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Sample records for c-jun n-terminal kinase

  1. c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0431 TITLE: “c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ” PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE “c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Scelerosis” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER... Lateral   Sclerosis ”   Final  Report:  Project  Period  Sept  2012-­‐Dec  2014     Personnel  List:     Feng,  Yangbo

  2. Correlation between spina bifida manifesta in fetal rats and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yinghuan; Bao, Yongxin; Li, Chenghao; Jiao, Fubin; Xin, Hongjie; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2012-01-01

    Fetal rat models with neural tube defects were established by injection with retinoic acid at 10 days after conception. The immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis showed that the number of caspase-3 positive cells in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta was increased. There was also increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, a member of the mitogen activated protein kinase family. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation level was positively correlated with caspase-3 expression in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta. Experimental findings indicate that abnormal apoptosis is involved in retinoic acid-induced dominant spina bifida formation in fetal rats, and may be associated with the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signal transduction pathway. PMID:25337099

  3. Evolutionary conserved role of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase in CO2-induced epithelial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Vadász

    Full Text Available Elevated CO(2 levels (hypercapnia occur in patients with respiratory diseases and impair alveolar epithelial integrity, in part, by inhibiting Na,K-ATPase function. Here, we examined the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK in CO(2 signaling in mammalian alveolar epithelial cells as well as in diptera, nematodes and rodent lungs. In alveolar epithelial cells, elevated CO(2 levels rapidly induced activation of JNK leading to downregulation of Na,K-ATPase and alveolar epithelial dysfunction. Hypercapnia-induced activation of JNK required AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and protein kinase C-ζ leading to subsequent phosphorylation of JNK at Ser-129. Importantly, elevated CO(2 levels also caused a rapid and prominent activation of JNK in Drosophila S2 cells and in C. elegans. Paralleling the results with mammalian epithelial cells, RNAi against Drosophila JNK fully prevented CO(2-induced downregulation of Na,K-ATPase in Drosophila S2 cells. The importance and specificity of JNK CO(2 signaling was additionally demonstrated by the ability of mutations in the C. elegans JNK homologs, jnk-1 and kgb-2 to partially rescue the hypercapnia-induced fertility defects but not the pharyngeal pumping defects. Together, these data provide evidence that deleterious effects of hypercapnia are mediated by JNK which plays an evolutionary conserved, specific role in CO(2 signaling in mammals, diptera and nematodes.

  4. c-Jun N-Terminal Kinases (JNKs) Are Critical Mediators of Osteoblast Activity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Zhang, Chao; Shin, Dong Yeon; Kim, Jung-Min; Lalani, Sarfaraz; Li, Na; Yang, Yeon-Suk; Liu, Yifang; Eiseman, Mark; Davis, Roger J; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Greenblatt, Matthew B

    2017-09-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are ancient and evolutionarily conserved regulators of proliferation, differentiation, and cell death responses. Currently, in vitro studies offer conflicting data about whether the JNK pathway augments or represses osteoblast differentiation, and the contribution of the JNK pathway to regulation of bone mass in vivo remains unclear. Here we show that Jnk1-/- mice display severe osteopenia due to impaired bone formation, whereas Jnk2-/- mice display a mild osteopenia only evident in long bones. In order to both confirm that these effects were osteoblast intrinsic and assess whether redundancy with JNK1 masks a potential contribution of JNK2, mice with a conditional deletion of both JNK1 and JNK2 floxed conditional alleles in osteoblasts (Jnk1-2osx ) were bred. These mice displayed a similar degree of osteopenia to Jnk1-/- mice due to decreased bone formation. In vitro, Jnk1-/- osteoblasts display a selective defect in the late stages of osteoblast differentiation with impaired mineralization activity. Downstream of JNK1, phosphorylation of JUN is impaired in Jnk1-/- osteoblasts. Transcriptome analysis showed that JNK1 is required for upregulation of several osteoblast-derived proangiogenic factors such as IGF2 and VEGFa. Accordingly, JNK1 deletion results in a significant reduction skeletal vasculature in mice. Taken together, this study establishes that JNK1 is a key mediator of osteoblast function in vivo and in vitro. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  5. Involvement of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase in TNF-α-Driven Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurlings, Irene M J; Reynaert, Niki L; van de Wetering, Cheryl; Aesif, Scott W; Mercken, Evi M; de Cabo, Rafael; van der Velden, Jos L; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M; Wouters, Emiel F M; Dentener, Mieke A

    2017-03-01

    Lung tissue remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airway wall thickening and/or emphysema. Although the bronchial and alveolar compartments are functionally independent entities, we recently showed comparable alterations in matrix composition comprised of decreased elastin content and increased collagen and hyaluronan contents of alveolar and small airway walls. Out of several animal models tested, surfactant protein C (SPC)-TNF-α mice showed remodeling in alveolar and airway walls similar to what we observed in patients with COPD. Epithelial cells are able to undergo a phenotypic shift, gaining mesenchymal properties, a process in which c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is involved. Therefore, we hypothesized that TNF-α induces JNK-dependent epithelial plasticity, which contributes to lung matrix remodeling. To this end, the ability of TNF-α to induce a phenotypic shift was assessed in A549, BEAS2B, and primary bronchial epithelial cells, and phenotypic markers were studied in SPC-TNF-α mice. Phenotypic markers of mesenchymal cells were elevated both in vitro and in vivo, as shown by the expression of vimentin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, collagen, and matrix metalloproteinases. Concurrently, the expression of the epithelial markers, E-cadherin and keratin 7 and 18, was attenuated. A pharmacological inhibitor of JNK attenuated this phenotypic shift in vitro, demonstrating involvement of JNK signaling in this process. Interestingly, activation of JNK signaling was also clearly present in lungs of SPC-TNF-α mice and patients with COPD. Together, these data show a role for TNF-α in the induction of a phenotypic shift in vitro, resulting in increased collagen production and the expression of elastin-degrading matrix metalloproteinases, and provide evidence for involvement of the TNF-α-JNK axis in extracellular matrix remodeling.

  6. TAK1 Participates in c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling during Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Stapleton, Mark; Danos, Maria C.; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; O'Connor, Michael B.; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Ueno, Naoto

    2000-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a member of the MAPKKK superfamily and has been characterized as a component of the TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway. TAK1 function has been extensively studied in cultured cells, but its in vivo function is not fully understood. In this study, we isolated a Drosophila homolog of TAK1 (dTAK1) which contains an extensively conserved NH2-terminal kinase domain and a partially conserved COOH-terminal domain. To learn about possible endogenous roles of TAK1 during animal development, we generated transgenic flies which express dTAK1 or the mouse TAK1 (mTAK1) gene in the fly visual system. Ectopic activation of TAK1 signaling leads to a small eye phenotype, and genetic analysis reveals that this phenotype is a result of ectopically induced apoptosis. Genetic and biochemical analyses also indicate that the c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is specifically activated by TAK1 signaling. Expression of a dominant negative form of dTAK during embryonic development resulted in various embryonic cuticle defects including dorsal open phenotypes. Our results strongly suggest that in Drosophila melanogaster, TAK1 functions as a MAPKKK in the JNK signaling pathway and participates in such diverse roles as control of cell shape and regulation of apoptosis. PMID:10757786

  7. Activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway aggravates proteotoxicity of hepatic mutant Z alpha1-antitrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Nunzia; Attanasio, Sergio; Granese, Barbara; Castello, Raffaele; Teckman, Jeffrey; Wilson, Andrew A; Ballabio, Andrea; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic disease that can affect both the lung and the liver. The vast majority of patients harbor a mutation in the serine protease inhibitor 1A (SERPINA1) gene leading to a single amino acid substitution that results in an unfolded protein that is prone to polymerization. Alpha1-antitrypsin defciency-related liver disease is therefore caused by a gain-of-function mechanism due to accumulation of the mutant Z alpha1-antitrypsin (ATZ) and is a key example of an disease mechanism induced by protein toxicity. Intracellular retention of ATZ triggers a complex injury cascade including apoptosis and other mechanisms, although several aspects of the disease pathogenesis are still unclear. We show that ATZ induces activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun and that genetic ablation of JNK1 or JNK2 decreased ATZ levels in vivo by reducing c-Jun-mediated SERPINA1 gene expression. JNK activation was confirmed in livers of patients homozygous for the Z allele, with severe liver disease requiring hepatic transplantation. Treatment of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell-hepatic cells with a JNK inhibitor reduced accumulation of ATZ. These data reveal that JNK is a key pathway in the disease pathogenesis and add new therapeutic entry points for liver disease caused by ATZ. (Hepatology 2017;65:1865-1874). © 2017 The Authors. Hepatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. Spinal release of tumour necrosis factor activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase and mediates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, D B; Abdelmoaty, S; Sandor, K; Codeluppi, S; Fitzsimmons, B; Steinauer, J; Hua, X Y; Yaksh, T L; Svensson, C I

    2015-02-01

    Mounting evidence points to individual contributions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway to the induction and maintenance of various pain states. Here we explore the role of spinal TNF and JNK in carrageenan-induced hypersensitivity. As links between TNF and JNK have been demonstrated in vitro, we investigated if TNF regulates spinal JNK activity in vivo. TNF levels in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, spinal TNF gene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction and TNF protein expression, JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation by western blotting. The role of spinal TNF and JNK in inflammation-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was assessed by injecting the TNF inhibitor etanercept and the JNK inhibitors SP600125 and JIP-1 intrathecally (i.t.). TNF-mediated regulation of JNK activity was examined by assessing the effect of i.t. etanercept on inflammation-induced spinal JNK activity. TNF levels were increased in CSF and spinal cord following carrageenan-induced inflammation. While JNK phosphorylation followed the same temporal pattern as TNF, c-jun was only activated at later time points. Intrathecal injection of TNF and JNK inhibitors attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity. TNF stimulation induced JNK phosphorylation in cultured spinal astrocytes and blocking the spinal actions of TNF in vivo by i.t. injection of etanercept reduced inflammation-induced spinal JNK activity. Here we show that spinal JNK activity is dependent on TNF and that both TNF and the JNK signalling pathways modulate pain-like behaviour induced by peripheral inflammation. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  9. Silymarin suppresses TNF-induced activation of NF-kappa B, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, S K; Mukhopadhyay, A; Van, N T; Aggarwal, B B

    1999-12-15

    Silymarin is a polyphenolic flavonoid derived from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) that has anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and anticarcinogenic effects. How silymarin produces these effects is not understood, but it may involve suppression of NF-kappa B, a nuclear transcription factor, which regulates the expression of various genes involved in inflammation, cytoprotection, and carcinogenesis. In this report, we investigated the effect of silymarin on NF-kappa B activation induced by various inflammatory agents. Silymarin blocked TNF-induced activation of NF-kappa B in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was mediated through inhibition of phosphorylation and degradation of Iota kappa B alpha, an inhibitor of NF-kappa B. Silymarin blocked the translocation of p65 to the nucleus without affecting its ability to bind to the DNA. NF-kappa B-dependent reporter gene transcription was also suppressed by silymarin. Silymarin also blocked NF-kappa B activation induced by phorbol ester, LPS, okadaic acid, and ceramide, whereas H2O2-induced NF-kappa B activation was not significantly affected. The effects of silymarin on NF-kappa B activation were specific, as AP-1 activation was unaffected. Silymarin also inhibited the TNF-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and abrogated TNF-induced cytotoxicity and caspase activation. Silymarin suppressed the TNF-induced production of reactive oxygen intermediates and lipid peroxidation. Overall, the inhibition of activation of NF-kappa B and the kinases may provide in part the molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of silymarin, and its effects on caspases may explain its role in cytoprotection.

  10. c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent apoptotic photocytotoxicity of solvent exchange-prepared curcumin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunovic, Verica; Ristic, Biljana; Markovic, Zoran; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Kosic, Milica; Prekodravac, Jovana; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Martinovic, Tamara; Micusik, Matej; Spitalsky, Zdeno; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica

    2016-04-01

    Indian spice curcumin is known for its anticancer properties, but the anticancer mechanisms of nanoparticulate curcumin have not been completely elucidated. We here investigated the in vitro anticancer effect of blue light (470 nm, 1 W)-irradiated curcumin nanoparticles prepared by tetrahydrofuran/water solvent exchange, using U251 glioma, B16 melanoma, and H460 lung cancer cells as targets. The size of curcumin nanocrystals was approximately 250 nm, while photoexcitation induced their oxidation and partial agglomeration. Although cell membrane in the absence of light was almost impermeable to curcumin nanoparticles, photoexcitation stimulated their internalization. While irradiation with blue light (1-8 min) or nanocurcumin (1.25-10 μg/ml) alone was only marginally toxic to tumor cells, photoexcited nanocurcumin displayed a significant cytotoxicity depending both on the irradiation time and nanocurcumin concentration. Photoexcited nanocurcumin induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), mitochondrial depolarization, caspase-3 activation, and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, indicating apoptotic cell death. Accordingly, pharmacologial inhibition of JNK and caspase activity rescued cancer cells from photoexcited nanocurcumin. On the other hand, antioxidant treatment did not reduce photocytotoxicity of nanocurcumin, arguing against the involvement of oxidative stress. By demonstrating the ability of photoexcited nanocurcumin to induce oxidative-stress independent, JNK- and caspase-dependent apoptosis, our results support its further investigation in cancer therapy.

  11. Phosphorylation of purified mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 modifies channel voltage-dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2017-06-01

    Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) phosphorylated by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 (JNK3) was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single-channel electrophysiological properties of the native and the phosphorylated VDAC were compared. The open probability versus voltage curve of the native VDAC displayed symmetry around the voltage axis, whereas that of the phosphorylated VDAC showed asymmetry. This result indicates that phosphorylation by JNK3 modifies voltage-dependence of VDAC.

  12. c-Jun N-terminal kinase is required for thermotherapy-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Liu, Bin; Zhu, Qing-Xian

    2012-12-28

    To investigate the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in thermotherapy-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells were cultured in vitro. Following thermotherapy at 43°C for 0, 0.5, 1, 2 or 3 h, the cells were cultured for a further 24 h with or without the JNK specific inhibitor, SP600125 for 2 h. Apoptosis was evaluated by immunohistochemistry [terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)] and flow cytometry (Annexin vs propidium iodide). Cell proliferation was determined by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. The production of p-JNK, Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 proteins was evaluated by Western blotting. The expression of JNK at mRNA level was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The proliferation of gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 cells was significantly inhibited following thermotherapy, and was 32.7%, 30.6%, 43.8% and 52.9% at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h post-thermotherapy, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an increased population of SGC-790l cells in G0/G1 phase, but a reduced population in S phase following thermotherapy for 1 or 2 h, compared to untreated cells (P thermotherapy for 0.5, 1, 2 or 3 h, compared to the untreated group (46.5% ± 0.23%, 39.9% ± 0.53%, 56.6% ± 0.35% and 50.4% ± 0.29% vs 7.3% ± 0.10%, P thermotherapy, compared to mock-inhibitor treatment, which was in line with the decreased rate of apoptosis. The expression of Bcl-2 was consistent with thermotherapy alone. Thermotherapy induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells by promoting p-JNK at the mRNA and protein levels, and up-regulated the expression of Bax and caspase-3 proteins. Bcl-2 may play a protective role during thermotherapy. Activation of JNK via the Bax-caspase-3 pathway may be important in thermotherapy-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  13. Extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2, Jun N-terminal kinase, and c-Jun are involved in NF-kappa B-dependent IL-6 expression in human monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyt, LML; Dokter, WHA; Birbenkamp, K; Koopmans, S.B.; Lummen, C; Kruijer, W; Vellenga, E

    1999-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the possible involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family members extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in mediating IL-6 gene expression in human monocytes, in particular their role in enhancing NF-kappa B

  14. Calcium has a permissive role in interleukin-1beta-induced c-jun N-terminal kinase activation in insulin-secreting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Kapelioukh, Iouri L

    2005-01-01

    The c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway mediates IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-secreting cells, a mechanism relevant to the destruction of pancreatic beta-cells in type 1 and 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms that contribute to IL-1beta activation of JNK in beta-cells are la......+) ionophore A23187, or exposure to thapsigargin, an inhibitor of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase, all caused an amplification of IL-1beta-induced JNK activation in INS-1 cells. Finally, a chelator of intracellular free Ca(2+) [bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid...

  15. c-Jun N-terminal kinase negatively regulates epidermal growth factor-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husvik, Camilla; Bryne, Magne; Halstensen, Trond S

    2009-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in squamous cell carcinomas is mediated through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathways. Examination of a basaloid and a conventional oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line revealed that inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) with SP600125 increased EGF-induced (but not basal) COX-2 transcription 1.5-1.9-fold in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathway-dependent manners. Although JNK may phosphorylate the cyclosporine A-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells c3, it was seemingly not involved because cyclosporine A did not reduce EGF-induced COX-2 expression. Thus, JNK negatively regulated EGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and/or p38-mediated COX-2 transcription, presumably through activating an unidentified phosphatase.

  16. Identification of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase-2-dependent signal amplification cascade that regulates c-Myc levels in ras transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, D.P.; Egebjerg, C.; Andersen, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    that is critical for ras transformation in murine embryonic fibroblasts. This cascade is coordinated by ERK and JNK2 MAPKs, whose Ras-mediated activation leads to the enhanced levels of three oncogenic transcription factors, namely, c-Myc, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) and ATF3, all of which...... are essential for ras transformation. Previous studies show that ERK-mediated serine 62 phosphorylation protects c-Myc from proteasomal degradation. ERK is, however, not alone sufficient to stabilize c-Myc but requires the cooperation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), an oncogene......Ras is one of the most frequently activated oncogenes in cancer. Two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important for ras transformation: extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2). Here we present a downstream signal amplification cascade...

  17. Resveratrol reduces prostaglandin E1-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis in osteoblasts: suppression of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naohiro; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kondo, Akira; Kainuma, Shingo; Nakakami, Akira; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol mainly existing in red grapes and berries, possesses beneficial effects on human being. We have previously reported that prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) but not p44/p42 MAP kinase in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the PGE1-effect on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis and the effect of resveratrol on the synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. PGE1 induced the expression levels of OPG mRNA and stimulated the OPG release. Resveratrol significantly reduced the PGE1-induced OPG release and the mRNA expression. SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, suppressed the release of OPG. The protein levels of SIRT1 were not up-regulated by resveratrol with or without PGE1. Both SB203580 and SP600125, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor and a specific SAPK/JNK inhibitor, respectively, but not PD98059, a specific MEK inhibitor, reduced the PGE1-stimulated OPG release. Resveratrol or SRT1720 failed to affect the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. On the contrary, PGE1-induced phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK was significantly attenuated by both resveratrol and SRT1720. Our results strongly suggest that resveratrol inhibits PGE1-stimulated OPG synthesis via suppressing SAPK/JNK but not p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 expression in the retina of ocular hypertension mice: a possible target to reduce ganglion cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma, a type of optic neuropathy, is characterized by the loss of retinal ganglion cells. It remains controversial whether c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK participates in the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. This study sought to explore a possible mechanism of action of JNK signaling pathway in glaucoma-induced retinal optic nerve damage. We established a mouse model of chronic ocular hypertension by reducing the aqueous humor followed by photocoagulation using the laser ignition method. Results showed significant pathological changes in the ocular tissues after the injury. Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells increased with increased intraocular pressure, as did JNK3 mRNA expression in the retina. These data indicated that the increased expression of JNK3 mRNA was strongly associated with the increase in intraocular pressure in the retina, and correlated positively with the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

  19. [Regulating effect of N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline on activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase pathway in rats with silicosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhong-qiu; Yu, Wan-ying; Feng, Hai-li; Ma, Wen-dong; Li, Zhi-guo; Xu, Hong; Wang, Rui-min; Yang, Fang

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the regulatory effect of N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (AcSDKP) on the activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway and its role in silicotic fibrosis. A rat model of silicosis was developed by intratracheal instillation. Sixty rats were randomly divided into 4-week control group (n = 10), 8-week control group (n = 10), 4-week silicosis model group (n = 10), 8-week silicosis model group (n = 10), AcSDKP treatment group (n = 10), and AcSDKP prevention group (n = 10). The content of hydroxyproline in lung tissue was measured using a p-dimethylaminoben-zaldehyde reagent; the expression levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 (TGF-β1), phospho-JNK, JNK, and c-jun in lung tissue were measured by Western blot. The lung fibroblasts from neonatal rats were cultured, and the 4th generation of cells were used in the experiment; these cells were divided into control group, TGF-β1 stimulation group, SP600125 intervention group, and AcSDKP intervention group. The distributions of phospho-JNK and c-jun in lung fibroblasts were observed by immunocytochemistry; the expression levels of type I collagen and type III collagen in lung fibroblasts were measured by Western blot. The expression levels of TGF-β1, phospho-JNK, and c-jun and the content of hydroxyproline in the AcSDKP treatment group were 70.60%, 78.03%, 79.85%, and 71.28%, respectively, of those in the 4-week silicosis model group (P silicosis model group (P silicosis model group (P < 0.05). The expression levels of phospho-JNK and c-jun in the AcSDKP intervention group were 54.59% and 55.56%, respectively, of those in the TGF-β1 stimulation group; the expression levels of type I collagen and type III collagen in the AcSDKP intervention group were 79.9% and 84.4%, respectively, of those in the TGF-β1 stimulation group (P < 0.05). AcSDKP exerts anti-silicotic fibrosis effect probably by inhibiting the activation of JNK signal transduction pathway mediated by

  20. Monosodium Urate in the Presence of RANKL Promotes Osteoclast Formation through Activation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yoon Choe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to clarify the role of monosodium urate (MSU crystals in receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand- (RANKL- RANK-induced osteoclast formation. RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells were incubated with MSU crystals or RANKL and differentiated into osteoclast-like cells as confirmed by staining for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP and actin ring, pit formation assay, and TRAP activity assay. MSU crystals in the presence of RANKL augmented osteoclast differentiation, with enhanced mRNA expression of NFATc1, cathepsin K, carbonic anhydrase II, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, in comparison to RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated in the presence of RANKL alone. Treatment with both MSU crystals and RANKL induced osteoclast differentiation by activating downstream molecules in the RANKL-RANK pathway including tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF-6, JNK, c-Jun, and NFATc1. IL-1b produced in response to treatment with both MSU and RANKL is involved in osteoclast differentiation in part through the induction of TRAF-6 downstream of the IL-1b pathway. This study revealed that MSU crystals contribute to enhanced osteoclast formation through activation of RANKL-mediated pathways and recruitment of IL-1b. These findings suggest that MSU crystals might be a pathologic causative agent of bone destruction in gout.

  1. Nintedanib modulates surfactant protein-D expression in A549 human lung epithelial cells via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase-activator protein-1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamio, Koichiro; Usuki, Jiro; Azuma, Arata; Matsuda, Kuniko; Ishii, Takeo; Inomata, Minoru; Hayashi, Hiroki; Kokuho, Nariaki; Fujita, Kazue; Saito, Yoshinobu; Miya, Toshimichi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease with a high mortality rate. Signalling pathways activated by several tyrosine kinase receptors are known to be involved in lung fibrosis, and this knowledge has led to the development of the triple tyrosine kinase inhibitor nintedanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), for the treatment of IPF. Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D), an important biomarker of IPF, reportedly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. In this study, we investigated whether nintedanib modulates SP-D expression in human lung epithelial (A549) cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the effects of nintedanib, we evaluated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its downstream target c-Jun. The effect of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 on c-Jun phosphorylation was also tested. Activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) was examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based test, and cell proliferation assays were performed to estimate the effect of nintedanib on cell proliferation. Furthermore, we treated mice with nintedanib to examine its in vivo effect on SP-D levels in lungs. These experiments showed that nintedanib up-regulated SP-D messenger RNA expression in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations up to 5 μM, with significant SP-D induction observed at concentrations of 3 μM and 5 μM, in comparison with that observed in vehicle controls. Nintedanib stimulated a rapid increase in phosphorylated JNK in A549 cells within 30 min of treatment and stimulated c-Jun phosphorylation, which was inhibited by the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Additionally, nintedanib was found to activate AP-1. A549 cell proliferation was not affected by nintedanib at any of the tested

  2. WNT6 promotes the migration and differentiation of human dental pulp cells partly through c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruimin; Wang, Chenglin; Tong, Juan; Su, Yingying; Lin, Yunfeng; Zhou, Xuedong; Ye, Ling

    2014-07-01

    During the dental pulp repair process, human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) migrate to injury sites where they may differentiate into odontoblastlike cells. WNT6 plays a role in dental development and can activate a noncanonical pathway including the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. The mechanism of WNT6 in dental pulp repair is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential role of the WNT6/JNK signaling pathway in the promotion of cell migration and the differentiation of HDPCs. The third passage of HDPCs were cultured in vitro and treated with WNT6 conditioned medium with or without the pretreatment of JNK inhibitor SP600125. The activation of JNK was detected by Western blot, the expression of c-Jun was quantified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, the migration of HDPCs was determined by wound healing and transwell migration assays, and the differentiation of HDPCs was investigated using alkaline phosphatase staining and alizarin red staining. The expression of odontogenesis-related genes such as Runt-related transcription factor 2, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix protein 1 was quantified. WNT6 activates the JNK pathway in HDPCs and enhances cell migration, mineralization nodule formation, and alkaline phosphatase activation. WNT6 also increases the expression of Runt-related transcription factor 2, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix protein messenger RNA in HDPCs. Blockage of the JNK pathway in HDPCs decreases but does not completely abolish the cell migration and differentiation capacity induced by WNT6. WNT6 activates the JNK signaling pathway in HDPCs, leading to migration and differentiation. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase is essential for mitochondrial membrane potential change and apoptosis induced by doxycycline in melanoma cells

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    Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Huang, Tur-Fu; Hung, Chi-Feng; Chou, Kuan-Hsien; Tsai, Yih-Jeng; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tetracyclines were recently found to induce tumour cell death, but the early processes involved in this cytotoxic effect remain unclear. Experimental approach: Viability of human and mouse melanoma cells was determined by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Kinase/protein/caspase activation was measured by Western blotting and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Key results: Human and mouse melanoma cells were treated with doxycycline or minocycline but only doxycycline was cytotoxic. This cell death (apoptosis) in A2058 cells involved activation of caspase-3, -7 and -9 and contributed to inhibition, by doxycycline, of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and migration of these cells. Doxycycline induced intra-cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, apoptosis signal-regulated kinase 1 (ASK1), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation at an early stage of treatment and induced mitochondrial cytochrome c release into cytosol and ΔΨm change during apoptosis. The JNK inhibitor/small interference RNA inhibited doxycycline-induced JNK activation, ΔΨm change and apoptosis, but did not affect ASK1 activation, suggesting a role of ASK1 for JNK activation in melanoma cell apoptosis. Two ROS scavengers reduced doxycycline-induced JNK and caspase activation, and apoptosis. Taken together, the results suggest the involvement of a ROS-ASK1-JNK pathway in doxycycline-induced melanoma cell apoptosis. Conclusions and implications: We have shown a promising cytotoxic effect of doxycycline on melanoma cells, have identified ROS and ASK1 as the possible initiators and have demonstrated that JNK activation is necessary for doxycycline-induced melanoma cell apoptosis. PMID:20590610

  4. Rhinovirus infection causes steroid resistance in airway epithelium through nuclear factor κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Alberto; Contoli, Marco; Adcock, Ian M; Bellettato, Cinzia; Padovani, Anna; Casolari, Paolo; Stanciu, Luminita A; Barnes, Peter J; Johnston, Sebastian L; Ito, Kazuhiro; Caramori, Gaetano

    2013-11-01

    Although inhaled glucocorticoids are the mainstays of asthma treatment, they are poorly effective at treating and preventing virus-induced asthma exacerbations. The major viruses precipitating asthma exacerbations are rhinoviruses. We sought to evaluate whether rhinovirus infection interferes with the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids. Cultured primary human bronchial or transformed (A549) respiratory epithelial cells were infected with rhinovirus 16 (RV-16) before dexamethasone exposure. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) α nuclear translocation, glucocorticoid response element (GRE) binding, and transactivation/transrepression functional readouts were evaluated by using immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, DNA binding assays, real-time quantitative PCR, coimmunoprecipitation, and ELISA techniques. Specific inhibitors of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and of IκB kinase (IKK) were used to investigate the involvement of intracellular signaling pathways. RV-16 infection impaired dexamethasone-dependent (1) inhibition of IL-1β-induced CXCL8 release, (2) induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 gene expression, and (3) binding of GR to GREs in airway epithelial cells. This was associated with impaired GRα nuclear translocation, as assessed by means of both immunochemistry (54.0% ± 6.8% vs 24.7% ± 3.8% GR-positive nuclei after 10 nmol/L dexamethasone treatment in sham- or RV-16-infected cells, respectively; P rhinovirus-infected cells the combination of JNK and IKK2 inhibitors totally restored dexamethasone suppression of CXCL8 release, induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 gene expression, and GRα nuclear translocation. RV-16 infection of human airway epithelium induces glucocorticoid resistance. Inhibition of RV-16-induced JNK and nuclear factor κB activation fully reversed rhinovirus impairment of both GRα nuclear translocation and the transactivation/transrepression activities of glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2013

  5. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway of a vector insect is activated by virus capsid protein and promotes viral replication

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    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Wan; Li, Jing; Luo, Lan; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2017-01-01

    No evidence has shown whether insect-borne viruses manipulate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway of vector insects. Using a system comprising the plant virus Rice stripe virus (RSV) and its vector insect, the small brown planthopper, we have studied the response of the vector insect’s JNK pathway to plant virus infection. We found that RSV increased the level of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and decreased the level of G protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2) in the insect vector. The virus capsid protein competitively bound GPS2 to release it from inhibiting the JNK activation machinery. We confirmed that JNK activation promoted RSV replication in the vector, whereas JNK inhibition caused a significant reduction in virus production and thus delayed the disease incidence of plants. These findings suggest that inhibition of insect vector JNK may be a useful strategy for controling the transmission of plant viruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26591.001 PMID:28716183

  6. Inhibition of spinal astrocytic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activation correlates with the analgesic effects of ketamine in neuropathic pain

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    Wang Wen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that inhibition of astrocytic activation contributes to the analgesic effects of intrathecal ketamine on spinal nerve ligation (SNL-induced neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, a member of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK family, has been reported to be critical for spinal astrocytic activation and neuropathic pain development after SNL. Ketamine can decrease lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced phosphorylated JNK (pJNK expression and could thus exert its anti-inflammatory effect. We hypothesized that inhibition of astrocytic JNK activation might be involved in the suppressive effect of ketamine on SNL-induced spinal astrocytic activation. Methods Immunofluorescence histochemical staining was used to detect SNL-induced spinal pJNK expression and localization. The effects of ketamine on SNL-induced mechanical allodynia were confirmed by behavioral testing. Immunofluorescence histochemistry and Western blot were used to quantify the SNL-induced spinal pJNK expression after ketamine administration. Results The present study showed that SNL induced ipsilateral pJNK up-regulation in astrocytes but not microglia or neurons within the spinal dorsal horn. Intrathecal ketamine relieved SNL-induced mechanical allodynia without interfering with motor performance. Additionally, intrathecal administration of ketamine attenuated SNL-induced spinal astrocytic JNK activation in a dose-dependent manner, but not JNK protein expression. Conclusions The present results suggest that inhibition of JNK activation may be involved in the suppressive effects of ketamine on SNL-induced spinal astrocyte activation. Therefore, inhibition of spinal JNK activation may be involved in the analgesic effects of ketamine on SNL-induced neuropathic pain.

  7. A peptide fragment of ependymin neurotrophic factor uses protein kinase C and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway to activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase and a functional AP-1 containing c-Jun and c-Fos proteins in mouse NB2a cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David S; Hasson, Brendan; Boyer-Boiteau, Anne; El-Khishin, Adam; Shashoua, Victor E

    2003-05-01

    Ependymin (EPN) is a goldfish brain neurotrophic factor previously shown to function in a variety of cellular events related to long-term memory formation and neuronal regeneration. CMX-8933, an 8-amino-acid synthetic peptide fragment of EPN, was designed for aiding an investigation of the biological properties of this glycoprotein. We reported from previous studies that treatment of mouse neuroblastoma (NB2a) cultures with CMX-8933 promotes activation of transcription factor AP-1, a characteristic previously associated with the following full-length neurotrophic factors: nerve growth factor, neurotropin-3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The CMX-8933-activated AP-1 specifically bound an AP-1 consensus probe and appeared to contain c-Jun and c-Fos protein components in antibody supershift experiments. Because AP-1 influences a variety of positive and negative cellular processes, determined in part by its exact protein composition and mechanism of activation, we extended these initial AP-1 observations in the current study to confirm the identity of the CMX-8933-activated c-Jun and c-Fos components. CMX-8933 increases the enzymatic activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), increases the phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun proteins, and increases the cellular titers of c-Jun and c-Fos mRNAs. Furthermore, the AP-1 activated by CMX-8933 is functional, insofar as it transactivates both synthetic and natural AP-1-dependent reporter plasmids. Inhibition studies indicate that activation of the 8933-induced AP-1 occurs via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These data are in agreement with the recently proposed model for the conversion of short- to long-term synaptic plasticity and memory, in which a JNK-activated transcription factor AP-1, containing c-Jun and c-Fos components, functions at the top of a hierarchy of transcription factors known to regulate long-term neural plasticity. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Control Reactive Oxygen Species Release, Mitochondrial Autophagy and C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase/P38 Phosphorylation During Necrotizing Enterocolitis

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    Naira Baregamian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress and inflammation may contribute to the disruption of the protective gut barrier through various mechanisms; mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from inflammatory and oxidative injury may potentially be a significant source of apoptosis during necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. Tumor necrosis factor (TNFα is thought to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS and activate the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/p38 pathway. Hence, the focus of our study was to examine the effects of TNFα/ROs on mitochondrial function, ASK1-JNK/p38 cascade activation in intestinal epithelial cells during NEC.

  9. A Novel Dual NO-donating Oxime and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Inhibitor Protects Against Cerebral Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Seledtsov, Victor I.; Swanson, Helen; Quinn, Mark T.; Huang, Paul L.

    2017-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to be an important regulator of neuronal cell death. Previously, we synthesized the sodium salt of 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one (IQ-1S) and demonstrated that it was a high-affinity inhibitor of the JNK family. In the present work, we found that IQ-1S could release nitric oxide (NO) during its enzymatic metabolism by liver microsomes. Moreover, serum nitrite/nitrate concentration in mice increased after intraperitoneal injection of IQ-1S. Because of these dual actions as JNK inhibitor and NO-donor, the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S was evaluated in an animal stroke model. We subjected wild-type C57BL6 mice to focal ischemia (30 minutes) with subsequent reperfusion (48 hours). Mice were treated with IQ-1S (25 mg/kg) suspended in 10% solutol or with vehicle alone 30 minutes before and 24 hours after middle cerebral artery MCA) occlusion (MCAO). Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we monitored cerebral blood flow (CBF) above the MCA during 30 minutes of MCAO provoked by a filament and during the first 30 minutes of subsequent reperfusion. In mice treated with IQ-1S, ischemic and reperfusion values of CBF were not different from vehicle-treated mice. However, IQ-1S treated mice demonstrated markedly reduced neurological deficit and infarct volumes as compared with vehicle-treated mice after 48 hours of reperfusion. Our results indicate that the novel JNK inhibitor releases NO during its oxidoreductive bioconversion and improves stroke outcome in a mouse model of cerebral reperfusion. We conclude that IQ-1S is a promising dual functional agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury. PMID:26923672

  10. Antcin H Protects Against Acute Liver Injury Through Disruption of the Interaction of c-Jun-N-Terminal Kinase with Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yazhen; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Yin, Shutao; Ye, Min; Hu, Hongbo; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-02-10

    Antrodia Camphorate (AC) is a mushroom that is widely used in Asian countries to prevent and treat various diseases, including liver diseases. However, the active ingredients that contribute to the biological functions remain elusive. The purpose of the present study is to test the hepatoprotective effect of Antcin H, a major triterpenoid chemical isolated from AC, in murine models of acute liver injury. We found that Antcin H pretreatment protected against liver injury in both acetaminophen (APAP) and galactosamine/tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α models. More importantly, Antcin H also offered a significant protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury when it was given 1 h after acetaminophen. The protection was verified in primary mouse hepatocytes. Antcin H prevented sustained c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in both models. We excluded an effect of Antcin H on acetaminophen metabolism and TNF receptor signaling and excluded a direct effect as a free radical scavenger or JNK inhibitor. Since the sustained JNK activation through its interaction with mitochondrial Sab, leading to increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), is pivotal in both models, we examined the effect of Antcin H on p-JNK binding to mitochondria and impairment of mitochondrial respiration. Antcin H inhibited the direct effect of p-JNK on isolated mitochondrial function and binding to isolated mitochondria. Innovation and Conclusion: Our study has identified Antcin H as a novel active ingredient that contributes to the hepatoprotective effect of AC, and Antcin H protects against liver injury through disruption of the binding of p-JNK to Sab, which interferes with the ROS-dependent self-sustaining activation of MAPK cascade. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 207-220.

  11. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David' s North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Vinken, Mathieu [Department of Toxicology, Center for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. - Highlights: • 2-APB protected against APAP-induced liver injury in mice in vivo and in vitro • 2-APB protected by inhibiting APAP metabolic activation and JNK signaling pathway • DMSO inhibited APAP metabolic activation as the solvent of 2-APB

  12. Lower susceptibility of female mice to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: Role of mitochondrial glutathione, oxidant stress and c-jun N-terminal kinase

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    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu

    2014-11-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe hepatotoxicity in animals and humans. However, the mechanisms underlying the gender differences in susceptibility to APAP overdose in mice have not been clarified. In our study, APAP (300 mg/kg) caused severe liver injury in male mice but 69–77% lower injury in females. No gender difference in metabolic activation of APAP was found. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) was rapidly depleted in both genders, while GSH recovery in female mice was 2.6 fold higher in the mitochondria at 4 h, and 2.5 and 3.3 fold higher in the total liver at 4 h and 6 h, respectively. This faster recovery of GSH, which correlated with greater induction of glutamate-cysteine ligase, attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress in female mice, as suggested by a lower GSSG/GSH ratio at 6 h (3.8% in males vs. 1.4% in females) and minimal centrilobular nitrotyrosine staining. While c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was similar at 2 and 4 h post-APAP, it was 3.1 fold lower at 6 h in female mice. However, female mice were still protected by the JNK inhibitor SP600125. 17β-Estradiol pretreatment moderately decreased liver injury and oxidative stress in male mice without affecting GSH recovery. Conclusion: The lower susceptibility of female mice is achieved by the improved detoxification of reactive oxygen due to accelerated recovery of mitochondrial GSH levels, which attenuates late JNK activation and liver injury. However, even the reduced injury in female mice was still dependent on JNK. While 17β-estradiol partially protects male mice, it does not affect hepatic GSH recovery. - Highlights: • Female mice are less susceptible to acetaminophen overdose than males. • GSH depletion and protein adduct formation are similar in both genders. • Recovery of hepatic GSH levels is faster in females and correlates with Gclc. • Reduced oxidant stress in females leads to reduced JNK activation. • JNK activation and mitochondrial translocation are critical

  13. Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor-mediated Invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into Host Cells Requires a Coordinate Signaling of SRC Family of Protein-tyrosine Kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M.; Dierdorf, Nina I.; Hauck, Christof R.; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells. PMID:20829350

  14. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-mediated invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into host cells requires a coordinate signaling of SRC family of protein-tyrosine kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M; Dierdorf, Nina I; Hauck, Christof R; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-11-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells.

  15. Exercise training protects against atherosclerotic risk factors through vascular NADPH oxidase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase downregulation in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, Sabeur; Montezano, Augusto C I; Meziri, Fayçal; Riva, Catherine; Touyz, Rhian M; Laurant, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Exercise training reverses atherosclerotic risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity. The aim of the present study was to determine the molecular anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-atherogenic effects in aorta from rats with high-fat diet-induced obesity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a high-fat (HFD) or control (CD) diet for 12 weeks. The HFD rats were then divided into four groups: (i) sedentary HFD-fed rats (HFD-S); (ii) exercise trained (motor treadmill 5 days/week, 60 min/day, 12 weeks) HFD-fed rats (HFD-Ex); (iii) modified diet (HFD to CD) sedentary rats (HF/CD-S); and (iv) an exercise-trained modified diet group (HF/CD-Ex). Tissue levels of NADPH oxidase (activity and expression), NADPH oxidase (Nox) 1, Nox2, Nox4, p47(phox) , superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptors, phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were determined in the aorta. Plasma cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6) levels were also measured. Obesity was accompanied by increases in NADPH oxidase activity, p47(phox) translocation, Nox4 and VCAM-1 protein expression, MAPK (ERK1/2, SAPK/JNK) phosphorylation and plasma TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Exercise training and switching from the HFD to CD reversed almost all these molecular changes. In addition, training increased aortic SOD-1 protein expression and decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that protective effects of exercise training on atherosclerotic risk factors induced by obesity are associated with downregulation of NADPH oxidase, ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK activity and increased SOD-1 expression. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Cytotoxic Activity of 3,6-Dihydroxyflavone in Human Cervical Cancer Cells and Its Therapeutic Effect on c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inhibition

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    Eunjung Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that 3,6-dihydroxyflavone (3,6-DHF is a potent agonist of the human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (hPPAR with cytotoxic effects on human cervical cancer cells. To date, the mechanisms by which 3,6-DHF exerts its antitumor effects on cervical cells have not been clearly defined. Here, we demonstrated that 3,6-DHF exhibits a novel antitumor activity against HeLa cells with IC50 values of 25 μM and 9.8 μM after 24 h and 48 h, respectively. We also showed that the anticancer effects of 3,6-DHF are mediated via the toll-like receptor (TLR 4/CD14, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, Jun-N terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular-signaling regulated kinase (ERK, and cyclooxygenase (COX-2 pathways in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. We found that 3,6-DHF showed a similar IC50 (113 nM value to that of the JNK inhibitor, SP600125 (IC50 = 118 nM in a JNK1 kinase assay. Binding studies revealed that 3,6-DHF had a strong binding affinity to JNK1 (1.996 × 105 M−1 and that the 6-OH and the carbonyl oxygen of the C ring of 3,6-DHF participated in hydrogen bonding interactions with the carbonyl oxygen and the amide proton of Met111, respectively. Therefore, 3,6-DHF may be a candidate inhibitor of JNKs, with potent anticancer effects.

  17. Caruifolin D from artemisia absinthium L. inhibits neuroinflammation via reactive oxygen species-dependent c-jun N-terminal kinase and protein kinase c/NF-κB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Liao, Li-Xi; Song, Xiao-Min; Lv, Hai-Ning; Song, Fang-Jiao; Yu, Qian; Dong, Xin; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2015-11-15

    This work aims to evaluate the anti-neuroinflammatory effects of natural sesquiterpene dimer caruifolin D from Artemisia absinthium L., which is an edible vegetable or traditional medicinal food in East Asia due to its sedation, anti-asthma and antipruritic effects. In this study, we reported that caruifolin D significantly inhibited the productions of various neuroinflammatory mediators from microglia in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Moreover, anti-inflammatory mechanism study showed that caruifolin D markedly suppressed the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, which was an important player involved in neuroinflammation, leading to inhibitory effects on the activations of protein kinase C (PKC) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which were two major neuroinflammatory signaling pathways in the brains. Furthermore, caruifolin D protected neurons against microglia-mediated neuronal inflammatory damages by up-regulating neuronal viability and maintaining healthy neuronal morphology. Taken together, these results expanded our knowledge about the anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective mechanism of Artemisia absinthium L., and also suggested that caruifolin D was a major anti-inflammatory component from Artemisia absinthium L., which might be developed as a drug candidate for neuroinflammation-related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hyperoside Downregulates the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE and Promotes Proliferation in ECV304 Cells via the c-Jun N-Terminal Kinases (JNK Pathway Following Stimulation by Advanced Glycation End-Products In Vitro

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    Zhengyu Zhang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyperoside is a major active constituent in many medicinal plants which are traditionally used in Chinese medicines for their neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. In this study, quiescent ECV304 cells were treated in vitro with advanced glycation end products (AGEs in the presence or absence of hyperoside. The results demonstrated that AGEs induced c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK activation and apoptosis in ECV304 cells. Hyperoside inhibited these effects and promoted ECV304 cell proliferation. Furthermore, hyperoside significantly inhibited RAGE expression in AGE-stimulated ECV304 cells, whereas knockdown of RAGE inhibited AGE-induced JNK activation. These results suggested that AGEs may promote JNK activation, leading to viability inhibition of ECV304 cells via the RAGE signaling pathway. These effects could be inhibited by hyperoside. Our findings suggest a novel role for hyperoside in the treatment and prevention of diabetes.

  19. Highly Oxygenated Sesquiterpene Lactones from Cousinia aitchisonii and their Cytotoxic Properties: Rhaserolide Induces Apoptosis in Human T Lymphocyte (Jurkat) Cells via the Activation of c-Jun n-terminal Kinase Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranshahy, Milad; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra; Kasaian, Jamal; Ghandadi, Morteza; Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Asili, Javad; Chandran, Jima N; Schneider, Bernd; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2016-02-01

    Infrared-guided chromatographic fractionation of sesquiterpene lactones from the extracts of Cousinia aitchisonii and Cousinia concolor led to the isolation of five pure compounds. A new sesquiterpene lactone, namely, aitchisonolide, and two known sesquiterpene lactones (desoxyjanerin and rhaserolide) were isolated from C. aitchisonii and two known lignans (arctiin and arctigenin) from C. concolor. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, as well as high-resolution mass spectrometry. The purified and characterized compounds were subjected to cytotoxicity assay. The sesquiterpene lactones desoxyjanerin and rhaserolide showed significant cytotoxic activities against five different cancer cell lines and the normal human embryonic kidney cell line. Rhaserolide was chosen to evaluate the possible mechanism of action. Western blot analysis revealed that rhaserolide could induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via the activation of c-Jun n-terminal kinase phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-binding protein (JNKBP1) acts as a negative regulator of NOD2 protein signaling by inhibiting its oligomerization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecat, Aurore; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Somja, Joan; Jourdan, Samuel; Fillet, Marianne; Kufer, Thomas A; Habraken, Yvette; Sadzot, Catherine; Louis, Edouard; Delvenne, Philippe; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2012-08-24

    NOD2 is one of the best characterized members of the cytosolic NOD-like receptor family. NOD2 is able to sense muramyl dipeptide, a specific bacterial cell wall component, and to subsequently induce various signaling pathways leading to NF-κB activation and autophagy, both events contributing to an efficient innate and adaptive immune response. Interestingly, loss-of-function NOD2 variants were associated with a higher susceptibility for Crohn disease, which highlights the physiological importance of proper regulation of NOD2 activity. We performed a biochemical screen to search for new NOD2 regulators. We identified a new NOD2 partner, c-Jun N-terminal kinase-binding protein 1 (JNKBP1), a scaffold protein characterized by an N-terminal WD-40 domain. JNKBP1, through its WD-40 domain, binds to NOD2 following muramyl dipeptide activation. This interaction attenuates NOD2-mediated NF-κB activation and IL-8 secretion as well as NOD2 antibacterial activity. JNKBP1 exerts its repressor effect by disturbing NOD2 oligomerization and RIP2 tyrosine phosphorylation, both steps required for downstream NOD2 signaling. We furthermore showed that JNKBP1 and NOD2 are co-expressed in the human intestinal epithelium and in immune cells recruited in the lamina propria, which suggests that JNKBP1 contributes to maintain NOD2-mediated intestinal immune homeostasis.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells promote liver regeneration and prolong survival in small-for-size liver grafts: involvement of C-Jun N-terminal kinase, cyclin D1, and NF-κB.

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    Weijie Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been highlighted recently for treatment of acute or chronic liver injury, by possibly differentiating into hepatocyte-like cells, reducing inflammation, and enhancing tissue repair. Despite recent progress, exact mechanisms of action are not clearly elucidated. In this study, we attempted to explore whether and how MSCs protected hepatocytes and stimulated allograft regeneration in small-for-size liver transplantation (SFSLT. METHODS: SFSLT model was established with a 30% partial liver transplantation (30PLT in rats. The differentiation potential and characteristics of bone marrow derived MSCs were explored in vitro. MSCs were infused transvenously immediately after graft implantation in therapy group. Expressions of apoptosis-, inflammatory-, anti-inflammatory-, and growth factor-related genes were measured by RT-PCR, activities of transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB were analyzed by EMSA, and proliferative responses of the hepatic graft were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot. RESULTS: MSCs were successfully induced into hepatocyte-like cells, osteoblasts and adipocytes in vitro. MSCs therapy could not only alleviate ischemia reperfusion injury and acute inflammation to promote liver regeneration, but also profoundly improve one week survival rate. It markedly up-regulated the mRNA expressions of HGF, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, IL-6, IL-10, IP-10, and CXCR2, however, down-regulated TNF-α. Increased activities of AP-1 and NF-κB, as well as elevated expressions of p-c-Jun, cyclin D1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, were also found in MSCs therapy group. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that MSCs therapy promotes hepatocyte proliferation and prolongs survival in SFSLT by reducing ischemia reperfusion injury and acute inflammation, and sustaining early increased expressions of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase, Cyclin D1, and NF-κB.

  2. MicroRNA-181a Regulates Apoptosis and Autophagy Process in Parkinson's Disease by Inhibiting p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)/c-Jun N-Terminal Kinases (JNK) Signaling Pathways.

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    Liu, Ying; Song, Yanfeng; Zhu, Xiaotun

    2017-04-02

    BACKGROUND microRNA (miR)-181a has been reported to be downregulated in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the regulatory mechanism of miR-181a on neuron apoptosis and autophagy is still poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of miR-181a on PD in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS Human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells were incubated with different concentrations of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) to induce the PD model. The expression of miR-181a was then analyzed. After transfection with miR-181a mimic or scramble following MPP+ treatment, the expression of autophagy protein markers (LC3II, LC3I, and Beclin 1) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) signaling proteins (p-p38, p38, p-JNK, and JNK) and cell apoptosis were detected. Furthermore, the cells were transfected with miR-181a inhibitor and cultured in the presence or absence of p38 inhibitor SB203582 or JNK inhibitor SP600125, and the cell apoptosis was tested again. RESULTS The expression of miR-181a was gradually decreased with the increase of MPP+ concentration (P<0.05, P<0.01, or P<0.001). Overexpression of miR-181a significantly decreased the LC3II/LC3I ratio, Beclin 1 expression, cell apoptosis, and the expression of p-p38 and p-JNK compared to the MPP+ + miR-181a scramble group (all P<0.05). In addition, we observed that SB203582 or SP600125 showed no effects on cell apoptosis, but the effects of miR-181a inhibitor on cell apoptosis were reversed by administration of SB203582 or SP600125 compared to the scramble group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that miR-181a regulates apoptosis and autophagy in PD by inhibiting the p38 MAPK/JNK pathway.

  3. Investigating the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinases in the proliferation of Werner syndrome fibroblasts using diaminopyridine inhibitors

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    Davis Terence

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroblasts derived from the progeroid Werner syndrome show reduced replicative lifespan and a "stressed" morphology, both alleviated using the MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. However, interpretation of these data is problematical because although SB203580 has the stress-activated kinases p38 and JNK1/2 as its preferred targets, it does show relatively low overall kinase selectivity. Several lines of data support a role for both p38 and JNK1/2 activation in the control of cellular proliferation and also the pathology of diseases of ageing, including type II diabetes, diseases to which Werner Syndrome individuals are prone, thus making the use of JNK inhibitors attractive as possible therapeutics. We have thus tested the effects of the widely used JNK inhibitor SP600125 on the proliferation and morphology of WS cells. In addition we synthesised and tested two recently described aminopyridine based inhibitors. SP600125 treatment resulted in the cessation of proliferation of WS cells and resulted in a senescent-like cellular phenotype that does not appear to be related to the inhibition of JNK1/2. In contrast, use of the more selective aminopyridine CMPD 6o at concentrations that fully inhibit JNK1/2 had a positive effect on cellular proliferation of immortalised WS cells, but no effect on the replicative lifespan of primary WS fibroblasts. In addition, CMPD 6o corrected the stressed WS cellular morphology. The aminopyridine CMPD 6r, however, had little effect on WS cells. CMDP 6o was also found to be a weak inhibitor of MK2, which may partially explain its effects on WS cells, since MK2 is known to be involved in regulating cellular morphology via HSP27 phosphorylation, and is thought to play a role in cell cycle arrest. These data suggest that total JNK1/2 activity does not play a substantial role in the proliferation control in WS cells.

  4. Effects of different therapeutic methods and typical recipes of Chinese medicine on activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in kupffer cells of rats with fatty liver disease.

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    Yang, Qin-He; Hu, Si-Ping; Zhang, Yu-Pei; Ping, Huan-Huan; Yang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Tong-Yan; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2012-10-01

    To observe the effects of different therapeutic methods and the recipes of Chinese medicine (CM) on the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in Kupffer cells of rats with fatty liver disease and to explore the mechanisms of these therapeutic methods. By using a random number table, 98 rats were randomly divided into 7 groups: control group, model group, and 5 treatment groups, including soothing Liver (Gan) recipe group, invigorating Spleen (Pi) recipe group, dispelling dampness recipe group, promoting blood recipe group, and complex recipe group. Rats in the control group were fed with normal food and distilled water by gastric perfusion, while rats in the model group were fed with high-fat food and distilled spirits by gastric perfusion. Rats in the 5 treatment groups were fed with high-fat food and corresponding recipes by gastric perfusion. Twelve weeks later, all rats were sacrificed and liver tissues were stained for pathohistological observation. Kupffer cells were isolated from livers of rats to evaluate JNK and phospho-JNK expressions by Western blotting. The grade of hepatic steatosis was higher in the model group than the control group (PLiver recipe group and invigorating Spleen recipe group were significantly ameliorated (Pliver disease in rats. The recipes of CM, especially invigorating Spleen recipe and soothing Liver recipe, might protect liver against injury by reducing the total JNK protein content and inhibiting the activation of JNK protein in Kupffer cells of fatty liver model rats, which showed beneficial effects on fatty liver disease.

  5. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 prevents luminal cell commitment in normal mammary glands and tumors by inhibiting p53/Notch1 and breast cancer gene 1 expression

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    Pfefferle, Adam D.; Perou, Charles M.; Van Den Berg, Carla Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with several subtypes carrying unique prognoses. Patients with differentiated luminal tumors experience better outcomes, while effective treatments are unavailable for poorly differentiated tumors, including the basal-like subtype. Mechanisms governing mammary tumor subtype generation could prove critical to developing better treatments. C-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) is important in mammary tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Using a variety of mouse models, human breast cancer cell lines and tumor expression data, studies herein support that JNK2 inhibits cell differentiation in normal and cancer-derived mammary cells. JNK2 prevents precocious pubertal mammary development and inhibits Notch-dependent expansion of luminal cell populations. Likewise, JNK2 suppresses luminal populations in a p53-competent Polyoma Middle T-antigen tumor model where jnk2 knockout causes p53-dependent upregulation of Notch1 transcription. In a p53 knockout model, JNK2 restricts luminal populations independently of Notch1, by suppressing Brca1 expression and promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transition. JNK2 also inhibits estrogen receptor (ER) expression and confers resistance to fulvestrant, an ER inhibitor, while stimulating tumor progression. These data suggest that therapies inhibiting JNK2 in breast cancer may promote tumor differentiation, improve endocrine therapy response, and inhibit metastasis. PMID:25970777

  6. Cadmium induces apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells through a mitochondria-dependent pathway: the role of oxidative stress-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation.

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    Kai-Chih Chang

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd, one of well-known highly toxic environmental and industrial pollutants, causes a number of adverse health effects and diseases in humans. The growing epidemiological studies have suggested a possible link between Cd exposure and diabetes mellitus (DM. However, the toxicological effects and underlying mechanisms of Cd-induced pancreatic β-cell injury are still unknown. In this study, we found that Cd significantly decreased cell viability, and increased sub-G1 hypodiploid cells and annexin V-Cy3 binding in pancreatic β-cell-derived RIN-m5F cells. Cd also increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and malondialdehyde (MDA production and induced mitochondrial dysfunction (the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and the increase of cytosolic cytochrome c release, the decreased Bcl-2 expression, increased p53 expression, poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, and caspase cascades, which accompanied with intracellular Cd accumulation. Pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC effectively reversed these Cd-induced events. Furthermore, exposure to Cd induced the phosphorylations of c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2, and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, which was prevented by NAC. Additionally, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 or JNK-specific small interference RNA (si-RNA transfection suppressed Cd-induced β-cell apoptosis and related signals, but not ERK1/2 and p38-MAPK inhibitors (PD98059 and SB203580 did not. However, the JNK inhibitor or JNK-specific si-RNA did not suppress ROS generation in Cd-treated cells. These results indicate that Cd induces pancreatic β-cell death via an oxidative stress downstream-mediated JNK activation-triggered mitochondria-regulated apoptotic pathway.

  7. Long-Term Reduction of Kappa Opioid Receptor Function by the Biased Ligand, Norbinaltorphimine, Requires c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activity and New Protein Synthesis in Peripheral Sensory Neurons.

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    Jamshidi, Raehannah J; Sullivan, Laura C; Jacobs, Blaine A; Chavera, Teresa A; Berg, Kelly A; Clarke, William P

    2016-11-01

    A single administration of the κ opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist, norbinaltorphimine (norBNI), produces long-term reduction in KOR function in heterologous expression systems and brain that is mediated by activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In this study, we examined the long-term effects of norBNI on adult rat peripheral sensory neurons in vivo and ex vivo. Following a single intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of norBNI into the hind paw, peripheral KOR-mediated antinociception in the ipsilateral, but not the contralateral, hindpaw was abolished for at least 9 days. By contrast, the antinociceptive response to mu and delta opioid receptor agonists was unaltered. The long-term inhibitory effect on antinociception produced by pretreatment with norBNI required occupancy of peripheral KOR and was completely blocked by i.pl. injection of the JNK inhibitor, SP600125. In cultures of peripheral sensory neurons, norBNI activated JNK for at least 30 minutes. Furthermore, norBNI blocked KOR-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity measured 24 hours later in a JNK-dependent manner, but did not block activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The long-term inhibitory effect of norBNI on KOR function in vivo and ex vivo was blocked by inhibitors of mRNA translation, cycloheximide and rapamycin. These data suggest that in peripheral sensory neurons norBNI is a KOR-biased ligand for activation of JNK signaling, resulting in long-term blockade of some (antinociception, inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity), but not all (ERK), KOR signaling. Importantly, norBNI elicits de novo protein synthesis in sensory neuron terminals that produces selective long-term regulation of KOR. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. Tyrosine-phosphorylated caveolin-1 (Tyr-14) increases sensitivity to paclitaxel by inhibiting BCL2 and BCLxL proteins via c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK).

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    Shajahan, Ayesha N; Dobbin, Zachary C; Hickman, F Edward; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Clarke, Robert

    2012-05-18

    Paclitaxel, an anti-microtubule agent, is an effective chemotherapeutic drug in breast cancer. Nonetheless, resistance to paclitaxel remains a major clinical challenge. The need to better understand the resistant phenotype and to find biomarkers that could predict tumor response to paclitaxel is evident. In estrogen receptor α-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer cells, phosphorylation of caveolin-1 (CAV1) on Tyr-14 facilitates mitochondrial apoptosis by increasing BCL2 phosphorylation in response to low dose paclitaxel (10 nM). However, two variants of CAV1 exist: the full-length form, CAV1α (wild-type CAV1 or wtCAV1), and a truncated form, CAV1β. Only wtCAV1 has the Tyr-14 region at the N terminus. The precise cellular functions of CAV1 variants are unknown. We now show that CAV1 variants play distinct roles in paclitaxel-mediated cell death/survival. CAV1β expression is increased in paclitaxel-resistant cells when compared with sensitive cells. Expression of CAV1β in sensitive cells significantly reduces their responsiveness to paclitaxel. These activities reflect an essential role for Tyr-14 phosphorylation because wtCAV1 expression, but not a phosphorylation-deficient mutant (Y14F), inactivates BCL2 and BCLxL through activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). MCF-7 cells that express Y14F are resistant to paclitaxel and are resensitized by co-treatment with ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic small molecule inhibitor. Using structural homology modeling, we propose that phosphorylation on Tyr-14 enables a favorable conformation for proteins to bind to the CAV1 scaffolding domain. Thus, we highlight novel roles for CAV1 variants in cell death; wtCAV1 promotes cell death, whereas CAV1β promotes cell survival by preventing inactivation of BCL2 and BCLxL via JNK in paclitaxel-mediated apoptosis.

  9. The Green Tea Component (--Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Sensitizes Primary Endothelial Cells to Arsenite-Induced Apoptosis by Decreasing c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase-Mediated Catalase Activity.

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    Jee-Youn Kim

    Full Text Available The green tea component (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG has been shown to sensitize many different types of cancer cells to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, although it protects against non-cancerous primary cells against toxicity from certain conditions such as exposure to arsenic (As or ultraviolet irradiation. Here, we found that EGCG promotes As-induced toxicity of primary-cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC at doses in which treatment with each chemical alone had no such effect. Increased cell toxicity was accompanied by an increased condensed chromatin pattern and fragmented nuclei, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, activity of the pro-apoptotic enzymes caspases 3, 8 and 9, and Bax translocation into mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of an apoptotic signaling pathway. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that compared with EGCG or As alone, combined EGCG and As (EGCG/As treatment significantly induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which was accompanied by decreased catalase activity and increased lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or catalase reversed EGCG/As-induced caspase activation and EC toxicity. EGCG/As also increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, which was not reversed by catalase. However, pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed all of the observed effects of EGCG/As, suggesting that JNK may be the most upstream protein examined in this study. Finally, we also found that all the observed effects by EGCG/As are true for other types of EC tested. In conclusion, this is firstly to show that EGCG sensitizes non-cancerous EC to As-induced toxicity through ROS-mediated apoptosis, which was attributed at least in part to a JNK-activated decrease in catalase activity.

  10. Neuroprotection by inhibiting the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway after cerebral ischemia occurs independently of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC/CXCL1 secretion

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    Benakis Corinne

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral ischemia is associated with the activation of glial cells, infiltration of leukocytes and an increase in inflammatory mediators in the ischemic brain and systemic circulation. How this inflammatory response influences lesion size and neurological outcome remains unclear. D-JNKI1, an inhibitor of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway, is strongly neuroprotective in animal models of stroke. Intriguingly, the protection mediated by D-JNKI1 is high even with intravenous administration at very low doses with undetectable drug levels in the brain, pointing to a systemic mode of action, perhaps on inflammation. Findings We evaluated whether D-JNKI1, administered intravenously 3 h after the onset of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, modulates secretion of the inflammatory mediators interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine in the plasma and from the spleen and brain at several time points after MCAO. We found an early release of both mediators in the systemic circulation followed by an increase in the brain and went on to show a later systemic increase in vehicle-treated mice. Release of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine from the spleen of mice with MCAO was not significantly different from sham mice. Interestingly, the secretion of these inflammatory mediators was not altered in the systemic circulation or brain after successful neuroprotection with D-JNKI1. Conclusions We demonstrate that neuroprotection with D-JNKI1 after experimental cerebral ischemia is independent of systemic and brain release of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the early systemic release of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine may not necessarily predict an unfavorable outcome in this model.

  11. The effects of urotensin II on migration and invasion are mediated by NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway in human hepatoma cells.

