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Sample records for c-di-gmp receptor linking

  1. [Progress in c-di-GMP inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xuwen; Liu, Xingyu; Tao, Hui; Cui, Zining; Zhang, Lianhui

    2017-09-25

    The cyclic dinucleotide c-di-GMP is known as an important second messenger in bacteria, which controls various important cellular processes, such as cell differentiation, biofilm formation and virulence factors production. It is extremely vital for the development of new antibacterial agents by virtue of blocking c-di-GMP signal conduction. Current research indicates that there are three potential targets for discovering new antibacterial agents based on c-di-GMP regulated signal pathway, which are c-di-GMP synthases, c-di-GMP degrading enzymes and c-di-GMP receptors. Herein, we review small molecules that have been developed to inhibit c-di-GMP related enzymes and indicate perspectives of c-di-GMP inhibitors.

  2. Synthesis of Triazole-Linked Analogues of c-di-GMP and Their Interactions with Diguanylate Cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernicola, Silvia; Torquati, Ilaria; Paiardini, Alessandro; Giardina, Giorgio; Rampioni, Giordano; Messina, Marco; Leoni, Livia; Del Bello, Fabio; Petrelli, Riccardo; Rinaldo, Serena; Cappellacci, Loredana; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2015-10-22

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widespread second messenger that plays a key role in bacterial biofilm formation. The compound's ability to assume multiple conformations allows it to interact with a diverse set of target macromolecules. Here, we analyzed the binding mode of c-di-GMP to the allosteric inhibitory site (I-site) of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and compared it to the conformation adopted in the catalytic site of the EAL phosphodiesterases (PDEs). An array of novel molecules has been designed and synthesized by simplifying the native c-di-GMP structure and replacing the charged phosphodiester backbone with an isosteric nonhydrolyzable 1,2,3-triazole moiety. We developed the first neutral small molecule able to selectively target DGCs discriminating between the I-site of DGCs and the active site of PDEs; this molecule represents a novel tool for mechanistic studies, particularly on those proteins bearing both DGC and PDE modules, and for future optimization studies to target DGCs in vivo.

  3. c-di-GMP and its Effects on Biofilm Formation and Dispersion: a Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A

    2015-04-01

    Since its initial discovery as an allosteric factor regulating cellulose biosynthesis in Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the list of functional outputs regulated by c-di-GMP has grown. We have focused this article on one of these c-di-GMP-regulated processes, namely, biofilm formation in the organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The majority of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases encoded in the P. aeruginosa genome still remain uncharacterized; thus, there is still a great deal to be learned about the link between c-di-GMP and biofilm formation in this microbe. In particular, while a number of c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes have been identified that participate in reversible and irreversible attachment and biofilm maturation, there is a still a significant knowledge gap regarding the c-di-GMP output systems in this organism. Even for the well-characterized Pel system, where c-di-GMP-mediated transcriptional regulation is now well documented, how binding of c-di-GMP by PelD stimulates Pel production is not understood in any detail. Similarly, c-di-GMP-mediated control of swimming, swarming and twitching also remains to be elucidated. Thus, despite terrific advances in our understanding of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and the role of c-di-GMP in this process since the last version of this book (indeed there was no chapter on c-di-GMP!) there is still much to learn.

  4. GIL, a new c-di-GMP binding protein domain involved in regulation of cellulose synthesis in enterobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Xin; Ahmad, Irfan; Blanka, Andrea; Schottkowski, Marco; Cimdins, Annika; Galperin, Michael Y.; Römling, Ute; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to numerous enzymes involved in c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation in enterobacteria, only a handful of c-di-GMP receptors/effectors have been identified. In search of new c-di-GMP receptors, we screened the Escherichia coli ASKA overexpression gene library using the Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA) with fluorescently and radioisotope-labeled c-di-GMP. We uncovered three new candidate c-di-GMP receptors in E. coli and characterized one of them, BcsE. ...

  5. Near-infrared light responsive synthetic c-di-GMP module for optogenetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-11-21

    Enormous potential of cell-based therapeutics is hindered by the lack of effective means to control genetically engineered cells in mammalian tissues. Here, we describe a synthetic module for remote photocontrol of engineered cells that can be adapted for such applications. The module involves photoactivated synthesis of cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), a stable small molecule that is not produced by higher eukaryotes and therefore is suitable for orthogonal regulation. The key component of the photocontrol module is an engineered bacteriophytochrome diguanylate cyclase, which synthesizes c-di-GMP from GTP in a light-dependent manner. Bacteriophytochromes are particularly attractive photoreceptors because they respond to light in the near-infrared window of the spectrum, where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and also because their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally available in mammalian cells. The second component of the photocontrol module, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, maintains near-zero background levels of c-di-GMP in the absence of light, which enhances the photodynamic range of c-di-GMP concentrations. In the E. coli model used in this study, the intracellular c-di-GMP levels could be upregulated by light by >50-fold. Various c-di-GMP-responsive proteins and riboswitches identified in bacteria can be linked downstream of the c-di-GMP-mediated photocontrol module for orthogonal regulation of biological activities in mammals as well as in other organisms lacking c-di-GMP signaling. Here, we linked the photocontrol module to a gene expression output via a c-di-GMP-responsive transcription factor and achieved a 40-fold photoactivation of gene expression.

  6. GIL, a new c-di-GMP-binding protein domain involved in regulation of cellulose synthesis in enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Ahmad, Irfan; Blanka, Andrea; Schottkowski, Marco; Cimdins, Annika; Galperin, Michael Y; Römling, Ute; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to numerous enzymes involved in c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation in enterobacteria, only a handful of c-di-GMP receptors/effectors have been identified. In search of new c-di-GMP receptors, we screened the Escherichia coli ASKA overexpression gene library using the Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA) with fluorescently and radioisotope-labelled c-di-GMP. We uncovered three new candidate c-di-GMP receptors in E. coli and characterized one of them, BcsE. The bcsE gene is encoded in cellulose synthase operons in representatives of Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The purified BcsE proteins from E. coli, Salmonella enterica and Klebsiella pneumoniae bind c-di-GMP via the domain of unknown function, DUF2819, which is hereby designated GIL, GGDEF I-site like domain. The RxGD motif of the GIL domain is required for c-di-GMP binding, similar to the c-di-GMP-binding I-site of the diguanylate cyclase GGDEF domain. Thus, GIL is the second protein domain, after PilZ, dedicated to c-di-GMP-binding. We show that in S. enterica, BcsE is not essential for cellulose synthesis but is required for maximal cellulose production, and that c-di-GMP binding is critical for BcsE function. It appears that cellulose production in enterobacteria is controlled by a two-tiered c-di-GMP-dependent system involving BcsE and the PilZ domain containing glycosyltransferase BcsA.

  7. Structural basis for c-di-GMP-mediated inside-out signaling controlling periplasmic proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos V A S Navarro

    Full Text Available The bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5' cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP has emerged as a central regulator for biofilm formation. Increased cellular c-di-GMP levels lead to stable cell attachment, which in Pseudomonas fluorescens requires the transmembrane receptor LapD. LapD exhibits a conserved and widely used modular architecture containing a HAMP domain and degenerate diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase domains. c-di-GMP binding to the LapD degenerate phosphodiesterase domain is communicated via the HAMP relay to the periplasmic domain, triggering sequestration of the protease LapG, thus preventing cleavage of the surface adhesin LapA. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanism of autoinhibition and activation of LapD based on structure-function analyses and crystal structures of the entire periplasmic domain and the intracellular signaling unit in two different states. In the absence of c-di-GMP, the intracellular module assumes an inactive conformation. Binding of c-di-GMP to the phosphodiesterase domain disrupts the inactive state, permitting the formation of a trans-subunit dimer interface between adjacent phosphodiesterase domains via interactions conserved in c-di-GMP-degrading enzymes. Efficient mechanical coupling of the conformational changes across the membrane is realized through an extensively domain-swapped, unique periplasmic fold. Our structural and functional analyses identified a conserved system for the regulation of periplasmic proteases in a wide variety of bacteria, including many free-living and pathogenic species.

  8. The REC domain mediated dimerization is critical for FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to function as a c-di-GMP receptor and flagella gene regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tiantian; Liu, Shiheng; Wang, Kang; Chi, Kaikai; Zhu, Deyu; Wei, Tiandi; Huang, Yan; Guo, Liming; Hu, Wei; Xu, Sujuan; Lin, Zong; Gu, Lichuan

    2015-10-01

    FleQ is an AAA+ ATPase enhancer-binding protein that regulates both flagella and biofilm formation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. FleQ belongs to the NtrC subfamily of response regulators, but lacks the corresponding aspartic acid for phosphorylation in the REC domain (FleQ(R), also named FleQ domain). Here, we show that the atypical REC domain of FleQ is essential for the function of FleQ. Crystal structure of FleQ(R) at 2.3Å reveals that the structure of FleQ(R) is significantly different from the REC domain of NtrC1 which regulates gene expression in a phosphorylation dependent manner. FleQ(R) forms a novel active dimer (transverse dimer), and mediates the dimerization of full-length FleQ in an unusual manner. Point mutations that affect the dimerization of FleQ lead to loss of function of the protein. Moreover, a c-di-GMP binding site deviating from the previous reported one is identified through structure analysis and point mutations.

  9. A Minimal Threshold of c-di-GMP Is Essential for Fruiting Body Formation and Sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotnicka, Dorota; Smaldone, Gregory T; Petters, Tobias; Trampari, Eleftheria; Liang, Jennifer; Kaever, Volkhard; Malone, Jacob G; Singer, Mitchell; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2016-05-01

    Generally, the second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates the switch between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. Here, we show that c-di-GMP is an essential regulator of multicellular development in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. In response to starvation, M. xanthus initiates a developmental program that culminates in formation of spore-filled fruiting bodies. We show that c-di-GMP accumulates at elevated levels during development and that this increase is essential for completion of development whereas excess c-di-GMP does not interfere with development. MXAN3735 (renamed DmxB) is identified as a diguanylate cyclase that only functions during development and is responsible for this increased c-di-GMP accumulation. DmxB synthesis is induced in response to starvation, thereby restricting DmxB activity to development. DmxB is essential for development and functions downstream of the Dif chemosensory system to stimulate exopolysaccharide accumulation by inducing transcription of a subset of the genes encoding proteins involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis. The developmental defects in the dmxB mutant are non-cell autonomous and rescued by co-development with a strain proficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis, suggesting reduced exopolysaccharide accumulation as the causative defect in this mutant. The NtrC-like transcriptional regulator EpsI/Nla24, which is required for exopolysaccharide accumulation, is identified as a c-di-GMP receptor, and thus a putative target for DmxB generated c-di-GMP. Because DmxB can be-at least partially-functionally replaced by a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, these results altogether suggest a model in which a minimum threshold level of c-di-GMP is essential for the successful completion of multicellular development in M. xanthus.

  10. Characterization of c-di-GMP signaling in Salmonella typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Simm, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Signal transduction via cyclic nucleotides is a general mechanism utilized by cells from all kingdoms of life. Identification of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as an allosteric activator of the cellulose synthase in Gluconacetobacter xylinus 20 years ago, paved the way for the discovery of a novel general signalling system which is unique to bacteria. In this thesis, the c-di-GMP signalling network leading to the formation of a biofilm behavior in Salmonella...

  11. Structures of the activator of K. pneumonia biofilm formation, MrkH, indicates PilZ domains involved in c-di-GMP and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Maria A; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Klebsiella pneumonia is linked to the bacteria's ability to form biofilms. Mannose-resistant Klebsiella-like (Mrk) hemagglutinins are critical for K pneumonia biofilm development, and the expression of the genes encoding these proteins is activated by a 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)-regulated transcription factor, MrkH. To gain insight into MrkH function, we performed structural and biochemical analyses. Data revealed MrkH to be a monomer with a two-domain architecture consisting of a PilZ C-domain connected to an N domain that unexpectedly also harbors a PilZ-like fold. Comparison of apo- and c-di-GMP-bound MrkH structures reveals a large 138° interdomain rotation that is induced by binding an intercalated c-di-GMP dimer. c-di-GMP interacts with PilZ C-domain motifs 1 and 2 (RxxxR and D/NxSxxG) and a newly described c-di-GMP-binding motif in the MrkH N domain. Strikingly, these c-di-GMP-binding motifs also stabilize an open state conformation in apo MrkH via contacts from the PilZ motif 1 to residues in the C-domain motif 2 and the c-di-GMP-binding N-domain motif. Use of the same regions in apo structure stabilization and c-di-GMP interaction allows distinction between the states. Indeed, domain reorientation by c-di-GMP complexation with MrkH, which leads to a highly compacted structure, suggests a mechanism by which the protein is activated to bind DNA. To our knowledge, MrkH represents the first instance of specific DNA binding mediated by PilZ domains. The MrkH structures also pave the way for the rational design of inhibitors that target K pneumonia biofilm formation.

  12. Biofilms and Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Signaling: Lessons from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Martina; Filloux, Alain

    2016-06-10

    The cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) second messenger represents a signaling system that regulates many bacterial behaviors and is of key importance for driving the lifestyle switch between motile loner cells and biofilm formers. This review provides an up-to-date compendium of c-di-GMP pathways connected to biofilm formation, biofilm-associated motilities, and other functionalities in the ubiquitous and opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa This bacterium is frequently adopted as a model organism to study bacterial biofilm formation. Importantly, its versatility and adaptation capabilities are linked with a broad range of complex regulatory networks, including a large set of genes involved in c-di-GMP biosynthesis, degradation, and transmission.

  13. Optimization of RNA-based c-di-GMP fluorescent sensors through tuning their structural modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuzuka, Saki; Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger of bacteria and its detection is an important issue in basic and applied microbiology. As c-di-GMP riboswitch ligand-binding domains (aptamer domains) capture c-di-GMP with high affinity and selectivity, they are promising platforms for the development of RNA-based c-di-GMP sensors. We analyzed two previously reported c-di-GMP sensor RNAs derived from the Vc2 riboswitch. We also designed and tested their variants, some of which showed improved properties as RNA-based c-di-GMP sensors.

  14. Formation and dimerization of the phosphodiesterase active site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa MorA, a bi-functional c-di-GMP regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phippen, Curtis William; Mikolajek, Halina; Schlaefli, Henry George; Keevil, Charles William; Webb, Jeremy Stephen; Tews, Ivo

    2014-12-20

    Diguanylate cyclases (DGC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE), respectively synthesise and hydrolyse the secondary messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), and both activities are often found in a single protein. Intracellular c-di-GMP levels in turn regulate bacterial motility, virulence and biofilm formation. We report the first structure of a tandem DGC-PDE fragment, in which the catalytic domains are shown to be active. Two phosphodiesterase states are distinguished by active site formation. The structures, in the presence or absence of c-di-GMP, suggest that dimerisation and binding pocket formation are linked, with dimerisation being required for catalytic activity. An understanding of PDE activation is important, as biofilm dispersal via c-di-GMP hydrolysis has therapeutic effects on chronic infections.

  15. C-di-GMP regulates antimicrobial peptide resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Rybtke, Morten Theil

    2013-01-01

    Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an intracellular second messenger which controls the life styles of many bacteria. A high intracellular level of c-di-GMP induces a biofilm lifestyle, whereas a low intracellular level of c-di-GMP stimulates dispersal of biofilms and promotes a plankto......Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an intracellular second messenger which controls the life styles of many bacteria. A high intracellular level of c-di-GMP induces a biofilm lifestyle, whereas a low intracellular level of c-di-GMP stimulates dispersal of biofilms and promotes...... a planktonic lifestyle. Here, we used expression of different reporters to show that planktonic cells (PCells), biofilm cells (BCells) and cells dispersed from biofilms (DCells) had distinct intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Proteomics analysis showed that the low intracellular c-di-GMP level of DCells induced...... the expression of proteins required for the virulence and development of antimicrobial peptide resistance in P. aeruginosa. In accordance, P. aeruginosa cells with low c-di-GMP levels were found to be more resistant to colistin than P. aeruginosa cells with high c-di-GMP levels. This contradicts the current...

