potential of the C-H stretching vibration as a new tool for conformational analysis. This is especially important when considering that hydrocarbon chains are structural units in organic and biological molecules.

  9. Wearable motion capturing with the flexing and turning based on a hetero-core fiber optic stretching sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Y.; Nishiyama, M.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, motion capturing technologies have been applied to the service of the rehabilitation for the physically challenged people and practicing sports in human daily life. In these application fields, it is important that a measurement system does not prevent human from doing natural activity for unrestricted motion capture in daily-life. The hetero-core optic fiber sensor that we developed is suited for the unconstrained motion capturing because of optical intensity-based measurement with excellent stability and repeatability using single-mode transmission fibers and needless of any compensation. In this paper, we propose the development of wearable sensor enables unconstrained motion capture systems using the hetero-core fiber optic stretching sensor in real time, which satisfy user's requirements of comfort and ubiquitous. The experiments of motion capturing were demonstrated by setting the hetero-core fiber optic stretching sensor on the elbow, the back of the body and the waist. As a result, the hetero-core fiber optic stretching sensor was able to detect the displacement of expansion and contraction in the optical loss by flexion motion of the arm and the trunk motion. The optical loss performance of the hetero-core fiber optic stretching sensor reveals monotonic characteristics with the displacement. The optical loss changes at the full scale of motion were 1.45dB for the motion of anteflexion and 1.99 dB for the motion of turn. The real-time motion capturing was demonstrated by means of the proposed hetero-core fiber optic stretching sensor without restricting natural human behavior.

  10. A Method for Semi-quantitative Analysis of C-S-H Gel in a Blended Cement Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An amended method for accurate measuring the quantity of calcium silicate hydrate(C-S-H) in pure cement paste and blended cement paste by water adsorption was made, which based on R.A.Olson's method. Two improvements to this method, such as using C-S-H gel by hydro-thermal synthesis as standard sample and the stoichiometry of C-S-H gel is partitioned based on hydration time and the amount of mineral admixture. The result of C-S-H gel content in pure cement paste and blended cement paste is higher than by R.A.Olson's method.

  11. Acute effects of two different stretching techniques on isokinetic strength and power

    OpenAIRE

    Ayala, F.; De Ste Croix, M; Sainz de Baranda, P.; Santonja, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine and compare the acute effects of short duration static and dynamic lower-limb stretching routines on the knee flexor and extensor peak torque and mean power during maximal concentric and eccentric muscle actions. Method: Forty-nine active adults completed the following intervention protocols on separate days: non-stretching, static stretching and dynamic stretching. After the stretching or control intervention, concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque and mean...

  12. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained...

  13. Dynamic Contractility and Efficiency Impairments in Stretch-Shortening Cycle Are Stretch-Load-Dependent After Training-Induced Muscle Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaczi, Mark; Racz, Levente; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Tihanyi, Jozsef

    Vaczi, M, Racz, L, Hortobagyi, T, and Tihanyi, J. Dynamic contractility and efficiency impairments in stretch-shortening cycle are stretch-load-dependent after training-induced muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 27(8): 2171-2179, 2013To determine the acute task and stretch-load dependency of

  14. Dynamic Contractility and Efficiency Impairments in Stretch-Shortening Cycle Are Stretch-Load-Dependent After Training-Induced Muscle Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaczi, Mark; Racz, Levente; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Tihanyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    Vaczi, M, Racz, L, Hortobagyi, T, and Tihanyi, J. Dynamic contractility and efficiency impairments in stretch-shortening cycle are stretch-load-dependent after training-induced muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 27(8): 2171-2179, 2013To determine the acute task and stretch-load dependency of neuromu

  15. Stretching to prevent musculoskeletal injuries. An approach to workplace wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartley, Rosanna M; Prosser, J Lynn

    2011-06-01

    A pre-shift stretching protocol to reduce employee injuries was initiated at a beverage company and a tin mill in the northeastern United States. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effects of a pre-shift stretching program on work-related musculoskeletal injuries. A secondary goal was to evaluate daily participation compliance during the 90-day program. Data on employee injuries during the stretching program were collected and compared to injury events during the same time period 1 year earlier. Comparison to injury events of the total eligible population during the study time frame was also included. Results of this pilot program in terms of injury rate reduction and participant compliance are promising. Study results may be useful for employers considering implementing similar programs and also suggest the need for further study in this area.

  16. Cell volume and membrane stretch independently control K+ channel activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholtz, Sofia Hammami; Willumsen, Niels J; Olsen, Hervør L

    2009-01-01

    A number of potassium channels including members of the KCNQ family and the Ca(2+) activated IK and SK, but not BK, are strongly and reversibly regulated by small changes in cell volume. It has been argued that this general regulation is mediated through sensitivity to changes in membrane stretch...... was not affected by membrane stretch. The results indicate that (1) activation of BK channels by local membrane stretch is not mimicked by membrane stress induced by cell swelling, and (2) activation of KCNQ1 channels by cell volume increase is not mediated by local tension in the cell membrane. We conclude....... To test this hypothesis we have studied the regulation of KCNQ1 and BK channels after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Results from cell-attached patch clamp studies (approximately 50 microm(2) macropatches) in oocytes expressing BK channels demonstrate that the macroscopic volume-insensitive BK current...

  17. Directional Cell Migration in Response to Repeated Substratum Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimura, Chika; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Crawling migration plays an essential role in a variety of biological phenomena, including development, wound healing, and immune system function. Migration properties such as anterior-posterior polarity, directionality, and velocity are regulated not only by the reception of a chemoattractant but also by sensing mechanical inputs from the external environment. In this review, we describe the mechanical response of migrating cells, particularly under repeated stretching of the elastic substratum, highlighting the fact that there appear to be two independent mechanosensing systems that generate the polarity needed for migration. Cells that have no stress fibers, such as Dictyostelium cells and neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells, migrate perpendicular to the stretching direction via myosin II localization. Cells that do possess stress fibers, however, such as fish keratocytes, migrate parallel to the stretching via a stress-fiber-dependent process.

  18. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Brown, Lee E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wistocki, David R; Davis, Gregory S; Naimo, Marshall A; Zito, Gina A; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    It is previously demonstrated that static stretching was associated with a decrease in running economy and distance run during a 30-minute time trial in trained runners. Recently, the detrimental effects of static stretching on economy were found to be limited to the first few minutes of an endurance bout. However, economy remains to be studied for its direct effects on performance during shorter endurance events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance, electromyography (EMG), ground contact time (GCT), and flexibility. Ten trained male distance runners aged 24 ± 5 years with an average VO2max of 64.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 were recruited. Subjects reported to the laboratory on 3 separate days interspersed by 72 hours. On day 1, anthropometrics and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max were determined on a motor-driven treadmill. On days 2 and 3, subjects performed a 5-minute treadmill warm-up and either performed a series of 6 lower-body stretches for three 30-second repetitions or sat still for 10 minutes. Time to complete a 1-mile run under stretching and nonstretching conditions took place in randomized order. For the performance run, subjects were instructed to run as fast as possible at a set incline of 5% until a distance of 1 mile was completed. Flexibility from the sit and reach test, EMG, GCT, and performance, determined by time to complete the 1-mile run, were recorded after each condition. Time to complete the run was significantly less (6:51 ± 0:28 minutes) in the nonstretching condition as compared with the stretching condition (7:04 ± 0:32 minutes). A significant condition-by-time interaction for muscle activation existed, with no change in the nonstretching condition (pre 91.3 ± 11.6 mV to post 92.2 ± 12.9 mV) but increased in the stretching condition (pre 91.0 ± 11.6 mV to post 105.3 ± 12.9 mV). A significant condition-by-time interaction for GCT was also present, with no changes in

  19. Convective flow of sisko fluid over a bidirectional stretching sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Munir, Asif; Khan, Masood

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation discusses the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a steady three dimensional Sisko fluid. The flow is induced due to bidirectional stretching sheet. The influence of power-law index and stretching ratio on flow and heat transfer is studied thoroughly. Governing partial differential equations are reduced to coupled ordinary differential equations by suitable similarity variable. The resulting equations are then solved numerically by shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta algorithm in combination with Broyden's method in the domain . The numerical results for the velocity and temperature fields are graphically presented and effects of the relevant parameters are discussed in detail. Moreover, the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number for different values of the power-law index and stretching ratio are presented through tabulated data. The numerical results are verified with the results obtained by HAM. Additionally, the results are also validated with previously ...

  20. Realization of Tapered Waveguide by Stretching the Rod Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Ke-yu; YU Rong-jin; MENG Hua-mao

    2004-01-01

    By stretching the rod waveguide with different velocities in opposite directions,the tapered waveguide can be fabricated.In condition of taking no account of volume expansion caused by heating and under the assumptions of volume conservation,the rod waveguide can be stretched freely in the heated region without being stretched outside of the heated region. A model,which shows the relation of the transition shape and the two factors,that is the ratio of two velocity and the heated region length,is presented for the shape of the taper transition through mathematic deduction.Based on this model,a desired tapered waveguide can be fabricated.The tapered waveguide are widely used for fabricating tapered fiber couplers and sensors.In addition,the conclusion can be used for fabricating fused fiber coupler.

  1. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  2. Transcription upregulation via force-induced direct stretching of chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Arash; Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Sun, Jian; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Wenwen; Singh, Rishi; Khanna, Nimish; Belmont, Andrew S.; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical forces play critical roles in the function of living cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of how forces influence nuclear events remain elusive. Here, we show that chromatin deformation as well as force-induced transcription of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacterial-chromosome dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) transgene can be visualized in a living cell by using three-dimensional magnetic twisting cytometry to apply local stresses on the cell surface via an Arg-Gly-Asp-coated magnetic bead. Chromatin stretching depended on loading direction. DHFR transcription upregulation was sensitive to load direction and proportional to the magnitude of chromatin stretching. Disrupting filamentous actin or inhibiting actomyosin contraction abrogated or attenuated force-induced DHFR transcription, whereas activating endogenous contraction upregulated force-induced DHFR transcription. Our findings suggest that local stresses applied to integrins propagate from the tensed actin cytoskeleton to the LINC complex and then through lamina-chromatin interactions to directly stretch chromatin and upregulate transcription.

  3. The acute effects of dynamic and ballistic stretching on vertical jump height, force, and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, Jason R; Swank, Ann M; Frost, Karen L; Lee, Chong D

    2008-11-01

    Stretching before performance is a common practice among athletes in hopes of increasing performance and reducing the risk of injury. However, cumulative results indicate a negative impact of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on performance; thus, there is a need for evaluating other stretching strategies for effective warm-up. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences between two sets of ballistic stretching and two sets of a dynamic stretching routine on vertical jump performance. Twenty healthy male and female college students between the ages of 22 and 34 (24.8 +/- 3 years) volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects completed three individual testing sessions on three nonconsecutive days. On each day, the subjects completed one of three treatments (no stretch, ballistic stretch, and dynamic stretch). Intraclass reliability was determined using the data obtained from each subject. A paired samples t-test revealed no significant difference in jump height, force, or power when comparing no stretch with ballistic stretch. A significant difference was found on jump power when comparing no stretch with dynamic stretch, but no significant difference was found for jump height or force. Statistics showed a very high reliability when measuring jump height, force, and power using the Kistler Quattro Jump force plate. It seems that neither dynamic stretching nor ballistic stretching will result in an increase in vertical jump height or force. However, dynamic stretching elicited gains in jump power poststretch.

  4. Acute Effects of Three Different Stretching Protocols on the Wingate Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Bruno L.; Signorelli, Gabriel R.; Trajano, Gabriel S.; Costa, Pablo B.; de Oliveira, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of different stretching exercises on the performance of the traditional Wingate test (WT). Fifteen male participants performed five WT; one for familiarization (FT), and the remaining four after no stretching (NS), static stretching (SS), dynamic stretching (DS), and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF). Stretches were targeted for the hamstrings, quadriceps, and calf muscles. Peak power (PP), mean power (MP), and the time to reach PP (TP) were calculated. The MP was significantly lower when comparing the DS (7.7 ± 0.9 W/kg) to the PNF (7.3 ± 0.9 W/kg) condition (p stretching providing the lowest result. A consistent increase of TP was observed after all stretching exercises when compared to NS. The results suggest the type of stretching, or no stretching, should be considered by those who seek higher performance and practice sports that use maximal anaerobic power. Key points The mean power was significantly lower when comparing dynamic stretching.to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation. For peak power, significant differences were observed between more comparisons, with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching providing the lowest result. A consistent increase of time to reach the peak was observed after all stretching exercises when compared to non-stretching. The type of stretching, or no stretching, should be considered by those who seek higher performance and practice sports that use maximal anaerobic power. PMID:24149116

  5. a First-Principles Model of Fermi Resonance in the Alkyl CH Stretch Region: Application to Hydronaphthalenes, Indanes, and Cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, Edwin; Kidwell, Nathanael; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the alkyl CH stretch region (2750-3000 cm-1) of a series of bicyclic hydrocarbons and free radicals has been studied under supersonic expansion cooling in the gas phase, and compared with a theoretical model that describes the local mode stretch-bend Fermi resonance interactions. The double resonance method of fluorescence-dip infrared (FDIR) spectroscopy was used on the stable molecules 1,2-dihydronaphthalene, 1,4-dihydronaphthalene, tetralin, indene, and indane using the S_0-S_1 origin transition as a monitor of transitions. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectra were recorded for the trihydronaphthyl (THN) and inden-2-yl methyl (I2M) radicals. The previously developed model Hamiltonian [J. Chem. Phys. 138 064308 (2013)] incorporates cubic stretch-bend coupling with parameters obtained from density functional theory methods. Full dimensional calculations are compared to reduced dimensional Hamiltonian results in which anharmonic CH streches and CH_2 scissor modes are Fermi coupled. Excellent agreement between theoretical results is found. Scale factors of select terms in the reduced dimensional Hamiltonian, obtained by fitting the theoretical Hamiltonian predictions to the experimental spectra, are found to be similar to previous work. The resulting Hamiltonian predicts successfully all the major spectral features considered in this study. A simplified model is introduced in which the CH_2 groups are decoupled. This model enables the assignment of many of the spectral features. The model results are extended to describe the CH stretch spectrum of the chair and twist-boat conformers of cyclohexane. The chair conformer is used to illustrate the shortcomings of the CH_2 coupling model.

  6. TeraHz tuning of whispering gallery modes in a PDMS, stand-alone, stretchable microsphere

    CERN Document Server

    Madugani, Ramgopal; Ward, Jonathan M; Riordan, John Daniel; Coppola, Sara; Vespini, Veronica; Grilli, Simonetta; Finizio, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2012-01-01

    We report on tuning the optical whispering gallery modes in a poly dimethyl siloxane-based (PDMS) microsphere resonator by more than a THz. The PDMS microsphere system consists of a solid spherical resonator directly formed with double stems on either side. The stems act like tie-rods for simple mechanical stretching of the microresonator over tens of microns, resulting in tuning of the whispering gallery modes by one free spectral range. Further investigations demonstrate that the whispering gallery mode shift has a higher sensitivity (0.13 nm/{\\mu}N) to an applied force when the resonator is in its maximally stretched state compared to its relaxed state.

  7. EMG and peak force responses to PNF stretching and the relationship between stretching-induced force deficits and bilateral deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Asim

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of an interaction between stretching induced deficit (SFD) and bilateral deficits (BLD) during maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion under PNF stretch and no-stretch conditions through measurement of EMG and force production. [Subjects and Methods] Ten physically active male Caucasian students (age, 24.1±2.38 years; body mass, 79.48±11.40 kg; height, 174.15±0.8 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. EMG and force measurements of the subjects were recorded during either unilateral or bilateral 3-second maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion (MVC) against a force transducer. The paired sample t-test was used to examine the significance of differences among several conditions. Pearson product-moment correlation was used to evaluate the associations between different parameters. [Results] Stretching-induced deficits correlated with bilateral deficits in both force (r=0.85) and iEMG (r=0.89). PNF stretching caused significant decrements in the bilateral and unilateral conditions for both the right and left sides. [Conclusion] Since both force and iEMG decreases were observed in most measurements; it suggests there is a neural mechanism behinnd both the BLD and the SFD.

  8. EMG and peak force responses to PNF stretching and the relationship between stretching-induced force deficits and bilateral deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Asim

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of an interaction between stretching induced deficit (SFD) and bilateral deficits (BLD) during maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion under PNF stretch and no-stretch conditions through measurement of EMG and force production. [Subjects and Methods] Ten physically active male Caucasian students (age, 24.1±2.38 years; body mass, 79.48±11.40 kg; height, 174.15±0.8 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. EMG and force measurements of the subjects were recorded during either unilateral or bilateral 3-second maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion (MVC) against a force transducer. The paired sample t-test was used to examine the significance of differences among several conditions. Pearson product-moment correlation was used to evaluate the associations between different parameters. [Results] Stretching-induced deficits correlated with bilateral deficits in both force (r=0.85) and iEMG (r=0.89). PNF stretching caused significant decrements in the bilateral and unilateral conditions for both the right and left sides. [Conclusion] Since both force and iEMG decreases were observed in most measurements; it suggests there is a neural mechanism behinnd both the BLD and the SFD. PMID:25931696

  9. Short Term Effects of Neurodynamic Stretching and Static Stretching Techniques on Hamstring Muscle Flexibility in Healthy Male Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Rashad Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Flexibility is a key component of rehabilitation and inadequate muscle extensibility remains a commonly accepted factor for musculoskeletal disorders. Studies on the most optimal technique for improving muscle flexibility are a widely debated. The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of neurodynamic and static stretching techniques on hamstring flexibility in healthy male subjects. This study was a randomized experimental trial; forty healthy male subjects with hamstring tightness were randomly divided into two equal groups: The neurodynamic group and the static stretching group. Treatment was given for 5 consecutive days and the outcomes were measured using Active knee Extension Test and Straight Leg Raising. There was a significant improvement in hamstring flexibility following application of both neurodynamic and static stretching but the improvement in the neurodynamic group (p<0.001 was better than that of the static group (p<0.02. Results suggest that a neurodynamic stretching could increase hamstring flexibility to a greater extent than static stretching in healthy male subjects with a tight hamstring.

  10. Effects of contract-relax vs static stretching on stretch-induced strength loss and length-tension relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, S S; Magnusson, S P; McHugh, M P

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of contract-relax stretching (CRS) vs static stretching (SS) on strength loss and the length-tension relationship. We hypothesized that there would be a greater muscle length-specific effect of CRS vs SS. Isometric hamstring strength...... was measured in 20 healthy people at four knee joint angles (90°, 70°, 50°, 30°) before and after stretching. One leg received SS, the contralateral received CRS. Both stretching techniques resulted in significant strength loss, which was most apparent at short muscle lengths [SS: P = 0.025; stretching × angle.......7%) vs SS (3.7%). The muscle length effect on strength loss was not different between CRS and SS (stretching × angle × stretching technique P = 0.43). Contrary to the hypothesis, CRS did not result in a greater shift in the length-tension relationship, and in fact, resulted in greater overall strength...

  11. Structure of low-stretch methane nonpremixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bai; Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Sung, Chih-Jen; T' ien, James S. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    The present study experimentally and numerically investigates the structure associated with extremely low-stretch ({proportional_to}2 s{sup -1}) gaseous nonpremixed flames. The study of low-stretch flames aims to improve our fundamental understanding of the flame radiation effects on flame response and extinction limits. Low-stretch flames are also relevant to fire safety in reduced-gravity environments and to large buoyant fires, where localized areas of low stretch are attainable. In this work, ultra-low-stretch flames are established in normal gravity by bottom burning of a methane/nitrogen mixture discharged from a porous spherically symmetric burner of large radius of curvature. The large thickness of the resulting nonpremixed flame allows detailed mapping of the flame structure. Several advanced nonintrusive optical diagnostics are used to study the flame structure. Gas phase temperatures are measured by Raman scattering, while the burner surface temperatures are obtained by IR imaging. In addition, OH-PLIF and chemiluminescence imaging techniques are used to help characterize the extent of the flame reaction zone. These experimental results allow direct comparison with a quasi-one-dimensional numerical model including detailed chemistry, thermodynamic/transport properties, and radiation treatment. In addition, the radiative interactions between the flame and porous burner (modeled as a gray surface) are accounted for in the present model. The numerical modeling is demonstrated to be able to simulate the low-stretch flame structure. Using the current model, the extinction limits under different conditions are also examined. The computational results are consistent with experimental observations. (author)

  12. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth H Sloot

    Full Text Available Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms. Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally

  13. Magnetohydrodynamics stagnation point flow towards a stretching vertical sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, A.; Nazar, R.; Pop, I.

    2006-03-01

    The analysis of steady two-dimensional stagnation point flow of an incompressible viscous and electrically conducting fluid, subject to a transverse uniform magnetic field, over a vertical stretching sheet is investigated when the sheet is stretched in its own plane with a velocity and a temperature proportional to the distance from the stagnation point. It is shown that the basic partial differential equations reduce to similarity equations. This is followed by a direct numerical solution of the resulting boundary value problem using a very efficient finite-difference method. Discussions are made to trace among them the physically realistic solution. Tables 5, Figs 13, Refs 17.

  14. Simulation of stretch in non-uniform filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Clasen, Christian; McKinley, Gareth H.

    We consider the rapid stretching of a liquid lament under the action of a constant imposed tensile force. This problem was rst considered experimentally by Matta and Tytus (1990). A liquid bridge formed from a dilute polymer solution is established between two cylindrical disks. The upper disk...... numerically using FENE type models and two alternative kinematic descriptions. The axisymmetric lament is described by a Lagrangian approach based on an average stretch of axial elements (see Renardy (1990)). A noslip boundary condition is imposed indirectly at the end-plates according to a method described...

  15. Stretch Polytetrafluoroethylene Grafts for Hemodialysis Angioaccess: Three-year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Dayel Adel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of 90 stretch polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE grafts in 78 chronic renal failure patients over a 3-year period from 1995-1998. The grafts were used as primary access in 15% of the patients. The cumulative patency was 63.3% and there were no complications in 48.8% of the cases. Infection was encountered in 15.5% and thrombosis in 31.1% of the grafts. Intimal hyperplasia, venous anastomotic stenosis, improper puncture technique and subclavian vein stenosis were the major causes of failure of grafts. We conclude that stretch PTFE grafts as angioaccesses may provide good patency and durability.

  16. Interventions for the treatment of stretch marks: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Ma, Hong; Li, Yumei

    2014-08-01

    Stretch marks are a common disfiguring skin condition that can have a deep psychological impact on affected patients. Although there are a variety of treatments available, no consistently effective therapies have been established. In this systematic review, we evaluate 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the efficacy and safety of currently available therapies for the treatment of stretch marks. Due to the limited number of patients and high or unclear risk of bias in the studies included in this assessment, the evidence from this review is insufficient to provide clear guidelines for practice. Therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed.