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    Li, Ying-Ying; Shi, Zheng-Ming; Yu, Xiao-Tong; Feng, Ping; Wang, Xue-Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a vasoactive neuropeptide involved in migration and invasion in various cell types. However, the effects of UII on human hepatoma cells still remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanism of UII on migration and invasion in human hepatoma cells. Migration was measured by wound healing assays and a Transwell(®) methodology, and invasion was analyzed using Matrigel(®) invasion chambers. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were detected using a 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe, and flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were evaluated by western blotting. Cell proliferation and actin polymerization were examined using cell proliferation reagent WST-1 and F-actin immunohistochemistry staining. Exposure to UII promoted migration and invasion in hepatoma cells compared with that in cells without UII. UII also increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) expression in a time-independent manner. Furthermore, UII markedly enhanced ROS generation and NADPH oxidase subunit expression, and consequently facilitated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The UT antagonist urantide or the antioxidant/NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin decreased UII-induced ROS production. JNK phosphorylation, migration, invasion, and MMP9/2 expression were also reversed by pretreatment with apocynin. Urantide and JNK inhibitor SP600125 abrogated migration, invasion, or MMP9/2 expression in response to UII. UII induced actin polymerization and fascin protein expression, and could be reversed by apocynin and SP600125. Exogenous UII induced migration and invasion in hepatoma cells that mainly involved NADPH oxidase-derived ROS through JNK activation. UT played an additional role in regulating hepatoma cells migration and invasion. Thus, our data suggested an important effect of UII in hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The drosophila T-box transcription factor midline functions within Insulin/Akt and c-Jun-N terminal kinase stress-reactive signaling pathways to regulate interommatial bristle formation and cell survival.

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    Chen, Q Brent; Das, Sudeshna; Visic, Petra; Buford, Kendrick D; Zong, Yan; Buti, Wisam; Odom, Kelly R; Lee, Hannah; Leal, Sandra M

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that the T-box transcription factor midline (mid) functions within the Notch-Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor (SOP) cell fates in early-staged pupal eye imaginal discs and to suppress apoptosis (Das et al.). From genetic and allelic modifier screens, we now report that mid interacts with genes downstream of the insulin receptor(InR)/Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Notch signaling pathways to regulate interommatidial bristle (IOB) formation and cell survival. One of the most significant mid-interacting genes identified from the modifier screen is dFOXO, a transcription factor exhibiting a nucleocytoplasmic subcellular distribution pattern. In common with dFOXO, we show that Mid exhibits a nucleocytoplasmic distribution pattern within WT third-instar larval (3(o)L) tissue homogenates. Because dFOXO is a stress-responsive factor, we assayed the effects of either oxidative or metabolic stress responses on modifying the mid mutant phenotype which is characterized by a 50% loss of IOBs within the adult compound eye. While metabolic starvation stress does not affect the mid mutant phenotype, either 1 mM paraquat or 20% coconut oil, oxidative stress inducers, partially suppresses the mid mutant phenotype resulting in a significant recovery of IOBs. Another significant mid-interacting gene we identified is groucho (gro). Mid and Gro are predicted to act as corepressors of the enhancer-of-split gene complex downstream of Notch. Immunolabeling WT and dFOXO null 3(o)L eye-antennal imaginal discs with anti-Mid and anti-Engrailed (En) antibodies indicate that dFOXO is required to activate Mid and En expression within photoreceptor neurons of the eye disc. Taken together, these studies show that Mid and dFOXO serve as critical effectors of cell fate specification and survival within integrated Notch, InR/dAkt, and JNK signaling pathways during 3(o)L and pupal eye imaginal disc development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland

  13. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) during hypoxia in cerebral cortical nuclei of guinea pig fetus at term: role of nitric oxide.

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    Maulik, Dev; Ashraf, Qazi M; Mishra, Om P; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    2008-07-04

    Previously we have shown that cerebral tissue hypoxia results in generation of nitric oxide (NO) free radicals as well as increased expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase like extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The present study tested the hypothesis that administration of l-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a NOS inhibitor, prior to hypoxia prevents the hypoxia-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and in the cerebral cortex of the term guinea pig fetus. To test this hypothesis normoxic (Nx, n=6), hypoxic (Hx, n=7) and hypoxic pretreated with l-NAME (Hx+L-NAME, n=6) guinea pig fetuses at 60 days gestation were studied to determine the phosphorylated p38, ERK and JNK. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pregnant guinea pigs to FiO2 of 0.07 for 1h. l-NAME (30mg/kg i.p.) was administered to pregnant mothers 60min prior to hypoxia. Cerebral tissue hypoxia was documented biochemically by determining the tissue levels of ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr). Neuronal nuclei were isolated, purified and proteins separated using 12% SDS-PAGE, and then probed with specific phosphorylated ERK, JNK and p38 antibodies. Protein bands were detected by enhanced chemiluminescence, analyzed by imaging densitometry and expressed as absorbance (ODxmm2). The relative level of p-p38 was 51.41+/-9.80 (Nx), 173.67+/-3.63 (Hx), 58.56+/-3.40 (Hx+L-NAME), phypoxia decreased the relative level of phosphorylated p38, ERK and JNK at term gestation. Since a NOS inhibitor prevented the hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of p38, ERK and JNK, we conclude that the hypoxia-induced activation of p38, ERK and JNK in the cerebral cortical nuclei of guinea pig fetus at term is NO-mediated. We speculate that NO-mediated modification of cysteine residue leading to inhibition of MAP kinase phosphatases results in increased activation of p38, ERK and JNK

  14. Antiepileptic Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline Involved in the Initiation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MAPK Signal Pathways in Acute Seizures of Kainic Acid-Treated Rats

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    Hsin-Cheng Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures cause inflammation of the central nervous system. The extent of the inflammation is related to the severity and recurrence of the seizures. Cell surface receptors are stimulated by stimulators such as kainic acid (KA, which causes intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signal pathway transmission to coordinate a response. It is known that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR and rhynchophylline (RP have anticonvulsive effects, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy for treating epilepsy by investigating how UR and RP initiate their anticonvulsive mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered KA (12 mg/kg, i.p. to induce seizure before being sacrificed. The brain was removed 3 h after KA administration. The results indicate that pretreatment with UR (1.0 g/kg, RP (0.25 mg/kg, and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg for 3 d could reduce epileptic seizures and could also reduce the expression of c-Jun aminoterminal kinase phosphorylation (JNKp of MAPK signal pathways in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α remain unchanged, indicating that the anticonvulsive effect of UR and RP is initially involved in the JNKp MAPK signal pathway during the KA-induced acute seizure period.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Apoptosis by Gugulipid Extract of Ayurvedic Medicine Plant Commiphora mukul in Human Prostate Cancer Cells Is Regulated by c-Jun N-Terminal KinaseS⃞

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    Zeng, Yan; Prakash, Lakshmi; Badmaev, Vladmir; Majeed, Muhammed; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2011-01-01

    Gugulipid (GL), extract of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, has been used to treat a variety of ailments. We report an anticancer effect and mechanism of GL against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with GL significantly inhibited the viability of human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and its androgen-independent variant (C81) with an IC50 of ∼1 μM (24-h treatment), at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-guggulsterone. The GL-induced growth inhibition correlated with apoptosis induction as evidenced by an increase in cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and sub-G0/G1-DNA fraction, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The GL-induced apoptosis was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. The induction of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak and a decrease of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bcl-2 were observed in GL-treated cells. SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Bax-Bak double-knockout mice were significantly more resistant to GL-induced cell killing compared with wild-type cells. It is interesting to note that a representative normal prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC) was relatively more resistant to GL-mediated cellular responses compared with prostate cancer cells. The GL treatment caused the activation of JNK that functioned upstream of Bax activation in apoptosis response. The GL-induced conformational change of Bax and apoptosis were significantly suppressed by genetic suppression of JNK activation. In conclusion, the present study indicates that ROS-dependent apoptosis by GL is regulated by JNK signaling axis. PMID:21115635

  16. Reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis by gugulipid extract of Ayurvedic medicine plant Commiphora mukul in human prostate cancer cells is regulated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

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    Xiao, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Prakash, Lakshmi; Badmaev, Vladmir; Majeed, Muhammed; Singh, Shivendra V

    2011-03-01

    Gugulipid (GL), extract of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, has been used to treat a variety of ailments. We report an anticancer effect and mechanism of GL against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with GL significantly inhibited the viability of human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and its androgen-independent variant (C81) with an IC(50) of ∼1 μM (24-h treatment), at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-guggulsterone. The GL-induced growth inhibition correlated with apoptosis induction as evidenced by an increase in cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and sub-G(0)/G(1)-DNA fraction, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The GL-induced apoptosis was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. The induction of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak and a decrease of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bcl-2 were observed in GL-treated cells. SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Bax-Bak double-knockout mice were significantly more resistant to GL-induced cell killing compared with wild-type cells. It is interesting to note that a representative normal prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC) was relatively more resistant to GL-mediated cellular responses compared with prostate cancer cells. The GL treatment caused the activation of JNK that functioned upstream of Bax activation in apoptosis response. The GL-induced conformational change of Bax and apoptosis were significantly suppressed by genetic suppression of JNK activation. In conclusion, the present study indicates that ROS-dependent apoptosis by GL is regulated by JNK signaling axis.

  17. Differential Effects of Ethanol on c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase, 14-3-3 Proteins, and Bax in Postnatal Day 4 and Postnatal Day 7 Rat Cerebellum

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    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Paiva, Michael; Kubovic, Stacey; Kotler, Alexandra; Rogozinski, Jonathan; Swanson, Eric; Madorsky, Vladimir; Posados, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    These studies investigated ethanol effects on upstream cellular elements and interactions which contribute to Bax-related apoptosis in neonatal rat cerebellum at ages of peak ethanol sensitivity (postnatal day 4 [P4]), compared to later ages of relative resistance (P7). Analyses were made of basal levels of the pro-apoptotic c-jun N-termimal kinase (JNK), Bax, and the 14-3-3 anchoring proteins, as well as the responsiveness of these substances to ethanol at P4 versus P7. Dimerization of Bax with 14-3-3 was also investigated at the two ages following ethanol treatment, a process which sequesters Bax in the cytosol, thus inhibiting its mitochondrial translocation and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Cultured cerebellar granule cells were used to examine the protective potential of JNK inhibition on ethanol-mediated cell death. Basal levels of JNK were significantly higher at P4 than P7, but no differences in the other proteins were found. Activated JNK, and cytosolic and mitochondrially-translocated Bax were increased in P4 but not P7 animals following ethanol exposure, while protective 14-3-3 proteins were increased only at P7. Ethanol treatment resulted in decreases in Bax:14-3-3 heterodimers at P4, but not at P7. Inhibition of JNK activity in vitro provided partial protection against ethanol neurotoxicity. Thus, differential temporal vulnerability to ethanol in this CNS region correlates with differences in both levels of apoptosis-related substances (e.g., JNK), and differential cellular responsiveness, favoring apoptosis at the most sensitive age and survival at the resistant age. The upstream elements contributing to this vulnerability can be targets for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:22169498

  18. Growth arrest- and DNA-damage-inducible 45beta gene inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and decreases IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-producing INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus Morten; Døssing, M G; Papa, S

    2006-01-01

    -activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. Inhibition of JNK prevents IL-1beta-mediated beta cell destruction. In mouse embryo fibroblasts and 3DO T cells, overexpression of the gene encoding growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45beta (Gadd45b) downregulates pro-apoptotic JNK signalling. The aim of this study...

  19. Saw palmetto extract suppresses insulin-like growth factor-I signaling and induces stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation in human prostate epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Teri L; Carroll, Julie M; Mallinson, Rebecca A; Roberts, Charles T; Roselli, Charles E

    2004-07-01

    A common alternative therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the extract from the fruit of saw palmetto (SPE). BPH is caused by nonmalignant growth of epithelial and stromal elements of the prostate. IGF action is important for prostate growth and development, and changes in the IGF system have been documented in BPH tissues. The main signaling pathways activated by the binding of IGF-I to the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) are the ERK arm of the MAPK cascade and the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) cascade. We tested the hypothesis that SPE suppresses growth and induces apoptosis in the P69 prostate epithelial cell line by inhibiting IGF-I signaling. Treatment with 150 microg/ml SPE for 24 h decreased IGF-I-induced proliferation of P69 cells and induced cleavage of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP), an index of apoptosis. Treatment of serum-starved P69 cells with 150 microg/ml SPE for 6 h reduced IGF-I-induced phosphorylation of Akt (assessed by Western blot) and Akt activity (assessed by an Akt kinase assay). Western blot analysis showed that SPE reduced IGF-I-induced phosphorylation of the adapter protein insulin receptor substrate-1 and decreased downstream effects of Akt activation, including increased cyclin D1 levels and phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 and p70(s6k). There was no effect on IGF-I-induced phosphorylation of MAPK, IGF-IR, or Shc. Treatment of starved cells with SPE alone induced phosphorylation the proapoptotic protein JNK. SPE treatment may relieve symptoms of BPH, in part, by inhibiting specific components of the IGF-I signaling pathway and inducing JNK activation, thus mediating antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on prostate epithelia.

  20. Sustained activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways by hepatitis B virus X protein mediates apoptosis via induction of Fas/FasL and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1/TNF-alpha expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Horng; Grégori, Gérald; Hullinger, Ronald L; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2004-12-01

    Activation of the cellular stress pathways (c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK] and p38 mitogen-activated protein [MAP] kinase) is linked to apoptosis. However, whether both pathways are required for apoptosis remains unresolved. Hepatitis B virus X protein (pX) activates p38 MAP kinase and JNK pathways and, in response to weak apoptotic signals, sensitizes hepatocytes to apoptosis. Employing hepatocyte cell lines expressing pX, which was regulated by tetracycline, we investigated the mechanism of apoptosis by p38 MAP kinase and JNK pathway activation. Inhibition of the p38 MAP kinase pathway rescues by 80% the initiation of pX-mediated apoptosis, whereas subsequent apoptotic events involve both pathways. pX-mediated activation of p38 MAP kinase and JNK pathways is sustained, inducing the transcription of the death receptor family genes encoding Fas/FasL and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1)/TNF-alpha and the p53-regulated Bax and Noxa genes. The pX-dependent expression of Fas/FasL and TNFR1/TNF-alpha mediates caspase 8 activation, resulting in Bid cleavage. In turn, activated Bid, acting with pX-induced Bax and Noxa, mediates the mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, resulting in the activation of caspase 9 and apoptosis. Combined antibody neutralization of FasL and TNF-alpha reduces by 70% the initiation of pX-mediated apoptosis. These results support the importance of the pX-dependent activation of both the p38 MAP kinase and JNK pathways in pX-mediated apoptosis and suggest that this mechanism of apoptosis occurs in vivo in response to weak apoptotic signals.

  1. c-Jun-N-terminal phosphorylation regulates DNMT1 expression and genome wide methylation in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiland, Dieter H; Ferrarese, Roberto; Claus, Rainer; Dai, Fangping; Masilamani, Anie P; Kling, Eva; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Kling, Teresia; Nelander, Sven; Carro, Maria S

    2017-01-24

    High-grade gliomas (HGG) are the most common brain tumors, with an average survival time of 14 months. A glioma-CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), associated with better clinical outcome, has been described in low and high-grade gliomas. Mutation of IDH1 is known to drive the G-CIMP status. In some cases, however, the hypermethylation phenotype is independent of IDH1 mutation, suggesting the involvement of other mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that DNMT1 expression is higher in low-grade gliomas compared to glioblastomas and correlates with phosphorylated c-Jun. We show that phospho-c-Jun binds to the DNMT1 promoter and causes DNA hypermethylation. Phospho-c-Jun activation by Anisomycin treatment in primary glioblastoma-derived cells attenuates the aggressive features of mesenchymal glioblastomas and leads to promoter methylation and downregulation of key mesenchymal genes (CD44, MMP9 and CHI3L1). Our findings suggest that phospho-c-Jun activates an important regulatory mechanism to control DNMT1 expression and regulate global DNA methylation in Glioblastoma.

  2. Flavopiridol suppresses tumor necrosis factor-induced activation of activator protein-1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), p44/p42 MAPK, and Akt, inhibits expression of antiapoptotic gene products, and enhances apoptosis through cytochrome c release and caspase activation in human myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yasunari; Sethi, Gautam; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2008-05-01

    Although flavopiridol, a semisynthetic flavone, was initially thought to be a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, it has now been shown that flavopiridol mediates antitumor responses through mechanism(s) yet to be defined. We have shown previously that flavopiridol abrogates tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. In this report, we examined whether this flavone affects other cellular responses activated by TNF. TNF is a potent inducer of activator protein-1 (AP-1), and flavopiridol abrogated this activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flavopiridol also suppressed AP-1 activation induced by various carcinogens and inflammatory stimuli. When examined for its effect on other signaling pathways, flavopiridol inhibited TNF-induced activation of various mitogen-activated protein kinases, including c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and p44/p42 MAPK. It is noteworthy that this flavone also suppressed TNF-induced activation of Akt, a cell survival kinase, and expression of various antiapoptotic proteins, such as IAP-1, IAP-2, XIAP, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and TRAF-1. Flavopiridol also inhibited the TNF-induced induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, c-Myc, and c-Fos, all known to mediate tumorigenesis. Moreover, TNF-induced apoptosis was enhanced by flavopiridol through activation of the bid-cytochrome-caspase-9-caspase-3 pathway. Overall, our results clearly suggest that flavopiridol interferes with the TNF cell-signaling pathway, leading to suppression of antiapoptotic mechanisms and enhancement of apoptosis.

  3. Antinociceptive Effect of Najanalgesin from Naja Naja Atra in a Neuropathic Pain Model via Inhibition of c-Jun NH2-terminal Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying-Xia; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Zhang, Rui

    2015-09-05

    Najanalgesin, a toxin isolated from the venom of Naja naja atra, has been shown to exert significant analgesic effects in a neuropathic pain model in rats. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this protective effect of najanalgesin is poorly understood. The present study sought to evaluate the intracellular signaling pathways that are involved in the antinociceptive effect of najanalgesin on neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive properties of najanalgesin were tested in hind paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimulation. We analyzed the participation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38, extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by western blot analysis. This inhibition of JNK was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The phosphorylation levels of JNK (as well as its downstream molecule c-Jun), p38, and ERK were significantly increased after injury. Najanalgesin only inhibited JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation but had no effect on either ERK or p38. This inhibition of JNK was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which suggested that the antinociceptive effect of najanalgesin on spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain in rats is associated with JNK activation in the spinal cord. The antinociceptive effect of najanalgesin functions by inhibiting the JNK in a neuropathic pain model.

  4. Thrombin-induced apoptosis in neurons through activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lei; Zu, Jie; He, Qianqian; Zhao, Hui; Zhou, Su; Ye, Xinchun; Yang, Xinxin; Zan, Kun; Zhang, Zuohui; Shi, Hongjuan; Cui, Guiyun

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that thrombin activation played a central role in cell injuries associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Here, our study investigated the cytotoxicity of thrombin on neurons, and determined the involvement of JNK pathways in thrombin-induced neuronal apoptosis. Primary cultured neurons were treated with different doses of thrombin. Some neurons were given either SP600125 or vehicle. LDH release assay and flow cytometry were used to measure neuronal apoptosis caused by thrombin. The activation of JNK and capases-3 were measured by Western blot. Our results showed large doses of thrombin that increased the LDH release, the level of cleaved caspase-3 and apoptosis rate of neurons. JNK was activated by thrombin in a time-dependent manner. Administration of SP600125 protects neurons from thrombin-induced apoptosis. These data indicate that the activation of JNK is crucial for thrombin-induced neuronal apoptosis, and inhibition of JNK may be a potential therapeutic target for ICH.

  5. cJun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1): roles in metabolic regulation of insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Davis, Roger J

    2010-01-01

    The cJun NH2-terminal kinase isoform JNK1 is implicated in the mechanism of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Feeding a high fat diet causes activation of the JNK1 signaling pathway, insulin resistance, and obesity in mice. Germ-line ablation of Jnk1 prevents both diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Genetic analysis indicates that the effects of JNK1 on insulin resistance can be separated from effects of JNK1 on obesity. Emerging research indicates that JNK1 plays multiple roles in...

  6. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 and endoplasmic reticulum stress as interdependent and reciprocal causation in diabetic embryopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezheng; Xu, Cheng; Yang, Peixin

    2013-02-01

    Embryos exposed to high glucose exhibit aberrant maturational and cytoarchitectural cellular changes, implicating cellular organelle stress in diabetic embryopathy. c-Jun-N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) activation is a causal event in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTD). However, the relationship between JNK1/2 activation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in diabetic embryopathy has never been explored. We found that maternal diabetes significantly increased ER stress markers and induced swollen/enlarged ER lumens in embryonic neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Deletion of either jnk1 or jnk2 gene diminished hyperglycemia-increased ER stress markers and ER chaperone gene expression. In embryos cultured under high-glucose conditions (20 mmol/L), the use of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), an ER chemical chaperone, diminished ER stress markers and abolished the activation of JNK1/2 and its downstream transcription factors, caspase 3 and caspase 8, and Sox1 neural progenitor apoptosis. Consequently, both 1 and 2 mmol/L 4-PBA significantly ameliorated high glucose-induced NTD. We conclude that hyperglycemia induces ER stress, which is responsible for the proapoptotic JNK1/2 pathway activation, apoptosis, and NTD induction. Suppressing JNK1/2 activation by either jnk1 or jnk2 gene deletion prevents ER stress. Thus, our study reveals a reciprocal causation of ER stress and JNK1/2 in mediating the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes.

  7. The tobacco smoke component, acrolein, suppresses innate macrophage responses by direct alkylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Milena; Spiess, Page C; Kasahara, David I; Randall, Matthew J; Deng, Bin; van der Vliet, Albert

    2012-01-01

    The respiratory innate immune system is often compromised by tobacco smoke exposure, and previous studies have indicated that acrolein, a reactive electrophile in tobacco smoke, may contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of smoking. Exposure of mice to acrolein at concentrations similar to those in cigarette smoke (5 ppm, 4 h) significantly suppressed alveolar macrophage responses to bacterial LPS, indicated by reduced induction of nitric oxide synthase 2, TNF-α, and IL-12p40. Mechanistic studies with bone marrow-derived macrophages or MH-S macrophages demonstrated that acrolein (1-30 μM) attenuated these LPS-mediated innate responses in association with depletion of cellular glutathione, although glutathione depletion itself was not fully responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Inhibitory actions of acrolein were most prominent after acute exposure (system.

  8. Expression of c-Jun and Sox-2 in human schwannomas and traumatic neuromas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivane, Aditya; Parkinson, David B; Ammoun, Sylwia; Hanemann, Clemens O

    2013-03-01

    Schwann cells myelinate axons of the peripheral nervous system. This process of myelination is regulated by various transcription factors. c-Jun and Sox-2 are negative regulators of myelination and control Schwann cell differentiation and plasticity. Schwannoma cells within tumours no longer express myelin markers, and show increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis. We have shown previously that several signalling pathways are activated in schwannoma cells in situ, in particular the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. Both in vitro and in vivo we have demonstrated that c-Jun and Sox-2 are co-regulated in Schwann cells and evidence shows that both these proteins regulate myelination negatively. In this study, we aimed to characterize the expression of c-Jun and Sox-2 in schwannoma and traumatic neuroma. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to c-Jun and Sox-2 was applied to six schwannomas, and the results were compared with those seen in traumatic neuroma and normal nerve. Increased expression of c-Jun and Sox-2 was seen in schwannoma. We have demonstrated increased expression of c-Jun and Sox-2 in schwannoma compared to traumatic neuroma. There was no expression of c-Jun and Sox-2 in a histologically normal peripheral nerve. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. The MEKK1 SWIM domain is a novel substrate receptor for c-Jun ubiquitylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Michael A; Duellman, Tyler; Hooper, Christopher; Ameka, Magdalene; Bakowska, Joanna C; Cuevas, Bruce D

    2012-08-01

    MEKK1 [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) kinase kinase 1] is a MAP3K (MAPK kinase kinase) that regulates MAPK activation, and is the only known mammalian kinase that is also a ubiquitin ligase. MEKK1 contains a RING domain within its N-terminal regulatory region, and MEKK1 has been shown to ubiquitylate the AP-1 (activator protein 1) transcription factor protein c-Jun, but the mechanism by which MEKK1 interacts with c-Jun to induce ubiquitylation has not been defined. Proximal to the RING domain is a SWIM (SWI2/SNF2 and MuDR) domain of undetermined function. In the present study, we demonstrate that the MEKK1 SWIM domain, but not the RING domain, directly associates with the c-Jun DNA-binding domain, and that the SWIM domain is required for MEKK1-dependent c-Jun ubiquitylation. We further show that this MEKK1 SWIM-Jun interaction is specific, as SWIM domains from other proteins failed to bind c-Jun. We reveal that, although the Jun and Fos DNA-binding domains are highly conserved, the MEKK1 SWIM domain does not bind Fos. Finally, we identify the sequence unique to Jun proteins required for specific interaction with the MEKK1 SWIM domain. Therefore we propose that the MEKK1 SWIM domain represents a novel substrate-binding domain necessary for direct interaction between c-Jun and MEKK1 that promotes MEKK1-dependent c-Jun ubiquitylation.

  10. Protein kinase B/Akt activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase by increasing NO production in response to shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Y. M.; Boo, Y. C.; Park, H.; Maland, M. C.; Patel, R.; Pritchard, K. A. Jr; Fujio, Y.; Walsh, K.; Darley-Usmar, V.; Jo, H.

    2001-01-01

    Laminar shear stress activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) by the mechanisms involving both nitric oxide (NO) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Because protein kinase B (Akt), a downstream effector of PI3K, has been shown to phosphorylate and activate endothelial NO synthase, we hypothesized that Akt regulates shear-dependent activation of JNK by stimulating NO production. Here, we examined the role of Akt in shear-dependent NO production and JNK activation by expressing a dominant negative Akt mutant (Akt(AA)) and a constitutively active mutant (Akt(Myr)) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). As expected, pretreatment of BAEC with the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) prevented shear-dependent stimulation of Akt and NO production. Transient expression of Akt(AA) in BAEC by using a recombinant adenoviral construct inhibited the shear-dependent stimulation of NO production and JNK activation. However, transient expression of Akt(Myr) by using a recombinant adenoviral construct did not induce JNK activation. This is consistent with our previous finding that NO is required, but not sufficient on its own, to activate JNK in response to shear stress. These results and our previous findings strongly suggest that shear stress triggers activation of PI3K, Akt, and endothelial NO synthase, leading to production of NO, which (along with O(2-), which is also produced by shear) activates Ras-JNK pathway. The regulation of Akt, NO, and JNK by shear stress is likely to play a critical role in its antiatherogenic effects.

  11. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-dependent upregulation of DR5 mediates cooperative induction of apoptosis by perifosine and TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Georgia Z

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perifosine, an alkylphospholipid tested in phase II clinical trials, modulates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway and cooperates with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL to augment apoptosis. The current study focuses on revealing the mechanisms by which perifosine enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Results The combination of perifosine and TRAIL was more active than each single agent alone in inducing apoptosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells and inhibiting the growth of xenografts. Interestingly, perifosine primarily increased cell surface levels of DR5 although it elevated the expression of both DR4 and DR5. Blockade of DR5, but not DR4 upregulation, via small interfering RNA (siRNA inhibited perifosine/TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Perifosine increased phosphorylated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and c-Jun levels, which were paralleled with DR4 and DR5 induction. However, only DR5 upregulaiton induced by perifosine could be abrogated by both the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and JNK siRNA. The antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine and glutathione, but not vitamin C or tiron, inhibited perifosine-induced elevation of p-c-Jun, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, no increased production of reactive oxygen species was detected in perifosine-treated cells although reduced levels of intracellular GSH were measured. Conclusions DR5 induction plays a critical role in mediating perifosine/TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Perifosine induces DR5 expression through a JNK-dependent mechanism independent of reactive oxygen species.

  12. Activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase is required for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus-induced apoptosis but not for virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shutao; Huo, Yazhen; Dong, Yinhui; Fan, Lihong; Yang, Hanchun; Wang, Leyuan; Ning, Yibao; Hu, Hongbo

    2012-06-01

    Apoptosis of host cells plays a critical role in pathogenesis of virus infection. MAPK kinases especially stress-activated protein kinases c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) and p38 are often involved in virus-mediated apoptosis. It has been shown that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection resulted in apoptosis of the host cells both in vitro and in vivo. The current investigation was initiated to determine whether stress-activated protein kinases JNK and p38 play a role in apoptosis induction by PRRSV infection. We examined phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and found that JNK but not p38 was activated in response to PRRSV infection. We then examined effects of this kinase on apoptosis induction and virus replication by using specific inhibitor. We found that JNK inhibition by its inhibitor SP600125 led to the abolishment of PRRSV-mediated apoptosis, but did not suppress virus replication. Further studies demonstrated that ROS generation was involved in JNK activation, and Bcl-2 family anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-xl were downstream targets of JNK to mediate apoptosis. We conclude that activation of JNK signaling pathway is essential for PRRSV-mediated apoptosis but not for virus replication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Anthrax lethal toxin rapidly reduces c-Jun levels by inhibiting c-Jun gene transcription and promoting c-Jun protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Weiming; Guo, Pengfei; Fang, Hui; Frucht, David M

    2017-10-27

    Anthrax is a life-threatening disease caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis , which expresses lethal factor and the receptor-binding protective antigen. These two proteins combine to form anthrax lethal toxin (LT), whose proximal targets are mitogen-activated kinase kinases (MKKs). However, the downstream mediators of LT toxicity remain elusive. Here we report that LT exposure rapidly reduces the levels of c-Jun, a key regulator of cell proliferation and survival. Blockade of proteasome-dependent protein degradation with the 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132 largely restored c-Jun protein levels, suggesting that LT promotes degradation of c-Jun protein. Using the MKK1/2 inhibitor U0126, we further show that MKK1/2-Erk1/2 pathway inactivation similarly reduces c-Jun protein, which was also restored by MG132 pre-exposure. Interestingly, c-Jun protein rebounded to normal levels 4 h following U0126 exposure but not after LT exposure. The restoration of c-Jun in U0126-exposed cells was associated with increased c-Jun mRNA levels and was blocked by inactivation of the JNK1/2 signaling pathway. These results indicate that LT reduces c-Jun both by promoting c-Jun protein degradation via inactivation of MKK1/2-Erk1/2 signaling and by blocking c-Jun gene transcription via inactivation of MKK4-JNK1/2 signaling. In line with the known functions of c-Jun, LT also inhibited cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of LT-resistant MKK2 and MKK4 variants partially restored Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 signaling in LT-exposed cells, enabling the cells to maintain relatively normal c-Jun protein levels and cell proliferation. Taken together, these findings indicate that LT reduces c-Jun protein levels via two distinct mechanisms, thereby inhibiting critical cell functions, including cellular proliferation.

  14. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue but not nuclear factor-kappaB activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is an independent determinant of insulin resistance in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sourris, Karly C; Lyons, Jasmine G; de Courten, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low-grade activation of the immune system (CLAIS) predicts type 2 diabetes via a decrease in insulin sensitivity. Our study investigated potential relationships between nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways-two pathways proposed as the link between...

  15. c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inactivation by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 1 Determines Resistance to Taxanes and Anthracyclines in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Raúl; Zazo, Sandra; Chamizo, Cristina; Manso, Rebeca; González-Alonso, Paula; Martín-Aparicio, Ester; Cristóbal, Ion; Cañadas, Carmen; Perona, Rosario; Lluch, Ana; Eroles, Pilar; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Albanell, Joan; Rovira, Ana; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Rojo, Federico

    2016-11-01

    MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is overexpressed during malignant transformation of the breast in many patients, and it is usually associated with chemoresistance through interference with JNK-driven apoptotic pathways. Although the molecular settings of the mechanism have been documented, details about the contribution of MKP-1 to the failure of chemotherapeutic interventions are unclear. Transient overexpression of MKP-1 and treatment with JNK-modulating agents in breast carcinoma cells confirmed the mediation of MKP-1 in the resistance to taxanes and anthracyclines in breast cancer, through the inactivation of JNK1/2. We next assessed MKP-1 expression and JNK1/2 phosphorylation status in a large cohort of samples from 350 early breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy. We detected that MKP-1 overexpression is a recurrent event predominantly linked to dephosphorylation of JNK1/2 with an adverse impact on relapse of the tumor and overall and disease-free survival. Moreover, MKP-1 and p-JNK1/2 determinations in 64 locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant taxane-based chemotherapy showed an inverse correlation between MKP-1 overexpression (together with JNK1/2 inhibition) and the pathologic response of the tumors. Our results emphasize the importance of MKP-1 as a potential predictive biomarker for a subset of breast cancer patients with worse outcome and less susceptibility to treatment. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2780-90. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Protective effect of DA-9401 in finasteride-induced apoptosis in rat testis: inositol requiring kinase 1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni KK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Kiran Kumar Soni,1,* Yu Seob Shin,1,* Bo Ram Choi,1 Keshab Kumar Karna,1 Hye Kyung Kim,2 Sung Won Lee,3 Chul Young Kim,4 Jong Kwan Park1 1Department of Urology, Chonbuk National University and Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute and Clinical Trial Center of Medical Device of Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 2College of Pharmacy, Kyungsung University, Busan, 3Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University Medical School, Seoul, 4College of Pharmacy, Hangyang University, Ansan, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Finasteride is used to treat male pattern baldness and benign prostatic hyperplasia. This study investigated the toxicity of finasteride and recovery by DA-9401 using Sprague Dawley (SD rats. Forty adult male SD rats were assigned to four groups: control (CTR, finasteride 1 mg/kg/day (F, finasteride 1 mg/kg + DA-9401 100 mg/kg/day (F + DA 100 and finasteride 1 mg/kg + DA-9401 200 mg/kg/day (F + DA 200. Treatments were by oral delivery once daily for 90 consecutive days. The gross anatomical parameters assessed included: genital organ weight; vas deferens sperm count and sperm motility; testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT and malondialdehyde levels; and histological and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase enzyme mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL staining of testis for spermatogenic cell density, Johnsen’s score and apoptosis. Testicular tissue was also used for evaluating endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and apoptotic proteins. Epididymis weight, seminal vesicle weight, prostate weight, penile weight and vas deferens sperm motility showed significant differences between the F group and the CTR, F + DA 100 and F + DA 200 groups. There was no significant change in the testosterone level. DHT level decreased significantly in the F group compared with the CTR group. Testis tissue revealed significant changes in spermatogenic cell density, Johnsen’s score and apoptotic index. Western blot showed significant changes in the ER stress and apoptotic markers. Finasteride resulted in reduced fertility and increased ER stress and apoptotic markers, which were recovered by administration of DA-9401 in the SD rats. Keywords: finasteride, DA-9401, infertility, sperm, dihydrotestosterone, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis 

  17. A feed-forward regulation of endothelin receptors by c-Jun in human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells and retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junming; Ma, Hai-Ying; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R; Yorio, Thomas; He, Shaoqing

    2017-01-01

    c-Jun, c-Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK) and endothelin B (ETB) receptor have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Previously, we reported that an increase of c-Jun and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) immunohistostaining is associated with upregulation of the ETB receptor within the ganglion cell layer of rats with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). In addition, both transcription factors regulate the expression of the ETB receptor in human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells (HNPE). The current study addressed the mechanisms by which ET-1 produced upregulation of ET receptors in primary rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and HNPE cells. Treatment of ET-1 and ET-3 increased the immunocytochemical staining of c-Jun and C/EBPβ in primary rat RGCs and co-localization of both transcription factors was observed. A marked increase in DNA binding activity of AP-1 and C/EBPβ as well as elevated protein levels of c-Jun and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) were detected following ET-1 treatment in HNPE cells. Overexpression of ETA or ETB receptor promoted the upregulation of c-Jun and also elevated its promoter activity. In addition, upregulation of C/EBPβ augmented DNA binding and mRNA expression of c-Jun, and furthermore, the interaction of c-Jun and C/EBPβ was confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation. Apoptosis of HNPE cells was identified following ET-1 treatment, and overexpression of the ETA or ETB receptor produced enhanced apoptosis. ET-1 mediated upregulation of c-Jun and C/EBPβ and their interaction may represent a novel mechanism contributing to the regulation of endothelin receptor expression. Reciprocally, c-Jun was also found to regulate the ET receptors and C/EBPβ appeared to play a regulatory role in promoting expression of c-Jun. Taken together, the data suggests that ET-1 triggers the upregulation of c-Jun through both ETA and ETB receptors, and conversely c-Jun also upregulates endothelin receptor expression, thereby

  18. A feed-forward regulation of endothelin receptors by c-Jun in human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells and retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junming Wang

    Full Text Available c-Jun, c-Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK and endothelin B (ETB receptor have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Previously, we reported that an increase of c-Jun and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ immunohistostaining is associated with upregulation of the ETB receptor within the ganglion cell layer of rats with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP. In addition, both transcription factors regulate the expression of the ETB receptor in human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells (HNPE. The current study addressed the mechanisms by which ET-1 produced upregulation of ET receptors in primary rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and HNPE cells. Treatment of ET-1 and ET-3 increased the immunocytochemical staining of c-Jun and C/EBPβ in primary rat RGCs and co-localization of both transcription factors was observed. A marked increase in DNA binding activity of AP-1 and C/EBPβ as well as elevated protein levels of c-Jun and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK were detected following ET-1 treatment in HNPE cells. Overexpression of ETA or ETB receptor promoted the upregulation of c-Jun and also elevated its promoter activity. In addition, upregulation of C/EBPβ augmented DNA binding and mRNA expression of c-Jun, and furthermore, the interaction of c-Jun and C/EBPβ was confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation. Apoptosis of HNPE cells was identified following ET-1 treatment, and overexpression of the ETA or ETB receptor produced enhanced apoptosis. ET-1 mediated upregulation of c-Jun and C/EBPβ and their interaction may represent a novel mechanism contributing to the regulation of endothelin receptor expression. Reciprocally, c-Jun was also found to regulate the ET receptors and C/EBPβ appeared to play a regulatory role in promoting expression of c-Jun. Taken together, the data suggests that ET-1 triggers the upregulation of c-Jun through both ETA and ETB receptors, and conversely c-Jun also upregulates endothelin receptor expression

  19. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate decreases thrombin/paclitaxel-induced endothelial tissue factor expression via the inhibition of c-Jun terminal NH2 kinase phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huang-Joe [Institute of Biotechnology, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2, Yuh-Der Road, Taichung 40447, Taiwan (China); Lo, Wan-Yu [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2, Yuh-Der Road, Taichung 40447, Taiwan (China); Graduate Integration of Chinese and Western Medicine, China Medical University, No. 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lu, Te-Ling [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, No. 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Haimei, E-mail: hmhuang@life.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-01

    Patients with paclitaxel-eluting stents are concerned with stent thrombosis caused by premature discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy or clopidogrel resistance. This study investigates the effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the expression of thrombin/paclitaxel-induced endothelial tissue factor (TF) expressions in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). EGCG was nontoxic to HAECs at 6 h up to a concentration of 25 {mu}mol/L. At a concentration of 25 {mu}mol/L, EGCG pretreatment potently inhibited both thrombin-stimulated and thrombin/paclitaxel-stimulated endothelial TF protein expression. Thrombin and thrombin/paclitaxel-induced 2.6-fold and 2.9-fold increases in TF activity compared with the control. EGCG pretreatment caused a 29% and 38% decrease in TF activity on thrombin and thrombin/paclitaxel treatment, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that thrombin and thrombin/paclitaxel-induced 3.0-fold and 4.6-fold TF mRNA expressions compared with the control. EGCG pretreatment caused an 82% and 72% decrease in TF mRNA expression on thrombin and thrombin/paclitaxel treatment, respectively. The c-Jun terminal NH2 kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 reduced thrombin/paclitaxel-induced TF expression. Furthermore, EGCG significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK to 49% of thrombin/paclitaxel-stimulated HAECs at 60 min. Immunofluorescence assay did not show an inhibitory effect of EGCG on P65 NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in the thrombin/paclitaxel-stimulated endothelial cells. In conclusion, EGCG can inhibit TF expression in thrombin/paclitaxel-stimulated endothelial cells via the inhibition of JNK phosphorylation. The unique property of EGCG may be used to develop a new drug-eluting stent by co-coating EGCG and paclitaxel.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Michael [San Diego, CA; Hibi, Masahiko [San Diego, CA; Lin, Anning [La Jolla, CA

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  1. Antiestrogenic activity of flavnoid phytochemicals mediated via c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase pathway. Cell-type specific regulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavonoid phytochemicals act as both agonists and antagonists of the human estrogen receptors (ERs). While a number of these compounds act by directly binding to the ER, certain phytochemicals, such as the flavonoid compounds chalcone and flavone, elicit antagonistic effects on estrogen signaling in...

  2. p63/p51-induced Onset of Keratinocyte Differentiation via the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Pathway Is Counteracted by Keratinocyte Growth Factor*

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Eisaku; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Egawa, Teie; Nagoshi, Hirokazu; Obinata, Masuo; Tagami, Hachiro; Ikawa, Shuntaro; Aiba, Setsuya

    2008-01-01

    p63/p51, a homolog of the tumor suppressor protein p53, is chiefly expressed in epithelial tissues, including the epidermis. p63 affects cell death similar to p53, and also plays important roles in the development of epithelial tissues and the maintenance of epithelial stem cells. Because it remains unclear how p63 regulates epithelial cell differentiation, we examined the function(s) of p63 in keratinocyte differentiation through the use of a keratinocyte culture syst...

  3. Radiation-induced apoptosis in developing rats and kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity in adult rats are associated with distinctive morphological and biochemical c-Jun/AP-1 (N) expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozas, E. [Unitat de Neuropatologia, Servei d' Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Princeps d' Espanya, Universitat de Barcelona, 08907 Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Planas, A.M. [Departament de Farmacologia i Toxicologia, IIBB, CSIC Barcelona (Spain); Ferrer, I. [Unitat de Neuropatologia, Servei d' Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Princeps d' Espanya, Universitat de Barcelona, 08907 Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain)

    1997-07-14

    Ionizing radiation produces apoptosis in the developing rat brain. Strong c-Jun immunoreactivity, as revealed with the antibody c-Jun/AP-1 (N) which is raised against the amino acids 91-105 mapping with the amino terminal domain of mouse c-Jun p39, is simultaneously observed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of apoptotic cells. Western blotting of total brain homogenates, using the same antibody, shows a p39 band in control rats which is accompanied by a strong, phosphorylated p62 double-band in irradiated animals. In addition, increased c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 expression, as found on western blots, is found in irradiated rats when compared with controls. Intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid at convulsant doses to the adult rat produces cell death with morphological features of necrosis, together with the appearance of cells with fine granular chromatin degeneration and small numbers of apoptotic-like cells, in the entorhinal and piriform cortices, basal amygdala, certain thalamic nuclei, and CA1 region of the hippocampus. c-Jun expression in kainic acid-treated rats, as revealed with the c-Jun/AP-1 (N) antibody, is found in the nuclei of a minority of cells in the same areas. The vast majority of c-Jun-immunoreactive cells have normal nuclear morphology, whereas necrotic cells are negative and only a few cells with fine granular chromatin condensation and apoptotic cells following kainic acid injection are stained with c-Jun antibodies. Western blotting, using the same antibody, shows a p39 band in control rats, which is accompanied by a band at about p26 from 6 h onwards following kainic acid injection. Decreased c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 expression, as revealed on western blots, is observed in kainic acid-treated rats.These results show that the antibody c-Jun/AP-1 (N) recognizes three different forms of c-Jun-related immunoreactivity in normal and pathological states, which are associated with the different outcome of cells. These results stress the necessity

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid downregulates phenobarbital-induced cytochrome P450 2B1 gene expression in rat primary hepatocytes via the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chia-Yang; Li, Chien-Chun; Liu, Kai-Li; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Chen, Haw-Wen

    2009-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways play central roles in the transduction of extracellular stimuli into cells and the regulation of expression of numerous genes. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was shown to be involved in the regulation of expression of drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) in rat primary hepatocytes in response to xenobiotics. Cytochrome P450 2B1 (CYP 2B1) is a DME that is dramatically induced by phenobarbital-type inducers. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays a critical role in regulating the expression of DMEs, and the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of CAR is an important event in CYP 2B1 expression. In the present study, we determined the effect of DHA on MAPK transactivation and its role in CYP 2B1 expression induced by phenobarbital. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 were activated by phenobarbital in a dose-dependent manner. DHA (100 muM) inhibited JNK1/2 and ERK2 activation induced by phenobarbital in a time-dependent manner. Both SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) inhibited CYP 2B1 protein and mRNA expression induced by phenobarbital. SB203580 significantly increased the intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration compared with a control group (p expression induced by phenobarbital.

  5. c-Jun interacts with the corepressor TG-interacting factor (TGIF) to suppress Smad2 transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessah, Marcia; Prunier, Céline; Marais, Jacqueline; Ferrand, Nathalie; Mazars, Anne; Lallemand, François; Gauthier, Jean-Michel; Atfi, Azeddine

    2001-01-01

    The Sma and Mad related (Smad) family proteins are critical mediators of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily signaling. After TGF-β-mediated phosphorylation and association with Smad4, Smad2 moves to the nucleus and activates expression of specific genes through cooperative interactions with DNA-binding proteins, including members of the winged-helix family of transcription factors, forkhead activin signal transducer (FAST)-1 and FAST2. TGF-β has also been described to activate other signaling pathways, such as the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway. Here, we show that activation of JNK cascade blocked the ability of Smad2 to mediate TGF-β-dependent activation of the FAST proteins. This inhibitory activity is mediated through the transcriptional factor c-Jun, which enhances the association of Smad2 with the nuclear transcriptional corepressor TG-interacting factor (TGIF), thereby interfering with the assembly of Smad2 and the coactivator p300 in response to TGF-β signaling. Interestingly, c-Jun directly binds to the nuclear transcriptional corepressor TGIF and is required for TGIF-mediated repression of Smad2 transcriptional activity. These studies thus reveal a mechanism for suppression of Smad2 signaling pathway by JNK cascade through transcriptional repression. PMID:11371641

  6. Regulation of c-Fes Tyrosine Kinase and Biological Activities by N-Terminal Coiled-Coil Oligomerization Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haiyun; Rogers, Jim A.; Dunham, Nancy A.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase Fes has been implicated in cytokine signal transduction, hematopoiesis, and embryonic development. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that active Fes exists as a large oligomeric complex in vitro. However, when Fes is expressed in mammalian cells, its kinase activity is tightly repressed. The Fes unique N-terminal sequence has two regions with strong homology to coiled-coil-forming domains often found in oligomeric proteins. Here we show that disruption or deletion of the first coiled-coil domain upregulates Fes tyrosine kinase and transforming activities in Rat-2 fibroblasts and enhances Fes differentiation-inducing activity in myeloid leukemia cells. Conversely, expression of a Fes truncation mutant consisting only of the unique N-terminal domain interfered with Rat-2 fibroblast transformation by an activated Fes mutant, suggesting that oligomerization is essential for Fes activation in vivo. Coexpression with the Fes N-terminal region did not affect the transforming activity of v-Src in Rat-2 cells, arguing against a nonspecific suppressive effect. Taken together, these findings suggest a model in which Fes activation may involve coiled-coil-mediated interconversion of monomeric and oligomeric forms of the kinase. Mutation of the first coiled-coil domain may activate Fes by disturbing intramolecular coiled-coil interaction, allowing for oligomerization via the second coiled-coil domain. Deletion of the second coiled-coil domain blocks fibroblast transformation by an activated form of c-Fes, consistent with this model. These results provide the first evidence for regulation of a nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinase by coiled-coil domains. PMID:10567558

  7. Enzyme activity effects of N-terminal His-tag attached to catalytic sub-unit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, James M J; Lee, Woo-Jeong; Shepherd, Peter R; Buchanan, Christina M

    2013-11-05

    NTT (N-terminal tags) on the catalytic (p110) sub-unit of PI 3-K (phosphoinositol 3-kinase) have previously been shown to increase cell signalling and oncogenic transformation. Here we test the impact of an NT (N-terminal) His-tag on in vitro lipid and protein kinase activity of all class-1 PI 3-K isoforms and two representative oncogenic mutant forms (E545K and H1047R), in order to elucidate the mechanisms behind this elevated signalling and transformation observed in vivo. Our results show that an NT His-tag has no impact on lipid kinase activity as measured by enzyme titration, kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility. Conversely, the NT His-tag did result in a differential effect on protein kinase activity, further potentiating the elevated protein kinase activity of both the helical domain and catalytic domain oncogenic mutants with relation to p110 phosphorylation. All other isoforms also showed elevated p110 phosphorylation (although not statistically significant). We conclude that the previously reported increase in cell signalling and oncogenic-like transformation in response to p110 NTT is not mediated via an increase in the lipid kinase activity of PI 3-K, but may be mediated by increased p110 autophosphorylation and/or other, as yet unidentified, intracellular protein/protein interactions. We further observe that tagged recombinant protein is suitable for use in in vitro lipid kinase screens to identify PI 3-K inhibitors; however, we recommend that in vivo (including intracellular) experiments and investigations into the protein kinase activity of PI 3-K should be conducted with untagged constructs.

  8. Distinct Molecular Regulation of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3α Isozyme Controlled by Its N-terminal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Yaffe, Yakey; Licht-Murava, Avital; Urbanska, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Jacek; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Hirschberg, Koret; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is expressed as two isozymes α and β. They share high similarity in their catalytic domains but differ in their N- and C-terminal regions, with GSK-3α having an extended glycine-rich N terminus. Here, we undertook live cell imaging combined with molecular and bioinformatic studies to understand the distinct functions of the GSK-3 isozymes focusing on GSK-3α N-terminal region. We found that unlike GSK-3β, which shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, GSK-3α was excluded from the nucleus. Deletion of the N-terminal region of GSK-3α resulted in nuclear localization, and treatment with leptomycin B resulted in GSK-3α accumulation in the nucleus. GSK-3α rapidly accumulated in the nucleus in response to calcium or serum deprivation, and accumulation was strongly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin. This nuclear accumulation was not mediated by cleavage of the N-terminal region or phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Rather, we show that calcium-induced GSK-3α nuclear accumulation was governed by GSK-3α binding with as yet unknown calpain-sensitive protein or proteins; this binding was mediated by the N-terminal region. Bioinformatic and experimental analyses indicated that nuclear exclusion of GSK-3α was likely an exclusive characteristic of mammalian GSK-3α. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of GSK-3α reduced the nuclear pool of β-catenin and its target cyclin D1. Taken together, these data suggest that the N-terminal region of GSK-3α is responsible for its nuclear exclusion and that binding with a calcium/calpain-sensitive product enables GSK-3α nuclear retention. We further uncovered a novel link between calcium and nuclear GSK-3α-mediated inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:21266584

  9. Identification and significance of the N-terminal part of swine pyruvate kinase in aged Parma hams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Stefano; Boni, Matteo; Ruozi, Roberto; Virgili, Roberta; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2003-01-01

    Within a project aimed at studying the peptide fraction in dry-cured Parma hams, a peptide was purified by means of reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and identified by its molecular mass and amino acid sequence analysis. The peptide showed a very high degree of homology with the N-terminal part of different mammalian pyruvate kinases reported in databases and was accordingly identified as the N-terminal part of swine pyruvate kinase, whose sequence had never been reported before. The peptide was determined quantitatively by comparison with a suitable internal standard (Phe-Phe) in commercial ham samples with different age degrees. The peptide was found to be ubiquitous in Parma ham and its amount to increase during ageing even if a large variability was found within each assayed maturing time. The correlation found with the ham proteolysis degree (Pham, in agreement with the hypothesis that this taste is more related to free amino acids and low molecular weight peptides.

  10. Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroehlein, Andreas J.; Young, Neil D.; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Chang, Bill C. H.; Sternberg, Paul W.; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Gasser, Robin B.

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea) represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes) of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan) kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation. PMID:27412987

  11. Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas J. Stroehlein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor-4 enhances proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells via activation of c-Jun signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ho Kook

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF4 is expressed in embryonic stages and in adult tissues, where it plays critical roles in modulating multiple cellular functions. However, the exact roles of FGF4 on proliferation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs are not completely understood. Exogenous addition of FGF4 stimulated proliferation of mouse ESCs (mESCs, as proven by the increases in DNA synthesis and cell cycle regulatory protein induction. These increases were almost completely inhibited by pre-treating cells with anti-FGF4 antibody. FGF4 also activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK signaling, but not p38 kinase. Blockage of JNK signaling by SP600125 or by transfection with its specific siRNA significantly inhibited FGF4-stimulated cell proliferation through the suppression of c-Jun induction and activator protein-1 (AP-1 activity. However, ERK or p38 kinase inhibitor did not affect FGF4-stimulated proliferation in mESCs. FGF4 suppressed osteogenic differentiation of mESCs by inhibiting expression of transcription factors involved in bone formation. Further, exogenous FGF4 addition stimulated proliferation of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs via activation of ERK signaling. FGF4 also augmented mineralization of hPDLSCs, but not of BMMSCs. Collectively, it is suggested that FGF4 triggers proliferation of stem cells by activating MAPK-mediated signaling, while it affects differently osteogenic differentiation according to the origins of stem cells.

  13. Rad53 kinase activation-independent replication checkpoint function of the N-terminal forkhead-associated (FHA1) domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Brietta L; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2004-09-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad53 has crucial functions in many aspects of the cellular response to DNA damage and replication blocks. To coordinate these diverse roles, Rad53 has two forkhead-associated (FHA) phosphothreonine-binding domains in addition to a kinase domain. Here, we show that the conserved N-terminal FHA1 domain is essential for the function of Rad53 to prevent the firing of late replication origins in response to replication blocks. However, the FHA1 domain is not required for Rad53 activation during S phase, and as a consequence of defective downstream signaling, Rad53 containing an inactive FHA1 domain is hyperphosphorylated in response to replication blocks. The FHA1 mutation dramatically hypersensitizes strains with defects in the cell cycle-wide checkpoint pathways (rad9Delta and rad17Delta) to DNA damage, but it is largely epistatic with defects in the replication checkpoint (mrc1Delta). Altogether, our data indicate that the FHA1 domain links activated Rad53 to downstream effectors in the replication checkpoint. The results reveal an important mechanistic difference to the homologous Schizosaccharomyces pombe FHA domain that is required for Mrc1-dependent activation of the corresponding Cds1 kinase. Surprisingly, despite the severely impaired replication checkpoint and also G(2)/M checkpoint functions, the FHA1 mutation by itself leads to only moderate viability defects in response to DNA damage, highlighting the importance of functionally redundant pathways.

  14. MORINGA TEA BLOCKS ACUTE LUNG INFLAMMATION INDUCED BY SWINE CONFINEMENT DUST THROUGH A MECHANISM INVOLVING TNF-α EXPRESSION, C-JUN N-TERMINAL KINASE ACTIVATION AND NEUTROPHIL REGULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mykea Mcknight; Jabria Allen; Jenora T. Waterman; Steven Hurley; Joshua Idassi; Radiah C. Minor

    2014-01-01

    Plant based products represent a promising alternative to conventional treatments for inflammation. Moringa oleifera Lam is a tree rich in proteins, vitamins, minerals and a variety of phytochemcals with health benefits. Among the reported health benefits are antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether tea brewed from dried Moringa leaves would abrogate inflammation in a mouse model of acute lung inflammation induced by...

  15. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK mediates Wnt5a-induced cell motility dependent or independent of RhoA pathway in human dental papilla cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Wang

    Full Text Available Wnt5a plays an essential role in tissue development by regulating cell migration, though the molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Our study investigated the pathways involved in Wnt5a-dependent cell motility during the formation of dentin and pulp. Over-expression of Wnt5a promoted cell adhesion and formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs in human dental papilla cells (hDPCs, while inhibiting cell migration. Instead of activating the canonical Wnt signal pathway in hDPCs, Wnt5a stimulation induced activation of the JNK signal in a RhoA-dependent or independent manner. Inhibiting JNK abrogated Wnt5a-induced FACs formation but not cytoskeletal rearrangement. Both dominant negative RhoA (RhoA T19N and constitutively active RhoA mutants (RhoA Q63L blocked the Wnt5a-dependent changes in hDPCs adhesion, migration and cytoskeletal rearrangement here too, with the exception of the formation of FACs. Taken together, our study suggested that RhoA and JNK signaling have roles in mediating Wnt5a-dependent adhesion and migration in hDPCs, and the Wnt5a/JNK pathway acts both dependently and independently of the RhoA pathway.

  16. C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) Mediates Wnt5a-Induced Cell Motility Dependent or Independent of RhoA Pathway in Human Dental Papilla Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenglin; Zhao, Yuan; Su, Yingying; Li, Ruimin; Lin, Yunfeng; Zhou, Xuedong; Ye, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Wnt5a plays an essential role in tissue development by regulating cell migration, though the molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Our study investigated the pathways involved in Wnt5a-dependent cell motility during the formation of dentin and pulp. Over-expression of Wnt5a promoted cell adhesion and formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs) in human dental papilla cells (hDPCs), while inhibiting cell migration. Instead of activating the canonical Wnt signal pathway in hDPCs, Wnt5a stimulation induced activation of the JNK signal in a RhoA-dependent or independent manner. Inhibiting JNK abrogated Wnt5a-induced FACs formation but not cytoskeletal rearrangement. Both dominant negative RhoA (RhoA T19N) and constitutively active RhoA mutants (RhoA Q63L) blocked the Wnt5a-dependent changes in hDPCs adhesion, migration and cytoskeletal rearrangement here too, with the exception of the formation of FACs. Taken together, our study suggested that RhoA and JNK signaling have roles in mediating Wnt5a-dependent adhesion and migration in hDPCs, and the Wnt5a/JNK pathway acts both dependently and independently of the RhoA pathway. PMID:23844260

  17. c-jun gene expression in human cells exposed to either ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collart, F.R.; Horio, M.; Huberman, E.

    1993-06-01

    We investigated the role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) and protein kinase C (PKC) in radiation- and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-evoked c-jun gene expression in human HL-205 cells. This induction of c-jun gene expression could be prevented by pretreatment of the cells with Nacetylcysteine (an antioxidant) or H7 (a PKC and PKA inhibitor) but not by HA1004, a PKA inhibitor, suggesting a role for ROls and PKC in mediating c-jun gene expression. We also investigated potential differences in c-jun gene expression in a panel of normal and tumor cells untreated or treated with ionizing radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Treatment with radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced a varied response, from some reduction to an increase of more than an order of magnitude in the steady-state level of c-jun mRNA. These data indicate that although induction of c-jun may be a common response to ionizing radiation and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, this response was reduced or absent in some cell types.

  18. Selection and characterization of a DNA aptamer that can discriminate between cJun/cJun and cJun/cFos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D Walters

    Full Text Available The AP-1 family of transcriptional activators plays pivotal roles in regulating a wide range of biological processes from the immune response to tumorigenesis. Determining the roles of specific AP-1 dimers in cells, however, has remained challenging because common molecular biology techniques are unable to distinguish between the role of, for example, cJun/cJun homodimers versus cJun/cFos heterodimers. Here we used SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment to identify and characterize DNA aptamers that are >100-fold more specific for binding cJun/cJun compared to cJun/cFos, setting the foundation to investigate the biological functions of different AP-1 dimer compositions.

  19. p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase regulate the accumulation of a tight junction protein, ZO-1, in cell-cell contacts in HaCaT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakami, Masahiko; Kitagawa, Norio; Iida, Hiroshi; Anan, Hisashi; Inai, Tetsuichiro

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the involvement of stress-activated protein kinases, JNK and p38 MAPK, in the assembly of tight junctions in keratinocytes, we treated HaCaT cells with various combinations of SP600125 (an inhibitor of JNK), SB202190 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK) and anisomycin (an activator of both JNK and p38 MAPK) and examined the localization of ZO-1, an undercoat constitutive protein of the tight junction. Short-term (8h) incubation with SP600125, SB202190 or anisomycin induced the accumulation of ZO-1 in the cell-cell contacts, with reduced ZO-1 staining in the cytoplasm, while only long-term (24h) incubation with SP600125 induced the accumulation of ZO-1. SP600125, SB202190 or SP600125 plus SB202190 treatment induced thin linear staining for ZO-1 in the cell-cell contacts. Anisomycin treatment induced thick and irregular linear staining for ZO-1, while anisomycin plus SP600125 treatment induced zipper-like staining for ZO-1. Anisomycin plus SB202190 treatment or anisomycin plus both SP600125 and SB202190 treatment for 8h failed to lead to the accumulation of ZO-1 in cell-cell contacts, but induced thin linear staining with several gaps 16 h after removal of these agents. These results suggest that the localization of ZO-1 in cell-cell contacts is differently regulated by activation and inhibition of JNK and/or p38 MAPK depending on the incubation period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A role for mixed lineage kinases in granule cell apoptosis induced by cytoskeletal disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Geist, Marie Aavang; Veng, Lone Merete

    2006-01-01

    Microtubule disruption by colchicine induces apoptosis in selected neuronal populations. However, little is known about the upstream death signalling events mediating the neurotoxicity. We investigated first whether colchicine-induced granule cell apoptosis activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase...... (JNK) pathway. Cultured murine cerebellar granule cells were exposed to 1 microm colchicine for 24 h. Activation of the JNK pathway was detected by western blotting as well as immunocytochemistry using antibodies against phospho-c-Jun (p-c-Jun). Next, adult male rats were injected...... intracerebroventricularly with colchicine (10 microg), and JNK pathway activation in dentate granule cells (DGCs) was detected by antibodies against p-c-Jun. The second part of the study tested the involvement of mixed lineage kinases (MLK) as upstream activators of the JNK pathway in colchicine toxicity, using CEP-1347...