  16. Endo-S-c-di-GMP Analogues-Polymorphism and Binding Studies with Class I Riboswitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman O. Sintim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available C-di-GMP, a cyclic guanine dinucleotide, has been shown to regulate biofilm formation as well as virulence gene expression in a variety of bacteria. Analogues of c-di-GMP have the potential to be used as chemical probes to study c-di-GMP signaling and could even become drug leads for the development of anti-biofilm compounds. Herein we report the synthesis and biophysical studies of a series of c-di-GMP analogues, which have both phosphate and sugar moieties simultaneously modified (called endo-S-c-di-GMP analogues. We used computational methods to predict the relative orientation of the guanine nucleobases in c-di-GMP and analogues. DOSY NMR of the endo-S-c-di-GMP series showed that the polymorphism of c-di-GMP can be tuned with conservative modifications to the phosphate and sugar moieties (conformational steering. Binding studies with Vc2 RNA (a class I c-di-GMP riboswitch revealed that conservative modifications to the phosphate and 2'-positions of c-di-GMP dramatically affected binding to class I riboswitch.

  17. Trigger phosphodiesterases as a novel class of c-di-GMP effector proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengge, Regine

    2016-11-01

    The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP controls bacterial biofilm formation, motility, cell cycle progression, development and virulence. It is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (with GGDEF domains), degraded by specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs, with EAL of HD-GYP domains) and sensed by a wide variety of c-di-GMP-binding effectors that control diverse targets. c-di-GMP-binding effectors can be riboswitches as well as proteins with highly diverse structures and functions. The latter include 'degenerate' GGDEF/EAL domain proteins that are enzymatically inactive but still able to bind c-di-GMP. Surprisingly, two enzymatically active 'trigger PDEs', the Escherichia coli proteins PdeR and PdeL, have recently been added to this list of c-di-GMP-sensing effectors. Mechanistically, trigger PDEs are multifunctional. They directly and specifically interact with a macromolecular target (e.g. with a transcription factor or directly with a promoter region), whose activity they control by their binding and degradation of c-di-GMP-their PDE activity thus represents the c-di-GMP sensor or effector function. In this process, c-di-GMP serves as a regulatory ligand, but in contrast to classical allosteric control, this ligand is also degraded. The resulting kinetics and circuitry of control are ideally suited for trigger PDEs to serve as key components in regulatory switches.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  18. c-di-GMP induction of Dictyostelium cell death requires the polyketide DIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Luciani, Marie-Françoise; Giusti, Corinne; Golstein, Pierre

    2015-02-15

    Cell death in the model organism Dictyostelium, as studied in monolayers in vitro, can be induced by the polyketide DIF-1 or by the cyclical dinucleotide c-di-GMP. c-di-GMP, a universal bacterial second messenger, can trigger innate immunity in bacterially infected animal cells and is involved in developmental cell death in Dictyostelium. We show here that c-di-GMP was not sufficient to induce cell death in Dictyostelium cell monolayers. Unexpectedly, it also required the DIF-1 polyketide. The latter could be exogenous, as revealed by a telling synergy between c-di-GMP and DIF-1. The required DIF-1 polyketide could also be endogenous, as shown by the inability of c-di-GMP to induce cell death in Dictyostelium HMX44A cells and DH1 cells upon pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DIF-1 biosynthesis. In these cases, c-di-GMP-induced cell death was rescued by complementation with exogenous DIF-1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that c-di-GMP could trigger cell death in Dictyostelium only in the presence of the DIF-1 polyketide or its metabolites. This identified another element of control to this cell death and perhaps also to c-di-GMP effects in other situations and organisms.

  19. Structural Basis of Ligand Binding by a C-di-GMP Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Lipchock, S; Ames, T; Wang, J; Breaker, R; Strobel, S

    2009-01-01

    The second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3{prime}-5{prime})-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) regulates many processes in bacteria, including motility, pathogenesis and biofilm formation. c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches are important downstream targets in this signaling pathway. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, of a c-di-GMP riboswitch aptamer from Vibrio cholerae bound to c-di-GMP, showing that the ligand binds within a three-helix junction that involves base-pairing and extensive base-stacking. The symmetric c-di-GMP is recognized asymmetrically with respect to both the bases and the backbone. A mutant aptamer was engineered that preferentially binds the candidate signaling molecule c-di-AMP over c-di-GMP. Kinetic and structural data suggest that genetic regulation by the c-di-GMP riboswitch is kinetically controlled and that gene expression is modulated through the stabilization of a previously unidentified P1 helix, illustrating a direct mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling.

  20. Responses to Elevated c-di-GMP Levels in Mutualistic and Pathogenic Plant-Interacting Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Aragón, Isabel M.; Prada-Ramírez, Harold A.; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Ramos, Cayo; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Despite a recent burst of research, knowledge on c-di-GMP signaling pathways remains largely fragmentary and molecular mechanisms of regulation and even c-di-GMP targets are yet unknown for most bacteria. Besides genomics or bioinformatics, accompanying alternative approaches are necessary to reveal c-di-GMP regulation in bacteria with complex lifestyles. We have approached this study by artificially altering the c-di-GMP economy of diverse pathogenic and mutualistic plant-interacting bacteria and examining the effects on the interaction with their respective host plants. Phytopathogenic Pseudomonas and symbiotic Rhizobium strains with enhanced levels of intracellular c-di-GMP displayed common free-living responses: reduction of motility, increased production of extracellular polysaccharides and enhanced biofilm formation. Regarding the interaction with the host plants, P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi cells containing high c-di-GMP levels formed larger knots on olive plants which, however, displayed reduced necrosis. In contrast, development of disease symptoms in P. syringae-tomato or P. syringae-bean interactions did not seem significantly affected by high c-di-GMP. On the other hand, increasing c-di-GMP levels in symbiotic R. etli and R. leguminosarum strains favoured the early stages of the interaction since enhanced adhesion to plant roots, but decreased symbiotic efficiency as plant growth and nitrogen contents were reduced. Our results remark the importance of c-di-GMP economy for plant-interacting bacteria and show the usefulness of our approach to reveal particular stages during plant-bacteria associations which are sensitive to changes in c-di-GMP levels. PMID:24626229

  1. Trigger phosphodiesterases as a novel class of c-di-GMP effector proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP controls bacterial biofilm formation, motility, cell cycle progression, development and virulence. It is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (with GGDEF domains), degraded by specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs, with EAL of HD-GYP domains) and sensed by a wide variety of c-di-GMP-binding effectors that control diverse targets. c-di-GMP-binding effectors can be riboswitches as well as proteins with highly diverse structures and functions. The latter include ‘degenerate’ GGDEF/EAL domain proteins that are enzymatically inactive but still able to bind c-di-GMP. Surprisingly, two enzymatically active ‘trigger PDEs’, the Escherichia coli proteins PdeR and PdeL, have recently been added to this list of c-di-GMP-sensing effectors. Mechanistically, trigger PDEs are multifunctional. They directly and specifically interact with a macromolecular target (e.g. with a transcription factor or directly with a promoter region), whose activity they control by their binding and degradation of c-di-GMP—their PDE activity thus represents the c-di-GMP sensor or effector function. In this process, c-di-GMP serves as a regulatory ligand, but in contrast to classical allosteric control, this ligand is also degraded. The resulting kinetics and circuitry of control are ideally suited for trigger PDEs to serve as key components in regulatory switches. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672149

  2. Optogenetic Module for Dichromatic Control of c-di-GMP Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Fomicheva, Anastasia; Moskvin, Oleg V; Gomelsky, Mark

    2017-09-15

    Many aspects of bacterial physiology and behavior, including motility, surface attachment, and the cell cycle, are controlled by cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-dependent signaling pathways on the scale of seconds to minutes. Interrogation of such processes in real time requires tools for introducing rapid and reversible changes in intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Inducing the expression of genes encoding c-di-GMP-synthetic (diguanylate cyclases) and -degrading (c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase) enzymes by chemicals may not provide adequate temporal control. In contrast, light-controlled diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases can be quickly activated and inactivated. A red/near-infrared-light-regulated diguanylate cyclase, BphS, was engineered previously, yet a complementary light-activated c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase has been lacking. In search of such a phosphodiesterase, we investigated two homologous proteins from Allochromatium vinosum and Magnetococcus marinus, designated BldP, which contain C-terminal EAL-BLUF modules, where EAL is a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase domain and BLUF is a blue light sensory domain. Characterization of the BldP proteins in Escherichia coli and in vitro showed that they possess light-activated c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activities. Interestingly, light activation in both enzymes was dependent on oxygen levels. The truncated EAL-BLUF fragment from A. vinosum BldP lacked phosphodiesterase activity, whereas a similar fragment from M. marinus BldP, designated EB1, possessed such activity that was highly (>30-fold) upregulated by light. Following light withdrawal, EB1 reverted to the inactive ground state with a half-life of ∼6 min. Therefore, the blue-light-activated phosphodiesterase EB1 can be used in combination with the red/near-infrared-light-regulated diguanylate cyclase BphS for the bidirectional regulation of c-di-GMP-dependent processes in E. coli as well as other bacterial and nonbacterial cells.IMPORTANCE Regulation of motility

  3. Host Immune Response to Bacterial Cyclic Diguanylic Acid (c-di-GMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Materials and Methods c-di-GMP and chemicals used The c-di-GMP (Fig. 1) used in these studies was synthesized and prepared as previously described (19–24...godeoxynucleotide (ODN) 2216 (25). LPS endotoxin (Limulus amebocyte lysate assay) test A dose of 500 M c-di-GMP was tested for the presence of LPS endotoxin using...inoculation, 100 CFU of S. aureus New- bould 305 (ATCC 29740) were injected into each gland and the coloniza- tion was allowed for 10 h. Raw bacterial CFU

  4. The expanding roles of c-di-GMP in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides and secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2015-05-01

    The cyclic dinucleotide c-di-GMP has emerged in the last decade as a prevalent intracellular messenger that orchestrates the transition between the motile and sessile lifestyles of many bacterial species. The motile-to-sessile transition is often associated with the formation of extracellular matrix-encased biofilm, an organized community of bacterial cells that often contributes to antibiotic resistance and host-pathogen interaction. It is increasingly clear that c-di-GMP controls motility, biofilm formation and bacterial pathogenicity partially through regulating the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and small-molecule secondary metabolites. This review summarizes our current understanding of the regulation of EPS biosynthesis by c-di-GMP in a diversity of bacterial species and highlights the emerging role of c-di-GMP in the biosynthesis of small-molecule secondary metabolites.

  5. New insights into Legionella pneumophila biofilm regulation by c-di-GMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécastaings, Sophie; Allombert, Julie; Lajoie, Barbora; Doublet, Patricia; Roques, Christine; Vianney, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila grows as a biofilm, freely or inside amoebae. Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger frequently implicated in biofilm formation, is synthesized and degraded by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs), respectively. To characterize the c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes involved in L. pneumophila biofilm regulation, the consequences on biofilm formation and the c-di-GMP concentration of each corresponding gene inactivation were assessed in the Lens strain. The results showed that one DGC and two PDEs enhance different aspects of biofilm formation, while two proteins with dual activity (DGC/PDE) inhibit biofilm growth. Surprisingly, only two mutants exhibited a change in global c-di-GMP concentration. This study highlights that specific c-di-GMP pathways control L. pneumophila biofilm formation, most likely via temporary and/or local modulation of c-di-GMP concentration. Furthermore, Lpl1054 DGC is required to enable the formation a dense biofilm in response to nitric oxide, a signal for biofilm dispersion in many other species.

  6. Structural and Biochemical Determinants of Ligand Binding by the c-di-GMP Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Lipchock, S; Livingston,; Shanahan, C; Strobel, S

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP is used in many species to control essential processes that allow the organism to adapt to its environment. The c-di-GMP riboswitch (GEMM) is an important downstream target in this signaling pathway and alters gene expression in response to changing concentrations of c-di-GMP. The riboswitch selectively recognizes its second messenger ligand primarily through contacts with two critical nucleotides. However, these two nucleotides are not the most highly conserved residues within the riboswitch sequence. Instead, nucleotides that stack with c-di-GMP and that form tertiary RNA contacts are the most invariant. Biochemical and structural evidence reveals that the most common natural variants are able to make alternative pairing interactions with both guanine bases of the ligand. Additionally, a high-resolution (2.3 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the native complex reveals that a single metal coordinates the c-di-GMP backbone. Evidence is also provided that after transcription of the first nucleotide on the 3{prime}-side of the P1 helix, which is predicted to be the molecular switch, the aptamer is functional for ligand binding. Although large energetic effects occur when several residues in the RNA are altered, mutations at the most conserved positions, rather than at positions that base pair with c-di-GMP, have the most detrimental effects on binding. Many mutants retain sufficient c-di-GMP affinity for the RNA to remain biologically relevant, which suggests that this motif is quite resilient to mutation.

  7. The anti-cancerous drug doxorubicin decreases the c-di-GMP content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa but promotes biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groizeleau, Julie; Rybtke, Morten; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    formation in many clinically relevant bacteria. It is hypothesized that drugs lowering the intracellular level of c-di-GMP will force biofilm bacteria into a more treatable planktonic lifestyle. To identify compounds capable of lowering c-di-GMP levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we screened 5000 compounds...... for their potential c-di-GMP-lowering effect using a recently developed c-di-GMP biosensor strain. Our screen identified the anti-cancerous drug doxorubicin as a potent c-di-GMP inhibitor. In addition, the drug decreased the transcription of many biofilm-related genes. However, despite its effect on the c......-di-GMP content in P. aeruginosa, doxorubicin was unable to inhibit biofilm formation or disperse established biofilms. On the contrary, the drug was found to promote P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, possibly through release of extracellular DNA from a subpopulation of killed bacteria. Our findings emphasize...

  8. The c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm development in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fernández, Alicia; López-Sánchez, Aroa; Calero, Patricia; Govantes, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    We previously showed the isolation of biofilmpersistent Pseudomonas putida mutants that fail to undergo biofilm dispersal upon entry in stationary phase. Two such mutants were found to bear insertions in PP0914, encoding a GGDEF/EAL domain protein with high similarity to Pseudomon asaeruginosa BifA. Here we show the phenotypic characterization of a ΔbifA mutant in P. putida KT2442.This mutant displayed increased biofilm and pellicle formation, cell aggregation in liquid medium and decreased starvation-induced biofilm dispersal relative to the wild type. Unlike its P. aeruginosa counterpart, P. putida BifA did not affect swarming motility. The hyperadherent phenotype of the ΔbifA mutant correlates with a general increase in cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels, Congo Red-binding exopolyaccharide production and transcription of the adhesin-encoding lapA gene. Integrity of the EAL motif and a modified GGDEF motif (altered to GGDQF)were crucial for BifA activity, and c-di-GMP depletion by overexpression of a heterologous c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase in the ΔbifA mutant restored wild-type biofilm dispersal and lapA expression.Our results indicate that BifA is a phosphodiesterase involved in the regulation of the c-di-GMP pool and required for the generation of the low c-di-GMP signal that triggers starvation-induced biofilm dispersal.

  9. Bacterial c-di-GMP affects hematopoietic stem/progenitors and their niches through STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Chiharu I; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Karigane, Daiki; Haeno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Sato, Taku; Ohteki, Toshiaki; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Barber, Glen N; Kurokawa, Mineo; Suda, Toshio; Takubo, Keiyo

    2015-04-01

    Upon systemic bacterial infection, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to the periphery in order to supply a sufficient number of immune cells. Although pathogen-associated molecular patterns reportedly mediate HSPC activation, how HSPCs detect pathogen invasion in vivo remains elusive. Bacteria use the second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) for a variety of activities. Here, we report that c-di-GMP comprehensively regulated both HSPCs and their niche cells through an innate immune sensor, STING, thereby inducing entry into the cell cycle and mobilization of HSPCs while decreasing the number and repopulation capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, we show that type I interferon acted as a downstream target of c-di-GMP to inhibit HSPC expansion in the spleen, while transforming growth factor-β was required for c-di-GMP-dependent splenic HSPC expansion. Our results define machinery underlying the dynamic regulation of HSPCs and their niches during bacterial infection through c-di-GMP/STING signaling.