  17. 基于 C/S 架构的气象观测站点智能统计系统%An intelligent statistical system of meteorological observation station based on C/S architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王磊; 杨涛

    2015-01-01

    随着我国气象事业的快速发展,各类气象观测站点数量越来越多,及时准确的统计各类观测站点的业务可用性数据对提高气象预报质量是至关重要的。传统人工统计主要采用常见的 Office 办公软件,耗时长且错误率高,特别是当出现交叉数据或关联数据且数据量相当大时,则人工无法是完成的。针对这一问题,建立了一个基于 C/S 架构的气象观测站点智能统计系统。该智系统在技术上采用了 VC++编程语言。并采用 VS.2008软件开发工具及SQL Server2008数据库协同开发。系统分为服务器端和客户端,分别实现数据的存储管理和逻辑操作。软件测试运行后,实现自动化站点业务统计查询和报表打印,大大提高了工作效率,并降低了数据的出错率。该系统能够在全省局域网范围内实现智能化观测站点统计管理。%With the rapid development of meteorological service in China,the number of various kinds of meteorological observation stations increases more and more.It is important that we must do the statistics for the available business data of various kinds of observation stations accurately to improve the quality of the weather forecast.Traditional artificial statistics mainly adopts common office software.The defect of this mode is the time consuming and high error rate.The artificial mode could not complete the assignment when there was a large amount of the cross or associated data.In order to solve this problem,this paper establishes an intelligent statistical system of meteorological observation station based on C/S architecture.The VC + + programming language is used in this intelligent system.The VS.2008 software development tools and the SQL Server 2008 database software are also be used.This system is divided into client part and server part.They could realize the data storage management and logical operation respectively.After testing and operating

  18. Structural insights into catalysis by βC-S lyase from Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezuka, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nonaka, Takamasa

    2012-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a causative agent of oral malodor and may play an important role in the pathogenicity of oral bacteria such as Streptococcus anginosus. In this microorganism, H(2)S production is associated with βC-S lyase (Lcd) encoded by lcd gene, which is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the α,β-elimination of sulfur-containing amino acids. When Lcd acts on L-cysteine, H(2)S is produced along with pyruvate and ammonia. To understand the H(2)S-producing mechanism of Lcd in detail, we determined the crystal structures of substrate-free Lcd (internal aldimine form) and two reaction intermediate complexes (external aldimine and α-aminoacrylate forms). The formation of intermediates induced little changes in the overall structure of the enzyme and in the active site residues, with the exception of Lys234, a PLP-binding residue. Structural and mutational analyses highlighted the importance of the active site residues Tyr60, Tyr119, and Arg365. In particular, Tyr119 forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain oxygen atom of L-serine, a substrate analog, in the external aldimine form suggesting its role in the recognition of the sulfur atom of the true substrate (L-cysteine). Tyr119 also plays a role in fixing the PLP cofactor at the proper position during catalysis through binding with its side chain. Finally, we partly modified the catalytic mechanism known for cystalysin, a βC-S lyase from Treponema denticola, and proposed an improved mechanism, which seems to be common to the βC-S lyases from oral bacteria.

  19. The embodiment of value: C.S. Sherrington and the cultivation of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R

    2000-09-01

    The paper examines the ruputation of C.S. Sherrington as both eminent physiologist and eminent representative of scientific culture. It describes Sherrington's 'figurehead' status. In his career, research and personal manner, he embodied a life of science, not only in opposition to humanistic values but in fact appearing to be the highest achievement of those values. An analysis of Sherrington's research, of his lectures on Man on His Nature and of his poetry supports this account. The paper uses Sherrington's reputation to describe the values of an establishment group of English-speaking scientists and physicians in the 1930s and 1940s.

  20. Polarization of Inclusive $\\Lambda_{c}$'s in a Hybrid Model

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, G R

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid model is presented for hyperon polarization that is based on perturbative QCD subprocesses and the recombination of polarized quarks with scalar diquarks. The updated hybrid model is applied to $p+p\\to \\Lambda +X$ and successfully reproduces the detailed kinematic dependence shown by the data. The hybrid model is extended to include pion beams and polarized $\\Lambda_c$'s. The resulting polarization is found to be in fair agreement with recent experiments. Predictions for the polarization dependence on $x_F$ and $p_T$ is given.

  1. A concise, efficient synthesis of sugar-based benzothiazoles through chemoselective intramolecular C-S coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2012-01-01

    Sugar-based benzothiazoles are a new class of molecules promising for many biological applications. Here, we have synthesized a wide range of sugar-based benzothiazoles from readily accessible glycosyl thioureas by chemoselective, palladium-catalyzed C-S coupling reactions. Corroborated by theoretical calculations, a mechanistic investigation indicates that the coordination to the palladium by a pivaloyl carbonyl group and the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding play important roles in the efficiency and chemoselectivity of reaction. These fluorescent glycoconjugates can be observed to readily enter mammalian tumor cells and exhibit potential in vitro antitumor activity. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  2. C. S. Peirce’s Semiotic Answer to the Riddle of Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    A scientific explanation of consciousness that is not partially based on phenomenology seems logically impossible. C.S. Peirce’s pragmaticist semiotics attempts to bridge the gap between natural sciences and humanities by combining a phenomenological approach with an evolutionary and realistic...... understanding of nature and society in the development of a new transdisicplinary and evolutionary theory of meaning and logic in a semiotic theory of mind and consciousness. Though a contributor to the development of modern logic and science Peirce, through inventing a semiotics that embraced phenomenology...

  3. Regio-selectivity of the Oxidative C-S Bond Formation in Ergothioneine and Ovothiol Biosyntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Heng; Leninger, Maureen; Lee, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Ergothioneine (5) and ovothiol (8) are two novel thiol-containing natural products. Their C-S bonds are formed by oxidative coupling reactions catalyzed by EgtB and OvoA enzymes, respectively. In this work, it was discovered that besides catalyzing the oxidative coupling between histidine and cysteine (1 → 6 conversion), OvoA can also catalyze a direct oxidative coupling between hercynine (2) and cysteine (2 → 4 conversion), which can shorten the ergothioneine biosynthetic pathway by two steps. PMID:24016264

  4. Regioselectivity of the oxidative C-S bond formation in ergothioneine and ovothiol biosyntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Heng; Leninger, Maureen; Lee, Norman; Liu, Pinghua

    2013-09-20

    Ergothioneine (5) and ovothiol (8) are two novel thiol-containing natural products. Their C-S bonds are formed by oxidative coupling reactions catalyzed by EgtB and OvoA enzymes, respectively. In this work, it was discovered that in addition to catalyzing the oxidative coupling between histidine and cysteine (1 → 6 conversion), OvoA can also catalyze a direct oxidative coupling between hercynine (2) and cysteine (2 → 4 conversion), which can shorten the ergothioneine biosynthetic pathway by two steps.

  5. [Symbol-based communication in non-human primates: a C. S. Peirce's semiotic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, João

    2003-12-01

    Are (or were) there any other symbolic species? This question has been addressed by researchers from many different fields and is responsible for a historical controversy on the existence of a threshold between "symbolic creatures" vs "simple forms of language creatures". According to the mainstream ethology and comparative psychology only the Homo sapiens is cognitively equiped to produce and interpret symbols. Here, I introduce an empirically testable model of symbolic semiosis ("symbolic action of sign") supported by C.S.Peirce logical-phenomenological theory of categories. I suggest that a specific sign-user pattern of behavior, observed in non-human primate communication, indicate a transition from indexical to symbolic semiosis.

  6. Examining flow-flame interaction and the characteristic stretch rate in vortex-driven combustion dynamics using PIV and numerical simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Seunghyuck

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate the combustion dynamics in lean premixed flames in a laboratory scale backward-facing step combustor in which flame-vortex driven dynamics are observed. A series of tests was conducted using propane/hydrogen/air mixtures for various mixture compositions at the inlet temperature ranging from 300K to 500K and at atmospheric pressure. Pressure measurements and high speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) are used to generate pressure response curves and phase-averaged vorticity and streamlines as well as the instantaneous flame front, respectively, which describe unsteady flame and flow dynamics in each operating regime. This work was motivated in part by our earlier study where we showed that the strained flame consumption speed Sc can be used to collapse the pressure response curves over a wide range of operating conditions. In previous studies, the stretch rate at which Sc was computed was determined by trial and error. In this study, flame stretch is estimated using the instantaneous flame front and velocity field from the PIV measurement. Independently, we also use computed strained flame speed and the experimental data to determine the characteristic values of stretch rate near the mode transition points at which the flame configuration changes. We show that a common value of the characteristic stretch rate exists across all the flame configurations. The consumption speed computed at the characteristic stretch rate captures the impact of different operating parameters on the combustor dynamics. These results suggest that the unsteady interactions between the turbulent flow and the flame dynamics can be encapsulated in the characteristic stretch rate, which governs the critical flame speed at the mode transitions and thereby plays an important role in determining the stability characteristics of the combustor. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  7. Effect of CH stretching excitation on the reaction dynamics of F + CHD{sub 3} → DF + CHD{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jiayue; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Zhen; Jiang, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Blauert, Florian [Dynamics at Surfaces, Faculty of Chemistry, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Dai, Dongxu; Wu, Guorong, E-mail: wugr@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn; Zhang, Donghui; Yang, Xueming, E-mail: wugr@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-07-28

    The vibrationally excited reaction of F + CHD{sub 3}(ν{sub 1} = 1) → DF + CHD{sub 2} at a collision energy of 9.0 kcal/mol is investigated using the crossed-beams and time-sliced velocity map imaging techniques. Detailed and quantitative information of the CH stretching excitation effects on the reactivity and dynamics of the title reaction is extracted with the help of an accurate determination of the fraction of the excited CHD{sub 3} reagent in the crossed-beam region. It is found that all vibrational states of the CHD{sub 2} products observed in the ground-state reaction, which mainly involve the excitation of the umbrella mode of the CHD{sub 2} products, are severely suppressed by the CH stretching excitation. However, there are four additional vibrational states of the CHD{sub 2} products appearing in the excited-state reaction which are not presented in the ground-state reaction. These vibrational states either have the CH stretching excitation retained or involve one quantum excitation in the CH stretching and the excitation of the umbrella mode. Including all observed vibrational states, the overall cross section of the excited-state reaction is estimated to be 66.6% of that of the ground-state one. Experimental results also show that when the energy of CH stretching excitation is released during the reaction, it is deposited almost exclusively as the rovibrational energy of the DF products, with little portion in the translational degree of freedom. For vibrational states of the CHD{sub 2} products observed in both ground- and excited-state reactions, the CH stretching excitation greatly suppresses the forward scattered products, causing a noticeable change in the product angular distributions.

  8. Effects on hamstring muscle extensibility, muscle activity, and balance of different stretching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyoung-Il; Nam, Hyung-Chun; Jung, Kyoung-Sim

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different stretching techniques on range of motion (ROM), muscle activation, and balance. [Subjects] For the present study, 48 adults with hamstring muscle tightness were recruited and randomly divided into three groups: a static stretching group (n=16), a PNF stretching group (n=16), a control group (n=16). [Methods] Both of the stretching techniques were applied to the hamstring once. Active knee extension angle, muscle activation during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC), and static balance were measured before and after the application of each stretching technique. [Results] Both the static stretching and the PNF stretching groups showed significant increases in knee extension angle compared to the control group. However, there were no significant differences in muscle activation or balance between the groups. [Conclusion] Static stretching and PNF stretching techniques improved ROM without decrease in muscle activation, but neither of them exerted statistically significant effects on balance.

  9. Effects on Hamstring Muscle Extensibility, Muscle Activity, and Balance of Different Stretching Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyoung-Il; Nam, Hyung-Chun; Jung, Kyoung-Sim

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different stretching techniques on range of motion (ROM), muscle activation, and balance. [Subjects] For the present study, 48 adults with hamstring muscle tightness were recruited and randomly divided into three groups: a static stretching group (n=16), a PNF stretching group (n=16), a control group (n=16). [Methods] Both of the stretching techniques were applied to the hamstring once. Active knee extension angle, muscle activation during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC), and static balance were measured before and after the application of each stretching technique. [Results] Both the static stretching and the PNF stretching groups showed significant increases in knee extension angle compared to the control group. However, there were no significant differences in muscle activation or balance between the groups. [Conclusion] Static stretching and PNF stretching techniques improved ROM without decrease in muscle activation, but neither of them exerted statistically significant effects on balance. PMID:24648633

  10. Acute effects of three different stretching protocols on the wingate test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Bruno L; Signorelli, Gabriel R; Trajano, Gabriel S; Costa, Pablo B; de Oliveira, Carlos G

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of different stretching exercises on the performance of the traditional Wingate test (WT). Fifteen male participants performed five WT; one for familiarization (FT), and the remaining four after no stretching (NS), static stretching (SS), dynamic stretching (DS), and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF). Stretches were targeted for the hamstrings, quadriceps, and calf muscles. Peak power (PP), mean power (MP), and the time to reach PP (TP) were calculated. The MP was significantly lower when comparing the DS (7.7 ± 0.9 W/kg) to the PNF (7.3 ± 0.9 W/kg) condition (p stretching providing the lowest result. A consistent increase of TP was observed after all stretching exercises when compared to NS. The results suggest the type of stretching, or no stretching, should be considered by those who seek higher performance and practice sports that use maximal anaerobic power.

  11. EFFICACY OF ACTIVE STRETCHING OVER PASSIVE STRETCHING ON THE FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME AMONG PATIENTS WITH MECHANICAL LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Luke Fernandez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low back pain has a significant impact on the individual’s family, socio-economic status, occupation, health system, community. Stretching is included as a part of treatment regimen for low back pain. Much controversy exists on the type of stretching technique and parameters which would prove beneficial to improve flexibility. Aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of active stretching over passive stretching, on the functional performance among patients with low back pain. Materials and method: 52 subjects with mechanical low back pains in the age group of 20-50 were enrolled for the study. Flexibility measurement and Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index was used as the primary outcome measure. Flexibility of Iliopsoas was measured using the modified Thomas test; Flexibility of Hamstring was measured using the active knee extension test. The subjects underwent 7 days of therapy sessions, after 7 days of therapy the individuals where re-assessed for flexibility and they were asked to fill the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire. Results: 52 subjects were enrolled in the study, of which 36 subjects completed the study, among them 18 subjects in the control group and 18 subjects in intervention group. For independent groups paired t-test was used. Using the paired sample t-test significant difference was measured between the pre and post of the intervention group and control groups a significant difference of .001 was achieved in both the groups (P=.001. Discussion: The results of the present study prove that both active and passive stretching is beneficial in improving the flexibility of tight muscles in the lower limbs. Also both active stretching and passive stretching has a profound effect on the functional aspect in patients suffering with low back pain. Conclusion: The result of present study conveys that both active and passive stretch is helpful in improving the flexibility in the major muscle groups of

  12. Characterization of C-S Lyase from C. diphtheriae: A Possible Target for New Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Astegno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistance in microbial pathogens requires the identification of new antibacterial drugs. The biosynthesis of methionine is an attractive target because of its central importance in cellular metabolism. Moreover, most of the steps in methionine biosynthesis pathway are absent in mammals, lowering the probability of unwanted side effects. Herein, detailed biochemical characterization of one enzyme required for methionine biosynthesis, a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP- dependent C-S lyase from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, a pathogenic bacterium that causes diphtheria, has been performed. We overexpressed the protein in E. coli and analyzed substrate specificity, pH dependence of steady state kinetic parameters, and ligand-induced spectral transitions of the protein. Structural comparison of the enzyme with cystalysin from Treponema denticola indicates a similarity in overall folding. We used site-directed mutagenesis to highlight the importance of active site residues Tyr55, Tyr114, and Arg351, analyzing the effects of amino acid replacement on catalytic properties of enzyme. Better understanding of the active site of C. diphtheriae C-S lyase and the determinants of substrate and reaction specificity from this work will facilitate the design of novel inhibitors as antibacterial therapeutics.

  13. A remark on nano-particle stability of cement C-S-H gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficker, Tomáš; Len, Adél; Martišek, Dalibor

    2011-04-01

    Hydrated pastes of ordinary Portland cement prepared with different water-to-cement ratios were investigated by using the small-angle neutron scattering technique in the region of Q ∈ (0.0045, 0.11) Å-1. Samples of cement pastes were subjected to non-standard hydration conditions using a mix with D2O, low RH, and water-to-cement ratios spread over a very wide interval (0.4; 1.4). The investigation was focused on testing the structural stability of nano-metric particles in the cement C-S-H gel. Owing to the high structural stability of these nano-particles, their average diameter might be used as a microscopic parameter characterizing the nano-metric structure of C-S-H gels. The average diameter of the nano-particles of the studied ordinary Portland cement CEMI 42.5 R-SC was found to be close to the value of 4.2 nm and independent of the water-to-cement ratios.

  14. Habituation of lower leg stretch responses in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, B R; van Vugt, J P; Beckley, D J; Remler, M P; Roos, R A

    1998-02-01

    In young healthy subjects, initially large stretch responses in leg muscles are progressively attenuated following a series of identical postural perturbations. We have studied whether this habituation of stretch responses is impaired in Parkinson's disease. Ten patients and 10 elderly controls received 10 serial 'toe-up' rotational perturbations (amplitude 10 degrees) while standing on a supporting forceplate. We recorded posturally destabilizing medium latency (ML) stretch responses from the medial gastrocnemius muscle. Functional habituation across the first few trials occurred in patients, but not in elderly controls. The rate of habituation was influenced by the size of the response to the first perturbation. This observation explained the absence of habituation in elderly subjects because their responses during the first few trials were much smaller compared to patients. These results suggest that habituation of lower leg stretch responses is unimpaired in Parkinson's disease. The presence of initially large and 'unpracticed' responses may partially explain why Parkinson patients fall in response to unexpected postural disturbances that commonly occur in daily life.

  15. Sport stretching : Effect on passive muscle stiffness of short hamstrings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halbertsma, JPK; vanBolhuis, AI; Goeken, LNH

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of one 10-minute stretch on muscle stiffness in subjects with short hamstrings. Design: Randomized control trial. Setting: Laboratory for human movement sciences in the department of rehabilitation of a university hospital. Subjects: Sixteen students from the Depar

  16. Viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells exposed to uniaxial stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Chew, Thomas; Loury, Phillip; Haga, Jason; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Chien, Shu

    2011-11-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (VECs) line the interior of blood vessels and regulate a variety of functions in the cardiovascular system. It is widely accepted that VECs will remodel themselves in response to mechanical stimuli, but few studies have analyzed the mechanical properties of these cells under stretch. We hypothesize that uniaxial stretch will cause an anisotropic realignment of actin filaments, and a change in the viscoelastic properties of the cell. To test this hypothesis, VECs were grown on a thin, transparent membrane mounted on a microscope. The membrane was stretched, consequently stretching the cells. Time-lapse sequences of the cells were taken every hour with a time resolution of 10 Hz. The random trajectories of intracellular endogenous particles were tracked using in-house algorithms. These trajectories were analyzed using a novel particle tracking microrheology formulation that takes into account the anisotropy of the cytoplasm of VECs. Supported by NSF CBET-1055697 CAREER Award (JCA) and NIH grants BRP HL064382 (SC), 1R01 HL080518 (SC).

  17. Contact of a spherical probe with a stretched rubber substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frétigny, Christian; Chateauminois, Antoine

    2017-07-01

    We report on a theoretical and experimental investigation of the normal contact of stretched neo-Hookean substrates with rigid spherical probes. Starting from a published formulation of surface Green's function for incremental displacements on a prestretched, neo-Hookean, substrate [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 56, 2957 (2008), 10.1016/j.jmps.2008.07.002], a model is derived for both adhesive and nonadhesive contacts. The shape of the elliptical contact area together with the contact load and the contact stiffness are predicted as a function of the in-plane stretch ratios λx and λy of the substrate. The validity of this model is assessed by contact experiments carried out using an uniaxally stretched silicone rubber. For stretch ratio below about 1.25, a good agreement is observed between theory and experiments. Above this threshold, some deviations from the theoretical predictions are induced as a result of the departure of the mechanical response of the silicone rubber from the neo-Hokeean description embedded in the model.

  18. Mediators of Yoga and Stretching for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Sherman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although yoga is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for its benefits. In a trial comparing yoga to intensive stretching and self-care, we explored whether physical (hours of back exercise/week, cognitive (fear avoidance, body awareness, and self-efficacy, affective (psychological distress, perceived stress, positive states of mind, and sleep, and physiological factors (cortisol, DHEA mediated the effects of yoga or stretching on back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Scale (RDQ. For yoga, 36% of the effect on 12-week RDQ was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 18% by sleep disturbance, 9% by hours of back exercise, and 61% by the best combination of all possible mediators (6 mediators. For stretching, 23% of the effect was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 14% by days of back exercise, and 50% by the best combination of all possible mediators (7 mediators. In open-ended questions, ≥20% of participants noted the following treatment benefits: learning new exercises (both groups, relaxation, increased awareness, and the benefits of breathing (yoga, benefits of regular practice (stretching. Although both self-efficacy and hours of back exercise were the strongest mediators for each intervention, compared to self-care, qualitative data suggest that they may exert their benefits through partially distinct mechanisms.

  19. Mediators of yoga and stretching for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Karen J; Wellman, Robert D; Cook, Andrea J; Cherkin, Daniel C; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2013-01-01

    Although yoga is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for its benefits. In a trial comparing yoga to intensive stretching and self-care, we explored whether physical (hours of back exercise/week), cognitive (fear avoidance, body awareness, and self-efficacy), affective (psychological distress, perceived stress, positive states of mind, and sleep), and physiological factors (cortisol, DHEA) mediated the effects of yoga or stretching on back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Scale (RDQ)). For yoga, 36% of the effect on 12-week RDQ was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 18% by sleep disturbance, 9% by hours of back exercise, and 61% by the best combination of all possible mediators (6 mediators). For stretching, 23% of the effect was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 14% by days of back exercise, and 50% by the best combination of all possible mediators (7 mediators). In open-ended questions, ≥20% of participants noted the following treatment benefits: learning new exercises (both groups), relaxation, increased awareness, and the benefits of breathing (yoga), benefits of regular practice (stretching). Although both self-efficacy and hours of back exercise were the strongest mediators for each intervention, compared to self-care, qualitative data suggest that they may exert their benefits through partially distinct mechanisms.

  20. The amyloid stretch hypothesis: Recruiting proteins toward the dark side

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis; de la Paz, Manuela López

    2005-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the molecular events underlying the conversion and self-association of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is fundamental to the identification of therapeutic strategies to prevent or cure amyloid-related disorders. Recent investigations indicate that amyloid fibril formation is not just a general property of the polypeptide backbone depending on external factors, but that it is strongly modulated by amino acid side chains. Here, we propose and address the validation of the premise that the amyloidogenicity of a protein is indeed localized in short protein stretches (amyloid stretch hypothesis). We demonstrate that the conversion of a soluble nonamyloidogenic protein into an amyloidogenic prone molecule can be triggered by a nondestabilizing six-residue amyloidogenic insertion in a particular structural environment. Interestingly enough, although the inserted amyloid sequences clearly cause the process, the protease-resistant core of the fiber also includes short adjacent sequences from the otherwise soluble globular domain. Thus, short amyloid stretches accessible for intermolecular interactions trigger the self-assembly reaction and pull the rest of the protein into the fibrillar aggregate. The reliable identification of such amyloidogenic stretches in proteins opens the possibility of using them as targets for the inhibition of the amyloid fibril formation process. PMID:16263932

  1. Electrohydrodynamic direct-writing microfiber patterns under stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gaofeng; Sun, Lingling; Wang, Xiang; Wei, Jin; Xu, Lei; Liu, Yifang; Zheng, Jianyi; Liu, Juan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the rheology and deposition behaviors of electrohydrodynamic direct-write (EDW) jet under stretching tension are studied. The EDW jet is stretched into tightened state by the drag force from moving collector, when moving speed of collector is higher than deposition velocity of jet. The drag force from the moving collector provides an extra force to stretch the charged jet, which promotes the stability and decreases the diameter of direct-written fiber. The whipping and bending motion of jet can be overcome by the drag force, and then, straight orderly fibers are direct-written along the trajectory of collector. The falling jet would be also deviated from the extension line of spinneret by the drag force. As the collector velocity increases from 10 to 1000 mm/s, the average line width of direct-written microfiber decreases from 18.89 to 0.89 µm. The thickness of microfiber ranges from 100 nm to 1.5 µm. The moving collector leads to large deviation of charged jet. The tightened charged jet has good resistance against the interference of charge repulsion force, which helps to direct-write orderly nanofiber. During the EDW process, the mechanical stretching force had provided an excellent function to control the morphology and deposition pattern of micro-/nanofiber.

  2. Automation of a single-DNA molecule stretching device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Tommerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We automate the manipulation of genomic-length DNA in a nanofluidic device based on real-time analysis of fluorescence images. In our protocol, individual molecules are picked from a microchannel and stretched with pN forces using pressure driven flows. The millimeter-long DNA fragments free...

  3. Bruxism: Is There an Indication for Muscle-Stretching Exercises?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, S.; Wijer, A. de; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kalaykova, S.I.