  1. Distinct molecular regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha isozyme controlled by its N-terminal region: functional role in calcium/calpain signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Yaffe, Yakey; Licht-Murava, Avital; Urbanska, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Jacek; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Hirschberg, Koret; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit

    2011-04-15

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is expressed as two isozymes α and β. They share high similarity in their catalytic domains but differ in their N- and C-terminal regions, with GSK-3α having an extended glycine-rich N terminus. Here, we undertook live cell imaging combined with molecular and bioinformatic studies to understand the distinct functions of the GSK-3 isozymes focusing on GSK-3α N-terminal region. We found that unlike GSK-3β, which shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, GSK-3α was excluded from the nucleus. Deletion of the N-terminal region of GSK-3α resulted in nuclear localization, and treatment with leptomycin B resulted in GSK-3α accumulation in the nucleus. GSK-3α rapidly accumulated in the nucleus in response to calcium or serum deprivation, and accumulation was strongly inhibited by the calpain inhibitor calpeptin. This nuclear accumulation was not mediated by cleavage of the N-terminal region or phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Rather, we show that calcium-induced GSK-3α nuclear accumulation was governed by GSK-3α binding with as yet unknown calpain-sensitive protein or proteins; this binding was mediated by the N-terminal region. Bioinformatic and experimental analyses indicated that nuclear exclusion of GSK-3α was likely an exclusive characteristic of mammalian GSK-3α. Finally, we show that nuclear localization of GSK-3α reduced the nuclear pool of β-catenin and its target cyclin D1. Taken together, these data suggest that the N-terminal region of GSK-3α is responsible for its nuclear exclusion and that binding with a calcium/calpain-sensitive product enables GSK-3α nuclear retention. We further uncovered a novel link between calcium and nuclear GSK-3α-mediated inhibition of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  2. N-terminal myristoylation is required for membrane localization of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); T. Jarchau; S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells harbors a unique isozyme of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK type II) which acts as a key regulator of ion transport systems, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

  3. The N-Terminal Non-Kinase-Domain-Mediated Binding of Haspin to Pds5B Protects Centromeric Cohesion in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Linli; Liang, Cai; Chen, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhenlei; Zhang, Bo; Yan, Haiyan; Qi, Feifei; Zhang, Miao; Yi, Qi; Guan, Youchen; Xiang, Xingfeng; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Fangwei

    2017-04-03

    Sister-chromatid cohesion, mediated by the multi-subunit cohesin complex, must be precisely regulated to prevent chromosome mis-segregation. In prophase and prometaphase, whereas the bulk of cohesin on chromosome arms is removed by its antagonist Wapl, cohesin at centromeres is retained to ensure chromosome biorientation until anaphase onset. It remains incompletely understood how centromeric cohesin is protected against Wapl in mitosis. Here we show that the mitotic histone kinase Haspin binds to the cohesin regulatory subunit Pds5B through a conserved YGA/R motif in its non-catalytic N terminus, which is similar to the recently reported YSR-motif-dependent binding of Wapl to Pds5B. Knockout of Haspin or disruption of Haspin-Pds5B interaction causes weakened centromeric cohesion and premature chromatid separation, which can be reverted by centromeric targeting of a N-terminal short fragment of Haspin containing the Pds5B-binding motif or by prevention of Wapl-dependent cohesin removal. Conversely, excessive Haspin capable of binding Pds5B displaces Wapl from Pds5B and suppresses Wapl activity, and it largely bypasses the Wapl antagonist Sgo1 for cohesion protection. Taken together, these data indicate that the Haspin-Pds5B interaction is required to ensure proper sister-chromatid cohesion, most likely through antagonizing Wapl-mediated cohesin release from mitotic centromeres. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential effect of shear stress on extracellular signal-regulated kinase and N-terminal Jun kinase in endothelial cells. Gi2- and Gbeta/gamma-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, H; Sipos, K; Go, Y M; Law, R; Rong, J; McDonald, J M

    1997-01-10

    Shear stress differentially regulates production of many vasoactive factors at the level of gene expression in endothelial cells that may be mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinases, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and N-terminal Jun kinase (JNK). Here we show, using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), that shear stress differentially regulates ERK and JNK by mechanisms involving Gi2 and pertussis toxin (PTx)-insensitive G-protein-dependent pathways, respectively. Shear activated ERK with a rapid, biphasic time course (maximum by 5 min and basal by 30-min shear exposure) and force dependence (minimum and maximum at 1 and 10 dyn/cm2 shear stress, respectively). PTx treatment prevented shear-dependent activation of ERK1/2, consistent with a Gi-dependent mechanism. In contrast, JNK activity was maximally turned on by a threshold level of shear force (0.5 dyn/cm2 or higher) with a much slower and prolonged time course (requiring at least 30 min to 4 h) than that of ERK. Also, PTx had no effect on shear-dependent activation of JNK. To further define the shear-sensitive ERK and JNK pathways, vectors expressing hemagglutinin epitope-tagged ERK (HA-ERK) or HA-JNK were co-transfected with other vectors by using adenovirus-polylysine in BAEC. Expression of the mutant (alpha)i2(G203), antisense G(alpha)i2 and a dominant negative Ras (N17Ras) prevented shear-dependent activation of HA-ERK, while that of (alpha)i2(G204) and antisense (alpha)i3 did not. Expression of a Gbeta/gamma scavenger, the carboxyl terminus of beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (betaARK-ct), and N17Ras inhibited shear-dependent activation of HA-JNK. Treatment of BAEC with genistein prevented shear-dependent activation of ERK and JNK, indicating the essential role of tyrosine kinase(s) in both ERK and JNK pathways. These results provide evidence that 1) Gi2-protein, Ras, and tyrosine kinase(s) are upstream regulators of shear-dependent activation of ERK and 2) that shear

  5. Telmisartan directly ameliorates the neuronal inflammatory response to IL-1β partly through the JNK/c-Jun and NADPH oxidase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Tao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blockade of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 receptors ameliorates brain inflammation, and reduces excessive brain interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β production and release from cortical microglia. The aim of this study was to determine whether, in addition, AT1 receptor blockade directly attenuates IL-1β-induced inflammatory responses in neuronal cultures. Methods SK-N-SH human neuroblasts and primary rat cortical neurons were pretreated with telmisartan followed by exposure to IL-1β. Gene expression was determined by reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR, protein expression and kinase activation by western blotting, NADPH oxidase activity by the lucigenin method, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 release by enzyme immunoassay, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation by the dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluorescent probe assay, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ involvement was assessed with the antagonists GW9662 and T0070907, the agonist pioglitazone and the expression of PPARγ target genes ABCG1 and CD36. Results We found that SK-N-SH neuroblasts expressed AT1 but not AT2 receptor mRNA. Telmisartan reduced IL-1β-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression and PGE2 release more potently than did candesartan and losartan. Telmisartan reduced the IL-1β-induced increase in IL-1R1 receptor and NADPH oxidase-4 (NOX-4 mRNA expression, NADPH oxidase activity, and ROS generation, and reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced COX-2 gene expression. Telmisartan did not modify IL-1β-induced ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphorylation or nuclear factor-κB activation but significantly decreased IL-1β-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and c-Jun activation. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 decreased IL-1β-induced PGE2 release with a potency similar to that of telmisartan. The PPARγ agonist pioglitazone reduced IL-1β-induced inflammatory reaction, whereas telmisartan did not activate PPARγ, as shown by its

  6. Inhibition of Jun N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) Improves Erectile Function by Alleviation of Cavernosal Apoptosis in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juhyun; Chai, Ji Sun; Kim, Soo Woong; Paick, Jae-Seung; Cho, Min Chul

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether JNK inhibition could alleviate erectile dysfunction (ED) through suppressing cavernosal apoptosis in a rat model of carvernosal nerve crush injury (CNCI), thereby providing potential therapeutic strategy for alleviating post-radical prostatectomy (RP) ED. Fifty-six 11-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were categorized equally into the following four groups: 1) sham surgery (S), 2) CNCI (I), 3) CNCI treated with low-dose JNK inhibitor (L), and 4) CNCI treated with high-dose JNK inhibitor (H). The L and H groups received daily intraperitoneal injection of JNK inhibitors (1.0 mg/kg for L group and 10.0 mg/kg for H group) for 2-weeks starting from the following day after surgery. Erectile response, western blot and immunohistochemistry were assessed. At 2 weeks after surgery, intracavernous pressure (ICP)/mean arterial pressure (MAP) and area under the curve (AUC)/MAP in group I were significantly decreased compared to those in group S. Erectile responses in group H were significantly improved compared to those in group I. Group I showed decreased SM content, increased apoptosis, increased apoptotic or SM cells positive for phosphorylated c-Jun, increased c-Jun phosphorylation, and decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio compared to group S. Group H showed significant improvements in histological alterations and dysregulation of JNK-driven pathway. Our data suggest that JNK inhibition can improve erectile function by alleviating cavernosal apoptosis through restoring JNK-related pathway towards normal. Thus, an early therapeutic strategy targeting JNK pathway might be able to alleviate cavernosal SM apoptosis and post-RP ED caused by CN injury. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Generation and characterization of polyclonal antibodies specific to N-terminal extension of p85 isoform of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (p85 S6K1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savinska L. O.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Generation of polyclonal antibodies specific to the ribosomal protein S6 kinase isoform – p85S6K1 and directed to the N-terminal (1–23 aa extension of p85S6K1. Methods. Animal immunization with synthetic (1–23 aa peptide, ELISA, Western blot, Immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescent analysis. Results. Polyclonal antibodies have been generated, which specifically recognize only p85 but not p70 isoform of S6K1 in western blot, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analysis. Conclusions. The obtained antibodies can be recommended for studies on the p85S6K1 and other S6K1 isoforms possessing the N-terminal extension – the identification of binding protein partners, analysis of subcellular localization under different physiological conditions, elucidation of the signal transduction pathways involving different S6K1 isoforms.

  8. Critical role of c-Jun overexpression in liver metastasis of human breast cancer xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background c-Jun/AP-1 has been linked to invasive properties of aggressive breast cancer. Recently, it has been reported that overexpression of c-Jun in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 resulted in increased AP-1 activity, motility and invasiveness of the cells in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice. However, the role of c-Jun in metastasis of human breast cancer in vivo is currently unknown. Methods To further investigate the direct involvement of c-Jun in tumorigenesis and metastasis, in the present study, the effects of c-Jun overexpression were studied in both in vitro and in nude mice. Results Ectopic overexpression of c-Jun promoted the growth of MCF-7 cells and resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of cells in S phase and increased motility and invasiveness. Introduction of c-Jun gene alone into weakly invasive MCF-7 cells resulted in the transfected cells capable of metastasizing to the nude mouse liver following tail vein injection. Conclusion The present study confirms that overexpression of c-Jun contributes to a more invasive phenotype in MCF-7 cells. It indicates an interesting relationship between c-Jun expression and increased property of adhesion, migration and in vivo liver metastasis of MCF-7/c-Jun cells. The results provide further evidence that c-Jun is involved in the metastasis of breast cancer. The finding also opens an opportunity for development of anti-c-Jun strategies in breast cancer therapy.

  9. Leuconostoc citreum HJ-P4 (KACC 91035) regulates immunoglobulin E in an ovalbumin-induced allergy model and induces interleukin-12 through nuclear factor-kappa B and p38/c-Jun N-terminal kinases signaling in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee; Oh, Yoo-Joung; Ahn, Kyoo-Seok; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Han, NamSoo; Kim, Yoon-Bum; Sohn, Nak-Won

    2009-06-01

    Leuconostoc citreum (L. citreum) HJ-P4 (KACC 91035) is one of the major predominant species in kimchi fermentation in Korea. The purpose of the present study was to test the immunomodulatory capacity of L. citreum to modulate the IgE-mediated allergic response and to examine the involvement of NF-kappaB and MAPK in IL-12 production in macrophages. Balb/c mice were sensitized with OVA/alum and oral administration of L. citreum to the mice began before or after the OVA sensitization. Protein and mRNA expression of Th1 cytokines in splenocytes by L. citreum in vitro was measured. The role of NF-kappaB and MAPK such as p38, ERK1/2 and JNK in L. citreum-induced IL-12 was investigated in peritoneal macrophages and RAW264.7 cell lines. L. citreum inhibited the serum levels of total IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a altogether and increased OVA-specific IFN-gamma production in splenocytes from pre- and post-sensitized animals. However, the downregulation of IL-4 and IL-5 production was observed only in the pre-sensitization group. The ability of L. citreum to stimulate IFN-gamma was dependent on its induction of IL-12. NF-kappaB, p38 and JNK were mainly involved in L. citreum-induced IL-12 production. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that L. citreum is able to regulate serum IgE generation at the induction and effector phases of allergic response through overall control over antibody production and that its involvement of IL-12 production was mediated through NF-kappaB and p38/JNK. Taken together, the use of L. citreum can be useful in preventing the development and progression of IgE production.

  10. Allosteric regulation of protein kinase PKCζ by the N-terminal C1 domain and small compounds to the PIF-pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Garcia, Laura A; Schulze, Jörg O; Fröhner, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases are key mediators of cellular signaling, and therefore, their activities are tightly controlled. AGC kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and by N- and C-terminal regions. Here, we studied the molecular mechanism of inhibition of atypical PKCζ and found that the inhibition by ...

  11. Agrin Binds to the N-terminal Region of Lrp4 Protein and Stimulates Association between Lrp4 and the First Immunoglobulin-like Domain in Muscle-specific Kinase (MuSK)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Coldefy, Anne-Sophie; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Burden, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Neuromuscular synapse formation depends upon coordinated interactions between motor neurons and muscle fibers, leading to the formation of a highly specialized postsynaptic membrane and a highly differentiated nerve terminal. Synapse formation begins as motor axons approach muscles that are prepatterned in the prospective synaptic region in a manner that depends upon Lrp4, a member of the LDL receptor family, and muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a receptor tyrosine kinase. Motor axons supply Agrin, which binds Lrp4 and stimulates further MuSK phosphorylation, stabilizing nascent synapses. How Agrin binds Lrp4 and stimulates MuSK kinase activity is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Agrin binds to the N-terminal region of Lrp4, including a subset of the LDLa repeats and the first of four β-propeller domains, which promotes association between Lrp4 and MuSK and stimulates MuSK kinase activity. In addition, we show that Agrin stimulates the formation of a functional complex between Lrp4 and MuSK on the surface of myotubes in the absence of the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Lrp4. Further, we demonstrate that the first Ig-like domain in MuSK, which shares homology with the NGF-binding region in Tropomyosin Receptor Kinase (TrKA), is required for MuSK to bind Lrp4. These findings suggest that Lrp4 is a cis-acting ligand for MuSK, whereas Agrin functions as an allosteric and paracrine regulator to promote association between Lrp4 and MuSK. PMID:21969364

  12. Agrin binds to the N-terminal region of Lrp4 protein and stimulates association between Lrp4 and the first immunoglobulin-like domain in muscle-specific kinase (MuSK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Coldefy, Anne-Sophie; Hubbard, Stevan R; Burden, Steven J

    2011-11-25

    Neuromuscular synapse formation depends upon coordinated interactions between motor neurons and muscle fibers, leading to the formation of a highly specialized postsynaptic membrane and a highly differentiated nerve terminal. Synapse formation begins as motor axons approach muscles that are prepatterned in the prospective synaptic region in a manner that depends upon Lrp4, a member of the LDL receptor family, and muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a receptor tyrosine kinase. Motor axons supply Agrin, which binds Lrp4 and stimulates further MuSK phosphorylation, stabilizing nascent synapses. How Agrin binds Lrp4 and stimulates MuSK kinase activity is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Agrin binds to the N-terminal region of Lrp4, including a subset of the LDLa repeats and the first of four β-propeller domains, which promotes association between Lrp4 and MuSK and stimulates MuSK kinase activity. In addition, we show that Agrin stimulates the formation of a functional complex between Lrp4 and MuSK on the surface of myotubes in the absence of the transmembrane and intracellular domains of Lrp4. Further, we demonstrate that the first Ig-like domain in MuSK, which shares homology with the NGF-binding region in Tropomyosin Receptor Kinase (TrKA), is required for MuSK to bind Lrp4. These findings suggest that Lrp4 is a cis-acting ligand for MuSK, whereas Agrin functions as an allosteric and paracrine regulator to promote association between Lrp4 and MuSK.

  13. [Expression of c-jun protein after experimental rat brain concussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Li, Yong-hong

    2010-02-01

    To observe e-jun protein expression after rat brain concussion and explore the forensic pathologic markers following brain concussion. Fifty-five rats were randomly divided into brain concussion group and control group. The expression of c-jun protein was observed by immunohistochemistry. There were weak positive expression of c-jun protein in control group. In brain concussion group, however, some neutrons showed positive expression of c-jun protein at 15 min after brain concussion, and reach to the peak at 3 h after brain concussion. The research results suggest that detection of c-jun protein could be a marker to determine brain concussion and estimate injury time after brain concussion.

  14. C-Jun expression in lichen planus, psoriasis and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Marae, Alaa Hassan; Shoeib, Mohammed; Dawood, Ghada; Abouelfath, Enas

    2017-11-16

    The AP-1 transcription factor complex is a key player in regulating inflammatory processes, cell proliferation, differentiation and cell transformation. The aim of the present study is to investigate C-Jun (one of AP-1complex) expression and its proliferative role in skin samples of lichen planus, psoriasis as common inflammatory skin diseases and squamous cell carcinoma using immunohistochemical method. The present study was carried out on skin biopsies of 15 psoriatic patients, 15 lichen planus patients, 15 SCC and 15 normal skin biopsies. Nuclear expression of C-Jun was detected in basal and few suprabasal layers of epidermis of normal skin. C-Jun was expressed in the whole epidermal layers of both psoriasis (14/15) and lichen planus (15/15) in addition to its expression in lymphocytic infiltrate in the latter in about half of cases (8/15). C-Jun was also expressed in 93.3% (14/15) of SCC in a percentage lower than that of psoriasis, lichen planus and normal skin. The percentage of C-Jun expression in SCC was significantly associated with an early stage (p = 0.000), free surgical margins (p = 0.022) and small tumor size (p = 0.003). The marked reduction of C-Jun in SCC in comparison to normal skin and inflammatory skin dermatoses may refer to its tumor suppressor activity. C-Jun expression in SCC carries favorable prognosis. Absence of significant association between C-Jun and Ki-67 either in SCC or inflammatory skin diseases indicates that it does not affect proliferative capacity of cells.

  15. Influenza A Virus Virulence Depends on Two Amino Acids in the N-Terminal Domain of Its NS1 Protein To Facilitate Inhibition of the RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierhorn, Kristina L.; Jolmes, Fabian; Bespalowa, Julia; Saenger, Sandra; Peteranderl, Christin; Dzieciolowski, Julia; Mielke, Maja; Budt, Matthias; Pleschka, Stephan; Herrmann, Andreas; Herold, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) has broad antiviral activity inducing translational shutdown of viral and cellular genes and is therefore targeted by various viral proteins to facilitate pathogen propagation. The pleiotropic NS1 protein of influenza A virus acts as silencer of PKR activation and ensures high-level viral replication and virulence. However, the exact manner of this inhibition remains controversial. To elucidate the structural requirements within the NS1 protein for PKR inhibition, we generated a set of mutant viruses, identifying highly conserved arginine residues 35 and 46 within the NS1 N terminus as being most critical not only for binding to and blocking activation of PKR but also for efficient virus propagation. Biochemical and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based interaction studies showed that mutation of R35 or R46 allowed formation of NS1 dimers but eliminated any detectable binding to PKR as well as to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Using in vitro and in vivo approaches to phenotypic restoration, we demonstrated the essential role of the NS1 N terminus for blocking PKR. The strong attenuation conferred by NS1 mutation R35A or R46A was substantially alleviated by stable knockdown of PKR in human cells. Intriguingly, both NS1 mutant viruses did not trigger any signs of disease in PKR+/+ mice, but replicated to high titers in lungs of PKR−/− mice and caused lethal infections. These data not only establish the NS1 N terminus as highly critical for neutralization of PKR's antiviral activity but also identify this blockade as an indispensable contribution of NS1 to the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus inhibits activation of the RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) by means of its nonstructural NS1 protein, but the underlying mode of inhibition is debated. Using mutational analysis, we identified arginine residues 35 and 46 within the N-terminal NS1 domain as highly critical for binding to and functional

  16. Metformin prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis through AMPK-PI3K-c-Jun NH2 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, T.W.; Lee, M.W.; Lee, Y.-J.; Kim, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to be partially associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress toxicity on pancreatic beta cells and the result of decreased insulin synthesis and secretion. In this study, we showed that a well-known insulin sensitizer, metformin, directly protects against dysfunction and death of ER stress-induced NIT-1 cells (a mouse pancreatic beta cell line) via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI3) kinase activation. We also showed that exposure of NIT-1 cells to metformin (5mM) increases cellular resistance against ER stress-induced NIT-1 cell dysfunction and death. AMPK and PI3 kinase inhibitors abolished the effect of metformin on cell function and death. Metformin-mediated protective effects on ER stress-induced apoptosis were not a result of an unfolded protein response or the induced inhibitors of apoptotic proteins. In addition, we showed that exposure of ER stressed-induced NIT-1 cells to metformin decreases the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK). These data suggest that metformin is an important determinant of ER stress-induced apoptosis in NIT-1 cells and may have implications for ER stress-mediated pancreatic beta cell destruction via regulation of the AMPK-PI3 kinase-JNK pathway.

  17. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 mediates denbinobin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Shiow-Lin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, we explore the role of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 in denbinobin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549 cells. Denbinobin-induced cell apoptosis was attenuated by an ASK1 dominant-negative mutant (ASK1DN, two antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC and glutathione (GSH, a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK inhibitor (SP600125, and an activator protein-1 (AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin. Treatment of A549 cells with denbinobin caused increases in ASK1 activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and these effects were inhibited by NAC and GSH. Stimulation of A549 cells with denbinobin caused JNK activation; this effect was markedly inhibited by NAC, GSH, and ASK1DN. Denbinobin induced c-Jun phosphorylation, the formation of an AP-1-specific DNA-protein complex, and Bim expression. Bim knockdown using a bim short interfering RNA strategy also reduced denbinobin-induced A549 cell apoptosis. The denbinobin-mediated increases in c-Jun phosphorylation and Bim expression were inhibited by NAC, GSH, SP600125, ASK1DN, JNK1DN, and JNK2DN. These results suggest that denbinobin might activate ASK1 through ROS production to cause JNK/AP-1 activation, which in turn induces Bim expression, and ultimately results in A549 cell apoptosis.

  18. IL-6, IL-10, c-Jun and STAT3 expression in B-CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosz, Halina; Wojciechowska, Katarzyna; Sajewicz, Joanna; Choroszyńska, Dorota; Marzec-Kotarska, Barbara; Osiak, Magdalena; Pająk, Natalia; Tomczak, Waldemar; Jargiełło-Baszak, Małgorzata; Baszak, Jacek

    2015-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is characterized by the accumulation of functionally abnormal, monoclonal B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen, resulting in a reduction count of normal immunocompetent cells and their impaired immune function. The defect in transmission of signals from various types of extracellular receptors, leading to aberrant cytokines and transcription factors gene expression, may underlie the basis of immune failure in B-CLL. The aim of the study was to assess of IL-6, IL-10, c-Jun, and STAT3 expression. In response to antigenic stimulation IL-6, IL-10, c-Jun, and STAT3 proteins induce mutual activity. The subject of the study was subpopulations of leukemic lymphocytes (CD5+ CD19+) and CD19+ B cells from healthy donors (control group). Our results provide evidence that the regulation of IL-6, IL-10, c-Jun, and STAT3 gene expression in CLL B cells is clearly different from normal B lymphocytes. In B-CLL STAT3 expression in unstimulated lymphocytes is significantly higher (pCLL in comparison with the control group, in all cases (pCLL stage according Rai we revealed decreasing c-Jun expression, both at the mRNA and protein levels, along with advancing stage of disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modulation of c-Jun NH2-Terminal (JNK) by Cholinergic Autoantibodies from Patients with Sjögren’s Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Borda, Enri Santiago; Passafaro, Daniela; Reina, Silvia; Sterin Borda, Leonor

    2017-01-01

    Background: We wanted to determine (via an immunopharmacological approach) whether the c-Jun NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) cascade is phosphorylated in the submandibular gland by carbachol and cholinergic autoantibodies (IgG) present in the sera of patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) by interaction and activation of salivary gland muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Methods: The JNK, PGE2 and NOS assays were measured in rat sub- mandibular gland with pSS IgG and carbachol alon...

  20. Defizienz der c-Jun n-terminalen Kinase und das metabolische Syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Haß, Tim Frederick

    2009-01-01

    Auswirkungen eines JNK2/3 Doppelknockout im Mausmodel im Hinblick auf das Metabolische Syndrom. Die untersuchten Parameter waren u. a. Gewichtsentwicklung, Fettzellgröße, Stoffwechsel des Fettgewebes und der Leber. Effects of the double knockout of JNK2 and JNK3 in mice with regards to the metabolic syndrome. Analysis of weight, fat cell size and metabolism of liver and fat tissue.

  1. From JNK to pay dirt: jun kinases, their biochemistry, physiology and clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Michael; Gallagher, Ewen

    2005-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) were originally identified by their ability to phosphorylate c-Jun in response to UV-irradiation, but now are recognized as critical regulators of various aspects of mammalian physiology, including: cell proliferation, cell survival, cell death, DNA repair and metabolism. JNK-mediated phosphorylation enhances the ability of c-Jun, a component of the AP-1 transcription factor, to activate transcription, in response to a plethora of extracellular stimuli. The JNK activation leads to induction of AP-1-dependent target genes involved in cell proliferation, cell death, inflammation, and DNA repair. The JNKs, which are encoded by three different Jnk loci, are now known to be regulated by many other stimuli, from pro-inflammatory cytokines to obesity, in addition to UV-irradiation. Targeted disruption of the Jnk loci in mice has proved to be a critical tool in better understanding their physiological functions. Such studies revealed that the JNKs play important roles in numerous cellular processes, including: programmed cell death, T cell differentiation, negative regulation of insulin signaling, control of fat deposition, and epithelial sheet migration. Importantly, the JNKs have become prime targets for drug development in several important clinical areas, including: inflammation, diabetes, and cancer.

  2. Modelling the mechanism of GR/c-Jun/Erg crosstalk in apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne eChen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is one of the most common forms of malignancy that occurs in lymphoid progenitor cells, particularly in children. Synthetic steroid hormones glucocorticoids (GCs are widely used as part of the ALL treatment regimens due to their apoptotic function, but their use also brings about various side effects and drug resistance. The identification of the molecular differences between the GCs responsive and resistant cells therefore are essential to decipher such complexity and can be used to improve therapy. However, the emerging picture is complicated as the activities of genes and proteins involved are controlled by multiple factors. By adapting the systems biology framework to address this issue, we here integrated the available knowledge together with experimental data via the building of a series of mathematical models. This rationale enabled us to unravel molecular interactions involving c-Jun in GC induced apoptosis and identify Erg as determinant for GC resistance. The results revealed an alternative potential mechanism where c-Jun may be an indirect GR target that is controlled via an upstream repressor protein. The models also highlight the importance of Erg for GR function, particularly in GC sensitive C7 cells where Erg directly regulates GR in agreement with our previous experimental results. Our models describe potential GR-controlled molecular mechanisms of c-Jun/Bim and Erg regulation. We also demonstrate the importance of using a systematic approach to translate human disease processes into computational models in order to derive information-driven new hypotheses.

  3. Modeling the Mechanism of GR/c-Jun/Erg Crosstalk in Apoptosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daphne Wei-Chen; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common forms of malignancy that occurs in lymphoid progenitor cells, particularly in children. Synthetic steroid hormones glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely used as part of the ALL treatment regimens due to their apoptotic function, but their use also brings about various side effects and drug resistance. The identification of the molecular differences between the GCs responsive and resistant cells therefore are essential to decipher such complexity and can be used to improve therapy. However, the emerging picture is complicated as the activities of genes and proteins involved are controlled by multiple factors. By adopting the systems biology framework to address this issue, we here integrated the available knowledge together with experimental data by building a series of mathematical models. This rationale enabled us to unravel molecular interactions involving c-Jun in GC induced apoptosis and identify Ets-related gene (Erg) as potential biomarker of GC resistance. The results revealed an alternative possible mechanism where c-Jun may be an indirect GR target that is controlled via an upstream repressor protein. The models also highlight the importance of Erg for GR function, particularly in GC sensitive C7 cells where Erg directly regulates GR in agreement with our previous experimental results. Our models describe potential GR-controlled molecular mechanisms of c-Jun/Bim and Erg regulation. We also demonstrate the importance of using a systematic approach to translate human disease processes into computational models in order to derive information-driven new hypotheses.

  4. ERK/c-Jun Recruits Tet1 to Induce Zta Expression and Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation through DNA Demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Han, Dongjie; Wan, Pin; Pan, Pan; Cao, Yanhua; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-10-06

    DNA demethylation plays an essential role in the reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latency infection. However, it is unclear how epigenetic modification is initiated in responding to stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that ERK/c-Jun signaling is involved in DNA demethylation of EBV immediate early (IE) gene Zta in response to 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulation. Remarkably, Ser73 phosphorylation of c-Jun facilitates Zta promoter demethylation and EBV reactivation, whereas knockdown of c-Jun attenuates Zta demethylation and viral reactivation. More importantly, we reveal for the first time that c-Jun interacts with DNA dioxygenase Tet1 and facilitates Tet1 to bind to Zta promoter. The binding of c-Jun and Tet1 to Zta enhances promoter demethylation, resulting in the activation of Zta, the stimulation of BHRF1 (a lytic early gene) and gp350/220 (a lytic late gene), and ultimately the reactivation of EBV. Knockdown of Tet1 attenuates TPA-induced Zta demethylation and EBV reactivation. Thus, TPA activates ERK/c-Jun signaling, which subsequently facilitates Tet1 to bind to Zta promoter, leading to DNA demethylation, gene expression, and EBV reactivation. This study reveals important roles of ERK/c-Jun signaling and Tet1 dioxygenase in epigenetic modification, and provides new insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of virus latent and lytic infection.

  5. Botulinum Toxin Complex Increases Paracellular Permeability in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYASHITA, Shin-ichiro; SAGANE, Yoshimasa; INUI, Ken; HAYASHI, Shintaro; MIYATA, Keita; SUZUKI, Tomonori; OHYAMA, Tohru; WATANABE, Toshihiro; NIWA, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum produces a large toxin complex (L-TC) that increases paracellular permeability in intestinal epithelial cells by a mechanism that remains unclear. Here, we show that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in this permeability increase. Paracellular permeability was measured by FITC-dextran flux through a monolayer of rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells, and MAPK activation was estimated from western blots. L-TC of C. botulinum serotype D strain 4947 increased paracellular dextran flux and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in IEC-6 cells. The permeability increase induced by L-TC was abrogated by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results indicate that L-TC increases paracellular permeability by activating p38, but not JNK and ERK. PMID:23884081

  6. Light induces Fos expression via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 in melanopsin-expressing PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldrup, Marie-Louise Bülow; Georg, Birgitte; Falktoft, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    and the cells respond to light by a membrane depolarization and induction of the immediate early response gene Fos. Previous studies showed that the light activated melanopsin-induced signaling, the phototransduction, leading to depolarization of the membrane resembles the invertebrate opsins, which involves......-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) was found as pharmacological blockage of this kinase suppressed the light-induced Fos expression. Illumination increased the inositol phosphate turnover and induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 but not the c-Jun N-terminal kinase. The Galpha(q/11) protein inhibitor YM......254890 attenuated these intracellular light responses. Our data strongly indicate that Galpha(q/11)-mediated ERK1/2 activation is essential for expression of Fos upon illumination of melanopsin-expressing PC12 cells....

  7. MAGE-A1 promotes melanoma proliferation and migration through C-JUN activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dong [Department of Dermatology, General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China); The 309th Hospital of China People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100091 (China); Wang, Junyun; Ding, Nan [CAS Key Laboratory of Genome Sciences and Information, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Yongjun; Yang, Yaran [CAS Key Laboratory of Genome Sciences and Information, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Fang, Xiangdong, E-mail: fangxd@big.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Genome Sciences and Information, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhao, Hua, E-mail: luckhua301@163.com [Department of Dermatology, General Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2016-05-13

    MAGE-A1 belongs to the chromosome X-clustered genes of cancer-testis antigen family and is normally expressed in the human germ line but is also overexpressed in various tumors. Previous studies of MAGE-A1 in melanoma mainly focused on methylation changes or its role in immunotherapy, however, its biological functions in melanoma have remained unknown. In order to determine the role of MAGE-A1 in melanoma growth and metastasis, we manipulated melanoma cell lines with overexpression and knockdown of MAGE-A1. Integration of cell proliferation assays, transwell migration and invasion assays, and RNA-Seq analysis revealed that up-regulation of MAGE-A1 dramatically promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of human melanoma cell lines in vitro, while down-regulation of MAGE-A1 inhibited those characteristics associated with tumor cells. Furthermore, transcriptome sequencing revealed that MAGE-A1 exerts its tumor promoting activity by activating p-C-JUN directly or through ERK-MAPK signaling pathways. Based on our findings, we propose that MAGE-A1 may be a potential therapeutic target for melanoma patients. - Highlights: • MAGE-A1 promotes proliferation and clone formation in melanoma cell lines. • MAGE-A1 enhances tumor cell migration and invasion in melanoma cell lines. • Network including C-JUN, IL8, and ARHGAP29 play critical role in malignant melanoma. • Oncogenic MAGE-A1 increases p-C-JUN levels, possibly via ERK-MAPK signaling pathway.

  8. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways in perfluorooctane sulfonic acid-induced inflammatory reaction in BV2 microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingying; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Gao, Rong; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2015-12-01

    Microglial activation is closely related to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by producing proinflammatory cytokines. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), known as an emerging persistent organic pollutant, is reported to disturb human immune homeostasis; however, whether it affects cytokine production or the immune response in the central nervous system remains unclear. The present study was aimed to explore whether PFOS contributed to inflammatory action and to investigate the corresponding mechanisms in BV2 microglia. PFOS-mediated morphologic changes, cytokine responses and signaling events were examined by light microscopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot assays. Our results indicated that PFOS increased BV2 cells activation and simultaneously increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 expression. In addition, the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase inhibitor (SP600125), as well as ERK1/2 blocker (PD98059), transcriptionally at least, displayed anti-inflammatory properties on PFOS-elicited cytokine responses. Moreover, the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB was specifically activated by PFOS as well. These results, taken together, suggested that PFOS exerts its functional effects on the response of microglial cell activation via, in part, the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, ERK and NF-κB signaling pathways with its subsequent influence on proinflammatory action. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Anti-proliferative activities of finasteride in benign prostate epithelial cells require stromal fibroblasts and c-Jun gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the role of mouse fibroblast-mediated c-Jun and IGF-1 signaling in the therapeutic effect of finasteride on benign prostatic epithelial cells. BPH-1 cells, alone or with fibroblasts (c-Jun+/+ or c-Jun-/-, were implanted subcutaneously in male nude mice who were then treated with finasteride. The degrees of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sizes of the xenografts were determined. BPH-1 cells were grown alone or co-cultured with mouse fibroblasts in the presence of finasteride and the level of IGF-1 secreted into the medium by the fibroblasts was determined. The proliferation-associated signaling pathway in BPH-1 cells was also evaluated. Fibroblasts and c-Jun promoted xenograft growth, stimulated Ki-67 expression, and inhibited BPH-1 apoptosis. Finasteride did not induce the shrinkage of xenografts in the combined-grafted groups despite repressing Ki-67 expression and inducing cell apoptosis. The addition of c-Jun-/- fibroblasts did not promote xenograft growth. In the absence of c-Jun and fibroblasts, finasteride did not alter xenograft growth, Ki-67 expression, or cell apoptosis. The in vitro results demonstrated that when BPH-1 cells were grown in monoculture, treatment with finasteride did not induce cell death and stimulated the expression of pro-proliferative signaling molecules, while in the presence of fibroblasts containing c-Jun, finasteride treatment repressed epithelial cell proliferation, the level of IGF-1 in the medium, and the activation of downstream pro-proliferative signaling pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that fibroblasts, c-Jun, and IGF-1 play key roles in mediating stromal-epithelial interactions that are required for the therapeutic effects of finasteride in benign prostate epithelial cells.

  10. Anti-proliferative activities of finasteride in benign prostate epithelial cells require stromal fibroblasts and c-Jun gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Song; Fan, Dongdong; Wang, Mingshuai; Xing, Nianzeng; Niu, Yinong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the role of mouse fibroblast-mediated c-Jun and IGF-1 signaling in the therapeutic effect of finasteride on benign prostatic epithelial cells. BPH-1 cells, alone or with fibroblasts (c-Jun+/+ or c-Jun-/-), were implanted subcutaneously in male nude mice who were then treated with finasteride. The degrees of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sizes of the xenografts were determined. BPH-1 cells were grown alone or co-cultured with mouse fibroblasts in the presence of finasteride and the level of IGF-1 secreted into the medium by the fibroblasts was determined. The proliferation-associated signaling pathway in BPH-1 cells was also evaluated. Fibroblasts and c-Jun promoted xenograft growth, stimulated Ki-67 expression, and inhibited BPH-1 apoptosis. Finasteride did not induce the shrinkage of xenografts in the combined-grafted groups despite repressing Ki-67 expression and inducing cell apoptosis. The addition of c-Jun-/- fibroblasts did not promote xenograft growth. In the absence of c-Jun and fibroblasts, finasteride did not alter xenograft growth, Ki-67 expression, or cell apoptosis. The in vitro results demonstrated that when BPH-1 cells were grown in monoculture, treatment with finasteride did not induce cell death and stimulated the expression of pro-proliferative signaling molecules, while in the presence of fibroblasts containing c-Jun, finasteride treatment repressed epithelial cell proliferation, the level of IGF-1 in the medium, and the activation of downstream pro-proliferative signaling pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that fibroblasts, c-Jun, and IGF-1 play key roles in mediating stromal-epithelial interactions that are required for the therapeutic effects of finasteride in benign prostate epithelial cells.

  11. Mitochondrial Kinases in Parkinson's Disease: Converging Insights from Neurotoxin and Genetic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagda, Ruben K.; Zhu, Jianhui; Chu, Charleen T.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial biology have long been implicated in neurotoxin, and more recently, genetic models of parkinsonian neurodegeneration. In particular, kinase regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and turnover are emerging as central mechanisms at the convergence of neurotoxin, environmental and genetic approaches to studying Parkinson's disease (PD). Kinases that localize to mitochondria during neuronal injury include mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) such as extracellular signal regulated protein kinases (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), protein kinase B/Akt, and PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1). Although site(s) of action within mitochondria and specific kinase targets are still unclear, these signaling pathways regulate mitochondrial respiration, transport, fission-fusion, calcium buffering, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial autophagy and apoptotic cell death. In this review, we summarize accelerating experimental evidence gathered over the last decade that implicate a central role for kinase signaling at the mitochondrion in Parkinson's and related neurodegenerative disorders. Interactions involving α-synuclein, leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), DJ-1 and parkin are discussed. Converging mechanisms from different model systems support the concept of common pathways in parkinsonian neurodegeneration that may be amenable to future therapeutic interventions. PMID:19563915

  12. Silver nanoparticles increase connexin43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication in HaCaT cells through activation of reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Yu; Han, Limin; Yang, Di

    2017-01-01

    of Cx43 on GJIC were assessed. HaCaT cells exposed to non-coated AgNPs at different doses after a 24 hour exposure. To explore further the underlying mechanism, reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway were evaluated after 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours. Our results revealed that non......-coated AgNP exposure at subcytotoxic doses increase GJIC partially via Cx43 upregulation. Reactive oxygen species and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase were involved in the AgNP-induced upregulation of Cx43. This study provides new insight into the potential......Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in health and consumer products that routinely contact skin. However, the biological effects and possible mechanisms of AgNPs on skin remain unclear. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays a critical role in multicellular organisms...

  13. c-Jun is involved in interstitial cystitis antiproliferative factor (APF)-induced growth inhibition of human bladder cancer T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeliang; Zhu, Yuyan; Yu, Meng; Ji, Decai; Yang, Zhenxing; Kong, Chuize

    2013-02-01

    To uncover the role of c-Jun, a proto-oncogene, in inhibitory effects of antiproliferative factor (APF) on tumor cell growth. Expression of c-Jun was analyzed by Western blotting in 45 clinical specimens (30 tumorous tissues and 15 paired non-tumorous tissues) and 3 bladder cancer cell lines. APF-responsive T24 transitional carcinoma bladder cells were treated with APF or mock control. Cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Change of c-Jun expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The influence of c-Jun on APF treatment was evaluated by transient transfection of c-Jun and MTT assay in T24 cells. c-Jun was significantly higher in invasive bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. T24 cells treated with APF had decreased c-Jun expression and suppressed cell growth. More importantly, ectopic c-Jun attenuated APF inhibitory effects on cell growth. These observations suggest that c-Jun is involved in APF-mediated inhibition for bladder tumor cell growth, as potential target of APF in patients with aggressive bladder carcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cigarette smoke inhibits LPS-induced FABP5 expression by preventing c-Jun binding to the FABP5 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Deviyani; Perraud, Anne-Laure; Schmitz, Carsten; Gally, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with repeated and sustained infections linked to disease pathogenesis and exacerbations. The airway epithelium constitutes the first line of host defense against infection and is known to be impaired in COPD. We have previously identified Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 (FABP5) as an important anti-inflammatory player during respiratory infections and showed that overexpression of FABP5 in primary airway epithelial cells protects against bacterial infection and inflammation. While cigarette smoke down regulates FABP5 expression, its mechanism remains unknown. In this report, we have identified three putative c-Jun binding sites on the FABP5 promoter and show that cigarette smoke inhibits the binding of c-Jun to its consensus sequence and prevents LPS-induced FABP5 expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we have determined that c-Jun binds the FABP5 promoter when stimulated with LPS but the presence of cigarette smoke greatly reduces this binding. Furthermore, cigarette smoke or a mutation in the c-Jun binding site inhibits LPS-induced FABP5 promoter activity. These data demonstrate that cigarette smoke interferes with FABP5 expression in response to bacterial infection. Thus, functional activation of FABP5 may be a new therapeutic strategy when treating COPD patients suffering from exacerbations.

  15. Palbociclib inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis in breast cancer via c-Jun/COX-2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ge; Xu, Fei; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Qiufan; Shi, Dingbo; Xia, Wen; Tian, Yun; Tang, Yanlai; Wang, Jingshu; Xiao, Xiangshen; Deng, Wuguo; Wang, Shusen

    2015-12-08

    Palbociclib, a highly selective CDK4/6 inhibitor, has been shown to be a novel anti-tumor agent that suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation. However, its anti-metastasis activity remains controversial. In the present study, we evaluated whether palbociclib prevented breast cancer cell metastasis and revealed its regulatory mechanism. We found that palbociclib inhibited migration and invasion in the breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T47D. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, vimentin and Snail, were down-regulated with palbociclib treatment. Moreover, we revealed that this inhibition was mediated by the c-Jun/COX-2 pathway. COX-2 was decreased after palbociclib treatment. The production of PGE2 was also reduced along with COX-2. Additionally, our data showed that c-Jun, a crucial transcriptional regulator of COX-2, was down-regulated by palbociclib. We found that palbociclib weakened the COX-2 promoter binding activity of c-Jun and prevented its translocation from the cytoplasm to cell nuclei. Bioluminescence imaging and tail intravenous injection were used to evaluate the anti-metastasis effect of palbociclib in vivo. The data demonstrated that palbociclib reduced breast cancer metastasis to the lung. These results therefore demonstrated that the anti-metastasis activity of palbociclib is mediated via the c-Jun/COX-2 signaling pathway by inhibiting EMT in breast cancer cells.

  16. c-Jun DNAzymes inhibit myocardial inflammation, ROS generation, infarct size, and improve cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao; Cai, Hong; Ni, Jun; Bhindi, Ravinay; Lowe, Harry C; Chesterman, Colin N; Khachigian, Levon M

    2009-11-01

    Coronary reperfusion has been the mainstay therapy for reduced infarct size after a heart attack. However, this intervention also results in myocardial injury by initiating a marked inflammatory reaction, and new treatments are keenly sought. The basic-region leucine zipper protein, c-Jun is poorly expressed in the normal myocardium and is induced within 24 hours after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Synthetic catalytic DNA molecules (DNAzymes) targeting c-Jun (Dz13) reduce infarct size in the area-at-risk (AAR) regardless of whether it is delivered intramyocardially at the initiation of ischemia or at the time of reperfusion. Dz13 attenuates neutrophil infiltration, c-Jun and ICAM-1 expression in vascular endothelium, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and the generation of reactive oxygen species in the reperfused myocardium. It inhibits infiltration into the AAR of complement 3 (C3), C3a receptor (C3aR), membrane attack complex-1 (Mac-1), or matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) positive inflammatory cells. Dz13 also improves cardiac function without influencing myocardial vascularity or fibrosis. These findings demonstrate the regulatory role of c-Jun in the pathogenesis of myocardial inflammation and infarction following ischemia-reperfusion injury, and inhibition of this process using catalytic DNA.

  17. c-fos/c-jun expression and AP-1 activation in skin fibroblasts from centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassilli, E; Bellesia, E; Salomoni, P; Croce, M A; Sikora, E; Radziszewska, E; Tesco, G; Vergelli, M; Latorraca, S; Barbieri, D; Fagiolo, U; Santacaterina, S; Amaducci, L; Tiozzo, R; Sorbi, S; Franceschi, C

    1996-09-13

    In vitro replicative senescence is characterized by an irreversible growth arrest due to the inability of the cell to induce some key regulators of cell cycle progression, such as c-fos and AP-1, in response to mitogenic stimuli. In vitro replicative senescence and in vivo aging have been assumed to be two related phenomena, likely controlled by overlapping or interacting genes. As a corollary, fibroblasts from centenarians, which have undergone a long process of senescence in vivo should have very limited proliferative capability. On the contrary, in a previous work we found that fibroblasts from centenarians exhibited the same capacity to respond to different mitogenic stimuli as fibroblasts from young donors. Here we provide evidences that the well preserved proliferative response is likely due to the fact that some pivotal regulators- c-fos, c-jun and AP-1-are still fully inducible, despite a long process of in vivo senescence. Our data therefore suggest that in vivo and in vitro aging are separate phenomena whose possible relationships, if any, have to be ascertained very carefully.

  18. PGD2 stimulates osteoprotegerin synthesis via AMP-activated protein kinase in osteoblasts: Regulation of ERK and SAPK/JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainuma, Shingo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Ohguchi, Reou; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2015-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key enzyme sensing cellular energy metabolism, is currently known to regulate multiple metabolic pathways. Osteoprotegerin plays a pivotal role in the regulation of bone metabolism by inhibiting osteoclast activation. We have previously reported that prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) stimulates the synthesis of osteoprotegerin through the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, p44/p42 MAP kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. On the basis of these findings, we herein investigated the implication of AMPK in PGD2-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis in these cells. PGD2 induced the phosphorylation of AMPKα (Thr-172) and AMPKβ (Ser-108), and the phosphorylation of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a direct AMPK substrate. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, which suppressed the phosphorylation of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, significantly attenuated both the release and the mRNA levels of osteoprotegerin stimulated by PGD2. The PGD2-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK but not p38 MAP kinase were markedly inhibited by compound C. These results strongly suggest that AMPK regulates the PGD2-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis at a point upstream of p44/p42 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK in osteoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Hypoxic/Ischemic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbao Luo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissue hypoxia/ischemia is a pathological feature of many human disorders including stroke, myocardial infarction, hypoxic/ischemic nephropathy, as well as cancer. In the kidney, the combination of limited oxygen supply to the tissues and high oxygen demand is considered the main reason for the susceptibility of the kidney to hypoxic/ischemic injury. In recent years, increasing evidence has indicated that a reduction in renal oxygen tension/blood supply plays an important role in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and renal tumorigenesis. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms, whereby hypoxia alters cellular behaviors, remain poorly understood. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are key signal-transducing enzymes activated by a wide range of extracellular stimuli, including hypoxia/ischemia. There are four major family members of MAPKs: the extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, p38 MAPKs, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5/BMK1. Recent studies, including ours, suggest that these MAPKs are differentially involved in renal responses to hypoxic/ischemic stress. This review will discuss their changes in hypoxic/ischemic pathophysiology with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney diseases and renal carcinoma.

  20. Effect of growth hormone and serum on the expression of the proto-oncogenes c-jun and c-fos in insulin producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Elisabeth D.; Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun was analysed in the insulin producing rat tumor cell line, RIN 5AH. Addition of fetal calf serum (FCS) to serum-starved cells in the presence of cycloheximid induced a modest increase in c-fos and c-jun mRNA levels, whereas growth hormone (GH...

  1. Vaccinia-Related Kinase 2 Modulates the Stress Response to Hypoxia Mediated by TAK1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Sandra; Santos, Claudio; Lazo, Pedro A.

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxia represents a major stress that requires an immediate cellular response in which different signaling pathways participate. Hypoxia induces an increase in the activity of TAK1, an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK), which responds to oxidative stress by triggering cascades leading to the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). JNK activation by hypoxia requires assembly with the JIP1 scaffold protein, which might also interact with other intracellular proteins that are less well known but that might modulate MAPK signaling. We report that TAK1 is able to form a stable complex with JIP1 and thus regulate the activation of JNK, which in turn determines the cellular stress response to hypoxia. This activation of TAK1-JIP1-JNK is suppressed by vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2). VRK2A is able to interact with TAK1 by its C-terminal region, forming stable complexes. The kinase activity of VRK2 is not necessary for this interaction or the downregulation of AP1-dependent transcription. Furthermore, reduction of the endogenous VRK2 level with short hairpin RNA can increase the response induced by hypoxia, suggesting that the intracellular levels of VRK2 can determine the magnitude of this stress response. PMID:17709393

  2. Hypertonic stress induces c-fos but not c-jun expression in the human embryonal EUE epithelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, D; Fuhrman Conti, A M; De Grada, L; Larizza, L

    1995-12-01

    Recent evidence has indicated a role for the two early response genes c-fos and c-jun in transcriptional regulation of genes acting in osmoregulation. On this basis we investigated their expression in response to hypertonic stress in the human embryonal EUE epithelial cell line. EUE cells have proven to be a useful tool for studying long-term in vitro adaptation to hypertonic stress. After culturing EUE cells in hypertonic medium a marked c-fos induction was observed, both at the mRNA and the protein level. Northern analysis of fos-mRNA showed a peak expression at 4 h, followed by a progressive decline till complete extinction at 8 h. Immunofluorescence analysis of FOS protein evidenced a similar, although slightly delayed kinetics of expression. Conversely, neither c-jun nor c-myc up-regulation could be detected. The treatment of EUE cells with cycloheximide led to superinduction of c-fos expression, (with high levels up to 12 h), and to a c-jun expression that was just detectable. Hypertonic stimulation of the transformed cell lines A549, MCF7 and JR induced both c-fos and c-jun only in JR cells. Hypertonic shock was also effective in inducing c-fos expression in fetal human diploid fibroblasts, although the response was earlier and more transient than in EUE cells. These findings indicate that c-fos is a primary response gene in hypertonic stress-activated cells, although the pattern and kinetics of its induction may differ according to the type of cell.

  3. Towards the N-terminal acetylome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation (N(α)-acetylation) is observed widely from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It gains increased importance in biological field, due to its multiple roles in many aspects of the protein life, such as assembly, stability, activity, and location. Today, mass spectrometry (MS...

  4. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 alters the wound epidermis and enhances auricular cartilage regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Shi Zhang

    Full Text Available Why regeneration does not occur in mammals remains elusive. In lower vertebrates, epimorphic regeneration of the limb is directed by the wound epidermis, which controls blastema formation to promote regrowth of the appendage. Herein, we report that knockout (KO or inhibition of Apoptosis Signal-regulated Kinase-1 (ASK1, also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 (MAP3K5, after full thickness ear punch in mice prolongs keratinocyte activation within the wound epidermis and promotes regeneration of auricular cartilage. Histological analysis showed the ASK1 KO ears displayed enhanced protein markers associated with blastema formation, hole closure and regeneration of auricular cartilage. At seven days after punch, the wound epidermis morphology was markedly different in the KO, showing a thickened stratum corneum with rounded cell morphology and a reduction of both the granular cell layer and decreased expression of filament aggregating protein. In addition, cytokeratin 6 was expressed in the stratum spinosum and granulosum. Topical application of inhibitors of ASK1 (NQDI-1, the upstream ASK1 activator, calcium activated mitogen kinase 2 (KN93, or the downstream target, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SP600125 also resulted in enhanced regeneration; whereas inhibition of the other downstream target, the p38 α/β isoforms, (SB203580 had no effect. The results of this investigation indicate ASK1 inhibition prolongs keratinocyte and blastemal cell activation leading to ear regeneration.

  5. Effects of protein kinase C activators on phorbol ester-sensitive and -resistant EL4 thymoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansbury, H M; Wisehart-Johnson, A E; Qi, C; Fulwood, S; Meier, K E

    1997-09-01

    Phorbol ester-sensitive EL4 murine thymoma cells respond to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate with activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases, synthesis of interleukin-2, and death, whereas phorbol ester-resistant variants of this cell line do not exhibit these responses. Additional aspects of the resistant phenotype were examined, using a newly-established resistant cell line. Phorbol ester induced morphological changes, ERK activation, calcium-dependent activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), interleukin-2 synthesis, and growth inhibition in sensitive but not resistant cells. A series of protein kinase C activators caused membrane translocation of protein kinase C's (PKCs) alpha, eta, and theta in both cell lines. While PKC eta was expressed at higher levels in sensitive than in resistant cells, overexpression of PKC eta did not restore phorbol ester-induced ERK activation to resistant cells. In sensitive cells, PKC activators had similar effects on cell viability and ERK activation, but differed in their abilities to induce JNK activation and interleukin-2 synthesis. PD 098059, an inhibitor of the mitogen activated protein (MAP)/ERK kinase kinase MEK, partially inhibited ERK activation and completely blocked phorbol ester-induced cell death in sensitive cells. Thus MEK and/or ERK activation, but not JNK activation or interleukin-2 synthesis, appears to be required for phorbol ester-induced toxicity. Alterations in phorbol ester response pathways, rather than altered expression of PKC isoforms, appear to confer phorbol ester resistance to EL4 cells.

  6. Resveratrol suppresses prostaglandin F(2α)-induced osteoprotegerin synthesis in osteoblasts: inhibition of the MAP kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Gen; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kondo, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2014-01-15

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol abundantly found in grape skins and red wine, possesses various beneficial properties for human health. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the effects of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis and of resveratrol on the OPG synthesis in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. PGF2α stimulated both the release of the OPG protein and the expression of OPG mRNA. Treatment with PD98059, SB203580 and SP600125, specific inhibitors of MEK1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) all suppressed the OPG release induced by PGF2α. Resveratrol also significantly reduced the PGF2α-stimulated OPG release and the mRNA levels of OPG. Similarly, treatment with SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, also suppressed the PGF2α-stimulated OPG release. Resveratrol and SRT1720 both attenuated the phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, MEK1/2, Raf-1, p38 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK induced by PGF2α. These findings strongly suggest that resveratrol suppresses PGF2α-stimulated OPG synthesis by inhibiting the MAP kinase pathways in osteoblasts, and that the effect is mediated via SIRT1 activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 alters the wound epidermis and enhances auricular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Shi; Kurpad, Deepa S; Mahoney, My G; Steinbeck, Marla J; Freeman, Theresa A

    2017-01-01

    Why regeneration does not occur in mammals remains elusive. In lower vertebrates, epimorphic regeneration of the limb is directed by the wound epidermis, which controls blastema formation to promote regrowth of the appendage. Herein, we report that knockout (KO) or inhibition of Apoptosis Signal-regulated Kinase-1 (ASK1), also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 (MAP3K5), after full thickness ear punch in mice prolongs keratinocyte activation within the wound epidermis and promotes regeneration of auricular cartilage. Histological analysis showed the ASK1 KO ears displayed enhanced protein markers associated with blastema formation, hole closure and regeneration of auricular cartilage. At seven days after punch, the wound epidermis morphology was markedly different in the KO, showing a thickened stratum corneum with rounded cell morphology and a reduction of both the granular cell layer and decreased expression of filament aggregating protein. In addition, cytokeratin 6 was expressed in the stratum spinosum and granulosum. Topical application of inhibitors of ASK1 (NQDI-1), the upstream ASK1 activator, calcium activated mitogen kinase 2 (KN93), or the downstream target, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SP600125) also resulted in enhanced regeneration; whereas inhibition of the other downstream target, the p38 α/β isoforms, (SB203580) had no effect. The results of this investigation indicate ASK1 inhibition prolongs keratinocyte and blastemal cell activation leading to ear regeneration.

  8. Calcium Hydroxide-induced Proliferation, Migration, Osteogenic Differentiation, and Mineralization via the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luoping; Zheng, Lisha; Jiang, Jingyi; Gui, Jinpeng; Zhang, Lingyu; Huang, Yan; Chen, Xiaofang; Ji, Jing; Fan, Yubo

    2016-09-01

    Calcium hydroxide has been extensively used as the gold standard for direct pulp capping in clinical dentistry. It induces proliferation, migration, and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway in calcium hydroxide-induced proliferation, migration, osteogenic differentiation, and mineralization in human DPSCs. Human DPSCs between passages 3 and 6 were used. DPSCs were preincubated with inhibitors of MAP kinases and cultured with calcium hydroxide. The phosphorylated MAP kinases were detected by Western blot analysis. Cell viability was analyzed via the methylthiazol tetrazolium assay. Cell migration was estimated using the wound healing assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression was analyzed using the ALP staining assay. Mineralization was studied by alizarin red staining analysis. Calcium hydroxide significantly promoted the phosphorylation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. The inhibition of JNK and p38 signaling abolished calcium hydroxide-induced proliferation of DPSCs. The inhibition of JNK, p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling suppressed the migration, ALP expression, and mineralization of DPSCs. Our study showed that the MAP kinase pathway was involved in calcium hydroxide-induced proliferation, migration, osteogenic differentiation, and mineralization in human DPSCs. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulation of the Ste20-like Kinase, SLK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhovy, Artem Y.; Jaberi, Aala; Papillon, Joan; Guillemette, Julie; Cybulsky, Andrey V.

    2012-01-01

    Expression and activation of the Ste20-like kinase, SLK, is increased during kidney development and recovery from ischemic acute kidney injury. SLK promotes apoptosis, and it may regulate cell survival during injury or repair. This study addresses the role of phosphorylation in the regulation of kinase activity. We mutated serine and threonine residues in the putative activation segment of the SLK catalytic domain and expressed wild type (WT) and mutant proteins in COS-1 or glomerular epithelial cells. Compared with SLK WT, the T183A, S189A, and T183A/S189A mutants showed reduced in vitro kinase activity. SLK WT, but not mutants, increased activation-specific phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. Similarly, SLK WT stimulated activator protein-1 reporter activity, but activation of activator protein-1 by the three SLK mutants was ineffective. To test if homodimerization of SLK affects phosphorylation, the cDNA encoding SLK amino acids 1–373 (which include the catalytic domain) was fused with a cDNA for a modified FK506-binding protein, Fv (Fv-SLK 1–373). After transfection, the addition of AP20187 (an FK506 analog) induced regulated dimerization of Fv-SLK 1–373. AP20187-stimulated dimerization enhanced the kinase activity of Fv-SLK 1–373 WT. In contrast, kinase activity of Fv-SLK 1–373 T183A/S189A was weak and was not enhanced after dimerization. Finally, apoptosis was increased after expression of Fv-SLK 1–373 WT but not T183A/S189A. Thus, phosphorylation of Thr-183 and Ser-189 plays a key role in the activation and signaling of SLK and could represent a target for novel therapeutic approaches to renal injury. PMID:22203681

  10. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Robert J; Boetefuer, Erica L; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Jeong, Jieun; Choi, Inchan; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  11. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Lake

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  12. Melatonin promotes sorafenib-induced apoptosis through synergistic activation of JNK/c-jun pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shibo; Hoffmann, Katrin; Gao, Chao; Petrulionis, Marius; Herr, Ingrid; Schemmer, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Melatonin has been shown to exert anticancer activity on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effect in both experimental and clinical studies, and sorafenib is the only approved drug for the systemic treatment of HCC. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the combined effect of melatonin and sorafenib on proliferation, apoptosis, and its possible mechanism in human HCC. Here, we found that both melatonin and sorafenib resulted in a dose-dependent growth inhibition of HuH-7 cells after 48 hours treatment, and the combination of them enhanced the growth inhibition in a synergistic manner. Colony formation assay indicated that co-treatment of HuH-7 cells with melatonin and sorafenib significantly decreased the clonogenicity compared to the treatment with single agent. Furthermore, FACS and TUNEL assay confirmed that melatonin synergistically augmented the sorafenib-induced apoptosis after 48 hours incubation, which was in accordance with the activation of caspase-3 and the JNK/c-jun pathway. Inhibition of JNK/c-jun pathway with its inhibitor SP600125 reversed the phosphorylation of c-jun and the activation of caspase-3 induced by co-treatment of HuH-7 cells with melatonin and sorafenib in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, SP600125 exhibited protective effect against apoptosis induced by the combination of melatonin and sorafenib. This study demonstrates that melatonin in combination with sorafenib synergistically inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human HCC cells; therefore, supplementation of sorafenib with melatonin may serve as a potential therapeutic choice for advanced HCC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Elevated cJUN expression and an ATF/CRE site within the ATF3 promoter contribute to activation of ATF3 transcription by the amino acid response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lingchen; Kilberg, Michael S

    2013-02-15

    Mammalian cells respond to amino acid deprivation through multiple signaling pathways referred to as the amino acid response (AAR). Transcription factors mediate the AAR after their activation by several mechanisms; examples include translational control (activating transcription factor 4, ATF4), phosphorylation (p-cJUN), and transcriptional control (ATF3). ATF4 induces ATF3 transcription through a promoter-localized C/EBP-ATF response element (CARE). The present report characterizes an ATF/CRE site upstream of the CARE that also contributes to AAR-induced ATF3 transcription. ATF4 binds to the ATF/CRE and CARE sequences and both are required for a maximal response to ATF4 induction. ATF3, which antagonizes ATF4 and represses its own gene, also exhibited binding activity to the ATF/CRE and CARE sequences. The AAR resulted in elevated total cJUN and p-cJUN protein levels and both forms exhibited binding activity to the ATF/CRE and CARE ATF3 sequences. Knockdown of AAR-enhanced cJUN expression blocked induction of the ATF3 gene and mutation of either the ATF/CRE or the CARE site prevented the cJUN-dependent increase in ATF3-driven luciferase activity. The results indicate that both increased cJUN and the cis-acting ATF/CRE sequence within the ATF3 promoter contribute to the transcriptional activation of the gene during the AAR.

  14. Activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the esophageal epithelium of patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiesko, A; Baniukiewicz, A; Semeniuk, J; Kaczmarski, M; Wasielica-Berger, J; Milewski, R; Dabrowski, A

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE), a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, is associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer. Mitogen-activated protein kinases may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this process. We aimed to evaluate mitogen-activated protein kinases activity in esophageal mucosa of patients with BE and find possible relationship between reflux type and BE. Twenty-four patients (mean age: 59 years) with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and endoscopically suspected esophageal metaplasia (ESEM) were prospectively enrolled for testing by a multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring along with a Bilitec 2000. Endoscopic biopsies were taken from methylene blue-positive pit patterns (sites suggesting specialized intestinal metaplasia [SIM]), from 2 cm above the Z-line and from cardial parts of the stomach. The biopsies were analyzed for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 activity by Western blot. Seventeen ESEMs had histologically proven metaplasia: eight patients had SIM and nine had gastric-type epithelia (GE). Biliary reflux was more evident in SIM (P = 0.019) but not in GE (P = 0.019); non-biliary reflux was typical for GE (P = 0.005) but not for SIM (P = 0.04). Strong activations of ERK and p38 were found predominantly in SIM, but not in normal esophageal mucosa (NE) (P = 0.01 and P Diseases of the Esophagus.

  15. Analysis of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Bone and Cartilage of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Abatacept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Kanbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the histological changes related to mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases in bone and cartilage treated with abatacept for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. A total of 20 patients of bone and cartilage were assessed: 10 abatacept with methotrexate (MTX-treated RA patients were compared with 10 MTX-treated RA patients (control. The histology of bone and cartilage was observed by staining with hematoxylin and eosin and analyzed immunohistochemically for the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, CD4 (T cell, CD68 (macrophage, receptor activator of nuclear kappa-B ligand, osteoprotegerin, osteopontin, CD29 (β-1 integrin, phospho-p38 MAPK (Tyr180/Tyr182, phospho-p44/42 MAPK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ERK1/ERK2, and phosphor-c-Jun N-terminal kinase. The expressions of CD29 known as mechanoreceptor and ERK known as mechanotransduction signal protein in MAP kinases in the bone and cartilage of patients treated with abatacept were significantly different from those of control. These findings suggest that increases in CD29 and ERK in MAP kinases may change the metabolism of bone and cartilage in RA patients treated with abatacept.