  10. Temperature affects c-di-GMP signalling and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsley, Loni; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-11-01

    Biofilm formation is crucial to the environmental survival and transmission of Vibrio cholerae, the facultative human pathogen responsible for the disease cholera. During its infectious cycle, V. cholerae experiences fluctuations in temperature within the aquatic environment and during the transition between human host and aquatic reservoirs. In this study, we report that biofilm formation is induced at low temperatures through increased levels of the signalling molecule, cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). Strains harbouring in frame deletions of all V. cholerae genes that are predicted to encode diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) or phosphodiesterases (PDEs) were screened for their involvement in low-temperature-induced biofilm formation and Vibrio polysaccharide gene expression. Of the 52 mutants tested, deletions of six DGCs and three PDEs were found to affect these phenotypes at low temperatures. Unlike wild type, a strain lacking all six DGCs did not exhibit a low-temperature-dependent increase in c-di-GMP, indicating that these DGCs are required for temperature modulation of c-di-GMP levels. We also show that temperature modulates c-di-GMP levels in a similar fashion in the Gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not in the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. This study uncovers the role of temperature in environmental regulation of biofilm formation and c-di-GMP signalling.

  11. c-di-GMP enhances protective innate immunity in a murine model of pertussis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokrollah Elahi

    Full Text Available Innate immunity represents the first line of defense against invading pathogens in the respiratory tract. Innate immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, and granulocytes contain specific pathogen-recognition molecules which induce the production of cytokines and subsequently activate the adaptive immune response. c-di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that stimulates innate immunity and regulates biofilm formation, motility and virulence in a diverse range of bacterial species with potent immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, c-di-GMP was used to enhance the innate immune response against pertussis, a respiratory infection mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis. Intranasal treatment with c-di-GMP resulted in the induction of robust innate immune responses to infection with B. pertussis characterized by enhanced recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells and dendritic cells. The immune responses were associated with an earlier and more vigorous expression of Th1-type cytokines, as well as an increase in the induction of nitric oxide in the lungs of treated animals, resulting in significant reduction of bacterial numbers in the lungs of infected mice. These results demonstrate that c-di-GMP is a potent innate immune stimulatory molecule that can be used to enhance protection against bacterial respiratory infections. In addition, our data suggest that priming of the innate immune system by c-di-GMP could further skew the immune response towards a Th1 type phenotype during subsequent infection. Thus, our data suggest that c-di-GMP might be useful as an adjuvant for the next generation of acellular pertussis vaccine to mount a more protective Th1 phenotype immune response, and also in other systems where a Th1 type immune response is required.

  12. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie WC; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease. PMID:24874800

  13. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie W C; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease.

  14. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, John C; Whitfield, Gregory B; Marmont, Lindsey S; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E; Howell, P Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. These results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.

  15. Bi-modal distribution of the second messenger c-di-GMP controls cell fate and asymmetry during the caulobacter cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Abel

    Full Text Available Many bacteria mediate important life-style decisions by varying levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Behavioral transitions result from the coordination of complex cellular processes such as motility, surface adherence or the production of virulence factors and toxins. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for these processes have been elucidated in some cases, the global pleiotropic effects of c-di-GMP are poorly understood, primarily because c-di-GMP networks are inherently complex in most bacteria. Moreover, the quantitative relationships between cellular c-di-GMP levels and c-di-GMP dependent phenotypes are largely unknown. Here, we dissect the c-di-GMP network of Caulobacter crescentus to establish a global and quantitative view of c-di-GMP dependent processes in this organism. A genetic approach that gradually reduced the number of diguanylate cyclases identified novel c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes and unraveled c-di-GMP as an essential component of C. crescentus cell polarity and its bimodal life cycle. By varying cellular c-di-GMP concentrations, we determined dose response curves for individual c-di-GMP-dependent processes. Relating these values to c-di-GMP levels modeled for single cells progressing through the cell cycle sets a quantitative frame for the successive activation of c-di-GMP dependent processes during the C. crescentus life cycle. By reconstructing a simplified c-di-GMP network in a strain devoid of c-di-GMP we defined the minimal requirements for the oscillation of c-di-GMP levels during the C. crescentus cell cycle. Finally, we show that although all c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes were qualitatively restored by artificially adjusting c-di-GMP levels with a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, much higher levels of the second messenger are required under these conditions as compared to the contribution of homologous c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes. These experiments suggest that a common c-di-GMP pool

  16. c-di-GMP signalling and the regulation of developmental transitions in streptomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Matthew J; Tschowri, Natalia; Schlimpert, Susan; Flärdh, Klas; Buttner, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    The complex life cycle of streptomycetes involves two distinct filamentous cell forms: the growing (or vegetative) hyphae and the reproductive (or aerial) hyphae, which differentiate into long chains of spores. Until recently, little was known about the signalling pathways that regulate the developmental transitions leading to sporulation. In this Review, we discuss important new insights into these pathways that have led to the emergence of a coherent regulatory network, focusing on the erection of aerial hyphae and the synchronous cell division event that produces dozens of unigenomic spores. In particular, we highlight the role of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in controlling the initiation of development, and the role of the master regulator BldD in mediating c-di-GMP signalling.

  17. Complex regulatory network encompassing the Csr, c-di-GMP and motility systems of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N; Ahmad, Irfan; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Ojar

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial survival depends on the ability to switch between sessile and motile lifestyles in response to changing environmental conditions. In many species, this switch is governed by (3'-5')-cyclic-diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a signalling molecule, which is metabolized by proteins containing GGDEF and/or EAL domains. Salmonella Typhimurium contains 20 such proteins. Here, we show that the RNA-binding protein CsrA regulates the expression of eight genes encoding GGDEF, GGDEF-EAL and EAL domain proteins. CsrA bound directly to the mRNA leaders of five of these genes, suggesting that it may regulate these genes post-transcriptionally. The c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase STM3611, which reciprocally controls flagella function and production of biofilm matrix components, was regulated by CsrA binding to the mRNA, but was also indirectly regulated by CsrA through the FlhDC/FliA flagella cascade and STM1344. STM1344 is an unconventional (c-di-GMP-inactive) EAL domain protein, recently identified as a negative regulator of flagella gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that CsrA directly downregulates expression of STM1344, which in turn regulates STM3611 through fliA and thus reciprocally controls motility and biofilm factors. Altogether, our data reveal that the concerted and complex regulation of several genes encoding GGDEF/EAL domain proteins allows CsrA to control the motility-sessility switch in S. Typhimurium at multiple levels.

  18. Identification, activity and disulfide connectivity of C-di-GMP regulating proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal Gupta

    Full Text Available C-di-GMP, a bacterial second messenger plays a key role in survival and adaptation of bacteria under different environmental conditions. The level of c-di-GMP is regulated by two opposing activities, namely diguanylate cyclase (DGC and phosphodiesterase (PDE-A exhibited by GGDEF and EAL domain, respectively in the same protein. Previously, we reported a bifunctional GGDEF-EAL domain protein, MSDGC-1 from Mycobacterium smegmatis showing both these activities (Kumar and Chatterji, 2008. In this current report, we have identified and characterized the homologous protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv 1354c named as MtbDGC. MtbDGC is also a bifunctional protein, which can synthesize and degrade c-di-GMP in vitro. Further we expressed Mtbdgc in M. smegmatis and it was able to complement the MSDGC-1 knock out strain by restoring the long term survival of M. smegmatis. Another protein Rv 1357c, named as MtbPDE, is an EAL domain protein and degrades c-di-GMP to pGpG in vitro. Rv1354c and 1357c have seven cysteine amino acids in their sequence, distributed along the full length of the protein. Disulfide bonds play an important role in stabilizing protein structure and regulating protein function. By proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometric analysis of MtbDGC, connectivity between cysteine pairs Cys94-Cys584, Cys2-Cys479 and Cys429-Cys614 was determined, whereas the third cysteine (Cys406 from N terminal was found to be free in MtbDGC protein, which was further confirmed by alkylation with iodoacetamide labeling. Bioinformatics modeling investigations also supported the pattern of disulfide connectivity obtained by Mass spectrometric analysis. Cys406 was mutated to serine by site directed mutagenesis and the mutant MtbC406S was not found to be active and was not able to synthesize or degrade c-di-GMP. The disulfide connectivity established here would help further in understanding the structure - function relationship in MtbDGC.

  19. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP-dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y; Krasteva, Petya V; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V A S

    2016-01-12

    Bacterial biofilm formation during chronic infections confers increased fitness, antibiotic tolerance, and cytotoxicity. In many pathogens, the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to collaborative, sessile biofilms represents a regulated process orchestrated by the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP. A main effector for c-di-GMP signaling in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the transcription regulator FleQ. FleQ is a bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) with a central AAA+ ATPase σ(54)-interaction domain, flanked by a C-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif and a divergent N-terminal receiver domain. Together with a second ATPase, FleN, FleQ regulates the expression of flagellar and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes in response to cellular c-di-GMP. Here we report structural and functional data that reveal an unexpected mode of c-di-GMP recognition that is associated with major conformational rearrangements in FleQ. Crystal structures of FleQ's AAA+ ATPase domain in its apo-state or bound to ADP or ATP-γ-S show conformations reminiscent of the activated ring-shaped assemblies of other bEBPs. As revealed by the structure of c-di-GMP-complexed FleQ, the second messenger interacts with the AAA+ ATPase domain at a site distinct from the ATP binding pocket. c-di-GMP interaction leads to active site obstruction, hexameric ring destabilization, and discrete quaternary structure transitions. Solution and cell-based studies confirm coupling of the ATPase active site and c-di-GMP binding, as well as the functional significance of crystallographic interprotomer interfaces. Taken together, our data offer unprecedented insight into conserved regulatory mechanisms of gene expression under direct c-di-GMP control via FleQ and FleQ-like bEBPs.

  20. A direct screen for c-di-GMP modulators reveals a Salmonella Typhimurium periplasmic ʟ-arginine-sensing pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Erez; Petersen, Erik; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-06-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that transduces internal and external signals and regulates bacterial motility and biofilm formation. Some organisms encode more than 100 c-di-GMP-modulating enzymes, but only for a few has a signal been defined that modulates their activity. We developed and applied a high-throughput, real-time flow cytometry method that uses a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor of free c-di-GMP to screen for signals that modulate its concentration within Salmonella Typhimurium. We identified multiple compounds, including glucose, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, salicylic acid, and ʟ-arginine, that modulated the FRET signal and therefore the free c-di-GMP concentration. By screening a library of mutants, we identified proteins required for the c-di-GMP response to each compound. Furthermore, low micromolar concentrations of ʟ-arginine induced a rapid translation-independent increase in c-di-GMP concentrations and c-di-GMP-dependent cellulose synthesis, responses that required the regulatory periplasmic domain of the diguanylate cyclase STM1987. ʟ-Arginine signaling also required the periplasmic putative ʟ-arginine-binding protein ArtI, implying that ʟ-arginine sensing occurred in the periplasm. Among the 20 commonly used amino acids, S. Typhimurium specifically responded to ʟ-arginine with an increase in c-di-GMP, suggesting that ʟ-arginine may serve as a signal during S. Typhimurium infection. Our results demonstrate that a second-messenger biosensor can be used to identify environmental signals and define pathways that alter microbial behavior.

  1. Elevated level of the second messenger c-di-GMP in Comamonas testosteroni enhances biofilm formation and biofilm-based biodegradation of 3-chloroaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yichao; Ding, Yuanzhao; Cohen, Yehuda; Cao, Bin

    2015-02-01

    The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger that determines bacterial lifestyle between the planktonic and biofilm modes of life. Although the role of c-di-GMP signaling in biofilm development and dispersal has been extensively studied, how c-di-GMP signaling influences environmental bioprocess activities such as biodegradation remains unexplored. To elucidate the impacts of elevating c-di-GMP level on environmental bioprocesses, we constructed a Comamonas testosteroni strain constitutively expressing a c-di-GMP synthase YedQ from Escherichia coli and examined its capability in biofilm formation and biodegradation of 3-chloroaniline (3-CA). The high c-di-GMP strain exhibited an increased binding to Congo red dye, a decreased motility, and an enhanced biofilm formation capability. In planktonic cultures, the strain with an elevated c-di-GMP concentration and the wild type could degrade 3-CA comparably well. However, under batch growth conditions with a high surface to volume ratio, an elevated c-di-GMP concentration in C. testosteroni significantly increased the contribution of biofilms in 3-CA biodegradation. In continuous submerged biofilm reactors, C. testosteroni with an elevated c-di-GMP level exhibited an enhanced 3-CA biodegradation and a decreased cell detachment rate. Taken together, this study provides a novel strategy to enhance biofilm-based biodegradation of toxic xenobiotic compounds through manipulating bacterial c-di-GMP signaling.

  2. The CRP/FNR family protein Bcam1349 is a c-di-GMP effector that regulates biofilm formation in the respiratory pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; O'Connell, Aileen; Nilsson, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to control a wide range of functions in bacteria, but little is known about these regulatory mechanisms in B. cenocepacia. Here we investigated the role that c-di-GMP plays in the regulation of biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Elevated intracellular levels of c-di-GMP promoted wrinkly...... colony, pellicle and biofilm formation in B. cenocepacia. A screen for transposon mutants unable to respond to elevated levels of c-di-GMP led to the identification of the mutant bcam1349 that did not display increased biofilm and pellicle formation with excessive c-di-GMP levels, and displayed a biofilm...... larvae infection model. Taken together, these findings suggest that the Bcam1349 protein is a transcriptional regulator that binds c-di-GMP and regulates biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia in response to the level of c-di-GMP....

  3. Capture compound mass spectrometry--a powerful tool to identify novel c-di-GMP effector proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laventie, Benoît-Joseph; Nesper, Jutta; Ahrné, Erik; Glatter, Timo; Schmidt, Alexander; Jenal, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made during the last decade towards the identification and characterization of enzymes involved in the synthesis (diguanylate cyclases) and degradation (phosphodiesterases) of the second messenger c-di-GMP. In contrast, little information is available regarding the molecular mechanisms and cellular components through which this signaling molecule regulates a diverse range of cellular processes. Most of the known effector proteins belong to the PilZ family or are degenerated diguanylate cyclases or phosphodiesterases that have given up on catalysis and have adopted effector function. Thus, to better define the cellular c-di-GMP network in a wide range of bacteria experimental methods are required to identify and validate novel effectors for which reliable in silico predictions fail. We have recently developed a novel Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry (CCMS) based technology as a powerful tool to biochemically identify and characterize c-di-GMP binding proteins. This technique has previously been reported to be applicable to a wide range of organisms(1). Here we give a detailed description of the protocol that we utilize to probe such signaling components. As an example, we use Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen in which c-di-GMP plays a critical role in virulence and biofilm control. CCMS identified 74% (38/51) of the known or predicted components of the c-di-GMP network. This study explains the CCMS procedure in detail, and establishes it as a powerful and versatile tool to identify novel components involved in small molecule signaling.

  4. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin;

    2015-01-01

    tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further...... increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed...... to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth....

  5. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  6. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten; Yuan, Mingjun; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Thomas E; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Cao, Bin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid tellurite (TeO3(2-)) exposure induced the intracellular content of the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), SadC and SiaD, were responsible for the increased intracellular content of c-di-GMP. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels by TeO3(2-) further increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.