    2017-01-01

    Bruxism is a common phenomenon involving repetitive activation of the masticatory muscles. Muscle-stretching exercises are a recommended part of several international guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders and may be effective in management of the jaw muscle activity that gives rise to bruxism.

  4. Transient filament stretching rheometer I: force balance analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The filament stretching device which is used increasingly as an apparatus for measuring extensional properties of polymeric liquids isanalysed. A force balance that includes the effects of inertia and surface tension is derived.The force balance may be used to correct for the effects of inertia...

  5. Effects of Warm-Up Stretching Exercises on Sprint Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaruk, Hubert; Makaruk, Beata; Kedra, Stanislaw

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To assess direct effects of warm-up consisting of static and dynamic stretching exercises on sprint results attained by students differing in sprint performance. Material and methods: A group of 24 male and 19 female physical education students, including 12 and 9 sprinters, respectively. They performed warm-ups consisting of dynamic…

  6. OH stretching frequencies in systems with intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens; Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    OH stretching wavenumbers were investigated for 30 species with intramolecularly hydrogen bonded hydroxyl groups, covering the range from 3600 to ca. 1900 cm-1. Theoretical wavenumbers were predicted with B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional theory using the standard harmonic approximation, as well...

  7. Data on calcium increases depending on stretch in dystrophic cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aguettaz

    2016-09-01

    Here, the Ca2+ dye fluo-8 was used for [Ca2+]i measurement, in both resting and stretching conditions, using a perfusion protocol starting initially with a calcium free Tyrode solution followed by the perfusion of 1.8 mM Ca2+ Tyrode solution. The variation of [Ca2+]i was found higher in mdx cardiomyocytes.

  8. Structural information from OH stretching frequencies monohydric saturated alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.H. van der; Lutz, E.T.G.

    1974-01-01

    Infrared data have been recorded of the hydroxyl stretching band for about 70 monohydric saturated alcohols in dilute carbon tetrachloride solution. The wavenumber maximum, the half-bandwidth and the band pattern could be related to the structure of the molecules. Not only primary, secondary and ter

  9. Effects of Warm-Up Stretching Exercises on Sprint Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaruk, Hubert; Makaruk, Beata; Kedra, Stanislaw

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To assess direct effects of warm-up consisting of static and dynamic stretching exercises on sprint results attained by students differing in sprint performance. Material and methods: A group of 24 male and 19 female physical education students, including 12 and 9 sprinters, respectively. They performed warm-ups consisting of dynamic…

  10. Partly Imidized Polyamic Acid and Its Uniaxial Stretched Polyimide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Peng-chang; HOU Yong

    2013-01-01

    Partly imidized polyamic acid(PAA) has been used to prepare high performance polyimide films.The behaviors of two polyamic acids derived from pyromellitic dianhydride(PMDA)/4,4'-oxydianiline(ODA) and 3,Y,4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic diahhydride(BPDA)/paraphenylenediamine(PPD) containing dehydrating agents composed of acetic anhydride and a tertiary amine as the catalyst were investigated.The gel point was dependent on imidization degree in despite of temperature and the molar ratio of catalyst to acetic acid.Imdization content was about 35% for PMDA/ODA and about 22% for BPDA/PPD.The effect of catalyst on imidization possessed an order of triethylamine>3-methylpyridine>pyridine>isoquinoline>2-methylpyridine.The stretching of the films greatly reduced the coefficient of linear thermal expansion(CTE) either in the longitudinal direction or transversal direction.Compared to the film from polyamic acid,the partly imidized film had greater stretching ratio,so that the uniaxial stretched polyimide film from partly imidized PAA had higher tensile strength and tensile modulus,but lower elongation in the stretching direction.

  11. THE CONVERGENCE BEHAVIOR OF ITERATIVE METHODS ON SEVERELY STRETCHED GRIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOTTA, EFF; WUBS, FW

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we examine the dramatic influence that a severe stretching of finite difference grids can have on the convergence behaviour of iterative methods. For the most important classes of iterative methods this phenomenon is considered for a simple model problem with various boundary

  12. Cell volume and membrane stretch independently control K+ channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Sofia; Willumsen, Niels J; Olsen, Hervør L; Morera, Francisco J; Latorre, Ramón; Klaerke, Dan A

    2009-05-15

    A number of potassium channels including members of the KCNQ family and the Ca(2+) activated IK and SK, but not BK, are strongly and reversibly regulated by small changes in cell volume. It has been argued that this general regulation is mediated through sensitivity to changes in membrane stretch. To test this hypothesis we have studied the regulation of KCNQ1 and BK channels after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Results from cell-attached patch clamp studies (approximately 50 microm(2) macropatches) in oocytes expressing BK channels demonstrate that the macroscopic volume-insensitive BK current increases with increasing negative hydrostatic pressure (suction) applied to the pipette. Thus, at a pipette pressure of -5.0 +/- 0.1 mmHg the increase amounted to 381 +/- 146% (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6, P < 0.025). In contrast, in oocytes expressing the strongly volume-sensitive KCNQ1 channel, the current was not affected by membrane stretch. The results indicate that (1) activation of BK channels by local membrane stretch is not mimicked by membrane stress induced by cell swelling, and (2) activation of KCNQ1 channels by cell volume increase is not mediated by local tension in the cell membrane. We conclude that stretch and volume sensitivity can be considered two independent regulatory mechanisms.

  13. Cooperativity among short amyloid stretches in long amyloidogenic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lele Hu

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrillar aggregates of polypeptides are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. Short peptide segments in protein sequences may trigger aggregation. Identifying these stretches and examining their behavior in longer protein segments is critical for understanding these diseases and obtaining potential therapies. In this study, we combined machine learning and structure-based energy evaluation to examine and predict amyloidogenic segments. Our feature selection method discovered that windows consisting of long amino acid segments of ~30 residues, instead of the commonly used short hexapeptides, provided the highest accuracy. Weighted contributions of an amino acid at each position in a 27 residue window revealed three cooperative regions of short stretch, resemble the β-strand-turn-β-strand motif in A-βpeptide amyloid and β-solenoid structure of HET-s(218-289 prion (C. Using an in-house energy evaluation algorithm, the interaction energy between two short stretches in long segment is computed and incorporated as an additional feature. The algorithm successfully predicted and classified amyloid segments with an overall accuracy of 75%. Our study revealed that genome-wide amyloid segments are not only dependent on short high propensity stretches, but also on nearby residues.

  14. Stretching of DNA confined in nanochannels with charged walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manneschi, Chiara; Fanzio, Paola; Angeli, Elena; Repetto, Luca; Valbusa, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    There is currently a growing interest in control of stretching of DNA inside nanoconfined regions due to the possibility to analyze and manipulate single biomolecules for applications such as DNA mapping and barcoding, which are based on stretching the DNA in a linear fashion. In the present work, we couple Finite Element Methods and Monte Carlo simulations in order to study the conformation of DNA molecules confined in nanofluidic channels with neutral and charged walls. We find that the electrostatic forces become more and more important when lowering the ionic strength of the solution. The influence of the nanochannel cross section geometry is also studied by evaluating the DNA elongation in square, rectangular, and triangular channels. We demonstrate that coupling electrostatically interacting walls with a triangular geometry is an efficient way to stretch DNA molecules at the scale of hundreds of nanometers. The paper reports experimental observations of λ-DNA molecules in poly(dimethylsiloxane) nanochannels filled with solutions of different ionic strength. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, confirming the crucial role of the electrostatic repulsion of the constraining walls on the molecule stretching. PMID:25553196

  15. Cyclic stretch-bending: mechanics, stability and formability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmens, W.C.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic stretch-bending has been studied using the so-called Continuous-Bending-under-Tension (CBT) test. This is a modified tensile test where the specimen is subjected to repetitive bending at the same time. A wide variety of materials have been tested this way. A simple mechanical model is

  16. Immediate effects of different types of stretching exercises on badminton jump smash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hwi S; Kim, Daeho; Park, Jihong

    2017-04-13

    Since different types of stretching exercises may alter athletic performance, we compared the effects of three types of stretching exercises on badminton jump smash. Sixteen male collegiate badminton players performed one of three different stretching exercises in a counterbalanced order on different days. Static stretching had seven typical stretches, while dynamic stretching involved nine dynamic movements, and resistance dynamic stretching was performed with weighted vests and dumbbells. Before and after each stretching exercise, subjects performed 20 trials of jump smashes. Dependent measurements were the jump heights during jump smashes, velocities of jump-smashed shuttlecocks, and drop points of jump-smashed shuttlecocks. To test the effects of each stretching exercise, we performed mixed model ANOVAs and calculated between-time effect sizes (ES). Each stretching exercise improved the jump heights during jump smashes (type main effect: F2,75= 1.19, p=0.31; static stretching: 22.1%, pstretching: 30.1%, pstretching: 17.7%, p=0.03, ES: 0.98) and velocities of jump-smashed shuttlecocks (type main effect: F2,75= 2.18, p=0.12; static stretching: 5.7%, p=0.61, ES: 0.39; dynamic stretching: 3.4%, p=0.94, ES: 0.28; resistance dynamic stretching: 6%, p=0.50, ES: 0.66). However, there were no differences among the stretching exercises for any measurement. The drop point of jump-smashed shuttlecocks did not change (interaction: F2,75= 0.88, p=0.42). All stretching exercises improved badminton jump smash performance, but we could not determine the best protocol. Since badminton requires high-speed movement and explosive force, we suggest performing dynamic stretching or resistance dynamic stretching.

  17. Numerical Analysis of AHSS Fracture in a Stretch-bending Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meng; Chen, Xiaoming; Shi, Ming F.; Shih, Hua-Chu

    2010-06-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are increasingly used in the automotive industry due to their superior strength and substantial weight reduction advantage. However, their limited ductility gives rise to numerous manufacturing issues. One of them is the so-called `shear fracture' often observed on tight radii during stamping processes. Since traditional approaches, such as the Forming Limit Diagram (FLD), are unable to predict this type of fracture, efforts have been made to develop failure criteria that can predict shear fractures. In this paper, a recently developed Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) ductile fracture criterion[1] is adopted to analyze the failure behavior of a Dual Phase (DP) steel sheet during stretch bending operations. The plasticity and ductile fracture of the present sheet are fully characterized by the Hill'48 orthotropic model and the MMC fracture model respectively. Finite Element models with three different element types (3D, shell and plane strain) were built for a Stretch Forming Simulator (SFS) test and numerical simulations with four different R/t ratios (die radius normalized by sheet thickness) were performed. It has been shown that the 3D and shell element models can accurately predict the failure location/mode, the upper die load-displacement responses as well as the wall stress and wrap angle at the onset of fracture for all R/t ratios. Furthermore, a series of parametric studies were conducted on the 3D element model, and the effects of tension level (clamping distance) and tooling friction on the failure modes/locations were investigated.

  18. Stretching skeletal muscle: chronic muscle lengthening through sarcomerogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Zöllner

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle responds to passive overstretch through sarcomerogenesis, the creation and serial deposition of new sarcomere units. Sarcomerogenesis is critical to muscle function: It gradually re-positions the muscle back into its optimal operating regime. Animal models of immobilization, limb lengthening, and tendon transfer have provided significant insight into muscle adaptation in vivo. Yet, to date, there is no mathematical model that allows us to predict how skeletal muscle adapts to mechanical stretch in silico. Here we propose a novel mechanistic model for chronic longitudinal muscle growth in response to passive mechanical stretch. We characterize growth through a single scalar-valued internal variable, the serial sarcomere number. Sarcomerogenesis, the evolution of this variable, is driven by the elastic mechanical stretch. To analyze realistic three-dimensional muscle geometries, we embed our model into a nonlinear finite element framework. In a chronic limb lengthening study with a muscle stretch of 1.14, the model predicts an acute sarcomere lengthening from 3.09[Formula: see text]m to 3.51[Formula: see text]m, and a chronic gradual return to the initial sarcomere length within two weeks. Compared to the experiment, the acute model error was 0.00% by design of the model; the chronic model error was 2.13%, which lies within the rage of the experimental standard deviation. Our model explains, from a mechanistic point of view, why gradual multi-step muscle lengthening is less invasive than single-step lengthening. It also explains regional variations in sarcomere length, shorter close to and longer away from the muscle-tendon interface. Once calibrated with a richer data set, our model may help surgeons to prevent muscle overstretch and make informed decisions about optimal stretch increments, stretch timing, and stretch amplitudes. We anticipate our study to open new avenues in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery and enhance

  19. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  20. Stretching of roots contributes to the pathophysiology of radiculopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Darrieutort-Laffite, Christelle; Maugars, Yves

    2017-01-20

    To perform a synthesis of articles addressing the role of stretching on roots in the pathophysiology of radiculopathy. Review of relevant articles on this topic available in the PubMed database. An intraoperative microscopy study of patients with sciatica showed that in all patients the hernia was adherent to the dura mater of nerve roots. During the SLR (Lasègue's) test, the limitation of nerve root movement occurs by periradicular adhesive tissue, and temporary ischemic changes in the nerve root induced by the root stretching cause transient conduction disturbances. Spinal roots are more frail than peripheral nerves, and other mechanical stresses than root compression can also induce radiculopathy, especially if they also impair intraradicular blood flow, or the function of the arachnoid villi intimately related to radicular veins. For instance arachnoiditis, the lack of peridural fat around the thecal sac, and epidural fibrosis following surgery, can all promote sciatica, especially in patients whose sciatic trunks also stick to piriformis or internus obturator muscles. Indeed, stretching of roots is greatly increased by adherence at two levels. As excessive traction of nerve roots is not shown by imaging, many physicians have unlearned to think in terms of microscopic and physiologic changes, although nerve root compression in the lumbar MRI is lacking in more than 10% of patients with sciatica. It should be reminded that, while compression of a spinal nerve root implies stretching of this root, the reverse is not true: stretching of some roots can occur without any visible compression. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Stretch reflex instability compared in three different human muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbaba, R; Taylor, A; Manu, C A; Buonajuti, M

    2005-06-01

    The possibility of causing instability in the stretch reflex has been examined in three different human muscles: biceps, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) of the hand and digastric. Tremor recorded as fluctuation of isometric force was compared with that occurring during contraction against a spring load. The spring compliance was selected to make the natural frequency of the part in each case appropriate for oscillations in the short latency stretch reflex. A computer model of the whole system was used to predict the frequency at which oscillations should be expected and to estimate the reflex gain required in each case to cause sustained oscillations. Estimates were computed of the autospectra of the force records and of the rectified surface EMG signals and of the coherence functions. Normal subjects showed no evidence of a distinct spectral peak during isometric recording from any of the three muscles. However, in anisometric conditions regular oscillations in force occurred in biceps, but not in FDI or digastric. The oscillations in biceps at 8-9 Hz were accompanied by similar oscillations in the EMG which were highly coherent with the force signal. The results are consistent with the presence of a strong segmental stretch reflex effect in biceps and weak or absent reflex in FDI. Digastric is known to contain no muscle spindles and therefore to lack a stretch reflex. In two subjects who volunteered that they had more tremor than normal, but had no known neurological abnormality, there was a distinct peak in the force spectrum at 8-9 Hz in biceps and FDI in isometric conditions with coherent EMG activity. The peak increased in size in anisometric conditions in biceps but not in FDI. This component appears to be of central rather than of reflex origin. No equivalent component was found in digastric records. The results are discussed in relation to the possible role of the short latency stretch reflex in the genesis of physiological tremor in different muscles.

  2. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of Pozzolanic Reaction and Its Effect on the C-S-H Gel in Fly Ash-cement Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; HE Zhen; CAI Xinhua

    2011-01-01

    High resolution solid-state 29Si MAS NMR, combined with XRD, SEM and FTIR were used to characterize the pozzolanic activity of FA, type of main pozzolanic reaction products, and the effect of pozzolanic reaction on the C-S-H microstructure in fly ash-cement (FC) paste. The experimental results indicate that in the hydrated FC paste with 30% dosage of FA at 3 d, FA partially participated in the pozzolanic reaction, while, at 120 d, FA largely reacts. During the hydration of FCpaste at laboratory temperature, the pozzolanic reaction products are C-S-H gel rather than zeolitic gel.Moreover, after the covalent bonds of Si-O-Si, Si-O-Al and Al-O-Al in the structure of FA are broken,monosilicates Si-OH and Al-OH groups form, these chemical species can connect C-S-H dimers, thus producing more Al-free C-S-H and aluminous C-S-H than in the plain cement paste. The increased content of Al for Si substitution in the bridging tetrahedra of C-S-H may decrease the stability of C-S-H, which results in a rather obvious loss in the mechanical strength of hardened FC paste.

  4. Compositional Evolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Structures by Total X-Ray Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Soyer-Uzun, Sezen

    2011-12-09

    High-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to study the structural characteristics of a set of C-S-H samples with 0.6 ≤ C/S a;circ 1.75. It has been observed that Si is tetrahedrally coordinated to O for all samples irrespective of chemical composition and the Ca-O coordination number gradually decreases from ∼7 to ∼6 with increasing C/S ratio. This suggests that the C-S-H structure evolves from a tobermorite-like structure into a jennite-like structure as a function of increasing C/S ratio as the interlayer space decreases from ∼1.3 to ∼1 nm. Evolution of these short- and medium-range order structural characteristics in the C-S-H system is associated with the alteration of the Ca-O layers and silicate depolymerization with increasing C/S. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.

  5. Two-Dimensional Photonic Band-Gap Defect Modes with Deformed Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiang-Hua; ZHENG Wan-Hua; MA Xiao-Tao; REN Gang; XIA Jian-Bai

    2005-01-01

    @@ A numerical study of the defect modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals with deformed triangular lattice is presented by using the supercell method and the finite-difference time-domain method We find the stretch or shrink of the lattice can bring the change not only on the frequencies of the defect modes but also on their magnetic field distributions. We obtain the separation of the doubly degenerate dipole modes with the change of the lattice and find that both the stretch and the shrink of the lattice can make the dipole modes separate large enough to realize the single-mode emission. These results may be advantageous to the manufacture of photonic crystal lasers and provide a new way to realize the single-mode operation in photonic crystal lasers.

  6. The effectiveness of manual stretching in the treatment of plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish Ben

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain is a commonly occurring foot complaint. Stretching is frequently utilised as a treatment, yet a systematic review focusing only on its effectiveness has not been published. This review aimed to assess the effectiveness of stretching on pain and function in people with plantar heel pain. Methods Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and The Cochrane Library were searched from inception to July 2010. Studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were independently assessed, and their quality evaluated using the modified PEDro scale. Results Six studies including 365 symptomatic participants were included. Two compared stretching with a control, one study compared stretching to an alternative intervention, one study compared stretching to both alternative and control interventions, and two compared different stretching techniques and durations. Quality rating on the modified Pedro scale varied from two to eight out of a maximum of ten points. The methodologies and interventions varied significantly between studies, making meta-analysis inappropriate. Most participants improved over the course of the studies, but when stretching was compared to alternative or control interventions, the changes only reached statistical significance in one study that used a combination of calf muscle stretches and plantar fascia stretches in their stretching programme. Another study comparing different stretching techniques, showed a statistically significant reduction in some aspects of pain in favour of plantar fascia stretching over calf stretches in the short term. Conclusions There were too few studies to assess whether stretching is effective compared to control or other interventions, for either pain or function. However, there is some evidence that plantar fascia stretching may be more effective than Achilles tendon stretching alone in the short-term. Appropriately powered randomised controlled trials, utilizing validated outcome

  7. The effectiveness of manual stretching in the treatment of plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain is a commonly occurring foot complaint. Stretching is frequently utilised as a treatment, yet a systematic review focusing only on its effectiveness has not been published. This review aimed to assess the effectiveness of stretching on pain and function in people with plantar heel pain. Methods Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and The Cochrane Library were searched from inception to July 2010. Studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were independently assessed, and their quality evaluated using the modified PEDro scale. Results Six studies including 365 symptomatic participants were included. Two compared stretching with a control, one study compared stretching to an alternative intervention, one study compared stretching to both alternative and control interventions, and two compared different stretching techniques and durations. Quality rating on the modified Pedro scale varied from two to eight out of a maximum of ten points. The methodologies and interventions varied significantly between studies, making meta-analysis inappropriate. Most participants improved over the course of the studies, but when stretching was compared to alternative or control interventions, the changes only reached statistical significance in one study that used a combination of calf muscle stretches and plantar fascia stretches in their stretching programme. Another study comparing different stretching techniques, showed a statistically significant reduction in some aspects of pain in favour of plantar fascia stretching over calf stretches in the short term. Conclusions There were too few studies to assess whether stretching is effective compared to control or other interventions, for either pain or function. However, there is some evidence that plantar fascia stretching may be more effective than Achilles tendon stretching alone in the short-term. Appropriately powered randomised controlled trials, utilizing validated outcome measures, blinded assessors and

  8. Acute effects of constant torque and constant angle stretching on the muscle and tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Andreas; Budini, Francesco; Tilp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Static stretching induces acute structural changes of the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) that are related to the intensity or duration of stretching. It has been reported that stretching with a constant torque (CT) leads to greater joint range of motion changes than stretching with a constant angle (CA). Whether or not this difference is due to different structural changes of the MTUs of the lower leg and ankle plantar flexors is not known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of single CA and CT stretching on various muscle and tendon mechanical properties. Seventeen young, healthy volunteers were tested on two separate days using either CT or CA stretching (4 × 30 s each). Before and after stretching, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), passive resistive torque (PRT), and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured with a dynamometer. Ultrasonography of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) displacement allowed us to determine the length changes in the tendon and muscle, respectively, and hence to calculate their stiffness. Maximum dorsiflexion increased while PRT, muscle-tendon stiffness, and muscle stiffness decreased following both CA and CT stretching. There was a greater increase in RoM following CT stretching compared to CA stretching. Moreover, the decline in PRT was greater during CT stretching compared to CA stretching. As expected, several functional adaptations (RoM, PRT) were different between CT and CA stretching due to the higher intensity of CT stretching. However, no structural differences in the adaptations to the stretching modalities could be detected. We suggest that the different functional adaptations between CA and CT stretching are the consequence of different adaptations in the perception of stretch and pain.

  9. Acute effect of different stretching methods on Illinois agility test in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Sahebozamani, Mansour; Tabrizi, Kourosh G; Yusof, Ashril B

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static, dynamic, and the combination of static and dynamic stretching within a pre-exercise warm-up on the Illinois agility test (IAT) in soccer players. Nineteen professional soccer players (age = 22.5 ± 2.5 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.003 m, body mass = 74.8 ± 10.9 kg) were tested for agility performance using the IAT after different warm-up protocols consisting of static, dynamic, combined stretching, and no stretching. The players were subgrouped into less and more experienced players (5.12 ± 0.83 and 8.18 ± 1.16 years, respectively). There were significant decreases in agility time after no stretching, among no stretching vs. static stretching; after dynamic stretching, among static vs. dynamic stretching; and after dynamic stretching, among dynamic vs. combined stretching during warm-ups for the agility: mean ± SD data were 14.18 ± 0.66 seconds (no stretch), 14.90 ± 0.38 seconds (static), 13.95 ± 0.32 seconds (dynamic), and 14.50 ± 0.35 seconds (combined). There was significant difference between less and more experienced players after no stretching and dynamic stretching. There was significant decrease in agility time following dynamic stretching vs. static stretching in both less and more experienced players. Static stretching does not appear to be detrimental to agility performance when combined with dynamic warm-up for professional soccer players. However, dynamic stretching during the warm-up was most effective as preparation for agility performance. The data from this study suggest that more experienced players demonstrate better agility skills due to years of training and playing soccer.

  10. Note on predictions for c s bar quarkonia using a three-loop static potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Noah; Repko, Wayne W.; Radford, Stanley F.