  16. miR-138 protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis via MLK3/JNK/c-jun pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Siyi; Liu, Peng; Jian, Zhao; Li, Jingwei; Zhu, Yun; Feng, Zezhou; Xiao, Yingbin, E-mail: xiaoyb@vip.sina.com

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •First time to find miR-138 is up-regulated in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. •First time to find miR-138 targets MLK3 and regulates JNK/c-jun pathway. •Rare myocardial biopsy of patients with CHD were collected. •Both silence and overexpression of miR-138 were implemented. •Various methods were used to detect cell function. -- Abstract: Cardiomyocytes experience a series of complex endogenous regulatory mechanisms against apoptosis induced by chronic hypoxia. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate cellular pathophysiological processes. Recently, microRNA-138 (miR-138) has been found related to hypoxia, and beneficial for cell proliferation. Therefore, we intend to study the role of miR-138 in hypoxic cardiomyocytes and the main mechanism. Myocardial samples of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) were collected to test miR-138 expression. Agomir or antagomir of miR-138 was transfected into H9C2 cells to investigate its effect on cell apoptosis. Higher miR-138 expression was observed in patients with cyanotic CHD, and its expression gradually increased with prolonged hypoxia time in H9C2 cells. Using MTT and LDH assays, cell growth was significantly greater in the agomir group than in the negative control (NC) group, while antagomir decreased cell survival. Dual luciferase reporter gene and Western-blot results confirmed MLK3 was a direct target of miR-138. It was found that miR-138 attenuated hypoxia-induced apoptosis using TUNEL, Hoechst staining and Annexin V-PE/7-AAD flow cytometry analysis. We further detected expression of apoptosis-related proteins. In the agomir group, the level of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved-caspase-3, cleaved-PARP and Bad significantly reduced, while Bcl-2 and Bcl-2/Bax ratio increased. Opposite changes were observed in the antagomir group. Downstream targets of MLK3, JNK and c-jun, were also suppressed by miR-138. Our study demonstrates that up-regulation of miR-138 plays

  17. Tristetraprolin induces cell cycle arrest in breast tumor cells through targeting AP-1/c-Jun and NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Ning, Huan; Gu, Ling; Wang, Qinghong; Lu, Wenbao; Peng, Hui; Cui, Weiguang; Ying, Baoling; Ross, Christina R; Wilson, Gerald M; Wei, Lin; Wold, William S M; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-12-08

    The main characteristic of cancers, including breast cancer, is the ability of cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably. However, the underlying mechanisms of cancer cell proliferation, especially those regulated by the RNA binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP), are not completely understood. In this study, we found that TTP inhibits cell proliferation in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo through inducing cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Our studies demonstrate that TTP inhibits c-Jun expression through the C-terminal Zn finger and therefore increases Wee1 expression, a regulatory molecule which controls cell cycle transition from the S to the G2 phase. In contrast to the well-known function of TTP in regulating mRNA stability, TTP inhibits c-Jun expression at the level of transcription by selectively blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Reconstitution of NF-κB p65 completely abolishes the inhibition of c-Jun transcription by TTP. Moreover, reconstitution of c-Jun in TTP-expressing breast tumor cells diminishes Wee1 overexpression and promotes cell proliferation. Our results indicate that TTP suppresses c-Jun expression that results in Wee1 induction which causes cell cycle arrest at the S phase and inhibition of cell proliferation. Our study provides a new pathway for TTP function as a tumor suppressor which could be targeted in tumor treatment.

  18. Theobromine, the primary methylxanthine found in Theobroma cacao, prevents malignant glioblastoma proliferation by negatively regulating phosphodiesterase-4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin kinase, and nuclear factor-kappa B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Miwa, Shinji; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Yachie, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Theobromine, a caffeine derivative, is the primary methylxanthine produced by Theobroma cacao. We previously showed that methylxanthines, including caffeine and theophylline, have antitumor and antiinflammatory effects, which are in part mediated by their inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE). A member of the PDE family, PDE4, is widely expressed in and promotes the growth of glioblastoma, the most common type of brain tumor. The purpose of this study was to determine whether theobromine could exert growth inhibitory effects on U87-MG, a cell line derived from human malignant glioma. We show that theobromine treatment elevates intracellular cAMP levels and increases the activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, whereas it attenuates p44/42 extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity and the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathways. It also inhibits cell proliferation. These results suggest that foods and beverages containing cocoa bean extracts, including theobromine, might be extremely effective in preventing human glioblastoma.

  19. Role of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in APP Hyperphosphorylation Induced by NMDA Stimulation in Cortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthi Antoniou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The phosphorylation of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP at Thr668 plays a key role in APP metabolism that is highly relevant to AD. The c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 can all be responsible for this phosphorylation. These kinases are activated by excitotoxic stimuli fundamental hallmarks of AD. The exposure of cortical neurons to a high dose of NMDA (100 μM for 30’-45’ led to an increase of P-APP Thr668. During NMDA stimulation APP hyperphosphorylation has to be assigned to GSK-3β activity, since addition of L803-mts, a substrate competitive inhibitor of GSK-3β reduced APP phosphorylation induced by NMDA. On the contrary, inhibition of JNK and Cdk5 with D-JNKI1 and Roscovitine respectively did not prevent NMDA-induced P-APP increase. These data show a tight connection, in excitotoxic conditions, between APP metabolism and the GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  20. The intriguing role of fibroblasts and c-Jun in the chemopreventive and therapeutic effect of finasteride on xenograft models of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yi-Nong; Wang, Kai; Jin, Song; Fan, Dong-Dong; Wang, Ming-Shuai; Xing, Nian-Zeng; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In a large clinical trial, finasteride reduced the rate of low-grade prostate cancer (PCa) while increasing the incidence of high-grade cancer. Whether finasteride promotes the development of high-grade tumors remains controversial. We demonstrated the role of fibroblasts and c-Jun in chemopreventive and therapeutic effect of finasteride on xenograft models of PCa. LNCaP (PC3) cells or recombinants of cancer cells and fibroblasts were implanted in male athymic nude mice treated with finasteride. Tumor growth, cell proliferation, apoptosis, p-Akt, and p-ERK1/2 were evaluated. In LNCaP (PC3) mono-grafted models, finasteride did not change the tumor growth. In recombinant-grafted models, fibroblasts and c-Jun promoted tumor growth; finasteride induced proliferation of LNCaP cells and repressed PC3 cell apoptosis. When c-Jun was knocked out, fibroblasts and/or finasteride did not promote the tumor growth. Finasteride inhibited p-Akt and p-ERK1/2 in mono-culture cancer cells while stimulating the same signaling molecules in the presence of fibroblasts. Reduced p-Akt and p-ERK1/2 were noted in the presence of c-Jun-/- fibroblasts. Fibroblasts and c-Jun promote PCa growth; finasteride further stimulates tumor growth with promoted proliferation, repressed apoptosis, and up-regulated pro-proliferative molecular pathway in the presence of fibroblasts and c-Jun. Stromal-epithelial interactions play critical roles in finasteride's therapeutic effects on PCa. Our findings have preliminary implications in using finasteride as a chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for PCa patients.

  1. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-jun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Aumercier, Marc [IRI, CNRS USR 3078, Université de Lille-Nord de France, Parc CNRS de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley, BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Tyagi, Rakesh K., E-mail: rktyagi@yahoo.com [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling. - Highlights: • The study identified cis-regulatory elements in the nuclear receptor PXR promoter. • Several trans-acting factors modulating the PXR-promoter have been identified. • PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1, c-Jun, LyF-VI and NF-1 act as modulators of the PXR-promoter. • Ets-1 in conjunction with LEF-1 and c-Jun exhibit 5-fold activation of the PXR-promoter. • Insights into PXR-regulation have relevance in normal and pathological conditions.

  2. Predicting Virulence of Aeromonas Isolates Based-on Changes in Transcription of c-jun and c-fos in Human Tissue Culture Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To assess virulence of Aeromonas isolates based on the change in regulation of c-jun and c-fos in the human intestinal tissue culture cell line Caco-2. Methods and Results: Aeromonas cells were added to Caco-2 cells at approximately a one to one ratio. After 1, 2 and 3 ...

  3. Exopolysaccharides from Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 induce c-Jun dependent Fas/Fasl-mediated apoptosis via TLR2 in mouse intestinal epithelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingtao; Hong, Tao; Yu, Qiang; Nie, Shaoping; Gong, Deming; Xiong, Tao; Xie, Mingyong

    2017-10-27

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been reported to play vital parts in the modulation of cell-cycle and apoptosis in cancer cells. However, the mechanisms by which EPS regulate the proliferation and apoptosis of cancer cells remain incompletely understood. We thus used different cancer cells to evaluate the anticancer ability and to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of EPS from Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 (EPS116). Our studies showed that EPS116 inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells in a cell type manner, and remarkably repressed the growth and survival of CT26 through induction of apoptosis. Moreover, EPS116 increased the expression of pro-apoptotic genes, including Fas, Fasl and c-Jun, induced the phosphorylation of c-Jun in CT26 cells. Furthermore, TLR2 (Toll like receptor 2) was upregulated by EPS116, and the CT26 cells with TLR2 knockdown were found to be insensitive to EPS116, suggesting that the anti-cancer activity of EPS116 may be TLR2-dependent. Taken together, the suppressive efficacy of EPS116 on the proliferation of CT26 cells may be mediated via TLR2 and the activation of c-Jun dependent Fas/Fasl-mediated apoptotic pathway. Our study has, for the first time, shown that EPS from LAB induced c-Jun dependent Fas/Fasl-mediated apoptosis via TLR2 in CT26 cells.

  4. Induction of c-Jun immunoreactivity in spinal cord and brainstem neurons in a transgenic mouse model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, D.; Holstege, J. C.; Troost, D.; Davis, M.; Kennis, J.; Haasdijk, E. D.; de Jong, V. J.

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations develop a motoneuron disease resembling human ALS. c-Jun is a transcription factor frequently induced in injured neurons. In this study we have examined the distribution of

  5. Induction of c-Jun immunoreactivity in spinal cord and brainstem neurons in a transgenic mouse model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Jaarsma (Dick); J.C. Holstege (Jan); D. Troost (Dirk); M. Davis (Maria); J.H.H. Kennis (Josette); E.D. Haasdijk (Elize); J.M.B.V. de Jong (Vianney)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTransgenic mice carrying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations develop a motoneuron disease resembling human ALS. c-Jun is a transcription factor frequently induced in injured neurons. In this study we have examined the distribution of

  6. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

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    Chen-Shuang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering.

  7. Serine-threonine protein kinase activation may be an effective target for reducing neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury

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    Mu Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The signaling mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced nerve cell apoptosis are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of apoptosis-related signal transduction pathways following ischemic spinal cord injury, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, serine-threonine protein kinase (Akt and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling pathways. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury by inserting a catheter balloon in the left subclavian artery for 25 minutes. Rat models exhibited notable hindlimb dysfunction. Apoptotic cells were abundant in the anterior horn and central canal of the spinal cord. The number of apoptotic neurons was highest 48 hours post injury. The expression of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt and phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK increased immediately after reperfusion, peaked at 4 hours (p-Akt or 2 hours (p-ERK, decreased at 12 hours, and then increased at 24 hours. Phosphorylated JNK expression reduced after reperfusion, increased at 12 hours to near normal levels, and then showed a downward trend at 24 hours. Pearson linear correlation analysis also demonstrated that the number of apoptotic cells negatively correlated with p-Akt expression. These findings suggest that activation of Akt may be a key contributing factor in the delay of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord ischemia, particularly at the stage of reperfusion, and thus may be a target for neuronal protection and reduction of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury.

  8. The intriguing role of fibroblasts and c-Jun in the chemopreventive and therapeutic effect of finasteride on xenograft models of prostate cancer

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    Yi-Nong Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a large clinical trial, finasteride reduced the rate of low-grade prostate cancer (PCa while increasing the incidence of high-grade cancer. Whether finasteride promotes the development of high-grade tumors remains controversial. We demonstrated the role of fibroblasts and c-Jun in chemopreventive and therapeutic effect of finasteride on xenograft models of PCa. LNCaP (PC3 cells or recombinants of cancer cells and fibroblasts were implanted in male athymic nude mice treated with finasteride. Tumor growth, cell proliferation, apoptosis, p-Akt, and p-ERK1/2 were evaluated. In LNCaP (PC3 mono-grafted models, finasteride did not change the tumor growth. In recombinant-grafted models, fibroblasts and c-Jun promoted tumor growth; finasteride induced proliferation of LNCaP cells and repressed PC3 cell apoptosis. When c-Jun was knocked out, fibroblasts and/or finasteride did not promote the tumor growth. Finasteride inhibited p-Akt and p-ERK1/2 in mono-culture cancer cells while stimulating the same signaling molecules in the presence of fibroblasts. Reduced p-Akt and p-ERK1/2 were noted in the presence of c-Jun−/− fibroblasts. Fibroblasts and c-Jun promote PCa growth; finasteride further stimulates tumor growth with promoted proliferation, repressed apoptosis, and up-regulated pro-proliferative molecular pathway in the presence of fibroblasts and c-Jun. Stromal-epithelial interactions play critical roles in finasteride′s therapeutic effects on PCa. Our findings have preliminary implications in using finasteride as a chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for PCa patients.

  9. Using c-Jun to identify fear extinction learning-specific patterns of neural activity that are affected by single prolonged stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Dayan; Stanfield, Briana R; Staib, Jennifer M; David, Nina P; DePietro, Thomas; Chamness, Marisa; Schneider, Elizabeth K; Keller, Samantha M; Lawless, Caroline

    2017-12-29

    Neural circuits via which stress leads to disruptions in fear extinction is often explored in animal stress models. Using the single prolonged stress (SPS) model of post traumatic stress disorder and the immediate early gene (IEG) c-Fos as a measure of neural activity, we previously identified patterns of neural activity through which SPS disrupts extinction retention. However, none of these stress effects were specific to fear or extinction learning and memory. C-Jun is another IEG that is sometimes regulated in a different manner to c-Fos and could be used to identify emotional learning/memory specific patterns of neural activity that are sensitive to SPS. Animals were either fear conditioned (CS-fear) or presented with CSs only (CS-only) then subjected to extinction training and testing. C-Jun was then assayed within neural substrates critical for extinction memory. Inhibited c-Jun levels in the hippocampus (Hipp) and enhanced functional connectivity between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) during extinction training was disrupted by SPS in the CS-fear group only. As a result, these effects were specific to emotional learning/memory. SPS also disrupted inhibited Hipp c-Jun levels, enhanced BLA c-Jun levels, and altered functional connectivity among the vmPFC, BLA, and Hipp during extinction testing in SPS rats in the CS-fear and CS-only groups. As a result, these effects were not specific to emotional learning/memory. Our findings suggest that SPS disrupts neural activity specific to extinction memory, but may also disrupt the retention of fear extinction by mechanisms that do not involve emotional learning/memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Accumulating microglia phagocytose injured neurons in hippocampal slice cultures: involvement of p38 MAP kinase.

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    Takahiro Katayama

    Full Text Available In this study, microglial migration and phagocytosis were examined in mouse organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, which were treated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA to selectively injure neuronal cells. Microglial cells were visualized by the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein. Daily observation revealed microglial accumulation in the pyramidal cell layer, which peaked 5 to 6 days after NMDA treatment. Time-lapse imaging showed that microglia migrated to the pyramidal cell layer from adjacent and/or remote areas. There was no difference in the number of proliferating microglia between control and NMDA-treated slices in both the pyramidal cell layer and stratum radiatum, suggesting that microglial accumulation in the injured areas is mainly due to microglial migration, not to proliferation. Time-lapse imaging also showed that the injured neurons, which were visualized by propidium iodide (PI, disappeared just after being surrounded by microglia. Daily observation revealed that the intensity of PI fluorescence gradually attenuated, and this attenuation was suppressed by pretreatment with clodronate, a microglia toxin. These findings suggest that accumulating microglia phagocytosed injured neurons, and that PI fluorescence could be a useful indicator for microglial phagocytosis. Using this advantage to examine microglial phagocytosis in living slice cultures, we investigated the involvements of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases in microglial accumulation and phagocytosis. p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580, but not MAP kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125, suppressed the attenuation of PI fluorescence. On the other hand, microglial accumulation in the injured areas was not inhibited by any of these inhibitors. These data suggest that p38 MAP kinase plays an important role in microglial phagocytosis of injured neurons.

  11. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase (Mkp)-1 Protects Mice against Acetaminophen-induced Hepatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wancket, Lyn M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Rogers, Lynette K.; Liu, Yusen

    2012-01-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation promotes hepatocyte death during acetaminophen overdose, a common cause of drug-induced liver failure. While mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (Mkp)-1 is a critical negative regulator of JNK MAPK, little is known about the role of Mkp-1 during hepatotoxicity. In this study, we evaluated the role of Mkp-1 during acute acetaminophen toxicity. Mkp-1+/+ and Mkp-1−/− mice were dosed ip with vehicle or acetaminophen at 300 mg/kg (for mechanistic studies) or 400 mg/kg (for survival studies). Tissues were collected 1–6 hr post 300 mg/kg dosing to assess glutathione levels, organ damage, and MAPK activation. Mkp-1−/− mice exhibited more rapid plasma clearance of acetaminophen than did Mkp-1+/+ mice, indicated by a quicker decline of plasma acetaminophen level. Moreover, Mkp-1−/− mice suffered more severe liver injury, indicated by higher plasma alanine transaminase activity and more extensive centrilobular apoptosis and necrosis. Hepatic JNK activity in Mkp-1−/− mice was higher than in Mkp-1+/+ mice. Finally, Mkp-1−/− mice displayed a lower overall survival rate and shorter median survival time after dosing with 400 mg/kg acetaminophen. The more severe phenotype exhibited by Mkp-1−/− mice indicates that Mkp-1 plays a protective role during acute acetaminophen overdose, potentially through regulation of JNK. PMID:22623522

  12. [Oxidative stress promotes hepatocyte apoptosis mediated by glycogen synthase kinase 3β].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangying; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Li; Wen, Tao; Piao, Zhengfu; Shi, Hongbo; Chen, Dexi; Duan, Zhongping; Ren, Feng

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the role of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in hepatocyte apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Human HL-7702 hepatoma cells were induced by H₂O₂/antimycin A to establish oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis models. SB216763, a specific inhibitor of GSK3β, was given to the cells two hours before H₂O₂/antimycin A induction. Cell survival was observed using calcein acetoxymethyl ester/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and cell apoptosis was detected using annexin V-FITC/PI staining combined with flow cytometry. In the meanwhile, the cell culture supernatant was subjected to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay to evaluate the extent of cell death. The expressions of p-GSK3β, GSK3β, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and cytochrome C (CytC) proteins were examined using Western blotting. Oxidative stress triggered by H₂O₂/antimycin A promoted GSK3β activity; inhibition of GSK3β activity by SB216763 relieved oxidative stress and reduced cell apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Compared with the model groups, SB216763 intervened group showed that the cell apoptosis rate and the level of LDH were reduced significantly, and that the expressions of cleaved caspase-3, JNK, CytC proteins decreased. GSK3β is an important signaling molecule in the apoptosis pathway induced by oxidative stress. The inhibition on GSK3β may alleviate the oxidative stress-induced hepatocyte apoptosis.

  13. Protection against chronic hypoperfusion-induced retinal neurodegeneration by PARP inhibition via activation of PI-3-kinase Akt pathway and suppression of JNK and p38 MAP kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Laszlo; Szabo, Aliz; Atlasz, Tamas; Szabadfi, Krisztina; Reglodi, Dora; Kiss, Peter; Racz, Boglarka; Tamas, Andrea; Gallyas, Ferenc; Sumegi, Balazs; Hocsak, Eniko; Gabriel, Robert; Kovacs, Krisztina

    2009-07-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation is considered as a major regulator of cell death in various pathophysiological conditions, however, no direct information is available about its role in chronic hypoperfusion-induced neuronal death. Here, we provide evidence for the protective effect of PARP inhibition on degenerative retinal damage induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), an adequate chronic hypoperfusion murine model. We found that BCCAO in adult male Wistar rats led to severe degeneration of all retinal layers that was attenuated by a carboxaminobenzimidazol-derivative PARP inhibitor (HO3089) administered unilaterally into the vitreous body immediately following carotid occlusion and then 4 times in a 2-week-period. Normal morphological structure of the retina was preserved and the thickness of the retinal layers was increased in HO3089-treated eyes compared to the BCCAO eyes. For Western blot studies, HO3089 was administered immediately after BCCAO and retinas were removed 4 h later. According to Western blot analysis utilizing phosphorylation-specific primary antibodies, besides activating poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) synthesis, BCCAO induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). HO3089 inhibited PAR synthesis, and decreased the phosphorylation of these proapoptotic MAPKs. In addition, HO3089 treatment induced phosphorylation, that is activation, of the protective Akt/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathways. These data indicate that PARP activation has a major role in mediating chronic hypoperfusion-induced neuronal death, and inhibition of the enzyme prevents the pathological changes both in the morphology and the kinase signaling cascades involved. These results identify PARP inhibition as a possible molecular target in the clinical management of chronic hypoperfusion-induced neurodegenerative diseases

  14. Flavopiridol protects against inflammation by attenuating leukocyte-endothelial interaction via inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Sass, Gabriele; Khandoga, Alexander G; Joore, Jos; Mayer, Bettina A; Berberich, Nina; Totzke, Frank; Krombach, Fritz; Tiegs, Gisa; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-02-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor flavopiridol is currently being tested in clinical trials as anticancer drug. Beyond its cell death-inducing action, we hypothesized that flavopiridol affects inflammatory processes. Therefore, we elucidated the action of flavopiridol on leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction and endothelial activation in vivo and in vitro and studied the underlying molecular mechanisms. Flavopiridol suppressed concanavalin A-induced hepatitis and neutrophil infiltration into liver tissue. Flavopiridol also inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction in the mouse cremaster muscle. Endothelial cells were found to be the major target of flavopiridol, which blocked the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and E-selectin), as well as NF-κB-dependent transcription. Flavopiridol did not affect inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase, the degradation and phosphorylation of IκBα, nuclear translocation of p65, or nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) DNA-binding activity. By performing a cellular kinome array and a kinase activity panel, we found LIM domain kinase-1 (LIMK1), casein kinase 2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinase C (PKC), CDK4, CDK6, CDK8, and CDK9 to be influenced by flavopiridol. Using specific inhibitors, as well as RNA interference (RNAi), we revealed that only CDK9 is responsible for the action of flavopiridol. Our study highlights flavopiridol as a promising antiinflammatory compound and inhibition of CDK9 as a novel approach for the treatment of inflammation-associated diseases.

  15. Signaling of mechanical stretch in human keratinocytes via MAP kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenberger, S; Bernd, A; Loitsch, S; Guschel, M; Müller, J; Bereiter-Hahn, J; Kaufmann, R

    2000-03-01

    Cells within human skin are permanently exposed to mechanical stretching. Here we present evidence that alterations in cell shape trigger biochemical signaling via MAP kinases in human keratinocytes. In an in vitro attempt we demonstrate a fast but transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 in response to cell stretch. This activation is reversed by preincubation with functional blocking antibodies directed towards beta1-integrins. As a second member of MAP kinases, stress-activated protein kinase/c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase was activated in a slower fashion, peaking at 1 h after the initial stimulus. The delay in signal transmission suggests that extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and stress-activated protein kinase/c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase do not share the same signaling pathway. p38 was not activated by cell stretching. The contribution of cytoskeletal elements in signal perception and transduction was evaluated by selective disruption of either actin filaments, microtubules, or keratin filaments but showed no clear effect on stretch-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and stress-activated protein kinase/c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase. In conclusion we found evidence of a cell-shape-dependent activation of MAP kinases in human keratinocytes disclosing beta1-integrins as putative mechano-transducers. It is likely that alterations of skin mechanics in vivo underlying pathogenic processes like wound formation and healing trigger physiologic responses via the MAP kinase pathway.

  16. Epidermal growth factor stimulates Rac1 and p21-activated kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Imke; Düsing, Rainer; Vetter, Hans; Schmitz, Udo

    2008-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to be a potent mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) both in vitro and in vivo, thus contributing to the development of atherosclerosis and hypertension. Stimulation of Rho-family GTPases Rac/Cdc42 exerts pleiotropic cellular effects and have been demonstrated to contribute to EGF-induced proliferation in other cell systems. However, the effect of EGF on Rac/Cdc42 activation is unknown for VSMC. In the present report, we evaluated stimulation of Rac/Cdc42 by EGF in VSMC performing PAK-PBD binding assay. EGF treatment of VSMC induced time and concentration dependent binding of GTP-bound Rac1 to PAK-PBD peaking at 1 min and showing sustained activation up to 15 min. However, stimulation of Cdc42 could not be demonstrated. To further evaluate downstream effectors of Rac1 stimulation of p21-activated kinase (PAK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by EGF was determined. In VSMC, EGF sequentially stimulated PAK, peaking at 5 min, and JNK, peaking at 15 min. Pretreatment of VSMC by EGF receptor specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 and non-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibited EGF-induced activation of Rac1, PAK and JNK, whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors specific for Src (PP1) and specific for platelet-derived growth factor (AG1296) had no effect. Specific inhibition or Rac1 by NSC23766 attenuated EGF-induced [(3)H] thymidine incorporation in VSMC. Our data provide evidence for EGF-induced Rac1 activation and implicate PAK and JNK as downstream targets of Rac1 in EGF signal transduction in VSMC.

  17. β-glucan reduces exercise-induced stress through downregulation of c-Fos and c-Jun expression in the brains of exhausted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Heeok; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Jae-Deung; Seo, Jin-Hee

    2014-05-01

    Immediate-early genes are involved in acute stress responses in the central nervous system. β-glucan stimulates innate immune defenses, exerts an anti-tumor response and increases resistance to a wide variety of types of infection. To date, the effect of β-glucan on the expression of immediate-early genes under stressful conditions has not been elucidated. In the present study, the effects of β-glucan on the expression of the oncogenes c-Fos and c-Jun in the hypothalamus, dentate gyrus and dorsal raphe in rats following exhaustive treadmill running were investigated. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n=10 in each group) as follows: Control, exercise, exercise and 50 mg/kg β-glucan treatment, exercise and 100 mg/kg β-glucan treatment, and exercise and 200 mg/kg β-glucan treatment. Rats in the β-glucan‑treated groups were administered β-glucan at the respective dose once per day for seven days. Rats in the exercise groups performed treadmill running once per day for six days. On the seventh day of the experiment, the time to exhaustion in response to treadmill running was determined for the exercise groups. The expression of c-Fos and c-Jun in the hypothalamus, dorsal raphe and hippocampus was enhanced by exhaustive treadmill running. Administration of β-glucan resulted in an increase in the time to exhaustion and the suppression of the exercise-induced increment in c-Fos and c-Jun expression. In conclusion, β-glucan may exert an alleviating effect on exercise-induced stress through the suppression of c-Fos and c-Jun expression in the brains of exhausted rats.

  18. Towards a functional understanding of protein N-terminal acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Arnesen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein N-terminal acetylation is a major modification of eukaryotic proteins. Its functional implications include regulation of protein-protein interactions and targeting to membranes, as demonstrated by studies of a handful of proteins. Fifty years after its discovery, a potential general function of the N-terminal acetyl group carried by thousands of unique proteins remains enigmatic. However, recent functional data suggest roles for N-terminal acetylation as a degradation signal and as a determining factor for preventing protein targeting to the secretory pathway, thus highlighting N-terminal acetylation as a major determinant for the life and death of proteins. These contributions represent new and intriguing hypotheses that will guide the research in the years to come.

  19. Polysaccharide from Ganoderma atrum evokes antitumor activity via Toll-like receptor 4-mediated NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenshen; Nie, Shaoping; Huang, Danfei; Huang, Jianqin; Wang, Yawei; Xie, Mingyong

    2013-04-17

    Ganoderma atrum has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. In this study, the antitumor activity of a novel G. atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1) was investigated in vitro and in vivo using S180 tumor-bearing mice. The results showed that PSG-1 significantly inhibited the proliferation of S180 via the activation of macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. PSG-1-primed macrophages exhibited a higher tumoricidal activity than untreated macrophages. Administration of PSG-1 significantly inhibited the growth of transplantable sarcoma S180-bearing mice and increased macrophage phagocytosis and the levels of cytokines and nitride oxide. Expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 in the membrane was markedly increased in PSG-1-treated groups, suggesting that it may be a possible receptor for PSG-1. PSG-1 also promoted the translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB from cytosol to nucleus and the degradation of IκBα. Moreover, the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in macrophages was improved by PSG-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, it is suggested that PSG-1 may elicit its antitumor effect by improving immune system functions through TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways.

  20. Moringa oleifera fruit induce apoptosis via reactive oxygen species-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in human melanoma A2058 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guon, Tae Eun; Chung, Ha Sook

    2017-08-01

    The present study was performed to determine the effect of Moringa oleifera fruit extract on the apoptosis of human melanoma A2058 cells. A2058 cells were treated for 72 h with Moringa oleifera fruit extract at 50-100 µg/ml, and cell viability with apoptotic changes was examined. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was examined. It was revealed that Moringa oleifera fruit extract significantly inhibited the cell viability and promoted apoptosis of A2058 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Moringa oleifera fruit extract-treated A2058 cells exhibited increased activities of cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3. It also caused an enhancement of MAPK phosphorylation and ROS production. The pro-apoptotic activity of Moringa oleifera fruit extract was significantly reversed by pretreatment with the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98058 or ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Taken together, Moringa oleifera fruit extract is effective in inducing mitochondrial apoptosis of A2058 cells, which is mediated through induction of ROS formation, and JNK and ERK activation. Moringa oleifera fruit extract may thus have therapeutic benefits for human melanoma A2058 cells.

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinases pathway is involved in physiological testosterone-induced tissue factor pathway inhibitor expression in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong; Wang, Da-yu; Mei, Yi-fang; Qiu, Wen-bing; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Dong-ming; Tan, Xue-rui; Li, Yu-guang

    2010-07-01

    The mechanism of testosterone inducing the tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in protecting against thrombosis is unknown. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the induction by observing, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), a major cell signaling system. The level of testosterone regulating several signaling pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK, was measured by western blot in HUVECs. ELISA and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR were used to analyze TFPI expression after blocking ERK1/2 (with PD98059) or JNK (with SP600125) pathway in HUVECs. Testosterone-induced a rapid phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK in HUVECs, which could not be inhibited by androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Blocking ERK1/2 or JNK pathway could significantly impair testosterone-induced TFPI at both translational and transcriptional levels in HUVECs. Testosterone at a physiological concentration may help to prevent thrombosis development by stimulating TFPI expression in HUVECs, partly through the ERK1/2 and JNK MAPK pathway.

  2. Resveratrol prevents impairment in activation of retinoic acid receptors and MAP kinases in the embryos of a rodent model of diabetic embryopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandra K; Kumar, Ambrish; LaVoie, Holly A; DiPette, Donald J; Singh, Ugra S

    2012-09-01

    Diabetes induces impairments in gene expression during embryonic development that leads to premature and improper tissue specialization. Retinoic acid receptors (RARs and retinoid X receptor [RXRs]) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play crucial roles during embryonic development, and their suppression or activation has been shown as a determinant of the fate of embryonic organogenesis. We studied the activation of RARs and MAPKs in embryonic day 12 (E12) in embryos of rats under normal, diabetic, and diabetic treated with resveratrol ([RSV]; 100 mg/kg body weight) conditions. We found downregulation of RARs and RXRs expressions as well as their DNA-binding activities in the embryos exhibiting developmental delays due to diabetes. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 was decreased and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2 and p38 was increased. Interestingly, embryos of diabetic rats treated with RSV showed normalized patterns of RARs, RXRs, neuronal markers, and ERK, JNK and p38 phosphorylation.

  3. Interplay between viral Tat protein and c-Jun transcription factor in controlling LTR promoter activity in different human immunodeficiency virus type I subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, Renée M; Derking, Ronald; Breidel, Seyguerney; Speijer, Dave; Berkhout, Ben; Jeeninga, Rienk E

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 transcription depends on cellular transcription factors that bind to sequences in the long-terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. Each HIV-1 subtype has a specific LTR promoter configuration, and minor sequence changes in transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or their arrangement can influence transcriptional activity, virus replication and latency properties. Previously, we investigated the proviral latency properties of different HIV-1 subtypes in the SupT1 T cell line. Here, subtype-specific latency and replication properties were studied in primary PHA-activated T lymphocytes. No major differences in latency and replication capacity were measured among the HIV-1 subtypes. Subtype B and AE LTRs were studied in more detail with regard to a putative AP-1 binding site using luciferase reporter constructs. c-Jun, a member of the AP-1 transcription factor family, can activate both subtype B and AE LTRs, but the latter showed a stronger response, reflecting a closer match with the consensus AP-1 binding site. c-Jun overexpression enhanced Tat-mediated transcription of the viral LTR, but in the absence of Tat inhibited basal promoter activity. Thus, c-Jun can exert a positive or negative effect via the AP-1 binding site in the HIV-1 LTR promoter, depending on the presence or absence of Tat.

  4. Aloe-Emodin Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation of ATDC5 Cells via MAP Kinases and BMP-2 Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Li, Liang; Heo, Seok-Mo; Soh, Yunjo

    2016-01-01

    Endochondral bone formation is the process by which mesenchymal cells condense into chondrocytes, which are ultimately responsible for new bone formation. The processes of chondrogenic differentiation and hypertrophy are critical for bone formation and are therefore highly regulated. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of aloe-emodin on chondrogenic differentiation in clonal mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells. Aloe-emodin treatment stimulated the accumulation of cartilage nodules in a dose-dependent manner. ATDC5 cells were treated with aloe-emodin and stained with alcian blue. Compared with the control cells, the ATDC5 cells showed more intense alcian blue staining. This finding suggested that aloe-emodin induced the synthesis of matrix proteoglycans and increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase. Aloe-emodin also enhanced the expressions of chondrogenic marker genes such as collagen II, collagen X, BSP and RunX2 in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, examination of the MAPK signaling pathway showed that aloe-emodin increased the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but had no effect on p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Aloe-emodin also enhanced the protein expression of BMP-2 in a time-dependent manner. Thus, these results showed that aloe-emodin exhibited chodromodulating effects via the BMP-2 or ERK signaling pathway. Aloe-emodin may have potential future applications for the treatment of growth disorders. PMID:27350340

  5. Regulation of endothelial protein C receptor shedding by cytokines is mediated through differential activation of MAP kinase signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menschikowski, Mario, E-mail: Mario.Menschikowski@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Technical University of Dresden, Medical Faculty ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Fetscherstrasse 74, D-01307 Dresden (Germany); Hagelgans, Albert; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Siegert, Gabriele [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Technical University of Dresden, Medical Faculty ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Fetscherstrasse 74, D-01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-09-10

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays a pivotal role in coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation, and cancer, but its activity is markedly changed by ectodomain cleavage and release as the soluble protein (sEPCR). In this study we examined the mechanisms involved in the regulation of EPCR shedding in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), but not interferon-{gamma} and interleukin-6, suppressed EPCR mRNA transcription and cell-associated EPCR expression in HUVEC. The release of sEPCR induced by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} correlated with activation of p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). EPCR shedding was also induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, ionomycin, anisomycin, thiol oxidants or alkylators, thrombin, and disruptors of lipid rafts. Both basal and induced shedding of EPCR was blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitors, TAPI-0 and GM6001, and by the reduced non-protein thiols, glutathione, dihydrolipoic acid, dithiothreitol, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Because other antioxidants and scavengers of reactive oxygen species failed to block the cleavage of EPCR, a direct suppression of metalloproteinase activity seems responsible for the observed effects of reduced thiols. In summary, the shedding of EPCR in HUVEC is effectively regulated by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha}, and downstream by MAP kinase signaling pathways and metalloproteinases.

  6. Advances in revealing the molecular targets downstream of oxidative stress-induced proapoptotic kinase signaling in diabetic embryopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-08-01

    Preexisting maternal diabetes is a high-risk factor of diabetic embryopathy, such as neural tube defects and congenital heart defects. Maternal diabetes significantly increases the production of reactive oxygen species, resulting in oxidative stress and diabetic embryopathy. Multiple cellular and metabolic factors contribute to these processes. Forkhead box O (FoxO)-3a has been demonstrated as a key transcription factor in the signaling transduction pathways responsible for maternal diabetes-induced birth defects. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) activated by oxidative stress stimulates nuclear translocation of FoxO3a, resulting in the overexpression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-associated death domain protein, which, in turn, leads to caspase-8 activation and apoptosis. Maternal diabetes-activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-1/2, downstream effectors of ASK1, can be blocked by superoxide dismutase-1 overexpression, suggesting that oxidative stress is responsible for JNK1/2 signaling activation. Deletion of JNK1/2 significantly suppressed the activity of FoxO3a. These observations indicate that maternal diabetes-induced oxidative stress stimulates the activation of ASK1, JNK1/2, FoxO3a, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-associated death domain protein, caspase-8 cleavage, and finally, apoptosis and diabetic embryopathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Treatment at an Early Osteoarthritis Stage Protects Rabbit Cartilage From Damage via the Integrin/Focal Adhesion Kinase/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng; Shen, Shihao; Lin, Qiang; Cheng, Kai; Ren, Shasha; Gao, Mingxia; Li, Xueping

    2015-11-01

    To investigate whether low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (US) has different protective effects on early and late rabbit osteoarthritis cartilage via the integrin/focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Thirty-six New Zealand White rabbits were divided into early control, early osteoarthritis, early treatment, late control, late osteoarthritis, and late treatment groups. The early and late osteoarthritis and treatment groups underwent anterior cruciate ligament transection. The remaining groups underwent sham operations with knee joint exposure. The early and late treatment groups were exposed to low-intensity pulsed US 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. After 6 weeks of US exposure, pathologic changes on the articular surface of the femoral condyle were assessed by modified Mankin scores. Expression of type II collagen, matrix metalloproteinase, integrin β1, phosphorylated FAK, and MAPKs (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, MAPK 38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase) was assessed by Western blot analysis. Cartilage damage was less severe in the early treatment group than the early osteoarthritis group. The Mankin score was significantly lower in the early treatment group than the early osteoarthritis group (P treatment and late osteoarthritis groups. There was a significant increase in type II collagen expression but a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase 13 expression in the early treatment group compared to the early osteoarthritis group, whereas no significant difference was found between the late treatment and late osteoarthritis groups. Integrin β1 and phosphorylated FAK expression was significantly higher, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and phosphorylated MAPK 38 expression was significantly lower in the early treatment group than the early osteoarthritis group. Our findings indicate that low-intensity pulsed US protects cartilage from damage in early

  8. Alcohol induces RNA polymerase III-dependent transcription through c-Jun by co-regulating TATA-binding protein (TBP) and Brf1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shuping; Machida, Keigo; Tsukamoto, Hide; Johnson, Deborah L

    2011-01-28

    Chronic alcohol consumption is associated with steatohepatitis and cirrhosis, enhancing the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes a variety of small, untranslated RNAs, including tRNAs and 5S rRNAs, which determine the biosynthetic capacity of cells. Increased RNA pol III-dependent transcription, observed in transformed cells and human tumors, is required for oncogenic transformation. Given that alcohol consumption increases risk for liver cancer, we examined whether alcohol regulates this class of genes. Ethanol induces RNA pol III-dependent transcription in both HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes in a manner that requires ethanol metabolism and the activation of JNK1. This regulatory event is mediated, at least in part, through the ability of ethanol to induce expression of the TFIIIB components, Brf1, and the TATA-binding protein (TBP). Induction of TBP, Brf1, and RNA pol III-dependent gene expression is driven by enhanced c-Jun expression. Ethanol promotes a marked increase in the direct recruitment of c-Jun to TBP, Brf1, and tRNA gene promoters. Chronic alcohol administration in mice leads to enhanced expression of TBP, Brf1, tRNA, and 5S rRNA gene transcription in the liver. These alcohol-dependent increases are more pronounced in transgenic animals that express the HCV NS5A protein that display increased incidence of liver tumors. Together, these results identify a new class of genes that are regulated by alcohol through the co-regulation of TFIIIB components and define a central role for c-Jun in this process.

  9. NetAcet: prediction of N-terminal acetylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Blom, Nikolaj

    2005-01-01

    Summary: We present here a neural network based method for prediction of N-terminal acetylation-by far the most abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The method was developed on a yeast dataset for N-acetyltransferase A (NatA) acetylation, which is the type of N-acetylation for ......Summary: We present here a neural network based method for prediction of N-terminal acetylation-by far the most abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The method was developed on a yeast dataset for N-acetyltransferase A (NatA) acetylation, which is the type of N...

  10. c-myc, c-fos, and c-jun regulation in the regenerating livers of normal and H-2K/c-myc transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, D; Fitzgerald, M J; Babinet, C; Fausto, N

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of regulation of c-myc, c-fos, and c-jun at the early stages of liver regeneration in mice. We show that the transient increase in steady-state levels of c-myc mRNA at the start of liver regeneration is most probably regulated by posttranscriptional mechanisms. Although there was a marked increase in c-myc transcriptional initiation shortly after partial hepatectomy, a block in elongation prevented the completion of most transcripts. To gain further information ...

  11. Fas-Induced Apoptosis of Renal Cell Carcinoma is Mediated by Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 via Mitochondrial Damage-Dependent Caspase-8 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is a prototype of a chemo refractory tumour. It remains the most lethal of the common urologic cancers and is highly resistant to conventional therapy. Here, we confirmed the efficiency of anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (CH11 as alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of RCC and investigated the molecular mechanism(s, whereby CH11 induces apoptosis of RCC cells. The present study shows an essential role for apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1, together with both c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 pathways, and caspase-8 in this process. Furthermore, CH11-dependent induction of the ASK1–JNK/p38 pathways was found to activate the transcription factors AP-1 and ATF-2, and FADD-caspase-8-Bid signalling, resulting in the translocation of both Bax and Bak proteins, and subsequently mitochondrial dysregulation that is characterized by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, cytochrome c release and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. Thus, the described molecular mechanisms of CH11-induced apoptosis suggest the reliability of Fas activation as an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

  12. Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom ethyl acetate extract protects against high-fat diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis by regulating kinase phosphorylation in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong Hoon; Kim, Ji-Su; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Choo, Young-Kug

    2016-09-30

    Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom (AMK) is an herb used as a traditional medicine; however, it causes side effects such as nephrotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Nevertheless, AMK can be applied in specific ways medicinally, including via ingestion of low doses for short periods of time. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) induced the hepatocyte injury and inflammation. The protective effects of AMK against NASH are unclear; therefore, in this study, the protective effects of AMK ethyl acetate extract were investigated in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NASH model. We found decreased hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as well as increased levels of lipoproteins during AMK extract treatment. We also observed decreased hepatic lipid peroxidation and triglycerides, as well as suppressed hepatic expression of lipogenic genes in extract-treated livers. Treatment with extract decreased the activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) and increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). These results demonstrate that the protective effect of the extract against HFD-induced NASH occurred via reductions in reactive oxygen species production, inflammation suppression, and apoptosis related to the suppression of JNK1/2 activation and increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that that ethyl acetate extract of AMK has potential therapeutic effects in the HFD-induced NASH mouse model.

  13. Ursolic acid-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation contributes to growth inhibition and apoptosis in human bladder cancer T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing-you; Jin, Feng-suo; Yao, Chen; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Guo-hui; Ai, Xing

    2012-03-23

    Ursolic acid (UA) has shown the anti-tumor properties against a number of human cancers both in vivo and in vitro, however, its effect in bladder cancer and the corresponding mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we found that UA dose-dependently induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in human bladder cancer T24 cells, and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) may contribute to the process. Our Western-blot results demonstrated a significant AMPK activation after UA treatment in T24 cells. Notably, knockdown of AMPKα by the targeted shRNA largely inhibited UA-induced T24 cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, while an AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) or a constitutively active form of AMPK mimic UA's effect. We found the ceramide level was increased after UA treatment in T24 cells, and UA-induced AMPK activation and T24 cell apoptosis were inhibited by ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, and was enhanced by exogenously adding cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6), suggesting that ceramide might serve as an upstream signal for AMPK activation. Further, activation of AMPK by UA promoted c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, but inhibited mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling to cause survivin down-regulation. Our study suggests that activation of AMPK by UA contributes to growth inhibition and apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Src Inhibition Can Synergize with Gemcitabine and Reverse Resistance in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells via the AKT/c-Jun Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Hua Wu

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine-based chemotherapy remains one of the standards in management of metastatic breast cancer. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance to gemcitabine inevitably occurs. The aims of this study were to assess the efficacy of the combination of src inhibition and gemcitabine in gemcitabine-resistant breast cancer cells.By using colony formation, sphere forming, flow cytometry, cell counting kit-8 and transwell assays, 231/GEM-res (gemcitabine-resistant cell line, which was 10 times more resistant, was shown to have elevated drug tolerance, enhanced proliferative and self-renewal abilities, compared with its parental cells. Inhibition of src by both saracatinib (AZD0530 and siRNA could partially reverse gemcitabine resistance and attenuate resistance-associated anti-apoptosis, migration and stem cell capacities. In addition, the combination of src inhibition and gemcitabine had synergistic antitumor effects. Western blot analysis revealed up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein BAX, along with the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins (BCL-XL, Survivin, migration associated proteins (p-FAK, MMP-3 and cancer stem cell (CSC markers (CD44, Oct-4, which was probably mediated by AKT/c-Jun pathway.In highly gemcitabine-resistant 231 cells, src inhibition can synergize with gemcitabine, reverse drug resistance, inhibit tumor growth/metastasis/stemness of cancer stem cells, possibly via the AKT/c-Jun pathway.

  15. Dynamic acetylation of all lysine 4-methylated histone H3 in the mouse nucleus: analysis at c-fos and c-jun.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Hazzalin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A major focus of current research into gene induction relates to chromatin and nucleosomal regulation, especially the significance of multiple histone modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and methylation during this process. We have discovered a novel physiological characteristic of all lysine 4 (K4-methylated histone H3 in the mouse nucleus, distinguishing it from lysine 9-methylated H3. K4-methylated histone H3 is subject to continuous dynamic turnover of acetylation, whereas lysine 9-methylated H3 is not. We have previously reported dynamic histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation as a key characteristic of the inducible proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. We show here that dynamically acetylated histone H3 at these genes is also K4-methylated. Although all three modifications are proven to co-exist on the same nucleosome at these genes, phosphorylation and acetylation appear transiently during gene induction, whereas K4 methylation remains detectable throughout this process. Finally, we address the functional significance of the turnover of histone acetylation on the process of gene induction. We find that inhibition of turnover, despite causing enhanced histone acetylation at these genes, produces immediate inhibition of gene induction. These data show that all K4-methylated histone H3 is subject to the continuous action of HATs and HDACs, and indicates that at c-fos and c-jun, contrary to the predominant model, turnover and not stably enhanced acetylation is relevant for efficient gene induction.

  16. Flavopiridol inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α production through inactivation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in the MyD88-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Abedul; Koide, Naoki; Iftakhar-E-Khuda, Imtiaz; Noman, Abu Shadat Mohammod; Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Badamtseren, Battuvshin; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Flavopiridol is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and inhibits the growth of various cancer cells. The effect of flavopiridol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory mediator production was examined in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Flavopiridol significantly reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and, to a lesser extent, nitric oxide in LPS-stimulated cells. Flavopiridol inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and IκB kinase in response to LPS. Flavopiridol also inhibited the activation of a series of mitogen-activated protein kinases, such as p38, stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in response to LPS. However, flavopiridol did not alter the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) or CD14/toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Flavopiridol inhibited nitric oxide production induced by a MyD88-dependent TLR2 ligand, but not a MyD88-independent TLR3 ligand. Further, flavopiridol did not alter the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 in the MyD88-independent pathway. Therefore, it was suggested that flavopiridol exclusively inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in the MyD88-dependent pathway. Flavopiridol might be useful for the prevention of LPS-induced inflammatory response. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway reduces caspase-14 expression in impaired keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Several investigations have revealed that caspase-14 is responsible for the epidermal differentiation and cornification, as well as the regulation of moisturizing effect. However, the precise regulation mechanism is still not clear. This study was aimed to investigate the expression of caspase-14 in filaggrin-deficient normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs and to explore the possible mechanism that contributes to the regulation of caspase-14. Materials and Methods:The filaggrin-deficient NHEKs were induced by transfection with lentivirus (LV vector encoding small hairpin RNAs (shRNA. The inhibitors SB203580, PD98059 and SP600125 were used for suppressing the expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, p44/42 MAPK and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK. The expression of filaggrin, p38 MAPK, p44/42 MAPK and SAPK/JNK, caspase-14, keratin1and keratin2 were detected by western blot.  Results:In filaggrin-deficient NHEKs, the expression of p38, p44/42 MAPK and SAPK/JNK and caspase-14 were significantly decreased. The inhibition of p38 and SAPK/JNK reduced the expression of caspase-14, while the p44/42 MAPK showed no consistent effects. Moreover, the filaggrin knockdown decreased the expression of keratin2, but had no effects on the level of keratin1. Conclusion: The decreased expression of caspase-14 in filaggrin-deficient NHEKs may be induced by the inactivation of MAPK signaling pathway. These provide a novel perspective to understand the mechanism for the protective effects of filaggrin and caspase-14 on skin barrier function.

  18. Inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway reduces caspase-14 expression in impaired keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Ningning; Pang, Shuguang; Song, Haiyan; An, Liguo; Ma, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Several investigations have revealed that caspase-14 is responsible for the epidermal differentiation and cornification, as well as the regulation of moisturizing effect. However, the precise regulation mechanism is still not clear. This study was aimed to investigate the expression of caspase-14 in filaggrin-deficient normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and to explore the possible mechanism that contributes to the regulation of caspase-14. The filaggrin-deficient NHEKs were induced by transfection with lentivirus (LV) vector encoding small hairpin RNAs (shRNA). The inhibitors SB203580, PD98059 and SP600125 were used for suppressing the expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), p44/42 MAPK and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK). The expression of filaggrin, p38 MAPK, p44/42 MAPK and SAPK/JNK, caspase-14, keratin1and keratin2 were detected by western blot. In filaggrin-deficient NHEKs, the expression of p38, p44/42 MAPK and SAPK/JNK and caspase-14 were significantly decreased. The inhibition of p38 and SAPK/JNK reduced the expression of caspase-14, while the p44/42 MAPK showed no consistent effects. Moreover, the filaggrin knockdown decreased the expression of keratin2, but had no effects on the level of keratin1. The decreased expression of caspase-14 in filaggrin-deficient NHEKs may be induced by the inactivation of MAPK signaling pathway. These provide a novel perspective to understand the mechanism for the protective effects of filaggrin and caspase-14 on skin barrier function.

  19. Ste20-like kinase, SLK, activates the heat shock factor 1 - Hsp70 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Andrey V; Guillemette, Julie; Papillon, Joan

    2016-09-01

    Expression and activation of SLK increases during renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. When highly expressed, SLK signals via c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 to induce apoptosis, and it exacerbates apoptosis induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury. Overexpression of SLK in glomerular epithelial cells (GECs)/podocytes in vivo induces injury and proteinuria. In response to various stresses, cells enhance expression of chaperones or heat shock proteins (e.g. Hsp70), which are involved in the folding and maturation of newly synthesized proteins, and can refold denatured or misfolded proteins. We address the interaction of SLK with the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-Hsp70 pathway. Increased expression of SLK in GECs (following transfection) induced HSF1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, HSF1 transcriptional activity was increased by in vitro ischemia-reperfusion injury (chemical anoxia/recovery) and heat shock, and in both instances was amplified further by SLK overexpression. HSF1 binds to promoters of target genes, such as Hsp70 and induces their transcription. By analogy to HSF1, SLK stimulated Hsp70 expression. Hsp70 was also enhanced by anoxia/recovery and was further amplified by SLK overexpression. Induction of HSF1 and Hsp70 was dependent on the kinase activity of SLK, and was mediated via polo-like kinase-1. Transfection of constitutively active HSF1 enhanced Hsp70 expression and inhibited SLK-induced apoptosis. Conversely, the proapoptotic action of SLK was augmented by HSF1 shRNA, or the Hsp70 inhibitor, pifithrin-μ. In conclusion, increased expression/activity of SLK activates the HSF1-Hsp70 pathway. Hsp70 attenuates the primary proapoptotic effect of SLK. Modulation of chaperone expression may potentially be harnessed as cytoprotective therapy in renal cell injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in human thyroid cancer cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ching Chang

    Full Text Available Local anesthetics are frequently used in fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions and locoregional control of persistent or recurrent thyroid cancer. Recent evidence suggests that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of effects including inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in neuronal and other types of cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in decreased cell viability and colony formation of both 8505C and K1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lidocaine and bupivacaine induced apoptosis, and necrosis in high concentrations, as determined by flow cytometry. Lidocaine and bupivacaine caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, accompanied by activation of caspase 3 and 7, PARP cleavage, and induction of a higher ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Based on microarray and pathway analysis, apoptosis is the prominent transcriptional change common to lidocaine and bupivacaine treatment. Furthermore, lidocaine and bupivacaine attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 activity and induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and c-jun N-terminal kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK/ERK kinase and p38 MAPK suppressed caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results for the first time demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on thyroid cancer cells and implicate the MAPK pathways as an important mechanism. Our findings have potential clinical relevance in that the use of local anesthetics may confer previously unrecognized benefits in the management of patients with thyroid cancer.

  1. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in human thyroid cancer cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Ching; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Liu, Chien-Liang; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Hu, Meng-Chun; Cheng, Shih-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics are frequently used in fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions and locoregional control of persistent or recurrent thyroid cancer. Recent evidence suggests that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of effects including inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in neuronal and other types of cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in decreased cell viability and colony formation of both 8505C and K1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lidocaine and bupivacaine induced apoptosis, and necrosis in high concentrations, as determined by flow cytometry. Lidocaine and bupivacaine caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, accompanied by activation of caspase 3 and 7, PARP cleavage, and induction of a higher ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Based on microarray and pathway analysis, apoptosis is the prominent transcriptional change common to lidocaine and bupivacaine treatment. Furthermore, lidocaine and bupivacaine attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity and induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK/ERK kinase and p38 MAPK suppressed caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results for the first time demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on thyroid cancer cells and implicate the MAPK pathways as an important mechanism. Our findings have potential clinical relevance in that the use of local anesthetics may confer previously unrecognized benefits in the management of patients with thyroid cancer.

  2. A new identity for MLK3 as an NIMA-related, cell cycle-regulated kinase that is localized near centrosomes and influences microtubule organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Katherine I; Winkler, Katharine E; Means, Anthony R

    2003-01-01

    Although conserved counterparts for most proteins involved in the G(2)/M transition of the cell cycle have been found in all eukaryotes, a notable exception is the essential but functionally enigmatic fungal kinase NIMA. While a number of vertebrate kinases have been identified with catalytic domain homology to NIMA, none of these resemble NIMA within its extensive noncatalytic region, a region critical for NIMA function in Aspergillus nidulans. We used a bioinformatics approach to search for proteins with homology to the noncatalytic region of NIMA and identified mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3). MLK3 has been proposed to serve as a component in MAP kinase cascades, particularly those resulting in the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Here we describe the first in-depth study of endogenous MLK3 and report that, like NIMA, MLK3 phosphorylation and activity are enhanced during G(2)/M, whereas JNK remains inactive. Coincident with the G(2)/M transition, a period marked by dramatic reorganization of the cytoplasmic microtubule network, endogenous MLK3 transiently disperses away from the centrosome and centrosomal-proximal sites where it is localized during interphase. Furthermore, when overexpressed, MLK3, like NIMA, localizes to the centrosomal region, induces profound disruption of cytoplasmic microtubules and a nuclear distortion phenotype that differs from mitotic chromosome condensation. Cellular depletion of MLK3 protein using siRNA technology results in an increased sensitivity to the microtubule-stabilizing agent taxol. Our studies suggest a new role for MLK3, separable from its function in the JNK pathway, that may contribute to promoting microtubule instability, a hallmark of M phase entry.

  3. Selective Derivatization of N-Terminal Cysteines Using Cyclopentenediones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Omar; Agramunt, Jordi; Raich, Lluis; Rovira, Carme; Pedroso, Enrique; Grandas, Anna

    2016-10-07

    The outcome of the Michael-type reaction between thiols and 2,2-disubstituted cyclopentenediones varies depending on the thiol. Stable compounds with two fused rings were formed upon reaction with 1,2-aminothiols (such as N-terminal cysteines in peptides). Other thiols gave reversibly Michael-type adducts that were in equilibrium with the starting materials. This differential reactivity allows differently placed cysteines to be distinguished and has been exploited to prepare bioconjugates incorporating two or three different moieties.

  4. Differential expression of c-Jun proteins during müllerian duct growth and apoptosis: caspase-related tissue death blocked by diethylstilbestrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, C S

    2000-12-01

    To elucidate whether the differentiation of the Müllerian duct (MD) is mediated by c-Jun proteins, Western immunoblot with c-Jun/sc-45 antibody was used to investigate these proteins in female chick left and right MDs (LMD and RMD, respectively). The content of these proteins (e.g., the 66-kDa, 45-kDa, and 39-kDa forms) in the LMD or RMD of various stages of embryos was detected by measuring their density in autoradiograms by a Spot-denso-program with Alpha Ease software. In the LMD, the growing embryonic sex tract, the content of the 66-kDa and 39-kDa proteins increased to their highest level in 9th to 12th day embryos and then declined thereafter. In the RMD, the apoptotic embryonic sex tract, the content of these proteins also showed a linear increase from the 9th to 10th day and then declined at the 13th day. When the RMD entered the apoptosis stages (14th to 18th day of incubation), these proteins were persistently overexpressed. Another protein (45 kDa) was detected in both ducts only at the 9th to 13th days, and its content was higher in RMD than in the LMD. In parallel to this finding, high caspase-3 activity (determined by the measurement of the fragmented 85-kDa poly ADP-ribose polymerase) was found in the RMD during apoptosis. The apoptotic death of RMD was prevented by in vivo diethylstilbestrol treatment, which inhibited the overexpression of the 66-kDa and 45-kDa proteins, the fragmentation of DNA, and the activity of caspase-3. No inhibitory effect was found for the 39-kDa protein.

  5. miR200c attenuates P-gp-mediated MDR and metastasis by targeting JNK2/c-Jun signaling pathway in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Hua; Cai, Guo-Xiang; Pan, Shu-Fang; Deng, Wan-Li; Wang, Yu-Wei; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Cai, San-Jun; Zhu, Hui-Rong; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNA-200c (miR200c) recently emerged as an important regulator of tumorigenicity and cancer metastasis; however, its role in regulating multidrug resistance (MDR) remains unknown. In the current study, we found that the expression levels of miR200c in recurrent and metastatic colorectal cancers were significantly lower, whereas the JNK2 expression was higher compared with primary tumors. We showed that in MDR colorectal cancer cells, miR200c targeted the 3' untranslated region of the JNK2 gene. Overexpression of miR200c attenuated the levels of p-JNK, p-c-Jun, P-gp, and MMP-2/-9, the downstream factors of the JNK signaling pathway, resulting in increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, which was accompanied by heightened apoptosis and decreased cell invasion and migration. Moreover, in an orthotopic MDR colorectal cancer mouse model, we demonstrated that overexpression of miR200c effectively inhibited the tumor growth and metastasis. At last, in the tumor samples from patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer with routine postsurgical chemotherapy, we observed an inverse correlation between the levels of mRNA expression of miR200c and JNK2, ABCB1, and MMP-9, thus predicting patient therapeutic outcomes. In summary, we found that miR200c negatively regulated the expression of JNK2 gene and increased the sensitivity of MDR colorectal cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs, via inhibiting the JNK2/p-JNK/p-c-Jun/ABCB1 signaling. Restoration of miR200c expression in MDR colorectal cancer may serve as a promising therapeutic approach in MDR-induced metastasis. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. N-terminal N-myristoylation of proteins: prediction of substrate proteins from amino acid sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2002-04-05

    Myristoylation by the myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) is an important lipid anchor modification of eukaryotic and viral proteins. Automated prediction of N-terminal N-myristoylation from the substrate protein sequence alone is necessary for large-scale sequence annotation projects but it requires a low rate of false positive hits in addition to a sufficient sensitivity. Our previous analysis of substrate protein sequence variability, NMT sequences and 3D structures has revealed motif properties in addition to the known PROSITE motif that are utilized in a new predictor described here. The composite prediction function (with separate ad hoc parameterization (a) for queries from non-fungal eukaryotes and their viruses and (b) for sequences from fungal species) consists of terms evaluating amino acid type preferences at sequences positions close to the N terminus as well as terms penalizing deviations from the physical property pattern of amino acid side-chains encoded in multi-residue correlation within the motif sequence. The algorithm has been validated with a self-consistency and two jack-knife tests for the learning set as well as with kinetic data for model substrates. The sensitivity in recognizing documented NMT substrates is above 95 % for both taxon-specific versions. The corresponding rate of false positive prediction (for sequences with an N-terminal glycine residue) is close to 0.5 %; thus, the technique is applicable for large-scale automated sequence database annotation. The predictor is available as public WWW-server with the URL http://mendel.imp.univie.ac.at/myristate/. Additionally, we propose a version of the predictor that identifies a number of proteolytic protein processing sites at internal glycine residues and that evaluates possible N-terminal myristoylation of the protein fragments.A scan of public protein databases revealed new potential NMT targets for which the myristoyl modification may be of critical importance for

  7. Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential of the Pim-1 Kinase in Colon Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Weirauch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus 1 (Pim-1 kinase is overexpressed in various tumors and has been linked to poor prognosis. Its role as proto-oncogene is based on several Pim-1 target proteins involved in pivotal cellular processes. Here, we explore the functional relevance of Pim-1 in colon carcinoma. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: RNAi-based knockdown approaches, as well as a specific small molecule inhibitor, were used to inhibit Pim-1 in colon carcinoma cells. The effects were analyzed regarding proliferation, apoptosis, sensitization toward cytostatic treatment, and overall antitumor effect in vitro and in mouse tumor models in vivo. RESULTS: We demonstrate antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and overall antitumor effects of Pim-1 inhibition. The sensitization to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment upon Pim-1 knockdown offers new possibilities for combinatorial treatment approaches. Importantly, this also antagonizes a 5-FU-triggered Pim-1 up-regulation, which is mediated by decreased levels of miR-15b, a microRNA we newly identify to regulate Pim-1. The analysis of the molecular effects of Pim-1 inhibition reveals a complex regulatory network, with therapeutic Pim-1 repression leading to major changes in oncogenic signal transduction with regard to p21Cip1/WAF1, STAT3, c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK, c-Myc, and survivin and in the levels of apoptosis-related proteins Puma, Bax, and Bcl-xL. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that Pim-1 plays a pivotal role in several tumor-relevant signaling pathways and establish the functional relevance of Pim-1 in colon carcinoma. Our results also substantiate the RNAi-mediated Pim-1 knockdown based on polymeric polyethylenimine/ small interfering RNA nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic approach.

  8. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 deficiency attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang Joo; Ha, Chae-Myeong; Choi, Young-Keun; Park, Sungmi; Choe, Mi Sun; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Huh, Yang Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Lee, Sun Joo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Harris, Robert A; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Clinical prescription of cisplatin, one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents, is limited by its side effects, particularly tubular injury-associated nephrotoxicity. Since details of the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, we investigated the role of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Among the PDK isoforms, PDK4 mRNA and protein levels were markedly increased in the kidneys of mice treated with cisplatin, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation was involved in cisplatin-induced renal PDK4 expression. Treatment with the PDK inhibitor sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) or genetic knockout of PDK4 attenuated the signs of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, including apoptotic morphology of the kidney tubules along with numbers of TUNEL-positive cells, cleaved caspase-3, and renal tubular injury markers. Cisplatin-induced suppression of the mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption rate, expression of electron transport chain components, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and disruption of mitochondrial morphology were noticeably improved in the kidneys of DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice. Additionally, levels of the oxidative stress marker 4-hydroxynonenal and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species were attenuated, whereas superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase expression and glutathione synthetase and glutathione levels were recovered in DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice. Interestingly, lipid accumulation was considerably attenuated in DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice via recovered expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and coactivator PGC-1α, which was accompanied by recovery of mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, PDK4 mediates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, suggesting that PDK4 might be a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Recruitment of nuclear factor Y to the inverted CCAAT element (ICE) by c-Jun and E1A stimulates basal transcription of the bone sialoprotein gene in osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming; Bansal, Anil K; Mantovani, Roberto; Sodek, Jaro

    2005-11-18

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP), a major protein in the extracellular matrix of bone, is expressed almost exclusively by bone cells and by cancer cells that have a propensity to metastasize to bone. Previous studies have shown that v-src stimulates basal transcription of bsp in osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells by targeting the inverted CCAAT element (ICE) in the proximal promoter. To identify possible downstream effectors of Src we studied the effects of the proto-oncogene c-jun, which functions downstream of Src, on basal transcription of bsp using transient transfection assays. Increased expression of endogenous c-Jun induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol 13-acetate and ectopic expression of c-Jun increased basal transcription of chimeric reporter constructs encompassing the proximal promoter by 1.5-3-fold in ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma cells, with more modest effects in a normal bone cell line, RBMC-D8. The effects of c-Jun were abrogated by mutations in the ICE box and by co-expression of dominant negative nuclear factor Y, subunit A (NF-YA). The increase in bsp transcription did not require phosphorylation of c-Jun and was not altered by trichostatin treatment or by ectopic expression of p300/CREB-binding protein (CBP) or mutated forms lacking histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. Similarly, ectopic expression of p300/CBP-associated factor (P/CAF), which transduces p300/CBP effects, or of HAT-defective P/CAF did not influence the c-jun effects. Surprisingly, E1A, which competes with P/CAF binding to p300/CBP, also stimulated BSP transcription through NF-Y independently of c-jun, p300/CBP, and P/CAF. Collectively, these studies show that c-Jun and E1A regulate basal transcription of bsp in osteosarcoma cells by recruiting the NF-Y transcriptional complex to the ICE box in a mechanism that is independent of p300/CBP and P/CAF HAT activities.