  7. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments. PMID:27375563

  8. Differential regulation of c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes by environmental signals modulates biofilm formation in Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Xian eRen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs, HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE, HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of nonlethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfonate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulates their DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  9. Genetic Modulation of c-di-GMP Turnover Affects Multiple Virulence Traits and Bacterial Virulence in Rice Pathogen Dickeya zeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yufan; Lv, Mingfa; Liao, Lisheng; Gu, Yanfang; Liang, Zhibin; Shi, Zurong; Liu, Shiyin; Zhou, Jianuan; Zhang, Lianhui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent outbreaks of rice foot rot disease caused by Dickeya zeae have become a significant concern in rice planting regions and countries, but the regulatory mechanisms that govern the virulence of this important pathogen remain vague. Given that the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is associated with modulation of various virulence-related traits in various microorganisms, here we set to investigate the role of the genes encoding c-di-GMP metabolism in the regulation of the bacterial physiology and virulence by construction all in-frame deletion mutants targeting the annotated c-di-GMP turnover genes in D. zeae strain EC1. Phenotype analyses identified individual mutants showing altered production of exoenzymes and phytotoxins, biofilm formation and bacterial motilities. The results provide useful clues and a valuable toolkit for further characterization and dissection of the regulatory complex that modulates the pathogenesis and persistence of this important bacterial pathogen. PMID:27855163

  10. Oxygen-dependent regulation of c-di-GMP synthesis by SadC controls alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Annika; Hammerbacher, Anna Silke; Bastian, Mike; Nieken, Karen Jule; Klockgether, Jens; Merighi, Massimo; Lapouge, Karine; Poschgan, Claudia; Kölle, Julia; Acharya, K Ravi; Ulrich, Martina; Tümmler, Burkhard; Unden, Gottfried; Kaever, Volkhard; Lory, Stephen; Haas, Dieter; Schwarz, Sandra; Döring, Gerd

    2016-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces increased levels of alginate in response to oxygen-deprived conditions. The regulatory pathway(s) that links oxygen limitation to increased synthesis of alginate has remained elusive. In the present study, using immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that anaerobiosis-induced alginate production by planktonic PAO1 requires the diguanylate cyclase (DGC) SadC, previously identified as a regulator of surface-associated lifestyles. Furthermore, we found that the gene products of PA4330 and PA4331, located in a predicted operon with sadC, have a major impact on alginate production: deletion of PA4330 (odaA, for oxygen-dependent alginate synthesis activator) caused an alginate production defect under anaerobic conditions, whereas a PA4331 (odaI, for oxygen-dependent alginate synthesis inhibitor) deletion mutant produced alginate also in the presence of oxygen, which would normally inhibit alginate synthesis. Based on their sequence, OdaA and OdaI have predicted hydratase and dioxygenase reductase activities, respectively. Enzymatic assays using purified protein showed that unlike OdaA, which did not significantly affect DGC activity of SadC, OdaI inhibited c-di-GMP production by SadC. Our data indicate that SadC, OdaA and OdaI are components of a novel response pathway of P. aeruginosa that regulates alginate synthesis in an oxygen-dependent manner. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A c-di-GMP effector system controls cell adhesion by inside-out signaling and surface protein cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Newell

    Full Text Available In Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 the availability of inorganic phosphate (Pi is an environmental signal that controls biofilm formation through a cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In low Pi conditions, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE RapA is expressed, depleting cellular c-di-GMP and causing the loss of a critical outer-membrane adhesin LapA from the cell surface. This response involves an inner membrane protein LapD, which binds c-di-GMP in the cytoplasm and exerts a periplasmic output promoting LapA maintenance on the cell surface. Here we report how LapD differentially controls maintenance and release of LapA: c-di-GMP binding to LapD promotes interaction with and inhibition of the periplasmic protease LapG, which targets the N-terminus of LapA. We identify conserved amino acids in LapA required for cleavage by LapG. Mutating these residues in chromosomal lapA inhibits LapG activity in vivo, leading to retention of the adhesin on the cell surface. Mutations with defined effects on LapD's ability to control LapA localization in vivo show concomitant effects on c-di-GMP-dependent LapG inhibition in vitro. To establish the physiological importance of the LapD-LapG effector system, we track cell attachment and LapA protein localization during Pi starvation. Under this condition, the LapA adhesin is released from the surface of cells and biofilms detach from the substratum. This response requires c-di-GMP depletion by RapA, signaling through LapD, and proteolytic cleavage of LapA by LapG. These data, in combination with the companion study by Navarro et al. presenting a structural analysis of LapD's signaling mechanism, give a detailed description of a complete c-di-GMP control circuit--from environmental signal to molecular output. They describe a novel paradigm in bacterial signal transduction: regulation of a periplasmic enzyme by an inner membrane signaling protein that binds a cytoplasmic second messenger.

  12. BolA Is Required for the Accurate Regulation of c-di-GMP, a Central Player in Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ricardo N; Dressaire, Clémentine; Barahona, Susana; Galego, Lisete; Kaever, Volkhard; Jenal, Urs; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2017-09-19

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is a nearly ubiquitous intracellular signaling molecule involved in the transition from the motile to the sessile/biofilm state in bacteria. C-di-GMP regulates various cellular processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. BolA is a transcription factor that promotes survival in different stresses and is also involved in biofilm formation. Both BolA and c-di-GMP participate in the regulation of motility mechanisms leading to similar phenotypes. Here, we establish the importance of the balance between these two factors for accurate regulation of the transition between the planktonic and sessile lifestyles. This balance is achieved by negative-feedback regulation of BolA and c-di-GMP. BolA not only contributes directly to the motility of bacteria but also regulates the expression of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases. This expression modulation influences the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP, while this signaling metabolite has a negative influence in bolA mRNA transcription. Finally, we present evidence of the dominant role of BolA in biofilm, showing that, even in the presence of elevated c-di-GMP levels, biofilm formation is reduced in the absence of BolA. C-di-GMP is one of the most important bacterial second messengers involved in several cellular processes, including virulence, cell cycle regulation, biofilm formation, and flagellar synthesis. In this study, we unravelled a direct connection between the bolA morphogene and the c-di-GMP signaling molecule. We show the important cross-talk that occurs between these two molecular regulators during the transition between the motile/planktonic and adhesive/sessile lifestyles in Escherichia coli This work provides important clues that can be helpful in the development of new strategies, and the results can be applied to other organisms with relevance for human health.IMPORTANCE Bacterial cells have evolved several mechanisms

  13. Novel mixed-linkage β-glucan activated by c-di-GMP in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel Ángel; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Farias, Gabriela de Araujo; Lloret, Javier; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2015-02-17

    An artificial increase of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels in Sinorhizobium meliloti 8530, a bacterium that does not carry known cellulose synthesis genes, leads to overproduction of a substance that binds the dyes Congo red and calcofluor. Sugar composition and methylation analyses and NMR studies identified this compound as a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-D-glucan (ML β-glucan), not previously described in bacteria but resembling ML β-glucans found in plants and lichens. This unique polymer is hydrolyzed by the specific endoglucanase lichenase, but, unlike lichenan and barley glucan, it generates a disaccharidic → 4)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 3)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → repeating unit. A two-gene operon bgsBA required for production of this ML β-glucan is conserved among several genera within the order Rhizobiales, where bgsA encodes a glycosyl transferase with domain resemblance and phylogenetic relationship to curdlan synthases and to bacterial cellulose synthases. ML β-glucan synthesis is subjected to both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. bgsBA transcription is dependent on the exopolysaccharide/quorum sensing ExpR/SinI regulatory system, and posttranslational regulation seems to involve allosteric activation of the ML β-glucan synthase BgsA by c-di-GMP binding to its C-terminal domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-glucan produced by a bacterium. The S. meliloti ML β-glucan participates in bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation and is required for efficient attachment to the roots of a host plant, resembling the biological role of cellulose in other bacteria.

  14. N-Acetylglucosamine-dependent biofilm formation in Pectobacterium atrosepticum is cryptic and activated by elevated c-di-GMP levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Sanjuán, Juan; Salmond, George P C

    2011-12-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba) strain SCRI1043 does not exhibit appreciable biofilm formation under standard laboratory conditions. Here we show that a biofilm-forming phenotype in this strain could be activated from a cryptic state by increasing intracellular levels of c-di-GMP, through overexpression of a constitutively active diguanylate cyclase (PleD*) from Caulobacter crescentus. Randomly obtained Pba transposon mutants defective in the pga operon, involved in synthesis and translocation of poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA), were all impaired in this biofilm formation. The presence of the PGA-degrading enzyme dispersin B in the growth media prevented biofilm formation by Pba overexpressing PleD*, further supporting the importance of PGA for biofilm formation by Pba. Importantly, a pga mutant exhibited a reduction in root binding to the host plant under conditions of high intracellular c-di-GMP levels. A modest but consistent increase in pga transcript levels was associated with high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP. Our results indicate tight control of PGA-dependent biofilm formation by c-di-GMP in Pba.

  15. Genetic Dissection of the Regulatory Network Associated with High c-di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-González, María Isabel; Travieso, María L; Soriano, María I; Matilla, Miguel A; Huertas-Rosales, Óscar; Barrientos-Moreno, Laura; Tagua, Víctor G; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria grow in nature forming multicellular structures named biofilms. The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a key player in the regulation of the transition from planktonic to sessile lifestyles and this regulation is crucial in the development of biofilms. In Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Rup4959, a multidomain response regulator with diguanylate cyclase activity, when overexpressed causes an increment in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP that gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype consisting of increased biofilm formation and crinkly colony morphology. In a broad genomic screen we have isolated mutant derivatives that lose the crinkly morphology, designed as cfc (crinkle free colony). A total of 19 different genes have been identified as being related with the emergence of the cfc phenotype either because the expression or functionality of Rup4959 is compromised, or due to a lack of transduction of the c-di-GMP signal to downstream elements involved in the acquisition of the phenotype. Discernment between these possibilities was investigated by using a c-di-GMP biosensor and by HPLC-MS quantification of the second messenger. Interestingly five of the identified genes encode proteins with AAA+ ATPase domain. Among the bacterial determinants found in this screen are the global transcriptional regulators GacA, AlgU and FleQ and two enzymes involved in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We present evidences that this pathway seems to be an important element to both the availability of the free pool of the second messenger c-di-GMP and to its further transduction as a signal for biosynthesis of biopolimers. In addition we have identified an uncharacterized hybrid sensor histidine kinase whose phosphoaceptor conserved histidine residue has been shown in this work to be required for in vivo activation of the orphan response regulator Rup4959, which suggests these two elements constitute a two-component phosphorelay system.

  16. Genetic Dissection of the Regulatory Network Associated with High C-di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Ramos-González

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Most bacteria grow in nature forming multicellular structures named biofilms. The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP is a key player in the regulation of the transition from planktonic to sessile lifestyles and this regulation is crucial in the development of biofilms. In Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Rup4959, a multidomain response regulator with diguanylate cyclase activity, when overexpressed causes an increment in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP that gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype consisting of increased biofilm formation and crinkly colony morphology. In a broad genomic screen we have isolated mutant derivatives that lose the crinkly morphology, designed as cfc (crinkle free colony. A total of nineteen different genes have been identified as being related with the emergence of the cfc phenotype either because the expression or functionality of Rup4959 is compromised, or due to a lack of transduction of the c-di-GMP signal to downstream elements involved in the acquisition of the phenotype. Discernment between these possibilities was investigated by using a c-di-GMP biosensor and by HPLC-MS quantification of the second messenger. Interestingly five of the identified genes encode proteins with AAA+ ATPase domain. Among the bacterial determinants found in this screen are the global transcriptional regulators GacA, AlgU and FleQ and two enzymes involved in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We present evidences that this pathway seems to be an important element to both the availability of the free pool of the second messenger c-di-GMP and to its further transduction as a signal for biosynthesis of biopolimers. In addition we have identified an uncharacterized hybrid sensor histidine kinase whose phosphoaceptor conserved histidine residue has been shown in this work to be required for in vivo activation of the orphan response regulator Rup4959, which suggests these two elements constitute a two

  17. Genetic Dissection of the Regulatory Network Associated with High c-di-GMP Levels in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-González, María Isabel; Travieso, María L.; Soriano, María I.; Matilla, Miguel A.; Huertas-Rosales, Óscar; Barrientos-Moreno, Laura; Tagua, Víctor G.; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria grow in nature forming multicellular structures named biofilms. The bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a key player in the regulation of the transition from planktonic to sessile lifestyles and this regulation is crucial in the development of biofilms. In Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Rup4959, a multidomain response regulator with diguanylate cyclase activity, when overexpressed causes an increment in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP that gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype consisting of increased biofilm formation and crinkly colony morphology. In a broad genomic screen we have isolated mutant derivatives that lose the crinkly morphology, designed as cfc (crinkle free colony). A total of 19 different genes have been identified as being related with the emergence of the cfc phenotype either because the expression or functionality of Rup4959 is compromised, or due to a lack of transduction of the c-di-GMP signal to downstream elements involved in the acquisition of the phenotype. Discernment between these possibilities was investigated by using a c-di-GMP biosensor and by HPLC-MS quantification of the second messenger. Interestingly five of the identified genes encode proteins with AAA+ ATPase domain. Among the bacterial determinants found in this screen are the global transcriptional regulators GacA, AlgU and FleQ and two enzymes involved in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. We present evidences that this pathway seems to be an important element to both the availability of the free pool of the second messenger c-di-GMP and to its further transduction as a signal for biosynthesis of biopolimers. In addition we have identified an uncharacterized hybrid sensor histidine kinase whose phosphoaceptor conserved histidine residue has been shown in this work to be required for in vivo activation of the orphan response regulator Rup4959, which suggests these two elements constitute a two-component phosphorelay system

  18. Regulation of Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilm formation by RpoN and the c-di-GMP effector BerB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazli, Mustafa; Rybtke, Morten; Steiner, Elisabeth; Weidel, Elisabeth; Berthelsen, Jens; Groizeleau, Julie; Bin, Wu; Zhi, Boo Zhao; Yaming, Zhang; Kaever, Volkhard; Givskov, Michael; Hartmann, Rolf W; Eberl, Leo; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of biofilm formation is essential for the development of biofilm-control measures. It is well established that the nucleotide second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a positive regulator of biofilm formation in many bacteria, but more knowledge about c-di-GMP effectors is needed. We provide evidence that c-di-GMP, the alternative sigma factor RpoN (σ54), and the enhancer-binding protein BerB play a role in biofilm formation of Burkholderia cenocepacia by regulating the production of a biofilm-stabilizing exopolysaccharide. Our findings suggest that BerB binds c-di-GMP, and activates RpoN-dependent transcription of the berA gene coding for a c-di-GMP-responsive transcriptional regulator. An increased level of the BerA protein in turn induces the production of biofilm-stabilizing exopolysaccharide in response to high c-di-GMP levels. Our findings imply that the production of biofilm exopolysaccharide in B. cenocepacia is regulated through a cascade involving two consecutive transcription events that are both activated by c-di-GMP. This type of regulation may allow tight control of the expenditure of cellular resources. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Characterization of a natural triple-tandem c-di-GMP riboswitch and application of the riboswitch-based dual-fluorescence reporter

    OpenAIRE

    Hang Zhou; Cao Zheng; Jianmei Su; Bo Chen; Yang Fu; Yuqun Xie; Qing Tang; Shan-Ho Chou; Jin He

    2016-01-01

    c-di-GMP riboswitches are structured RNAs located in the 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTRs) of mRNAs that regulate expression of downstream genes in response to changing concentrations of the second messenger c-di-GMP. We discovered three complete c-di-GMP riboswitches (Bc3, Bc4 and Bc5 RNA) with similar structures, which are arranged in tandem to constitute a triple-tandem (Bc3-5 RNA) riboswitch in the 5′-UTR of the cspABCDE mRNA in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. chinensis CT-43. Our results s...

  20. A label-free and self-assembled electrochemical biosensor for highly sensitive detection of cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) based on RNA riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qingyun; Zhao, Fulin; Liu, Hongrui; Shan, Yanke; Liu, Fei

    2015-07-02

    Cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is an important second messenger that regulates a variety of complex physiological processes involved in motility, virulence, biofilm formation and cell cycle progression in several bacteria. Herein we report a simple label-free and self-assembled RNA riboswitch-based biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of c-di-GMP. The detectable concentration range of c-di-GMP is from 50 nM to 1 μM with a detection limit of 50 nM.

  1. C-di-GMP regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa stress response to tellurite during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Rybtke, Morten Levin

    2015-01-01

    increased P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and resistance to TeO3(2-). P. aeruginosa ΔsadCΔsiaD and PAO1/p(lac)-yhjH mutants with low intracellular c-di-GMP content were more sensitive to TeO3(2-) exposure and had low relative fitness compared to the wild-type PAO1 planktonic and biofilm cultures exposed...... to TeO3(2-). Our study provided evidence that c-di-GMP level can play an important role in mediating stress response in microbial communities during both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth.......Stress response plays an important role on microbial adaptation under hostile environmental conditions. It is generally unclear how the signaling transduction pathway mediates a stress response in planktonic and biofilm modes of microbial communities simultaneously. Here, we showed that metalloid...