    2017-02-01

    We extend our treatment of the spectroscopy and decays of the charm-strange quarkonium system to include the effect of using the full three-loop QCD correction to the static short distance potential. As before, our potential model consists of the relativistic kinetic energy term, a scalar linear confining term including its relativistic corrections and the perturbative QCD spin-dependent terms. A set of unperturbed wave functions for the various states is obtained using a variational technique that is further constrained by requiring that the wave functions also satisfy the relativistic virial theorem. These are then used in a perturbative treatment of the potential to fit the mass spectrum of the c s bar system and calculate the radiative decay widths. Our results accurately describe the Ds spectrum and are compatible with the little data that is available for the radiative decays of the Ds states.

  11. Dark science and techno-utopia: the conservative approach of C. S. Lewis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ramos Vera

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The rise of scientific, illustrated and progressive late nineteenth century utopias triggered proposals with alternative meanings. Some of those were articulated through a conservative thought as well as a christian, transcendent and otherworldly metanarrative. C. S. Lewis, for example, provided his answer to the techno-utopia in his essay The Abolition of Man as well as in the novel That Hideous Strength —conclusion of the Cosmic Trilogy (or Ransom Trilogy. We will introduce his challenge through three different arguments: (1 contrary to the project of personality conditioning , education is a link of continuity with the past and of respect for tradition; (2 in the light of the methodological atheism of these dystopias elicited the metaphysical and transcendent lewisian foundation of the imperfection of the human condition; (3 He will reply to the arrogance of social and political engineering by reducing power to a technical criterion of instrumental knowledge with the modest language of politics.

  12. Consciousness and C. S. Peirce’s Answer to the Riddle of the Sphinx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2016-01-01

    on phenomenology seems logically impossible therefore the many (unsuccessful) attempts to naturalize. C.S. Peirce’s pragmaticist semiotics attempts to bridge the gap between natural sciences and humanities by combining a phenomenological approach with an evolutionary and realistic understanding of nature...... some of the first to integrate Eastern philosophy in their thinking). But there was a split between the empiricist and intuitionist view of knowledge among them. Peirce through his pragmaticist semiotics suggested a way to unite these two hostile epistemologies. Peirce attempts a new way of answering...... Kant’s basic question in the Critique of Pure Reason: What can we know? and What may we hope? Peirce saw as his primary task to develop a comprehensive metaphysical and epistemological system in which a theory of categories was defined in a completely new way....

  13. PONDEROSA-C/S: client–server based software package for automated protein 3D structure determination

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woonghee; Stark, Jaime L.; Markley, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Peak-picking Of Noe Data Enabled by Restriction Of Shift Assignments-Client Server (PONDEROSA-C/S) builds on the original PONDEROSA software (Lee et al. in Bioinformatics 27:1727–1728. doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btr200, 2011) and includes improved features for structure calculation and refinement. PONDEROSA-C/S consists of three programs: Ponderosa Server, Ponderosa Client, and Ponderosa Analyzer. PONDEROSA-C/S takes as input the protein sequence, a list of assigned chemical shifts, and nucle...

  14. B-modes and the Nature of Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel; Porto, Rafael A

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background do not yet determine whether inflation was driven by a slowly-rolling scalar field or involved another physical mechanism. In this paper we discuss the prospects of using the power spectra of scalar and tensor modes to probe the nature of inflation. We focus on the leading modification to the slow-roll dynamics, which entails a sound speed $c_s$ for the scalar fluctuations. We derive analytically a lower bound on $c_s$ in terms of a given tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$, taking into account the difference in the freeze-out times between the scalar and tensor modes. We find that any detection of primordial B-modes with $r > 0.01$ implies a lower bound on $c_s$ that is stronger than the bound derived from the absence of non-Gaussianity in the Planck data. Our analytic expectation is confirmed by a joint analysis of data from WMAP, Planck and BICEP2, which leads to $c_s > 0.25$ (95$\\%$CL). This~bound is tantalizingly close to a critical value for the sound speed, $(c_s)...

  15. Hardware Assisted ROP Detection Mode (HARD Mode)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Distribution A. Cleared for public release; unlimited distribution. USAFA-CN-2013-457 Hardware Assisted ROP Detection Mode (HARD Mode) NATHANIEL HART...457 This report, "Hardware Assisted ROP Detection Mode (HARD Mode)" is presented as a competent treatment of the subj ect, worthy of publication. The...Technical 20120810-20121215 Hardware Assisted ROP Detection Mode (HARD Mode) NATHANIEL HART MICHAEL WINSTEAD MARTIN CARLISLE RODNEY LYKINS MICHAEL

  16. Effects of Mode Shares on Mode Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Carrion; Nebiyou Tilahun; David Levinson

    2011-01-01

    This study considers the influence of the knowledge of existing mode shares on travelers mode choice. This contrasts with traditional mode choice models, where the main objective is to predict the overall mode shares as the aggregate of individual mode choices according to variables encompassing attributes of the modes, and characteristics of the travelers. In this study, a computer-administered adaptive stated preference survey is developed and applied to a sample of subjects selected from t...

  17. A systematic literature review of the relationship between stretching and athletic injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Athletic-related injuries are a major cause for healthcare visits and financial burden for an otherwise healthy population of adults. The purpose of this article was to investigate the effects of stretching on injury prevention and to determine whether current stretching guidelines are beneficial for athletes. A systematic review of the literature was conducted through searching MEDLINE and CINAHL on topics related to stretching and injury prevention. Current belief is that stretching reduces injury incidence and that it should be performed prior to athletic activities. An examination of 11 articles provided inconclusive outcomes regarding the positive effect of stretching on injury prevention. A sport or activity-specific tailored stretch and warm-up program yielded the best outcomes in relation to preventing injuries. Direct negative effects of stretching were not identified; therefore, the application of stretching should be performed on an individual basis.

  18. Acute Effects of Static and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Muscle Strength and Power Output

    OpenAIRE

    Marek, Sarah M; Cramer, Joel T; Fincher, A. Louise; Massey, Laurie L; Dangelmaier, Suzanne M; Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fitz, Kristi A; Culbertson, Julie Y

    2005-01-01

    Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the clinical setting. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help clinicians make decisions for rehabilitation progression and return to play.

  19. Fluidization, resolidification, and reorientation of the endothelial cell in response to slow tidal stretches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Canovic, Elizabeth Peruski; Iordan, Andreea L; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Pirentis, Athanassios P; Smith, Michael L; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Stamenovic, Dimitrije

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating shape and orientation of the vascular endothelial cell. This morphological response to stretch is basic to angiogenesis, neovascularization, and vascular homeostasis, but mechanism remains unclear. To elucidate mechanisms, we used cell mapping rheometry to measure traction forces in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to periodic uniaxial stretches. Onset of periodic stretch of 10% strain amplitude caused a fluidization response typified by attenuation of traction forces almost to zero. As periodic stretch continued, the prompt fluidization response was followed by a slow resolidification response typified by recovery of the traction forces, but now aligned along the axis perpendicular to the imposed stretch. Reorientation of the cell body lagged reorientation of the traction forces, however. Together, these observations demonstrate that cellular reorientation in response to periodic stretch is preceded by traction attenuation by means of cytoskeletal fluidization and subsequent traction recovery transverse to the stretch direction by means of cytoskeletal resolidification.

  20. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis is induced by non-injurious mechanical stretch in a model of alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazi, Despoina; Kitsiouli, Eirini; Karkabounas, Athanasios; Trangas, Theoni; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E

    2013-08-01

    Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, (DP-PtdCho), the major phospholipid component of lung surfactant is biosynthesized via a de novo pathway, the last step of which is catalyzed by CDP-choline:cholinephosphotransferase (CPT) and two remodeling steps: a deacylation and a reacylation one, catalyzed by an acidic, Ca²⁺-independent phospholipase A₂ (aiPLA₂) and a lyso-phosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), respectively. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a low magnitude, non-injurious static mode of mechanical stretch can induce phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) biosynthesis and its remodeling to DP-PtdCho in the A549 cell-line, a model of alveolar type II cells. The deformation of A549 cells did not cause any release of lactate dehydrogenase, or phospholipids into the cell culture supernatants. An increase in PtdCho levels was observed after 1 h of static stretching, especially among the DP-PtdCho molecular species, as indicated by targeted lipidomics approach and site-directed fatty acyl-chain analysis. Moreover, although sphingomyelin (CerPCho) levels were unaffected, the DP-PtdCho/CerPCho ratio increased. Induction was observed in CPT, LPCAT and aiPLA₂ enzymatic activities and gene expression. Finally, incubation of the cells with MJ33 suppressed aiPLA₂ activity and DP-PtdCho production. Our data suggest that mild static mechanical stretch can promote the biosynthesis of PtdCho and its remodeling to DP-PtdCho in lung epithelial cells. Thus, low magnitude stretch could contribute to protective mechanisms rather than to injurious ones.

  1. Vacuum response to cosmic stretching: accelerated Universe and prevention of singularity

    OpenAIRE

    Novikov, E. A.

    2006-01-01

    Spacetime stretching is included in the general relativity alongside with the spacetime curvature. Response of the vacuum to cosmic stretching is considered as macroscopic quantum effect. This effect explains the accelerated expansion of the Universe without resorting to Plank scale. For negative stretching (collapse) the same effect can prevent formation of singularity. Stretching effect can be important for a variety of cosmic phenomena, including collisions of galaxies and local collapses.

  2. Acute effects of two different stretching techniques on isokinetic strength and power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ayala

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Short pre-exercise static and dynamic lower-limb stretching routines did not elicit stretching-induce reductions or improvements in knee flexor and knee extensor isokinetic concentric and eccentric strength. In addition, the findings of the current study support the claim that dynamic stretching may be preferable to static stretching as part of a warm-up designed to prepare for physical activity.

  3. Juvenile first rib fracture caused by morning stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Joon; Yie, Kilsoo; Chon, Sung Bin

    2012-08-01

    First rib fractures are very rare, being primarily associated with external blunt trauma. Related conditions, such as sudden contraction of the neck muscle, stress fractures, and fatigue fractures, have been reported sporadically. These fractures are mostly related to repetitive or explosive physical training. However, anatomical relationships and related injury mechanisms may cause first rib fractures without repetitive sports activity. To present a case of juvenile first rib fracture caused by morning stretching without sports activity. CASE  We present a rare case report of juvenile atraumatic first rib fracture. Physicians should be aware that even morning stretching with yawning can cause a first rib fracture in children. Awareness is important for early recognition, and proper management is critical for a pain-free return to normal life. An understanding of the mechanism of atraumatic first rib fracture is important. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Stretching and imaging studies of single DNA molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    DNA molecules were stretched on silanized mica surface with the molecular combing technique, and detected with fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Meantime, DNA molecules were stretched with a modified dynamic molecular combing technique and studied with atomic force microscopy. The results indicate that, compared with the dynamic molecular combing technique, the modified dynamic molecular combing technique has advantages of less-sample demand and less contamination to sample; as compared with the molecular combing technique, it has better aligning effect and reproducibility. Combination of this kind of DNA molecular manipulating technique with the single DNA molecule detecting technique by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy will play an important role in the basic research of molecular dynamics and the application of gene research.

  5. Cavity approach for modeling and fitting polymer stretching

    CERN Document Server

    Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Vicente, Conrad J Pérez

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of molecules are today captured by single molecule manipulation experiments, so that polymer features are tested at a nanometric scale. Yet devising mathematical models to get further insight beyond the commonly studied force--elongation relation is typically hard. Here we draw from techniques developed in the context of disordered systems to solve models for single and double--stranded DNA stretching in the limit of a long polymeric chain. Since we directly derive the marginals for the molecule local orientation, our approach allows us to readily calculate the experimental elongation as well as other observables at wish. As an example, we evaluate the correlation length as a function of the stretching force. Furthermore, we are able to fit successfully our solution to real experimental data. Although the model is admittedly phenomenological, our findings are very sound. For single--stranded DNA our solution yields the correct (monomer) scale and, yet more importantly, the right pers...

  6. Exponential stretch-rotation (ESR) formulation of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Khokhlov, A M

    2003-01-01

    We study a tensorial exponential transformation of a three-dimensional metric of space-like hypersurfaces embedded in a four-dimensional space-time, $\\gamma_{ij} = e^{\\epsilon_{ikm}\\theta_m} e^{\\phi_k} e^{-\\epsilon_{jkn}\\theta_n}$, where $\\phi_k$ are logarithms of the eigenvalues of $\\gamma_{ij}$, $\\theta_k$ are rotation angles, and $\\epsilon_{ijk}$ is a fully anti-symmetric symbol. Evolution part of Einstein's equations, formulated in terms of $\\phi_k$ and $\\theta_k$, describes time evolution of the metric at every point of a hyper-surface as a continuous stretch and rotation of a local coordinate system in a tangential space. The exponential stretch-rotation (ESR) transformation generalizes particular exponential transformations used previously in cases of spatial symmetry. The ESR 3+1 formulation of Einstein's equations may have certain advantages for long-term stable integration of these equations.

  7. Flame Stretch Analysis in Diffusion Flames with Inert Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ay Su; Ying-Chieh Liu

    2001-01-01

    Experimental investigations of impinging flame with fuel mixed with non-reaction gas were conducted.According to the observations of combustion test and temperature measurement, the non-reaction gas might dilute the local concentration of fuel in the diffusion process. The shape of the flame was symmetrical due to the flame stretch force. Results show that the conical flame might be de-structured by the addition of inert gas in pure methane fuel. The impinging flame became shorter and bluer as nitrogen was added to the fuel. The conditions of N2/CH4 equal to 1/2 and 1/1 show a wider plane in the YZ plane. The effect of inert gas overcomes the flame stretch and destroys the symmetrical column flame as well as the cold flow. Nitrogen addition also enhances the diffusion rate and combustion efficiency.

  8. Development of Stretched wire measurement bench at IDDL, DAVV Indore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlot, Mona; Mishra, G.

    2016-10-01

    A stretched wire magnetic measurement bench is under development at IDDL, DAVV, Indore. In this method a multistrend wire consisting of N turns is stretched inside the undulator to measure the field integrals of the undulators. The wire moved with constant velocity of translation measures the first integral of the undulator field. The cross motion of the wire at the undulator ends measures the second field integral. The measurement accuracy depends on the wire conditions and material properties. In this paper we follow an analytical approach to find the voltage fluctuations due to wire vibrations during the field measurement. It is shown that the voltage fluctuations depend on undulator gap, magnitude of the impulse on the wire. The mass density and the length of the wire also cause sizeable voltage fluctuations. The analytical derived expression is analysed to optimize system parameters for minimum errors during the measurement.

  9. Effect of passive muscle stretching in osteoarthritis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivseth, G; Torstensson, J; Reikerås, O

    1989-01-01

    1. Twenty-five minute daily muscle stretching, perpendicular to the fibre direction of the adductor muscles without movement of the hip, was performed in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. 2. Before and after treatment hip abduction was measured and muscle biopsies were taken for analysis of fibre cross-sectional areas of type 1 and type 2 fibres as well as adenosine 5'-triphosphate, creatine phosphate and glycogen contents. 3. From the results it is concluded that passive muscle stretching leads to a significant increase in hip abduction of 8.3 degrees (P less than 0.05). There was also a significant increase of type 1 and type 2 fibre cross-sectional area and of glycogen content after the treatment period (P less than 0.05), but the concentrations of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and creatine phosphate did not change significantly.

  10. Finite Element Simulation of the Stretch-Forming of Aircraft Skins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.H.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2005-01-01

    In the aerospace industry stretch forming is often used to produce skin parts. During stretch forming a sheet is clamped at two sides and stretched over a die, such that the sheet gets the shape of the die. However for complex shapes it is necessary to use expensive intermediate heat-treatments in o

  11. Can Stretching Prior to Exercise and Sports Improve Performance and Prevent Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracko, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data from research on stretching as it relates to enhanced performance and injury prevention so that fitness, exercise, and sports performance professionals can make informed decisions about stretching programs for clients. The paper notes that stretching is a misunderstood component of fitness and sports training. Few studies show…

  12. 49 CFR 180.413 - Repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting of specification cargo tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or... of Cargo Tanks § 180.413 Repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting of specification cargo tanks. (a) General. Any repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting of a cargo...

  13. Effect of Stretching--Setting Treatment on Dyeing Behavior of Wool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琳

    2003-01-01

    Changes of dyeing behavior of wool after stretching - setting treatment are studied.Effects of stretching - setting on wool structure are analyzed.It is concluded that stretching - setting treatment not only reduces wool diameter and increases wool length,but also brings about low-temperature dyeing of wool.

  14. Can Stretching Prior to Exercise and Sports Improve Performance and Prevent Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracko, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data from research on stretching as it relates to enhanced performance and injury prevention so that fitness, exercise, and sports performance professionals can make informed decisions about stretching programs for clients. The paper notes that stretching is a misunderstood component of fitness and sports training. Few studies show…

  15. The Acute Effects of Static Stretching on Speed and Agility Performance Depend on Stretch Duration and Conditioning Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Avloniti, Christina; Protopapa, Maria; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Stampoulis, Theodoros; Leontsini, Diamanda; Mavropalias, George; Gounelas, George; Kambas, Antonios

    2016-10-01

    Avloniti, A, Chatzinikolaou, A, Fatouros, IG, Avloniti, C, Protopapa, M, Draganidis, D, Stampoulis, T, Leontsini, D, Mavropalias, G, Gounelas, G, and Kambas, A. The acute effects of static stretching on speed and agility performance depend on stretch duration and conditioning level. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2767-2773, 2016-Although static stretching (SS) is an integral part of physical preparation before training and competition, its usefulness in regards to power performance improvement has been questioned. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 SS durations on speed and agility performance. According to a cross-over design, 34 trained men (age, 20.5 ± 1.4 years; height, 1.81 ± 0.2 m; weight, 77.2 ± 2.6 kg; body fat, 8.2 ± 2.6%) participated in a control session (no stretch) and 6 experimental conditions (10, 15, 20, 30, 40, and 60 seconds) performed in a randomized order. Performance in speed (10 and 20 m) and agility (T-test) was measured after the control and experimental conditions. Static stretching, consisting of stretches for hip extensors, hip adductors, knee extensors, knee flexors, and ankle sole flexors, was performed after light cardiovascular exercise (8 minutes). A 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that speed was improved only by SS of short duration (15/20 seconds), whereas agility remained unaffected by all SS trials. When participants' speed and agility level was taken into account, it was revealed that only those of moderate performance demonstrated an improved speed (in 15- and 20-second trials) and agility (in 10- and 15-second trials) performance. These results suggest that short-duration SS protocols induce an acute improvement of speed and agility performance, whereas longer-duration SS protocols have neither positive nor negative effect. Furthermore, it seems that individuals of lower speed and agility performance level are more likely to benefit by a short-duration SS protocol.

  16. Centrifugal stretching of 170Hf in the interacting boson model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a recent experiment to deduce lifetimes of members of the ground state rotational band of 170Hf, which show the effect of centrifugal stretching in this deformed isotope. Results are compared to the geometrical confined beta-soft(CBS rotor model, as well as to the interacting boson model (IBM. Two methods to correct for effects due to the finite valence space within the IBM are proposed.

  17. Cardiac mechanosensitivity and stretch-activated ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, G C; Sachs, F

    1997-01-01

    Mechanosensitivity is a ubiquitous property of cells, and mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs) are hypothesized to be the transducers. In the heart, MSCs are likely to account for changes in beating rate as a function of filling and for initiating stretch-induced arrhythmias (for example, following a myocardial infarction). Pharmacological agents that affect MSCs may provide a new class of antiarrhythmic drugs. © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:4-8).

  18. Nonequilibrium Markov state modeling of the globule-stretch transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We describe a systematic approach to construct coarse-grained Markov state models from molecular dynamics data of systems driven into a nonequilibrium steady state. We apply this method to study the globule-stretch transition of a single tethered model polymer in shear flow. The folding and unfolding rates of the coarse-grained model agree with the original detailed model. We demonstrate that the folding and unfolding proceeds through the same narrow region of configuration space but along different cycles.

  19. Vortex stretching in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regály, Zs.; Vorobyov, E.

    2017-10-01

    Horseshoe-shaped brightness asymmetries of several transitional discs are thought to be caused by large-scale vortices. Anticyclonic vortices efficiently collect dust particles, therefore they can play a major role in planet formation. Former studies suggest that the disc self-gravity weakens vortices formed at the edge of the gap opened by a massive planet in discs whose masses are in the range of 0.01 ≤ Mdisc/M* ≤ 0.1. Here, we present an investigation on the long-term evolution of the large-scale vortices formed at the viscosity transition of the discs' dead zone outer edge by means of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations taking disc self-gravity into account. We perform a numerical study of low-mass, 0.001 ≤ Mdisc/M* ≤ 0.01, discs, for which cases disc self-gravity was previously neglected. The large-scale vortices are found to be stretched due to disc self-gravity even for low-mass discs with Mdisc/M* ≳ 0.005, where initially the Toomre Q-parameter was ≲ 50 at the vortex distance. As a result of stretching, the vortex aspect ratio increases and a weaker azimuthal density contrast develops. The strength of the vortex stretching is proportional to the disc mass. The vortex stretching can be explained by a combined action of a non-vanishing gravitational torque caused by the vortex and the Keplerian shear of the disc. Self-gravitating vortices are subject to significantly faster decay than non-self-gravitating ones. We found that vortices developed at sharp viscosity transitions of self-gravitating discs can be described by a Goodman - Narayan - Goldreich (GNG) model as long as the disc viscosity is low, i.e. αdz ≤ 10-5.

  20. Gravitational Entropy and String Bits on the Stretched Horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, E

    2003-01-01

    We show that the entropy of Schwarzschild black holes in any dimension can be described by a gas of free string bits at the stretched horizon. The number of string bits is equal to the black hole entropy and energy dependent. For an asymptotic observer the bit gas is at the Hawking temperature. We show that the same description is also valid for de Sitter space--times in any dimension.

  1. The effects of strain heating in lithospheric stretching models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M.; Hodge, D.; Cozzarelli, F.

    1985-01-01

    The deformation by stretching of a continental type lithosphere has been formulated so that the problem can be solved by a continuum mechanical approach. The deformation, stress state, and temperature distribution are constrained to satisfy the physical laws of conservation of mass, energy, momentum, and an experimentally defined rheological response. The conservation of energy equation including a term of strain energy dissipation is given. The continental lithosphere is assumed to have the rheology of an isotropic, incompressible, nonlinear viscous, two layered solid.

  2. The Influence of Dosing Modes of Coagulate on Arsenic Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three different dosing modes, including one single dosing mode and two sequential dosing modes, were applied in high-arsenic contaminated water treatment. The results illustrated that the As (V soluble and the As (V nonspecifically sorbed were the insignificant species from Fe-As (V samples in the sequential dosing mode, while they were higher in the single dosing mode. However, it could be further concluded that the mobility of the Fe-As (V in sequential dosing mode was greater than that in single dosing mode. Besides, the main arsenic speciation governing the arsenic-borne coagulates was the As (V associated with poorly crystalline hydrous oxides of Fe in sequential or single dosing mode. Moreover, the particle size distribution analysis indicated that the sequential dosing mode was more prevalent in neutralizing and adsorbing the As (V compared with the single dosing mode. In the FT-IR spectra, the presence of arsenic was highlighted by a well resolved band at 825–829 cm−1. The positions of the As–O stretching vibration bands were shifted gradually as the dosing mode changed from the single to the sequential. This result could be related to the distribution of arsenic speciation in different dosing modes.