  10. ATF3 expression precedes death of spinal motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-SOD1 transgenic mice and correlates with c-Jun phosphorylation, CHOP expression, somato-dendritic ubiquitination and Golgi fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlug, Angela S; Teuling, Eva; Haasdijk, Elize D; French, Pim; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Jaarsma, Dick

    2005-10-01

    To obtain insight into the morphological and molecular correlates of motoneuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mice that express G93A mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 (G93A mice), we have mapped and characterized 'sick' motoneurons labelled by the 'stress transcription factors' ATF3 and phospho-c-Jun. Immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that a subset of motoneurons express ATF3 from a relatively early phase of disease before the onset of active caspase 3 expression and motoneuron loss. The highest number of ATF3-expressing motoneurons occurred at symptom onset. The onset of ATF3 expression correlated with the appearance of ubiquitinated neurites. Confocal double-labelling immunofluorescence showed that all ATF3-positive motoneurons were immunoreactive for phosphorylated c-Jun. Furthermore, the majority of ATF3 and phospho-c-Jun-positive motoneurons were also immunoreactive for CHOP (GADD153) and showed Golgi fragmentation. A subset of ATF3 and phosphorylated c-Jun-immunoreactive motoneurons showed an abnormal appearance characterized by a number of distinctive features, including an eccentric flattened nucleus, perikaryal accumulation of ubiquitin immunoreactivity, juxta-nuclear accumulation of the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum, and intense Hsp70 immunoreactivity. These abnormal cells were not immunoreactive for active caspase 3. We conclude that motoneurons in ALS-SOD1 mice prior to their death and disappearance experience a prolonged sick phase, characterized by the gradual accumulation of ubiquitinated material first in the neurites and subsequently the cell body.

  11. Overexpression of ATF3 or the combination of ATF3, c-Jun, STAT3 and Smad1 promotes regeneration of the central axon branch of sensory neurons but without synergistic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fagoe, Nitish D; Attwell, Callan L; Kouwenhoven, Dorette; Verhaagen, J.; Mason, M.R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury results in the activation of a number of transcription factors (TFs) in injured neurons, some of which may be key regulators of the regeneration-associated gene (RAG) programme. Among known RAG TFs, ATF3, Smad1, STAT3 and c-Jun have all been linked to successful axonal

  12. Sorting signals, N-terminal modifications and abundance of the chloroplast proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zybailov

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chloroplast proteome is needed to understand the essential contribution of the chloroplast to plant growth and development. Here we present a large scale analysis by nanoLC-Q-TOF and nanoLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS of ten independent chloroplast preparations from Arabidopsis thaliana which unambiguously identified 1325 proteins. Novel proteins include various kinases and putative nucleotide binding proteins. Based on repeated and independent MS based protein identifications requiring multiple matched peptide sequences, as well as literature, 916 nuclear-encoded proteins were assigned with high confidence to the plastid, of which 86% had a predicted chloroplast transit peptide (cTP. The protein abundance of soluble stromal proteins was calculated from normalized spectral counts from LTQ-Obitrap analysis and was found to cover four orders of magnitude. Comparison to gel-based quantification demonstrates that 'spectral counting' can provide large scale protein quantification for Arabidopsis. This quantitative information was used to determine possible biases for protein targeting prediction by TargetP and also to understand the significance of protein contaminants. The abundance data for 550 stromal proteins was used to understand abundance of metabolic pathways and chloroplast processes. We highlight the abundance of 48 stromal proteins involved in post-translational proteome homeostasis (including aminopeptidases, proteases, deformylases, chaperones, protein sorting components and discuss the biological implications. N-terminal modifications were identified for a subset of nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded proteins and a novel N-terminal acetylation motif was discovered. Analysis of cTPs and their cleavage sites of Arabidopsis chloroplast proteins, as well as their predicted rice homologues, identified new species-dependent features, which will facilitate improved subcellular localization prediction. No evidence

  13. Characterization and N-terminal sequence of human platelet proteoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périn, J P; Bonnet, F; Maillet, P; Jollès, P

    1988-01-01

    Human platelet proteoglycan (P.PG) was prepared from a 4 M-guanidinium chloride platelet extract in the presence of proteinase inhibitors. The purification procedure included CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation, DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B ion-exchange chromatography and f.p.l.c. on a Mono Q HR 5/5 column. P.PG was recovered as a polydisperse molecule, but the protein core appeared to be at least 90% homogeneous. This observation could be due to partial proteolysis of the core protein during extraction. The N-terminal sequence of the human P.PG core protein was determined up to residue 66 and was shown to be highly homologous to the propeptide of an embryonic rat yolk-sac tumour proteoglycan (PG19); the significance of this homology is discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3214420

  14. Methyl gallate isolated from Spondias pinnata exhibits anticancer activity against human glioblastoma by induction of apoptosis and sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Dipankar; Ghate, Nikhil Baban; Singh, Sudhir Shankar; Mandal, Nripendranath

    2015-01-01

    Spondias pinnata has been reported for its efficient anticancer effects, but the studies were mostly focused on its extract. Since its bioactive compounds are largely unknown, this study was designed to characterize the lead components present in it and their anticancer activity against human glioblastoma cell line (U87). Major compounds from the ethyl acetate fraction were isolated by column chromatography and their anticancer potentials against U87 cells were evaluated. Furthermore, flow cytometric and immunoblotting analyses were performed to demonstrate the mechanism of apoptosis inducing activity of methyl gallate (MG) against U87 cell line. Four major compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction. Amongst these, two compounds showed promising activities and with the help of different spectroscopic methods they were identified as gallic acid and MG. Flow cytometric studies revealed that MG-induced apoptosis in U87 cells dose-dependently; the same was confirmed by activation of caspases through cleavage of endogenous substrate poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase. MG treatment also induced the expression of p53 and B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X and cleavage of BH3 interacting-domain with a concomitant decrease in B-cell lymphoma-2 expression. Moreover, MG-induced sustained phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) in U87 cells with no change in the phosphorylation of other mitogen-activated protein kinases (c-Jun N-terminal of stress-activated protein kinases, p38). MG is a potent antioxidant and it induces sustained ERK1/2 activation and apoptosis in human glioblastoma U87, and provide a rationale for evaluation of MG for other brain carcinoma cell lines for the advancement of glioblastoma therapy.

  15. Xingshentongqiao Decoction Mediates Proliferation, Apoptosis, Orexin-A Receptor and Orexin-B Receptor Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Expression and Represses Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanli Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypocretin (HCRT signaling plays an important role in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy and can be significantly influenced by Chinese herbal therapy. Our previous study showed that xingshentongqiao decoction (XSTQ is clinically effective for the treatment of narcolepsy. To determine whether XSTQ improves narcolepsy by modulating HCRT signaling, we investigated its effects on SH-SY5Y cell proliferation, apoptosis, and HCRT receptor 1/2 (orexin receptor 1 [OX1R] and orexin receptor 2 [OX2R] expression. The signaling pathways involved in these processes were also assessed. Methods: The effects of XSTQ on proliferation and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells were assessed using cell counting kit-8 and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate assays. OX1R and OX2R expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Western blotting for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway activation was performed to further assess the signaling mechanism of XSTQ. Results: XSTQ reduced the proliferation and induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. This effect was accompanied by the upregulation of OX1R and OX2R expression and the reduced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk 1/2, p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. Conclusions: XSTQ inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. XSTQ also promotes OX1R and OX2R expression. These effects are associated with the repression of the Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK signaling pathways. These results define a molecular mechanism for XSTQ in regulating HCRT and MAPK activation, which may explain its ability to treat narcolepsy.

  16. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) during testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury in nuclear factor-kappaB knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minutoli, Letteria; Antonuccio, Pietro; Polito, Francesca; Bitto, Alessandra; Fiumara, Tiziana; Squadrito, Francesco; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Arena, Salvatore; Marini, Herbert; Romeo, Carmelo; Altavilla, Domenica

    2007-07-12

    Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) and c-jun-N terminal kinase (JNK) play an important role in testicular ischemia. We investigated the patterns of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 activation in NF-kappaB knockout (KO) mice subjected to testicular torsion. KO and normal littermate wild-type (WT) animals underwent at 1 h testicular ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion (TI/R). Sham testicular ischemia-reperfusion mice served as controls. ERK 1/2, JNK and p38 expression by western blot analysis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression (RT-PCR and western blot analysis) and a complete histological examination were carried out. TI/R caused a greater increase in phosphorylated form of ERK 1/2 in KO mice than in WT animals in either the ischemic testis and the contralateral one. By contrary, active form of JNK and p38 were completely abrogated in both testes of KO mice, while WT animals showed a significant activation of those kinases in both testes. TNF-alpha expression was markedly reduced in KO mice when compared to WT mice either at the mRNA and the protein level. Finally TI/R-induced histological damage was markedly reduced in KO mice. Our data indicate that NF-kappaB plays a pivotal role in the development of testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury and suggest that, in the absence of the transcriptional factor, the up-stream signal JNK and p38 may be abrogated while ERK 1/2 activity is enhanced.

  17. Inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinases increases the sensitivity of A549 lung cancer cells to the cytotoxicity induced by a kava chalcone analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmka, Janel K; Solberg, Eric L; Zeliadt, Nicholette A; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Charlson, Aaron T; Xing, Chengguo; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V

    2012-08-03

    We are interested in investigating the biological activity of chalcones, a major class of compounds found in the beverage kava, in order to develop potent and selective chemopreventive candidates. Consumption of kava in the South Pacific Islands is inversely correlated with cancer incidence, even among smokers. Accordingly, chalcones have anti-cancer activities in animal and cell culture models. To investigate signaling pathways that affect chalcone action we studied a potent analog, (E)-3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (chalcone-24). Chalcone-24 was selected from a series of chalcone analogs that were synthesized based on the structures derived from flavokawain compounds found in kava, and screened in A549 lung cancer cells for induction of cytotoxicity and inhibition of NF-κB, a transcription factor associated with cell survival. Incubation of A549 cells with chalcone-24 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability, inhibition of NF-κB, activation of caspases, and activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK); ERK1/2 and JNK are mitogen activated protein kinases that play central roles in regulating cell fate. Pharmacological inhibitors of ERK1/2 or JNK increased the sensitivity of A549 cells to chalcone-24-induced cytotoxicity, without affecting NF-κB or caspase activity. These results will help refine the synthesis of chalcone analogs to maximize the combination of actions required to prevent and treat cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Biodentine and Bioaggregate on odontoblastic differentiation via mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, J-Y; Woo, S-M; Lee, B-N; Koh, J-T; Nör, J E; Hwang, Y-C

    2015-02-01

    To compare the mineralization inductive capacity of Biodentine and Bioaggregate with Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and to investigate possible signaling pathways of mineralization in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Viability of HDPCs in response to Biodentine, Bioaggregate, and MTA was measured using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide. To investigate their potential to induce odontoblast differentiation, expression of dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentine matrix protein1 (DMP1) mRNA level was evaluated by RT-PCR. For the mineralized nodule assay, Alizarin red staining was performed. To determine the role of MAPK signaling in the odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs, activated MAPKs were investigated by Western blot and the effect of MAPK inhibitor was examined by Alizarin red S staining. The results were statistically analysed using one-way anova and the Bonferroni test. The effects of MTA, Biodentine, and Bioaggregate on cell viability were similar. Biodentine and Bioaggregate enhanced DSPP and DMP1 mRNA expression compared to the control group, but to the same extent as MTA (P Biodentine, and Bioaggregate increased the area of calcified nodules compared to the control (P Biodentine, and Bioaggregate increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). MAPK inhibitors attenuated mineralized nodule formation, which was increased by MTA, Biodentine, and Bioaggregate, respectively (P Biodentine and Bioaggregate stimulated odontoblastic differentiation and mineralization nodule formation by activating the MAPK pathway as did MTA. This suggests that the new materials could be useful for regenerative endodontic procedures. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase enhances apoptosis induced by arsenic trioxide in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Li, Aiping; Liu, Qizhan; Wang, Xinru; Zhou, Jianwei

    2005-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has recently been used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia and has activity in vitro against several solid tumour cell lines where the induction of differentiation and apoptosis are the prime effects. The mechanism of As2O3-induced cell death has yet to be clarified, especially in solid cancers. In the present study, the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was examined as a cellular model for As2O3 treatment. The involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was investigated in As2O3-induced cell death. 3. It was found that As2O3 activates the prosurvival mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK pathway in MCF-7 cells, which, conversely, may compromise the efficacy of As2O3. Hence, a combination treatment of As2O3 and MEK inhibitors was investigated to determine whether this treatment could lead to enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. 4. Inhibition of MEK/ERK with the pharmacological inhibitors U0126 (10 micromol/L) or PD98059 (20 micromol/L) together with As2O3 (2 and 5 micromol/L) resulted in a significant enhancement of growth inhibition in breast cancer MCF-7 cells as determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay and [Methyl-3H]-thymidine incorporation. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that combined treatment with As2O3 and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 could augment breast cancer MCF-7 cell apoptosis approximately twofold compared with the effects of the two drugs alone, as determined by Hoechst 33258 or annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining and flow cytometry. 5. In addition, As2O3 activated p38 in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on JNK1/2. Treatment with a p38 inhibitor did not prevent As2O3-induced apoptosis. 6. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed that enhanced apoptosis is detected in breast cancer MCF-7 cells in the presence of As2O3 and an MEK inhibitor, which may be a

  20. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  1. Venus kinase receptors control reproduction in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Vanderstraete

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Venus kinase receptor (VKR is a single transmembrane molecule composed of an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptor and an extracellular Venus Flytrap (VFT structure similar to the ligand binding domain of many class C G protein coupled receptors. This receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK was first discovered in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, then in a large variety of invertebrates. A single vkr gene is found in most genomes, except in S. mansoni in which two genes Smvkr1 and Smvkr2 exist. VKRs form a unique family of RTKs present only in invertebrates and their biological functions are still to be discovered. In this work, we show that SmVKRs are expressed in the reproductive organs of S. mansoni, particularly in the ovaries of female worms. By transcriptional analyses evidence was obtained that both SmVKRs fulfill different roles during oocyte maturation. Suppression of Smvkr expression by RNA interference induced spectacular morphological changes in female worms with a strong disorganization of the ovary, which was dominated by the presence of primary oocytes, and a defect of egg formation. Following expression in Xenopus oocytes, SmVKR1 and SmVKR2 receptors were shown to be activated by distinct ligands which are L-Arginine and calcium ions, respectively. Signalling analysis in Xenopus oocytes revealed the capacity of SmVKRs to activate the PI3K/Akt/p70S6K and Erk MAPK pathways involved in cellular growth and proliferation. Additionally, SmVKR1 induced phosphorylation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Activation of JNK by SmVKR1 was supported by the results of yeast two-hybrid experiments identifying several components of the JNK pathway as specific interacting partners of SmVKR1. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the functions of SmVKR in gametogenesis, and particularly in oogenesis and egg formation. By eliciting signalling pathways potentially involved in oocyte proliferation, growth

  2. Venus kinase receptors control reproduction in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Gouignard, Nadège; Cailliau, Katia; Morel, Marion; Hahnel, Steffen; Leutner, Silke; Beckmann, Svenja; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dissous, Colette

    2014-05-01

    The Venus kinase receptor (VKR) is a single transmembrane molecule composed of an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptor and an extracellular Venus Flytrap (VFT) structure similar to the ligand binding domain of many class C G protein coupled receptors. This receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) was first discovered in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, then in a large variety of invertebrates. A single vkr gene is found in most genomes, except in S. mansoni in which two genes Smvkr1 and Smvkr2 exist. VKRs form a unique family of RTKs present only in invertebrates and their biological functions are still to be discovered. In this work, we show that SmVKRs are expressed in the reproductive organs of S. mansoni, particularly in the ovaries of female worms. By transcriptional analyses evidence was obtained that both SmVKRs fulfill different roles during oocyte maturation. Suppression of Smvkr expression by RNA interference induced spectacular morphological changes in female worms with a strong disorganization of the ovary, which was dominated by the presence of primary oocytes, and a defect of egg formation. Following expression in Xenopus oocytes, SmVKR1 and SmVKR2 receptors were shown to be activated by distinct ligands which are L-Arginine and calcium ions, respectively. Signalling analysis in Xenopus oocytes revealed the capacity of SmVKRs to activate the PI3K/Akt/p70S6K and Erk MAPK pathways involved in cellular growth and proliferation. Additionally, SmVKR1 induced phosphorylation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). Activation of JNK by SmVKR1 was supported by the results of yeast two-hybrid experiments identifying several components of the JNK pathway as specific interacting partners of SmVKR1. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the functions of SmVKR in gametogenesis, and particularly in oogenesis and egg formation. By eliciting signalling pathways potentially involved in oocyte proliferation, growth and migration

  3. In vivo crypt surface hyperproliferation is decreased by butyrate and increased by deoxycholate in normal rat colon: associated in vivo effects on c-Fos and c-Jun expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, O C; Zhou, D; Seto, R W; Jabbar, A; Choi, J; Lederer, H M; Rombeau, J L

    1996-01-01

    Studies on colon carcinogenesis suggest that the short-chain fatty acid butyrate may be protective, whereas the secondary bile acid deoxycholate may promote tumor development. Crypt surface hyperproliferation is regarded as a biomarker of colon cancer risk and can be modulated in vitro by the differentiation inducer butyrate and the tumor promoter deoxycholate. We hypothesized that butyrate decreases and deoxycholate increases crypt surface proliferation in vivo and that these effects are mediated by changes in the expression of the protooncogenes c-Fos and c-Jun, which are known to regulate proliferation and differentiation. Twenty-five adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent colonic isolation and 24-hour intraluminal instillation of 10 mmol/L sodium chloride, 10 mmol/ L sodium butyrate, or 10 mmol/L sodium deoxycholate. Proliferation of the whole crypt and five crypt compartments from base to surface was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. The øh value, an index of "premalignant" hyperproliferation, was calculated as the ratio of labeled cells in the two surface compartments divided by the labeled cells in the entire crypt. Expression of c-Fos and c-Jun was evaluated by Western blot. Crypt surface proliferation and the øh value were significantly decreased by butyrate and increased by deoxycholate. Butyrate increased colonic expression of c-Jun, whereas deoxycholate significantly induced c-Fos. The in vivo effects on surface proliferation are consistent with a potential protective [corrected] role for butyrate and a promotive role for deoxycholate in colon carcinogenesis. The concurrently observed effects on colonic c-Jun and c-Fos expression represent a novel finding and suggest that direct or indirect modulation of protooncogene expression may be the mechanism by which these dietary byproducts regulate proliferation in vivo.

  4. The c-Fos and c-Jun from Litopenaeus vannamei play opposite roles in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Wang, Sheng; Song, Xuan; Zhang, Zijian; Qian, Zhe; Zuo, Hongliang; Xu, Xiaopeng; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo

    2015-09-01

    Growing evidence indicates that activator protein-1 (AP-1) plays a major role in stimulating the transcription of immune effector molecules in cellular response to an incredible array of stimuli, including growth factors, cytokines, cellular stresses and bacterial and viral infection. Here, we reported the isolation and characterization of a cDNA from Litopenaeus vannamei encoding the full-length c-Fos protein (named as Lvc-Fos). The predicted amino acid sequences of Lvc-Fos contained a basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) domain, which was characteristic of members of the AP-1 family. Immunoprecipitation and native-PAGE assays determined that Lvc-Fos could interact with the Lvc-Jun, a homolog of c-Jun family in L. vannamei, in a heterodimer manner. Further investigation demonstrated that Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun were expressed in all tested tissues and located in the nucleus. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed both Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun in gills were up-regulated during Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenges. In addition, reporter gene assays indicated Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun could activate the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of Drosophila and shrimp, as well as WSSV immediate early (IE) genes wsv069 and wsv249, in a different manner. Knockdown of Lvc-Fos or Lvc-Jun by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in higher mortalities of L. vannamei after infection with V. parahaemolyticus, suggesting that Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun might play protective roles in bacterial infection. However, silencing of Lvc-Fos or Lvc-Jun in shrimp caused lower mortalities and virus loads under WSSV infection, suggesting that Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun could be engaged for WSSV replication and pathogenesis. In conclusion, our results provided experimental evidence and novel insight into the roles of L. vannamei AP-1 in bacterial and viral infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Induction of c-myc and c-jun proto-oncogene expression in rat L6 myoblasts by cadmium is inhibited by zinc preinduction of the metallothionein gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abshire, M.K.; Buzard, G.S.; Shiraishi, Noriyuki; Waalkers, M.P. [National Cancer Institute, Fredrick, MD (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Certain proto-oncogenes transfer growth regulatory signals from the cell surface to the nucleus. These genes often show activation soon after cells are exposed to mitogenic stimulation but can also be activated as a nonmitogenic stress response. Cadmium (Cd) is a carcinogenic metal in humans and rodents and, though its mechanism of action is unknown, it could involve activation of such proto-oncogenes. Metallothionein (MT), a metal-inducible protein that binds Cd, can protect against many aspects of Cd toxicity, including genotoxicity and possibly carcinogenesis. Thus, the effects of Cd on expression of c-myc and c-jun in rat L6 myoblasts, and the effect of preactivation of the MT gene by Zn treatment on such oncogene expression, were studied. MT protein levels were measured using oligonucleotide hybridization and standardized to {beta}-actin levels. Cd (5 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}, 0-30 h) stimulated both c-myc and c-jun mRNA expression. An initial peak of activation of c-myc expression occurred 2 h after initiation of Cd exposure, and levels remained elevated throughout the assessment period. Zn pretreatment markedly reduced the activation of c-myc expression by Cd compared to cells not receiving Zn pretreatment. Cd treatment increased c-jun mRNA levels by up to 3.5-fold. Again, Zn pretreatment markedly reduced. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  6. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin eWemhöner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in Ih activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of Ih to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish (ACI rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  7. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F; Meuth, Sven G; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in I h activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of I h to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  8. Dihydrolipoic Acid Inhibits Lysosomal Rupture and NLRP3 Through Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein-1/Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II/TAK1 Pathways After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Keren; Enkhjargal, Budbazar; Xie, Zhiyi; Sun, Chengmei; Wu, Lingyun; Malaguit, Jay; Chen, Sheng; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, John H

    2018-01-01

    The NLRP3 (nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome is a crucial component of the inflammatory response in early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this study, we investigated a role of dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) in lysosomal rupture, NLRP3 activation, and determined the underlying pathway. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in male Sprague-Dawley rats. DHLA was administered intraperitoneally 1 hour after SAH. Small interfering RNA for lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 and CaMKIIα (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α) was administered through intracerebroventricular 48 hours before SAH induction. SAH grade evaluation, short- and long-term neurological function testing, Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining experiments were performed. DHLA treatment increased the expression of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 and decreased phosphorylated CaMKIIα and NLRP3 inflammasome, thereby alleviating neurological deficits after SAH. Lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 small interfering RNA abolished the neuroprotective effects of DHLA and increased the level of phosphorylated CaMKIIα, p-TAK1 (phosphorylated transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase), p-JNK (phosphorylated c-Jun-N-terminal kinase), and NLRP3 inflammasome. CaMKIIα small interfering RNA downregulated the expression of p-TAK1, p-JNK, and NLRP3 and improved the neurobehavior after SAH. DHLA treatment improved neurofunction and alleviated inflammation through the lysosome-associated membrane protein-1/CaMKII/TAK1 pathway in early brain injury after SAH. DHLA may provide a promising treatment to alleviate early brain injury after SAH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. N-terminal PDZ-like domain of chromatin organizer SATB1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 36; Issue 3. N-terminal PDZ-like domain of chromatin ... In the present study, we set out to address whether the PDZ-domain-mediated interactions of SATB1 are critical for its in vivo function as a global repressor. We reasoned that since the N-terminal ...

  10. N-terminal acetylation promotes synaptonemal complex assembly in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinmin; Barroso, Consuelo; Zhang, Pan; Kim, Hyun-Min; Li, Shangtong; Labrador, Leticia; Lightfoot, James; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Colaiácovo, Monica P

    2016-11-01

    N-terminal acetylation of the first two amino acids on proteins is a prevalent cotranslational modification. Despite its abundance, the biological processes associated with this modification are not well understood. Here, we mapped the pattern of protein N-terminal acetylation in Caenorhabditis elegans, uncovering a conserved set of rules for this protein modification and identifying substrates for the N-terminal acetyltransferase B (NatB) complex. We observed an enrichment for global protein N-terminal acetylation and also specifically for NatB substrates in the nucleus, supporting the importance of this modification for regulating biological functions within this cellular compartment. Peptide profiling analysis provides evidence of cross-talk between N-terminal acetylation and internal modifications in a NAT substrate-specific manner. In vivo studies indicate that N-terminal acetylation is critical for meiosis, as it regulates the assembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a proteinaceous structure ubiquitously present during meiosis from yeast to humans. Specifically, N-terminal acetylation of NatB substrate SYP-1, an SC structural component, is critical for SC assembly. These findings provide novel insights into the biological functions of N-terminal acetylation and its essential role during meiosis. © 2016 Gao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Antral content, secretion and peripheral metabolism of N-terminal progastrin fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Hansen, Carsten Palnaes; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In addition to the acid-stimulatory gastrins, progastrin also release N-terminal fragments. In order to examine the cellular content, secretion and peripheral metabolism of these fragments, we developed an immunoassay specific for the N-terminal sequence of human progastrin. RESULTS...

  12. N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide during pharmacological heart rate reduction in hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, M; Kistorp, C; Corell, P

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that elevated N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels in hyperthyroidism are mainly driven by increased metabolism due to excess thyroid hormones. Therefore, serum levels of N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide were studied during reduced cardiac work load by means o...

  13. Activated type I TGFbeta receptor (Alk5) kinase confers enhancedsurvival to mammary epithelial cells and accelerates mammary tumorprogression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka-Cook, Rebecca S.; Shin, Incheol; Yi, Jae Youn; Easterly,Evangeline; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Zent, Roy; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2005-01-02

    The transforming growth factor-betas (TGF{beta}s) are members of a large superfamily of pleiotropic cytokines that also includes the activins and the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Members of the TGF{beta} family regulate complex physiological processes such cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, motility, and cell death, among others (Massague, 1998). Dysregulation of TGF{beta} signaling contributes to several pathological processes including cancer, fibrosis, and auto-immune disorders (Massague et al., 2000). The TGF{beta}s elicit their biological effects by binding to type II and type I transmembrane receptor serine-threonine kinases (T{beta}RII and T{beta}RI) which, in turn, phosphorylated Smad 2 and Smad 3. Phosphorylated Smad 2/3 associate with Smad 4 and, as a heteromeric complex, translocate to the nucleus where they regulate gene transcription. The inhibitory Smad7 down regulates TGF{beta} signaling by binding to activated T{beta}RI and interfering with its ability to phosphorylate Smad 2/3 (Derynck and Zhang, 2003; Shi and Massague, 2003). Signaling is also regulated by Smad proteolysis. TGF{beta} receptor-mediated activation results in multi-ubiquitination of Smad 2 in the nucleus and subsequent degradation of Smad 2 by the proteasome (Lo and Massague, 1999). Activation of TGF{beta} receptors also induces mobilization of a Smad 7-Smurf complex from the nucleus to the cytoplasm; this complex recognizes the activated receptors and mediates their ubiquitination and internalization via caveolin-rich vesicles, leading to termination of TGF{beta} signaling (Di Guglielmo et al., 2003). Other signal transducers/pathways have been implicated in TGF{beta} actions. These include the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (Jnk), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein phosphatase PP2A, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), and the family of Rho GTPases [reviewed in

  14. N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qiuping; Minaisah, Rose-Marie; Ferraro, Elisa; Li, Chen; Porter, Lauren J.; Zhou, Can; Gao, Fang; Zhang, Junyi; Rajgor, Dipen; Autore, Flavia; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Warren, Derek T., E-mail: derek.warren@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-07-15

    The spatial compartmentalisation of biochemical signalling pathways is essential for cell function. Nesprins are a multi-isomeric family of proteins that have emerged as signalling scaffolds, herein, we investigate the localisation and function of novel nesprin-2 N-terminal variants. We show that these nesprin-2 variants display cell specific distribution and reside in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that nesprin-2 N-terminal variants colocalised with β-catenin at cell-cell junctions in U2OS cells. Calcium switch assays demonstrated that nesprin-2 and β-catenin are lost from cell-cell junctions in low calcium conditions whereas emerin localisation at the NE remained unaltered, furthermore, an N-terminal fragment of nesprin-2 was sufficient for cell-cell junction localisation and interacted with β-catenin. Disruption of these N-terminal nesprin-2 variants, using siRNA depletion resulted in loss of β-catenin from cell-cell junctions, nuclear accumulation of active β-catenin and augmented β-catenin transcriptional activity. Importantly, we show that U2OS cells lack nesprin-2 giant, suggesting that the N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling independently of the NE. Together, these data identify N-terminal nesprin-2 variants as novel regulators of β-catenin signalling that tether β-catenin to cell-cell contacts to inhibit β-catenin transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • N-terminal nesprin-2 variants display cell specific expression patterns. • N-terminal spectrin repeats of nesprin-2 interact with β-catenin. • N-terminal nesprin-2 variants scaffold β-catenin at cell-cell junctions.. • Nesprin-2 variants play multiple roles in β-catenin signalling.

  15. Quinacrine induces apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells via p38 MAPK-elicited BCL2 down-regulation and suppression of ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changchien, Jung-Jung; Chen, Ying-Jung; Huang, Chia-Hui [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tian-Lu [Department of Biomedical Science and Environmental Biology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shinne-Ren [Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, Long-Sen, E-mail: lschang@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-01

    Although previous studies have revealed the anti-cancer activity of quinacrine, its effect on leukemia is not clearly resolved. We sought to explore the cytotoxic effect and mechanism of quinacrine action in human leukemia K562 cells. Quinacrine induced K562 cell apoptosis accompanied with ROS generation, mitochondrial depolarization, and down-regulation of BCL2L1 and BCL2. Upon exposure to quinacrine, ROS-mediated p38 MAPK activation and ERK inactivation were observed in K562 cells. Quinacrine-induced cell death and mitochondrial depolarization were suppressed by the p38MAPK inhibitor SB202190 and constitutively active MEK1 over-expression. Activation of p38 MAPK was shown to promote BCL2 degradation. Further, ERK inactivation suppressed c-Jun-mediated transcriptional expression of BCL2L1. Over-expression of BCL2L1 and BCL2 attenuated quinacrine-evoked mitochondrial depolarization and rescued the viability of quinacrine-treated cells. Taken together, our data indicate that quinacrine-induced K562 cell apoptosis is mediated through mitochondrial alterations triggered by p38 MAPK-mediated BCL2 down-regulation and suppression of ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression. - Highlights: • Quinacrine induces K562 cell apoptosis via down-regulation of BCL2 and BCL2L1. • Quinacrine induces p38 MAPK activation and ERK inactivation in K562 cells. • Quinacrine elicits p38 MAPK-mediated BCL2 down-regulation. • Quinacrine suppresses ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression.

  16. TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 signaling regulates TGF-β-induced WNT-5A expression in airway smooth muscle cells via Sp1 and β-catenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Kumawat

    Full Text Available WNT-5A, a key player in embryonic development and post-natal homeostasis, has been associated with a myriad of pathological conditions including malignant, fibroproliferative and inflammatory disorders. Previously, we have identified WNT-5A as a transcriptional target of TGF-β in airway smooth muscle cells and demonstrated its function as a mediator of airway remodeling. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying TGF-β-induced WNT-5A expression. We show that TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 is a critical mediator of WNT-5A expression as its pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing reduced TGF-β induction of WNT-5A. Furthermore, we show that TAK1 engages p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling which redundantly participates in WNT-5A induction as only simultaneous, but not individual, inhibition of p38 and JNK suppressed TGF-β-induced WNT-5A expression. Remarkably, we demonstrate a central role of β-catenin in TGF-β-induced WNT-5A expression. Regulated by TAK1, β-catenin is required for WNT-5A induction as its silencing repressed WNT-5A expression whereas a constitutively active mutant augmented basal WNT-5A abundance. Furthermore, we identify Sp1 as the transcription factor for WNT-5A and demonstrate its interaction with β-catenin. We discover that Sp1 is recruited to the WNT-5A promoter in a TGF-β-induced and TAK1-regulated manner. Collectively, our findings describe a TAK1-dependent, β-catenin- and Sp1-mediated signaling cascade activated downstream of TGF-β which regulates WNT-5A induction.

  17. Identification and Functional Characterization of N-Terminally Acetylated Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, Bertran; Roschitzki, Bernd; Mohanty, Sonali; Niederer, Eva M.; Laczko, Endre; Timmerman, Evy; Lange, Vinzenz; Hafen, Ernst; Aebersold, Ruedi; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Basler, Konrad; Ahrens, Christian H.; Gevaert, Kris; Brunner, Erich

    2009-01-01

    Protein modifications play a major role for most biological processes in living organisms. Amino-terminal acetylation of proteins is a common modification found throughout the tree of life: the N-terminus of a nascent polypeptide chain becomes co-translationally acetylated, often after the removal of the initiating methionine residue. While the enzymes and protein complexes involved in these processes have been extensively studied, only little is known about the biological function of such N-terminal modification events. To identify common principles of N-terminal acetylation, we analyzed the amino-terminal peptides from proteins extracted from Drosophila Kc167 cells. We detected more than 1,200 mature protein N-termini and could show that N-terminal acetylation occurs in insects with a similar frequency as in humans. As the sole true determinant for N-terminal acetylation we could extract the (X)PX rule that indicates the prevention of acetylation under all circumstances. We could show that this rule can be used to genetically engineer a protein to study the biological relevance of the presence or absence of an acetyl group, thereby generating a generic assay to probe the functional importance of N-terminal acetylation. We applied the assay by expressing mutated proteins as transgenes in cell lines and in flies. Here, we present a straightforward strategy to systematically study the functional relevance of N-terminal acetylations in cells and whole organisms. Since the (X)PX rule seems to be of general validity in lower as well as higher eukaryotes, we propose that it can be used to study the function of N-terminal acetylation in all species. PMID:19885390

  18. PKC phosphorylates residues in the N-terminal of the DA transporter to regulate amphetamine-induced DA efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Bubula, Nancy; Brown, Jason; Wang, Yunliang; Kondev, Veronika; Vezina, Paul

    2016-05-27

    The DA transporter (DAT), a phosphoprotein, controls extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the central nervous system through transport or reverse transport (efflux). Multiple lines of evidence support the claim that PKC significantly contributes to amphetamine-induced DA efflux. Other signaling pathways, involving CaMKII and ERK, have also been shown to regulate DAT mediated efflux. Here we assessed the contribution of putative PKC residues (S4, S7, S13) in the N-terminal of the DAT to amphetamine-induced DA efflux by transfecting DATs containing different serine to alanine (S-A) point mutations into DA pre-loaded HEK-293 cells and incubating these cells in amphetamine (2μM). The effects of a S-A mutation at the non-PKC residue S12 and a threonine to alanine (T-A) mutation at the ERK T53 residue were also assessed for comparison. WT-DATs were used as controls. In an initial experiment, we confirmed that inhibiting PKC with Go6976 (130nM) significantly reduced amphetamine-induced DA efflux. In subsequent experiments, cells transfected with the S4A, S12A, S13A, T53A and S4,7,13A mutants showed a reduction in amphetamine-induced DA efflux similar to that observed with Go6976. Interestingly, cells transfected with the S7A mutant, identified by some as a PKC-PKA residue, showed unperturbed WT-DAT levels of amphetamine-induced DA efflux. These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of select residues in the DAT N-terminal can regulate amphetamine-induced efflux. PKC can act either independently or in concert with other kinases such as ERK to produce this effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Breckenridge, David G.; Liles, John T. [Department of Biology, Gilead Sciences, Inc., Foster City, CA (United States); Lebofsky, Margitta [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David' s North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24 h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5 h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. - Highlights: • Two ASK1 inhibitors protected against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • The ASK1 inhibitors protect when used as pre- or post-treatment. • Protection by ASK1 inhibitor is

  20. Cloning of MASK, a novel member of the mammalian germinal center kinase III subfamily, with apoptosis-inducing properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan, Ippeita; Ong, Shao-En; Watanabe, Norinobu M

    2002-01-01

    We have cloned a novel human GCK family kinase that has been designated as MASK (Mst3 and SOK1-related kinase). MASK is widely expressed and encodes a protein of 416 amino acid residues, with an N-terminal kinase domain and a unique C-terminal region. Like other GCK-III subfamily kinases, MASK do...

  1. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation–dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Daniel C.; Hammill, Jared T.; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y.; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O.; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C.; Goktug, Asli N.; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K.; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A.; Cannon, Joe R.; Shelat, Anang A.; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R.; Alpi, Arno F.; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh , Bhuvanesh; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.; Guy, R. Kip (MSKCC); (Dundee); (SJCH); (Harvard-Med); (MXPL)

    2017-06-05

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ~80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation–dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide–binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2–E3 ligases.

  2. Kadar N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide sebagai Prediktor Luaran Klinis Sindrom Koroner Akut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Idajanti Tandhana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP levels may reflect the severity of ischemia, although there is no necrosis. A transient ischemia which can increase the heart wall stretch would induces BNP synthesis and release. Synthesis and release of BNP are comparable with the severity of ischemia. The aim of this study was to analyze whether NT-proBNP levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS can be used as a predictor for clinical outcome. Studies was held since January to March 2010. Subject were patients with ACS who came to emergency room Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung and were clinically diagnosed according to World Health Organization criteria. Subjects which were suited with the inclusion criteria, stored until assayed. NT-pro BNP concentration was examined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay method along with creatine kinase muscle brain (enzymatic method and cardiac troponin T (quantitative method. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for verifying normality, normally distributed data were analyzed using parametric analysis and abnormal distributed data was assayed using multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the parameters which can be used as predictor for clinical outcome in patients with ACS. Multiple logistic regression analysis on 83 subjects showed predictive value of NT-proBNP levels with OR=1.00, which mean there was no different likelihood in patients with high and low concentration of NT-proBNP to have longer hospitality duration. NT-proBNP β coefficient of 0.001 states that every addition of 1,000 pg/mL of NT-proBNP concentration will increase the length of hospitality duration for one day. On convalesce subjects, the most significant predictive value for predicting clinical outcome cTnT was more better than NT-proBNP concentration in patients with ACS (OR=32.53, 95%CI; 0.58–1,819.26. In conclusions, NT-proBNP is not a major

  3. Cytokine-induced loss of glucocorticoid function: effect of kinase inhibitors, long-acting β(2-adrenoceptor [corrected] agonist and glucocorticoid receptor ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Rider

    Full Text Available Acting on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1, glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, glucocorticoid resistance often leads to suboptimal asthma control. Since glucocorticoid-induced gene expression contributes to glucocorticoid activity, the aim of this study was to use a 2 × glucocorticoid response element (GRE reporter and glucocorticoid-induced gene expression to investigate approaches to combat cytokine-induced glucocorticoid resistance. Pre-treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF or interleukin-1β inhibited dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of the putative anti-inflammatory genes RGS2 and TSC22D3, or just TSC22D3, in primary human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Dexamethasone-induced DUSP1 mRNA was unaffected. In human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, dexamethasone-induced TSC22D3 and CDKN1C expression (at 6 h was reduced by TNF pre-treatment, whereas DUSP1 and RGS2 mRNAs were unaffected. TNF pre-treatment also reduced dexamethasone-dependent 2×GRE reporter activation. This was partially reversed by PS-1145 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK inhibitor VIII, inhibitors of IKK2 and JNK, respectively. However, neither inhibitor affected TNF-dependent loss of dexamethasone-induced CDKN1C or TSC22D3 mRNA. Similarly, inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, phosphoinositide 3-kinase or protein kinase C pathways failed to attenuate TNF-dependent repression of the 2×GRE reporter. Fluticasone furoate, fluticasone propionate and budesonide were full agonists relative to dexamethasone, while GSK9027, RU24858, des-ciclesonide and GW870086X were partial agonists on the 2×GRE reporter. TNF reduced reporter activity in proportion with agonist efficacy. Full and partial agonists showed various degrees of agonism on RGS2 and TSC22D3 expression, but were equally effective at inducing CDKN1C and DUSP1, and did not affect the repression of CDKN1C or TSC22D3

  4. Association of apoptosis with the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase activity in the tumor necrosis factor alpha-resistant ovarian carcinoma cell line UCI 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazlovitskaya, E M; Pelling, J C; Persons, D L

    1999-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) can function as both an autocrine and a paracrine growth factor and may therefore play a role in ovarian tumor progression. TNF alpha initiates multiple cellular responses, many of which are mediated through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which transduce signals from the TNF alpha receptors through the cytoplasm to the nucleus, resulting in regulation of gene expression. We examined the role of c-jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1 and 2 in the cellular growth response to TNF alpha in the ovarian carcinoma cell line UCI 101. JNK1 activity was increased to a maximum level ninefold above the basal level after 10-20 min of treatment with 10 ng/mL TNF alpha. A maximum threefold induction of ERK1/2 activity was observed after 1 min of treatment. At concentrations up to 100 ng/mL, TNF alpha had neither a stimulatory nor an inhibitory effect on growth of UCI 101 cells. However, inhibition of TNF alpha-induced ERK1/2 activity by the MAP/ERK kinase 1 inhibitor PD 98059 resulted in 60% inhibition of cell growth in TNF alpha-treated UCI 101 cells. This decrease in cell growth was accompanied by apoptosis, as demonstrated by the presence of a 180-bp DNA ladder. Thus, the inhibition of TNF alpha-induced ERK1/2 activity was associated with induction of apoptosis in the TNF alpha-resistant cell line UCI 101. Inhibition of TNF alpha-induced ERK1/2 activity was accompanied by a subsequent transient increase in TNF alpha-induced JNK1 activity. The significance of this increase with respect to apoptosis induction remains to be determined. These findings demonstrated that ERK1/2 activity can modulate cellular sensitivity to TNF alpha and suggested that the balance between the levels of ERK1/2 and JNK1 activation may be critical in the cellular growth response to TNF alpha.

  5. Acrolein-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is mediated by alkylation of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Randall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking remains a major health concern worldwide, and many of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke (CS can be attributed to its abundant electrophilic aldehydes, such as acrolein (2-propenal. Previous studies indicate that acrolein readily reacts with thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1, a critical enzyme involved in regulation of thioredoxin (Trx-mediated redox signaling, by alkylation at its selenocysteine (Sec residue. Because alkylation of Sec within TrxR1 has significant implications for its enzymatic function, we explored the potential importance of TrxR1 alkylation in acrolein-induced activation or injury of bronchial epithelial cells. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial HBE1 cells to acrolein (1–30 μM resulted in dose-dependent loss of TrxR thioredoxin reductase activity, which coincided with its alkylation, as determined by biotin hydrazide labeling, and was independent of initial GSH status. To test the involvement of TrxR1 in acrolein responses in HBE1 cells, we suppressed TrxR1 using siRNA silencing or augmented TrxR1 by cell supplementation with sodium selenite. Acrolein exposure of HBE1 cells induced dose-dependent activation of the MAP kinases, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and p38, and activation of JNK was markedly enhanced after selenite-mediated induction of TrxR1, and was associated with increased alkylation of TrxR1. Conversely, siRNA silencing of TrxR1 significantly suppressed the ability of acrolein to activate JNK, and also appeared to attenuate acrolein-dependent activation of ERK and p38. Alteration of initial TrxR1 levels by siRNA or selenite supplementation also affected initial Trx1 redox status and acrolein-mediated alkylation of Trx1, but did not significantly affect acrolein-mediated activation of HO-1 or cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that alkylation of TrxR1 and/or Trx1 may contribute directly to acrolein-mediated activation of MAP kinases

  6. SAR and QSAR studies on the N-terminally acylated pentapeptide agonists for GPR54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Kenji; Oishi, Shinya; Cluzeau, Jérôme; Ohno, Hiroaki; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Wang, Zi-xuan; Peiper, Stephen C; Akamatsu, Miki; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2007-07-12

    Kisspeptins (KPs) play important roles in the regulation of physiological and pathological states through activation of the cognate receptor GPR54. Our previous studies to downsize KP agonists to the essential GPR54 pharmacophore identified peptides 1-3 as low molecular weight GPR54 agonists. In this study, the effect of N-terminal acyl groups on the activity of a series of analogues (R-Phe-Gly-Leu-Arg-Trp-NH2) was investigated in order to develop novel potent GPR54 agonists. Among the compounds developed, the most potent agonistic activity for GPR54 was observed for N-terminal 4-fluorobenzoyl analogue 29. Using quantitative structure-activity relationship studies, it was demonstrated that the inductively negative and small substituents were preferred at the 4-position of N-terminal benzoyl groups.

  7. Functional stabilization of an RNA recognition motif by a noncanonical N-terminal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Catharina; Weber, Gert; Benecke, Heike; Wahl, Markus C

    2009-07-01

    RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) constitute versatile macromolecular interaction platforms. They are found in many components of spliceosomes, in which they mediate RNA and protein interactions by diverse molecular strategies. The human U11/U12-65K protein of the minor spliceosome employs a C-terminal RRM to bind hairpin III of the U12 small nuclear RNA (snRNA). This interaction comprises one side of a molecular bridge between the U11 and U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) and is reminiscent of the binding of the N-terminal RRMs in the major spliceosomal U1A and U2B'' proteins to hairpins in their cognate snRNAs. Here we show by mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that the beta-sheet surface and a neighboring loop of 65K C-terminal RRM are involved in RNA binding, as previously seen in canonical RRMs like the N-terminal RRMs of the U1A and U2B'' proteins. However, unlike U1A and U2B'', some 30 residues N-terminal of the 65K C-terminal RRM core are additionally required for stable U12 snRNA binding. The crystal structure of the expanded 65K C-terminal RRM revealed that the N-terminal tail adopts an alpha-helical conformation and wraps around the protein toward the face opposite the RNA-binding platform. Point mutations in this part of the protein had only minor effects on RNA affinity. Removal of the N-terminal extension significantly decreased the thermal stability of the 65K C-terminal RRM. These results demonstrate that the 65K C-terminal RRM is augmented by an N-terminal element that confers stability to the domain, and thereby facilitates stable RNA binding.

  8. Kinetic and stoichiometric analysis of the modification process for N-terminal PEGylation of staphylokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Tao; Liu, Yongdong; Zhang, Guifeng; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2011-05-01

    Staphylokinase (SAK) is a therapeutic protein with promise for thrombolytic therapy of acute myocardial infarction. In this study, polyethylene glycol (PEG) aldehyde was used for N-terminal PEGylation of SAK to improve the pharmacological profiles of SAK. Due to the presence of the competitive PEGylation between the N terminus and the Lys residues, kinetic and stoichiometric analysis was carried out to investigate the process for the N-terminal PEGylation of SAK. To achieve this objective, size exclusion chromatography and tryptic peptide mapping were used to measure the PEGylation extent of SAK molecule and its specific amino acid residues, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Apoptosis induction by Bid requires unconventional ubiquitination and degradation of its N-terminal fragment

    OpenAIRE

    Tait, Stephen W.G.; de Vries, Evert; Maas, Chiel; Keller, Anna M.; D'Santos, Clive S.; Borst, Jannie

    2007-01-01

    Bcl-2 family member Bid is subject to autoinhibition; in the absence of stimuli, its N-terminal region sequesters the proapoptotic Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domain. Upon proteolytic cleavage in its unstructured loop, Bid is activated, although structural data reveal no apparent resulting conformational change. We found that, upon Bid cleavage, the N-terminal fragment (tBid-N) is ubiquitinated and degraded, thus freeing the BH3 domain in the C-terminal fragment (tBid-C). Ubiquitination of tBid-N ...

  10. Roles of PI3K/Akt and c-Jun signaling pathways in human papillomavirus type 16 oncoprotein-induced HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8 expression and in vitro angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erying Zhang

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV-16 infection may be related to non-smoking associated lung cancer. Our previous studies have found that HPV-16 oncoproteins promoted angiogenesis via enhancing hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and interleukin-8 (IL-8 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. In this study, we further investigated the roles of PI3K/Akt and c-Jun signaling pathways in it.Human NSCLC cell lines, A549 and NCI-H460, were stably transfected with pEGFP-16 E6 or E7 plasmids. Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression of HIF-1α, p-Akt, p-P70S6K, p-P85S6K, p-mTOR, p-JNK, and p-c-Jun proteins. VEGF and IL-8 protein secretion and mRNA levels were determined by ELISA and Real-time PCR, respectively. The in vitro angiogenesis was observed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs tube formation assay. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to analyze the interaction between c-Jun and HIF-1α.HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins promoted the activation of Akt, P70S6K, P85S6K, mTOR, JNK, and c-Jun. LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, inhibited HPV-16 oncoprotein-induced activation of Akt, P70S6K, and P85S6K, expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8, and in vitro angiogenesis. c-Jun knockdown by specific siRNA abolished HPV-16 oncoprotein-induced HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8 expression and in vitro angiogenesis. Additionally, HPV-16 oncoproteins promoted HIF-1α protein stability via blocking proteasome degradation pathway, but c-Jun knockdown abrogated this effect. Furthermore, HPV-16 oncoproteins increased the quantity of c-Jun binding to HIF-1α.PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and c-Jun are involved in HPV-16 oncoprotein-induced HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8 expression and in vitro angiogenesis. Moreover, HPV-16 oncoproteins promoted HIF-1α protein stability possibly through enhancing the interaction between c-Jun and HIF-1α, thus making a contribution to angiogenesis in NSCLC cells.

  11. N-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide in serum associated with bone destruction in patients with multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylin, Anne K; Goetze, Jens P; Heickendorff, Lene

    2015-01-01

    evaluated at specific time-points. RESULTS: N-terminal proCNP concentrations increased with age. High N-terminal proCNP concentrations were associated with high-risk disease and renal impairment. Renal function explained 22% of the variation. N-terminal proCNP concentrations correlated with serum bone ALP...... and serum PINP, but lacked association with bone resorption markers, radiographic bone disease and skeletal-related events. CONCLUSION: Serum N-terminal proCNP are associated with bone formation activity in patients with multiple myeloma, but should be interpreted with caution in patients with renal...

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of N-terminal peptides from a nucleotide binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spoel, D.; Vogel, H.J.; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of N-terminal peptides from lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) with increasing length and individual secondary structure elements were used to study their stability in relation to folding, Ten simulations of 1-2 ns of different peptides in water starting from the

  13. BNP and N-terminal proBNP are both extracted in the normal kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, J P; Jensen, G; Møller, S

    2006-01-01

    therefore examined the renal and peripheral extraction of N-terminal proBNP and BNP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study comprised 18 patients with essential arterial hypertension, 51 with cirrhosis, and 18 control patients without kidney or liver disease. All patients underwent a haemodynamic investigation...

  14. BNP and N-terminal proBNP are both extracted in the normal kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    therefore examined the renal and peripheral extraction of N-terminal proBNP and BNP. Materials and methods The study comprised 18 patients with essential arterial hypertension, 51 with cirrhosis, and 18 control patients without kidney or liver disease. All patients underwent a haemodynamic investigation...

  15. N-terminal PDZ-like domain of chromatin organizer SATB1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and high affinity binding of MARs (Dickinson et al. 1997;. Purbey et al. 2008). Cleavage of SATB1 during T cell apoptosis at position 254 by caspase 6 causes detachment of. SATB1 from the chromatin (Galande et al. 2001). This observation resulted in the identification of an oligomerization domain in the N-terminal of ...

  16. Diagnostic Usefulness of N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) is useful in the diagnosis and management of adult patients with heart failure. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the usefulness of NT-proBNP in diagnosing congestive heart failure (CHF) in children and its correlation with left ...

  17. Modulation of mutant huntingtin N-terminal cleavage and its effect on aggregation and cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juenemann, Katrin; Weisse, Christina; Reichmann, Denise; Kaether, Christoph; Calkhoven, Cornelis F.; Schilling, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion near the N-terminus of huntingtin. A neuropathological hallmark of Huntington's disease is the presence of intracellular aggregates composed of mutant huntingtin N-terminal fragments in human postmortem

  18. The influence of the N-terminal region of antimicrobial peptide pleurocidin on fungal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-10-28

    In our previous study, the 25-mer antimicrobial peptide pleurocidin (Ple) had been thought to induce apoptosis in Candida albicans. This study demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was a major cause of Ple-induced apoptosis. Four truncated analogs were synthesized to understand the functional roles in the N- and C-terminal regions of Ple on the apoptosis. Ple, Ple (4-25), Ple (1-22), and Ple (1-19) produced ROS, including hydroxyl radicals, on the order of [Ple > Ple (1-22) > Ple (4-25) > Ple (1-19)], whereas Ple (7-25) did not induce any ROS production. The results suggested that the N-terminal deletion affected the ROS-inducing activities much more than that of the C-terminal deletion, and net hydrophobicity [Ple > Ple (1-22) > Ple (4-25) > Ple (1-19) > Ple (7-25)] was related to ROS generation rather than other primary factors like net charge. Hence, we focused on the N-terminal-truncated peptides, Ple (4-25) and Ple (7-25), and examined other apoptotic features, including mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The results also confirmed the disappearance of apoptotic activity of Ple (7-25) by the truncation of the N-terminal region (1-6) and the specific activity patterns between Ple and analogs. In conclusion, the N-terminal region of Ple played an important role in apoptosis.

  19. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Sheila G. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Grupo de Biofisica e Fisica Aplicada a Medicina, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, C.P. 131, 74001-970, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Cristina Nonato, M. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia de Proteinas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe S/N, 14040-903, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Costa-Filho, Antonio J., E-mail: ajcosta@ffclrp.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  20. N-terminal truncation mutations of adenomatous polyposis coli are associated with primary cilia defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Jia, Yuxin; Zhu, Wensi; Newton, Ian P; Li, Zhuoyu; Li, Wenling

    2014-10-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is a tumor suppressor gene and its truncated mutations cause a few cilia-related diseases such as Gardner's syndrome. However, little is known about the mechanism that links APC mutations and cilia disorder. APC mutations lead to the expression of N-terminal fragments, which have dominant effects in tumors owing to loss of the C-terminal region or a gain of function. The present study investigated the impact of tumor-associated N-terminal APC fragments on primary cilia assembly and the possible molecular mechanism involved. We discovered that expression of tumor-associated N-terminal APC fragments (APC-N, APC-N1, APC-N2, and APC-N3, which contain amino acids 1-1018, 1-448, 449-781, and 782-1018 respectively), resulted in primary cilia defects. We found that a β-catenin/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β feedback signal cascade is responsible for causing N-terminal APC fragment-induced cilia defects. In this cascade, dysfunctions of both β-catenin and GSK-3β were involved in the up-regulation of HDAC6 and subsequent decreased acetylated tubulin levels, which thereby led to cilia defects. These data suggest a mechanism for linking N-terminal APC fragments and cilia loss, thus accelerating our understanding of human cilia-related diseases such as Gardner's syndrome and their cause due to APC mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy: The role of troponins and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaperta, Rea; De Siena, Claudia; Cardani, Rosanna; Lombardia, Fortunata; Cenko, Edina; Rampoldi, Benedetta; Fossati, Barbara; Brigonzi, Elisa; Rigolini, Roberta; Gaia, Paola; Meola, Giovanni; Costa, Elena; Bugiardini, Raffaele

    2017-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2) are dominant inherited muscular dystrophies with multiple systemic involvement, often producing cardiac injury. This study sought to determine the clinical significance of elevated high sensitivity cardiac troponin T and I (hs-cTnT and hs-cTnI), and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in this population. Sixty DM patients (35 men and 25 women; mean age: 45.1 years, range: 12-73 years) underwent clinical cardiac investigations and measurements of serum hs-cTnT, hs-cTnI, creatine kinase (CK), and NT-proBNP. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was assessed by echocardiography. Genetic analysis revealed that 46 of the 60 patients were DM1, and 14 DM2. Blood measurements showed persistent elevation of hs-cTnT and CK in 55/60 DM patients (91.73%). In contrast, hs-cTnI values were persistently normal throughout the study. Only 2 patients showed an EF 125 pg/mL was an independent predictor of ECG abnormalities. NT-pro-BNP levels may be considered to be used clinically to identify DM patients at increased risk of developing myocardial conduction abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karaca

    Full Text Available Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  3. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Mehmet; Liu, Yuanbo; Zhang, Zhentao; De Silva, Dinuka; Parker, Joel S; Earp, H Shelton; Whang, Young E

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  4. Phosphorylation of Icariin Can Alleviate the Oxidative Stress Caused by the Duck Hepatitis Virus A through Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Xiong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The duck virus hepatitis (DVH caused by the duck hepatitis virus A (DHAV has produced extensive economic losses to the duck industry. The currently licensed commercial vaccine has shown some defects and does not completely prevent the DVH. Accordingly, a new alternative treatment for this disease is urgently needed. Previous studies have shown that icariin (ICA and its phosphorylated derivative (pICA possessed good anti-DHAV effects through direct and indirect antiviral pathways, such as antioxidative stress. But the antioxidant activity showed some differences between ICA and pICA. The aim of this study is to prove that ICA and pICA attenuate oxidative stress caused by DHAV in vitro and in vivo, and to investigate their mechanism of action to explain their differences in antioxidant activities. In vivo, the dynamic deaths, oxidative evaluation indexes and hepatic pathological change scores were detected. When was added the hinokitiol which showed the pro-oxidative effect as an intervention method, pICA still possessed more treatment effect than ICA. The strong correlation between mortality and oxidative stress proves that ICA and pICA alleviate oxidative stress caused by DHAV. This was also demonstrated by the addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as an intervention method in vitro. pICA can be more effective than ICA to improve duck embryonic hepatocytes (DEHs viability and reduce the virulence of DHAV. The strong correlation between TCID50 and oxidative stress demonstrates that ICA and pICA can achieve anti-DHAV effects by inhibiting oxidative stress. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px of ICA and pICA showed significant difference. pICA could significantly inhibit the phosphorylation of p38, extra cellular signal regulated Kinase (ERK 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, which were related to mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs signaling pathways. Ultimately, compared to ICA, pICA exhibited more

  5. Phosphorylation of Icariin Can Alleviate the Oxidative Stress Caused by the Duck Hepatitis Virus A through Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen; Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Wenjuan; Du, Hongxu; Ming, Ke; Yao, Fangke; Bai, Jingying; Chen, Yun; Liu, Jiaguo; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Wu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The duck virus hepatitis (DVH) caused by the duck hepatitis virus A (DHAV) has produced extensive economic losses to the duck industry. The currently licensed commercial vaccine has shown some defects and does not completely prevent the DVH. Accordingly, a new alternative treatment for this disease is urgently needed. Previous studies have shown that icariin (ICA) and its phosphorylated derivative (pICA) possessed good anti-DHAV effects through direct and indirect antiviral pathways, such as antioxidative stress. But the antioxidant activity showed some differences between ICA and pICA. The aim of this study is to prove that ICA and pICA attenuate oxidative stress caused by DHAV in vitro and in vivo, and to investigate their mechanism of action to explain their differences in antioxidant activities. In vivo, the dynamic deaths, oxidative evaluation indexes and hepatic pathological change scores were detected. When was added the hinokitiol which showed the pro-oxidative effect as an intervention method, pICA still possessed more treatment effect than ICA. The strong correlation between mortality and oxidative stress proves that ICA and pICA alleviate oxidative stress caused by DHAV. This was also demonstrated by the addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an intervention method in vitro. pICA can be more effective than ICA to improve duck embryonic hepatocytes (DEHs) viability and reduce the virulence of DHAV. The strong correlation between TCID50 and oxidative stress demonstrates that ICA and pICA can achieve anti-DHAV effects by inhibiting oxidative stress. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of ICA and pICA showed significant difference. pICA could significantly inhibit the phosphorylation of p38, extra cellular signal regulated Kinase (ERK 1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which were related to mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathways. Ultimately, compared to ICA, pICA exhibited more

  6. Phosphorylation of Icariin Can Alleviate the Oxidative Stress Caused by the Duck Hepatitis Virus A through Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen; Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Wenjuan; Du, Hongxu; Ming, Ke; Yao, Fangke; Bai, Jingying; Chen, Yun; Liu, Jiaguo; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Wu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The duck virus hepatitis (DVH) caused by the duck hepatitis virus A (DHAV) has produced extensive economic losses to the duck industry. The currently licensed commercial vaccine has shown some defects and does not completely prevent the DVH. Accordingly, a new alternative treatment for this disease is urgently needed. Previous studies have shown that icariin (ICA) and its phosphorylated derivative (pICA) possessed good anti-DHAV effects through direct and indirect antiviral pathways, such as antioxidative stress. But the antioxidant activity showed some differences between ICA and pICA. The aim of this study is to prove that ICA and pICA attenuate oxidative stress caused by DHAV in vitro and in vivo, and to investigate their mechanism of action to explain their differences in antioxidant activities. In vivo, the dynamic deaths, oxidative evaluation indexes and hepatic pathological change scores were detected. When was added the hinokitiol which showed the pro-oxidative effect as an intervention method, pICA still possessed more treatment effect than ICA. The strong correlation between mortality and oxidative stress proves that ICA and pICA alleviate oxidative stress caused by DHAV. This was also demonstrated by the addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an intervention method in vitro. pICA can be more effective than ICA to improve duck embryonic hepatocytes (DEHs) viability and reduce the virulence of DHAV. The strong correlation between TCID50 and oxidative stress demonstrates that ICA and pICA can achieve anti-DHAV effects by inhibiting oxidative stress. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of ICA and pICA showed significant difference. pICA could significantly inhibit the phosphorylation of p38, extra cellular signal regulated Kinase (ERK 1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which were related to mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathways. Ultimately, compared to ICA, pICA exhibited more

  7. Analysis of the role of the coat protein N-terminal segment in Potato virus X virion stability and functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashina, Elena; Ksenofontov, Alexander; Fedorova, Natalia; Badun, Gennady; Mukhamedzhanova, Anna; Karpova, Olga; Rodionova, Nina; Baratova, Lyudmila; Dobrov, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that intact Potato virus X (PVX) virions cannot be translated in cell-free systems, but acquire this capacity by the binding of PVX-specific triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) or after phosphorylation of the exposed N-terminal segment of intravirus coat protein (CP) by protein kinases. With the help of in vitro mutagenesis, a nonphosphorylatable PVX mutant (denoted ST PVX) was prepared in which all 12 S and T residues in the 20-residue-long N-terminal CP segment were substituted by A or G. Contrary to expectations, ST PVX was infectious, produced normal progeny and was translated in vitro in the absence of any additional factors. We suggest that the N-terminal PVX CP segment somehow participates in virion assembly in vivo and that CP subunits in ST virions may differ in structure from those in the wild-type (UK3 strain). In the present work, to test this suggestion, we performed a comparative tritium planigraphy study of CP structure in UK3 and ST virions. It was found that the profile of tritium incorporation into ST mutant virions in some CP segments differed from that of normal UK3 virions and from UK3 complexed with the PVX movement protein TGBp1. It is proposed that amino acid substitutions in ST CP and the TGBp1-driven remodelling of UK3 virions induce structural alterations in intravirus CPs. These alterations affect the predicted RNA recognition motif of PVX CP, but in different ways: for ST PVX, labelling is increased in α-helices 6 and 7, whereas, in remodelled UK3, labelling is increased in the β-sheet strands β3, β4 and β5. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2011 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  8. Cyclization of the N-Terminal X-Asn-Gly Motif during Sample Preparation for Bottom-Up Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We, herein, report a novel -17 Da peptide modification corresponding to an N-terminal cyclization of peptides possessing the N-terminal motif of X-Asn-Gly. The cyclization occurs spontaneously during sample preparation for bottom-up proteomics studies. Distinct from the two well-known N...