  2. Selective binding of 2'-F-c-di-GMP to Ct-E88 and Cb-E43, new class I riboswitches from Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiling; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jingxin; Dayie, T Kwaku; Sintim, Herman O

    2013-06-01

    C-di-GMP is a second messenger in bacteria and partly regulates bacterial physiology by binding to class I and II riboswitches. Four class I c-di-GMP riboswitch aptamer candidates, Ct-E88, Cb-17B, Cb-E43 and Cd-630 RNAs, selected from a GEMM RNA sequence motif in the Rfam database, were expressed and experimentally verified to bind to c-di-GMP. The two newly characterized c-di-GMP riboswitches, Ct-E88 and Cb-E43, bound c-di-GMP with nanomolar Kd whereas the affinities of Cb-17B and Cd-630 for c-di-GMP were at least a 100-fold weaker. Interestingly, whereas the three riboswitches (Vc2, Et-E88 and Cb-E43) bound c-di-GMP with similar Kd values, 2'-modified analogs of c-di-GMP differentially bound to these three class I aptamers. For example, 2'-F-c-di-GMP bound Vc2 with a Kd value of 102 nM whereas the Kd value of 2'-F-c-di-GMP-Ct-E88 is 43 μM (422× higher than that for Vc2 RNA), revealing that there are differences in the binding sites of functional class I c-di-GMP riboswitches.

  3. Diguanylate cyclase null mutant reveals that C-Di-GMP pathway regulates the motility and adherence of the extremophile bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Matías; Deane, Shelly M; Ruiz, Lina; Rawlings, Douglas E; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319) that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process.

  4. C-di-GMP Regulates Motile to Sessile Transition by Modulating MshA Pili Biogenesis and Near-Surface Motility Behavior in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher J; Utada, Andrew; Davis, Kimberly R; Thongsomboon, Wiriya; Zamorano Sanchez, David; Banakar, Vinita; Cegelski, Lynette; Wong, Gerard C L; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-10-01

    In many bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls the motile to biofilm life style switch. Yet, little is known about how this occurs. In this study, we report that changes in c-di-GMP concentration impact the biosynthesis of the MshA pili, resulting in altered motility and biofilm phenotypes in V. cholerae. Previously, we reported that cdgJ encodes a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase and a ΔcdgJ mutant has reduced motility and enhanced biofilm formation. Here we show that loss of the genes required for the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MshA) pilus biogenesis restores motility in the ΔcdgJ mutant. Mutations of the predicted ATPase proteins mshE or pilT, responsible for polymerizing and depolymerizing MshA pili, impair near surface motility behavior and initial surface attachment dynamics. A ΔcdgJ mutant has enhanced surface attachment, while the ΔcdgJmshA mutant phenocopies the high motility and low attachment phenotypes observed in a ΔmshA strain. Elevated concentrations of c-di-GMP enhance surface MshA pilus production. MshE, but not PilT binds c-di-GMP directly, establishing a mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling input in MshA pilus production. Collectively, our results suggest that the dynamic nature of the MshA pilus established by the assembly and disassembly of pilin subunits is essential for transition from the motile to sessile lifestyle and that c-di-GMP affects MshA pilus assembly and function through direct interactions with the MshE ATPase.

  5. Establishment of a High-throughput Setup for Screening Small Molecules That Modulate c-di-GMP Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugjee, Kushal N; An, Shi-Qi; Ryan, Robert P

    2016-06-30

    Bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has driven research attempts to identify new drug targets in recently discovered regulatory pathways. Regulatory systems that utilize intracellular cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a second messenger are one such class of target. c-di-GMP is a signaling molecule found in almost all bacteria that acts to regulate an extensive range of processes including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. The understanding of how c-di-GMP signaling controls aspects of antibiotic resistant biofilm development has suggested approaches whereby alteration of the cellular concentrations of the nucleotide or disruption of these signaling pathways may lead to reduced biofilm formation or increased susceptibility of the biofilms to antibiotics. We describe a simple high-throughput bioreporter protocol, based on green fluorescent protein (GFP), whose expression is under the control of the c-di-GMP responsive promoter cdrA, to rapidly screen for small molecules with the potential to modulate c-di-GMP cellular levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). This simple protocol can screen upwards of 3,500 compounds within 48 hours and has the ability to be adapted to multiple microorganisms.

  6. STING activator c-di-GMP enhances the anti-tumor effects of peptide vaccines in melanoma-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zili; Celis, Esteban

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic vaccines to induce anti-tumor CD8 T cells have been used in clinical trials for advanced melanoma patients, but the clinical response rate and overall survival time have not improved much. We believe that these dismal outcomes are caused by inadequate number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells generated by most vaccines. In contrast, huge CD8 T cell responses readily occur during acute viral infections. High levels of type-I interferon (IFN-I) are produced during these infections, and this cytokine not only exhibits anti-viral activity but also promotes CD8 T cell responses. The studies described here were performed to determine whether promoting the production of IFN-I could enhance the potency of a peptide vaccine. We report that cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which activates the stimulator of interferon genes, potentiated the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of a peptide vaccine against mouse B16 melanoma. The synergistic effects of c-di-GMP required co-administration of costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody, the adjuvant poly-IC, and were mediated in part by IFN-I. These findings demonstrate that peptides representing CD8 T cell epitopes can be effective inducers of large CD8 T cell responses in vaccination strategies that mimic acute viral infections.

  7. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D.; O´Toole, George A.; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica PMID:27380521

  8. In vitro and in vivo generation and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-dispersed cells via c-di-GMP manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Lin; Hultqvist, Louise D; Yuan, Mingjun; Rybtke, Morten; Nielsen, Thomas E; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Yang, Liang

    2015-08-01

    Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a global secondary bacterial messenger that controls the formation of drug-resistant multicellular biofilms. Lowering the intracellular c-di-GMP content can disperse biofilms, and it is proposed as a biofilm eradication strategy. However, freshly dispersed biofilm cells exhibit a physiology distinct from biofilm and planktonic cells, and they might have a clinically relevant role in infections. Here we present in vitro and in vivo protocols for the generation and characterization of dispersed cells from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by reducing the intracellular c-di-GMP content through modulation of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Unlike conventional protocols that demonstrate biofilm dispersal by biomass quantification, our protocols enable physiological characterization of the dispersed cells. Biomarkers of dispersed cells are identified and quantified, serving as potential targets for treating the dispersed cells. The in vitro protocol can be completed within 4 d, whereas the in vivo protocol requires 7 d.

  9. The exopolysaccharide gene cluster Bcam1330-Bcam1341 is involved in Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilm formation, and its expression is regulated by c-di-GMP and Bcam1349

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; McCarthy, Yvonne; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In Burkholderia cenocepacia, the second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) has previously been shown to positively regulate biofilm formation and the expression of cellulose and type-I fimbriae genes through binding to the transcriptional regulator Bcam1349. Here, we provide...... evidence that cellulose and type-I fimbriae are not involved in B. cenocepacia biofilm formation in flow chambers, and we identify a novel Bcam1349/c-di-GMP-regulated exopolysaccharide gene cluster which is essential for B. cenocepacia biofilm formation. Overproduction of Bcam1349 in trans promotes wrinkly...... matrix exopolysaccharide and to be essential for flow-chamber biofilm formation. We demonstrate that Bcam1349 binds to the promoter region of genes in the Bcam1330-Bcam1341 cluster and that this binding is enhanced by the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overproduction of both c...

  10. A flavin cofactor-binding PAS domain regulates c-di-GMP synthesis in AxDGC2 from Acetobacter xylinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yaning; Rao, Feng; Luo, Zhen; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2009-11-03

    The cytoplasmic protein AxDGC2 regulates cellulose synthesis in the obligate aerobe Acetobacter xylinum by controlling the cellular concentration of the cyclic dinucleotide messenger c-di-GMP. AxDGC2 contains a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and two putative catalytic domains (GGDEF and EAL) for c-di-GMP metabolism. We found that the PAS domain of AxDGC2 binds a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor noncovalently. The redox status of the FAD cofactor modulates the catalytic activity of the GGDEF domain for c-di-GMP synthesis, with the oxidized form exhibiting higher catalytic activity and stronger substrate inhibition. The results suggest that AxDGC2 is a signaling protein that regulates the cellular c-di-GMP level in response to the change in cellular redox status or oxygen concentration. Moreover, several residues predicated to be involved in FAD binding and signal transduction were mutated to examine the impact on redox potential and catalytic activity. Despite the minor perturbation of redox potential and unexpected modification of FAD in one of the mutants, none of the single mutations was able to completely disrupt the transmission of the signal to the GGDEF domain, indicating that the change in the FAD redox state can still trigger structural changes in the PAS domain probably by using substituted hydrogen-bonded water networks. Meanwhile, although the EAL domain of AxDGC2 was found to be catalytically inactive toward c-di-GMP, it was capable of hydrolyzing some phosphodiester bond-containing nonphysiological substrates. Together with the previously reported oxygen-dependent activity of the homologous AxPDEA1, the results provided new insight into relationships among oxygen level, c-di-GMP concentration, and cellulose synthesis in A. xylinum.

  11. The absence of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprF protein leads to increased biofilm formation through variation in c-di-GMP level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffartigues, Emeline; Moscoso, Joana A; Duchesne, Rachel; Rosay, Thibaut; Fito-Boncompte, Laurène; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Maillot, Olivier; Bénard, Magalie; Bazire, Alexis; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Lerouge, Patrice; Dufour, Alain; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Overhage, Joerg; Filloux, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    OprF is the major outer membrane porin in bacteria belonging to the Pseudomonas genus. In previous studies, we have shown that OprF is required for full virulence expression of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we describe molecular insights on the nature of this relationship and report that the absence of OprF leads to increased biofilm formation and production of the Pel exopolysaccharide. Accordingly, the level of c-di-GMP, a key second messenger in biofilm control, is elevated in an oprF mutant. By decreasing c-di-GMP levels in this mutant, both biofilm formation and pel gene expression phenotypes were restored to wild-type levels. We further investigated the impact on two small RNAs, which are associated with the biofilm lifestyle, and found that expression of rsmZ but not of rsmY was increased in the oprF mutant and this occurs in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. Finally, the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors AlgU and SigX displayed higher activity levels in the oprF mutant. Two genes of the SigX regulon involved in c-di-GMP metabolism, PA1181 and adcA (PA4843), were up-regulated in the oprF mutant, partly explaining the increased c-di-GMP level. We hypothesized that the absence of OprF leads to a cell envelope stress that activates SigX and results in a c-di-GMP elevated level due to higher expression of adcA and PA1181. The c-di-GMP level can in turn stimulate Pel synthesis via increased rsmZ sRNA levels and pel mRNA, thus affecting Pel-dependent phenotypes such as cell aggregation and biofilm formation. This work highlights the connection between OprF and c-di-GMP regulatory networks, likely via SigX (ECF), on the regulation of biofilm phenotypes.

  12. In vitro and in vivo generation and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-dispersed cells via c-di-GMP manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Hultqvist, Louise D; Yuan, Mingjun;

    2015-01-01

    Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a global secondary bacterial messenger that controls the formation of drug-resistant multicellular biofilms. Lowering the intracellular c-di-GMP content can disperse biofilms, and it is proposed as a biofilm eradication strategy...

  13. The EAL domain protein YciR acts as a trigger enzyme in a c-di-GMP signalling cascade in E. coli biofilm control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberg, Sandra; Klauck, Gisela; Pesavento, Christina; Klauck, Eberhard; Hengge, Regine

    2013-01-01

    C-di-GMP—which is produced by diguanylate cyclases (DGC) and degraded by specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs)—is a ubiquitous second messenger in bacterial biofilm formation. In Escherichia coli, several DGCs (YegE, YdaM) and PDEs (YhjH, YciR) and the MerR-like transcription factor MlrA regulate the transcription of csgD, which encodes a biofilm regulator essential for producing amyloid curli fibres of the biofilm matrix. Here, we demonstrate that this system operates as a signalling cascade, in which c-di-GMP controlled by the DGC/PDE pair YegE/YhjH (module I) regulates the activity of the YdaM/YciR pair (module II). Via multiple direct interactions, the two module II proteins form a signalling complex with MlrA. YciR acts as a connector between modules I and II and functions as a trigger enzyme: its direct inhibition of the DGC YdaM is relieved when it binds and degrades c-di-GMP generated by module I. As a consequence, YdaM then generates c-di-GMP and—by direct and specific interaction—activates MlrA to stimulate csgD transcription. Trigger enzymes may represent a general principle in local c-di-GMP signalling. PMID:23708798

  14. Characterization of a natural triple-tandem c-di-GMP riboswitch and application of the riboswitch-based dual-fluorescence reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hang; Zheng, Cao; Su, Jianmei; Chen, Bo; Fu, Yang; Xie, Yuqun; Tang, Qing; Chou, Shan-Ho; He, Jin

    2016-02-19

    c-di-GMP riboswitches are structured RNAs located in the 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) of mRNAs that regulate expression of downstream genes in response to changing concentrations of the second messenger c-di-GMP. We discovered three complete c-di-GMP riboswitches (Bc3, Bc4 and Bc5 RNA) with similar structures, which are arranged in tandem to constitute a triple-tandem (Bc3-5 RNA) riboswitch in the 5'-UTR of the cspABCDE mRNA in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. chinensis CT-43. Our results showed that this natural triple-tandem riboswitch controlled the expression of the reporter gene more stringently and digitally than the double-tandem or single riboswitch. A sandwich-like dual-fluorescence reporter was further constructed by fusing the Bc3-5 RNA gene between the two fluorescence protein genes amcyan and turborfp. This reporter strain was found to exhibit detectable fluorescence color changes under bright field in response to intracellular c-di-GMP level altered by induced expression of diguanylate cyclase (DGC) PleD. Using this system, two putative membrane-bound DGCs from B. thuringiensis and Xanthomonas oryzae were verified to be functional by replacing pleD with the corresponding DGC genes. This report represented the first native triple-tandem riboswitch that was applied to serve as a riboswitch-based dual-fluorescence reporter for the efficient and convenient verification of putative DGC activity in vivo.

  15. MrkH, a novel c-di-GMP-dependent transcriptional activator, controls Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm formation by regulating type 3 fimbriae expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Wilksch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly amongst hospitalized individuals. The principle mechanism for pathogenesis in hospital environments involves the formation of biofilms, primarily on implanted medical devices. In this study, we constructed a transposon mutant library in a clinical isolate, K. pneumoniae AJ218, to identify the genes and pathways implicated in biofilm formation. Three mutants severely defective in biofilm formation contained insertions within the mrkABCDF genes encoding the main structural subunit and assembly machinery for type 3 fimbriae. Two other mutants carried insertions within the yfiN and mrkJ genes, which encode GGDEF domain- and EAL domain-containing c-di-GMP turnover enzymes, respectively. The remaining two isolates contained insertions that inactivated the mrkH and mrkI genes, which encode for novel proteins with a c-di-GMP-binding PilZ domain and a LuxR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. Biochemical and functional assays indicated that the effects of these factors on biofilm formation accompany concomitant changes in type 3 fimbriae expression. We mapped the transcriptional start site of mrkA, demonstrated that MrkH directly activates transcription of the mrkA promoter and showed that MrkH binds strongly to the mrkA regulatory region only in the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, a point mutation in the putative c-di-GMP-binding domain of MrkH completely abolished its function as a transcriptional activator. In vivo analysis of the yfiN and mrkJ genes strongly indicated their c-di-GMP-specific function as diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase, respectively. In addition, in vitro assays showed that purified MrkJ protein has strong c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. These results demonstrate for the first time that c-di-GMP can function as an effector to stimulate the activity of a transcriptional activator, and explain how type 3 fimbriae

  16. Differential control of Yersinia pestis biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector by two c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cheng Sun

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis forms a biofilm in the foregut of its flea vector that promotes transmission by flea bite. As in many bacteria, biofilm formation in Y. pestis is controlled by intracellular levels of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP. Two Y. pestis diguanylate cyclase (DGC enzymes, encoded by hmsT and y3730, and one phosphodiesterase (PDE, encoded by hmsP, have been shown to control biofilm production in vitro via their opposing c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation activities, respectively. In this study, we provide further evidence that hmsT, hmsP, and y3730 are the only three genes involved in c-di-GMP metabolism in Y. pestis and evaluated the two DGCs for their comparative roles in biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector. As with HmsT, the DGC activity of Y3730 depended on a catalytic GGDEF domain, but the relative contribution of the two enzymes to the biofilm phenotype was influenced strongly by the environmental niche. Deletion of y3730 had a very minor effect on in vitro biofilm formation, but resulted in greatly reduced biofilm formation in the flea. In contrast, the predominant effect of hmsT was on in vitro biofilm formation. DGC activity was also required for the Hms-independent autoaggregation phenotype of Y. pestis, but was not required for virulence in a mouse model of bubonic plague. Our results confirm that only one PDE (HmsP and two DGCs (HmsT and Y3730 control c-di-GMP levels in Y. pestis, indicate that hmsT and y3730 are regulated post-transcriptionally to differentially control biofilm formation in vitro and in the flea vector, and identify a second c-di-GMP-regulated phenotype in Y. pestis.