  3. A discrete electromechanical model for human cardiac tissue: effects of stretch-activated currents and stretch conditions on restitution properties and spiral wave dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available We introduce an electromechanical model for human cardiac tissue which couples a biophysical model of cardiac excitation (Tusscher, Noble, Noble, Panfilov, 2006 and tension development (adjusted Niederer, Hunter, Smith, 2006 model with a discrete elastic mass-lattice model. The equations for the excitation processes are solved with a finite difference approach, and the equations of the mass-lattice model are solved using Verlet integration. This allows the coupled problem to be solved with high numerical resolution. Passive mechanical properties of the mass-lattice model are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material. Active mechanical contraction is initiated by changes of the intracellular calcium concentration, which is a variable of the electrical model. Mechanical deformation feeds back on the electrophysiology via stretch-activated ion channels whose conductivity is controlled by the local stretch of the medium. We apply the model to study how stretch-activated currents affect the action potential shape, restitution properties, and dynamics of spiral waves, under constant stretch, and dynamic stretch caused by active mechanical contraction. We find that stretch conditions substantially affect these properties via stretch-activated currents. In constantly stretched medium, we observe a substantial decrease in conduction velocity, and an increase of action potential duration; whereas, with dynamic stretch, action potential duration is increased only slightly, and the conduction velocity restitution curve becomes biphasic. Moreover, in constantly stretched medium, we find an increase of the core size and period of a spiral wave, but no change in rotation dynamics; in contrast, in the dynamically stretching medium, we observe spiral drift. Our results may be important to understand how altered stretch conditions affect the heart's functioning.

  4. Chaperones in Polyglutamine Aggregation: Beyond the Q-Stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, E. F. E.; de Mattos, Eduardo P.; Jardim, Laura B.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Bergink, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in at least nine unrelated proteins lead to inherited neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. The expansion size in all diseases correlates with age at onset (AO) of disease and with polyQ protein aggregation, indicating that the expanded polyQ stretch is the main driving force for the disease onset. Interestingly, there is marked interpatient variability in expansion thresholds for a given disease. Between different polyQ diseases the repeat length vs. AO also indicates the existence of modulatory effects on aggregation of the upstream and downstream amino acid sequences flanking the Q expansion. This can be either due to intrinsic modulation of aggregation by the flanking regions, or due to differential interaction with other proteins, such as the components of the cellular protein quality control network. Indeed, several lines of evidence suggest that molecular chaperones have impact on the handling of different polyQ proteins. Here, we review factors differentially influencing polyQ aggregation: the Q-stretch itself, modulatory flanking sequences, interaction partners, cleavage of polyQ-containing proteins, and post-translational modifications, with a special focus on the role of molecular chaperones. By discussing typical examples of how these factors influence aggregation, we provide more insight on the variability of AO between different diseases as well as within the same polyQ disorder, on the molecular level. PMID:28386214

  5. The different muscle-energetics during shortening and stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The helical shape of the thin filaments causes their passive counterclockwise rotation during muscle stretch that increases tensile stress and torque at first by unwinding and then by winding up the four anchoring Z-filaments. This means storage of energy in the series elastic Z-filaments and a considerable decrease of the liberated energy of heat and work to (h-w(ap)), where h is the heat energy and w(ap) the stretch energy induced from outside by an apparatus. The steep thin filament helix with an inclination angle of 70° promotes the passive rotation during stretch, but impedes the smooth sliding of shortening by increased friction and production of frictional heat. The frictional heat may be produced by the contact with the myosin cross-bridges: (1) when they passively snap on drilling thin filaments from cleft to cleft over a distance 2 × 2.7 nm = 5.4 nm between the globular actin monomers in one groove, causing stepwise motion; or (2) when they passively cycle from one helical groove to the next (distance 36 nm). The latter causes more heat and may take place on rotating thin filaments without an effective forward drilling ("idle rotation"), e.g., when they produce "unexplained heat" at the beginning of an isometric tetanus. In an Appendix to this paper the different states of muscle are defined. The function of its most important components is described and rotation model and power-stroke model of muscular contraction is compared.

  6. Hyperbolic neighborhoods as organizers of finite-time exponential stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva; Ouellette, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    Hyperbolic points and their unsteady generalization, hyperbolic trajectories, drive the exponential stretching that is the hallmark of nonlinear and chaotic flow. Typical experimental and observational velocity data is unsteady and available only over a finite time interval, and in such situations hyperbolic trajectories will move around in the flow, and may lose their hyperbolicity at times. Here we introduce a way to determine their region of influence, which we term a hyperbolic neighborhood, which marks fluid elements whose dynamics are instantaneously dominated by the hyperbolic trajectory. We establish, using both theoretical arguments and numerical verification from model and experimental data, that the hyperbolic neighborhoods profoundly impact Lagrangian stretching experienced by fluid elements. In particular, we show that fluid elements traversing a flow experience exponential boosts in stretching while within these time-varying regions, that greater residence time within hyperbolic neighborhoods is directly correlated to larger Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) values, and that FTLE diagnostics are reliable only when the hyperbolic neighborhoods have a geometrical structure which is regular in a specific sense. Future Fellowship Grant FT130100484 from the Australian Research Council (SB), and a Terman Faculty Fellowship from Stanford University (NO).

  7. Stretch fast dynamo mechanism via conformal mapping in Riemannian manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2007-10-01

    Two new analytical solutions of the self-induction equation in Riemannian manifolds are presented. The first represents a twisted magnetic flux tube or flux rope in plasma astrophysics, where the rotation of the flow implies that the poloidal field is amplified from toroidal field, in the spirit of dynamo theory. The value of the amplification depends on the Frenet torsion of the magnetic axis of the tube. Actually this result illustrates the Zeldovich stretch, twist, and fold method to generate dynamos from straight and untwisted ropes. Based on the fact that this problem was previously handled, using a Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux ropes [Phys Plasmas 13, 022309 (2006)], investigation of a second dynamo solution, conformally related to the Arnold kinematic fast dynamo, is obtained. In this solution, it is shown that the conformal effect on the fast dynamo metric enhances the Zeldovich stretch, and therefore a new dynamo solution is obtained. When a conformal mapping is performed in an Arnold fast dynamo line element, a uniform stretch is obtained in the original line element.

  8. Fibril orientation redistribution induced by stretching of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josefsson, Gabriella; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer [The Ångström Laboratory, Department of Engineering Sciences, Division of Applied Mechanics, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Ahvenainen, Patrik [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel [Department of Fiber and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-07

    The mechanical performance of materials reinforced by cellulose nanofibrils is highly affected by the orientation of these fibrils. This paper investigates the nanofibril orientation distribution of films of partly oriented cellulose nanofibrils. Stripes of hydrogel films were subjected to different amount of strain and, after drying, examined with X-ray diffraction to obtain the orientation of the nanofibrils in the films, caused by the stretching. The cellulose nanofibrils had initially a random in-plane orientation in the hydrogel films and the strain was applied to the films before the nanofibrils bond tightly together, which occurs during drying. The stretching resulted in a reorientation of the nanofibrils in the films, with monotonically increasing orientation towards the load direction with increasing strain. Estimation of nanofibril reorientation by X-ray diffraction enables quantitative comparison of the stretch-induced orientation ability of different cellulose nanofibril systems. The reorientation of nanofibrils as a consequence of an applied strain is also predicted by a geometrical model of deformation of nanofibril hydrogels. Conversely, in high-strain cold-drawing of wet cellulose nanofibril materials, the enhanced orientation is promoted by slipping of the effectively stiff fibrils.

  9. Towards a first-principles model of Fermi resonance in the alkyl CH stretch region: Application to 1,2-diphenylethane and 2,2,2-paracyclophane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; Dean, Jacob C.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2013-02-01

    The spectroscopy of two flexible hydrocarbons, 1,2-diphenylethane (DPE) and 2,2,2-paracyclophane (TCP) is presented, and a predictive theoretical model for describing the alkyl CH stretch region of these hydrocarbons is developed. Ultraviolet hole-burning spectroscopy identified two isomers of DPE and a single conformation of TCP present in the supersonic jet expansion. Through the analysis of the ground state low-frequency vibronic spectroscopy obtained by dispersed fluorescence, conformational assignments were made for both DPE and TCP. The two isomers of DPE were found to retain the low energy structures of butane, being present in both the gauche and anti structures. TCP forms a C2 symmetric structure, differing from the predicted lower energy C3 conformation by the symmetry of the ethano bridges (-CH2CH2-) linking the phenyl substituents. Resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy is used to record single-conformation IR spectra of the two conformers of DPE and the single conformer of TCP in the alkyl CH stretch region and in the mid-IR that covers the CH bend fundamentals. A local mode Hamiltonian that incorporates cubic stretch-bend coupling is developed. Its parameters are obtained from density functional theory methods. Full dimensional calculations are compared to those that use reduced dimensional Hamiltonians in which anharmonic CH stretches and scissor modes are Fermi coupled. Excellent agreement is found. Scale factors of select terms in the reduced dimensional Hamiltonian are determined by fitting the theoretical Hamiltonian to the anti-DPE spectrum. The scaled Hamiltonian is then used to predict successfully structures for the remaining lower symmetry experimentally determined spectra in the alkyl CH stretch region.

  10. Relaxation pathways of the OD stretch fundamental of HOD in liquid H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Beatriz; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2016-12-01

    The molecular dynamics with quantum transitions method is used to study the vibrational relaxation of the OD stretching mode of HOD dissolved in liquid H2O water at 303 K. All the vibrational modes of the solute and solvent molecules that participate in the relaxation process are described by quantum mechanics, while the rotational and translational degrees of freedom are treated classically. A modification of the water intramolecular SPC/E (Simple Point Charge/Extended) force field providing vibrational frequencies in solution closer to the experimental values is proposed to analyze the influence of the vibrational energy gaps on the relaxation channels. The relaxation times obtained are in satisfactory agreement with experimental values. The energy transfer during the relaxation process alters significantly the H-bond network around the HOD molecule. The analysis of the vibrational transitions during the relaxation process reveals a complex mechanism which involves the participation of both intra- and intermolecular channels and provides a compromise for the different interpretations of the experimental data reported for this system in recent years.

  11. A comparison of assisted and unassisted proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddigan, Meaghan E; Peach, Ashley A; Behm, David G

    2012-05-01

    A comparison of assisted and unassisted proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and static stretching. J Strength Cond Res 26(5): 1238-1244, 2012-Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching often requires a partner. Straps are available allowing an individual to perform PNF stretching alone. It is not known if a strap provides similar improvements in the range of motion (ROM) as partner-assisted PNF or static stretching. The purpose of this study was to compare assisted and unassisted (with a strap) PNF stretching and static stretching. Hip joint ROM, reaction time (RT), and movement time (MT) were measured prestretching and poststretching. Thirteen recreationally active adults participated in this study. The participants were subjected to 5 different stretch interventions in a random order on separate days. Stretch conditions included unassisted PNF stretching using (a) isometric, (b) concentric, and (c) eccentric contractions with a stretch strap, (d) partner-assisted isometric PNF, and (e) static stretching. The RT, MT, dynamic, active, passive hip flexion angle, and angular velocity with dynamic hip flexion were measured before and after the intervention. The ROM improved (p < 0.05) 2.6, 2.7, and 5.4%, respectively, with dynamic, active static, and passive static ROM, but there was no significant difference between the stretching protocols. There was a main effect for time (p < 0.05) with all stretching conditions negatively impacting dynamic angular velocity (9.2%). Although there was no significant effect on RT, MT showed a negative main effect for time (p < 0.05) slowing 3.4%. In conclusion, it was found that all 3 forms of active stretching provided similar improvements in the ROM and poststretching performance decrements in MT and angular velocity. Thus, individuals can implement PNF stretching techniques with a partner or alone with a strap to improve ROM, but athletes should not use these techniques before important

  12. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Naohiko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Ito, Satoru, E-mail: itori@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Furuya, Kishio [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Takahara, Norihiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naruse, Keiji [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hasegawa, Yoshinori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  13. Contraction-specific differences in maximal muscle power during stretch-shortening cycle movements in elderly males and females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserotti, Paolo; Aagaard, Per; Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    2001-01-01

    Aging, muscle power, stretch-shortening cycle, eccentric muscle actions, concentric contractions......Aging, muscle power, stretch-shortening cycle, eccentric muscle actions, concentric contractions...

  14. Normalized intensity correlation function of single-mode laser system driven by colored cross-correlation noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Wang; Xiuqing Wu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Considering a single-mode laser system with cross-correlated additive colored noise and multiplicative colored noise, we study the effects of correlation among noises on the normalized intensity correlation function C(s).C(s) is derived by means of the projection operator method.

  15. Formation of sulfido ciobium complexes through C-S bond activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Nélio Pires

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon reacting (eta5-C5H52NbCl2, eta5-C5H5 = Cp, and (Ph3Sn(SPh, in THF, (eta5-C5H52Nb(Cl(mu-SSn(Ph3(Cl, 1, and (eta5-C5H52Nb(SCl, 2, were obtained. Complexes 1 and 2 were characterized by IR, ¹H-NMR, 13C-NMR, Mössbauer spectroscopies, elemental analysis as well as by atomic absorption. Hydrolysis of 1 yielded the mu-oxo species, (eta5-C5H52Nb(Cl(mu-OSn(Ph3Cl, 3, which was characterized by IR, ¹H-NMR, 13C-NMR and Mössbauer spectroscopies, elemental analysis, atomic absorption as well as by X-ray crystallography. It crystallizes in the space group Pca2(1 with a = 17.282(3, b = 18.122(4, c = 17.3269(2, V = 5426.2(16 ų, and Z = 8. Additional studies indicated that the complexes were formed as a result of the nucleophilic displacement of the niobium-chloride bond by the thiolate ligand followed by a C-S bond cleavage. The cleavage occurs with an excess of the thiolate compound equal to or greater than 2:1.

  16. Jesus in Narnia. Narrative Katechese im Werk von C. S. Lewis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Garmaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to explore the narrative catechesis and elements of religious pedagogy in C. S. Lewis’ “The Chronicles of Narnia” and to critically ponder on the following questions: To what extent is the message of faith conveyed to the reader by Lewis’ story-telling? In which way is a narrative approach to theology and catechesis articulated and realised? Why is the narrative catechesis useful and what is its role in the context of the overall mission of the Church i.e. the preaching of the Gospel? In order to provide answers to these questions the first part of this paper outlines a Christian allegory of the Narnian stories. The second part deals with the formalistic approach as using allegory, allusion, and symbolism to interpret Lewis’ narrative. The third part outlines the need for a critical awareness and the role of theological narrative in flourishing humanity and human wholeness. The concluding section presents an overall assessment of Lewis’s Christian fantasy and its faith-shaping impact.

  17. The Acute Effects of Static Stretching Compared to Dynamic Stretching with and without an Active Warm up on Anaerobic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Bradley J

    2017-01-01

    The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) has been used in many studies to determine anaerobic performance. However, there has been poor reporting of warm-up protocols and limited consistency between warm-up methods that have been used. With the WAnT being such a commonly-used test, consistency in warm-up methods is essential in order to compare results across studies. Therefore, this study was designed to compare how static stretching, dynamic stretching, and an active warm-up affect WAnT performance. Ten recreationally active participants (5 males, 5 females) with a mean (SD) age of 23.3 (0.7) volunteered for this study. Subjects were randomized to a specific order of five warm-up protocols, which were performed on individual days followed by a WAnT. Peak power, mean power, power drop, and fatigue index were compared for each trial using a repeated measures ANOVA. For peak power, results revealed that warm-up protocol had a significant effect, F(4,36) = 3.90, p = .01, partial η(2) = .302. It was hypothesized that the dynamic stretching would lead to greater peak power than the static stretching protocol. However, results of post hoc analyses failed to detect a significant difference (p =.065). For the other measured variables no significant differences were found. The findings from this study suggest that warm-up protocols may have significantly different impacts on peak power during the WAnT. Additional research should use larger sample sizes and further explore these warm-up protocols. Developing a standardized warm-up protocol for the WAnT may improve consistency between studies.

  18. Infrared transient grating measurements of the dynamics of hydrogen local mode vibrations in amorphous silicon-germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobson, K.W.; Wells, J.P.R.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Vinh, N.Q.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2008-01-01

    We report on picosecond, time-resolved measurements of the vibrational relaxation and decay pathways of the Si–H and Ge–H stretching modes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium thin films (a-SiGe:H). It is demonstrated that the decay of both modes has a nonexponential shape, attributable to th

  19. Infrared transient grating measurements of the dynamics of hydrogen local mode vibrations in amorphous silicon-germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobson, K. W.; Wells, J. P. R.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Vinh, N. Q.; Dijkhuis, J. I.

    2008-01-01

    We report on picosecond, time-resolved measurements of the vibrational relaxation and decay pathways of the Si-H and Ge-H stretching modes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium thin films (a-SiGe: H). It is demonstrated that the decay of both modes has a nonexponential shape, attributable to t

  20. The acute effect of different stretching methods on sprint performance in taekwondo practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdaroğlu, Utku; Köklü, Yusuf; Koz, Mitat

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of different stretching types on sprint performance in taekwondo practitioners. Twelve male taekwondo practitioners performed stretching exercises using different types (ballistic, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation [PNF], static stretching) in a random order at three-day intervals; there was also a control condition involving no stretching exercises. The subjects performed 2 maximal 20-m sprints (with 10-m split times also recorded) with a recovery period of 1 minute immediately post stretching and at 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes after stretching. They also performed these sprints before doing the stretching exercises. The study results showed that sprint times significantly increased after static stretching (10-m pre =1.84±0.07 s, 10-m post =1.89±0.08 s; 20-m pre =3.33±0.19 s, 20-m post= 3.38±0.2 s), PNF stretching (10-m pre =1.84±0.07 s, 10-m post =1.89±0.08 s; 20-m pre =3.33±0.19 s, 20-m post =3.38±0.20 s) and ballistic stretching (pre =1.84±0.08 s, post =1.86±0.07 s; 20-m pre =3.33±0.20 s, 20-m post =3.35±0.21 s) (P<0.05). In the static stretching condition, 10-m and 20-m sprint performance had fully returned to normal at 15 minutes after stretching. In the PNF stretching condition, 20-m sprint performance returned to normal levels at 15 minutes after stretching, while 10-m performance took 20 minutes to recover fully. In the ballistic stretching method, both 10-m and 20-m sprint performances had fully recovered at 5 minutes after stretching. It is therefore concluded that the acute effects of static, PNF and ballistic stretching may negatively affect sprint performance, although sprint performance is less affected after ballistic stretching than after the other stretching types. Therefore, it is not advisable to perform PNF or static stretching immediately before sprint performance.

  1. Numerical Investigation on Mixing Efficiency and Exponential Fluid Stretching in Chaotic Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林翔; 陈鹰; 范毓润; 路甬祥

    2000-01-01

    The stretching and folding of fluid element during chaotic mixing field is studied using numerical method. The chaotic mixing process is caused by periodic secondary flow in a twisted curved pipe. Using the nonlinear discrete velocity field as the dynamical system, the present study connects the fluid particle's stretching along its trajectory in one period to a linearized time-varying variational equation. After numerical approximation of the variational equation, fluid stretching is calculated on the whole cross section. The stretching distribution shows an exponential fluid stretching and folding, which indicates an excellent mixing performance.

  2. Numerical Investigation on Mixing Efficiency and Exponential Fluid Stretching in Chaotic Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The stretching and folding of fluid element during chaotic mixing field isstudied using numerical method. The chaotic mixing process is caused byperiodicsecondary flow in a twisted curved pipe. Using the nonlinear discrete velocity field as thedynamical system, the present study connects the fluid particle's stretching along itstrajectory in one period to a linearized time-varying variational equation. After numericalapproximation of the variational equation, fluid stretching is calculated on the whole crosssection. The stretching distribution shows an exponential fluid stretching and folding,which indicates an excellent mixing performance.

  3. MULLIGAN MOBILIZATION VERSUS STRETCHING ON THE MANAGEMENT OF PIRIFORMIS SYNDROME A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samahir Abuaraki Elbkheet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Piriformis syndrome is a commonly overlooked specific cause of low back pain. Apart from mimicking the sciatica-like symptoms, unilateral piriformis tightness can cause rotational dysfunction and pain in the lumbar region. This could lead to low back pain which is a common musculo skeletal problem and a major reason for activity limitation. Stretching the piriformis tightened muscle is a preferred choice of treatment against surgical intervention to release the muscle. Mulligan’s mobilization is based on movement with mobilization which is proven to be effective in many musculo skeletal dysfunctions including the lumbar spine. The purpose of this study is to explore and compare the two treatment methods in relieving the low back pain in clinical conditions with piriformis syndrome. Methods: In this experimental study, 40 patients with piriformis syndrome were selected and divided into two groups. One group was given only piriformis stretching for the tightened muscle and the other group given Mulligan mobilization for lumbo sacral joints. VAS and lower limb functional index were taken to compare before and after the treatment regime of 4 weeks. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in both pain scale and lower limb mobility and function. But there was significant improvement in pain relief and LLFI after the treatment regime in both groups compared to the pre-treatment status. Conclusion: Even as the piriformis syndrome is caused by the tightness of the muscle, the consequence in the lower back and lumbar spine mobility can be improved by a Mulligan mobilization as a single mode of intervention.

  4. Acute effects of the different intensity of static stretching on flexibility and isometric muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Matsuo, Shingo; Hatano, Genki; Iwata, Masahiro; Yokoi, Kazuaki; Tsuchida, Wakako; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji

    2016-11-29

    In various fields, static stretching is commonly performed to improve flexibility, whereas the acute effects of different stretch intensities are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the acute effects of different stretch intensities on flexibility and muscle force. Eighteen healthy participants (nine men, nine women) performed 180-s static stretches of the right hamstrings at 80%, 100%, and 120% of maximum tolerable intensity without stretching pain, in random order. The following outcomes were assessed as markers of lower limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), range of motion (ROM), passive joint (muscle-tendon) stiffness, passive torque at onset of pain (PT), and isometric muscle force. SPT was significantly decreased after all stretching intensities (p stretching at 100% and 120% intensity, ROM and PT were significantly increased after stretching (p stretching at 100% and 120% than at 80%, and passive stiffness was significantly lower after 120% than after 80% (p stretching and the relative change for SPT (p stretching at greater intensity is more effective for increasing ROM and decreasing passive muscle-tendon stiffness.

  5. Mechanical stretching for tissue engineering: two-dimensional and three-dimensional constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Brandon D; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Lim, Jung Yul

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols.

  6. Mechanical Stretching for Tissue Engineering: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols. PMID:22335794

  7. The relevance of stretch intensity and position—a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Nikos; Metsios, George S.; Flouris, Andreas D.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Stretching exercises to increase the range of motion (ROM) of joints have been used by sports coaches and medical professionals for improving performance and rehabilitation. The ability of connective and muscular tissues to change their architecture in response to stretching is important for their proper function, repair, and performance. Given the dearth of relevant data in the literature, this review examined two key elements of stretching: stretch intensity and stretch position; and their significance to ROM, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and inflammation in different populations. A search of three databases, Pub-Med, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews, identified 152 articles, which were subsequently categorized into four groups: athletes (24), clinical (29), elderly (12), and general population (87). The use of different populations facilitated a wider examination of the stretching components and their effects. All 152 articles incorporated information regarding duration, frequency and stretch position, whereas only 79 referred to the intensity of stretching and 22 of these 79 studies were deemed high quality. It appears that the intensity of stretching is relatively under-researched, and the importance of body position and its influence on stretch intensity, is largely unknown. In conclusion, this review has highlighted areas for future research, including stretch intensity and position and their effect on musculo-tendinous tissue, in relation to the sensation of pain, delayed onset muscle soreness, inflammation, as well as muscle health and performance. PMID:26347668

  8. Massage and stretching reduce spinal reflex excitability without affecting twitch contractile properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David G; Peach, Ashley; Maddigan, Meaghan; Aboodarda, Saied Jalal; DiSanto, Mario C; Button, Duane C; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2013-10-01

    Both stretching and massage can increase range of motion. Whereas the stretching-induced increases in ROM have been attributed to changes in neural and muscle responses, there is no literature investigating the ROM mechanisms underlying the interaction of stretch and massage. The objective of this paper was to evaluate changes in neural and evoked muscle responses with two types of massage and static stretching. With this repeated measures design, 30s of plantar flexors musculotendinous junction (MTJ) and tapotement (TAP) massage were implemented either with or without 1min of concurrent stretching as well as a control condition. Measures included the soleus maximum H-reflex/M-wave (H/M) ratio, as well as electromechanical delay (EMD), and evoked contractile properties of the triceps surae. With the exception of EMD, massage and stretch did not significantly alter triceps surae evoked contractile properties. Massage with and without stretching decreased the soleus H/M ratio. Both TAP conditions provided greater H/M ratio depression than MTJ massage while the addition of stretch provided the greatest inhibition. Both massage types when combined with stretching increased the duration of the EMD. In conclusion, MTJ and TAP massage as well as stretching decreased spinal reflex excitability, with TAP providing the strongest suppression. While static stretching prolongs EMD, massage did not affect contractile properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of static stretching on prevention of injuries for military recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Masatoshi; Oda, Takaaki; Masuoka, Kazunori; Yokoi, Hiromichi; Campisi, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate whether static stretching can prevent training-related injuries in Japan Ground Self-Defense Force military recruits. A total of 901 recruits between 1996 and 1998 were divided into two groups. Of which, 518 recruits were assigned to the stretching group and practiced static stretching before and after each physical training session. The control subjects (383 recruits in the nonstretching group) did not stretch statically prior to exercise. The static stretching consisted of 18 exercises. We collected injury data from medical records and assessed the incidence and the location of injury. The total injury rate was almost the same between two groups; however, the incidences of muscle/tendon injury and low back pain were significantly lower in the stretching group (p stretching decreased the incidence of muscle-related injuries but did not prevent bone or joint injuries.