  9. Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin binds to target cells via the N-terminal 30 amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Ohnishi, Shinya; Kamitani, Shigeki; Abe, Hiroyuki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2011-03-01

    Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin (DNT) affects the biological function of host cells by activating intracellular Rho GTPases. The toxin binds to unidentified receptor(s) via 54 N-terminal amino acids, undergoes intramolecular cleavage on the C-terminal side of Arg(44) by furin or furin-like protease, and eventually enters the cytoplasm where the Rho GTPases reside. The binding to the receptor(s) and intramolecular cleavage are essential for DNT to intoxicate cells, and the 54 amino-acid binding domain encompasses the cleavage site, however, it is unclear whether these two events are related. In this study, we could narrow down the cell-binding domain to the N-terminal amino acids 2-30. The region does not contain the furin-recognition site, indicating that the cell binding and the intramolecular cleavage are independent events. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Resin-assisted Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing Proteolytic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seo; Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Baker, Scott E.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-06-17

    Proteolytic processing is a ubiquitous, irreversible posttranslational modification that plays an important role in cellular regulation in all living organisms. Herein we report a resin-assisted positive selection method for specifically enriching protein N-terminal peptides to facilitate the characterization of proteolytic processing events by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In this approach, proteins are initially reduced and alkylated and their lysine residues are converted to homoarginines. Then, protein N-termini are selectively converted to reactive thiol groups. We demonstrate that these sequential reactions were achieved with nearly quantitative efficiencies. Thiol-containing N-terminal peptides are then captured (>98% efficiency) by a thiol-affinity resin, a significant improvement over the traditional avidin/biotin enrichment. Application to cell lysates of Aspergillus niger, a filamentous fungus of interest for biomass degradation, enabled the identification of 1672 unique protein N-termini and proteolytic cleavage sites from 690 unique proteins.

  11. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A; Duggan, Brendan M; Marcotte, William R; Hennig, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35-40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes.

  12. Acute effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Hansen, Carsten P; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2017-01-01

    of progastrin fragment 1-35 were infused intravenously during constant gastric acid stimulation by gastrin-17. In addition, the effects of progastrin fragment 1-35, fragment 6-35, and fragment 1-19 on gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion were tested. The gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion decreased 30% after...... administration of a high dose of progastrin fragment 1-35 (P gastrin-17 alone did not reveal fading of gastric acid output during the time...... course of the experiments. The results show that N-terminal fragments of progastrin may acutely affect gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in vivo. Structure-function analysis suggests that the N-terminal pentapeptide of progastrin is required for the effect....

  13. N-Terminal acetylation is critical for forming α-helical oligomer of α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Adam J; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    The aggregation of the protein α-synuclein (AS) is critical to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Although generally described as an unstructured monomer, recent evidence suggests that the native form of AS may be an α-helical tetramer which resists aggregation. Here, we show that N-terminal acetylation in combination with a mild purification protocol results in an oligomeric form of AS with partial α-helical structure. N-terminal acetylation of AS could have important implications for both the native and pathological structures and functions of AS. Through our demonstration of a recombinant expression system, our results represent an important step toward biochemical and biophysical characterization of this potentially important form of AS. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  14. The basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 limits recombination endonuclease action at human telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Koelblen, Melanie; Civitelli, Livia; Bah, Amadou; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The stability of mammalian telomeres depends upon TRF2, which prevents inappropriate repair and checkpoint activation. By using a plasmid integration assay in yeasts carrying humanized telomeres, we demonstrated that TRF2 possesses the intrinsic property to both stimulate initial homologous recombination events and to prevent their resolution via its basic N-terminal domain. In human cells, we further showed that this TRF2 domain prevents telomere shortening mediated by the resolvase-associated protein SLX4 as well as GEN1 and MUS81, 2 different types of endonucleases with resolvase activities. We propose that various types of resolvase activities are kept in check by the basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 in order to favor an accurate repair of the stalled forks that occur during telomere replication.

  15. N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide during pharmacological heart rate reduction in hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, M; Kistorp, C; Corell, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that elevated N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels in hyperthyroidism are mainly driven by increased metabolism due to excess thyroid hormones. Therefore, serum levels of N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide were studied during reduced cardiac work load by means...... of pharmacologically induced heart rate reduction in untreated hyperthyroidism. We designed a noncontrolled interventional study. Eighteen women with newly diagnosed hyperthyroidism were evaluated (including an echocardiography) before and after pharmacological heart rate reduction with 360 mg verapamil daily for 6......-index decreased from median 319 to 315 arbitrary units (p=0.039) and free triiodothyronine-index increased from 8.6 to 9.9 arbitrary units (p=0.010). No changes in echocardiographic parameters were observed. A decrease in resting heart rate in untreated hyperthyroidism due to verapamil treatment did not result...

  16. N-terminal Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: a measure of significant patent cuctus arteriosus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OFarombi-Oghuvbu, IO

    2008-01-24

    Background: B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a marker for ventricular dysfunction secreted as a pre-prohormone, Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (ProBNP), and cleaved into BNP and a biologically inactive fragment, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Little is known about the clinical usefulness of NT-proBNP in preterm infants.\\r\

  17. Bordetella effector BopN is translocated into host cells via its N-terminal residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Akio; Nishimura, Ryutaro; Kuwae, Asaomi

    2017-06-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica infects a wide variety of mammals, the type III secretion system (T3SS) being involved in long-term colonization by Bordetella of the trachea and lung. T3SS translocates virulence factors (commonly referred to as effectors) into host cells, leading to alterations in the host's physiological function. The Bordetella effectors BopN and BteA are known to have roles in up-regulation of IL-10 and cytotoxicity, respectively. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which BopN is translocated into host cells has not been examined in sufficient detail. Therefore, to determine the precise mechanisms of translocation of BopN into host cells, truncated derivatives of BopN were built and the derivatives' ability to translocate into host cells evaluated by adenylate cyclase-mediated translocation assay. It was found that N-terminal amino acid (aa) residues 1-200 of BopN are sufficient for its translocation into host cells. Interestingly, BopN translocation was completely blocked by deletion of the N-terminal aa residues 6-50, indicating that the N-terminal region is critical for BopN translocation. Furthermore, BopN appears to play an auxiliary role in BteA-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, BopN can apparently translocate into host cells and may facilitate activity of BteA. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  19. Deciphering the Roles of the Histone H2B N-Terminal Domain in Genome-Wide Transcription†

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Michael A.; Kerr, David; Fahy, Deirdre; Pouchnik, Derek J; Wyrick, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Histone N-terminal domains are frequent targets of posttranslational modifications. Multiple acetylated lysine residues have been identified in the N-terminal domain of H2B (K6, K11, K16, K17, K21, and K22), but little is known about how these modifications regulate transcription. We systematically mutated the N-terminal domain of histone H2B, both at known sites of lysine acetylation and elsewhere, and characterized the resulting changes in genome-wide expression in each mutant strain. Our r...

  20. Blockade of adenosine A2A receptors prevents interleukin-1β-induced exacerbation of neuronal toxicity through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simões Ana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR affords robust neuroprotection in a number of brain conditions, although the mechanisms are still unknown. A likely candidate mechanism for this neuroprotection is the control of neuroinflammation, which contributes to the amplification of neurodegeneration, mainly through the abnormal release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin(IL-1β. We investigated whether A2AR controls the signaling of IL-1β and its deleterious effects in cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods Hippocampal neuronal cultures were treated with IL-1β and/or glutamate in the presence or absence of the selective A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nmol/l. The effect of SCH58261 on the IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 was evaluated by western blotting and immunocytochemistry. The effect of SCH58261 on glutamate-induced neurodegeneration in the presence or absence of IL-1β was evaluated by nucleic acid and by propidium iodide staining, and by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Finally, the effect of A2AR blockade on glutamate-induced intracellular calcium, in the presence or absence of IL-1β, was studied using single-cell calcium imaging. Results IL-1β (10 to 100 ng/ml enhanced both JNK and p38 phosphorylation, and these effects were prevented by the IL-1 type 1 receptor antagonist IL-1Ra (5 μg/ml, in accordance with the neuronal localization of IL-1 type 1 receptors, including pre-synaptically and post-synaptically. At 100 ng/ml, IL-1β failed to affect neuronal viability but exacerbated the neurotoxicity induced by treatment with 100 μmol/l glutamate for 25 minutes (evaluated after 24 hours. It is likely that this resulted from the ability of IL-1β to enhance glutamate-induced calcium entry and late calcium deregulation, both of which were unaffected by IL-1β alone. The selective A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nmol

  1. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186

  2. Molecular determinants of the N-terminal acetyltransferase Naa60 anchoring to the Golgi membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksnes, Henriette; Goris, Marianne; Strømland, Øyvind; Drazic, Adrian; Waheed, Qaiser; Reuter, Nathalie; Arnesen, Thomas

    2017-04-21

    Nα-Acetyltransferase 60 (Naa60 or NatF) was recently identified as an unconventional N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) because it localizes to organelles, in particular the Golgi apparatus, and has a preference for acetylating N termini of the transmembrane proteins. This knowledge challenged the prevailing view of N-terminal acetylation as a co-translational ribosome-associated process and suggested a new mechanistic functioning for the enzymes responsible for this increasingly recognized protein modification. Crystallography studies on Naa60 were unable to resolve the C-terminal tail of Naa60, which is responsible for the organellar localization. Here, we combined modeling, in vitro assays, and cellular localization studies to investigate the secondary structure and membrane interacting capacity of Naa60. The results show that Naa60 is a peripheral membrane protein. Two amphipathic helices within the Naa60 C terminus bind the membrane directly in a parallel position relative to the lipid bilayer via hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. A peptide corresponding to the C terminus was unstructured in solution and only folded into an α-helical conformation in the presence of liposomes. Computational modeling and cellular mutational analysis revealed the hydrophobic face of two α-helices to be critical for membranous localization. Furthermore, we found a strong and specific binding preference of Naa60 toward membranes containing the phosphatidylinositol PI(4)P, thus possibly explaining the primary residency of Naa60 at the PI(4)P-rich Golgi. In conclusion, we have defined the mode of cytosolic Naa60 anchoring to the Golgi apparatus, most likely occurring post-translationally and specifically facilitating post-translational N-terminal acetylation of many transmembrane proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments, vasoinhibins, are proapoptoptic and antiproliferative in the anterior pituitary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Ferraris

    Full Text Available The anterior pituitary is under a constant cell turnover modulated by gonadal steroids. In the rat, an increase in the rate of apoptosis occurs at proestrus whereas a peak of proliferation takes place at estrus. At proestrus, concomitant with the maximum rate of apoptosis, a peak in circulating levels of prolactin is observed. Prolactin can be cleaved to different N-terminal fragments, vasoinhibins, which are proapoptotic and antiproliferative factors for endothelial cells. It was reported that a 16 kDa vasoinhibin is produced in the rat anterior pituitary by cathepsin D. In the present study we investigated the anterior pituitary production of N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments along the estrous cycle and the involvement of estrogens in this process. In addition, we studied the effects of a recombinant vasoinhibin, 16 kDa prolactin, on anterior pituitary apoptosis and proliferation. We observed by Western Blot that N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments production in the anterior pituitary was higher at proestrus with respect to diestrus and that the content and release of these prolactin forms from anterior pituitary cells in culture were increased by estradiol. A recombinant preparation of 16 kDa prolactin induced apoptosis (determined by TUNEL assay and flow cytometry of cultured anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes from ovariectomized rats only in the presence of estradiol, as previously reported for other proapoptotic factors in the anterior pituitary. In addition, 16 kDa prolactin decreased forskolin-induced proliferation (evaluated by BrdU incorporation of rat total anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes in culture and decreased the proportion of cells in S-phase of the cell cycle (determined by flow cytometry. In conclusion, our study indicates that the anterior pituitary production of 16 kDa prolactin is variable along the estrous cycle and increased by estrogens. The antiproliferative and estradiol-dependent proapoptotic

  4. Molecular mechanism of regulation of the atypical protein kinase C by N-terminal domains and an allosteric small compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hua; Neimanis, Sonja; Lopez-Garcia, Laura A

    2014-01-01

    provide structural evidence that the small compound PS315 is an allosteric inhibitor that binds to the PIF-pocket of aPKC. PS315 exploits the physiological dynamics of helix αC for its binding and allosteric inhibition. The results will support research on allosteric mechanisms and selective drug...

  5. N-terminal acetylation by NatC is not a general determinant for substrate subcellular localization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette Aksnes

    Full Text Available N-terminal acetylation has been suggested to play a role in the subcellular targeting of proteins, in particular those acetylated by the N-terminal acetyltransferase complex NatC. Based on previous positional proteomics data revealing N-terminal acetylation status and the predicted NAT substrate classes, we selected 13 suitable NatC substrates for subcellular localization studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of GFP-tagged candidates in the presence or absence of the NatC catalytic subunit Naa30 (Mak3 revealed unaltered localization patterns for all 13 candidates, thus arguing against a general role for the N-terminal acetyl group as a localization determinant. Furthermore, all organelle-localized substrates indicated undisrupted structures, thus suggesting that absence of NatC acetylation does not have a vast effect on organelle morphology in yeast.

  6. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Clara Jana-Lui; Vogt, Alexander; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-07-13

    Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena.

  7. Proteinase K processing of rabbit muscle creatine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leydier, C; Andersen, Jens S.; Couthon, F

    1997-01-01

    of monomer cleavage. N-terminal sequencing of the K2 fragments from rabbit cytosolic and pig mitochondrial creatine kinase shows that these peptides begin with A328 and A324, respectively. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry demonstrates that K2 peptide is composed of 53 residues (A328-K380). However...

  8. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena

    OpenAIRE

    Mochizuki Kazufumi; Vogt Alexander; Busch Clara

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. Results In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymen...

  9. In Silico Identification and Characterization of N-Terminal Acetyltransferase Genes of Poplar (Populus trichocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-Yong Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nats complex is responsible for protein N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation, which is one of the most common covalent modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although genome-wide investigation and characterization of Nat catalytic subunits (CS and auxiliary subunits (AS have been conducted in yeast and humans they remain unexplored in plants. Here we report on the identification of eleven genes encoding eleven putative Nat CS polypeptides, and five genes encoding five putative Nat AS polypeptides in Populus. We document that the expansion of Nat CS genes occurs as duplicated blocks distributed across 10 of the 19 poplar chromosomes, likely only as a result of segmental duplication events. Based on phylogenetic analysis, poplar Nat CS were assigned to six subgroups, which corresponded well to the Nat CS types (CS of Nat A–F, being consistent with previous reports in humans and yeast. In silico analysis of microarray data showed that in the process of normal development of the poplar, their Nat CS and AS genes are commonly expressed at one relatively low level but share distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. This exhaustive survey of Nat genes in poplar provides important information to assist future studies on their functional role in poplar.

  10. N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma suggests covalent modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The N-terminal fragment of cardiac-derived pro–B-type natriuretic peptide is a glycosylated polypeptide. It is unknown whether N-terminal pro–atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) fragments are also covalently modified. We therefore evaluated the clinical performance of 2 distinctly...... different proANP assays on clinical outcome. METHODS: We examined 474 elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure presenting in a primary healthcare setting. Samples were analyzed with an automated immunoluminometric midregion proANP (MR-proANP) assay and a new processing-independent assay (PIA...... proANP than the MR-proANP assay (mean difference, 663 pmol/L; SD, 478 pmol/L). In contrast, the clinical performances of the 2 assays [as assessed by the area under the ROC curve (AUC)] in detecting left ventricular dysfunction were similar [proANP PIA, 0.71 (95% CI, 0.63–0.79); MR-proANP assay, 0...

  11. In silico identification and characterization of N-Terminal acetyltransferase genes of poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hang-Yong; Li, Chun-Ming; Wang, Li-Feng; Bai, Hui; Li, Yan-Ping; Yu, Wen-Xi; Xia, De-An; Liu, Chang-Cai

    2014-01-27

    N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nats) complex is responsible for protein N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation), which is one of the most common covalent modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although genome-wide investigation and characterization of Nat catalytic subunits (CS) and auxiliary subunits (AS) have been conducted in yeast and humans they remain unexplored in plants. Here we report on the identification of eleven genes encoding eleven putative Nat CS polypeptides, and five genes encoding five putative Nat AS polypeptides in Populus. We document that the expansion of Nat CS genes occurs as duplicated blocks distributed across 10 of the 19 poplar chromosomes, likely only as a result of segmental duplication events. Based on phylogenetic analysis, poplar Nat CS were assigned to six subgroups, which corresponded well to the Nat CS types (CS of Nat A-F), being consistent with previous reports in humans and yeast. In silico analysis of microarray data showed that in the process of normal development of the poplar, their Nat CS and AS genes are commonly expressed at one relatively low level but share distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. This exhaustive survey of Nat genes in poplar provides important information to assist future studies on their functional role in poplar.

  12. Isolation and N-terminal sequencing of a novel cadmium-binding protein from Boletus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Hansen, C.; Andersen, R. A.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    A Cd-binding protein was isolated from the popular edible mushroom Boletus edulis, which is a hyperaccumulator of both Cd and Hg. Wild-growing samples of B. edulis were collected from soils rich in Cd. Cd radiotracer was added to the crude protein preparation obtained from ethanol precipitation of heat-treated cytosol. Proteins were then further separated in two consecutive steps; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. In both steps the Cd radiotracer profile showed only one distinct peak, which corresponded well with the profiles of endogenous Cd obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Concentrations of the essential elements Cu and Zn were low in the protein fractions high in Cd. N-terminal sequencing performed on the Cd-binding protein fractions revealed a protein with a novel amino acid sequence, which contained aromatic amino acids as well as proline. Both the N-terminal sequencing and spectrofluorimetric analysis with EDTA and ABD-F (4-aminosulfonyl-7-fluoro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole) failed to detect cysteine in the Cd-binding fractions. These findings conclude that the novel protein does not belong to the metallothionein family. The results suggest a role for the protein in Cd transport and storage, and they are of importance in view of toxicology and food chemistry, but also for environmental protection.

  13. Contribution of histone N-terminal tails to the structure and stability of nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Wakana; Miya, Yuta; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takehiko; Kagawa, Wataru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Histones are the protein components of the nucleosome, which forms the basic architecture of eukaryotic chromatin. Histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 are composed of two common regions, the "histone fold" and the "histone tail". Many efforts have been focused on the mechanisms by which the post-translational modifications of histone tails regulate the higher-order chromatin architecture. On the other hand, previous biochemical studies have suggested that histone tails also affect the structure and stability of the nucleosome core particle itself. However, the precise contributions of each histone tail are unclear. In the present study, we determined the crystal structures of four mutant nucleosomes, in which one of the four histones, H2A, H2B, H3, or H4, lacked the N-terminal tail. We found that the deletion of the H2B or H3 N-terminal tail affected histone-DNA interactions and substantially decreased nucleosome stability. These findings provide important information for understanding the complex roles of histone tails in regulating chromatin structure.

  14. Isolated ZP-N domains constitute the N-terminal extensions of Zona Pellucida proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Monget, Philippe

    2007-08-01

    Zona Pellucida (ZP) domains have been found in a wide variety of extracellular proteins, in which they play essential role for polymerization. They are shared by the ZP proteins, which constitute the extracellular coat of animal eggs. Except from ZP3, constituting the primary sperm receptor, the ZP proteins possess, in addition to their C-terminal ZP domains, N-terminal extensions, which are thought to play an important role in the species-specific gamete recognition. Here, we show that these extensions are made of single or multiple copies of a small globular domain, which can be significantly related to the N-terminal region of ZP domains (ZP-N domains). This finding brings new insights into the molecular evolution of ZP proteins, which may have evolved around a common ZP-N architecture, and more generally into the noticeable sequence diversity of ZP-N domains, which can be found as isolated subunits or tightly associated with ZP-C domains to form complete, canonical ZP domains.

  15. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 remodels HORMA domains through N-terminal engagement and unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Qiaozhen; Kim, Dong Hyun; Dereli, Ihsan; Rosenberg, Scott C.; Hagemann, Goetz; Herzog, Franz; Tóth, Attila; Cleveland, Don W.; Corbett, Kevin D.

    2017-06-28

    Proteins of the conserved HORMA domain family, including the spindle assembly checkpoint protein MAD2 and the meiotic HORMADs, assemble into signaling complexes by binding short peptides termed “closure motifs”. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 regulates both MAD2 and meiotic HORMADs by disassembling these HORMA domain–closure motif complexes, but its mechanisms of substrate recognition and remodeling are unknown. Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and crosslinking mass spectrometry to outline how TRIP13 recognizes MAD2 with the help of the adapter protein p31comet. We show that p31comet binding to the TRIP13 N-terminal domain positions the disordered MAD2 N-terminus for engagement by the TRIP13 “pore loops”, which then unfold MAD2 in the presence of ATP. N-terminal truncation of MAD2 renders it refractory to TRIP13 action in vitro, and in cells causes spindle assembly checkpoint defects consistent with loss of TRIP13 function. Similar truncation of HORMAD1 in mouse spermatocytes compromises its TRIP13-mediated removal from meiotic chromosomes, highlighting a conserved mechanism for recognition and disassembly of HORMA domain–closure motif complexes by TRIP13.

  16. Protein kinases: mechanisms and downstream targets in inflammation-mediated obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, Kalyana C; Subramanian, Saravanan; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-02-01

    Obesity-induced low-grade inflammation (metaflammation) impairs insulin receptor signaling. This has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Insulin signaling in the target tissues is mediated by stress kinases such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, inhibitor of NF-kB kinase complex β (IKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase, protein kinase C, Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase, and RNA-activated protein kinase. Most of these kinases phosphorylate several key regulators in glucose homeostasis. The phosphorylation of serine residues in the insulin receptor and IRS-1 molecule results in diminished enzymatic activity in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. This has been one of the key mechanisms observed in the tissues that are implicated in insulin resistance especially in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2-DM). Identifying the specific protein kinases involved in obesity-induced chronic inflammation may help in developing the targeted drug therapies to minimize the insulin resistance. This review is focused on the protein kinases involved in the inflammatory cascade and molecular mechanisms and their downstream targets with special reference to obesity-induced T2-DM.

  17. N-Terminal Fragments of Huntingtin Longer than Residue 170 form Visible Aggregates Independently to Polyglutamine Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Moore Z; Mok, Sue-Ann; Ormsby, Angelique R; Muchowski, Paul J; Hatters, Danny M

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of Huntington's disease is the progressive aggregation of full length and N-terminal fragments of polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded Huntingtin (Htt) into intracellular inclusions. The production of N-terminal fragments appears important for enabling pathology and aggregation; and hence the direct expression of a variety of N-terminal fragments are commonly used to model HD in animal and cellular models. It remains unclear how the length of the N-terminal fragments relates to polyQ - mediated aggregation. We investigated the fundamental intracellular aggregation process of eight different-length N-terminal fragments of Htt in both short (25Q) and long polyQ (97Q). N-terminal fragments were fused to fluorescent proteins and transiently expressed in mammalian cell culture models. These included the classic exon 1 fragment (90 amino acids) and longer forms of 105, 117, 171, 513, 536, 552, and 586 amino acids based on wild-type Htt (of 23Q) sequence length nomenclature. N-terminal fragments of less than 171 amino acids only formed inclusions in polyQ-expanded form. By contrast the longer fragments formed inclusions irrespective of Q-length, with Q-length playing a negligible role in extent of aggregation. The inclusions could be classified into 3 distinct morphological categories. One type (Type A) was universally associated with polyQ expansions whereas the other two types (Types B and C) formed independently of polyQ length expansion. PolyQ-expansion was only required for fragments of less than 171 amino acids to aggregate. Longer fragments aggregated predominately through a non-polyQ mechanism, involving at least one, and probably more distinct clustering mechanisms.

  18. Taking out the JNK: A window of opportunity to improve cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrao, Petranel T

    2016-05-01

    c-JUN-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is a stress-induced response that enables survival of normal cells and is also utilized by cancer cells to evade therapy. Combining JNK inhibitors with standard therapies provides a potential strategy for overcoming drug resistance. Use of the optimal combination dosing and scheduling may substantially improve outcomes for cancer patients.

  19. Protective Role of Complement C3 Against Cytokine-Mediated beta-Cell Apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Santos, Reinaldo S.; Marroqui, Laura; Grieco, Fabio A.

    2017-01-01

    silencing exacerbates apoptosis under both basal condition and following exposure to cytokines, and it increases chemokine expression upon cytokine treatment. C3 exerts its prosurvival effects via AKT activation and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition. Exogenously added C3 also protects against cytokine...

  20. JNK1, but not JNK2, is required in two mechanistically distinct models of inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denninger, Katja; Rasmussen, Susanne B; Larsen, Jeppe Madura

    2011-01-01

    The roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) in inflammatory arthritis have been investigated; however, the roles of each isotype (ie, JNK1 and JNK2) in rheumatoid arthritis and conclusions about whether inhibition of one or both is necessary for amelioration of disease are unclear. By using ...

  1. Structure-Function Study of the N-terminal Domain of Exocyst Subunit Sec3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyuwon; Knödler, Andreas; Lee, Sung Haeng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Orlando, Kelly; Zhang, Jian; Foskett, Trevor J.; Guo, Wei; Dominguez, Roberto (UPENN)

    2010-04-19

    The exocyst is an evolutionarily conserved octameric complex involved in polarized exocytosis from yeast to humans. The Sec3 subunit of the exocyst acts as a spatial landmark for exocytosis through its ability to bind phospholipids and small GTPases. The structure of the N-terminal domain of Sec3 (Sec3N) was determined ab initio and defines a new subclass of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains along with a new family of proteins carrying this domain. Respectively, N- and C-terminal to the PH domain Sec3N presents an additional {alpha}-helix and two {beta}-strands that mediate dimerization through domain swapping. The structure identifies residues responsible for phospholipid binding, which when mutated in cells impair the localization of exocyst components at the plasma membrane and lead to defects in exocytosis. Through its ability to bind the small GTPase Cdc42 and phospholipids, the PH domain of Sec3 functions as a coincidence detector at the plasma membrane.

  2. The vasorelaxant effect of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide and amylin in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Eskesen, Karen; Lind, Peter Henrik

    2006-01-01

    In this study we aimed to assess in vivo, the vasodilator effects of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and amylin in human skin vasculature and compare the responses to the effects mediated by the endogenous neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP......) and substance P and to examine the mRNA expression of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL-R) and receptor-activity modifying proteins, RAMP1, RAMP 2 and RAMP3 in human subcutaneous arteries. Changes in skin blood flow of the forearm were measured using a Laser Doppler Imager after intradermal injection...... to the transient response induced by substance P. PAMP (10(-6)-10(-5) M) caused distinct itch sensation and local erythema. This effect could be abolished when combining the histamine H1-receptor antagonist mepyramin and PAMP. Real-time PCR data showed a higher level of mRNA for RAMP2 than CL-R, RAMP1 and RAMP3...

  3. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (FSI)

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  4. Efficient sortase-mediated N-terminal labeling of TEV protease cleaved recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpong, Kwabena; Bose, Ron

    2017-03-15

    A major challenge in attaching fluorophores or other handles to proteins is the availability of a site-specific labeling strategy that provides stoichiometric modification without compromising protein integrity. We developed a simple approach that combines TEV protease cleavage, sortase modification and affinity purification to N-terminally label proteins. To achieve stoichiometrically-labeled protein, we included a short affinity tag in the fluorophore-containing peptide for post-labeling purification of the modified protein. This strategy can be easily applied to any recombinant protein with a TEV site and we demonstrate this on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Membrane Scaffold Protein (MSP) constructs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased N-terminal CgA in circulation associated with cardiac reperfusin in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Kousholt, Birgitte S.; Larsen, Jens Rolighed

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Acute myocardial infarction causes neurohumoral activation characterized by increased sympathetic activity. CgA is a protein released during sympathoadrenal stress from neuroendocrine tissue. Recently, increased CgA concentrations in circulation have been reported and suggested to be an inde......Aim: Acute myocardial infarction causes neurohumoral activation characterized by increased sympathetic activity. CgA is a protein released during sympathoadrenal stress from neuroendocrine tissue. Recently, increased CgA concentrations in circulation have been reported and suggested......% increase in plasma N-terminal CgA 1 h after re-establishment of coronary blood supply. On the other hand, plasma pancreastatin did not change in response to ischemia or reperfusion but decreased during the entire experiment. Conclusion: Our results suggest a differentiated CgA response in myocardial...

  6. The Impact of N-terminal Acetylation of α-Synuclein on Phospholipid Membrane Binding and Fibril Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Aditya; Roeters, Steven J; Schilderink, Nathalie; Hommersom, Bob; Heeren, Ron M A; Woutersen, Sander; Claessens, Mireille M A E; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2016-09-30

    Human α-synuclein (αS) has been shown to be N terminally acetylated in its physiological state. This modification is proposed to modulate the function and aggregation of αS into amyloid fibrils. Using bacterially expressed acetylated-αS (NTAc-αS) and endogenous αS (Endo-αS) from human erythrocytes, we show that N-terminal acetylation has little impact on αS binding to anionic membranes and thus likely not relevant for regulating membrane affinity. N-terminal acetylation does have an effect on αS aggregation, resulting in a narrower distribution of the aggregation lag times and rates. 2D-IR spectra show that acetylation changes the secondary structure of αS in fibrils. This difference may arise from the slightly higher helical propensity of acetylated-αS in solution leading to a more homogenous fibril population with different fibril structure than non-acetylated αS. We speculate that N-terminal acetylation imposes conformational restraints on N-terminal residues in αS, thus predisposing αS toward specific interactions with other binding partners or alternatively decrease nonspecific interactions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Impact of N-terminal Acetylation of α-Synuclein on Phospholipid Membrane Binding and Fibril Structure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Aditya; Roeters, Steven J.; Schilderink, Nathalie; Hommersom, Bob; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Woutersen, Sander; Claessens, Mireille M. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Human α-synuclein (αS) has been shown to be N terminally acetylated in its physiological state. This modification is proposed to modulate the function and aggregation of αS into amyloid fibrils. Using bacterially expressed acetylated-αS (NTAc-αS) and endogenous αS (Endo-αS) from human erythrocytes, we show that N-terminal acetylation has little impact on αS binding to anionic membranes and thus likely not relevant for regulating membrane affinity. N-terminal acetylation does have an effect on αS aggregation, resulting in a narrower distribution of the aggregation lag times and rates. 2D-IR spectra show that acetylation changes the secondary structure of αS in fibrils. This difference may arise from the slightly higher helical propensity of acetylated-αS in solution leading to a more homogenous fibril population with different fibril structure than non-acetylated αS. We speculate that N-terminal acetylation imposes conformational restraints on N-terminal residues in αS, thus predisposing αS toward specific interactions with other binding partners or alternatively decrease nonspecific interactions. PMID:27531743

  8. Crystallization of Galectin-8 Linker Reveals Intricate Relationship between the N-terminal Tail and the Linker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Si

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-8 (Gal-8 plays a significant role in normal immunological function as well as in cancer. This lectin contains two carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD connected by a peptide linker. The N-terminal CRD determines ligand binding specificity, whereas the linker has been proposed to regulate overall Gal-8 function, including multimerization and biological activity. Here, we crystallized the Gal-8 N-terminal CRD with the peptide linker using a crystallization condition that contains Ni2+. The Ni2+ ion was found to be complexed between two CRDs via crystal packing contacts. The coordination between Ni2+ and Asp25 plays an indirect role in determining the structure of β-strand F0 and in influencing the linker conformation which could not be defined due to its dynamic nature. The linker was also shortened in situ and crystallized under a different condition, leading to a higher resolution structure refined to 1.08 Å. This crystal structure allowed definition of a short portion of the linker interacting with the Gal-8 N-terminal tail via ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds. Observation of two Gal-8 N-terminal CRD structures implies that the N-terminal tail and the linker may influence each other’s conformation. In addition, under specific crystallization conditions, glycerol could replace lactose and was observed at the carbohydrate binding site. However, glycerol did not show inhibition activity in hemagglutination assay.

  9. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of Escherichia coli Lon protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702-1201 (United States); Basic Research Program, SAIC-Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Gustchina, Alla [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702-1201 (United States); Rasulova, Fatima S. [Laboratory of Cell Biology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Melnikov, Edward E. [Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Maurizi, Michael R. [Laboratory of Cell Biology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Rotanova, Tatyana V. [Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Dauter, Zbigniew [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wlodawer, Alexander, E-mail: wlodawer@nih.gov [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702-1201 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The medium-resolution structure of the N-terminal fragment of E. coli Lon protease shows that this part of the enzyme consists of two compact domains and a very long α-helix. The structure of a recombinant construct consisting of residues 1–245 of Escherichia coli Lon protease, the prototypical member of the A-type Lon family, is reported. This construct encompasses all or most of the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. The structure was solved by SeMet SAD to 2.6 Å resolution utilizing trigonal crystals that contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecule consists of two compact subdomains and a very long C-terminal α-helix. The structure of the first subdomain (residues 1–117), which consists mostly of β-strands, is similar to that of the shorter fragment previously expressed and crystallized, whereas the second subdomain is almost entirely helical. The fold and spatial relationship of the two subdomains, with the exception of the C-terminal helix, closely resemble the structure of BPP1347, a 203-amino-acid protein of unknown function from Bordetella parapertussis, and more distantly several other proteins. It was not possible to refine the structure to satisfactory convergence; however, since almost all of the Se atoms could be located on the basis of their anomalous scattering the correctness of the overall structure is not in question. The structure reported here was also compared with the structures of the putative substrate-binding domains of several proteins, showing topological similarities that should help in defining the binding sites used by Lon substrates.

  10. Prunus serotina Amygdalin Hydrolase and Prunasin Hydrolase : Purification, N-Terminal Sequencing, and Antibody Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C P; Swain, E; Poulton, J E

    1992-09-01

    In black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) seed homogenates, amygdalin hydrolase (AH) participates with prunasin hydrolase (PH) and mandelonitrile lyase in the sequential degradation of (R)-amygdalin to HCN, benzaldehyde, and glucose. Four isozymes of AH (designated AH I, I', II, II') were purified from mature cherry seeds by concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and chromatofocusing. All isozymes were monomeric glycoproteins with native molecular masses of 52 kD. They showed similar kinetic properties (pH optima, K(m), V(max)) but differed in their isoelectric points and N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analytical isoelectric focusing revealed the presence of subisozymes of each isozyme. The relative abundance of these isozymes and/or subisozymes varied from seed to seed. Three isozymes of PH (designated PH I, IIa, and IIb) were purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity, ion-exchange, and hydroxyapatite chromatography and by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PH I and PH IIb are 68-kD monomeric glycoproteins, whereas PH IIa is dimeric (140 kD). The N-terminal sequences of all PH and AH isozymes showed considerable similarity. Polyclonal antisera raised in rabbits against deglycosylated AH I or a mixture of the three deglycosylated PH isozymes were not monospecific as judged by immunoblotting analysis, but also cross-reacted with the opposing glucosidase. Monospecific antisera deemed suitable for immunocytochemistry and screening of expression libraries were obtained by affinity chromatography. Each antiserum recognized all known isozymes of the specific glucosidase used as antigen.

  11. Hepatoma derived growth factor binds DNA through the N-terminal PWWP domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett Allen D

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatoma Derived Growth Factor (HDGF is a nuclear protein with nuclear targeting required for mitogenic activity. Recently we demonstrated that HDGF is a transcriptional repressor, but whether HDGF binds DNA, the specificity of DNA binding and what protein domain is required are still unknown. In this study, we aimed to identify if HDGF is a DNA binding protein, map the functional DNA binding domain and DNA binding element for HDGF. Results Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP of human DNA, we isolated 10 DNA sequences sharing a conserved ~200 bp element. Homology analysis identified the binding sequences as a motif within the promoter of the SMYD1 gene, a HDGF target gene. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA confirmed the binding of HDGF to this conserved sequence. As a result, an 80 bp conserved sequence located in the SMYD1 promoter bound GST-HDGF tightly. The binding core sequence for HDGF was narrowed down to 37 bp using a deletion mapping strategy from both the 5' and 3' ends. Moreover, ChIP and DNase I footprinting analysis revealed that HDGF binds this 80 bp DNA fragment specifically. Functionally overexpression of HDGF represses a reporter gene which is controlled by an SV-40 promoter containing the 80 bp DNA element. Using serial truncations of GST-HDGF, we mapped the DNA binding domain of HDGF to the N-terminal PWWP domain. Conclusion HDGF is a DNA binding protein, binds DNA specifically, and prefers a minimum of 37 bp long DNA fragment. The N-terminal PWWP domain of HDGF is required for DNA binding. HDGF exerts its transcription repressive effect through binding to a conserved DNA element in the promoter of target genes.

  12. Reaction of the N-terminal methionine residues in cyanase with diethylpyrocarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P M; Korte, J J; Holcomb, T A

    1994-11-29

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. The enzyme is a decamer of identical subunits (M(r) = 17,000). Previous studies have shown that modification of either the single cysteine residue or the single histidine residue in each subunit gives an active decameric derivative that dissociates reversibly to inactive dimer derivative, indicating that decameric structure is required for activity and that the SH and imidazole groups are not required for catalytic activity [Anderson, P. M., Korte, J. J., Holcomb, T. A., Cho, Y.-G., Son, C.-M., & Sung, Y.-C. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 15036-15045]. Here the effects of reaction of the reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) with cyanase or mutant cyanases are reported. DEPC reacts stoichiometrically with the histidine residue and at one additional site in each subunit when the enzyme is in the inactive dimer form, preventing reactivation. DEPC reacts stoichiometrically (with the same result on reactivation) at only one site per subunit with the inactive dimer form of cyanase mutants in which the single histidine residue has been replaced by one of several different amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis; the site of the reaction was identified as the amino group of the N-terminal methionine. DEPC does not react with the histidine residue of the active decameric form of wild-type cyanase and does not affect activity of the active decameric form of wild-type or mutant cyanases. Reaction with the N-terminal amino group of methionine apparently prevents reactivation of the mutant enzymes by blocking association to decamer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  14. Powdery mildew fungal effector candidates share N-terminal Y/F/WxC-motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmersen Jeppe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Powdery mildew and rust fungi are widespread, serious pathogens that depend on developing haustoria in the living plant cells. Haustoria are separated from the host cytoplasm by a plant cell-derived extrahaustorial membrane. They secrete effector proteins, some of which are subsequently transferred across this membrane to the plant cell to suppress defense. Results In a cDNA library from barley epidermis containing powdery mildew haustoria, two-thirds of the sequenced ESTs were fungal and represented ~3,000 genes. Many of the most highly expressed genes encoded small proteins with N-terminal signal peptides. While these proteins are novel and poorly related, they do share a three-amino acid motif, which we named "Y/F/WxC", in the N-terminal of the mature proteins. The first amino acid of this motif is aromatic: tyrosine, phenylalanine or tryptophan, and the last is always cysteine. In total, we identified 107 such proteins, for which the ESTs represent 19% of the fungal clones in our library, suggesting fundamental roles in haustoria function. While overall sequence similarity between the powdery mildew Y/F/WxC-proteins is low, they do have a highly similar exon-intron structure, suggesting they have a common origin. Interestingly, searches of public fungal genome and EST databases revealed that haustoria-producing rust fungi also encode large numbers of novel, short proteins with signal peptides and the Y/F/WxC-motif. No significant numbers of such proteins were identified from genome and EST sequences from either fungi which do not produce haustoria or from haustoria-producing Oomycetes. Conclusion In total, we identified 107, 178 and 57 such Y/F/WxC-proteins from the barley powdery mildew, the wheat stem rust and the wheat leaf rust fungi, respectively. All together, our findings suggest the Y/F/WxC-proteins to be a new class of effectors from haustoria-producing pathogenic fungi.

  15. N-terminal or signal peptide sequence engineering prevents truncation of human monoclonal antibody light chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S J; Bond, N J; Milne, S; Lewis, A; Sheriff, A; Pettman, G; Pradhan, R; Higazi, D R; Hatton, D

    2017-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) contain short N-terminal signal peptides on each individual polypeptide that comprises the mature antibody, targeting them for export from the cell in which they are produced. The signal peptide is cleaved from each heavy chain (Hc) and light chain (Lc) polypeptide after translocation to the ER and prior to secretion. This process is generally highly efficient, producing a high proportion of correctly cleaved Hc and Lc polypeptides. However, mis-cleavage of the signal peptide can occur, resulting in truncation or elongation at the N-terminus of the Hc or Lc. This is undesirable for antibody manufacturing as it can impact efficacy and can result in product heterogeneity. Here, we describe a truncated variant of the Lc that was detected during a routine developability assessment of the recombinant human IgG1 MEDI8490 in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found that the truncation of the Lc was caused due to the use of the murine Hc signal peptide together with a lambda Lc containing an SYE amino acid motif at the N-terminus. This truncation was not caused by mis-processing of the mRNA encoding the Lc and was not dependent on expression platform (transient or stable), the scale of the fed-batch culture or clonal lineage. We further show that using alternative signal peptides or engineering the Lc SYE N-terminal motif prevented the truncation and that this strategy will improve Lc homogeneity of other SYE lambda Lc-containing mAbs. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1970-1977. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase is phosphorylated and activated by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Antonio Juel; Buch, M B; Krag, T O

    1999-01-01

    90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) belongs to a family of growth factor-activated serine/threonine kinases composed of two kinase domains connected by a regulatory linker region. The N-terminal kinase of RSK2 is involved in substrate phosphorylation. Its activation requires phosphorylation of th...... of Ser(227), Ser(369), and Ser(386). Our study extend recent findings which implicate PDK1 in the activation of protein kinases B and C and p70(S6K), suggesting that PDK1 controls several major growth factor-activated signal transduction pathways.......90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) belongs to a family of growth factor-activated serine/threonine kinases composed of two kinase domains connected by a regulatory linker region. The N-terminal kinase of RSK2 is involved in substrate phosphorylation. Its activation requires phosphorylation...... involvement of ERK, leading to partial activation of RSK2. Similarly, two other members of the RSK family, RSK1 and RSK3, were partially activated by PDK1 in COS7 cells. Finally, our data indicate that full activation of RSK2 by growth factor requires the cooperation of ERK and PDK1 through phosphorylation...

  17. Interaction of the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C with interfacial phospholipid films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Keough, Kevin M W; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    . These results demonstrate that the sequence of the SP-C N-terminal region has intrinsic ability to interact with, insert into, and perturb the structure of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid films, even in the absence of the palmitic chains attached to this segment in the native protein. This effect has been......Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP......-C is inserted and is therefore a candidate motif to participate in interactions with other bilayers or monolayers. In the present work, we have detected intrinsic ability of a peptide based on the sequence of the N-terminal segment of SP-C to interact and insert spontaneously into preformed zwitterionic...

  18. Intrinsic structural differences in the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C from different species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Rivas, L; Casals, C

    2001-01-01

    with spontaneous lipid/peptide interactions. Both canine and porcine peptides were able to form monolayers at air-liquid interfaces, the canine peptides occupying lower area/molecule and being compressible to higher pressures than the porcine sequences. The peptides also shifted the isotherms and perturbed......Predictive studies suggest that the known sequences of the N-terminal segment of surfactant protein SP-C from animal species have an intrinsic tendency to form beta-turns, but there are important differences on the probable location of these motifs in different SP-C species. Our hypothesis...... is that intrinsic structural determinants of the sequence of the N-terminal region of SP-C could define conformation, acylation and perhaps surface properties of the mature protein. To test this hypothesis we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the 13-residue N-terminal sequence of porcine and canine SP...

  19. SAXS Structural Studies of Dps from Deinococcus radiodurans Highlights the Conformation of the Mobile N-Terminal Extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sandra P; Cuypers, Maxime G; Round, Adam; Finet, Stephanie; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Mitchell, Edward P; Romão, Célia V

    2017-03-10

    The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains two DNA-binding proteins from starved cells (Dps): Dps1 (DR2263) and Dps2 (DRB0092). These are suggested to play a role in DNA interaction and manganese and iron storage. The proteins assemble as a conserved dodecameric structure with structurally uncharacterised N-terminal extensions. In the case of DrDps1, these extensions have been proposed to be involved in DNA interactions, while in DrDps2, their function has yet to be established. The reported data reveal the relative position of the N-terminal extensions to the dodecameric sphere in solution for both Dps. The low-resolution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) results show that the N-terminal extensions protrude from the spherical shell of both proteins. The SAXS envelope of a truncated form of DrDps1 without the N-terminal extensions appears as a dodecameric sphere, contrasting strongly with the protrusions observed in the full-length models. The effect of iron incorporation into DrDps2 was investigated by static and stopped-flow SAXS measurements, revealing dynamic structural changes upon iron binding and core formation, as reflected by a quick alteration of its radius of gyration. The truncated and full-length versions of DrDps were also compared on the basis of their interaction with DNA to analyse functional roles of the N-terminal extensions. DrDps1 N-terminal protrusions appear to be directly involved with DNA, whilst those from DrDps2 are indirectly associated with DNA binding. Furthermore, detection of DrDps2 in the D. radiodurans membrane fraction suggests that the N-terminus of the protein interacts with the membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The N-terminal extension of the P. falciparum GBP130 signal peptide is irrelevant for signal sequence function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Corinna; Barniol, Luis; Hiss, Jan A; Przyborski, Jude M

    2017-07-17

    The malaria parasite P. falciparum exports a large number of proteins to its host cell, the mature human erythrocyte. Although the function of the majority of these proteins is not well understood, many exported proteins appear to play a role in modification of the erythrocyte following invasion. Protein export to the erythrocyte is a secretory process that begins with entry to the endoplasmic reticulum. For most exported proteins, this step is mediated by hydrophobic signal peptides found towards the N-terminal end of proteins. The signal peptides present on P. falciparum exported proteins often differ in length from those found in other systems, and generally contain a highly extended N-terminal region. Here we have investigated the function of these extended N-terminal regions, using the exported parasite protein GBP130 as a model. Surprisingly, several deletions of the extended N-terminal regions of the GBP130 signal peptide have no effect on the ability of the signal peptide to direct a fluorescent reporter to the secretory pathway. Addition of the same N-terminal extension to a canonical signal peptide does not affect transport of either soluble or membrane proteins to their correct respective subcellular localisations. Finally, we show that extended signal peptides are able to complement canonical signal peptides in driving protein traffic to the apicoplast of the parasite, and are also functional in a mammalian cell system. Our study is the first detailed analysis of an extended P. falciparum signal peptide and suggests that N-terminal extensions of exported Plasmodium falciparum proteins are not required for entry to the secretory system, and are likely to be involved in other, so far unknown, processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Prokaryotic Expression and Purification of Human TLE1 N-terminal Q Domain Fragment and Production of its Polyclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su WANG

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective TLE1 is an important protein in regulating Wnt, Notch and EGFR signaling pathways. The TLE1 N-terminal Q domain regulates the pathways by mediating its oligomerization and interaction with LEF1. The aim of this study is to construct the human TLE1 N-terminal Q domain fragment in prokaryotic expression system, express and purify protein TLE1 N-terminal Q domain and prepare its polyclonal antibody. Methods The sequence of TLE1 N-terminal Q domain obtained by PCR from human lung adenocarcinoma cDNA, was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1 containing Glutathione S-transferase (GST. Vector pGEX-4T1-TLE1-Q was transformed into E.coli BL21 condon plus. The GST-TLE1-Q(1-136 fusion protein was induced by IPTG, digested by Thrombin, purified with glutathione-sepharose beads and FPLC, identified by SDS-PAGE. Then rabbits were immunized with the purified protein TLE1-Q(1-136 for obtaining the antiserum. The titers and specificity of antibodies were measured by ELISA and Western blot. Results The PCR identification and the sequencing of recombinant plasmid demonstrated that vector pGEX-4T1-TLE1-Q was successfully constructed. The SDS-PAGE shows target protein (14 000 Da is the interest protein TLE1-Q(1-136. The TLE1 N-terminal Q domain fragment TLE1-Q(1-136 and its polyclonal antibody have been acquired, with an antibody titer of 1:20 000. Conclusion Expression vector pGEX-4T1-TLE1-Q is correctly constructed. The TLE1 N-terminal Q domain fragment TLE1-Q(1-136 and its polyclonal antibody have been acquired. These work established the foundation for further biological study between TLE1 and lung cancers.

  2. The N-terminal region of mature mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase can direct cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase into mitochondria in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannattasio, S; Azzariti, A; Marra, E; Quagliariello, E

    1994-06-30

    Two fused genes were constructed which encode for two chimeric proteins in which either 10 or 191 N-terminal amino acids of mature mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase had been attached to the entire polypeptide chain of cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase. The precursor and mature form of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, dihydrofolate reductase and both chimeric proteins were synthesized in vitro and their import into isolated mitochondria was studied. Both chimeric proteins were taken up by isolated organelles, where they became protease resistant, thus indicating the ability of the N-terminal portion of the mature moiety of the precursor of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to direct cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase into mitochondria.

  3. Mixed lineage kinase-3/JNK1 axis promotes migration of human gastric cancer cells following gastrin stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Prajna; Senthivinayagam, Subramanian; Rangasamy, Velusamy; Sondarva, Gautam; Rana, Basabi

    2010-03-01

    Gastrin is a gastrointestinal peptide hormone, secreted by the gastric G cells and can exist as a fully processed amidated form (G17) or as unprocessed forms. All forms of gastrin possess trophic properties towards the gastrointestinal mucosa. An understanding of the signaling pathways involved is important to design therapeutic approaches to target gastrin-mediated cellular events. The studies described here were designed to identify the signaling pathways by which amidated gastrin (G17) mediates cancer cell migration. These studies indicated a time- and dose-dependent increase in gastric cancer cell migration after G17 stimulation, involving cholecystokinin 2 receptor. G17-induced migration was preceded by activation of MAPK pathways and was antagonized after pretreatment with SP600125, a pharmacological inhibitor of c-Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. Knockdown of endogenous JNK1 expression via small interference RNA (JNK1-siRNA) inhibited G17-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun and migration, and overexpression of wild-type JNK1 or constitutive active JNK1 promoted G17-induced migration. Studies designed to identify the MAPK kinase kinase member mediating JNK activation indicated the involvement of mixed lineage kinase-3 (MLK3), which was transiently activated upon G17 treatment. Inhibition of MLK3 pathway via a pan-MLK inhibitor or knockdown of MLK3 expression by MLK3-siRNA antagonized G17-induced migration. Incubation with G17 also resulted in an induction of matrix metalloproteinase 7 promoter activity, which is known to mediate migration and invasion pathways in cancer cells. Modulation of MLK3, JNK1, and c-Jun pathways modulated G17-induced matrix metalloproteinase 7 promoter activation. These studies indicate that the MLK3/JNK1 axis mediates G17-induced gastric cancer cell migration, which can be targeted for designing novel therapeutic strategies for treating gastric malignancies.

  4. Fluid shear stress activation of focal adhesion kinase. Linking to mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Kim, M; Hu, Y L; Jalali, S; Schlaepfer, D D; Hunter, T; Chien, S; Shyy, J Y

    1997-11-28

    Shear stress, the tangential component of hemodynamic forces, activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathways in cultured vascular endothelial cells to induce the transcriptional activation of many immediate early genes. It appears that integrins, protein-tyrosine kinases, and the structural integrity of actin are important factors involved in these shear stress-induced responses. The underlying molecular events were investigated by the application of a shear stress of 12 dyn/cm2 on bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). We found that such a shear stress increased the tyrosine phosphorylation and the kinase activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and its association with growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) in a rapid and transient manner, suggesting that FAK may be linked to these mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways through a Grb2. Son of sevenless (Sos) complex. FAK(F397Y), which encodes a dominant negative mutant of FAK, attenuated the shear stress-induced kinase activity of Myc epitope-tagged ERK2 and hemagglutinin epitope-tagged JNK1. DeltamSos1, encoding a dominant negative mutant of Sos in which the guanine nucleotide exchange domain has been deleted, also attenuated shear stress activation of Myc-ERK2 and hemagglutinin-JNK1. Pretreating the confluent BAEC monolayers with a blocking type anti-vitronectin receptor monoclonal antibody had similar inhibitory effects in these shear stress-activated ERKs and JNKs. Confocal microscopic observation further demonstrated that FAK tended to cluster with vitronectin receptor near the abluminal side of the sheared BAEC. These results demonstrate that FAK signaling is critical in the shear stress-induced dual activation of ERK and JNK.

  5. Structure of the EMMPRIN N-terminal domain 1: Dimerization via [beta]-strand swapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jinquan; Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Beil, Eric; Baker, Audrey; Swencki-Underwood, Bethany; Zhao, Yonghong; Sprenkle, Justin; Dixon, Ken; Sweet, Raymond; Gilliland, Gary L.; (Centocor)

    2010-09-27

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), also known as Hab18G, CD147, Basigin, M6, and neurothelin, is a membrane glycoprotein expressed on the surface of various cell types and many cancer cells. EMMPRIN stimulates adjacent fibroblasts and tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases and plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, spermatogensis and fertilization, cell-cell adhesion and communication, and other biological processes (reviewed in Ref. 1 and references therein). It was demonstrated that the EMMPRIN extracellular domain (ECD), which structurally belongs to the IgG superfamily, can form homo-oligomers in a cis dependent manner and the N-terminal domain 1 (residues 22-101) was necessary and sufficient to mediate this interaction. The crystal structure of the ECD of recombinant human EMMPRIN (Hab18G/CD147) expressed in E. coli was reported at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution (Yu et al. 2008). The construct consists of residues 22-205 of the mature protein and has both an N-terminal IgC2 domain (ND1, residues 22-101) and a C-terminal IgC2 domain (ND2, residues 107-205). The two domains are joined by a five amino acid residue linker that constitutes a flexible hinge between the two domains. The crystal form has four copies of the molecule in the asymmetric unit, each of which has a different inter-domain angle that varies from 121{sup o} to 144{sup o}. The two domains each have a conserved disulfide bridge and both are comprised of two {beta}-sheets formed by strands EBA and GFCC, and DEBA and AGFCC for ND1 and ND2, respectively. Based on the crystal packing in this structure, the authors proposed that lateral packing between the two IgG domains of EMMPRIN ECD represents a potential mechanism for cell adhesion. Here we report the 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of EMMPRIN ECD (ND1) expressed in mammalian cells. The overall structure of the domain is very similar to that in the full length

  6. Abnormal kinetochore-generated pulling forces from expressing a N-terminally modified Hec1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Mattiuzzo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Highly Expressed in Cancer protein 1 (Hec1 is a constituent of the Ndc80 complex, a kinetochore component that has been shown to have a fundamental role in stable kinetochore-microtubule attachment, chromosome alignment and spindle checkpoint activation at mitosis. HEC1 RNA is found up-regulated in several cancer cells, suggesting a role for HEC1 deregulation in cancer. In light of this, we have investigated the consequences of experimentally-driven Hec1 expression on mitosis and chromosome segregation in an inducible expression system from human cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overexpression of Hec1 could never be obtained in HeLa clones inducibly expressing C-terminally tagged Hec1 or untagged Hec1, suggesting that Hec1 cellular levels are tightly controlled. On the contrary, a chimeric protein with an EGFP tag fused to the Hec1 N-terminus accumulated in cells and disrupted mitotic division. EGFP- Hec1 cells underwent altered chromosome segregation within multipolar spindles that originated from centriole splitting. We found that EGFP-Hec1 assembled a mutant Ndc80 complex that was unable to rescue the mitotic phenotypes of Hec1 depletion. Kinetochores harboring EGFP-Hec1 formed persisting lateral microtubule-kinetochore interactions that recruited the plus-end depolymerase MCAK and the microtubule stabilizing protein HURP on K-fibers. In these conditions the plus-end kinesin CENP-E was preferentially retained at kinetochores. RNAi-mediated CENP-E depletion further demonstrated that CENP-E function was required for multipolar spindle formation in EGFP-Hec1 expressing cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that modifications on Hec1 N-terminal tail can alter kinetochore-microtubule attachment stability and influence Ndc80 complex function independently from the intracellular levels of the protein. N-terminally modified Hec1 promotes spindle pole fragmentation by CENP-E-mediated plus-end directed kinetochore

  7. Heterogeneous N-terminal acylation of retinal proteins results from the retina's unusual lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, Grzegorz; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-05-10

    Protein N-myristoylation occurs by a covalent attachment of a C14:0 fatty acid to the N-terminal Gly residue. This reaction is catalyzed by a N-myristoyltransferase that uses myristoyl-coenzyme A as substrate. But proteins in the retina also undergo heterogeneous N-acylation with C14:2, C14:1, and C12:0 fatty acids. The basis and the role of this retina-specific phenomenon are poorly understood. We studied guanylate cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP1) as an example of retina-specific heterogeneously N-acylated protein. The types and the abundance of fatty acids bound to bovine retinal GCAP1 were C14:2, 37.0%; C14:0, 32.4%; C14:1, 22.3%; and C12:0, 8.3% as quantified by liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry. We also devised a method for N-acylating proteins in vitro and used it to modify GCAP1 with acyl moieties of different lengths. Analysis of these GCAPs both confirmed that N-terminal acylation of GCAP1 is critical for its high activity and proper Ca(2+)-dependent response and revealed comparable functionality for GCAP1 with acyl moieties of various lengths. We also tested the hypothesis that retinal heterogeneous N-acylation results from retinal enrichment of unusual N-myristoyltransferase substrates. Thus, acyl-coenzyme A esters were purified from both bovine retina and brain and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry. Substantial differences in acyl-coenzyme A profiles between the retina and brain were detected. Importantly, the ratios of uncommon N-acylation substrates--C14:2- and C14:1-coenyzme A to C14:0-coenzyme A--were higher in the retina than in the brain. Thus, our results suggest that heterogeneous N-acylation, responsible for expansion of retinal proteome, reflects the unique character of retinal lipid metabolism. Additionally, we propose a new hypothesis explaining the physiological relevance of elevated retinal ratios of C14:2- and C14:1-coenzyme A to C14:0-coenzyme A.

  8. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochizuki Kazufumi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. Results In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. Conclusions The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena.

  9. BETA-N-TERMINAL GLYCOHEMOGLOBINS IN SUBJECTS WITH COMMON HEMOGLOBINOPATHIES - RELATION WITH FRUCTOSAMINE AND MEAN ERYTHROCYTE AGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARTINA, WV; MARTIJN, EG; VANDERMOLEN, M; SCHERMER, JG; MUSKIET, FAJ

    1993-01-01

    Amounts of beta-N-terminal glycohemoglobins (HbX1c), serum fructosamine, and erythrocyte polyamines were determined in nondiabetic adults with HbAA, HbAC, HbAS, HbCC, HbSC, HbSS, and HbS/hereditary persistent HbF (HPFH). The groups did not differ in fructosamine concentrations. Mean (95% confidence

  10. Fine tuning of the catalytic activity of colicin e7 nuclease domain by systematic n-terminal mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Németh, Eszter; Körtvélyesi, Tamás; Thulstrup, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    -binding affinity were unaffected by the mutations as revealed by linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal calorimetric titrations, and gel mobility shift experiments. Semiempirical quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that K446, K449, and/or the N-terminal amino...

  11. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide predicts cardiovascular complications in pregnant women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, Marlies A. M.; Balci, Ali; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Sollie-Szarynska, Krystyna M.; Ludwig-Ruitenberg, Marieke; Melle, van Joost P.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    Aims In women with congenital heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular complications during pregnancy are common, but the risk assessment of these patients remains difficult. This study sought to determine the independent role of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels in addition to

  12. Prevalence and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and elevated N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Christian Malchau; Bay, Morten; Kirk, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiological features and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) and to compare these findings with those from patients with reduced ejection fraction. Furthermore the effects of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-p...

  13. N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen as a biomarker of anabolic response to recombinant human GH and testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context: Biomarkers that predict musculoskeletal response to anabolic therapies should expedite drug development. During collagen synthesis in soft lean tissue, N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (P3NP) is released into circulation. We investigated P3NP as a biomarker of lean body mass (L...

  14. Functional and structural characterization of a synthetic peptide representing the N-terminal domain of prokaryotic pyruvate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, A.F.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hooven, van den H.W.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Kok, de A.

    2002-01-01

    A synthetic peptide (Nterm-E1p) is used to characterize the structure and function of the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 4-45) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase component (E1p) from the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHC) from Azotobacter vinelandii. Activity and binding studies

  15. Troponin T and N-terminal pro B-Type natriuretic peptide and presence of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Mette R; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Carlsen, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the effects of exercise intensity, sampling intervals, degree of coronary artery stenosis, and demographic factors on circulating N-terminal pro B-Type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) in subjects suspected of coronary artery disease (CAD...

  16. N-Terminal-Based Targeted, Inducible Protein Degradation in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Sekar

    Full Text Available Dynamically altering protein concentration is a central activity in synthetic biology. While many tools are available to modulate protein concentration by altering protein synthesis rate, methods for decreasing protein concentration by inactivation or degradation rate are just being realized. Altering protein synthesis rates can quickly increase the concentration of a protein but not decrease, as residual protein will remain for a while. Inducible, targeted protein degradation is an attractive option and some tools have been introduced for higher organisms and bacteria. Current bacterial tools rely on C-terminal fusions, so we have developed an N-terminal fusion (Ntag strategy to increase the possible proteins that can be targeted. We demonstrate Ntag dependent degradation of mCherry and beta-galactosidase and reconfigure the Ntag system to perform dynamic, exogenously inducible degradation of a targeted protein and complement protein depletion by traditional synthesis repression. Model driven analysis that focused on rates, rather than concentrations, was critical to understanding and engineering the system. We expect this tool and our model to enable inducible protein degradation use particularly in metabolic engineering, biological study of essential proteins, and protein circuits.

  17. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P

    2011-05-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5\\' cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized--both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms--remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5\\' untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data.

  18. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of Escherichia coli Lon protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Rasulova, Fatima S.; Melnikov, Edward E.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Rotanova, Tatyana V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI); (RAS)

    2010-10-22

    The structure of a recombinant construct consisting of residues 1-245 of Escherichia coli Lon protease, the prototypical member of the A-type Lon family, is reported. This construct encompasses all or most of the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. The structure was solved by SeMet SAD to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution utilizing trigonal crystals that contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecule consists of two compact subdomains and a very long C-terminal {alpha}-helix. The structure of the first subdomain (residues 1-117), which consists mostly of {beta}-strands, is similar to that of the shorter fragment previously expressed and crystallized, whereas the second subdomain is almost entirely helical. The fold and spatial relationship of the two subdomains, with the exception of the C-terminal helix, closely resemble the structure of BPP1347, a 203-amino-acid protein of unknown function from Bordetella parapertussis, and more distantly several other proteins. It was not possible to refine the structure to satisfactory convergence; however, since almost all of the Se atoms could be located on the basis of their anomalous scattering the correctness of the overall structure is not in question. The structure reported here was also compared with the structures of the putative substrate-binding domains of several proteins, showing topological similarities that should help in defining the binding sites used by Lon substrates.