  17. 环二鸟苷酸(c-di-GMP)在微生物体内的作用及其类似物的研究%Activity of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) in bacteria and the study of its derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    那路新; 杨振军

    2012-01-01

    环二鸟苷酸(cyclic diguanylate,c-di-GMP)是在细菌中普遍存在的第二信使分子,参与调节多种生理功能,包括细胞分化、生物被膜形成、致病因子产生等.细菌细胞内c-di-GMP合成与降解代谢分别受二鸟苷酸环化酶(diguanylate cyclase,DGC)和磷酸二酯酶(phosphodiesterase,PDE)调控,DGC和PDE共处于同一个蛋白中,是一个双功能蛋白酶的两个区域,分别负责菌体内c-di-GMP的合成和降解.c-di-GMP作用菌体内下游靶点包括PilZ结构域和GEMM核开关两种类型.目前发现c-di-GMP核开关是唯一不参与代谢活动而参与信号传导的一类核开关.本文综述了c-di-GMP的代谢途径、调控机制、生物学功能,以及c-di-GMP结构类似物合成及生物学评价等方面的最新研究进展.%Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger present in a wide variety of bacteria, which is responsible for cell differentiation, biofilm formation, pathogenic factor generation, and so on. The level of c-di-GMP in bacteria is regulated by two opposing active domains, diguanylate cyclase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE), which are present in the same bifunctional protein, and in charge of the synthesis and the degradation of c-di-GMP, respectively. The target of c-di-GMP in the bacterial cell consists of PilZ domain and GEMM riboswitch, the only riboswitch that involved in signal transduction. This article gives an overview of c-di-GMP, focusing on its metabolic pathway, regulatory mechanism, biological function of c-di-GMP, and the synthesis of c-di-GMP analogues and their biological activity.

  18. Three cyanobacteriochromes work together to form a light color-sensitive input system for c-di-GMP signaling of cell aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Gen; Ni-Ni-Win; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2015-06-30

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photoreceptors that have diverse spectral properties and domain compositions. Although large numbers of CBCR genes exist in cyanobacterial genomes, no studies have assessed whether multiple CBCRs work together. We recently showed that the diguanylate cyclase (DGC) activity of the CBCR SesA from Thermosynechococcus elongatus is activated by blue-light irradiation and that, when irradiated, SesA, via its product cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), induces aggregation of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus cells at a temperature that is suboptimum for single-cell viability. For this report, we first characterize the photobiochemical properties of two additional CBCRs, SesB and SesC. Blue/teal light-responsive SesB has only c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, which is up-regulated by teal light and GTP. Blue/green light-responsive SesC has DGC and PDE activities. Its DGC activity is enhanced by blue light, whereas its PDE activity is enhanced by green light. A ΔsesB mutant cannot suppress cell aggregation under teal-green light. A ΔsesC mutant shows a less sensitive cell-aggregation response to ambient light. ΔsesA/ΔsesB/ΔsesC shows partial cell aggregation, which is accompanied by the loss of color dependency, implying that a nonphotoresponsive DGC(s) producing c-di-GMP can also induce the aggregation. The results suggest that SesB enhances the light color dependency of cell aggregation by degrading c-di-GMP, is particularly effective under teal light, and, therefore, seems to counteract the induction of cell aggregation by SesA. In addition, SesC seems to improve signaling specificity as an auxiliary backup to SesA/SesB activities. The coordinated action of these three CBCRs highlights why so many different CBCRs exist.

  19. Nucleotide binding by the widespread high-affinity cyclic di-GMP receptor MshEN domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Tu, Zhi-Le; He, Jin; Jones, Christopher J; Sanchez, David Zamorano; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Galperin, Michael Y; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger regulating various cellular functions. Many bacteria contain c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes but lack known c-di-GMP receptors. Recently, two MshE-type ATPases associated with bacterial type II secretion system and type IV pilus formation were shown to specifically bind c-di-GMP. Here we report crystal structure of the MshE N-terminal domain (MshEN1-145) from Vibrio cholerae in complex with c-di-GMP at a 1.37 Å resolution. This structure reveals a unique c-di-GMP-binding mode, featuring a tandem array of two highly conserved binding motifs, each comprising a 24-residue sequence RLGxx(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxG(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxxxLxxxLxxQ that binds half of the c-di-GMP molecule, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. Mutating these highly conserved residues markedly reduces c-di-GMP binding and biofilm formation by V. cholerae. This c-di-GMP-binding motif is present in diverse bacterial proteins exhibiting binding affinities ranging from 0.5 μM to as low as 14 nM. The MshEN domain contains the longest nucleotide-binding motif reported to date.

  20. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  1. Structures of the activator of K. pneumonia biofilm formation, MrkH, indicates PilZ domains involved in c-di-GMP and DNA binding

    OpenAIRE

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumonia is an important cause of refractory nosocomial infections, the pathogenicity of which is largely a result of the bacteria’s ability to form biofilms on biomedical devices. A 3′,5′-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)–activated transcription activator, MrkH, drives biofilm formation. Here we describe structures of MrkH in its apo- and c-di-GMP–bound states. MrkH consists of two domains, both of which have PilZ-like folds. PilZ domains are known signaling modules, but, to our ...

  2. E88, a new cyclic-di-GMP class I riboswitch aptamer from Clostridium tetani, has a similar fold to the prototypical class I riboswitch, Vc2, but differentially binds to c-di-GMP analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiling; Chen, Bin; Zhou, Jie; Sintim, Herman O; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2014-03-04

    C-di-GMP has emerged as a ubiquitous second messenger, which regulates the transition between sessile and motile lifestyles and virulence factor expression in many pathogenic bacteria using both RNA riboswitches and protein effectors. We recently showed that two additional class I c-di-GMP riboswitch aptamers (Ct-E88 and Cb-17B) bind c-di-GMP with nanomolar affinity, and that Ct-E88 RNA binds 2'-F-c-di-GMP 422 times less tightly than class I Vc2 RNA. Based on sequence comparison, it was concluded that the global folds of Ct-E88 and Vc2 RNAs were similar and that differences in ligand binding were probably due to differences in binding site architectures. Herein, we utilized EMSA, aptamer sensing spinach modules, SAXS and 1D NMR titration to study the conformational transitions of Ct-E88. We conclude that whereas the global folds of the bound states of Vc2 and Ct-E88 RNAs are similar, the unbound states are different and this could explain differences in ligand affinities between these class I c-di-GMP riboswitches.

  3. Activation and polar sequestration of PopA, a c-di-GMP effector protein involved in Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shogo; Schalch-Moser, Annina; Zumthor, Ludwig; Manfredi, Pablo; Ebbensgaard, Anna; Schirmer, Tilman; Jenal, Urs

    2014-11-01

    When Caulobacter crescentus enters S-phase the replication initiation inhibitor CtrA dynamically positions to the old cell pole to be degraded by the polar ClpXP protease. Polar delivery of CtrA requires PopA and the diguanylate cyclase PleD that positions to the same pole. Here we present evidence that PopA originated through gene duplication from its paralogue response regulator PleD and subsequent co-option as c-di-GMP effector protein. While the C-terminal catalytic domain (GGDEF) of PleD is activated by phosphorylation of the N-terminal receiver domain, functional adaptation has reversed signal transduction in PopA with the GGDEF domain adopting input function and the receiver domain serving as regulatory output. We show that the N-terminal receiver domain of PopA specifically interacts with RcdA, a component required for CtrA degradation. In contrast, the GGDEF domain serves to target PopA to the cell pole in response to c-di-GMP binding. In agreement with the divergent activation and targeting mechanisms, distinct markers sequester PleD and PopA to the old cell pole upon S-phase entry. Together these data indicate that PopA adopted a novel role as topology specificity factor to help recruit components of the CtrA degradation pathway to the protease specific old cell pole of C. crescentus.

  4. Evaluation of the sublingual route for administration of influenza H5N1 virosomes in combination with the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Kristian Pedersen

    Full Text Available Avian influenza A H5N1 is a virus with pandemic potential. Mucosal vaccines are attractive as they have the potential to block viruses at the site of entry, thereby preventing both disease and further transmission. The intranasal route is safe for the administration of seasonal live-attenuated influenza vaccines, but may be less suitable for administration of pandemic vaccines. Research into novel mucosal routes is therefore needed. In this study, a murine model was used to compare sublingual administration with intranasal and intramuscular administration of influenza H5N1 virosomes (2 µg haemagglutinin; HA in combination with the mucosal adjuvant (3',5'-cyclic dimeric guanylic acid (c-di-GMP. We found that sublingual immunisation effectively induced local and systemic H5N1-specific humoral and cellular immune responses but that the magnitude of response was lower than after intranasal administration. However, both the mucosal routes were superior to intramuscular immunisation for induction of local humoral and systemic cellular immune responses including high frequencies of splenic H5N1-specific multifunctional (IL-2+TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells. The c-di-GMP adjuvanted vaccine elicited systemic haemagglutination inhibition (HI antibody responses (geometric mean titres ≥ 40 both when administered sublingually, intranasally and inramuscularly. In addition, salivary HI antibodies were elicited by mucosal, but not intramuscular vaccination. We conclude that the sublingual route is an attractive alternative for administration of pandemic influenza vaccines.

  5. Evaluation of the sublingual route for administration of influenza H5N1 virosomes in combination with the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Gabriel Kristian; Ebensen, Thomas; Gjeraker, Ingrid Hjetland; Svindland, Signe; Bredholt, Geir; Guzmán, Carlos Alberto; Cox, Rebecca Jane

    2011-01-01

    Avian influenza A H5N1 is a virus with pandemic potential. Mucosal vaccines are attractive as they have the potential to block viruses at the site of entry, thereby preventing both disease and further transmission. The intranasal route is safe for the administration of seasonal live-attenuated influenza vaccines, but may be less suitable for administration of pandemic vaccines. Research into novel mucosal routes is therefore needed. In this study, a murine model was used to compare sublingual administration with intranasal and intramuscular administration of influenza H5N1 virosomes (2 µg haemagglutinin; HA) in combination with the mucosal adjuvant (3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanylic acid (c-di-GMP). We found that sublingual immunisation effectively induced local and systemic H5N1-specific humoral and cellular immune responses but that the magnitude of response was lower than after intranasal administration. However, both the mucosal routes were superior to intramuscular immunisation for induction of local humoral and systemic cellular immune responses including high frequencies of splenic H5N1-specific multifunctional (IL-2+TNF-α+) CD4+ T cells. The c-di-GMP adjuvanted vaccine elicited systemic haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody responses (geometric mean titres ≥ 40) both when administered sublingually, intranasally and inramuscularly. In addition, salivary HI antibodies were elicited by mucosal, but not intramuscular vaccination. We conclude that the sublingual route is an attractive alternative for administration of pandemic influenza vaccines.

  6. SiaA/D Interconnects c-di-GMP and RsmA Signaling to Coordinate Cellular Aggregation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Response to Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Brendan; Dederer, Verena; Carnell, Michael; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A; Klebensberger, Janosch

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as an important opportunistic human pathogen that is often highly resistant to eradication strategies, mediated in part by the formation of multicellular aggregates. Cellular aggregates may occur attached to a surface (biofilm), at the air-liquid interface (pellicle), or as suspended aggregates. Compared to surface attached communities, knowledge about the regulatory processes involved in the formation of suspended cell aggregates is still limited. We have recently described the SiaA/D signal transduction module that regulates macroscopic cell aggregation during growth with, or in the presence of the surfactant SDS. Targets for SiaA/D mediated regulation include the Psl polysaccharide, the CdrAB two-partner secretion system and the CupA fimbriae. While the global regulators c-di-GMP and RsmA are known to inversely coordinate cell aggregation and regulate the expression of several adhesins, their potential impact on the expression of the cupA operon remains unknown. Here, we investigated the function of SiaA (a putative ser/thr phosphatase) and SiaD (a di-guanylate cyclase) in cupA1 expression using transcriptional reporter fusions and qRT-PCR. These studies revealed a novel interaction between the RsmA posttranscriptional regulatory system and SiaA/D mediated macroscopic aggregation. The RsmA/rsmY/Z system was found to affect macroscopic aggregate formation in the presence of surfactant by impacting the stability of the cupA1 mRNA transcript and we reveal that RsmA directly binds to the cupA1 leader sequence in vitro. We further identified that transcription of the RsmA antagonist rsmZ is controlled in a SiaA/D dependent manner during growth with SDS. Finally, we found that the siaD transcript is also under regulatory control of RsmA and that overproduction of RsmA or the deletion of siaD results in decreased cellular cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) levels quantified by a transcriptional reporter, demonstrating that

  7. A cyclic dinucleotide containing 2-aminopurine is a general fluorescent sensor for c-di-GMP and 3',3'-cGAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roembke, Benjamin T; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Yue; Sayre, David; Lizardo, Allan; Bernard, Laurentee; Sintim, Herman O

    2014-06-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides have emerged as second messengers that regulate diverse processes in bacteria, as well as regulating the production of type I interferons in metazoans. Fluorescent sensors for these important second messengers are highly sought-after for high-throughput inhibitor discovery, yet most sensors reported to date are not amenable for high-throughput screening purposes. Herein, we demonstrate that a new analog, 3',3'-cG(d2AP)MP, which is a 2-aminopurine (2AP)-containing cyclic dinucleotide, self-associates in the presence of Mn(2+) with an association constant of 120,000 M(-1). 3'3'-cG(d2AP)MP can also form a heterodimer with cGAMP, activator of immune regulator, STING, or the bacterial biofilm regulator, c-di-GMP in the presence of Mn(II). Upon dimer formation, the fluorescence of 3',3'-cG(d2AP)MP is quenched and this provides a convenient method to monitor the enzymatic processing of both DGC and PDE enzymes, opening up several opportunities for the discovery of inhibitors of nucleotide signaling.

  8. A novel two-component system PdeK/PdeR regulates c-di-GMP turnover and virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Sun, Lei; Chen, Huamin; Wu, Maosen; Yang, Ching-Hong; He, Chenyang

    2012-10-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) consisting of histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR) play essential roles in bacteria to sense environmental signals and regulate cell functions. One type of RR is involved in metabolism of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger. Although genomic studies predicted a large number of them existing in different bacteria, only a few have been studied. In this work, we characterized a novel TCS consisting of PdeK(PXO_01018)/PdeR(PXO_ 01019) from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, which causes the bacterial leaf blight of rice. PdeR (containing GGDEF, EAL, and REC domains) was shown to have phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in vitro by colorimetric assays and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The PDE activity of full-length PdeR needs to be triggered by HK PdeK. Deletion of pdeK or pdeR in X. oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99(A) had attenuated its virulence on rice. ΔpdeK and ΔpdeR secreted less exopolysaccharide than the wild type but there were no changes in terms of motility or extracellular cellulase activity, suggesting the activity of PdeK/PdeR might be specific.