  10. Acute changes in hamstrings musculo-articular dissipative properties induced by cyclic and static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordez, A; McNair, P; Casari, P; Cornu, C

    2008-05-01

    This study was designed to measure changes in musculo-articular dissipative properties related to viscosity that were induced by passive cyclic and static stretching. Musculo-articular dissipative properties were assessed by calculating a dissipation coefficient using potential elastic energies stored and restituted during cyclic stretching. Eight subjects performed five passive knee extensions/flexions cycles on a Biodex dynamometer at 5 degrees . s (-1) to 80 % of their maximal range of motion before and after a static stretching protocol. Electromyographic activity from the hamstring muscles was monitored and remained constant during cyclic stretching and after static stretching (p > 0.05). The dissipation coefficient decreased during cyclic stretching (- 28.8 +/- 6.0 %, p musculo-articular dissipative properties were primarily affected by a single cycle of motion, and were not influenced by static stretching procedures. The decrease in dissipation coefficient following cyclic motion indicates that the musculo-articular system displays thixotropic behavior.

  11. Raman spectrum of plutonium dioxide: Vibrational and crystal field modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, M.; Magnani, N.; Bonales, L. J.; Mastromarino, S.; Colle, J.-Y.; Cobos, J.; Manara, D.

    2017-03-01

    The Raman spectrum of plutonium dioxide is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Particular attention has been devoted to the identification of high-energy modes at 2110 and 2620 c m-1 , whose attribution has so far been controversial. The temperature dependence of both modes suggests an electronic origin for them. Original crystal field (CF) calculations reported in this work show that these two modes can be respectively assigned to the Γ1→Γ5 and Γ1→Γ3 CF transitions within the I54 manifold. These two modes, together with the only vibrational line foreseen by the group theory for the F m -3 m Pu O2 symmetry—the T2 gPu -O stretching mode observed at 478 c m-1 —can thus be used as a Raman fingerprint of fcc plutonium dioxide.

  12. Stretching Effects: High-intensity & Moderate-duration vs. Low-intensity & Long-duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Andrade, R; Mil-Homens, P

    2016-03-01

    This study examined whether a high-intensity, moderate-duration bout of stretching would produce the same acute effects as a low-intensity, long-duration bout of stretching. 17 volunteers performed 2 knee-flexor stretching protocols: a high-intensity stretch (i. e., 100% of maximum tolerable passive torque) with a moderate duration (243.5 ± 69.5-s); and a low-intensity stretch (50% of tolerable passive torque) with a long duration (900-s). Passive torque at a given sub-maximal angle, peak passive torque, maximal range of motion (ROM), and muscle activity were assessed before and after each stretching protocol (at intervals of 1, 30 and 60 min). The maximal ROM and tolerable passive torque increased for all time points following the high-intensity stretching (p0.05). 1 min post-stretching, the passive torque decreased in both protocols, but to a greater extent in the low-intensity protocol. 30 min post-test, torque returned to baseline for the low-intensity protocol and had increased above the baseline for the high-intensity stretches. The following can be concluded: 1) High-intensity stretching increases the maximal ROM and peak passive torque compared to low-intensity stretching; 2) low-intensity, long-duration stretching is the best way to acutely decrease passive torque; and 3) high-intensity, moderate-duration stretching increases passive torque above the baseline 30 min after stretching. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Unilateral Plantar Flexors Static-Stretching Effects on Ipsilateral and Contralateral Jump Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josinaldo Jarbas da Silva, David George Behm, Willy Andrade Gomes, Fernando Henrique Domingues de Oliveira Silva, Enrico Gori Soares, Érica Paes Serpa, Guanis de Barros Vilela Junior, Charles Ricardo Lopes, Paulo Henrique Marchetti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static-stretching (SS on the passive range of movement (ROM of the stretched limb, surface electromyography (sEMG and single-leg bounce drop jump (SBDJ performance measures of the ipsilateral stretched and contralateral non-stretched lower limbs. Seventeen young men (24 ± 5 years performed SBDJ before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch unilateral ankle plantar flexor SS (6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort. SBDJ performance measures included jump height, impulse, time to reach peak force, contact time as well as the sEMG integral (IEMG and pre-activation (IEMGpre-activation of the gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive ROM increased in the stretched limb after the SS (pre-test: 21 ± 4° and post-test: 26.5 ± 5°, p < 0.001. Post-stretching decreases were observed with peak force (p = 0.029, IEMG (P<0.001, and IEMGpre-activation (p = 0.015 in the stretched limb; as well as impulse (p = 0.03, and jump height (p = 0.032 in the non-stretched limb. In conclusion, SS effectively increased passive ankle ROM of the stretched limb, and transiently (less than 10 minutes decreased muscle peak force and pre-activation. The decrease of jump height and impulse for the non-stretched limb suggests a SS-induced central nervous system inhibitory effect.

  14. Ransom, Religion, and Red Giants: C.S. Lewis and Fred Hoyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Famed fantasy writer C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) was known to friends as a well-read astronomy aficionado. However, this medieval scholar and Christian apologist embraced a pre-Copernican universe (with its astrological overtones) in his Chronicles of Narnia series and defended the beauty and relevance of the geocentric model in his final academic work, "The Discarded Image". In the "Ransom Trilogy” ("Out of the Silent Planet", "Perelandra", and "That Hideous Strength") philologist Ransom (loosely based on Lewis's close friend J.R.R. Tolkien) travels to Lewis's visions of Mars and Venus, where he interacts with intelligent extraterrestrials, battles with evil scientists, and aids in the continuation of extraterrestrial Christian values. In the final book, Ransom is joined by a handful of colleagues in open warfare against the satanic N.I.C.E. (National Institute for Coordinated Experiments). Geneticist and evolutionary biologist J.B.S. Haldane criticized Lewis for his scientifically inaccurate descriptions of the planets, and his disdain for the scientific establishment. Lewis responded to the criticism in essays of his own. Another of Lewis's favorite scientific targets was atheist Fred Hoyle, whom he openly criticized for anti-Christian statements in Hoyle's BBC radio series. Writer and Lewis friend Dorothy L. Sayers voiced her own criticism of Hoyle. In a letter, Lewis dismissed Hoyle as "not a great philosopher (and none of my scientific colleagues think much of him as a scientist.” Given Lewis's lack of respect for Hoyle, and use of creative license in describing the planets, and the flat-earth, "geocentric” Narnia, it is surprising that Lewis very carefully includes an astronomically correct description of red giants in two novels in the Narnia series ("The Magician's Nephew" and "The Last Battle"). This inclusion is even more curious given that Fred Hoyle is well-known as one of the pioneers in the field of stellar death and the properties of red giants.

  15. Ultrafast quantitative time-stretch imaging flow cytometry of phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Queenie T. K.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive quantification of phytoplankton abundance, sizes and other parameters, e.g. biomasses, has been an important, yet daunting task in aquatic sciences and biofuel research. It is primarily because of the lack of effective tool to image and thus accurately profile individual microalgae in a large population. The phytoplankton species are highly diversified and heterogeneous in terms of their sizes and the richness in morphological complexity. This fact makes time-stretch imaging, a new ultrafast real-time optical imaging technology, particularly suitable for ultralarge-scale taxonomic classification of phytoplankton together with quantitative image recognition and analysis. We here demonstrate quantitative imaging flow cytometry of single phytoplankton based on quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) - a new time-stretch imaging modality for label-free quantitative phase imaging without interferometric implementations. Sharing the similar concept of Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM accesses multiple phase-gradient contrasts of each single phytoplankton, from which the quantitative phase profile is computed. We employ such system to capture, at an imaging line-scan rate of 11.6 MHz, high-resolution images of two phytoplankton populations (scenedesmus and chlamydomonas) in ultrafast microfluidic flow (3 m/s). We further perform quantitative taxonomic screening analysis enabled by this technique. More importantly, the system can also generate quantitative phase images of single phytoplankton. This is especially useful for label-free quantification of biomasses (e.g. lipid droplets) of the particular species of interest - an important task adopted in biofuel applications. Combining machine learning for automated classification, Q-ATOM could be an attractive platform for continuous and real-time ultralarge-scale single-phytoplankton analysis.

  16. Resistance training vs. static stretching: effects on flexibility and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sam K; Whitehead, James R; Brinkert, Ronald H; Caine, Dennis J

    2011-12-01

    Morton, SK, Whitehead, JR, Brinkert, RH, and Caine, DJ. Resistance training vs. static stretching: Effects on flexibility and strength. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3391-3398, 2011-The purpose of this study was to determine how full-range resistance training (RT) affected flexibility and strength compared to static stretching (SS) of the same muscle-joint complexes in untrained adults. Volunteers (n = 25) were randomized to an RT or SS training group. A group of inactive volunteers (n = 12) served as a convenience control group (CON). After pretesting hamstring extension, hip flexion and extension, shoulder extension flexibility, and peak torque of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, subjects completed 5-week SS or RT treatments in which the aim was to stretch or to strength train the same muscle-joint complexes over similar movements and ranges. Posttests of flexibility and strength were then conducted. There was no difference in hamstring flexibility, hip flexion, and hip extension improvement between RT and SS, but both were superior to CON values. There were no differences between groups on shoulder extension flexibility. The RT group was superior to the CON in knee extension peak torque, but there were no differences between groups on knee flexion peak torque. The results of this preliminary study suggest that carefully constructed full-range RT regimens can improve flexibility as well as the typical SS regimens employed in conditioning programs. Because of the potential practical significance of these results to strength and conditioning programs, further studies using true experimental designs, larger sample sizes, and longer training durations should be conducted with the aim of confirming or disproving these results.

  17. Elastography Study of Hamstring Behaviors during Passive Stretching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Le Sant

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of hamstring muscles are usually inferred from global passive torque/angle relationships, in combination with adjoining tissues crossing the joint investigated. Shear modulus measurement provides an estimate of changes in muscle-tendon stiffness and passive tension. This study aimed to assess the passive individual behavior of each hamstring muscle in different stretching positions using shear wave elastography.The muscle shear modulus of each hamstring muscle was measured during a standardized slow passive knee extension (PKE, 80% of maximal range of motion on eighteen healthy male volunteers. Firstly, we assessed the reliability of the measurements. Results were good for semitendinosus (ST, CV: 8.9%-13.4%, semimembranosus (SM, CV: 10.3%-11.2% and biceps femoris long-head (BF-lh, CV: 8.6%-13.3%, but not for biceps femoris short-head (BF-sh, CV: 20.3%-44.9%. Secondly, we investigated each reliable muscle in three stretch positions: 70°, 90° and 110° of hip flexion. The results showed different values of shear modulus for the same amount of perceived stretch, with the highest measurements in the high-flexed hip situation. Moreover, individual muscles displayed different values, with values increasing or BF-lh, SM and ST, respectively. The inter-subject variability was 35.3% for ST, 27.4% for SM and 30.2% for BF-lh.This study showed that the hip needs to be high-flexed to efficiently tension the hamstrings, and reports a higher muscle-tendon stress tolerance at 110° of hip angle. In addition muscles have different passive behaviors, and future works will clarify if it can be linked with rate of injury.

  18. Muon anomalous magnetic moment due to the brane stretching effect

    CERN Document Server

    Sawa, K

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of extra dimensions to muon anomalous magnetic moment using a 6-dimensional model. The approach analyzes the extent to which small brane fluctuations influence the magnetic moment. In particular, we assume that the fluctuations are static in time, which add the new potential terms to the schr{\\"o}dinger equation through the induced vierbein. This paper shows that the fluctuations result in the brane stretching effect due to the negative tension. The effect would be a capable of reproducing the appropriate order for the recent BNL measurements of the muon (g-2) deviation.

  19. Stretched Lens Array (SLA) Photovoltaic Concentrator Hardware Development and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael; O'Neill, Mark J.; Eskenazi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, the Stretched Lens Array (SLA) photovoltaic concentrator has evolved, under a NASA contract, from a concept with small component demonstrators to operational array hardware that is ready for space validation testing. A fully-functional four panel SLA solar array has been designed, built and tested. This paper will summarize the focus of the hardware development effort, discuss the results of recent testing conducted under this program and present the expected performance of a full size 7kW array designed to meet the requirements of future space missions.

  20. A dynamical model for the full stretching curve of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We present a phenomenological dynamical model able to describe the stretching features of a length \\textit{vs} applied force DNA curve. As concerning the chain, the model grounds on the discrete worm-like chain model with the elastic modifications, which properly describes the elongation features at low and intermediate forces. At high forces the dynamics, developed under a double well potential with a cubic term, accounts for the narrow transition present in the DNA elongation (overstretching). An good agreement between simulation and experiment is obtained.

  1. Stretching Submicron Biomolecules with Constant-Force Axial Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Fan; Blab, Gerhard A.; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2009-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become powerful tools to manipulate biomolecular systems, but are increasingly difficult to use when the size of the molecules is optical manipulation protocol that makes this length scale accessible by stretching the molecule in the axial direction of the laser beam, thus avoiding limiting artifacts from steric hindrances from the microscope coverslip and other surface effects. The molecule is held under constant mechanical tension by a combination of optical gradient forces and backscattering forces, eliminating the need for electronic feedback. We demonstrate the utility of this method through a measurement of the force-extension relationship of a 1298 bp ds-DNA molecule. PMID:19486692

  2. HSZ 220 and 260 steel with excellent stretch formability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, G.; Heckelmann, I.; Menne, M. [Thyssenkrupp Stahl AG, Duisburg (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    As has been shown in the stretch forming and deep drawing tests, the newly developed HSZ steels are particularly suitable for the production of large exposed car body parts, such as roofs, doors and hoods. They are rather unfavourable for applications required higher drawing depths. Owing to its excellent strain hardening behaviour and a relatively high yield strength, the HSZ steel grades exhibits a good dent resistance. For weight reduction purposes, it is possible to replace soft aluminium-killed steels or IF steels by HSZ steels with reduced sheet thicknesses. If corrosion protection is required, HSZ grades are also available electrogalvanized. (orig.)

  3. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with convective boundary condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Hayat; M Waqas; S A Shehzad; A Alsaedi

    2016-01-01

    The steady laminar boundary layer flow of Carreau nanofluid over a stretching sheet is investigated. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are present. Heat transfer is characterized using convective boundary condition at the sheet. The governing partial differential equations are reduced into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations through suitable transformations. Results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are computed via homotopic procedure. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and discussed. A comparative study with existing solutions in a limiting sense is made.

  4. Doxycycline reduces plasma VEGF-C/sVEGFR-3 and improves pathology in lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrah, Alexander Yaw; Mand, Sabine; Specht, Sabine; Marfo-Debrekyei, Yeboah; Batsa, Linda; Pfarr, Kenneth; Larbi, John; Lawson, Bernard; Taylor, Mark; Adjei, Ohene; Hoerauf, Achim

    2006-09-01

    lymphedema in the doxycycline-treated patients being significantly lower compared to placebo patients 12 mo after treatment. The reduction in the stages manifested as better skin texture, a reduction of deep folds, and fewer deep skin folds. In conclusion, a 6-wk regimen of antifilarial treatment with doxycycline against W. bancrofti showed a strong macrofilaricidal activity and reduction in plasma levels of VEGF-C/sVEGFR-3, the latter being associated with amelioration of supratesticular dilated lymphatic vessels and with an improvement of pathology in lymphatic filariasis patients.

  5. Doxycycline reduces plasma VEGF-C/sVEGFR-3 and improves pathology in lymphatic filariasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Yaw Debrah

    2006-09-01

    the mean stage of lymphedema in the doxycycline-treated patients being significantly lower compared to placebo patients 12 mo after treatment. The reduction in the stages manifested as better skin texture, a reduction of deep folds, and fewer deep skin folds. In conclusion, a 6-wk regimen of antifilarial treatment with doxycycline against W. bancrofti showed a strong macrofilaricidal activity and reduction in plasma levels of VEGF-C/sVEGFR-3, the latter being associated with amelioration of supratesticular dilated lymphatic vessels and with an improvement of pathology in lymphatic filariasis patients.

  6. Effects of contraction intensity on muscle fascicle and stretch reflex behavior in the human triceps surae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Neil J; Peltonen, Jussi; Ishikawa, Masaki; Komi, Paavo V; Avela, Janne; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Voigt, Michael

    2008-07-01

    The aims of this study were to examine changes in the distribution of a stretch to the muscle fascicles with changes in contraction intensity in the human triceps surae and to relate fascicle stretch responses to short-latency stretch reflex behavior. Thirteen healthy subjects were seated in an ankle ergometer, and dorsiflexion stretches (8 degrees ; 250 degrees /s) were applied to the triceps surae at different moment levels (0-100% of maximal voluntary contraction). Surface EMG was recorded in the medial gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior muscles, and ultrasound was used to measure medial gastrocnemius and soleus fascicle lengths. At low forces, reflex amplitudes increased despite a lack of change or even a decrease in fascicle stretch velocities. At high forces, lower fascicle stretch velocities coincided with smaller stretch reflexes. The results revealed a decline in fascicle stretch velocity of over 50% between passive conditions and maximal force levels in the major muscles of the triceps surae. This is likely to be an important factor related to the decline in stretch reflex amplitudes at high forces. Because short-latency stretch reflexes contribute to force production and stiffness regulation of human muscle fibers, a reduction in afferent feedback from muscle spindles could decrease the efficacy of human movements involving the triceps surae, particularly where high force production is required.

  7. Effects of Contract-Relax, Static Stretching, and Isometric Contractions on Muscle-Tendon Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Anthony D; Husbands-Beasley, Jade; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2015-10-01

    Loading characteristics of stretching techniques likely influence the specific mechanisms responsible for acute increases in range of motion (ROM). Therefore, the effects of a version of contract-relax (CR) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching, static stretching (SS), and maximal isometric contraction (Iso) interventions were studied in 17 healthy human volunteers. Passive ankle moment was recorded on an isokinetic dynamometer, with EMG recording from the triceps surae, simultaneous real-time motion analysis, and ultrasound-imaging-recorded gastrocnemius medialis muscle and Achilles tendon elongation. Subjects then performed each intervention randomly on separate days before reassessment. Significant increases in dorsiflexion ROM (2.5°-5.3°; P stretching (P stretching and Iso (17.7%-22.1%; P 0.05), whereas significant reductions in muscle stiffness occurred after CR stretching and SS (16.0%-20.5%; P 0.05). Increases in peak passive moment (stretch tolerance) occurred after Iso (6.8%; P stretching (10.6%; P = 0.08), and SS (5.2%; P = 0.08); no difference in changes between conditions was found (P > 0.05). Significant correlations (rs = 0.69-0.82; P stretching suggest a broader adaptive response that likely explains its superior efficacy in acutely increasing ROM. Although mechanical changes appear tissue-specific between interventions, similar increases in stretch tolerance after all interventions are strongly correlated with changes in ROM.

  8. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materials and Methods: Sixty trained male subjects (Mean ± SD: height, 177.38 ± 6.92 cm; body mass, 68.4 ± 10.22 kg; age, 21.52 ± 1.17 years) volunteered to participate in this study. SROM was measured by V-sit test and DROM captured by a motion analysis system before and after (i) static stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (SFSE), (ii) dynamic stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (DFDE), (iii) static stretching for the hip flexors and dynamic stretching for hip extensors (SFDE), and (iv) dynamic stretching for the hip flexors and static stretching for hip extensors (DFSE). Results: DFSE showed a significantly higher increase in DROM and SROM than the remainder of the stretching protocols (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between DFDE with SFSE and SFDE (P < 0.05) and SFSE showed significant increase as compared to SFDE (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, DFSE is probably the best stretching arrangement due to producing more post activation potentiation on agonist muscles and less muscle stiffness in antagonist muscles. PMID:26715975

  9. Voltage Mode-to-Current Mode Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejmal S. Rathore

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a procedure for converting a class of Op Amp-, FTFN-, CC- and CFAbased voltage mode circuits to corresponding current mode circuits without requiring any additional circuit elements and finally from Op Amp-based voltage mode circuits to any of the FTFN, CC and CFA current mode circuits. The latter circuits perform better at high frequency than the former ones. The validity of the transformation has been checked on simulated circuits with PSPICE.

  10. Physical analogs that help to better understand the modern concepts on continental stretching, hyperextension and rupturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalan, Pedro

    2014-05-01

    modes envisaged by Manatschal and Peron-Pinvidic in several works published in the last ten years, dealing with the development of conjugate rifted margins (stretching, thinning, hyperextension/exhumation, oceanization/breakup), can be found in physical analogs of geological nature and of mundane phenomena, in a much smaller scale than that of a continental rupture. Rocks strained and cut by normal faults, especially the brittle sedimentary rocks, display geometries and structural domains, which in turn were formed by the particular deformation modes, very similar to those published for the Norwegian, Angolan and Southeastern Brazilian margins. A non-geological and non-conventional physical analog is the everyday breakup of a chocolate bar. Given it is stuffed by a thick ductile filling and covered by a thin, brittle chocolate layer; it is incredible how such a common phenomenon can replicate the rupture and breakup of a mega-continent. Such physical analogs can be compared to ultra-deep seismic sections and raise a cloud of incertitude on the definition of hyperextension. Instead of representing the coupling of the deformation of the upper and lower crusts into a brittle mode, rather, hyperextension could correspond to their coupling into a plastic or, at least, into a semi-brittle mode, but not into an entirely brittle mode.

  11. MHD biconvective flow of Powell Eyring nanofluid over stretched surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Faiza; Shafiq, Anum; Zhao, Lifeng; Naseem, Anum

    2017-06-01

    The present work is focused on behavioral characteristics of gyrotactic microorganisms to describe their role in heat and mass transfer in the presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) forces in Powell-Eyring nanofluids. Implications concerning stretching sheet with respect to velocity, temperature, nanoparticle concentration and motile microorganism density were explored to highlight influential parameters. Aim of utilizing microorganisms was primarily to stabilize the nanoparticle suspension due to bioconvection generated by the combined effects of buoyancy forces and magnetic field. Influence of Newtonian heating was also analyzed by taking into account thermophoretic mechanism and Brownian motion effects to insinuate series solutions mediated by homotopy analysis method (HAM). Mathematical model captured the boundary layer regime that explicitly involved contemporary non linear partial differential equations converted into the ordinary differential equations. To depict nanofluid flow characteristics, pertinent parameters namely bioconvection Lewis number Lb, traditional Lewis number Le, bioconvection Péclet number Pe, buoyancy ratio parameter Nr, bioconvection Rayleigh number Rb, thermophoresis parameter Nt, Hartmann number M, Grashof number Gr, and Eckert number Ec were computed and analyzed. Results revealed evidence of hydromagnetic bioconvection for microorganism which was represented by graphs and tables. Our findings further show a significant effect of Newtonian heating over a stretching plate by examining the coefficient values of skin friction, local Nusselt number and the local density number. Comparison was made between Newtonian fluid and Powell-Eyring fluid on velocity field and temperature field. Results are compared of with contemporary studies and our findings are found in excellent agreement with these studies.