  19. Procollagen III N-terminal Propeptide and Desmosine are Released by Matrix Destruction in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Jo; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Walker, Naomi F.; Yuen, Ho Ming; Sunpath, Henry; Tezera, Liku; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Bishai, William R.; Friedland, Jon S.; Elkington, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is transmitted by patients with pulmonary disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) drive lung destruction in tuberculosis but the resulting matrix degradation products (MDPs) have not been studied. We investigate the hypothesis that MMP activity generates matrix turnover products as correlates of lung pathology. Methods. Induced sputum and plasma were collected prospectively from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and negative patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and controls. Concentrations of MDPs and MMPs were analyzed by ELISA and Luminex array in 2 patient cohorts. Results. Procollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) was 3.8-fold higher in induced sputum of HIV-uninfected tuberculosis patients compared to controls and desmosine, released during elastin degradation, was 2.4-fold higher. PIIINP was elevated in plasma of tuberculosis patients. Plasma PIIINP correlated with induced sputum MMP-1 concentrations and radiological scores, demonstrating that circulating MDPs reflect lung destruction. In a second patient cohort of mixed HIV seroprevalence, plasma PIIINP concentration was increased 3.0-fold above controls (P tuberculosis patients (P = .001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis utilizing these 2 variables demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.832 (P pulmonary tuberculosis, MMP-driven immunopathology generates matrix degradation products. PMID:23922364

  20. Biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in adult healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Autumn N; Estrada, Amara H; Gallagher, Alexander E; Winter, Brandy; Lamb, Kenneth E; Bohannon, Mary; Hanscom, Jancy; Mainville, Celine A

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its impact on diagnostic utility is unknown in healthy cats and those with cardiac disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the biologic variation of NT-proBNP within-day and week-to-week in healthy adult cats. Methods Adult cats were prospectively evaluated by complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry, total thyroxine, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood pressure, to exclude underlying systemic or cardiac disease. Adult healthy cats were enrolled and blood samples were obtained at 11 time points over a 6 week period (0, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 10 h and at weeks 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6). The intra-individual (coefficient of variation [CVI]) biologic variation along with index of individuality and reference change values (RCVs) were calculated. Univariate models were analyzed and included comparison of the six different time points for both daily and weekly samples. This was followed by a Tukey's post-hoc adjustment, with a P value of cats. Further research is warranted to evaluate NT-proBNP variability, particularly how serial measurements of NT-proBNP may be used in the diagnosis and management of cats with cardiac disease.

  1. N-terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptides in dogs and cats: A technical and clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Vieira de Lima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are quantitative indicators of biological processes performed by an organ or system. In recent years, natriuretic peptides (NPs have emerged as important tools in the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of heart diseases. Research has shown that serum and plasma levels of N-terminal pro brain NP (NT-proBNP in dogs and cats are the only biomarkers that afford to diagnose and monitor congestive processes and, indirectly, the myocardial function of small animals. The present review discusses the peer-reviewed specialized literature about NT-proBNP and presents and compares the potential clinical applications of this NP in veterinary medicine of small animals, considering diagnosis, follow-up, and prognosis of myocardial or systemic diseases. The relevance of NT-proBNP is associated with sample stability, easy determination in laboratory, sensitivity, accuracy, and the possibility to analyze myocardial function. These advantages are specially important when NT-proBNP is compared with other cardiac biomarkers, mostly those that indicate the integrity of the myocardial cell. Fast NT-proBNP assays are marketed today and may be used in association with complementary tests. Together, these methods are an important source of information in differential diagnosis of heart and lung diseases as well in the early diagnosis of cardiopathy in dogs and cats, proving valuable tools in treatment and prognosis.

  2. The N-terminal region of reelin regulates postnatal dendritic maturation of cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chameau, Pascal; Inta, Dragos; Vitalis, Tania; Monyer, Hannah; Wadman, Wytse J; van Hooft, Johannes A

    2009-04-28

    Cajal-Retzius cells, located in layer I of the cortex, synthesize and secrete the glycoprotein reelin, which plays a pivotal role in neuronal migration during embryonic development. Cajal-Retzius cells persist after birth, but their postnatal role is unknown. Here we show that Cajal-Retzius cells receive a major excitatory synaptic input via serotonin 5-HT(3) receptors. Blocking this input using pharmacological tools or neutralization of reelin signaling results in hypercomplexity of apical, but not basal, dendrites of cortical layer II/III pyramidal neurons. A similar hypercomplexity is observed in the cortex of the 5-HT(3A) receptor knockout mouse. The increased dendritic complexity can be rescued by application of recombinant full-length reelin or its N-terminal fragment, but not by the central fragment of reelin, and involves a signal transduction pathway independent of the activation of the canonical reelin receptors. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role of serotonin, Cajal-Retzius cells, and reelin in the postnatal maturation of the cortex.

  3. N-Terminal Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-1, a Potential Subunit for Malaria Vivax Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. Versiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human malaria is widely distributed in the Middle East, Asia, the western Pacific, and Central and South America. Plasmodium vivax started to have the attention of many researchers since it is causing diseases to millions of people and several reports of severe malaria cases have been noticed in the last few years. The lack of in vitro cultures for P. vivax represents a major delay in developing a functional malaria vaccine. One of the major candidates to antimalarial vaccine is the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1, which is expressed abundantly on the merozoite surface and capable of activating the host protective immunity. Studies have shown that MSP-1 possesses highly immunogenic fragments, capable of generating immune response and protection in natural infection in endemic regions. This paper shows humoral immune response to different proteins of PvMSP1 and the statement of N-terminal to be added to the list of potential candidates for malaria vivax vaccine.

  4. Structure of the N-terminal region of Haemophilus Influenzae HI0017: Implications for function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Liping; Mack, Jamey; Hajduk, Phil; Fesik, Stephen W. [Abbott Laboratories, Pharmaceutical Discovery Division, D46Y, AP10/LL (United States)

    2001-06-15

    Haemophilus influenzae is a gram-negative pathogen that causes infections ranging from asymptomatic colonization of the human upper respiratory tract to serious invasive diseases such as meningitis. Although the genome of Haemophilus influenzae has been completely sequenced, the structure and function of many of these proteins are unknown. HI0017 is one of these uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the three-dimensional solution structure of the N-terminal portion of HI0017 as determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and two short {alpha}-helices. It is similar to the C-terminal domain of Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR). The C-terminal portion of HI0017 has an amino acid sequence that closely resembles pyruvate formate-lyase - an enzyme that converts pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and formate by a radical mechanism. Based on structural and sequence comparisons, we propose that the C-terminus of HI0017 functions as an enzyme with a glycyl radical mechanism, while the N-terminus participates in protein/protein interactions involving an activase (iron-sulfur protein) and/or the substrate.

  5. Solution structure of Atg8 reveals conformational polymorphism of the N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarten, Melanie, E-mail: m.schwarten@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Strukturbiologie und Biophysik, ISB-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Biologie und BMFZ, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stoldt, Matthias, E-mail: m.stoldt@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Strukturbiologie und Biophysik, ISB-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Biologie und BMFZ, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Mohrlueder, Jeannine, E-mail: j.mohrlueder@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Strukturbiologie und Biophysik, ISB-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Willbold, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.willbold@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institut fuer Strukturbiologie und Biophysik, ISB-3, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Biologie und BMFZ, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-05-07

    During autophagy a crescent shaped like membrane is formed, which engulfs the material that is to be degraded. This membrane grows further until its edges fuse to form the double membrane covered autophagosome. Atg8 is a protein, which is required for this initial step of autophagy. Therefore, a multistage conjugation process of newly synthesized Atg8 to phosphatidylethanolamine is of critical importance. Here we present the high resolution structure of unprocessed Atg8 determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Its C-terminal subdomain shows a well-defined ubiquitin-like fold with slightly elevated mobility in the pico- to nanosecond timescale as determined by heteronuclear NOE data. In comparison to unprocessed Atg8, cleaved Atg8{sup G116} shows a decreased mobility behaviour. The N-terminal domain adopts different conformations within the micro- to millisecond timescale. The possible biological relevance of the differences in dynamic behaviours between both subdomains as well as between the cleaved and uncleaved forms is discussed.

  6. PLC-δ1-Lf, a novel N-terminal extended phospholipase C-δ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Young; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Moo-Sang; Seo, Jung Soo; Kim, Bo Seong; Bak, Hye Jin; Lee, Jin Young; Park, Myoung-Ae; Park, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Hyung Ho; Chung, Joon Ki

    2013-10-10

    Phospholipase C-δ (PLC-δ), a key enzyme in phosphoinositide turnover, is involved in a variety of physiological functions. The widely expressed PLC-δ1 isoform is the best characterized and the most well understood phospholipase family member. However, the functional and molecular mechanisms of PLC-δ1 remain obscure. Here, we identified that the N-terminal region of mouse PLC-δ1 gene has two variants, a novel alternative splicing form, named as long form (mPLC-δ1-Lf) and the previously reported short form (mPLC-δ1-Sf), having exon 2 and exon 1, respectively, while both the gene variants share exons 3-16 for RNA transcription. Furthermore, the expression, identification and enzymatic characterization of the two types of PLC-δ1 genes were compared. Expression of mPLC-δ1-Lf was found to be tissue specific, whereas mPLC-δ1-Sf was widely distributed. The recombinant mPLC-δ1-Sf protein exhibited higher activity than recombinant mPLC-δ1-Lf protein. Although, the general catalytic and regulatory properties of mPLC-δ1-Lf are similar to those of PLC-δ1-Sf isozyme, the mPLC-δ1-Lf showed some distinct regulatory properties, such as tissue-specific expression and lipid binding specificity, particularly for phosphatidylserine. © 2013.

  7. The N-terminal 33 amino acid domain of Siva-1 is sufficient for nuclear localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.Y.; Yang, L.X. [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Z.F. [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Biochemistry, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Diseases Control, Sun Yat-sen University, Ministry of Education in China, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-12-02

    Siva-1 induces apoptosis in multiple pathological processes and plays an important role in the suppression of tumor metastasis, protein degradation, and other functions. Although many studies have demonstrated that Siva-1 functions in the cytoplasm, a few have found that Siva-1 can relocate to the nucleus. In this study, we found that the first 33 amino acid residues of Siva-1 are required for its nuclear localization. Further study demonstrated that the green fluorescent protein can be imported into the nucleus after fusion with these 33 amino acid residues. Other Siva-1 regions and domains showed less effect on Siva-1 nuclear localization. By site-mutagenesis of all of these 33 amino acid residues, we found that mutants of the first 1-18 amino acids affected Siva-1 nuclear compartmentalization but could not complete this localization independently. In summary, we demonstrated that the N-terminal 33 amino acid residues were sufficient for Siva-1 nuclear localization, but the mechanism of this translocation needs additional investigation.

  8. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  9. Structural insights into the human RyR2 N-terminal region involved in cardiac arrhythmias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borko, Ľubomír; Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk; Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Beck, Konrad [Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XY Wales (United Kingdom); Lai, F. Anthony [Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff CF14 4XN Wales (United Kingdom); Zahradníková, Alexandra, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Molecular Physiology and Genetics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 5, 833 34 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ševčík, Jozef, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-11-01

    X-ray and solution structures of the human RyR2 N-terminal region were obtained under near-physiological conditions. The structure exhibits a unique network of interactions between its three domains, revealing an important stabilizing role of the central helix. Human ryanodine receptor 2 (hRyR2) mediates calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, enabling cardiomyocyte contraction. The N-terminal region of hRyR2 (amino acids 1–606) is the target of >30 arrhythmogenic mutations and contains a binding site for phosphoprotein phosphatase 1. Here, the solution and crystal structures determined under near-physiological conditions, as well as a homology model of the hRyR2 N-terminal region, are presented. The N-terminus is held together by a unique network of interactions among its three domains, A, B and C, in which the central helix (amino acids 410–437) plays a prominent stabilizing role. Importantly, the anion-binding site reported for the mouse RyR2 N-terminal region is notably absent from the human RyR2. The structure concurs with the differential stability of arrhythmogenic mutations in the central helix (R420W, I419F and I419F/R420W) which are owing to disparities in the propensity of mutated residues to form energetically favourable or unfavourable contacts. In solution, the N-terminus adopts a globular shape with a prominent tail that is likely to involve residues 545–606, which are unresolved in the crystal structure. Docking the N-terminal domains into cryo-electron microscopy maps of the closed and open RyR1 conformations reveals C{sup α} atom movements of up to 8 Å upon channel gating, and predicts the location of the leucine–isoleucine zipper segment and the interaction site for spinophilin and phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 on the RyR surface.

  10. Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Novel Modification of Peptides: N-Terminal Cyclization through the Formation of α-Ketoamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Kyung, Hyunsook; Yokota, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-20

    The hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins constitutes a large group of post-translational modifications that can result in structural and functional changes. These oxidations can lead to hydroxylation, sulfoxidation, or carbonylation of certain amino acid residues and cleavage of peptide bonds. In addition, hydroxyl radicals can convert the N-terminus of peptides to an α-ketoamide via abstraction of the N-terminal α-hydrogen and hydrolysis of the ketimine intermediate. In the present study, we identified N-terminal cyclization as a novel modification mediated by a hydroxyl radical. The reaction of angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Cu(II)/ascorbic acid (AA) system or UV/hydrogen peroxide system produced N-terminal cyclized-Ang II (Ang C) and pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P, CH3COCONH-RVYIHPF). The structure of Ang C was confirmed by mass spectrometry and comparison to an authentic standard. The subsequent incubation of isolated Ang P in the presence of Cu(II)/AA revealed that Ang P was the direct precursor of Ang C. The proposed mechanism involves the formation of a nitrogen-centered (aminyl) radical, which cyclizes to form a five-membered ring containing the alkoxy radical. The subsequent β-scission reaction of the alkoxyl radical results in the cleavage of the terminal CH3CO group. The initial aminyl radical can be stabilized by chelation to the Cu(II) ions. The affinity of Ang C toward the Ang II type 1 receptor was significantly lower than that of Ang II or Ang P. Ang C was not further metabolized by aminopeptidase A, which converts Ang II to Ang III. Hydroxyl radical-mediated N-terminal cyclization was also observed in other Ang peptides containing N-terminal alanine, arginine, valine, and amyloid β 1-11 (DAEFRHDSGYE).

  11. A noncanonical PWI domain in the N-terminal helicase-associated region of the spliceosomal Brr2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absmeier, Eva; Rosenberger, Leonie; Apelt, Luise; Becke, Christian; Santos, Karine F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C

    2015-04-01

    The spliceosomal RNA helicase Brr2 is required for the assembly of a catalytically active spliceosome on a messenger RNA precursor. Brr2 exhibits an unusual organization with tandem helicase units, each comprising dual RecA-like domains and a Sec63 homology unit, preceded by a more than 400-residue N-terminal helicase-associated region. Whereas recent crystal structures have provided insights into the molecular architecture and regulation of the Brr2 helicase region, little is known about the structural organization and function of its N-terminal part. Here, a near-atomic resolution crystal structure of a PWI-like domain that resides in the N-terminal region of Chaetomium thermophilum Brr2 is presented. CD spectroscopic studies suggested that this domain is conserved in the yeast and human Brr2 orthologues. Although canonical PWI domains act as low-specificity nucleic acid-binding domains, no significant affinity of the unusual PWI domain of Brr2 for a broad spectrum of DNAs and RNAs was detected in band-shift assays. Consistently, the C. thermophilum Brr2 PWI-like domain, in the conformation seen in the present crystal structure, lacks an expanded positively charged surface patch as observed in at least one canonical, nucleic acid-binding PWI domain. Instead, in a comprehensive yeast two-hybrid screen against human spliceosomal proteins, fragments of the N-terminal region of human Brr2 were found to interact with several other spliceosomal proteins. At least one of these interactions, with the Prp19 complex protein SPF27, depended on the presence of the PWI-like domain. The results suggest that the N-terminal region of Brr2 serves as a versatile protein-protein interaction platform in the spliceosome and that some interactions require or are reinforced by the PWI-like domain.

  12. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-05-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents.

  13. Folding and stability studies on C-PE and its natural N-terminal truncant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Khalid; Parmar, Asha; Rahman, Safikur; Kaushal, Avani; Madamwar, Datta; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2014-03-01

    The conformational and functional state of biliproteins can be determined by optical properties of the covalently linked chromophores. α-Subunit of most of the phycoerythrin contains 164 residues. Recently determined crystal structure of the naturally truncated form of α-subunit of cyanobacterial phycoerythrin (Tr-αC-PE) lacks 31 N-terminal residues present in its full length form (FL-αC-PE). This provides an opportunity to investigate the structure-function relationship between these two natural forms. We measured guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denaturation curves of FL-αC-PE and Tr-αC-PE proteins, followed by observing changes in absorbance at 565nm, fluorescence at 350 and 573nm, and circular dichroism at 222nm. The denaturation curve of each protein was analyzed for ΔGD(∘), the value of Gibbs free energy change on denaturation (ΔGD) in the absence of GdmCl. The main conclusions of the this study are: (i) GdmCl-induced denaturation (native state↔denatured state) of FL-αC-PE and Tr-αC-PE is reversible and follows a two-state mechanism, (ii) FL-αC-PE is 1.4kcalmol(-1) more stable than Tr-αC-PE, (iii) truncation of 31-residue long fragment that contains two α-helices, does not alter the 3-D structure of the remaining protein polypeptide chain, protein-chromophore interaction, and (iv) amino acid sequence of Tr-αC-PE determines the functional structure of the phycoerythrin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Production and applications of an N-terminally-truncated recombinant beta-haemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M; Singh, A; Sharma, A

    2014-07-01

    The beta-haemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus (SA-hlb) is a secreted neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) implicated in the pathogenesis of infection and responsible for the characteristic in vitro 'hot-cold' haemolytic ability of the bacterium. Here, we describe the production of a biologically active N-terminally-truncated recombinant SA-hlb protein for use in in vitro assays and as a research tool. Using local isolates of S. aureus, we PCR-amplified an SA-hlb DNA sequence of 891 nucleotides, 99 nucleotides shorter than the full-length molecule, before cloning and sequencing (GenBank accession no. JN580071). The pQE.TriSystem vector (Qiagen, Germany) was used to express recombinant SA-hlb (r-SA-hlb) with a C-terminal 8xHis tag in Escherichia coli JM107 cells. Both JM107 lysate and the purified r-SA-hlb possessed hot-cold lytic activity against sheep and buffalo erythrocytes, which was abolished by incubation at ≥90 °C for 30 min or exposure to dithiothreitol, and could be neutralized by bovine immune sera. Purified r-SA-hlb was also cytotoxic to buffalo mononuclear cells and was effective as a coating antigen for indirect ELISA to screen for reactive sera. Importantly, the r-SA-hlb was suitable for use as a β-toxin in the modified CAMP test. We conclude that the r-SA-hlb protein produced was functionally active and has numerous potential applications. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Coactivation of the N-terminal transactivation of mineralocorticoid receptor by Ubc9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kenichi; Shibata, Hirotaka; Kurihara, Isao; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Suda, Noriko; Murai-Takeda, Ayano; Saito, Ikuo; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Kato, Shigeaki; Saruta, Takao; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2007-01-19

    Molecular mechanisms underlying mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-mediated gene expression are not fully understood. Various transcription factors are post-translationally modified by small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1). We investigated the role of the SUMO-1-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 in MR transactivation. Yeast two-hybrid, GST-pulldown, and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that Ubc9 interacted with N-terminal MR-(1-670). Endogenous Ubc9 is associated with stably expressing MR in 293-MR cells. Transient transfection assays in COS-1 cells showed that Ubc9 increased MR transactivation of reporter constructs containing MRE, ENaC, or MMTV promoter in a hormone-sensitive manner. Moreover, reduction of Ubc9 protein levels by small interfering RNA attenuated hormonal activation of a reporter construct as well as an endogenous target gene by MR. A sumoylation-inactive mutant Ubc9(C93S) similarly interacted with MR and potentiated aldosterone-dependent MR transactivation. An MR mutant in which four lysine residues within sumoylation motifs were mutated into arginine (K89R/K399R/K494R/K953R) failed to be sumoylated, but Ubc9 similarly enhanced transactivation by the mutant MR, indicating that sumoylation activity is dispensable for coactivation capacity of Ubc9. Coexpression of Ubc9 and steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) synergistically enhanced MR-mediated transactivation in transient transfection assays. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that endogenous MR, Ubc9, and SRC-1 were recruited to an endogenous ENaC gene promoter in a largely aldosterone-dependent manner. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed a complex of MR, Ubc9, and SRC-1 in mammalian cells, and the endogenous proteins were colocalized in the nuclei of the mouse collecting duct cells. These findings support a physiological role of Ubc9 as a transcriptional MR coactivator, beyond the known SUMO E2-conjugating enzyme.

  16. N-terminal pro-C-natriuretic peptide and cytokine kinetics in dogs with endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floras, A N K; Holowaychuk, M K; Bienzle, D; Bersenas, A M E; Sharif, S; Harvey, T; Nordone, S K; Wood, G A

    2014-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro-C-natriuretic peptide (NT-proCNP) concentration at hospital admission has sufficient sensitivity and specificity to differentiate naturally occurring sepsis from nonseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). However, little is known about serum NT-proCNP concentrations in dogs during the course of sepsis. To determine serum NT-proCNP and cytokine kinetics in dogs with endotoxemia, a model of canine sepsis. Eighty canine serum samples. Eight healthy adult Beagles were randomized to receive Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5 μg/kg) or placebo (0.9% NaCl) as a single IV dose in a randomized crossover study. Serum collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 24 hours was stored at -80°C for batch analysis. Serum NT-proCNP was measured by ELISA and 13 cytokines and chemokines by multiplex magnetic bead-based assay. Serum NT-proCNP concentrations did not differ significantly between LPS- and placebo-treated dogs at any time. When comparing serum cytokine concentrations, LPS-treated dogs had higher interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, TNF-α and KC-like at 1, 2, and 4 hours; higher CCL2 at 1, 2, 4, and 24 hours; and higher IL-8 and CXCL10 at 4 hours compared to placebo-treated dogs. There were no differences in serum GM-CSF, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-7, IL-15 or IL-18 between LPS- and placebo-treated dogs. Serum NT-proCNP concentration does not change significantly in response to LPS administration in healthy dogs. Certain serum cytokine and chemokine concentrations are significantly increased within 1-4 hours after LPS administration and warrant further investigation as tools for the detection and management of sepsis in dogs. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States); Ruggli, Nicolas [Institute of Virology and Immunology, CH-3147 Mittelhäusern (Switzerland); Choi, Kyung H., E-mail: kychoi@utmb.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  18. Interactions of the integrin subunit beta1A with protein kinase B/Akt, p130Cas and paxillin contribute to regulation of radiation survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidler, Julia; Durzok, Rita; Brakebusch, Cord

    2005-01-01

    in presence or absence of growth factors or inhibitors for phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), i.e. Ly294002 and wortmannin. In addition to colony formation, protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt) kinase activity, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p130Cas, paxillin and c-Jun N2-terminal kinase (JNK) expression...... substrates. PI3K inhibition moderately or strongly radiosensitized GD25beta1A or GD25beta1B cells, respectively. The pro-survival effects detected in serum starved GD25beta1A cells were due to direct, PI3K-mediated stimulation of PKB/Akt activity by beta1-integrins and induced p130Cas and paxillin...... phosphorylation. Phosphorylated p130Cas and paxillin subsequently prevented activation of cell death-regulating JNK. CONCLUSIONS: The data show that beta1-integrin-mediated signaling through the cytoplasmic integrin domains is critical for efficient pro-survival regulation after irradiation. Profound knowledge...

  19. N-terminal arginines modulate plasma-membrane localization of Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenawit Girmatsion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks is important for cardiac action potential termination. The underlying channel is composed of Kv7.1 α-subunits and KCNE1 β-subunits. While most evidence suggests a role of KCNE1 transmembrane domain and C-terminus for the interaction, the N-terminal KCNE1 polymorphism 38G is associated with reduced I(Ks and atrial fibrillation (a human arrhythmia. Structure-function relationship of the KCNE1 N-terminus for I(Ks modulation is poorly understood and was subject of this study. METHODS: We studied N-terminal KCNE1 constructs disrupting structurally important positively charged amino-acids (arginines at positions 32, 33, 36 as well as KCNE1 constructs that modify position 38 including an N-terminal truncation mutation. Experimental procedures included molecular cloning, patch-clamp recording, protein biochemistry, real-time-PCR and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: All KCNE1 constructs physically interacted with Kv7.1. I(Ks resulting from co-expression of Kv7.1 with non-atrial fibrillation '38S' was greater than with any other construct. Ionic currents resulting from co-transfection of a KCNE1 mutant with arginine substitutions ('38G-3xA' were comparable to currents evoked from cells transfected with an N-terminally truncated KCNE1-construct ('Δ1-38'. Western-blots from plasma-membrane preparations and confocal images consistently showed a greater amount of Kv7.1 protein at the plasma-membrane in cells co-transfected with the non-atrial fibrillation KCNE1-38S than with any other construct. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study indicate that N-terminal arginines in positions 32, 33, 36 of KCNE1 are important for reconstitution of I(Ks. Furthermore, our results hint towards a role of these N-terminal amino-acids in membrane representation of the delayed rectifier channel complex.

  20. N-Terminal Tau Fragments as Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease and Neurotrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    and the abnormal activation of kinases such as fyn and GSK3b. (2) This results in cell cycle re-entry, causing (2a) abortive apoptotic changes and (3...of AD, with important implications for both AD diagnostic and therapeutic development. Introduction The identification of neurodegeneration...neuropathogenesis (56-57) that links Aβ-driven synaptotoxicity via postsynaptic tau to CCRE, abortive apoptotic changes, damage to neuronal polarity and

  1. The N-terminal region of the dopamine D2 receptor, a rhodopsin-like GPCR, regulates correct integration into the plasma membrane and endocytic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, DI; Min, C; Jung, KS; Cheong, SY; Zheng, M; Cheong, SJ; Oak, MH; Cheong, JH; Lee, BK; Kim, KM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Functional roles of the N-terminal region of rhodopsin-like GPCR family remain unclear. Using dopamine D2 and D3 receptors as a model system, we probed the roles of the N-terminal region in the signalling, intracellular trafficking of receptor proteins, and explored the critical factors that determine the functionality of the N-terminal region. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor was gradually shortened or switched with that of the D3 receptor or a non-specific sequence (FLAG), or potential N-terminal glycosylation sites were mutated. Effects of these manipulations on surface expression, internalization, post-endocytic behaviours and signalling were determined. KEY RESULTS Shortening the N-terminal region of the D2 receptor enhanced receptor internalization and impaired surface expression and signalling; ligand binding, desensitization and down-regulation were not affected but their association with a particular microdomain, caveolae, was disrupted. Replacement of critical residues within the N-terminal region with the FLAG epitope failed to restore surface expression but partially restored the altered internalization and signalling. When the N-terminal regions were switched between D2 and D3 receptors, cell surface expression pattern of each receptor was switched. Mutations of potential N-terminal glycosylation sites inhibited surface expression but enhanced internalization of D2 receptors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Shortening of N-terminus or mutation of glycosylation sites located within the N-terminus enhanced receptor internalization but impaired the surface expression of D2 receptors. The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor, in a sequence-specific manner, controls the receptor's conformation and integration into the plasma membrane, which determine its subcellular localization, intracellular trafficking and signalling properties. PMID:22117524

  2. Molecular basis for activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boguth, Cassandra A.; Singh, Puja; Huang, Chih-chin; Tesmer, John J.G. (Michigan)

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) selectively recognize and are allosterically regulated by activated GPCRs, but the molecular basis for this interaction is not understood. Herein, we report crystal structures of GRK6 in which regions known to be critical for receptor phosphorylation have coalesced to stabilize the kinase domain in a closed state and to form a likely receptor docking site. The crux of this docking site is an extended N-terminal helix that bridges the large and small lobes of the kinase domain and lies adjacent to a basic surface of the protein proposed to bind anionic phospholipids. Mutation of exposed, hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal helix selectively inhibits receptor, but not peptide phosphorylation, suggesting that these residues interact directly with GPCRs. Our structural and biochemical results thus provide an explanation for how receptor recognition, phospholipid binding, and kinase activation are intimately coupled in GRKs.

  3. Spying the neutralizing epitopes on E2 N-terminal by candidate epitope-vaccines against classical swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Nan; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2006-05-08

    Our previous study proved that the N-terminal (aa693-711) of glycoprotein E2 contained sequential neutralizing epitopes. In this study, four candidate epitope-vaccines (EVs) were separately prepared and evaluated. Among them, epitope-vaccine EV-BC1a (BC1a: aa693-699) induced high level of epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies and exhibited similar protective capability with that induced by Chinese vaccine strain (C-strain). These results confirmed CKEDYRY (aa693-699) as a principal sequential neutralizing epitope on E2 N-terminal. Moreover, these findings also indicate that epitope-vaccine is a potent candidate strategy for marker vaccine against classical swine fever virus (CSFV).

  4. Copper binding to the N-terminally acetylated, naturally occurring form of alpha-synuclein induces local helical folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Marco C; Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Rossetti, Giulia; Zweckstetter, Markus; Carloni, Paolo; Selenko, Philipp; Griesinger, Christian; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2015-05-27

    Growing evidence supports a link between brain copper homeostasis, the formation of alpha-synuclein (AS)-copper complexes, and the development of Parkinson disease (PD). Recently it was demonstrated that the physiological form of AS is N-terminally acetylated (AcAS). Here we used NMR spectroscopy to structurally characterize the interaction between Cu(I) and AcAS. We found that the formation of an AcAS-Cu(I) complex at the N-terminal region stabilizes local conformations with α-helical secondary structure and restricted motility. Our work provides new evidence into the metallo-biology of PD and opens new lines of research as the formation of AcAS-Cu(I) complex might impact on AcAS membrane binding and aggregation.

  5. ELKS controls the pool of readily releasable vesicles at excitatory synapses through its N-terminal coiled-coil domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Richard G; Liu, Changliang; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-06-02

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, synaptic strength is determined by the pool of readily releasable vesicles (RRP) and the probability of release (P) of each RRP vesicle. These parameters are controlled at the active zone and vary across synapses, but how such synapse specific control is achieved is not understood. ELKS proteins are enriched at vertebrate active zones and enhance P at inhibitory hippocampal synapses, but ELKS functions at excitatory synapses are not known. Studying conditional knockout mice for ELKS, we find that ELKS enhances the RRP at excitatory synapses without affecting P. Surprisingly, ELKS C-terminal sequences, which interact with RIM, are dispensable for RRP enhancement. Instead, the N-terminal ELKS coiled-coil domains that bind to Liprin-α and Bassoon are necessary to control RRP. Thus, ELKS removal has differential, synapse-specific effects on RRP and P, and our findings establish important roles for ELKS N-terminal domains in synaptic vesicle priming.

  6. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and long-term mortality in stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Grønning, Bjørn; Køber, Lars

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of the inactive N-terminal fragment of pro-brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a strong predictor of mortality among patients with acute coronary syndromes and may be a strong prognostic marker in patients with chronic coronary heart disease as well. We assessed...... the relationship between N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) levels and long-term mortality from all causes in a large cohort of patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS: NT-pro-BNP was measured in baseline serum samples from 1034 patients referred for angiography because of symptoms or signs of coronary...... of myocardial infarction, angina, hypertension, diabetes, or chronic heart failure; creatinine clearance rate; body-mass index; smoking status; plasma lipid levels; LVEF; and the presence or absence of clinically significant coronary artery disease on angiography. CONCLUSIONS: NT-pro-BNP is a marker of long...

  7. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J.

    2016-06-22

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of thePyrococcus furiosusminichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation.

  8. The Autolysis of Human HtrA1 Is Governed by the Redox State of Its N-Terminal Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Ris?r, Michael W.; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Thomsen, Line R.; Dyrlund, Thomas F.; Nielsen, Tania A.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Enghild, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    Human HtrA1 (high-temperature requirement protein A1) belongs to a conserved family of serine proteases involved in protein quality control and cell fate. The homotrimeric ubiquitously expressed protease has chymotrypsin-like specificity and primarily targets hydrophobic stretches in selected or misfolded substrate proteins. In addition, the enzyme is capable of exerting autolytic activity by removing the N-terminal insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)/Kazal-like tandem motif wi...

  9. Detection of left ventricular enlargement and impaired systolic function with plasma N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønning, Bjørn Aaris; Nilsson, Jens C.; Søndergaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain- and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) have been identified as promising markers for heart failure. However, previous studies have revealed that they may hold insufficient diagnostic power for implementation into clinical practice because of a significant...... and magnetic resonance imaging along with 20 age-matched and gender-matched healthy control subjects. RESULTS: NT-proBNP was associated with LV end-diastolic (r = 0.69; P

  10. Plasmatic levels of N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in preeclamptic patients and healthy normotensive pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna-Villasmil, Eduardo; Mejia-Montilla, Jorly; Reyna-Villasmil, Nadia; Mayner-Tresol, Gabriel; Herrera-Moya, Pedro; Fernández-Ramírez, Andreina; Rondón-Tapía, Marta

    2017-08-31

    To compare plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations in preeclamptic patients and healthy normotensive pregnant women. A cases-controls study was done with 180 patients at Hospital Central Dr. Urquinaona, Maracaibo, Venezuela, that included 90 preeclamptic patients (group A; cases) and 90 healthy normotensive pregnant women selected with the same age and body mass index similar to group A (group B; controls). Blood samples were collected one hour after admission and prior to administration of any medication in group A to determine plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and other laboratory parameters. Plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations in group A (mean 1.01 [0.26] pg/mL) showed a significant difference when compared with patients in group B (mean 0.55 [0.07] pg/mL; P<.001]. There was no significant correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure values in preeclamptic patients (P=ns). A cut-off value of 0.66ng/mL had an area under the curve of 0.93, sensitivity of 87.8%, specificity of 83.3%, a positive predictive value of 84.0% and a negative predictive value of 87.2%, with a diagnostic accuracy of 85.6%. Preeclamptic patients have significantly higher concentrations of plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide compared with healthy normotensive pregnant women, with high predictive values for diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. N-terminal tagging of human P2X7 receptor disturbs calcium influx and dye uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisig, Karin; Kristensen, Nikolaj Pagh; Dommer, Maja Wallentin; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2017-12-30

    The P2X7 receptor is a frequently studied member of the purinergic receptor family signalling via channel opening and membrane pore formation. Fluorescent imaging is an important molecular method for studying cellular receptor expression and localization. Fusion of receptors to fluorescent proteins might cause major functional changes and requires careful functional evaluation such as has been done for the rat P2X7 receptor. This study examines fusion constructs of the human P2X7 receptor. We assessed surface expression, channel opening with calcium influx, and pore formation using YO-PRO-1 dye uptake in response to BzATP stimulation in transfected cells. We found that tagging at the N-terminal of the human P2X7 receptor with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) disturbed channel opening and pore formation despite intact surface expression. A triple hemagglutinin (3HA) fused to the N-terminal also disrupted pore formation but not channel opening showing that even a small tag alters the normal function of the receptor. Together, this suggests that in contrast to what has been observed for the rat P2X7 receptor, the human P2X7 receptor contains N-terminal motifs important for signalling that prevent the construction of a functionally active fusion protein.

  12. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences of polypeptides from early region 1A of human adenovirus 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, J F; Evelegh, C M; Branton, P E; Bayley, S T

    1984-01-01

    Experiments exploring the reasons for a multiplicity of products from early region 1A of adenovirus 5 are described. Labeled early region 1A products from wild-type virus were synthesized in infected cells and in a cell-free system programmed with mRNA from infected cells, immunoprecipitated specifically with an antipeptide serum, E1A-C1, directed against the C-terminal sequence of E1A products, and separated by gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional maps of [35S]methionine-labeled peptides were consistent with antigens of 52,000 daltons (52K) and 48.5K being from the 13S mRNA and antigens of 50K, 45K, and 35K from the 12S mRNA. Partial N-terminal sequences of 52K, 50K, 48.5K, and 45K synthesized in vitro showed that each of these antigens was initiated at the predicted ATG at nucleotide 560 in the DNA sequence. These results eliminate multiple initiation sites and proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminal end as sources of antigen diversity. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences were obtained in a similar way for E1A products from the Ad5 deletion mutant dl1504, which lacks the normal initiator codon. As predicted, these polypeptides are initiated at the next ATG, 15 codons downstream in the wild-type sequence. These results are discussed in relation to Kozak's ribosomal scanning model. Images PMID:6699947

  13. Insights into the Functional Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains of Helicobacter pylori DprA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajendradhar R Dwivedi

    Full Text Available DNA processing protein A (DprA plays a crucial role in the process of natural transformation. This is accomplished through binding and subsequent protection of incoming foreign DNA during the process of internalization. DprA along with Single stranded DNA binding protein A (SsbA acts as an accessory factor for RecA mediated DNA strand exchange. H. pylori DprA (HpDprA is divided into an N-terminal domain and a C- terminal domain. In the present study, individual domains of HpDprA have been characterized for their ability to bind single stranded (ssDNA and double stranded DNA (dsDNA. Oligomeric studies revealed that HpDprA possesses two sites for dimerization which enables HpDprA to form large and tightly packed complexes with ss and dsDNA. While the N-terminal domain was found to be sufficient for binding with ss or ds DNA, C-terminal domain has an important role in the assembly of poly-nucleoprotein complex. Using site directed mutagenesis approach, we show that a pocket comprising positively charged amino acids in the N-terminal domain has an important role in the binding of ss and dsDNA. Together, a functional cross talk between the two domains of HpDprA facilitating the binding and formation of higher order complex with DNA is discussed.

  14. The histone H3 N-terminal tail: a computational analysis of the free energy landscape and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuqing; Cui, Qiang

    2015-05-28

    Histone tails are the short peptide protrusions outside of the nucleosome core particle and they play a critical role in regulating chromatin dynamics and gene activity. A histone H3 N-terminal tail, like other histone tails, can be covalently modified on different residues to activate or repress gene expression. Previous studies have indicated that, despite its intrinsically disordered nature, the histone H3 N-terminal tail has regions of notable secondary structural propensities. To further understand the structure-dynamics-function relationship in this system, we have carried out 75.6 μs long implicit solvent simulations and 29.3 μs long explicit solvent simulations. The extensive samplings allow us to better characterize not only the underlying free energy landscape but also kinetic properties through Markov state models (MSM). Dihedral principal component analysis (dPCA) and locally scaled diffusion map (LSDMap) analysis yield consistent results that indicate an overall flat free energy surface with several shallow basins that correspond to conformations with a high α-helical propensity in two regions of the peptide. Kinetic information extracted from Markov state models reveals rapid transitions between different metastable states with mean first passage times spanning from several hundreds of nanoseconds to hundreds of microseconds. These findings shed light on how the dynamical nature of the histone H3 N-terminal tail is related to its function. The complementary nature of dPCA, LSDMap and MSM for the analysis of biomolecules is also discussed.

  15. Critical lysine residues within the overlooked N-terminal domain of human APE1 regulate its biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Damiano; Vascotto, Carlo; Marasco, Daniela; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Romanello, Milena; Vitagliano, Luigi; Pedone, Carlo; Poletto, Mattia; Cesaratto, Laura; Quadrifoglio, Franco; Scaloni, Andrea; Radicella, J Pablo; Tell, Gianluca

    2010-12-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), an essential protein in mammals, is involved in base excision DNA repair (BER) and in regulation of gene expression, acting as a redox co-activator of several transcription factors. Recent findings highlight a novel role for APE1 in RNA metabolism, which is modulated by nucleophosmin (NPM1). The results reported in this article show that five lysine residues (K24, K25, K27, K31 and K32), located in the APE1 N-terminal unstructured domain, are involved in the interaction of APE1 with both RNA and NPM1, thus supporting a competitive binding mechanism. Data from kinetic experiments demonstrate that the APE1 N-terminal domain also serves as a device for fine regulation of protein catalytic activity on abasic DNA. Interestingly, some of these critical lysine residues undergo acetylation in vivo. These results suggest that protein-protein interactions and/or post-translational modifications involving APE1 N-terminal domain may play important in vivo roles, in better coordinating and fine-tuning protein BER activity and function on RNA metabolism.

  16. The first N-terminal unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide: H-Gly-Aib-Gly-Aib-OtBu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2015-12-01

    Glycine (Gly) is incorporated in roughly half of all known peptaibiotic (nonribosomally biosynthesized antibiotic peptides of fungal origin) sequences and is the residue with the greatest conformational flexibility. The conformational space of Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid) is severely restricted by the second methyl group attached to the Cα atom. Most of the crystal structures containing Aib are N-terminal protected. Deprotection of the N- or C-terminus of peptides may alter the hydrogen-bonding scheme and/or the structure and may facilitate crystallization. The structure reported here for glycyl-α-aminoisobutyrylglycyl-α-aminoisobutyric acid tert-butyl ester, C16H30N4O5, describes the first N-terminal-unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide. The achiral peptide could form an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the C=O group of Gly1 and the N-H group of Aib4. This hydrogen bond is found in all tetrapeptides and N-terminal-protected tripeptides containing Aib, apart from one exception. In the present work, this hydrogen bond is not observed (N...O = 5.88 Å). Instead, every molecule is hydrogen bonded to six other symmetry-related molecules with a total of eight hydrogen bonds per molecule. The backbone conformation starts in the right-handed helical region (and the left-handed helical region for the inverted molecule) and reverses the screw sense in the last two residues.

  17. Structural basis of HypK regulating N-terminal acetylation by the NatA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Felix Alexander; Gumiero, Andrea; Lapouge, Karine; Bange, Gert; Kopp, Jürgen; Sinning, Irmgard

    2017-06-06

    In eukaryotes, N-terminal acetylation is one of the most common protein modifications involved in a wide range of biological processes. Most N-acetyltransferase complexes (NATs) act co-translationally, with the heterodimeric NatA complex modifying the majority of substrate proteins. Here we show that the Huntingtin yeast two-hybrid protein K (HypK) binds tightly to the NatA complex comprising the auxiliary subunit Naa15 and the catalytic subunit Naa10. The crystal structures of NatA bound to HypK or to a N-terminal deletion variant of HypK were determined without or with a bi-substrate analogue, respectively. The HypK C-terminal region is responsible for high-affinity interaction with the C-terminal part of Naa15. In combination with acetylation assays, the HypK N-terminal region is identified as a negative regulator of the NatA acetylation activity. Our study provides mechanistic insights into the regulation of this pivotal protein modification.

  18. N-Terminal Lipid Modification Is Required for the Stable Accumulation of CyanoQ in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D Juneau

    Full Text Available The CyanoQ protein has been demonstrated to be a component of cyanobacterial Photosystem II (PS II, but there exist a number of outstanding questions concerning its physical association with the complex. CyanoQ is a lipoprotein; upon cleavage of its transit peptide by Signal Peptidase II, which targets delivery of the mature protein to the thylakoid lumenal space, the N-terminal cysteinyl residue is lipid-modified. This modification appears to tether this otherwise soluble component to the thylakoid membrane. To probe the functional significance of the lipid anchor, mutants of the CyanoQ protein have been generated in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to eliminate the N-terminal cysteinyl residue, preventing lipid modification. Substitution of the N-terminal cysteinyl residue with serine (Q-C22S resulted in a decrease in the amount of detectable CyanoQ protein to 17% that of the wild-type protein. Moreover, the physical properties of the accumulated Q-C22S protein were consistent with altered processing of the CyanoQ precursor. The Q-C22S protein was shifted to a higher apparent molecular mass and partitioned in the hydrophobic phase in TX-114 phase-partitioning experiments. These results suggest that the hydrophobic N-terminal 22 amino acids were not properly cleaved by a signal peptidase. Substitution of the entire CyanoQ transit peptide with the transit peptide of the soluble lumenal protein PsbO yielded the Q-SS mutant and resulted in no detectable accumulation of the modified CyanoQ protein. Finally, the CyanoQ protein was present at normal amounts in the PS II mutant strains ΔpsbB and ΔpsbO, indicating that an association with PS II was not a prerequisite for stable CyanoQ accumulation. Together these results indicate that CyanoQ accumulation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 depends on the presence of the N-terminal lipid anchor, but not on the association of CyanoQ with the PS II complex.

  19. Structure of the two-domain hexameric APS kinase from Thiobacillus denitrificans: structural basis for the absence of ATP sulfurylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Sean C. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Segel, Irwin H. [Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Fisher, Andrew J., E-mail: fisher@chem.ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2009-10-01

    APS kinase from Thiobacillus denitrificans contains an inactive N-terminal ATP sulfurylase domain. The structure presented unveils the first hexameric assembly for an APS kinase, and reveals that structural changes in the N-terminal domain disrupt the ATP sulfurylase active site thus prohibiting activity. The Tbd-0210 gene of the chemolithotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans is annotated to encode a 60.5 kDa bifunctional enzyme with ATP sulfurylase and APS kinase activity. This putative bifunctional enzyme was cloned, expressed and structurally characterized. The 2.95 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure reported here revealed a hexameric assembly with D{sub 3} symmetry. Each subunit contains a large N-terminal sulfurylase-like domain and a C-terminal APS kinase domain reminiscent of the two-domain fungal ATP sulfurylases of Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which also exhibit a hexameric assembly. However, the T. denitrificans enzyme exhibits numerous structural and sequence differences in the N-terminal domain that render it inactive with respect to ATP sulfurylase activity. Surprisingly, the C-terminal domain does indeed display APS kinase activity, indicating that this gene product is a true APS kinase. Therefore, these results provide the first structural insights into a unique hexameric APS kinase that contains a nonfunctional ATP sulfurylase-like domain of unknown function.

  20. Identification and analysis of the acetylated status of poplar proteins reveals analogous N-terminal protein processing mechanisms with other eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Cai; Zhu, Hang-Yong; Dong, Xiu-Mei; Ning, De-Li; Wang, Hong-Xia; Li, Wei-Hua; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The N-terminal protein processing mechanism (NPM) including N-terminal Met excision (NME) and N-terminal acetylation (N(α)-acetylation) represents a common protein co-translational process of some eukaryotes. However, this NPM occurred in woody plants yet remains unknown. To reveal the NPM in poplar, we investigated the N(α)-acetylation status of poplar proteins during dormancy by combining tandem mass spectrometry with TiO2 enrichment of acetylated peptides. We identified 58 N-terminally acetylated (N(α)-acetylated) proteins. Most proteins (47, >81%) are subjected to N(α)-acetylation following the N-terminal removal of Met, indicating that N(α)-acetylation and NME represent a common NPM of poplar proteins. Furthermore, we confirm that poplar shares the analogous NME and N(α)-acetylation (NPM) to other eukaryotes according to analysis of N-terminal features of these acetylated proteins combined with genome-wide identification of the involving methionine aminopeptidases (MAPs) and N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nat) enzymes in poplar. The N(α)-acetylated reactions and the involving enzymes of these poplar proteins are also identified based on those of yeast and human, as well as the subcellular location information of these poplar proteins. This study represents the first extensive investigation of N(α)-acetylation events in woody plants, the results of which will provide useful resources for future unraveling the regulatory mechanisms of N(α)-acetylation of proteins in poplar.

  1. Role of Adenosine Receptor A2A in Traumatic Optic Neuropathies (Addendum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    during ret- inal hypoxia regulated by NO (Kaur et al., 2006). Under pathological conditions, NO is synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase... oxide -mediated activation of extracellular signal -regulated kinase (ERK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) during hypoxia in cerebral cortical nuclei... hypoxia or LPS-induced TNF-α release and significantly repressed the inflammatory signaling , ERK in the activated microglia. Collectively, this work

  2. Ulmus macrocarpa Hance Extracts Attenuated H2O2 and UVB-Induced Skin Photo-Aging by Activating Antioxidant Enzymes and Inhibiting MAPK Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sun-Il; Lee, Jin-Ha; Kim, Jae-Min; Jung, Tae-Dong; Cho, Bong-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Dae-Won; Kim, Jinkyung; Kim, Jong-Yea; Lee, Ok-Hawn

    2017-01-01

    To protect from reactive oxygen species (ROS) damages, skin cells have evolved to have antioxidant enzymes, such as copper and zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD1), mitochondrial manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and glutathione reductase (GR), and suppressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. ...

  3. N-Terminal Pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in the Korean General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Jang-Young; Koh, Sang-Baek; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan; Han, Sang-Woo; Park, Jong-Ku; Choe, Kyung-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP) levels may serve as a useful marker of cardiovascular risk for screening of the general population. We evaluated reference levels and distribution of NT-proBNP in the Korean general population based on a large cohort study. Subjects and Methods We included 1,518 adult subjects (ages 40-69) of a community-based cohort from the Korea Rural Genomic Cohort (KRGC) Study. Thorough biochemical and clinical data were recorded for all subjects. Levels of NT-proBNP from all participants were determined. In order to determine normal reference levels, subjects with factors known to influence NT-proBNP levels were excluded. Results The characteristics of the cohort are described below; subjects were 41.2% male, and the mean age was 54.8±8.4 years. The distribution of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the cohort included hypertension (25%), left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiography (ECG-LVH) (15%), hypercholestolemia (4.5%), smoking (32%), diabetes (10.9%), history of coronary heart disease (4.9%), history of heart failure (0.9%), symptoms of heart failure (6.1%), elevated serum creatinine (≥1.5, 3.7%), and severe obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m2, 4.6%). The levels of NT-proBNP of all subjects are shown below; the mean was 60.1±42.1, and the median was 36.5 pg/mL. In addition, the levels of NT-proBNP of normal subjects (which did not have any risk factors, n=224) are shown below; the mean was 40.8, and the median was 32.1 pg/mL. In normal subjects, the NT-proBNP level was slightly higher in females (25.7±24.8 vs. 46.9±35.4, pECG-LVH. However, in subjects with a history of congestive heart failure (CHF) (58.5±103.29 vs. 213.8±258.8, pCHF had higher BNP levels (risk 0: 40.8±34.0, 1-2: 57.4±93.2, ≥3: 85.0±152.9 pg/mL). NT-proBNP levels were also related with age, sex, urine albumin, serum Cr, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (p<0.05). Conclusion We

  4. [Designing of hybrid human interferon alfa-2 strain-producers and the use of enteropeptidase for obtaining N-terminal methionine-free interferons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokov, D A; Riabichenko, V V; Akishina, R I; Ospel'nikova, T P; Glazunov, A V; Chestukhina, G G; Veĭko, V P

    2011-01-01

    A system for production of human interferon-alpha2a (IFN-alpha2a) and IFN-alpha2b lacking N-terminal methionine has been developed. Plasmids containing genes of hybrid IFN-alpha2 under the control of different promoters were constructed; a sequence encoding the enteropeptidase hydrolysis site being introduced in proximal part of the genes. As the result, 4 strains of Escherichia coli producing hybrid IFN-alpha2 have been obtained. The methodology for IFN-alpha2 renaturation, hydrolysis of its N-terminal part, chromatographic purification of N-terminal methionine-free IFN-alpha2 has been developed.

  5. X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal region of Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase and its implications for viral DNA recognition: N-Terminal Region of M-MuLV Integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Rongjin [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Aiyer, Sriram [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Cote, Marie L. [Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Xiao, Rong [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Jiang, Mei [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Acton, Thomas B. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Roth, Monica J. [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Montelione, Gaetano T. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854

    2017-02-03

    The retroviral integrase (IN) carries out the integration of a dsDNA copy of the viral genome into the host DNA, an essential step for viral replication. All IN proteins have three general domains, the N-terminal domain (NTD), the catalytic core domain, and the C-terminal domain. The NTD includes an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved in all retroviral IN proteins. Two crystal structures of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) IN N-terminal region (NTR) constructs that both include an N-terminal extension domain (NED, residues 1–44) and an HHCC zinc-finger NTD (residues 45–105), in two crystal forms are reported. The structures of IN NTR constructs encoding residues 1–105 (NTR1–105) and 8–105 (NTR8–105) were determined at 2.7 and 2.15 Å resolution, respectively and belong to different space groups. While both crystal forms have similar protomer structures, NTR1–105 packs as a dimer and NTR8–105 packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of the NED consists of three anti-parallel β-strands and an α-helix, similar to the NED of prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN. These three β-strands form an extended β-sheet with another β-strand in the HHCC Zn2+ binding domain, which is a unique structural feature for the M-MuLV IN. The HHCC Zn2+ binding domain structure is similar to that in HIV and PFV INs, with variations within the loop regions. Differences between the PFV and MLV IN NEDs localize at regions identified to interact with the PFV LTR and are compared with established biochemical and virological data for M-MuLV. Proteins 2017; 85:647–656.

  6. [Correlation between thermostability of the xylanase EvXyn11(TS) and its N-terminal disulfide bridge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Rou; Li, Jianfang; Gao, Shujuan; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Jing; Wu, Minchen

    2013-04-04

    To reveal the correlation between thermostability of xylanase EvXyn11(TS) and its N-terminal disulfide bridge, an EvXyn11(TS)-encoding gene (Syxyn11) was synthesized and subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. Multiple homology alignment of protein primary structures between the EvXyn11(TS) and several GH family 11 xylanases displayed that, in their N-termini, only EvXyn11(TS) contained a disulfide bridge (Cys5-Cys32), whose effect on the xylanase thermostability was predicted by molecular dynamics simulation. We constructed a gene Syxyn11(M), encoding the mutated xylanase (EvXyn11(M)) without N-terminal disulfide bridge. Then, Syxyn11 and Syxyn11(M) were expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115, and temperature and pH properties of the expressed enzymes were analyzed. The analytical results displayed that the temperature optimum of EvXyn11(M) was 70 degrees C, which was 15 degrees C lower than that of EvXyn11(TS). The half-life (t1/2(90)) of EvXyn11(TS) at 90 degrees C was 32 min, while the t1/2(70) of EvXyn11(M) at 70 degrees C was only 8.0 min. The important role of the N-terminal disulfide bridge on the thermostability of EvXyn11(TS) was first predicted by molecular dynamics simulation, and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. This work provided a novel strategy to improve thermostabilities of the mesophilic family 11 xylanases with high specific activities.

  7. The EBNA-2 N-Terminal Transactivation Domain Folds into a Dimeric Structure Required for Target Gene Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Friberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a γ-herpesvirus that may cause infectious mononucleosis in young adults. In addition, epidemiological and molecular evidence links EBV to the pathogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV has the unique ability to transform resting B cells into permanently proliferating, latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2 is a key regulator of viral and cellular gene expression for this transformation process. The N-terminal region of EBNA-2 comprising residues 1-58 appears to mediate multiple molecular functions including self-association and transactivation. However, it remains to be determined if the N-terminus of EBNA-2 directly provides these functions or if these activities merely depend on the dimerization involving the N-terminal domain. To address this issue, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the EBNA-2 N-terminal dimerization (END domain by heteronuclear NMR-spectroscopy. The END domain monomer comprises a small fold of four β-strands and an α-helix which form a parallel dimer by interaction of two β-strands from each protomer. A structure-guided mutational analysis showed that hydrophobic residues in the dimer interface are required for self-association in vitro. Importantly, these interface mutants also displayed severely impaired self-association and transactivation in vivo. Moreover, mutations of solvent-exposed residues or deletion of the α-helix do not impair dimerization but strongly affect the functional activity, suggesting that the EBNA-2 dimer presents a surface that mediates functionally important intra- and/or intermolecular interactions. Our study shows that the END domain is a novel dimerization fold that is essential for functional activity. Since this specific fold is a unique feature of EBNA-2 it might provide a novel target for anti-viral therapeutics.

  8. The relationship between N-terminal prosomatostatin, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (ZODIAC-35)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Peter R; Landman, Gijs W D; van Essen, Larissa; Struck, Joachim; Groenier, Klaas H; Bilo, Henk J G; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hormone somatostatin inhibits growth hormone release from the pituitary gland and is theoretically linked to diabetes and diabetes related complications. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between levels of the stable somatostatin precursor, N-terminal prosomatostatin

  9. Osmotic Stress Activates the TAK1-JNK Pathway While Blocking TAK1-Mediated NF-κB Activation: TAO2 Regulates TAK1 Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    HuangFu, Wei-Chun; Omori, Emily; Akira, Shizuo; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Osmotic stress activates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, which play important roles in cellular stress responses. TGF-β activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a member of the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) family and can activate JNK and p38. TAK1 can also activate Iκ B kinase (IKK) that leads to degradation of IκB and subsequent NF-κB activation. We found that TAK1 is essential for osmotic stress-induced activation of JNK, but is not an exclusive...

  10. Prognostic usefulness of anemia and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in outpatients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Kistorp, Caroline N

    2007-01-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and anemia are predictors of outcome in systolic heart failure. It is currently unclear how these 2 markers interact in particular with regard to the prognostic information carried by each risk marker. We therefore tested the hypothesis...... that anemia (World Health Organization criteria, hemoglobin levels marker. Clinical data from 345 patients with systolic heart failure were obtained...... prospectively at the baseline visit to our heart failure clinic (inclusion criterion left ventricular ejection fraction

  11. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels associated with severe hand, foot and mouth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Li, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Yu; Xie, Yan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Dang, Shuang-Suo

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is sometimes associated with serious complications such as acute heart failure that can cause substantial child mortality. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a sensitive and specific biomarker of congestive heart failure. The aim of this study was to use plasma NT-proBNP levels to establish the severity of childhood HFMD. Methods A retrospective study was performed in 128 Chinese patients with severe HFMD and 88 patie...

  12. N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Dichorionic Diamniotic Twins with Selective Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Mizobuchi, Masami; Sakai Hitomi; Iwatani Sota; Wada Keiko; Yoshimoto Seiji; Nakao Hideto

    2013-01-01

    Monochorionic diamniotic (MD) twins with selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR) have known associations with cardiac complications. However, the cardiac load of dichorionic diamniotic (DD) twins with sIUGR (DD-sIUGR) remains unclear. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) is a convenient marker of cardiac dysfunction in neonates, and is elevated in MD twins with sIUGR (MD-sIUGR). However, there are no reports assessing serum NT-pro BNP levels in DD-sIUGR. Here, we ai...

  13. Constitución y relaciones histotopográficas de la porción terminal del conducto parotideo

    OpenAIRE

    Suñol Sala, J.; Ruano Gil, Domingo

    1986-01-01

    En el presente trabajo describimos los resultados obtenidos después del estudio microscópico de la porción terminal de dieciocho conductos parotídeos correspondientes a fetos y cadáveres humanos adultos, para determinar su constitución y relaciones histotopográficas. Nuestras observaciones, nos permiten afirmar que no existe ninguna estructura esfinterina en esta zona, por lo que pensamos que la actividad funcional del conducto de Stenon está regulada por el músculo buccinador.

  14. The Drosophila Microtubule-Associated Protein Mars Stabilizes Mitotic Spindles by Crosslinking Microtubules through Its N-Terminal Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function....... Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs....

  15. Conserved N-terminal negative charges support optimally efficient N-type inactivation of Kv1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Prince

    Full Text Available N-type inactivation is produced by the binding of a potassium channel's N-terminus within the open pore, blocking conductance. Previous studies have found that introduction of negative charges into N-terminal inactivation domains disrupts inactivation; however, the Aplysia AKv1 N-type inactivation domain contains two negatively charged residues, E2 and E9. Rather than being unusual, sequence analysis shows that this N-terminal motif is highly conserved among Kv1 sequences across many phyla. Conservation analysis shows some tolerance at position 9 for other charged residues, like D9 and K9, whereas position 2 is highly conserved as E2. To examine the functional importance of these residues, site directed mutagenesis was performed and effects on inactivation were recorded by two electrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes. We find that inclusion of charged residues at positions 2 and 9 prevents interactions with non-polar sites along the inactivation pathway increasing the efficiency of pore block. In addition, E2 appears to have additional specific electrostatic interactions that stabilize the inactivated state likely explaining its high level of conservation. One possible explanation for E2's unique importance, consistent with our data, is that E2 interacts electrostatically with a positive charge on the N-terminal amino group to stabilize the inactivation domain at the block site deep within the pore. Simple electrostatic modeling suggests that due to the non-polar environment in the pore in the blocked state, even a 1 Å larger separation between these charges, produced by the E2D substitution, would be sufficient to explain the 65× reduced affinity of the E2D N-terminus for the pore. Finally, our studies support a multi-step, multi-site N-type inactivation model where the N-terminus interacts deep within the pore in an extended like structure placing the most N-terminal residues 35% of the way across the electric field in the pore blocked

  16. Motif decomposition of the phosphotyrosine proteome reveals a new N-terminal binding motif for SHIP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Hanke, S.; Hinsby, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    (P)-specific binding partners for peptides corresponding to the extracted motifs. We confirmed numerous previously known interaction motifs and found 15 new interactions mediated by phosphosites not previously known to bind SH2 or PTB. Remarkably, a novel hydrophobic N-terminal motif ((L/V/I)(L/V/I)pY) was identified...... and validated as a binding motif for the SH2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase SHIP2. Our decomposition of the in vivo Tyr(P) proteome furthermore suggests that two-thirds of the Tyr(P) sites mediate interaction, whereas the remaining third govern processes such as enzyme activation and nucleic acid...

  17. Identification of a Major Dimorphic Region in the Functionally Critical N-Terminal ID1 Domain of VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doritchamou, Justin; Sabbagh, Audrey; Jespersen, Jakob S

    2015-01-01

    The VAR2CSA protein of Plasmodium falciparum is transported to and expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface where it plays a key role in placental malaria (PM). It is the current leading candidate for a vaccine to prevent PM. However, the antigenic polymorphism integral to VAR2CSA poses...... a challenge for vaccine development. Based on detailed analysis of polymorphisms in the sequence of its ligand-binding N-terminal region, currently the main focus for vaccine development, we assessed var2csa from parasite isolates infecting pregnant women. The results reveal for the first time the presence...

  18. The chondroitin sulfate A-binding site of the VAR2CSA protein involves multiple N-terminal domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlbäck, Madeleine; Jørgensen, Lars M; Nielsen, Morten A

    2011-01-01

    shown that full-length recombinant VAR2CSA binds specifically to CSA with high affinity, however to date no sub-fragment of VAR2CSA has been shown to interact with CSA with similar affinity or specificity. In this study, we used a biosensor technology to examine the binding properties of a panel...... of truncated VAR2CSA proteins. The experiments indicate that the core of the CSA-binding site is situated in three domains, DBL2X-CIDR(PAM) and a flanking domain, located in the N-terminal part of VAR2CSA. Furthermore, recombinant VAR2CSA subfragments containing this region elicit antibodies with high parasite...

  19. Mutational analysis of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu in search of a role for the N-terminal region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Laurberg, M

    1998-01-01

    We have mutated lysine 2 and arginine 7 in elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli separately either to alanine or glutamic acid. The aim of the work was to reveal the possible interactions between the conserved N-terminal part of the molecule, which is rich in basic residues and aminoacyl...... this activity. Furthermore, arginine 7 seems to play a role in regulating the binding of GTP. The three-dimensional structure of the ternary complex, EF-Tu:GTP:Phe-tRNAPhe, involving Thermus aquaticus EF-Tu and yeast Phe-tRNA(Phe), shows that Arg7 is in a position which permits salt bridge formation with Asp284...

  20. Ischemia leads to apoptosis--and necrosis-like neuron death in the ischemic rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Stadelmann, Christine; Bastholm, Lone

    2004-01-01

    pyramidal cells of the rat hippocampus. The earliest ischemic changes were found on day 2 and 3, reflected by an upregulation of phospho-c-Jun in a proportion of morphologically intact CA1 neurons, which matched the number of neurons that succumbed to ischemia at later time points. At day 3 and later 3...... and/or caspase-3 expression represented a minor fraction (neurons, while the vast majority followed a necrosis-like pathway. Our studies suggest that CA1 pyramidal cell death following transient forebrain ischemia may be initiated through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway...