  9. Transcriptional activation of the mrkA promoter of the Klebsiella pneumoniae type 3 fimbrial operon by the c-di-GMP-dependent MrkH protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yang

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae forms biofilms to facilitate colonization of biotic and abiotic surfaces. The formation of biofilms by K. pneumoniae requires the expression of type 3 fimbriae: elongate proteinaceous filaments extruded by a chaperone-usher system in the bacterial outer membrane. The expression of the mrkABCDF cluster that encodes this fimbrial system is strongly positively regulated by MrkH, a transcriptional activator that responds to the second messenger, c-di-GMP. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which the MrkH protein activates transcriptional initiation from the mrkA promoter. A mutational analysis supported by electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that a 12-bp palindromic sequence (the MrkH box centered at -78.5 is the binding site of MrkH. Deletion of half a turn, but not a full turn, of DNA located between the MrkH box and the mrkA promoter destroyed the ability of MrkH to activate mrkA transcription. In addition, a 10-bp AT-rich sequence (the UP element centered at -63.5 contributed significantly to MrkH-dependent mrkA transcription. In vivo analysis of rpoA mutants showed that the R265 and E273 determinants in the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase α subunit are needed for MrkH-mediated activation of mrkA transcription. Furthermore, results from mutagenesis of the mrkH gene suggest that the N-terminal region of the protein is involved in transcriptional activation. Taken together, our results suggest that MrkH activates mrkA expression by interacting directly with RNA polymerase, to overcome the inefficient transcriptional initiation caused by the presence of defective core promoter elements.

  10. YjcC, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase protein, regulates the oxidative stress response and virulence of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Jou Huang

    Full Text Available This study shows that the expression of yjcC, an in vivo expression (IVE gene, and the stress response regulatory genes soxR, soxS, and rpoS are paraquat inducible in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43. The deletion of rpoS or soxRS decreased yjcC expression, implying an RpoS- or SoxRS-dependent control. After paraquat or H2O2 treatment, the deletion of yjcC reduced bacterial survival. These effects could be complemented by introducing the ΔyjcC mutant with the YjcC-expression plasmid pJR1. The recombinant protein containing only the YjcC-EAL domain exhibited phosphodiesterase (PDE activity; overexpression of yjcC has lower levels of cyclic di-GMP. The yjcC deletion mutant also exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, oxidation damage, and oxidative stress scavenging activity. In addition, the yjcC deletion reduced capsular polysaccharide production in the bacteria, but increased the LD50 in mice, biofilm formation, and type 3 fimbriae major pilin MrkA production. Finally, a comparative transcriptome analysis showed 34 upregulated and 29 downregulated genes with the increased production of YjcC. The activated gene products include glutaredoxin I, thioredoxin, heat shock proteins, chaperone, and MrkHI, and proteins for energy metabolism (transporters, cell surface structure, and transcriptional regulation. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that YjcC positively regulates the oxidative stress response and mouse virulence but negatively affects the biofilm formation and type 3 fimbriae expression by altering the c-di-GMP levels after receiving oxidative stress signaling inputs.

  11. Correlation study between c-di-GMP and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa%环二鸟苷酸与铜绿假单胞菌形成生物膜的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岚; 刘新; 吴怡; 方芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between c-di-GMP and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa through constructing strains with phospho-diesterase gene mutation. Methods The plasmid for genetic mutation was constructed with gene engineering technique and transformed into wild Pseudomonas aeruginosa by homologous recombination. The genetic mutation strains were screened by resistance and sucrose. Results Compared with wild strains, the genetic mutation strains were more prone to form microclone and biofilm on catheter material. Conclusion The increase of c-di-GMP can promotes biofilm formation. C-di-GMP has closely correlation with nosocomial infection and drug resistance caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.%目的:通过构建环二鸟苷酸降解酶磷脂酶D基因突变株,探讨环二鸟苷酸与铜绿假单胞菌形成生物膜的相关性.方法:采用基因工程技术构建磷脂酶D基因突变质粒,通过同源重组转化至野生型铜绿假单胞菌PA01,抗性筛选获得基因突变株bf-.扫描电子显微镜下观察基因突变株与野生菌株生物膜表型的差异.结果:与野生菌株相比,基因突变株bf-细菌微克隆的形成增加,有利于细菌在导管材料表面形成生物膜.结论:环二鸟苷酸的增加可促进细菌生物膜的形成,与铜绿假单胞菌引起的院内感染和耐药性密切相关.

  12. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Badri N; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling.

  13. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Badri N.; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di–guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling. PMID:27652341

  14. The Bacterial Second Messenger c-di-GMP Metabolism Regulation and the Roles of Virulence%细菌第二信使c-di-GMP的代谢调控及在致病性中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏超; 杨军; 张元宝; 王磊; 孙文献; 王云月

    2013-01-01

    环鸟苷二磷酸(cyclic diguanylate,c-di-GMP)是细菌内广泛存在的一类全新的第二信使分子.具有鸟苷酸环化酶(diguanylate cyclase,DGC)活性的GGDEF结构域蛋白以及具有磷酸二酯酶(phosphodiesterases,PDE)活性的EAL或HD-GYP结构域蛋白分别负责c-di-GMP的合成与降解.细菌内存在多种类型c-di-GMP的受体,负责感知细胞内c-di-GMP浓度的变化,并启动或抑制下游特定基因的表达.这些受体包括PilZ结构域蛋白,退化的GGDEF和EAL结构域蛋白,转录因子以及核糖开关(riboswitch).c-di-GMP参与调控细菌的多种生物学功能,如生物膜形成、运动性、胞外多糖的合成、胞外酶的分泌和三型分泌系统等,从而影响病原细菌的致病性.本文对近期c-di-GMP相关研究进展进行综述,并就其应用前景进行了讨论.

  15. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms.

  16. Functional roles of a tetraloop/receptor interacting module in a cyclic di-GMP riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2012-02-01

    Riboswitches are a class of structural RNAs that regulate transcription and translation through specific recognition of small molecules. Riboswitches are attractive not only as drug targets for novel antibiotics but also as modular tools for controlling gene expression. Sequence comparison of a class of riboswitches that sense cyclic di-GMP (type-I c-di-GMP riboswitches) revealed that this type of riboswitch frequently shows a GAAA loop/receptor interaction between P1 and P3 elements. In the crystal structures of a type-I c-di-GMP riboswitch from Vibrio cholerae (the Vc2 riboswitch), the GNRA loop/receptor interaction assembled P2 and P3 stems to organize a ligand-binding pocket. In this study, the functional importance of the GAAA loop-receptor interaction in the Vc2 riboswitch was examined. A series of variant Vc2 riboswitches with mutations in the GAAA loop/receptor interaction were assayed for their switching abilities. In mutants with mutations in the P2 GAAA loop, expression of the reporter gene was reduced to approximately 40% - 60% of that in the wild-type. However, mutants in which the P3 receptor motif was substituted with base pairs were as active as the wild-type. These results suggested that the GAAA loop/receptor interaction does not simply establish the RNA 3D structure but docking of P2 GAAA loop reduces the flexibility of the GAAA receptor motif in the P3 element. This mechanism was supported by a variant riboswitch bearing a theophylline aptamer module in P3 the structural rigidity of which could be modulated by the small molecule theophylline.

  17. Linking tricyclic antidepressants to ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Laura; Gentile, Lisa

    2005-07-29

    Although tricyclic antidepressants have been in existence since the 1940s when they were discovered upon screening iminodibenzyl derivatives for other potential therapeutic uses, their mechanism of action has remained unclear [A. Goodman Gilman, T.W. Rall, A.S. Nies, P. Taylor, Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, eighth ed., Pergamon Press, New York, 1990]. In addition to their ability to hinder the reuptake of biogenic amines, there is mounting evidence that the tricyclic antidepressants inhibit glutamate transmission. Here, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy is used to document the binding of desipramine, a member of the tricyclic antidepressant family, to a well-defined extracellular glutamate binding domain (S1S2) of the GluR2 subunit of the amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor. The binding is distinct from those of other known effectors of the receptor, including the endogenous sulfated neurosteroids pregnenolone sulfate and 3alpha-hydroxy-5beta-pregnan-20-one sulfate, and is consistent with a conformational change upon binding that is allosterically transmitted to the channel region of the receptor.

  18. Systematic Identification of Cyclic-di-GMP Binding Proteins in Vibrio cholerae Reveals a Novel Class of Cyclic-di-GMP-Binding ATPases Associated with Type II Secretion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Kevin G; Jones, Christopher J; Helman, Sarah R; Shang, Xiaoran; Orr, Mona W; Goodson, Jonathan R; Galperin, Michael Y; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-10-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule that regulates a variety of complex processes through a diverse set of c-di-GMP receptor proteins. We have utilized a systematic approach to identify c-di-GMP receptors from the pathogen Vibrio cholerae using the Differential Radial Capillary Action of Ligand Assay (DRaCALA). The DRaCALA screen identified a majority of known c-di-GMP binding proteins in V. cholerae and revealed a novel c-di-GMP binding protein, MshE (VC0405), an ATPase associated with the mannose sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) type IV pilus. The known c-di-GMP binding proteins identified by DRaCALA include diguanylate cyclases, phosphodiesterases, PilZ domain proteins and transcription factors VpsT and VpsR, indicating that the DRaCALA-based screen of open reading frame libraries is a feasible approach to uncover novel receptors of small molecule ligands. Since MshE lacks the canonical c-di-GMP-binding motifs, a truncation analysis was utilized to locate the c-di-GMP binding activity to the N-terminal T2SSE_N domain. Alignment of MshE homologs revealed candidate conserved residues responsible for c-di-GMP binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of these candidate residues revealed that the Arg9 residue is required for c-di-GMP binding. The ability of c-di-GMP binding to MshE to regulate MSHA dependent processes was evaluated. The R9A allele, in contrast to the wild type MshE, was unable to complement the ΔmshE mutant for the production of extracellular MshA to the cell surface, reduction in flagella swimming motility, attachment to surfaces and formation of biofilms. Testing homologs of MshE for binding to c-di-GMP identified the type II secretion ATPase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA14_29490) as a c-di-GMP receptor, indicating that type II secretion and type IV pili are both regulated by c-di-GMP.

  19. Structural Basis of Differential Ligand Recognition by Two Classes of bis-(3-5)-cyclic Dimeric Guanosine Monophosphate-binding Riboswitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Smith; C Shanahan; E Moore; A Simon; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) signaling pathway regulates biofilm formation, virulence, and other processes in many bacterial species and is critical for their survival. Two classes of c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches have been discovered that bind this second messenger with high affinity and regulate diverse downstream genes, underscoring the importance of RNA receptors in this pathway. We have solved the structure of a c-di-GMP-II riboswitch, which reveals that the ligand is bound as part of a triplex formed with a pseudoknot. The structure also shows that the guanine bases of c-di-GMP are recognized through noncanonical pairings and that the phosphodiester backbone is not contacted by the RNA. Recognition is quite different from that observed in the c-di-GMP-I riboswitch, demonstrating that at least two independent solutions for RNA second messenger binding have evolved. We exploited these differences to design a c-di-GMP analog that selectively binds the c-di-GMP-II aptamer over the c-di-GMP-I RNA. There are several bacterial species that contain both types of riboswitches, and this approach holds promise as an important tool for targeting one riboswitch, and thus one gene, over another in a selective fashion.

  20. DMPD: Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15031527 Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and virus... (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and viruses. PubmedID 1503...1527 Title Toll-like receptor 3: a link between toll-like receptor, interferon and virus

  1. N-linked glycosylation supports cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinases and androgen receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri M Itkonen

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-associated deaths in men and signalling via a transcription factor called androgen receptor (AR is an important driver of the disease. Androgen treatment is known to affect the expression and activity of other oncogenes including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. In this study we report that AR-positive prostate cancer cell-lines express 50% higher levels of enzymes in the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP than AR-negative prostate cell-lines. HBP produces hexosamines that are used by endoplasmic reticulum and golgi enzymes to glycosylate proteins targeted to plasma-membrane and secretion. Inhibition of O-linked glycosylation by ST045849 or N-linked glycosylation with tunicamycin decreased cell viability by 20%. In addition, tunicamycin inhibited the androgen-induced expression of AR target genes KLK3 and CaMKK2 by 50%. RTKs have been shown to enhance AR activity and we used an antibody array to identify changes in the phosphorylation status of RTKs in response to androgen stimulation. Hormone treatment increased the activity of Insulin like Growth Factor 1-Receptor (IGF-1R ten-fold and this was associated with a concomitant increase in the N-linked glycosylation of the receptor, analyzed by lectin enrichment experiments. Glycosylation is known to be important for the processing and stability of RTKs. Inhibition of N-linked glycosylation resulted in accumulation of IGF-1R pro-receptor with altered mobility as shown by immunoprecipitation. Confocal imaging revealed that androgen induced plasma-membrane localization of IGF-1R was blocked by tunicamycin. In conclusion we have established that the glycosylation of IGF-1R is necessary for the full activation of the receptor in response to androgen treatment and that perturbing this process can break the feedback loop between AR and IGF-1R activation in prostate cells. Achieving similar results selectively in a clinical setting will be an

  2. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site.

  3. Endocytosis of GPI-linked membrane folate receptor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnboutt, S; Jansen, G; Posthuma, G; Hynes, J B; Schornagel, J H; Strous, G J

    1996-01-01

    GPI-linked membrane folate receptors (MFRs) have been implicated in the receptor-mediated uptake of reduced folate cofactors and folate-based chemotherapeutic drugs. We have studied the biosynthetic transport to and internalization of MFR isoform alpha in KB-cells. MFR-alpha was synthesized as a 32-kD protein and converted in a maturely glycosylated 36-38-kD protein 1 h after synthesis. 32-kD MFR-alpha was completely soluble in Triton X-100 at 0 degree C. In contrast, only 33% of the 36-38-kD species could be solubilized at these conditions whereas complete solubilization was obtained in Triton X-100 at 37 degrees C or in the presence of saponin at 0 degree C. Similar solubilization characteristics were found when MFR-alpha at the plasma membrane was labeled with a crosslinkable 125I-labeled photoaffinity-analog of folic acid as a ligand. Triton X-100-insoluble membrane domains containing MFR-alpha could be separated from soluble MFR-alpha on sucrose flotation gradients. Only Triton X-100 soluble MFR-alpha was internalized from the plasma membrane. The reduced-folate-carrier, an integral membrane protein capable of translocating (anti-)folates across membranes, was completely excluded from the Triton X-100-resistant membrane domains. Internalized MFR-alpha recycled slowly to the cell surface during which it remained soluble in Triton X-100 at 0 degree C. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found MFR-alpha along the entire endocytic pathway: in clathrin-coated buds and vesicles, and in small and large endosomal vacuoles. In conclusion, our data indicate that a large fraction, if not all, of internalizing MFR-alpha bypasses caveolae.

  4. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane eAllouche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioid receptors are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization and post-endocytic fate of the receptor.

  5. Negative regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases: unexpected links to c-Cbl and receptor ubiquitylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chanan RUBIN; Gal GUR; Yosef YARDEN

    2005-01-01

    Intracellular signals mediated by the family of receptor tyrosine kinases play pivotal roles in morphogenesis, cell fate determination and pathogenesis. Precise control of signal amplitude and duration is critical for the fidelity and robustness of these processes. Activation of receptor tyrosine kinases by their cognate growth factors not only leads to propagation of the signal through various biochemical cascades, but also sets in motion multiple attenuation mechanisms that ultimately terminate the active state. Early attenuators pre-exist prior to receptor activation and they act to limit signal propagation. Subsequently, late attenuators, such as Lrig and Sprouty, are transcriptionally induced and further act to dampen the signal. Central to the process of signaling attenuation is the role of the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl. While Cblmediated processes of receptor ubiquitylation and endocytosis are relatively well understood, the links of Cbl to other negative regulators are just now beginning to be appreciated. Here we review some emerging interfaces between Cbl and the transcriptionally induced negative regulators Lrig and Sprouty.

  6. DMPD: Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18022390 Nuclear receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammati...on. Szanto A, Roszer T. FEBS Lett. 2008 Jan 9;582(1):106-16. Epub 2007 Nov 20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nuclear... receptors in macrophages: a link between metabolism and inflammation. PubmedID 18022390 Title Nuclear

  7. A minimalist biosensor: Quantitation of cyclic di-GMP using the conformational change of a riboswitch aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, Colleen A; Sales-Lee, Jade; Pan, Yuchen; Gassaway, Madalee M; Herr, Amy E; Hammond, Ming C

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger that is important in regulating bacterial physiology and behavior, including motility and virulence. Many questions remain about the role and regulation of this signaling molecule, but current methods of detection are limited by either modest sensitivity or requirements for extensive sample purification. We have taken advantage of a natural, high affinity receptor of c-di-GMP, the Vc2 riboswitch aptamer, to develop a sensitive and rapid electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for c-di-GMP quantitation that required minimal engineering of the RNA.