  12. Stretched exponential relaxation and ac universality in disordered dielectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milovanov, Alexander V.; Rypdal, Kristoffer; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the connection between the properties of dielectric relaxation and alternating-current (ac) conduction in disordered dielectrics. The discussion is divided between the classical linear-response theory and a self-consistent dynamical modeling. The key issues are stretc......This paper is concerned with the connection between the properties of dielectric relaxation and alternating-current (ac) conduction in disordered dielectrics. The discussion is divided between the classical linear-response theory and a self-consistent dynamical modeling. The key issues...... are stretched exponential character of dielectric relaxation, power-law power spectral density, and anomalous dependence of ac conduction coefficient on frequency. We propose a self-consistent model of dielectric relaxation in which the relaxations are described by a stretched exponential decay function....... Mathematically, our study refers to the expanding area of fractional calculus and we propose a systematic derivation of the fractional relaxation and fractional diffusion equations from the property of ac universality....

  13. Extension by faulting, stretching and magma intrusion in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastow, I. D.; Keir, D.

    2012-12-01

    The 2001-2004 Ethiopia Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment showed that high seismic wavespeed, dense, mafic crustal intrusions exist beneath many zones of Quaternary magmatism in the Main Ethiopian rift, and that crustal thinning is minimal. From these observations, a consensus quickly emerged that extension presently occurs not by ductile stretching and brittle faulting but by magma intrusion. Striking InSAR images and accompanying seismic data from the 2005 Afar diking episode provided further compelling evidence in support of the magma assisted rifting hypothesis. Patterns of mantle seismic anisotropy, constrained by a combination of body and surface-wave analysis showed that melt intrusion likely also plays an important role in accommodating extension at greater depths in the extending plate. Evidence from further north in Afar, however, where crustal thickness decreases abruptly into the Danakil Depression, is not so easily explained by the magma assisted rifting hypothesis. Subsidence of the newly forming margin towards and below sea level, and eruption of voluminous basalt flows, is likely the result of late-stage thinning of the heavily intruded, weakened plate just before the onset of seafloor spreading. Faulting, stretching and magma intrusion are thus each important, but at different times during breakup. Combining, not isolating, these mechanisms of strain in new rifting models and appreciating how plate strength varies during rifting is essential in developing a clearer understanding of the incomplete geological record that documents continental breakup over time.

  14. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  15. Dynamic rotation and stretch tensors from a dynamic polar decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, George

    2016-01-01

    The local rigid-body component of continuum deformation is typically characterized by the rotation tensor, obtained from the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient. Beyond its well-known merits, the polar rotation tensor also has a lesser known dynamical inconsistency: it does not satisfy the fundamental superposition principle of rigid-body rotations over adjacent time intervals. As a consequence, the polar rotation diverts from the observed mean material rotation of fibers in fluids, and introduces a purely kinematic memory effect into computed material rotation. Here we derive a generalized polar decomposition for linear processes that yields a unique, dynamically consistent rotation component, the dynamic rotation tensor, for the deformation gradient. The left dynamic stretch tensor is objective, and shares the principal strain values and axes with its classic polar counterpart. Unlike its classic polar counterpart, however, the dynamic stretch tensor evolves in time without spin. The dynamic rotation tensor further decomposes into a spatially constant mean rotation tensor and a dynamically consistent relative rotation tensor that is objective for planar deformations. We also obtain simple expressions for dynamic analogues of Cauchy's mean rotation angle that characterize a deforming body objectively.

  16. Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer over a Permeable Stretching Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Vajravelu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze the effects of thermo-physical properties on the axisymmetric flow of a viscous fluid induced by a stretching cylinder in the presence of internal heat generation/absorption. It is assumed that the cylinder is stretched in the axial direction with a linear velocity and the surface temperature of the cylinder is subjected to vary linearly. Here, the temperature dependent thermo-physical properties namely, the fluid viscosity and the fluid thermal conductivity are respectively assumed to vary as an inverse function of the temperature and a linear function of the temperature. The governing system of partial differential equations is converted into a system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. The resulting system is solved numerically using a second order finite difference scheme known as the Keller-box method. The governing equations of the problem show that the flow and heat transfer characteristics depend on six parameters, namely the curvature parameter, fluid viscosity parameter, injection/suction parameter, variable thermal conductivity parameter, heat source/sink parameter and the Prandtl number. The numerical values obtained for the velocity, temperature, skin friction, and the Nusselt number are presented through graphs and tables for several sets of values of the pertinent parameters. The results obtained for the flow and heat transfer characteristics reveal many interesting behaviors that warrant further study on the axisymmetric flow phenomena. Comparisons with the available results in the literature are presented as special cases.

  17. The carpal stretch test at the rheumatoid wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Matsusita, Kazuhiko; Arai, Takeshi; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic changes of the carpus for rheumatoid wrists in patients who underwent the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure by examining the clinical results and comparing pre- and postoperative radiographic measurements. We studied 43 wrists in 37 patients who showed vertical laxity in the radiocarpal and midcarpal joint on preoperative carpal stretch test. Pain was improved in all patients and the forearm rotation angles of the wrist were significantly improved after the operation. The carpal collapse ratio was significantly reduced after the operation. The carpal collapse reduction rate was significantly greater in the group with than that in the group without midcarpal joint vertical laxity on the carpal stretch test. Although the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure was not sufficiently effective in preventing carpal collapse, it did have a protective effect against ulnar carpal shift. The results of our study showed that vertical laxity of the midcarpal joint was the risk factor of the carpal collapse after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

  18. Connectin filaments in stretched skinned fibers of frog skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of highly stretched skinned frog semi-tendinous muscle fibers revealed that connectin, an elastic protein of muscle, is located in the gap between actin and myosin filaments and also in the region of myosin filaments except in their centers. Electron microscopic observations showed that there were easily recognizable filaments extending from the myosin filaments to the I band region and to Z lines in the myofibrils treated with antiserum against connectin. In thin sections prepared with tannic acid, very thin filaments connected myosin filaments to actin filaments. These filaments were also observed in myofibrils extracted with a modified Hasselbach-Schneider solution (0.6 M KCl, 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, 2 mM ATP, 2 mM MgCl2, and 1 mM EGTA) and with 0.6 M Kl. SDS PAGE revealed that connectin (also called titin) remained in extracted myofibrils. We suggest that connectin filaments play an important role in the generation of tension upon passive stretch. A scheme of the cytoskeletal structure of myofibrils of vertebrate skeletal muscle is presented on the basis of our present information of connectin and intermediate filaments. PMID:6384237

  19. Tangential stretching rate (TSR) analysis of non premixed reactive flows

    KAUST Repository

    Valorani, Mauro

    2016-10-16

    We discuss how the Tangential stretching rate (TSR) analysis, originally developed and tested for spatially homogeneous systems (batch reactors), is extended to spatially non homogeneous systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of the TSR diagnostics, we study the ignition transient in a non premixed, reaction–diffusion model in the mixture fraction space, whose dependent variables are temperature and mixture composition. The reactive mixture considered is syngas/air. A detailed H2/CO mechanism with 12 species and 33 chemical reactions is employed. We will discuss two cases, one involving only kinetics as a model of front propagation purely driven by spontaneous ignition, the other as a model of deflagration wave involving kinetics/diffusion coupling. We explore different aspects of the system dynamics such as the relative role of diffusion and kinetics, the evolution of kinetic eigenvalues, and of the tangential stretching rates computed by accounting for the combined action of diffusion and kinetics as well for kinetics only. We propose criteria based on the TSR concept which allow to identify the most ignitable conditions and to discriminate between spontaneous ignition and deflagration front.

  20. Tweed Relaxation: a new multigrid smoother for stretched structured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Thomas; Mashayekhi, Alireza

    2012-11-01

    In DNS/LES of the NSE using a fractional step method, one must accurately solve a Poisson equation for the pressure update at each timestep. This step often represents a significant fraction of the overall computational burden and, when Fourier methods are unavailable, geometric multigrid methods are a preferred choice. When working on an unstretched Cartesian grid, the red-black Gauss-Seidel method is the most efficient multigrid smoother available. When working on a Cartesian grid that is stretched in 1 coordinate direction to provide grid clustering near a wall, zebra relaxation, on sets of lines perpendicular to the wall, is most efficient. When working on a structured grid that is stretched in 2 or 3 coordinate directions, however, one is forced to alternate the directions that the zebra relaxation is applied in order to pass information quickly across all regions of grid clustering. A new relaxation method is introduced which is shown to significantly outperform such alternating direction line smoothers. This new method is implicit along sets of lines that branch and form 90° corners, like the stripes at the shoulder of a tweed shirt, to stay everywhere perpendicular to the nearest wall, thus passing information quickly across all regions of grid clustering.

  1. Saturation of Zeldovich Stretch-Twist-Fold Map Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, Amit; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Zeldovich's stretch-twist fold (STF) dynamo provided a breakthrough in conceptual understanding of fast dynamos, including fluctuation or small scale dynamos. We study the evolution and saturation behaviour of two types of Baker's map dynamos, which have been used to model Zeldovich's STF dynamo process. Using such maps allows one to analyze dynamos at much higher magnetic Reynolds numbers $R_M$ as compared to direct numerical simulations. In the 2-strip map dynamo there is constant constructive folding while the 4-strip map dynamo also allows the possibility of field reversal. Incorporating a diffusive step parameterised by $R_M$, we find that the magnetic field $B(x)$ is amplified only above a critical $R_M=R_{crit} \\sim 4$ for both types of dynamos. We explore the saturation of these dynamos in 3 ways; by a renormalized decrease of the effective $R_M$ (Case I) or due to a decrease in the efficiency of field amplification by stretching (Case II), or a combination of both effects (Case III). For Case I, we s...

  2. Mechanistic studies of a novel C-S lyase in ergothioneine biosynthesis: the involvement of a sulfenic acid intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Heng; Hu, Wen; Naowarojna, Nathchar; Her, Ampon Sae; Wang, Shu; Desai, Rushil; Qin, Li; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    Ergothioneine is a histidine thio-derivative isolated in 1909. In ergothioneine biosynthesis, the combination of a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme catalyzed oxidative C-S bond formation reaction and a PLP-mediated C-S lyase (EgtE) reaction results in a net sulfur transfer from cysteine to histidine side-chain. This demonstrates a new sulfur transfer strategy in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing natural products. Due to difficulties associated with the overexpression of Mycobacterium smegmatis EgtE protein, the proposed EgtE functionality remained to be verified biochemically. In this study, we have successfully overexpressed and purified M. smegmatis EgtE enzyme and evaluated its activities under different in vitro conditions: C-S lyase reaction using either thioether or sulfoxide as a substrate in the presence or absence of reductants. Results from our biochemical characterizations support the assignment of sulfoxide 4 as the native EgtE substrate and the involvement of a sulfenic acid intermediate in the ergothioneine C-S lyase reaction.

  3. Thiourea in the Construction of C-S Bonds as Part of an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guo-ping; Chen, Fei; Cai, Chun

    2017-01-01

    The nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction and thia-Michael addition using thiourea as an odorless, cheap, and easy-to-handle sulfur source in water are described, which can be used to teach upper-division undergraduates the role of thiourea in the formation of C-S bonds and the principles of green chemistry. The use of a cheap, nontoxic…

  4. Protein C/S ratio, an accurate and simple tool to identify carriers of a protein C gene mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libourel, EJ; Meinardi, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Ruiters, MHJ; van der Meer, J; van der Schaaf, W; Veenstra, R.

    Hereditary protein C deficiency is demonstrated by lowered protein C plasma levels in a patient and at least one first-degree relative. This approach is insufficient in some cases owing to overlapping protein C levels in carriers and non-carriers of a protein C gene mutation. The protein C/S ratio

  5. Computer Simulation of the E.C.C.S. Buckling Curve using a Monte-Carlo Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strating, J.; Vos, H.

    1973-01-01

    The application of a Monte-Carlo simulation procedure to obtain the distribution function of the maximum load of a hinged column with imperfections is discussed. Buckling tests carried out by the E.C.C.S. on IPE 160 sections have been simulated. Information concerning the column variables is obtaine

  6. Final Evaluation Report for the C.S. 211 Bilingual Gifted and Talented Program 1978-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Stephan F.; Toledo, Victor

    This report provides a program description and evaluation findings of a bilingual program for gifted and talented children conducted at C.S. 211, an elementary school serving black and Hispanic children in an economically deprived area of the Bronx, New York. The program's goals, which included above grade level reading and mathematics performance…

  7. Silver-mediated decarboxylative C-S cross-coupling of aliphatic carboxylic acids under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Dai, Jian-Jun; Feng, Yi-Si; Xu, Hua-Jian

    2014-09-05

    A silver-mediated decarboxylative C-S cross-coupling reaction of aliphatic carboxylic acid is described. This reaction occurs smoothly under mild conditions and shows good tolerance of functional groups. It provides an alternative approach for the synthesis of alkyl aryl sulfides.

  8. The acute effects of static and ballistic stretching on vertical jump performance in trained women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unick, Jessica; Kieffer, H Scott; Cheesman, Wendy; Feeney, Anna

    2005-02-01

    Traditionally stretching has been included as part of a warm-up that precedes athletic participation. However, there is mixed evidence as to whether stretching actually enhances or hinders athletic performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of static (SS) and ballistic stretching (BS) on vertical jump (VJ) performance and to investigate whether power was altered at 15 and 30 minutes after stretching. Sixteen actively trained women performed a series of vertical jumps (countermovement and drop jumps) after an initial nonstretching (NS) session and after participating in BS and SS sessions that were conducted in a balanced and randomized order. The results indicated that there was no significant difference (p ballistic stretching, elapsed time, or initial flexibility scores. This suggests that stretching prior to competition may not negatively affect the performance of trained women.

  9. The Effects of Hamstring Stretching on Leg Rotation during Knee Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsushi

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of hamstring stretching on leg rotation during active knee extension. [Subjects] Subjects were 100 bilateral legs of 50 healthy women without articular disease. [Methods] Hamstring hardness, leg rotation and muscle activities of the knee extensors during active knee extension were measured before and after hamstring stretching. [Results] Hamstring hardness was significantly decreased after hamstring stretching. The leg rotation angle, variation in leg rotation angle, variation in leg external rotation angle, and muscle activities of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were significantly increased after hamstring stretching. A moderate positive correlation was found between variation in leg rotation and variation in muscle hardness in hamstring. [Conclusion] Leg rotation during active knee extension was increased by hamstring stretching. Hamstring stretching would be effective as a pretreatment for restoring proper leg rotation when knee extension is conducted as a therapeutic exercise.

  10. The uptake of Cs, Cl, I, Co, U and Pu by C-S-H, portlandite and ettringite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Callonnec, C.; Richet, C.; Ayache, R

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the retention of Pu, Cs, Cl, U, Co and I onto the three phases of a cement paste: calcium silicate hydrates or C-S-H (Ca/Si=1.65), portlandite (Ca(OH){sub 2}) and ettringite (Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 2}S{sub 3}O{sub 21}.32H{sub 2}O). C-S-H of Ca/Si molar ratio of 1.65 and ettringite were prepared in suspension, while portlandite was provided by an industrial laboratory. The sorptive power for each ion was determined by a batch model at 20 degrees Celsius. The uptake of ions onto the phases has been obtained by introducing a very small volume of radioactive Cs, Co, Cl, I, U and Pu solution in each batch. Aliquots of solution were periodically removed for analysis. The results show that there are two kinds of ions whatever the solid phase: those which are poorly sorbed: Cs, Cl, I and Co, U and Pu which are strongly sorbed (by a factor 100 to 10000). Elsewhere, the comparison between the sorptive power of each phase reveals that C-S-H develops a significant sorption potential for pluri-valent ions (Pu, U, Co) as well as for Cl. The retention capacity of portlandite mainly towards pluri-valent cations is one or two orders of magnitude weaker than C-S-H capacity. Ettringite only plays a sorptive role relatively to Cs. However, iodine does not have a strong affinity for any solid at all. The data allow us to calculate a global sorption coefficient Kd of the cement paste for each ion. Assuming that the proportion of C-S-H, portlandite, ettringite is respectively 65%, 15% and 5% in a Portland cement, the global sorption coefficient is in good agreement with literature regarding on U, Cs, I and Cl. Cementitious materials appear to be an interesting chemical barrier that can limit the diffusion of pluri-valent cations. As C-S-H represent from 60% to 75% of the cement paste, this study leads to underline that C-S-H is mainly responsible for the retention capacity of cementitious materials specially towards U, Pu, Co, Cl although its sorption power is

  11. Comparing the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Steven L; Kim, Eonho; Seo, Dong-Il; Bemben, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men. Twenty-one men were randomly assigned to vibration-stretching (VS; n = 8), vibration only (VO; n = 6), or stretching only (SO; n = 7) groups that trained 3 times per week for 3 weeks. All 3 groups performed 9 total sets of 30-second stretches. The VS group performed four 30-second upper-body vibration exercises and five 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. The VO group performed nine 30-second upper-body vibration exercises. The SO group performed nine 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. Shoulder flexion (SF), shoulder extension (SE), and shoulder transverse extension (STE) were assessed by a Leighton Flexometer and back scratch tests bilaterally (BSR, BSL) were measured via tape measure. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated groups at baseline and a 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA evaluated the interventions over time. At baseline, there were no group differences in age, height, or weight. There was a significant (p flexibility outcome variable (SF: +6.1%, +3.9%, +3.4%; SE: +8.9%, +13.5%, +26.9%; STE: +12.8%, +8.7%, +24.3%; BSR: +4.4 cm, +3.4 cm, +3.1 cm; BSL: +3.6 cm, +2.3 cm, +6.1 cm) for SO, VO, and VS, respectively. Shoulder extension was the only variable that showed a significant (p training, alone or combined with stretching, is a viable alternative to a standard stretching routine when attempting to increase shoulder flexibility. Adding vibration training to a flexibility regimen may improve the likelihood of regularly performing flexibility sessions because of increased variety.

  12. Effects of G-trainer, cycle ergometry, and stretching on physiological and psychological recovery from endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Amy D; Cooke, Matthew B; LaBounty, Paul M; Byars, Allyn G; Greenwood, Mike

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 3 treatment modes (Anti-Gravity Treadmill [G-trainer], stationary cycling [CompuTrainer], and static stretching) on the physiological and psychological recovery after an acute bout of exhaustive exercise. In a crossover design, 12 aerobically trained men (21.3 ± 2.3 years, 72.1 ± 8.1 kg, 178.4 ± 6.3 cm, (Equation is included in full-text article.): 53.7 ± 6.3 ml·kg·min) completed a 29-km stationary cycling time trial. Immediately after the time trial, subjects completed 30 minutes of G-trainer or CompuTrainer (40% (Equation is included in full-text article.)) or static stretching exercises. A significant time effect was detected for plasma lactate (p = 0.010) and serum cortisol (p = 0.039) after exercise. No treatment or treatment by time interaction was identified for lactate or cortisol, respectively. No main effects for time, treatment, or treatment by time interaction were identified for interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). No differences were observed among treatments in skeletal muscle peak power output, mean power output, time to peak power, and rate to fatigue at 24 hours postexercise bout. Finally, no significant changes in mood status were observed after exercise and between treatment groups. When compared with stationary cycling and static stretching, exercise recovery performed on the G-trainer was unable to reduce systemic markers of stress and inflammation, blood lactate, or improve anaerobic performance and psychological mood states after an exhaustive bout of endurance exercise. Further research is warranted that includes individualized recovery modalities to create balances between the stresses of training and competition.

  13. STATIC VERSUS PNF STRETCHING IN HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY-A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Naga Prahalada Karnati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stretching used as a technique for injury prevention in the clinical settings, the study aimed to determine the early findings of hamstring tightness with both groups in the population, now a days the sedentary activities like prolonged sitting might cause hamstring tightness and change in path kinematics of gait intern lead to postural defects and back pain, understanding of the stretching helps clinician to make decisions for rehabilitation. Methods: Across-sectional study, counterbalanced with repeated-measures , one group with static stretch – (double hamstring stretch and hurdlers stretch for 3 times,30seconds subsequently in another group PNF contract relax(agonist contraction technique for 10 seconds position and 10 seconds stretch repeated for 3 times. Results: The results from data and statistical analysis by using t-test, SPSS obtained by using goniometer are tabulated in terms of mean, standard deviation and p-value in both groups. In experimental group flexion with PNF showed improvement 9.27±1.91(right side, 9.53±2.42(left side and static stretching showed 7.8±2.91(right side, 7.47±1.96(left side this proves that PNF has consistent improvement than static stretching. Conclusions: Static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching both have produced greater improvement but compared with PNF contract relax(agonist stretching showed significant change in hamstring flexibility compared with control group . The effect sizes, however corresponding to these stretching-induced changes were small, which suggests the need for practitioners to consider a risk-to-benefit ratio when incorporating static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching.

  14. Orientation-specific responses to sustained uniaxial stretching in focal adhesion growth and turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Pasapera, Ana M.; Koretsky, Alan P.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Cells are mechanosensitive to extracellular matrix (ECM) deformation, which can be caused by muscle contraction or changes in hydrostatic pressure. Focal adhesions (FAs) mediate the linkage between the cell and the ECM and initiate mechanically stimulated signaling events. We developed a stretching apparatus in which cells grown on fibronectin-coated elastic substrates can be stretched and imaged live to study how FAs dynamically respond to ECM deformation. Human bone osteosarcoma epithelial cell line U2OS was transfected with GFP-paxillin as an FA marker and subjected to sustained uniaxial stretching. Two responses at different timescales were observed: rapid FA growth within seconds after stretching, and delayed FA disassembly and loss of cell polarity that occurred over tens of minutes. Rapid FA growth occurred in all cells; however, delayed responses to stretch occurred in an orientation-specific manner, specifically in cells with their long axes perpendicular to the stretching direction, but not in cells with their long axes parallel to stretch. Pharmacological treatments demonstrated that FA kinase (FAK) promotes but Src inhibits rapid FA growth, whereas FAK, Src, and calpain 2 all contribute to delayed FA disassembly and loss of polarity in cells perpendicular to stretching. Immunostaining for phospho-FAK after stretching revealed that FAK activation was maximal at 5 s after stretching, specifically in FAs oriented perpendicular to stretch. We hypothesize that orientation-specific activation of strain/stress-sensitive proteins in FAs upstream to FAK and Src promote orientation-specific responses in FA growth and disassembly that mediate polarity rearrangement in response to sustained stretch. PMID:23754369

  15. Acute effect of stretching one leg on regional arterial stiffness in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Fujie, Shumpei; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2017-06-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that a single bout of stretching exercises acutely reduced arterial stiffness. We hypothesized that this acute vascular response is due to regional mechanical stimulation of the peripheral arteries. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of a single bout of passive one leg stretching on arterial stiffness, comparing the stretched and the non-stretched leg in the same subject. Twenty-five healthy young men (20.9 ± 0.3 years, 172.5 ± 1.4 cm, 64.1 ± 1.2 kg) volunteered for the study. Subjects underwent a passive calf stretching on one leg (six repetitions of 30-s static stretch with a 10-s recovery). Pulse wave velocity (PWV, an index of arterial stiffness), blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured before and immediately, 15, and 30 min after the stretching. Femoral-ankle PWV (faPWV) in the stretched leg was significantly decreased from baseline (835.0 ± 15.9 cm/s) to immediately (802.9 ± 16.8 cm/s, P stretching, despite no changes in systolic and diastolic BP, or HR. However, faPWV in the non-stretched leg was not significantly altered at any time. Brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) also showed similar responses with faPWV, but this response was not significant. Additionally, the passive stretching did not alter carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV). These results suggest that mechanical stimulation to peripheral arteries as induced by static passive stretch may modulate arterial wall properties directly, rather than resulting in a systemic effect.