  1. The conserved N-terminal helix of acylpeptide hydrolase from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is important for its hyperthermophilic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuoming; Zheng, Baisong; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Yiqian; Manco, Giuseppe; Feng, Yan

    2008-09-01

    The acylpeptide hydrolases from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 has a short conserved N-terminal helix in its family. The role of this N-terminal helix in the function of the hyperthermophilic enzyme, however, is unknown. Here, we investigated this question by protein engineering and biophysical methods. We found that a mutant (DeltaN21) with the N-terminal helix deleted is no longer functional at the optimum temperature for WT enzyme (95 degrees C), required for the survival of Aeropyrum pernix K1. Instead, DeltaN21 has the optimum activity at approximately 77 degrees C, with higher activities than the WT enzyme below this temperature. DeltaN21 is less stable than the WT enzyme and started unfolding at approximately 77 degrees C, indicating that the loss of the enzymatic activity of DeltaN21 at higher temperature is due to its low thermodynamic stability. In addition, we found that the salt bridges formed between the N-terminal helix and the catalytic domain of the enzyme play only a minor role in stabilizing the enzyme, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions mainly contribute to the stabilization. Since the N-terminal helix is conserved in this family of enzymes, our results suggest that the N-terminal helix is likely to play an important role for stabilizing all other enzymes in this family.

  2. N-Terminal Domains in Two-Domain Proteins Are Biased to Be Shorter and Predicted to Fold Faster Than Their C-Terminal Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etai Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis of proteomes in all kingdoms of life reveals a strong tendency for N-terminal domains in two-domain proteins to have shorter sequences than their neighboring C-terminal domains. Given that folding rates are affected by chain length, we asked whether the tendency for N-terminal domains to be shorter than their neighboring C-terminal domains reflects selection for faster-folding N-terminal domains. Calculations of absolute contact order, another predictor of folding rate, provide additional evidence that N-terminal domains tend to fold faster than their neighboring C-terminal domains. A possible explanation for this bias, which is more pronounced in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, is that faster folding of N-terminal domains reduces the risk for protein aggregation during folding by preventing formation of nonnative interdomain interactions. This explanation is supported by our finding that two-domain proteins with a shorter N-terminal domain are much more abundant than those with a shorter C-terminal domain.

  3. MultiLoc: prediction of protein subcellular localization using N-terminal targeting sequences, sequence motifs and amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Annette; Dönnes, Pierre; Blum, Torsten; Adolph, Hans-Werner; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2006-05-15

    Functional annotation of unknown proteins is a major goal in proteomics. A key annotation is the prediction of a protein's subcellular localization. Numerous prediction techniques have been developed, typically focusing on a single underlying biological aspect or predicting a subset of all possible localizations. An important step is taken towards emulating the protein sorting process by capturing and bringing together biologically relevant information, and addressing the clear need to improve prediction accuracy and localization coverage. Here we present a novel SVM-based approach for predicting subcellular localization, which integrates N-terminal targeting sequences, amino acid composition and protein sequence motifs. We show how this approach improves the prediction based on N-terminal targeting sequences, by comparing our method TargetLoc against existing methods. Furthermore, MultiLoc performs considerably better than comparable methods predicting all major eukaryotic subcellular localizations, and shows better or comparable results to methods that are specialized on fewer localizations or for one organism. http://www-bs.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/Services/MultiLoc/

  4. New modules for the repeated internal and N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauss, Robert; Trautwein, Mark; Sommer, Thomas; Spang, Anne

    2005-01-15

    Epitope tagging is a powerful method for the rapid analysis of protein function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae epitope tags are introduced easily into chromosomal loci by homologous recombination using a simple PCR-based strategy. Although quite a number of tools exist for C-terminal tagging as well as N-terminal tagging of proteins expressed by heterologous promoters, there are only very limited possibilities to tag proteins at the N-terminus and retain the endogenous expression level. Furthermore, no PCR-templates for internal tagging have been reported. Here we describe new modules that are suitable for both the repeated N-terminal and internal tagging of proteins, leaving their endogenous promoters intact. The tags include 6xHA, 9xMyc, yEGFP, TEV-GST-6xHIS, ProtA, TEV-ProtA and TEV-ProtA-7xHIS in conjunction with different heterologous selection markers. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Characterization of four new monoclonal antibodies against the distal N-terminal region of PrPc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Didonna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders that affect humans and animals. They are characterized by the accumulation in the central nervous system of a pathological form of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC. The prion protein is a membrane glycoprotein that consists of two domains: a globular, structured C-terminus and an unstructured N-terminus. The N-terminal part of the protein is involved in different functions in both health and disease. In the present work we discuss the production and biochemical characterization of a panel of four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the distal N-terminus of PrPC using a well-established methodology based on the immunization of Prnp0/0 mice. Additionally, we show their ability to block prion (PrPSc replication at nanomolar concentrations in a cell culture model of prion infection. These mAbs represent a promising tool for prion diagnostics and for studying the physiological role of the N-terminal domain of PrPC.

  6. Identification of residues in the N-terminal PAS domains important for dimerization of Arnt and AhR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Whitelaw, Murray L.; Shearwin, Keith E.; Dodd, Ian B.; Chapman-Smith, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH).PAS dimeric transcription factors have crucial roles in development, stress response, oxygen homeostasis and neurogenesis. Their target gene specificity depends in part on partner protein choices, where dimerization with common partner Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt) is an essential step towards forming active, DNA binding complexes. Using a new bacterial two-hybrid system that selects for loss of protein interactions, we have identified 22 amino acids in the N-terminal PAS domain of Arnt that are involved in heterodimerization with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Of these, Arnt E163 and Arnt S190 were selective for the AhR/Arnt interaction, since mutations at these positions had little effect on Arnt dimerization with other bHLH.PAS partners, while substitution of Arnt D217 affected the interaction with both AhR and hypoxia inducible factor-1α but not with single minded 1 and 2 or neuronal PAS4. Arnt uses the same face of the N-terminal PAS domain for homo- and heterodimerization and mutational analysis of AhR demonstrated that the equivalent region is used by AhR when dimerizing with Arnt. These interfaces differ from the PAS β-scaffold surfaces used for dimerization between the C-terminal PAS domains of hypoxia inducible factor-2α and Arnt, commonly used for PAS domain interactions. PMID:21245039

  7. The N-terminal Domain of a TonB-dependent Transporter Undergoes a Reversible Stepwise Denaturation†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Jiménez, Ricardo H.; Cafiso, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria contain a family of outer membrane transport proteins that function in the uptake of rare nutrients, such as iron and vitamin B12. These proteins are termed TonB-dependent because transport requires an interaction with the inner membrane protein TonB. Using a combination of site-directed spin labeling and chemical denaturation, we examined the site-specific unfolding of regions of the Escherichia coli vitamin B12 transporter, BtuB. The data indicate that a portion of the N-terminal region of the protein, which occupies the lumen of the BtuB barrel, denatures prior to the unfolding of the barrel and that the free energy of folding for the N-terminus is less than that typically seen for globular proteins. Moreover, the data indicate that the N-terminal domain does not unfold in a single event, but unfolds in a series of independent steps. The unfolding of the N-terminus is reversible and removal of denaturant restores the native fold of the protein. These data are consistent with proposed transport mechanisms that involve a transient rearrangement or unfolding of the protein N-terminus, and they provide evidence for a specific protein conformation that might be an intermediate accessed during transport. PMID:22497281

  8. Recombinant N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain from mouse P-glycoprotein. Overexpression, purification, and role of cysteine 430.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, G; Baubichon-Cortay, H; Jault, J M; Cortay, J C; Deléage, G; Di Pietro, A

    1996-05-17

    Varying length cDNAs encoding the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from mouse mdr1 P-glyco- protein were prepared on the basis of structure predictions. Corresponding recombinant proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the shortest one containing amino acids 395-581 exhibited the highest solubility. Insertion of an N-terminal hexahistidine tag allowed domain purification by nickel-chelate affinity chromatography. NBD1 efficiently interacted with nucleotides. Fluorescence methods showed that ATP bound at millimolar concentrations and its 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) derivative at micromolar concentrations, while the 2'(3')-N-methylanthraniloyl derivative had intermediate affinity. Photoaffinity labeling was achieved upon irradiation with 8-azido-ATP. The domain exhibited ATPase activity with a Km for MgATP in the millimolar range, and ATP hydrolysis was competitively inhibited by micromolar 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-ATP. NBD1 contained a single cysteine residue, at position 430, that was derivatized with radiolabeled N-ethylmaleimide. Cysteine modification increased 6-fold the Kd for 2'(3')-N-methylanthraniloyl-ATP and prevented 8-azido-ATP photolabeling. ATPase activity was inhibited with a 5-fold increase in the Km for MgATP. The results suggest that chemical modification of Cys-430 is involved in the N-ethylmaleimide inhibition of whole P-glycoprotein by altering substrate interaction.

  9. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiheido, Hirokazu, E-mail: shiheido@ak.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  10. Opposing Functions of the N-terminal Acetyltransferases Naa50 and NatA in Sister-chromatid Cohesion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Ziye; Ouyang, Zhuqing; Magin, Robert S.; Marmorstein, Ronen; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    During the cell cycle, sister-chromatid cohesion tethers sister chromatids together from S phase to the metaphase-anaphase transition and ensures accurate segregation of chromatids into daughter cells. N-terminal acetylation is one of the most prevalent protein covalent modifications in eukaryotes and is mediated by a family of N-terminal acetyltransferases (NAT). Naa50 (also called San) has previously been shown to play a role in sister-chromatid cohesion in metazoans. The mechanism by which Naa50 contributes to cohesion is not understood however. Here, we show that depletion of Naa50 in HeLa cells weakens the interaction between cohesin and its positive regulator sororin and causes cohesion defects in S phase, consistent with a role of Naa50 in cohesion establishment. Strikingly, co-depletion of NatA, a heterodimeric NAT complex that physically interacts with Naa50, rescues the sister-chromatid cohesion defects and the resulting mitotic arrest caused by Naa50 depletion, indicating that NatA and Naa50 play antagonistic roles in cohesion. Purified recombinant NatA and Naa50 do not affect each other's NAT activity in vitro. Because NatA and Naa50 exhibit distinct substrate specificity, we propose that they modify different effectors and regulate sister-chromatid cohesion in opposing ways. PMID:27422821

  11. Opposing Functions of the N-terminal Acetyltransferases Naa50 and NatA in Sister-chromatid Cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Ziye; Ouyang, Zhuqing; Magin, Robert S; Marmorstein, Ronen; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-09-02

    During the cell cycle, sister-chromatid cohesion tethers sister chromatids together from S phase to the metaphase-anaphase transition and ensures accurate segregation of chromatids into daughter cells. N-terminal acetylation is one of the most prevalent protein covalent modifications in eukaryotes and is mediated by a family of N-terminal acetyltransferases (NAT). Naa50 (also called San) has previously been shown to play a role in sister-chromatid cohesion in metazoans. The mechanism by which Naa50 contributes to cohesion is not understood however. Here, we show that depletion of Naa50 in HeLa cells weakens the interaction between cohesin and its positive regulator sororin and causes cohesion defects in S phase, consistent with a role of Naa50 in cohesion establishment. Strikingly, co-depletion of NatA, a heterodimeric NAT complex that physically interacts with Naa50, rescues the sister-chromatid cohesion defects and the resulting mitotic arrest caused by Naa50 depletion, indicating that NatA and Naa50 play antagonistic roles in cohesion. Purified recombinant NatA and Naa50 do not affect each other's NAT activity in vitro Because NatA and Naa50 exhibit distinct substrate specificity, we propose that they modify different effectors and regulate sister-chromatid cohesion in opposing ways. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Functional characterization of heat-shock protein 90 from Oryza sativa and crystal structure of its N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Swetha; Suguna, Kaza

    2015-06-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that is essential for the normal functioning of eukaryotic cells. It plays crucial roles in cell signalling, cell-cycle control and in maintaining proteome integrity and protein homeostasis. In plants, Hsp90s are required for normal plant growth and development. Hsp90s are observed to be upregulated in response to various abiotic and biotic stresses and are also involved in immune responses in plants. Although there are several studies elucidating the physiological role of Hsp90s in plants, their molecular mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study, biochemical characterization of an Hsp90 protein from rice (Oryza sativa; OsHsp90) has been performed and the crystal structure of its N-terminal domain (OsHsp90-NTD) was determined. The binding of OsHsp90 to its substrate ATP and the inhibitor 17-AAG was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The protein also exhibited a weak ATPase activity. The crystal structure of OsHsp90-NTD was solved in complex with the nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue AMPPCP at 3.1 Å resolution. The domain was crystallized by cross-seeding with crystals of the N-terminal domain of Hsp90 from Dictyostelium discoideum, which shares 70% sequence identity with OsHsp90-NTD. This is the second reported structure of a domain of Hsp90 from a plant source.

  13. Characterization of an extensin-modifying metalloprotease: N-terminal processing and substrate cleavage pattern of Pectobacterium carotovorum Prt1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Tao; Nyffenegger, Christian; Højrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Compared to other plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, proteases are less well understood. In this study, the extracellular metalloprotease Prt1 from Pectobacterium carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora) was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized with respect to N-terminal processing......, thermal stability, substrate targets, and cleavage patterns. Prt1 is an autoprocessing protease with an N-terminal signal pre-peptide and a pro-peptide which has to be removed in order to activate the protease. The sequential cleavage of the N-terminus was confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS......) fingerprinting and N-terminus analysis. The optimal reaction conditions for the activity of Prt1 on azocasein were at pH 6.0, 50 °C. At these reaction conditions, KM was 1.81 mg/mL and kcat was 1.82 × 107 U M-1. The enzyme was relatively stable at 50 °C with a half-life of 20 min. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid...

  14. Phenotypic profiling of the human genome reveals gene products involved in plasma membrane targeting of SRC kinases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritzerfeld, J.; Remmele, S.; Wang, T.; Temmerman, K.; Brugger, B.; Wegehingel, S.; Tournaviti, S.; Strating, J.R.P.M.; Wieland, F.T.; Neumann, B.; Ellenberg, J.; Lawerenz, C.; Hesser, J.; Erfle, H.; Pepperkok, R.; Nickel, W.

    2011-01-01

    SRC proteins are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play key roles in regulating signal transduction by a diverse set of cell surface receptors. They contain N-terminal SH4 domains that are modified by fatty acylation and are functioning as membrane anchors. Acylated SH4 domains are both necessary

  15. Pb2+ induces gastrin gene expression by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and transcription factor activator protein 1 in human gastric carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chien-Pin; Tsai, Yao-Ting; Chen, Yao-Li; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Joseph T; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Shiurba, Robert; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2015-02-01

    Divalent lead ions (Pb(2+) ) are toxic environmental pollutants known to cause serious health problems in humans and animals. Absorption of Pb(2+) from air, water, and food takes place in the respiratory and digestive tracts. The ways in which absorbed Pb(2+) affects cell physiology are just beginning to be understood at the molecular level. Here, we used reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting to analyze cultures of human gastric carcinoma cells exposed to 10 μM lead nitrate. We found that Pb(2+) induces gastrin hormone gene transcription and translation in a time-dependent manner. Promoter deletion analysis revealed that activator protein 1 (AP1) was necessary for gastrin gene transcription in cells exposed to Pb(2+) . MitogIen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 suppressed the Pb(2+) -induced increase in messenger RNA. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors AG1478 and PD153035 reduced both transcription and phosphorylation by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Cells exposed to Pb(2+) also increased production of c-Jun protein, a component of AP1, and over-expression of c-Jun enhanced activation of the gastrin promoter. In sum, the findings suggest the EGFR-ERK1/2-AP1 pathway mediates the effects of Pb(2+) on gastrin gene activity in cell culture. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mitotic destruction of the cell cycle regulated NIMA protein kinase of Aspergillus nidulans is required for mitotic exit.

    OpenAIRE

    Pu, R T; Osmani, S A

    1995-01-01

    NIMA is a cell cycle regulated protein kinase required, in addition to p34cdc2/cyclin B, for initiation of mitosis in Aspergillus nidulans. Like cyclin B, NIMA accumulates when cells are arrested in G2 and is degraded as cells traverse mitosis. However, it is stable in cells arrested in mitosis. NIMA, and related kinases, have an N-terminal kinase domain and a C-terminal extension. Deletion of the C-terminus does not completely inactivate NIMA kinase activity but does prevent functional compl...

  17. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Maite Rocío, E-mail: arana@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás, E-mail: gtocchetti@live.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Domizi, Pablo, E-mail: domizi@ibr-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Arias, Agostina, E-mail: agoarias@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo, E-mail: jprigalli@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Ruiz, María Laura, E-mail: ruiz@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  18. Identification and analysis of the acetylated status of poplar proteins reveals analogous N-terminal protein processing mechanisms with other eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Cai Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The N-terminal protein processing mechanism (NPM including N-terminal Met excision (NME and N-terminal acetylation (N(α-acetylation represents a common protein co-translational process of some eukaryotes. However, this NPM occurred in woody plants yet remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To reveal the NPM in poplar, we investigated the N(α-acetylation status of poplar proteins during dormancy by combining tandem mass spectrometry with TiO2 enrichment of acetylated peptides. We identified 58 N-terminally acetylated (N(α-acetylated proteins. Most proteins (47, >81% are subjected to N(α-acetylation following the N-terminal removal of Met, indicating that N(α-acetylation and NME represent a common NPM of poplar proteins. Furthermore, we confirm that poplar shares the analogous NME and N(α-acetylation (NPM to other eukaryotes according to analysis of N-terminal features of these acetylated proteins combined with genome-wide identification of the involving methionine aminopeptidases (MAPs and N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nat enzymes in poplar. The N(α-acetylated reactions and the involving enzymes of these poplar proteins are also identified based on those of yeast and human, as well as the subcellular location information of these poplar proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study represents the first extensive investigation of N(α-acetylation events in woody plants, the results of which will provide useful resources for future unraveling the regulatory mechanisms of N(α-acetylation of proteins in poplar.

  19. Effect of post-mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in human control and Huntington disease brain lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Menno H; Patassini, Stefano; Kim, Eric H; Bullock, Jocelyn; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M; Pepers, Barry A; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2017-01-01

    Huntington disease is associated with elongation of a CAG repeat in the HTT gene that results in a mutant huntingtin protein. Several studies have implicated N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in Huntington disease pathogenesis. Ideally, these fragments are studied in human brain tissue. However, the use of human brain tissue comes with certain unavoidable variables such as post mortem delay, artefacts from freeze-thaw cycles and subject-to-subject variation. Knowledge on how these variables might affect N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in post mortem human brain is important for a proper interpretation of study results. The effect of post mortem delay on protein in human brain is known to vary depending on the protein of interest. In the present study, we have assessed the effect of post mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments using western blot. We mimicked post mortem delay in one individual control case and one individual Huntington disease case with low initial post mortem delay. The influence of subject-to-subject variation on N-terminal huntingtin fragments was assessed in human cortex and human striatum using two cohorts of control and Huntington disease subjects. Our results show that effects of post mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments are minor in our individual subjects. Additionally, one freeze-thaw cycle decreases the huntingtin western blot signal intensity in the cortex control subject, but does not introduce additional N-terminal huntingtin fragments. Our results suggest that subject-to-subject variation contributes more to variability in N-terminal huntingtin fragments than post mortem delay.

  20. Arabidopsis MKS1 is involved in basal immunity and requires an intact N-terminal domain for proper function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Klaus; Qiu, Jin-Long; Lütje, Juri

    2010-01-01

    Innate immune signaling pathways in animals and plants are regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) functions downstream of innate immune receptors via a nuclear substrate MKS1 to regulate the activity of the WRKY33 transcription factor, which in turn...

  1. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Verkhivker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock kinase from the system during client loading (release stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery.

  2. Crystal Structure of the N-Terminal Half of the Traffic Controller UL37 from Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigsberg, Andrea L.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2017-08-02

    Inner tegument protein UL37 is conserved among all three subfamilies of herpesviruses. Studies of UL37 homologs from two alphaherpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), have suggested that UL37 plays an essential albeit poorly defined role in intracellular capsid trafficking. At the same time, HSV and PRV homologs cannot be swapped, which suggests that in addition to a conserved function, UL37 homologs also have divergent virus-specific functions. Accurate dissection of UL37 functions requires detailed maps in the form of atomic-resolution structures. Previously, we reported the crystal structure of the N-terminal half of UL37 (UL37N) from PRV. Here, we report the crystal structure of HSV-1 UL37N. Comparison of the two structures reveals that UL37 homologs differ in their overall shapes, distributions of surface charges, and locations of projecting loops. In contrast, the previously identified R2 surface region is structurally conserved. We propose that within the N-terminal half of UL37, functional conservation is centered within the R2 surface region, whereas divergent structural elements pinpoint regions mediating virus-specific functions and may engage different binding partners. Together, the two structures can now serve as templates for a structure-guided exploration of both conserved and virus-specific functions of UL37.

    IMPORTANCEThe ability to move efficiently within host cell cytoplasm is essential for replication in all viruses. It is especially important in the neuroinvasive alphaherpesviruses, such as human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, and veterinarian pseudorabies virus (PRV), that infect the peripheral nervous system and have to travel long distances along axons. Capsid movement in these viruses is controlled by capsid-associated tegument proteins, yet their specific roles have not yet been defined. Systematic exploration of the roles of tegument proteins in capsid trafficking requires

  3. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R G; Sadler, Anthony J

    2017-03-10

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity.

  4. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase is essential for interleukin-1-induced and nuclear factor kappaB-mediated gene expression in insulin-producing INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lykke; Størling, J; Darville, M

    2005-01-01

    The beta cell destruction and insulin deficiency that characterises type 1 diabetes mellitus is partially mediated by cytokines, such as IL-1beta, and by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent and -independent effector mechanisms. IL-1beta activates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including...... extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and the nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) pathway. Both pathways are required for expression of the gene encoding inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and for IL-1beta-mediated beta cell death. The molecular mechanisms...... by which these two pathways regulate beta cell Nos2 expression are currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify the putative crosstalk between MAPK and NFkappaB activation in beta cells....

  5. N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide response to acute exercise in depressed patients and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Ströhle, Andreas; Westrin, Asa

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in major depression includes hyperactivity and reduced feedback inhibition. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is able to reduce the HPA-axis response to stress and has an anxiolytic effect in rodents and humans. We hypothesized...... that patients with depression would have an attenuated N-terminal proANP (NT-proANP) response to acute exercise compared to healthy controls. Secondly, we aimed to assess the effect of antidepressants on NT-proANP response to acute exercise. METHODS: We examined 132 outpatients with mild to moderate depression...... (ICD-10) and 44 healthy controls, group matched for age, sex, and BMI. We used an incremental bicycle ergometer test as a physical stressor. Blood samples were drawn at rest, at exhaustion, and 15, 30, and 60min post-exercise. RESULTS: The NT-proANP response to physical exercise differed between...

  6. The N-terminal half of the receptor domain of botulinum neurotoxin A binds to microdomains of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Lucia; Tosatto, Silvio; Motterlini, Lisa; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare

    2009-02-27

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is largely employed in human therapy because of its specific inhibition of peripheral cholinergic nerve terminals. BoNT/A binds to them rapidly and with high specificity via its receptor binding domain termed HC. Recent evidence indicate that BoNT/A interacts specifically with polysialogangliosides and with a luminal loop of the synaptic vesicle protein SV2 via the C-terminal half of HC. Here we show that the N-terminal half of HC binds to sphingomyelin-enriched membrane microdomains and that it has a defined interaction with phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIP). We have identified a PIP binding site in this half of HC and we show how this interaction could predispose BoNT/A for membrane insertion, which is the step subsequent to binding, in the four-steps route leading BoNT/A inside nerve terminals.

  7. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  8. N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide response to acute exercise in depressed patients and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Ströhle, Andreas; Westrin, Asa

    2011-01-01

    that patients with depression would have an attenuated N-terminal proANP (NT-proANP) response to acute exercise compared to healthy controls. Secondly, we aimed to assess the effect of antidepressants on NT-proANP response to acute exercise. METHODS: We examined 132 outpatients with mild to moderate depression...... (ICD-10) and 44 healthy controls, group matched for age, sex, and BMI. We used an incremental bicycle ergometer test as a physical stressor. Blood samples were drawn at rest, at exhaustion, and 15, 30, and 60min post-exercise. RESULTS: The NT-proANP response to physical exercise differed between......BACKGROUND: The dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in major depression includes hyperactivity and reduced feedback inhibition. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is able to reduce the HPA-axis response to stress and has an anxiolytic effect in rodents and humans. We hypothesized...

  9. The Drosophila Microtubule-Associated Protein Mars Stabilizes Mitotic Spindles by Crosslinking Microtubules through Its N-Terminal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs) are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs. PMID:23593258

  10. Expression and crystallization of an N-terminally activated form of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouskoura, T; Tickner, C; Crickmore, N

    2001-11-01

    When the active form of the Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin Cry1Ca was expressed in E. coli severe growth retardation was observed. The absence of a short peptide from the N-terminus of the protoxin was responsible for this effect. The introduction of a mutation at an amino acid previously reported as being involved in the initial stages of pore formation within the natural insect target partially abolished the growth retardation effect. We suggest that removal of the N-terminal peptide is a necessary step in toxin activation, the presence of this peptide preventing proper interaction of the toxin with the target membrane. Expression of the truncated toxin in Bacillus thuringiensis also prevented the formation of Cry1Ca crystals.

  11. A single N-terminal cysteine in TRPV1 determines activation by pungent compounds from onion and garlic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Héctor; Llorente, Itzel; Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; García-Villegas, Refugio; Munari, Mika; Gordon, Sharona E; Islas, León D; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Some members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of cation channels mediate sensory responses to irritant substances. Although it is well known that TRPA1 channels are activated by pungent compounds found in garlic, onion, mustard and cinnamon extracts, activation of TRPV1 by these extracts remains controversial. Here we establish that TRPV1 is activated by pungent extracts from onion and garlic, as well as by allicin, the active compound in these preparations, and participates together with TRPA1 in the pain-related behavior induced by this compound. We found that in TRPV1 these agents act by covalent modification of cysteine residues. In contrast to TRPA1 channels, modification of a single cysteine located in the N-terminal region of TRPV1 was necessary and sufficient for all the effects we observed. Our findings point to a conserved mechanism of activation in TRP channels, which provides new insights into the molecular basis of noxious stimuli detection. PMID:18297068

  12. Crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 reveals a three-helical domain architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanka, Anu; Solanki, Vipul; Parkesh, Raman; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-10-01

    Human SIRT7 is an NAD(+) dependent deacetylase, which belongs to sirtuin family of proteins. SIRT7, like other sirtuins has conserved catalytic domain and is flanked by N- and C-terminal domains reported to play vital functional roles. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 (SIRT7(NTD) ) at 2.3 Å resolution as MBP-SIRT7(NTD) fusion protein. SIRT7(NTD) adopts three-helical domain architecture and comparative structural analyses suggest similarities to some DNA binding motifs and transcription regulators. We also report here the importance of N- and C-terminal domains in soluble expression of SIRT7. Proteins 2016; 84:1558-1563. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Heritability assessment of cartilage metabolism. A twin study on circulating procollagen IIA N-terminal propeptide (PIIANP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, H L; Svendsen, A J; Hjelmborg, J V B

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this investigation was to estimate the heritability of circulating collagen IIA N-terminal propeptide (PIIANP) by studying mono- and dizygotic healthy twin pairs at different age and both genders. DESIGN: 598 monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin individuals aged 18......-59 years were recruited from the Danish Twin Registry. PIIANP was measured by competitive ELISA. The similarity of circulating PIIANP among MZ and DZ twins was assessed by intraclass correlations according to traits. The heritability was estimated by variance component analysis accounting for additive...... genetic impact on PIIANP in serum. Additive genetic effects explained 45% (21-70%), shared environment 24% (7-53%) and non-shared environment 31% (24-39%) of the total variance. The heritability estimate did not differ across ages and between genders. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that approximately 45...

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular distribution, and fibril formation by Pmel17 require an intact N-terminal domain junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Van den Eynde, Benoît J; Cresswell, Peter

    2010-05-21

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that subcellularly localizes to melanosomes, where it forms a fibrillar matrix that serves for the sequestration of potentially toxic reaction intermediates of melanin synthesis and deposition of the pigment. As a key factor in melanosomal biogenesis, understanding intracellular trafficking and processing of Pmel17 is of central importance to comprehend how these organelles are formed, how they mature, and how they function in the cell. Using a series of deletion and missense mutants of Pmel17, we are able to show that the integrity of the junction between the N-terminal region and the polycystic kidney disease-like domain is highly crucial for endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular targeting, and fibril formation by Pmel17 and thus for establishing functional melanosomes.

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Export, Subcellular Distribution, and Fibril Formation by Pmel17 Require an Intact N-terminal Domain Junction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Cresswell, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that subcellularly localizes to melanosomes, where it forms a fibrillar matrix that serves for the sequestration of potentially toxic reaction intermediates of melanin synthesis and deposition of the pigment. As a key factor in melanosomal biogenesis, understanding intracellular trafficking and processing of Pmel17 is of central importance to comprehend how these organelles are formed, how they mature, and how they function in the cell. Using a series of deletion and missense mutants of Pmel17, we are able to show that the integrity of the junction between the N-terminal region and the polycystic kidney disease-like domain is highly crucial for endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular targeting, and fibril formation by Pmel17 and thus for establishing functional melanosomes. PMID:20231267

  16. Basolateral localisation of KCNQ1 potassium channels in MDCK cells: molecular identification of an N-terminal targeting motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Grunnet, Morten

    2004-01-01

    KCNQ1 potassium channels are expressed in many epithelial tissues as well as in the heart. In epithelia KCNQ1 channels play an important role in salt and water transport and the channel has been reported to be located apically in some cell types and basolaterally in others. Here we show that KCNQ1...... channels are located basolaterally when expressed in polarised MDCK cells. The basolateral localisation of KCNQ1 is not affected by co-expression of any of the five KCNE beta-subunits. We characterise two independent basolateral sorting signals present in the N-terminal tail of KCNQ1. Mutation...... located protein, to the basolateral plasma membrane. Furthermore, a di-leucine-like motif at residues 38-40 (LEL) was found to affect the basolateral localisation of KCNQ1. Mutation of these two leucines resulted in a primarily intracellular localisation of the channel....

  17. Structure of the mouse galectin-4 N-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain reveals the mechanism of oligosaccharide recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krejciríková, Veronika; Pachl, Petr; Fábry, Milan; Malý, Petr; Rezácová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jirí (Czech Academy)

    2011-11-18

    Galectin-4, a member of the tandem-repeat subfamily of galectins, participates in cell-membrane interactions and plays an important role in cell adhesion and modulation of immunity and malignity. The oligosaccharide specificity of the mouse galectin-4 carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) has been reported previously. In this work, the structure and binding properties of the N-terminal domain CRD1 were further investigated and the crystal structure of CRD1 in complex with lactose was determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. The lactose-binding affinity was characterized by fluorescence measurements and two lactose-binding sites were identified: a high-affinity site with a K{sub d} value in the micromolar range (K{sub d1} = 600 {+-} 70 {mu}M) and a low-affinity site with K{sub d2} = 28 {+-} 10 mM.

  18. The N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE17 (Rv1168c) protein plays a dominant role in inducing antibody responses in active TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Philip Raj; Pathak, Niteen; Pradhan, Gourango; Sumanlatha, Gaddam; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2017-01-01

    The PPE (proline-proline-glutamic acid) proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are characterized by a conserved N-terminal domain of approximately 180 amino acids and variable C-terminal domain. Since last decade, these proteins have gained much importance in the serodiagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) as they act as a source of antigenic variation. We have demonstrated earlier that one of the PPE proteins PPE17 (Rv1168c) induces strong B-cell and T-cell responses in active TB disease and also displays a higher antibody titer compared to immunodominant antigens such as ESAT-6, Hsp60 and PPD. However, the immunodominant domain of PPE17 (N-terminal or C-terminal) was not examined in detail. In the present study, we observed that antibody responses elicited in TB patients were directed mostly towards the N-terminal domain of PPE17 (N-PPE17). The antibody generated against N-PPE17 in TB patients did not significantly cross-react with N-terminal domains of other PPE proteins used in this study. Our data suggest that the N-terminal domain of PPE17 protein is immunodominant and could be used as a better serodiagnostic marker than the full-length PPE17 protein.

  19. Immunological and protective effects of Bordetella bronchiseptica subunit vaccines based on the recombinant N-terminal domain of dermonecrotic toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanwen; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Zhen; Yan, Zhengui; Yu, Cuilian; Shao, Mingxu; Jiang, Xiaodong; Chi, Shanshan; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2015-10-01

    Dermonecrotic toxin (DNT) produced by Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. bronchiseptica) can cause clinical turbinate atrophy in swine and induce dermonecrotic lesions in model mice. We know that the N-terminal of DNT molecule contains the receptor-binding domain, which facilitates binding to the target cells. However, we do not know whether this domain has sufficient immunogenicity to resist B. bronchiseptica damage and thereby to develop a subunit vaccine for the swine industry. In this study, we prokaryotically expressed the recombinant N-terminal of DNT from B. bronchiseptica (named DNT-N) and prepared it for the subunit vaccine to evaluate its immunogenicity. Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, was used as the adjuvant to examine its immune-conditioning effects. At 49 d after inoculation, 10 mice from each group were challenged with B. bronchiseptica, and another 10 mice were intradermally challenged with native DNT, to examine the protection imparted by the vaccines. The immune parameters (T-lymphocyte counts, cytokine secretions, serum antibody titers, and survival rates) and skin lesions were determined. The results showed that pure DNT-N vaccine significantly induced immune responses and had limited ability to resist the B. bronchiseptica and DNT challenge, whereas the mice administered with TPPPS or Freund's incomplete adjuvant vaccine could induce higher levels of the above immune parameters. Remarkably, the DNT-N vaccine combined with TPPPS adjuvant protected the mice effectively to prevent B. bronchiseptica infection. Our findings indicated that DNT-N has potential for development as an effective subunit vaccine to counteract the damage of B. bronchiseptica infection, especially when used conjointly with TPPPS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving N-terminal protein annotation of Plasmodium species based on signal peptide prediction of orthologous proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Armando

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal peptide is one of the most important motifs involved in protein trafficking and it ultimately influences protein function. Considering the expected functional conservation among orthologs it was hypothesized that divergence in signal peptides within orthologous groups is mainly due to N-terminal protein sequence misannotation. Thus, discrepancies in signal peptide prediction of orthologous proteins were used to identify misannotated proteins in five Plasmodium species. Methods Signal peptide (SignalP and orthology (OrthoMCL were combined in an innovative strategy to identify orthologous groups showing discrepancies in signal peptide prediction among their protein members (Mixed groups. In a comparative analysis, multiple alignments for each of these groups and gene models were visually inspected in search of misannotated proteins and, whenever possible, alternative gene models were proposed. Thresholds for signal peptide prediction parameters were also modified to reduce their impact as a possible source of discrepancy among orthologs. Validation of new gene models was based on RT-PCR (few examples or on experimental evidence already published (ApiLoc. Results The rate of misannotated proteins was significantly higher in Mixed groups than in Positive or Negative groups, corroborating the proposed hypothesis. A total of 478 proteins were reannotated and change of signal peptide prediction from negative to positive was the most common. Reannotations triggered the conversion of almost 50% of all Mixed groups, which were further reduced by optimization of signal peptide prediction parameters. Conclusions The methodological novelty proposed here combining orthology and signal peptide prediction proved to be an effective strategy for the identification of proteins showing wrongly N-terminal annotated sequences, and it might have an important impact in the available data for genome-wide searching of potential vaccine and drug

  1. Inhibitor binding in a class 2 dihydroorotate dehydrogenase causes variations in the membrane-associated N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Majbritt; Le Nours, Jérôme; Johansson, Eva; Antal, Torben; Ullrich, Alexandra; Löffler, Monika; Larsen, Sine

    2004-04-01

    The flavin enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD; EC 1.3.99.11) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis of UMP. The enzyme is a promising target for drug design in different biological and clinical applications for cancer and arthritis. The first crystal structure of the class 2 dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from rat has been determined in complex with its two inhibitors brequinar and atovaquone. These inhibitors have shown promising results as anti-proliferative, immunosuppressive, and antiparasitic agents. A unique feature of the class 2 DHODs is their N-terminal extension, which folds into a separate domain comprising two alpha-helices. This domain serves as the binding site for the two inhibitors and the respiratory quinones acting as the second substrate for the class 2 DHODs. The orientation of the first N-terminal helix is very different in the two complexes of rat DHOD (DHODR). Binding of atovaquone causes a 12 A movement of the first residue in the first alpha-helix. Based on the information from the two structures of DHODR, a model for binding of the quinone and the residues important for the interactions could be defined. His 56 and Arg 136, which are fully conserved in all class 2 DHODs, seem to play a key role in the interaction with the electron acceptor. The differences between the membrane-bound rat DHOD and membrane-associated class 2 DHODs exemplified by the Escherichia coli DHOD has been investigated by GRID computations of the hydrophobic probes predicted to interact with the membrane.

  2. Investigation of the N-terminal coding region of MUC7 alterations in dentistry students with and without caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koç Öztürk L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human low-molecular weight salivary mucin (MUC7 is a small, secreted glycoprotein coded by MUC7. In the oral cavity, they inhibit the colonization of oral bacteria, including cariogenic ones, by masking their surface adhesions, thus helping saliva to avoid dental caries. The N-terminal domain is important for low-molecular weight (MG2 mucins to contact with oral microorganisms. In this study, we aimed to identify the N-terminal coding region of the MUC7 gene between individuals with and without caries. Forty-four healthy dental students were enrolled in this study; 24 of them were classified to have caries [decayed, missing, filled-teeth (DMFT = 5.6] according to the World Health Organization (WHO criteria, and 20 of them were caries-free (DMFT = 0. Simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S and gingival index (GI were used to determine the oral hygiene and gingival conditions. Total protein levels and salivary total protein levels and salivary buffer capacity (SBC were determined by Lowry and Ericsson methods. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells of all the participants and genotyping was carried out by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR-sequencing method. No statistical differences were found between two groups in the terms of salivary parameters, oral hygiene and gingival conditions. We detected one common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP that leads to a change of asparagine to lysine at codon 80. This substitution was found in 29.0 and 40.0%, respectively, of the groups with and without caries. No other sequence variations were detected. The SNP found in this study may be a specific polymorphism affecting the Turkish population. Further studies with extended numbers are necessary in order to clarify this finding.

  3. NMR solution structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biverståhl, Henrik; Andersson, August; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena

    2004-11-30

    The structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein (bPrPp) has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy in phospholipid membrane mimetic systems. CD spectroscopy revealed that the peptide adopts a largely alpha-helical structure in zwitterionic bicelles as well as in DHPC micelles but has a less degree of alpha-helix structure in partly charged bicelles. The solution structure of bPrPp was determined in DHPC micelles, and an alpha-helix was found between residues Ser8 and Ile21. The residues within the helical region show slow amide hydrogen exchange. Translational diffusion measurements in zwitterionic q = 0.5 bicelles show that the peptide does not induce aggregation of the bicelles. Increased quadrupolar splittings were observed in the outer part of the (2)H spectrum of DMPC in q = 3.5 bicelles, indicating that the peptide induces a certain degree of order in the bilayer. The amide hydrogen exchange and the (2)H NMR results are consistent with a slight positive hydrophobic mismatch and that bPrPp forms a stable helix that inserts in a transmembrane location in the bilayer. The structure of bPrPp and its position in the membrane may be relevant for the understanding of how the N-terminal (1-30) part of the bovine PrP functions as a cell-penetrating peptide. These findings may lead to a better understanding of how the prion protein accumulates at the membrane surface and also how the conversion into the scrapie form is carried out.

  4. Importance of the N-terminal proline for the promiscuous activity of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael addition of aldehydes to nitroolefins is an effective method to obtain useful chiral γ-nitroaldehydes. γ-Nitroaldehydes are precursors for chiral γ-aminobytiric acid analogues which have numerous pharmacological activities and are used for treatment of neurological disorders. A whole-cell system based on recombinantly expressed 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT has been developed and shown to be an effective biocatalyst for Michael addition of branched aldehydes to β-nitrostyrenes. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the substitution of the N-terminal proline with lysine and arginine both containing the reactive ε-amino group, on the Michael addition catalyzed by 4-OT. Firstly, the effect of these mutations was examined by in silico analysis, followed by generation of three terminal ly-sine mutants. The generated mutants, 4-OT_K, 4-OT_PK and 4-OT_KK were tested for the ability to utilise β-nitrostyrene (1, (E-2-(thiophene-2-ylnitroethen (2 and p-chloro-trans-β-nitrostyrene (3 as Michael acceptors with isobutanal as the donor. For comparison, the lithium salt of lysine was used in the same organocatalytic reactions. In general, the introduction of lysine had a negative effect on Michael additions based on overall product yields. However, additional lysine residues at the N-terminus of the protein resulted in structural changes that enhanced the activity towards 2 and 3. Therefore, the N-terminal proline is important for the 4-OT catalysed Michael-additons, but it is not essential. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173048 i br. 172002

  5. Heterologous expression and N-terminal His-tagging processes affect the catalytic properties of staphylococcal lipases: a monolayer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horchani, Habib; Sabrina, Lignon; Régine, Lebrun; Sayari, Adel; Gargouri, Youssef; Verger, Robert

    2010-10-15

    The interfacial and kinetic properties of wild type, untagged recombinant and tagged recombinant forms of three staphylococcal lipases (SSL, SXL and SAL3) were compared using the monomolecular film technique. A kinetic study on the dependence of the stereoselectivity of these nine lipase forms on the surface pressure was performed using the three dicaprin isomers spread in the form of monomolecular films at the air-water interface. New parameters, termed Recombinant expression Effects on Catalysis (REC), N-Tag Effects on Catalysis (TEC), and N-Tag and Recombinant expression Effects on Catalysis (TREC), were introduced. The findings obtained showed that with all the lipases tested, the recombinant expression process and the N-terminal His-tag slightly affect the sn-1 preference for dicaprin enantiomers as well as the penetration capacity into monomolecular films of phosphatidylcholine but significantly decrease the catalytic rate of hydrolysis of three dicaprin isomers. This rate reduction is more pronounced at high surface pressures, i.e. at low interfacial energies. In conclusion, the effects of the heterologous expression process on the catalytic properties of the staphylococcal lipases are three times more deleterious than the presence of an N-terminal tag extension. In the case of the situation most commonly encountered in the literature, i.e. the heterologous expression of a tagged lipase, the rate of catalysis can be decreased by these processes by 42-83% on average in comparison with the values measured with the corresponding wild type form. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of the N-terminal domain of BteA: a Bordetella type III secreted cytotoxic effector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available BteA, a 69-kDa cytotoxic protein, is a type III secretion system (T3SS effector in the classical Bordetella, the etiological agents of pertussis and related mammalian respiratory diseases. Currently there is limited information regarding the structure of BteA or its subdomains, and no insight as to the identity of its eukaryotic partners(s and their modes of interaction with BteA. The mechanisms that lead to BteA dependent cell death also remain elusive. The N-terminal domain of BteA is multifunctional, acting as a docking platform for its cognate chaperone (BtcA in the bacterium, and targeting the protein to lipid raft microdomains within the eukaryotic host cell. In this study we describe the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of this domain (BteA287 and determine its architecture. We characterize BteA287 as being a soluble and highly stable domain which is rich in alpha helical content. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR experiments combined with size exclusion and analytical ultracentrifugation measurements confirm these observations and reveal BteA287 to be monomeric in nature with a tendency to oligomerize at concentrations above 200 µM. Furthermore, diffusion-NMR demonstrated that the first 31 residues of BteA287 are responsible for the apparent aggregation behavior of BteA287. Light scattering analyses and small angle X-ray scattering experiments reveal a prolate ellipsoidal bi-pyramidal dumb-bell shape. Thus, our biophysical characterization is a first step towards structure determination of the BteA N-terminal domain.

  7. Antibiotic Radicicol Binds to the N-Terminal Domain of Hsp90 and Shares Important Biologic Activities with Geldanamycin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Theodor W. Schulte; Shiro Akinaga; Shiro Soga; William Sullivan; Bridget Stensgard; David Toft; Leonard M. Neckers

    1998-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 plays an essential role in the folding and function of important cellular proteins including steroid hormone receptors, protein kinases and proteins controlling the cell cycle and apoptosis. A 15 Å...

  8. Spatial-Temporal Mapping of the T Cell Receptor NF-kappaB Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-30

    nm dichroic and a 530–600-nm emission filter. All filters were from Chroma (Brattleboro, VT). Images were gathered without binning, at 12 bit , with...et al., Equine herpesvirus-2 E10 gene product, but not its cellular homologue, activates NF-kappaB transcription factor and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. J Biol Chem, 1999. 274(15): p. 9962-8.

  9. Maternal protein restriction induces alterations in hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α/CYP7A1 signaling and disorders regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the adult rat offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaomei; Qi, Ying; Tian, Baoling; Chen, Dong; Gao, Hong; Xi, Chunyan; Xing, Yanlin; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that adverse events in utero impair fetal development and lead to the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome in adulthood. To investigate the mechanisms linking impaired fetal growth to increased cholesterol, an important clinical risk factor characterizing the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, we examined the impact of maternal undernutrition on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway and the cholesterol 7α-hyd...

  10. The role of curcumin as an inhibitor of oxidative stress caused by ischaemia re-perfusion injury in tetralogy of Fallot patients undergoing corrective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukardi, Rubiana; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Siregar, Nurjati C; Djer, Mulyadi M; Suyatna, Fransciscus D; Sadikin, Mohammad; Ibrahim, Nurhadi; Rahayuningsih, Sri E; Witarto, Arief B

    2016-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass during tetralogy of Fallot corrective surgery is associated with oxidative stress, and contributes to peri-operative problems. Curcumin has been known as a potent scavenger of reactive oxygen species, which enhances the activity of antioxidants and suppresses phosphorylation of transcription factors involved in inflamation and apoptosis. To evaluate the effects of curcumin as an antioxidant by evaluating the concentrations of malondialdehyde and glutathione, activity of nuclear factor-kappa B, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, caspase-3, and post-operative clinical outcomes. Tetralogy of Fallot patients for corrective surgery were randomised to receive curcumin (45 mg/day) or placebo orally for 14 days before surgery. Malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations were evaluated during the pre-ischaemia, ischaemia, re-perfusion phases, and 6 hours after aortic clamping-off. Nuclear factor-kappa B, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and caspase-3, taken from the infundibulum, were assessed during the pre-ischaemia, ischaemia, and re-perfusion phases. Haemodynamic parameters were monitored until day 5 after surgery. In all the observation phases, malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations were similar between groups. There was no significant difference in nuclear factor-kappa B activity between the groups for three observations; however, in the curcumin group, c-Jun N-terminal kinase significantly decreased from the pre-ischaemia to the re-perfusion phases, and caspase-3 expression was lower in the ischaemia phase. Patients in the curcumin group had lower temperature and better ventricular functions, but no significant differences were found in mechanical ventilation day or length of hospital stay in the two groups. Cardioprotective effects of curcumin may include inhibition of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway and caspase-3 in cardiomyocytes, particularly in the ischaemia phase.

  11. JNK inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to radiation-induced premature senescence via Bcl-2/ROS/DDR signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Lee, Je Jung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Premature senescence is considered as a cellular defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Although recent evidences demonstrate that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is involved in the senescence process, the target and exact mechanism of JNK signaling in the regulation of cell proliferation has yet to be defined. In this study, we investigated the role of JNK in premature senescence and demonstrated JNK inhibition sensitized tumor cells to radiation-induced premature senescence.

  12. Casein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    The present review on casein kinases focuses mainly on the possible metabolic role of CK-2, with special emphasis on its behavior in pathological tissues. From these data at least three ways to regulate CK-2 activity emerge: (i) CK-2 activity changes during embryogenesis, being high at certain...

  13. NEMO is essential for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded vFLIP K13-induced gene expression and protection against death receptor-induced cell death, and its N-terminal 251 residues are sufficient for this process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolani, Bhairavi; Matta, Hittu; Gopalakrishnan, Ramakrishnan; Punj, Vasu; Chaudhary, Preet M

    2014-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) K13 was originally believed to protect virally infected cells against death receptor-induced apoptosis by interfering with caspase 8/FLICE activation. Subsequent studies revealed that K13 also activates the NF-κB pathway by binding to the NEMO/inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) kinase gamma (IKKγ) subunit of an IKK complex and uses this pathway to modulate the expression of genes involved in cellular survival, proliferation, and the inflammatory response. However, it is not clear if K13 can also induce gene expression independently of NEMO/IKKγ. The minimum region of NEMO that is sufficient for supporting K13-induced NF-κB has not been delineated. Furthermore, the contribution of NEMO and NF-κB to the protective effect of K13 against death receptor-induced apoptosis remains to be determined. In this study, we used microarray analysis on K13-expressing wild-type and NEMO-deficient cells to demonstrate that NEMO is required for modulation of K13-induced genes. Reconstitution of NEMO-null cells revealed that the N-terminal 251 amino acid residues of NEMO are sufficient for supporting K13-induced NF-κB but fail to support tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-induced NF-κB. K13 failed to protect NEMO-null cells against TNF-α-induced cell death but protected those reconstituted with the NEMO mutant truncated to include only the N-terminal 251 amino acid residues [the NEMO(1-251) mutant]. Taken collectively, our results demonstrate that NEMO is required for modulation of K13-induced genes and the N-terminal 251 amino acids of NEMO are sufficient for supporting K13-induced NF-κB. Finally, the ability of K13 to protect against TNF-α-induced cell death is critically dependent on its ability to interact with NEMO and activate NF-κB. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded vFLIP K13 is believed to protect virally infected cells against death receptor-induced apoptosis and to

  14. Inactivation of the integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in osteoblasts increases mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hoss, Jad; Arabian, Alice; Dedhar, Shoukat; St-Arnaud, René

    2014-01-01

    In osteoblasts, Integrin-Linked Kinase (ILK)-dependent phosphorylation of the cJUN transcriptional coactivator, αNAC, induces the nuclear accumulation of the coactivator and potentiates cJUN-dependent transcription. Mutation of the ILK phosphoacceptor site within the αNAC protein leads to cytoplasmic retention of the coactivator and cell-autonomous increases in osteoblastic activity. In order to gain further insight into the ILK-αNAC signaling cascade, we inactivated ILK using RNA knockdown in osteoblastic cells and engineered mice with specific ablation of ILK in osteoblasts. ILK knockdown in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells reduced phosphorylation of its downstream target glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), which led to cytoplasmic retention of αNAC and increased mineralization with augmented expression of the osteoblastic differentiation markers, pro-α1(I) collagen (col1A1), Bone Sialoprotein (Bsp) and Osteocalcin (Ocn). Cultured ILK-deficient primary osteoblasts also showed increased cytoplasmic αNAC levels, and augmented mineralization with higher Runx2, Col1a1 and Bsp expression. Histomorphometric analysis of bones from mutant mice with ILK-deficient osteoblasts (Col1-Cre;Ilk(-/fl)) revealed transient changes, with increased bone volume in newborn animals that was corrected by two weeks of age. Our data suggest that the ILK-αNAC cascade acts to reduce the pace of osteoblast maturation. We propose that in vivo, functional redundancy is able to compensate for the loss of ILK activity, leading to the absence of an obvious phenotype when osteoblast-specific Ilk-deficient mice reach puberty. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulating the activity of short arginine-tryptophan containing antibacterial peptides with N-terminal metallocenoyl groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bauke Albada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of small synthetic arginine and tryptophan containing peptides was prepared and analyzed for their antibacterial activity. The effect of N-terminal substitution with metallocenoyl groups such as ferrocene (FcCO and ruthenocene (RcCO was investigated. Antibacterial activity in different media, growth inhibition, and killing kinetics of the most active peptides were determined. The toxicity of selected derivatives was determined against erythrocytes and three human cancer cell lines. It was shown that the replacement of an N-terminal arginine residue with a metallocenoyl moiety modulates the activity of WRWRW-peptides against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MIC values of 2–6 µM for RcCO-W(RW2 and 1–11 µM for (RW3 were determined. Interestingly, W(RW2-peptides derivatized with ferrocene were significantly less active than those derivatized with ruthenocene which have similar structural but different electronic properties, suggesting a major influence of the latter. The high activities observed for the RcCO-W(RW2- and (RW3-peptides led to an investigation of the origin of activity of these peptides using several important activity-related parameters. Firstly, killing kinetics of the RcCO-W(RW2-peptide versus killing kinetics of the (RW3 derivative showed faster reduction of the colony forming units for the RcCO-W(RW2-peptide, although MIC values indicated higher activity for the (RW3-peptide. This was confirmed by growth inhibition studies. Secondly, hemolysis studies revealed that both peptides did not lead to significant destruction of erythrocytes, even up to 500 µg/mL for (RW3 and 250 µg/mL for RcCO-W(RW2. In addition, toxicity against three human cancer cell lines (HepG2, HT29, MCF7 showed that the (RW3-peptide had an IC50 value of ~140 µM and the RcW(RW2 one of ~90 µM, indicating a potentially interesting therapeutic window. Both the killing kinetics and growth inhibition studies presented in this work point to a

  16. Modulating the activity of short arginine-tryptophan containing antibacterial peptides with N-terminal metallocenoyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albada, H Bauke; Chiriac, Alina-Iulia; Wenzel, Michaela; Penkova, Maya; Bandow, Julia E; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2012-01-01

    A series of small synthetic arginine and tryptophan containing peptides was prepared and analyzed for their antibacterial activity. The effect of N-terminal substitution with metallocenoyl groups such as ferrocene (FcCO) and ruthenocene (RcCO) was investigated. Antibacterial activity in different media, growth inhibition, and killing kinetics of the most active peptides were determined. The toxicity of selected derivatives was determined against erythrocytes and three human cancer cell lines. It was shown that the replacement of an N-terminal arginine residue with a metallocenoyl moiety modulates the activity of WRWRW-peptides against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MIC values of 2-6 µM for RcCO-W(RW)(2) and 1-11 µM for (RW)(3) were determined. Interestingly, W(RW)(2)-peptides derivatized with ferrocene were significantly less active than those derivatized with ruthenocene which have similar structural but different electronic properties, suggesting a major influence of the latter. The high activities observed for the RcCO-W(RW)(2)- and (RW)(3)-peptides led to an investigation of the origin of activity of these peptides using several important activity-related parameters. Firstly, killing kinetics of the RcCO-W(RW)(2)-peptide versus killing kinetics of the (RW)(3) derivative showed faster reduction of the colony forming units for the RcCO-W(RW)(2)-peptide, although MIC values indicated higher activity for the (RW)(3)-peptide. This was confirmed by growth inhibition studies. Secondly, hemolysis studies revealed that both peptides did not lead to significant destruction of erythrocytes, even up to 500 µg/mL for (RW)(3) and 250 µg/mL for RcCO-W(RW)(2). In addition, toxicity against three human cancer cell lines (HepG2, HT29, MCF7) showed that the (RW)(3)-peptide had an IC(50) value of ~140 µM and the RcW(RW)(2) one of ~90 µM, indicating a potentially interesting therapeutic window. Both the killing kinetics and growth inhibition studies presented in

  17. ANNEXIN A1 N-TERMINAL DERIVED PEPTIDE AC2-26 EXERTS CHEMOKINETIC EFFECTS ON HUMAN NEUTROPHILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesmond eDalli

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that peptides derived from the N-terminal region of Annexin A1, a glucocorticoid-regulated 37-kDa protein, could act as biomimetics of the parent protein. However, recent evidence, amongst which the ability to interact with distinct receptors other then that described for Annexin A1, suggest that these peptides might fulfil other functions at variance to those reported for the parent protein. Here we tested the ability of peptide Ac2-26 to induce chemotaxis of human neutrophils, showing that this peptide can elicit responses comparable to those produced by the canonical activator formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (or FMLP. However, whilst disruption of the chemical gradient abolished the FMLP response, addition of peptide Ac2-26 in the top well of the chemotaxis chamber did not affect (10 µM or augmented (at 30 µM the neutrophil locomotion to the bottom well, as elicited by 10 µM peptide Ac2-26. Intriguingly, the sole addition of peptide Ac2-26 in the top wells produced a marked migration of neutrophils. A similar behaviour was observed when human primary monocytes were used. Thus, peptide Ac2-26 is a genuine chemokinetic agent towards human blood leukocytes.Neutralization strategies indicated that engagement of either the GPCR termed FPR1 or its cognate receptor FPR2/ALX was sufficient to sustain peptide Ac2-26 induced neutrophil migration. Similarly, application of pharmacological inhibitors showed that cell locomotion to peptide Ac2-26 was mediated primarily by the ERK, but not the JNK and p38 pathways.In conclusion, we report here novel in vitro properties for peptide Ac2-26, promoting neutrophil and monocyte chemokinesis, a process that may contribute to accelerate the resolution phase of inflammation. Here we postulate that the generation Annexin A1 N-terminal peptides at the site of inflammation may expedite the egress of migrated leukocytes thus promoting the return to homeostasis.

  18. Equivalent potency and pharmacokinetics of recombinant human growth hormones with or without an N-terminal methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J A; Rudman, C G; MacLachlan, N J; Fuller, G B; Burnett, B; Frane, J W

    1988-06-01

    Two forms of human GH (hGH) have been produced by recombinant DNA technology. One form has an amino acid sequence identical to that of the natural pituitary hormone (rhGH) and the other form has an additional N-terminal methionine (Met-hGH). The biological potencies of these 2 polypeptides have been compared in hypophysectomized rats in a multidose study measuring body weights and several long bone growth parameters. The pharmacokinetic profiles after iv and sc injection were determined in cynomolgus monkeys in a 4-period cross-over study. All of the measured parameters in all the studies indicated that there was no difference in the two forms of hGH. Measurements taken after 27 daily injections of rhGH or Met-hGH (30-500 micrograms/kg.day) indicated that femur length and width of the proliferative zone in the tibial epiphysis showed dose-related effects for both forms of hGH but no difference between them. The relative potency, based on body weight gain, was calculated using a parallel line bioassay. Weight gain after 8 daily injections in the 5-dose long bone growth study indicated a rhGH potency of 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.5-1.23) relative to Met-hGH. It was concluded that the presence of an N-terminal methionine on hGH has no effect on potency in this model. The pharmacokinetic parameters after iv administration were estimated by fitting serum concentration-time data to a 2-compartment model. Parameters after sc injection were computed by compartment-independent methods. Met-hGH and rhGH had very similar pharmacokinetic profiles after both routes of administration. Comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters indicated that the clearance after iv administration (rhGH, 15 ml/min; Met-hGH, 13 ml/min) and the sc bioavailability (rhGH, 0.72 +/- 0.21; Met-hGH, 0.59 +/- 0.21) were not significantly different for the 2 forms of hGH. It was concluded that rhGH and Met-hGH have equivalent bioavailability and pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys.

  19. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide

  20. Effects of site-directed mutagenesis in the N-terminal domain of thermolysin on its stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yuichi; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2013-01-01

    The thermolysin variant G8C/N60C/S65P in which the triple mutation in the N-terminal domain, Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys/Ser65→Pro, is undertaken increases stability [Yasukawa, K. and Inouye, K. (2007) Improving the activity and stability of thermolysin by site-directed mutagenesis. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1774, 1281-1288] and its mechanism is examined in this study. The apparent denaturing temperatures based on ellipticity at 222 nm of the wild-type thermolysin (WT), G8C/N60C, S65P and G8C/N60C/S65P were 85, >95, 88 and >95°C, respectively. The first-order rate constants, k(obs), of the thermal inactivation of WT and variants at 10 mM CaCl₂ increased with increasing thermal treatment temperatures (70-95°C), and those at 80°C decreased with increasing CaCl₂ concentrations (1-100 mM). The k(obs) values were in the order of WT > S65P > G8C/N60C≒G8C/N60C/S65P at all temperatures and CaCl₂ concentrations. These results indicate that the mutational combination, Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys and Ser65→Pro, increases stability only as high as Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys does. Assuming that irreversible inactivation of thermolysin occurs only in the absence of calcium ions, the dissociation constants, K(d), to the calcium ions of WT, G8C/N60C, S65P and G8C/N60C/S65P were 47, 8.9, 17 and 7.2 mM, respectively, suggesting that Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys and Ser65→Pro stabilize thermolysin by improving its affinity to calcium ions, most probably the one at the Ca²⁺-binding site III in the N-terminal domain.

  1. Heterogeneous N-terminal Acylation of Retinal Proteins Results from the Retina’s Unusual Lipid Metabolism†,§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, Grzegorz; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation occurs by a covalent attachment of a C14:0 fatty acid to the N-terminal Gly residue. This reaction is catalyzed by a N-myristoyltransferase that uses myristoyl-coenzyme A as substrate. But proteins in the retina also undergo heterogeneous N-acylation with C14:2, C14:1 and C12:0 fatty acids. The basis and the role of this retina-specific phenomenon are poorly understood. We studied guanylate cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP1) as an example of retina-specific heterogeneously N-acylated protein. The types and the abundance of fatty acids bound to bovine retinal GCAP1 were: C14:2, 37.0%; C14:0, 32.4%; C14:1, 22.3%; and C12:0, 8.3% as quantified by liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry. We also devised a method for N-acylating proteins in vitro and used it to modify GCAP1 with acyl moieties of different lengths. Analysis of these GCAPs both confirmed that N-terminal acylation of GCAP1 is critical for its high activity and proper Ca2+-dependent response and revealed comparable functionality for GCAP1 with acyl moieties of various lengths. We also tested the hypothesis that retinal heterogeneous N-acylation results from retinal enrichment of unusual N-myristoyltransferase substrates. Thus, acyl-coenzyme A esters were purified from both bovine retina and brain and analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry. Substantial differences in acyl-coenzyme A profiles between the retina and brain were detected. Importantly, the ratios of uncommon N-acylation substrates; C14:2- and C14:1-coenyzme A to C14:0-coenzyme A were higher in the retina than in the brain. Thus, our results suggest that heterogeneous N-acylation, responsible for expansion of retinal proteome, reflects the unique character of retinal lipid metabolism. Additionally, we propose a new hypothesis explaining the physiological relevance of elevated retinal ratios of C14:2- and C14:1-coenzyme A to C14:0-coenzyme A. PMID:21449552

  2. The Scavenger Receptor SSc5D Physically Interacts with Bacteria through the SRCR-Containing N-Terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa Pereira, Catarina; Bocková, Markéta; Santos, Rita F; Santos, Ana Mafalda; Martins de Araújo, Mafalda; Oliveira, Liliana; Homola, Jiří; Carmo, Alexandre M

    2016-01-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) of bacteria, fungi, or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion, which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Toward establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR) properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSc5D (N-SSc5D), thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein-bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to Escherichia coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively), and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time, and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based assay and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5, and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3). Our work thus advocates the

  3. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) reduces reinsertion rates of interaction partners sorted to Rab11-dependent slow recycling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    The scaffolding protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain and a central lipid-binding Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain. PICK1 is thought to regulate trafficking of its PDZ binding partners but different and even opposing...

  4. A-RAF Kinase Functions in ARF6 Regulated Endocytic Membrane Traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Nekhoroshkova, Elena; Albert, Stefan; Becker, Matthias; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: RAF kinases direct ERK MAPK signaling to distinct subcellular compartments in response to growth factor stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the three mammalian isoforms A-RAF is special in that one of its two lipid binding domains mediates a unique pattern of membrane localization. Specific membrane binding is retained by an N-terminal fragm