  16. Lewis lung carcinoma regulation of mechanical stretch-induced protein synthesis in cultured myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Carson, James A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stretch can activate muscle and myotube protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. While it has been established that tumor-derived cachectic factors can induce myotube wasting, the effect of this catabolic environment on myotube mechanical signaling has not been determined. We investigated whether media containing cachectic factors derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) can regulate the stretch induction of myotube protein synthesis. C2C12 myotubes preincubated in control or LLC-derived media were chronically stretched. Protein synthesis regulation by anabolic and catabolic signaling was then examined. In the control condition, stretch increased mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis. The LLC treatment decreased basal mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis and attenuated the stretch induction of protein synthesis. LLC media increased STAT3 and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in myotubes, independent of stretch. Both stretch and LLC independently increased ERK1/2, p38, and NF-κB phosphorylation. In LLC-treated myotubes, the inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 rescued the stretch induction of protein synthesis. Interestingly, either leukemia inhibitory factor or glycoprotein 130 antibody administration caused further inhibition of mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis in stretched myotubes. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibition increased basal mTORC1 signaling activity and protein synthesis in LLC-treated myotubes, but did not restore the stretch induction of protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that LLC-derived cachectic factors can dissociate stretch-induced signaling from protein synthesis through ERK1/2 and p38 signaling, and that glycoprotein 130 signaling is associated with the basal stretch response in myotubes.

  17. The effects of passive stretching plus vibration on strength and activation of the plantar flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Mosier, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effects of passive stretching only (PS+CON) and passive stretching with the addition of continuous vibration (VIB) during post-passive stretching tests (PS+VIB) on peak torque (PT), percent voluntary inactivation (%VI), single stimulus twitch torque (TTSINGLE), and doublet stimuli twitch torque (TTDOUBLET) of the plantar flexors at a short (20° plantar flexion (PF)) and long muscle length (15° dorsiflexion (DF)). Fourteen healthy men (age = 22 ± 3 years) performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions at PF and DF, and passive range of motion (PROM) assessments before and after 8 × 30-s passive stretches without (PS+CON) or with VIB (PS+VIB) administered continuously throughout post-passive stretching tests. The passive properties of the muscle tendon unit were assessed pre- and post-passive stretching via PROM, passive torque (PASSTQ), and musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) measurements. PT, TTSINGLE, and TTDOUBLET decreased, whereas, %VI increased following passive stretching at PF and DF (P stretching during both trials (P stretching-induced force/torque deficit and increases in %VI were evident following passive stretching at short and long muscle lengths. Although not statistically significant, effect size calculations suggested large and moderate differences in the absolute changes in PT (Cohen's d = 1.14) and %VI (Cohen's d = 0.54) from pre- to post-passive stretching between treatments, with PS+VIB having greater decreases of PT and higher %VI than PS+CON. The decrement in PT following passive stretching may be primarily neural in origin.

  18. Stretching training affects erythrocyte rheological properties and anaerobic performance in healthy young males

    OpenAIRE

    Toprak, Emine Kılıç; Koçak, Fatma Ünver; Erken, Gülten; Küçükatay, Melek Bor

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stretching exercise training is used to improve flexibility and performance. This study aimed to investigate the short and long-term effects of stretching exercise on flexibility, performance, red blood cell (RBC) deformability and aggregation. METHODS: 7 young male subjects (mean age 20.71±0.52 years) participated to the study. Stretching protocol consisted of 3 repetitions for 60 seconds, 3 days/week, 6 weeks. Blood samples were obtained before and immediately after the stretc...

  19. Effects of passive static stretching on blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study determined the effects of passive static stretching on blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. [Subjects] Fifteen patients (8 males and 7 females) with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned to the control group or passive static stretching group. [Methods] Glycated hemoglobin was measured before and after the 8-week training period. [Results] Glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly in the passive static stretching group, and there ...

  20. Force enhancement during and following muscle stretch of maximal voluntarily activated human quadriceps femoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2007-08-01

    Force enhancement during and following muscle stretch has been observed for electrically and voluntarily activated human muscle. However, especially for voluntary contractions, the latter observation has only been made for adductor pollicis and the ankle joint muscles, but not for large muscles like quadriceps femoris. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of active muscle stretch on force production for maximal voluntary contractions of in vivo human quadriceps femoris (n = 15). Peak torques during and torques at the end of stretch, torques following stretch, and passive torques following muscle deactivation were compared to the isometric torques at corresponding muscle length. In addition, muscle activation of rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis was obtained using surface EMG. Stretches with different amplitudes (15, 25 and 35 degrees at a velocity of 60 degrees s(-1)) were performed on the plateau region and the descending limb of the force-length relation in a random order. Data analysis showed four main results: (1) peak torques did not occur at the end of the stretch, but torques at the end of the stretch exceeded the corresponding isometric torque; (2) there was no significant force enhancement following muscle stretch, but a small significant passive force enhancement persisted for all stretch conditions; (3) forces during and following stretch were independent of stretch amplitude; (4) muscle activation during and following muscle stretch was significantly reduced. In conclusion, although our results showed passive force enhancement, we could not provide direct evidence that there is active force enhancement in voluntarily activated human quadriceps femoris.

  1. PONDEROSA-C/S: client-server based software package for automated protein 3D structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Stark, Jaime L; Markley, John L

    2014-11-01

    Peak-picking Of Noe Data Enabled by Restriction Of Shift Assignments-Client Server (PONDEROSA-C/S) builds on the original PONDEROSA software (Lee et al. in Bioinformatics 27:1727-1728. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btr200, 2011) and includes improved features for structure calculation and refinement. PONDEROSA-C/S consists of three programs: Ponderosa Server, Ponderosa Client, and Ponderosa Analyzer. PONDEROSA-C/S takes as input the protein sequence, a list of assigned chemical shifts, and nuclear Overhauser data sets ((13)C- and/or (15)N-NOESY). The output is a set of assigned NOEs and 3D structural models for the protein. Ponderosa Analyzer supports the visualization, validation, and refinement of the results from Ponderosa Server. These tools enable semi-automated NMR-based structure determination of proteins in a rapid and robust fashion. We present examples showing the use of PONDEROSA-C/S in solving structures of four proteins: two that enable comparison with the original PONDEROSA package, and two from the Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination by NMR (Rosato et al. in Nat Methods 6:625-626. doi: 10.1038/nmeth0909-625 , 2009) competition. The software package can be downloaded freely in binary format from http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html. Registered users of the National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison can submit jobs to the PONDEROSA-C/S server at http://ponderosa.nmrfam.wisc.edu, where instructions, tutorials, and instructions can be found. Structures are normally returned within 1-2 days.

  2. Preparation and vibrational modes of C60·2CHBr3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    C60·2CHBr3 polycrystalline powder was prepared by the solution method. The vibrational modes of the sample were studied by Raman scattering and infrared adsorption techniques. The Raman spectra showed that the Ag modes were downshifted by 4-5 cm1, while the Hg(1) mode was unshifted. The analyses of the downshifts of the Ag modes revealed that a small amount of electrons were transferred from the hydrogen atoms to the C60 molecules. In the infrared spectra, the F1u modes of the pristine C60 were unshifted after the intercalation with CHBr3. However, the vibrational modes of CHBr3 changed remarkably. The C-Br stretching mode was downshifted by ~4 cm1. The adsorption of the C-H twisting mode was weakened obviously, and the adsorption of the C-H stretching mode was not observed. These results exhibited that there were nonnegligible interactions between CHBr3 and C60 molecules, and that the strongest interaction took place between the hydrogen atoms and the C60 molecules. The interaction should induce not only the changes of the vibrational modes reported here, but also those of the electronic states. So this work should offer important glues to the mechanism of the superconductivity at 117 K of the field-doped C60·2CHBr3.

  3. Golgi tendon organ reflex inhibition following manually applied acute static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Burne, John A

    2014-01-01

    Golgi tendon organ disinhibition may contribute to exercise-associated muscle cramp (henceforth referred to as "cramps") genesis. Static stretching pre-exercise is prescribed to prevent cramps based on the assumption golgi tendon organ inhibition remains elevated post-stretching. We determined whether stretching increased gastrocnemius golgi tendon organ inhibition and, if so, the time course of this inhibition post-stretching. Twelve participants' dominant limb medial gastrocnemius inhibition was measured before, and at 1, 5, 10, 15 and 30 min after investigators applied three, 1-min duration stretches. Participants maintained voluntary contraction intensities of 5% of their maximum while the Achilles tendon was stimulated transcutaneously 50 times. Five-hundred millisecond epochs of raw electromyographic activity were band-pass filtered, full-wave rectified and averaged. An algorithm identified inhibitory points and calculated the area, maximum and duration of inhibition. Area of inhibition (F1,14 = 1.5, P = 0.25), maximum inhibition (F1,14 = 0.2, P = 0.72) and duration of inhibition (F1,14 = 1.5, P = 0.24) were unaffected by static stretching over the 30-min post-stretching period. If pre-stretching does prevent fatigue-induced cramping, the mechanism is unlikely to involve the autoinhibition produced by the golgi tendon organ reflex. Further empirical research is needed to validate the proposed link between static stretching and cramping and then to investigate alternative mechanisms.

  4. Enhanced Age Strengthening of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr Alloy via Pre-Stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erjun Guo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pre-stretching was carried out to modify the microstructure of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy to enhance its age strengthening. The results indicated that more heterogeneous nucleation sites can be provided by the high density of dislocations caused by the plastic pre-stretching deformation, as well as speeding up the growth rate of precipitates. Comparison of microstructure in non-pre-stretched specimens after artificial aging showed that pre-stretched specimens exhibited a higher number density of precipitates. The fine and coarse plate-shaped precipitates were found in the matrix. Due to an increase in the number density of precipitates, the dislocation slipping during the deformation process is effectively hindered, and the matrix is strengthened. The yield strength stabilizes at 4% pre-stretching condition, and then the evolution is stable within the error bars. The 8% pre-stretched specimens can achieve an ultimate tensile strength of 297 MPa. However, further pre-stretching strains after 8% cannot supply any increase in strength. Tensile fracture surfaces of specimens subjected to pre-stretching strain mainly exhibit a trans-granular cleavage fracture. This work indicated that a small amount of pre-stretching strain can further increase strength of alloy and also effectively enhance the formation of precipitates, which can expand the application fields of this alloy.

  5. A Model for Stress Fiber Realignment Caused by Cytoskeletal Fluidization During Cyclic Stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirentis, Athanassios P; Peruski, Elizabeth; Iordan, Andreea L; Stamenović, Dimitrije

    2011-03-01

    Uniaxial cyclic substrate stretching results in a concerted change of cytoskeletal organization such that stress fibers (SFs) realign away from the direction of stretching. Recent experiments revealed that brief transient stretch promptly ablates cellular contractile stress by means of cytoskeletal fluidization, followed by a slow stress recovery by means of resolidification. This, in turn, suggests that fluidization, resolidification and SF realignment may be linked together during stretching. We propose a mathematical model that simulates the effects of fluidization and resolidification on cytoskeletal contractile stress in order to investigate how these phenomena affect cytoskeletal realignment in response to pure uniaxial stretching of the substrate. The model comprises of individual elastic SFs anchored at the endpoints to an elastic substrate. Employing the global stability convention, the model predicts that in response to repeated stretch-unstretch cycles, SFs tend to realign in the direction perpendicular to stretching, consistent with data from the literature. The model is used to develop a computational scheme for predicting changes in cell orientation and polarity during stretching and how they relate to the underlying alterations in the cytoskeletal organization. We conclude that depletion of cytoskeletal contractile stress by means of fluidization and subsequent stress recovery by means of resolidification may play a key role in reorganization of cytoskeletal SFs in response to uniaxial stretching of the substrate.

  6. Effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury: systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herbert, Rob D; Gabriel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness after exercise, risk of injury, and athletic performance. Method: Systematic review. Data sources...

  7. The Effect of Cyclic Stretching on Matrix Production, Mineralization and Differentiation of Osteoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Jian(秦建); Tang Liling; Wang Yuanliang; Gu Li

    2003-01-01

    A four-point bending apparatus is used to investigate the effects of stretching on collagen synthesis, mineralization and differentiation of osteoblasts. Cells are stretched at 1500 με for 24 hours. The responses of osteoblasts to mechanical signal of physiological stretching are evaluated from three aspects: collagen production, extracellular inorganic calcium secretion and ALP activity. The results show that osteoblasts decrease the collagen synthesis, calcium secretion and ALP activity compared to the control cells (65.82%,73.51%,48.10% respectively), confirming that cyclic stretching at 1500 με inhabits the physiological activity of osteoblasts.

  8. Intermittent stretch training of rabbit plantarflexor muscles increases soleus mass and serial sarcomere number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jaeger, Dominique; Joumaa, Venus; Herzog, Walter

    2015-06-15

    In humans, enhanced joint range of motion is observed after static stretch training and results either from an increased stretch tolerance or from a change in the biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. We investigated the effects of an intermittent stretch training on muscle biomechanical and structural variables. The left plantarflexors muscles of seven anesthetized New Zealand (NZ) White rabbits were passively and statically stretched three times a week for 4 wk, while the corresponding right muscles were used as nonstretched contralateral controls. Before and after the stretching protocol, passive torque produced by the left plantarflexor muscles as a function of the ankle angle was measured. The left and right plantarflexor muscles were harvested from dead rabbits and used to quantify possible changes in muscle structure. Significant mass and serial sarcomere number increases were observed in the stretched soleus but not in the plantaris or medial gastrocnemius. This difference in adaptation between the plantarflexors is thought to be the result of their different fiber type composition and pennation angles. Neither titin isoform nor collagen amount was modified in the stretched compared with the control soleus muscle. Passive torque developed during ankle dorsiflexion was not modified after the stretch training on average, but was decreased in five of the seven experimental rabbits. Thus, an intermittent stretching program similar to those used in humans can produce a change in the muscle structure of NZ White rabbits, which was associated in some rabbits with a change in the biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit.

  9. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Stretching-induced nanostructures on shape memory polyurethane films and their regulation to osteoblasts morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Juan; Ma, Yufei; Lin, Manping; Wang, Yuanliang; Pan, Haobo; Ruan, Changshun; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    Programming such as stretching, compression and bending is indispensible to endow polyurethanes with shape memory effects. Despite extensive investigations on the contributions of programming processes to the shape memory effects of polyurethane, less attention has been paid to the nanostructures of shape memory polyurethanes surface during the programming process. Here we found that stretching could induce the reassembly of hard domains and thereby change the nanostructures on the film surfaces with dependence on the stretching ratios (0%, 50%, 100%, and 200%). In as-cast polyurethane films, hard segments sequentially assembled into nano-scale hard domains, round or fibrillar islands, and fibrillar apophyses. Upon stretching, the islands packed along the stretching axis to form reoriented fibrillar apophyses along the stretching direction. Stretching only changed the chemical patterns on polyurethane films without significantly altering surface roughness, with the primary composition of fibrillar apophyses being hydrophilic hard domains. Further analysis of osteoblasts morphology revealed that the focal adhesion formation and osteoblasts orientation were in accordance with the chemical patterns of the underlying stretched films, which corroborates the vital roles of stretching-induced nanostructures in regulating osteoblasts morphology. These novel findings suggest that programming might hold great potential for patterning polyurethane surfaces so as to direct cellular behavior. In addition, this work lays groundwork for guiding the programming of shape memory polyurethanes to produce appropriate nanostructures for predetermined medical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joong-Chul; Lee, Sung-Wan; Yeo, Yun-Ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed.

  12. Effects of passive static stretching on blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Hoon

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study determined the effects of passive static stretching on blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. [Subjects] Fifteen patients (8 males and 7 females) with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned to the control group or passive static stretching group. [Methods] Glycated hemoglobin was measured before and after the 8-week training period. [Results] Glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly in the passive static stretching group, and there were significant differences in blood glucose levels between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Passive static stretching of the skeletal muscles may be an alternative to exercise to help regulate blood glucose levels in diabetes patients.

  13. Acute effects of passive stretching of the plantarflexor muscles on neuromuscular function: the influence of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Eric D; Herda, Trent J; Costa, Pablo B; Herda, Ashley A; Cramer, Joel T

    2014-01-01

    The acute effects of stretching on peak force (Fpeak), percent voluntary activation (%VA), electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, maximum range of motion (MROM), peak passive torque, the passive resistance to stretch, and the percentage of ROM at EMG onset (%EMGonset) were examined in 18 young and 19 old men. Participants performed a MROM assessment and a maximal voluntary contraction of the plantarflexors before and immediately after 20 min of passive stretching. Fpeak (-11 %), %VA (-6 %), and MG EMG amplitude (-9 %) decreased after stretching in the young, but not the old (P > 0.05). Changes in Fpeak were related to reductions in all muscle activation variables (r = 0.56-0.75), but unrelated to changes in the passive resistance to stretch (P ≥ 0.24). Both groups experienced increases in MROM and peak passive torque and decreases in the passive resistance to stretch. However, the old men experienced greater changes in MROM (P stretching for both groups (P = 0.213), but occurred earlier in the old (P = 0.06). The stretching-induced impairments in strength and activation in the young but not the old men may suggest that the neural impairments following stretching are gamma-loop-mediated. In addition, the augmented changes in MROM and passive torque and the lack of change in %EMGonset for the old men may be a result of age-related changes in muscle-tendon behavior.

  14. Acute decrease in the stiffness of resting muscle belly due to static stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Shinohara, M; Nozaki, S; Katayose, M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the acute effect of static stretching exercise on the resting stiffness of gastrocnemius muscle belly. Ten healthy young adults performed standing wall stretching in dorsiflexion for 1 min at a time and repeated five times. Before and after stretching, the shear modulus was measured in medial and lateral heads of the resting gastrocnemius muscle with ultrasound shear-wave elastography. After the stretching, dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint increased (P stretching, shear modulus decreased (P stretching across muscle heads. The decrease in shear modulus returned in 20 min after stretching. In the comparison group of 10 additional subjects, the standing intervention without stretching had no influence on these measures. There was a negative correlation between dorsiflexion ROM and shear modulus in either head before and after stretching. The results demonstrate the transient decreases in the stiffness of the resting gastrocnemius muscle belly and indicate that joint flexibility is greater in individuals with lower resting stiffness of the muscle belly.

  15. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CARDIAC MYOCYTE DEBONDING AND REORIENTATION DURING CYCLIC SUBSTRATE STRETCH EXPERIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Tang; Jun Qiu; Meng Zhang; Zhuo Zhuang

    2009-01-01

    The substrate stretch experiment, which is carried out on several kinds of adherent cells, is usually used to catch the physiological variation and morphological response to cyclic substrate deformation. In this paper, stretch loading was exerted on cardiac myocytes cultured on silica substrates using a custom-made substrate stretch device. The effect of stretch on the alignment orientation of cardiac myocytes was studied through morphocytological statistics. Under cyclic stretch stimulus, the long axes of cardiac myocytes oriented perpendicularly to the stretch direction for continuous stretch acting. However, the mechanism underlying these behaviors is not well understood from such in vitro tests. Finite element (FE) model was developed in the analysis to investigate these behaviors. Xu-Needleman formulation was used to define the interaction behavior for contact surfaces between cell and substrate. The role of cell viscoelasticity nature is studied in adherent cell debonding with the substrate and aligning perpendicular to the stretch direction during long time cyclic stretch stimulation. There were four different strain magnitudes considered in the simulation to find out the cell debonding affected by the cyclic strains. The potential role of cyclic strain frequency in regulating cell debonding and alignment was also studied using FE analysis.

  16. Impact of stretching-segment on saturated flow rate of signalized intersection using cellular automation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岩; 陈宽民; 过秀成

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze the impact of stretching-segment on the saturated flow rate of signalized intersection approach, an improved cellular automation model was proposed to estimate its saturated flow rate. The NaSch model was improved by adding different slow probabilities, turning deceleration rules and modified lane changing rules. The relationship between the saturated flow rate of stretching-segments and adjacent lanes was tested in numerical simulation. The length of stretching-segment, cycle length and green time were selected as impact factors of the cellular automation model. The simulation result indicates that the geometrics design of stretching-segment and the traffic signal timing scenario have major effects on the saturated flow rate of the intersection approach. The saturated flow rate will continually increase with increasing stretching-segment length until it reaches a threshold. After reaching the threshold, the stretching-segment can be treated as a separate lane. The green time is approximately linearly related to the threshold length of the stretching-segment. An optimum cycle length exists when the length of the stretching-segment is not long enough, and it is approximately linearly related to the length of stretching-segment.

  17. Mechanical Stretch on Human Skin Equivalents Increases the Epidermal Thickness and Develops the Basement Membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Tokuyama

    Full Text Available All previous reports concerning the effect of stretch on cultured skin cells dealt with experiments on epidermal keratinocytes or dermal fibroblasts alone. The aim of the present study was to develop a system that allows application of stretch stimuli to human skin equivalents (HSEs, prepared by coculturing of these two types of cells. In addition, this study aimed to analyze the effect of a stretch on keratinization of the epidermis and on the basement membrane. HSEs were prepared in a gutter-like structure created with a porous silicone sheet in a silicone chamber. After 5-day stimulation with stretching, HSEs were analyzed histologically and immunohistologically. Stretch-stimulated HSEs had a thicker epidermal layer and expressed significantly greater levels of laminin 5 and collagen IV/VII in the basal layer compared with HSEs not subjected to stretch stimulation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the structure of the basement membrane was more developed in HSEs subjected to stretching. Our model may be relevant for extrapolating the effect of a stretch on the skin in a state similar to an in vivo system. This experimental system may be useful for analysis of the effects of stretch stimuli on skin properties and wound healing and is also expected to be applicable to an in vitro model of a hypertrophic scar in the future.

  18. EFFECTS OF DYNAMIC AND STATIC STRETCHING WITHIN GENERAL AND ACTIVITY SPECIFIC WARM-UP PROTOCOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Samson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1 general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2 general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3 general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4 general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested for movement time (kicking movement of leg over 0.5 m distance, countermovement jump height, sit and reach flexibility and 6 repetitions of 20 metre sprints. Results indicated that when a sport specific warm-up was included, there was an 0.94% improvement (p = 0.0013 in 20 meter sprint time with both the dynamic and static stretch groups. No such difference in sprint performance between dynamic and static stretch groups existed in the absence of the sport specific warm-up. The static stretch condition increased sit and reach range of motion (ROM by 2.8% more (p = 0.0083 than the dynamic condition. These results would support the use of static stretching within an activity specific warm-up to ensure maximal ROM along with an enhancement in sprint performance

  19. Impact of acute static-stretching on the optimal height in drop jumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo A. Pasqua

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the effect of static stretching on performance during drop jumps. Furthermore, we investigated if a reduction in drop height would compensate the stretching-caused alterations. Ten physically active male subjects performed drop jumps at four different drop heights without static stretching for the optimal drop height determination. After, they performed drop jumps on two drop heights with static stretching previously. The jump height, contact time and reactive strength index were significantly affected by static stretching. However, only the contact time was significantly improved by the reduction in drop height with previous static stretching. Our results suggest that the decrement in performance after static stretching could be partially compensated by a reduction in drop height, which decreases the contact time near a non-stretching jump condition. This can be explained by the lower landing velocity and, possibly, the smaller reduction in the activation of the plantar flexors muscles. In conclusion, the reduction in drop height seems to be interesting after a static stretching session, aiming to expose the athletes to lower impact forces to maintain jump performance.

  20. Printing of CNT/silicone rubber for a wearable flexible stretch sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Agee S.; Giffney, Tim; Lee, Jim; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Aw, Kean C.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a simple printing method for a highly resilient stretch sensor. The stretch sensors, based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/silicon rubber (Ecoflex® 00-30) polymer nanocomposites, were printed on silicon rubber (SR) substrate. The sensors exhibit good hysteresis with high linearity and small drift. Due to the biocompatibility of SR and is very soft, strong and able to be stretched many times its original size without tearing and will rebound to its original form without distortion, the proposed stretch sensor is suitable for many biomedical and wearable sensors application.