  8. Cyclic di-GMP-dependent signaling pathways in the pathogenic Firmicute Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We characterized key components and major targets of the c-di-GMP signaling pathways in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, identified a new c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide responsible for motility inhibition, cell aggregation, and enhanced tolerance to disinfectants and desiccation, and provided first insights into the role of c-di-GMP signaling in listerial virulence. Genome-wide genetic and biochemical analyses of c-di-GMP signaling pathways revealed that L. monocytogenes has three GGDEF domain proteins, DgcA (Lmo1911, DgcB (Lmo1912 and DgcC (Lmo2174, that possess diguanylate cyclase activity, and three EAL domain proteins, PdeB (Lmo0131, PdeC (Lmo1914 and PdeD (Lmo0111, that possess c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. Deletion of all phosphodiesterase genes (ΔpdeB/C/D or expression of a heterologous diguanylate cyclase stimulated production of a previously unknown exopolysaccharide. The synthesis of this exopolysaccharide was attributed to the pssA-E (lmo0527-0531 gene cluster. The last gene of the cluster encodes the fourth listerial GGDEF domain protein, PssE, that functions as an I-site c-di-GMP receptor essential for exopolysaccharide synthesis. The c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide causes cell aggregation in minimal medium and impairs bacterial migration in semi-solid agar, however, it does not promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The exopolysaccharide also greatly enhances bacterial tolerance to commonly used disinfectants as well as desiccation, which may contribute to survival of L. monocytogenes on contaminated food products and in food-processing facilities. The exopolysaccharide and another, as yet unknown c-di-GMP-dependent target, drastically decrease listerial invasiveness in enterocytes in vitro, and lower pathogen load in the liver and gallbladder of mice infected via an oral route, which suggests that elevated c-di-GMP levels play an overall negative role in listerial virulence.

  9. Cyclic di-GMP-dependent signaling pathways in the pathogenic Firmicute Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Hong; Köseoğlu, Volkan K; Güvener, Zehra T; Myers-Morales, Tanya; Reed, Joseph M; D'Orazio, Sarah E F; Miller, Kurt W; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-08-01

    We characterized key components and major targets of the c-di-GMP signaling pathways in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, identified a new c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide responsible for motility inhibition, cell aggregation, and enhanced tolerance to disinfectants and desiccation, and provided first insights into the role of c-di-GMP signaling in listerial virulence. Genome-wide genetic and biochemical analyses of c-di-GMP signaling pathways revealed that L. monocytogenes has three GGDEF domain proteins, DgcA (Lmo1911), DgcB (Lmo1912) and DgcC (Lmo2174), that possess diguanylate cyclase activity, and three EAL domain proteins, PdeB (Lmo0131), PdeC (Lmo1914) and PdeD (Lmo0111), that possess c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. Deletion of all phosphodiesterase genes (ΔpdeB/C/D) or expression of a heterologous diguanylate cyclase stimulated production of a previously unknown exopolysaccharide. The synthesis of this exopolysaccharide was attributed to the pssA-E (lmo0527-0531) gene cluster. The last gene of the cluster encodes the fourth listerial GGDEF domain protein, PssE, that functions as an I-site c-di-GMP receptor essential for exopolysaccharide synthesis. The c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide causes cell aggregation in minimal medium and impairs bacterial migration in semi-solid agar, however, it does not promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The exopolysaccharide also greatly enhances bacterial tolerance to commonly used disinfectants as well as desiccation, which may contribute to survival of L. monocytogenes on contaminated food products and in food-processing facilities. The exopolysaccharide and another, as yet unknown c-di-GMP-dependent target, drastically decrease listerial invasiveness in enterocytes in vitro, and lower pathogen load in the liver and gallbladder of mice infected via an oral route, which suggests that elevated c-di-GMP levels play an overall negative role in listerial virulence.

  10. Characterization of the receptor for endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF) by affinity cross-linking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Mehlman, T.; Maciag, T.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have demonstrated high affinity receptors for ECGF on endothelial cells by covalent cross-linking of (/sup 125/I)-ECGF with disuccinimidyl suberate and observe a single chain cross-linked polypeptide species with an apparent M/sub r/ of 170K. The M/sub r/ 170K species represents (/sup 125/I)-ECGF bound to its receptor since (i) excess unlabeled ECGF inhibits the cross-linking of (/sup 125/I)-ECGF, (ii) labeling of the M/sub r/170K species does not take place in the absence of cross-linker, (iii) cells previously shown to be refractory to ECGF and lack ECGF receptors do not yield a cross-linked species, (iv) the cross-linked species can be immunoprecipitated with anti-ECGF antibodies, and (v) preincubation of cells with ECGF at 37/sup 0/C significantly reduces cross-linking while incubation at 4/sup 0/C does not. These data demonstrate that ECGF induced cell proliferation occurs through the occupancy of a specific cell surface polypeptide receptor with an apparent M/sub r/ of 150K, and suggests that internalization of the receptor-ligand complex may be relevant to ECGF-induced signal transduction.

  11. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PilZ Domain Proteins Function Differentially in Cyclic di-GMP Binding and Regulation of Virulence and Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Chen, Huamin; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong; He, Chenyang

    2015-07-01

    The PilZ domain proteins have been demonstrated to be one of the major types of receptors mediating cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathways in several pathogenic bacteria. However, little is known about the function of PilZ domain proteins in c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in the bacterial blight pathogen of rice Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, the roles of PilZ domain proteins PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 in c-di-GMP binding, regulation of virulence and motility, and subcellular localization were characterized in comparison with PXO_02715, identified previously as an interactor with the c-di-GMP receptor Filp to regulate virulence. The c-di-GMP binding motifs in the PilZ domains were conserved in PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but were less well conserved in PXO_02715. PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but not PXO_02715 proteins bound to c-di-GMP with high affinity in vitro, and the R(141) and R(10) residues in the PilZ domains of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374, respectively, were crucial for c-di-GMP binding. Gene deletion of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 resulted in significant increases in virulence and hrp gene transcription, indicating their negative regulation of virulence via type III secretion system expression. All mutants showed significant changes in sliding motility but not exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. In trans expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of each gene in the relevant mutants led to restoration of the phenotype to wild-type levels. Moreover, PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 displayed mainly multisite subcellular localizations, whereas PXO_02715 showed nonpolar distributions in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. Therefore, this study demonstrated the different functions of the PilZ domain proteins in mediation of c-di-GMP regulation of virulence and motility in X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  12. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  13. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariisa, Ankunda T; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  14. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankunda T Kariisa

    Full Text Available In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment.

  15. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Navazo, Ana; Barahona, Emma; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  16. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martínez-Granero

    Full Text Available Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC and one phosphodiesterase (BifA implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  17. Is receptor oligomerization causally linked to activation of the EGF receptor kinase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintoul, D. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Transduction of a signal from an extracellular peptide hormone to produce an intracellular response is often mediated by a cell surface receptor, which is usually a glycoprotein. The secondary intracellular signal(s) generated after hormone binding to the receptor have been intensively studied. The nature of the primary signal generated by ligand binding to the receptor is understood less well in most cases. The particular case of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is analyzed, and evidence for or against two dissimilar models of primary signal transduction is reviewed. Evidence for the most widely accepted current model is found to be unconvincing. Evidence for the other model is substantial but indirect; a direct test of this model remains to be done.

  18. Methylation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter in Preschoolers: Links with Internalizing Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Ridout, Kathryn K.; Seifer, Ronald; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McWilliams, Melissa A.; Tyrka, Audrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that early adversity is linked to methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene, "NR3C1," which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Yet no prior work has considered the contribution of methylation of "NR3C1" to emerging behavior problems and psychopathology in…

  19. Characterization of receptor proteins using affinity cross-linking with biotinylated ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Tomonori; Osada, Tomohiko; Desaki, Yoshitake; Hatamoto, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Yuko; Hirano, Hisashi; Takai, Ryota; Che, Fang-Sik; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto

    2010-02-01

    The plant genome encodes a wide range of receptor-like proteins but the function of most of these proteins is unknown. We propose the use of affinity cross-linking of biotinylated ligands for a ligand-based survey of the corresponding receptor molecules. Biotinylated ligands not only enable the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions without the use of radioactive compounds but also the isolation and identification of receptor molecules by a simple affinity trapping method. We successfully applied this method for the characterization, isolation and identification of the chitin elicitor binding protein (CEBiP). A biocytin hydrazide conjugate of N-acetylchitooctaose (GN8-Bio) was synthesized and used for the detection of CEBiP in the plasma or microsomal membrane preparations from rice and carrot cells. Binding characteristics of CEBiP analyzed by inhibition studies were in good agreement with the previous results obtained with the use of a radiolabeled ligand. The biotin-tagged CEBiP could be purified by avidin affinity chromatography and identified by LC-MALDI-MS/MS after tryptic digestion. We also used this method to detect OsFLS2, a rice receptor-like kinase for the perception of the peptide elicitor flg22, in membrane preparations from rice cells overexpressing OsFLS2. This work demonstrates the applicability of this method to the purification and identification of plant receptor proteins.

  20. Nuclear angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptors are functionally linked to nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwathmey, Tanya M; Shaltout, Hossam A; Pendergrass, Karl D; Pirro, Nancy T; Figueroa, Jorge P; Rose, James C; Diz, Debra I; Chappell, Mark C

    2009-06-01

    Expression of nuclear angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptors in rat kidney provides further support for the concept of an intracellular renin-angiotensin system. Thus we examined the cellular distribution of renal ANG II receptors in sheep to determine the existence and functional roles of intracellular ANG receptors in higher order species. Receptor binding was performed using the nonselective ANG II antagonist (125)I-[Sar(1),Thr(8)]-ANG II ((125)I-sarthran) with the AT(1) antagonist losartan (LOS) or the AT(2) antagonist PD123319 (PD) in isolated nuclei (NUC) and plasma membrane (PM) fractions obtained by differential centrifugation or density gradient separation. In both fetal and adult sheep kidney, PD competed for the majority of cortical NUC (> or =70%) and PM (> or =80%) sites while LOS competition predominated in medullary NUC (> or =75%) and PM (> or =70%). Immunodetection with an AT(2) antibody revealed a single approximately 42-kDa band in both NUC and PM extracts, suggesting a mature molecular form of the NUC receptor. Autoradiography for receptor subtypes localized AT(2) in the tubulointerstitium, AT(1) in the medulla and vasa recta, and both AT(1) and AT(2) in glomeruli. Loading of NUC with the fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) detector DAF showed increased NO production with ANG II (1 nM), which was abolished by PD and N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, but not LOS. Our studies demonstrate ANG II receptor subtypes are differentially expressed in ovine kidney, while nuclear AT(2) receptors are functionally linked to NO production. These findings provide further evidence of a functional intracellular renin-angiotensin system within the kidney, which may represent a therapeutic target for the regulation of blood pressure.

  1. Activation and polar sequestration of PopA, a c-di-GMP effector protein involved in Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozaki, Shogo; Schalch-Moser, Annina; Zumthor, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    transduction in PopA with the GGDEF domain adopting input function and the receiver domain serving as regulatory output. We show that the N-terminal receiver domain of PopA specifically interacts with RcdA, a component required for CtrA degradation. In contrast, the GGDEF domain serves to target Pop...

  2. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  3. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  4. Characterization of the somatogenic receptor in rat liver. Hydrodynamic properties and affinity cross-linking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husman, B.; Haldosen, L.A.; Andersson, G.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1988-03-15

    Rat liver somatogenic receptors have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography, sucrose density gradients in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O, and affinity cross-linking using /sup 125/I-bovine growth hormone (bGH) as a specific somatogenic receptor ligand. Cross-linking of /sup 125/I-bovine growth hormone to a Triton X-100-treated low density fraction isolated from livers of late pregnant rats followed by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions showed three major binders with Mr 95,000, 86,000, and 43,000 and a minor binder of Mr 55,000, after correction for bound ligand assuming a 1:1 binding ratio of ligand-receptor. The Mr 86,000, 55,000, and 43,000 species were recovered in the detergent-soluble supernatant after high-speed centrifugation, whereas the Mr 95,000 species remained Triton X-100 insoluble. Detergent-soluble /sup 125/I-bGH-receptor complexes were further analyzed by sedimentation into sucrose density gradients. The sedimentation coefficient was S20,w = 5.2 S and the partial specific volume v = 0.72 ml/g. Gel permeation chromatography on a Sepharose S-400 column indicated a Stokes radius of 61 A for the /sup 125/I-bGH-receptor-Triton X-100 complex. Based on these figures, the molecular weight of the complex was calculated as 131,100. The molecular weight of the ligand-free receptor-Triton X-100 complex was calculated as Mr 109,100. Affinity cross-linking and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the 61 A peak from Sephacryl S-400 chromatography (cf. above) showed two binding entities, one major and one minor with Mr values 86,000 and 43,000, respectively, in the absence of reductant. When electrophoresis was run in the presence of reductant the Mr 43,000 species was the major binding entity.

  5. Both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids on O-linked glycoproteins act as functional receptors for porcine Sapovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deok-Song Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sapovirus, a member of the Caliciviridae family, is an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans and pigs. Currently, the porcine sapovirus (PSaV Cowden strain remains the only cultivable member of the Sapovirus genus. While some caliciviruses are known to utilize carbohydrate receptors for entry and infection, a functional receptor for sapovirus is unknown. To characterize the functional receptor of the Cowden strain of PSaV, we undertook a comprehensive series of protein-ligand biochemical assays in mock and PSaV-infected cell culture and/or piglet intestinal tissue sections. PSaV revealed neither hemagglutination activity with red blood cells from any species nor binding activity to synthetic histo-blood group antigens, indicating that PSaV does not use histo-blood group antigens as receptors. Attachment and infection of PSaV were markedly blocked by sialic acid and Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (NA, suggesting a role for α2,3-linked, α2,6-linked or α2,8-linked sialic acid in virus attachment. However, viral attachment and infection were only partially inhibited by treatment of cells with sialidase S (SS or Maackia amurensis lectin (MAL, both specific for α2,3-linked sialic acid, or Sambucus nigra lectin (SNL, specific for α2,6-linked sialic acid. These results indicated that PSaV recognizes both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids for viral attachment and infection. Treatment of cells with proteases or with benzyl 4-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (benzylGalNAc, which inhibits O-linked glycosylation, also reduced virus binding and infection, whereas inhibition of glycolipd synthesis or N-linked glycosylation had no such effect on virus binding or infection. These data suggest PSaV binds to cellular receptors that consist of α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids on glycoproteins attached via O-linked glycosylation.

  6. Both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids on O-linked glycoproteins act as functional receptors for porcine Sapovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Song; Hosmillo, Myra; Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Kim, Ji-Yun; Park, Jun-Gyu; Son, Kyu-Yeol; Ryu, Eun-Hye; Sorgeloos, Frederic; Kwon, Hyung-Jun; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Woo Song; Cho, Duck; Kwon, Joseph; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kang, Mun-Il; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-06-01

    Sapovirus, a member of the Caliciviridae family, is an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans and pigs. Currently, the porcine sapovirus (PSaV) Cowden strain remains the only cultivable member of the Sapovirus genus. While some caliciviruses are known to utilize carbohydrate receptors for entry and infection, a functional receptor for sapovirus is unknown. To characterize the functional receptor of the Cowden strain of PSaV, we undertook a comprehensive series of protein-ligand biochemical assays in mock and PSaV-infected cell culture and/or piglet intestinal tissue sections. PSaV revealed neither hemagglutination activity with red blood cells from any species nor binding activity to synthetic histo-blood group antigens, indicating that PSaV does not use histo-blood group antigens as receptors. Attachment and infection of PSaV were markedly blocked by sialic acid and Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (NA), suggesting a role for α2,3-linked, α2,6-linked or α2,8-linked sialic acid in virus attachment. However, viral attachment and infection were only partially inhibited by treatment of cells with sialidase S (SS) or Maackia amurensis lectin (MAL), both specific for α2,3-linked sialic acid, or Sambucus nigra lectin (SNL), specific for α2,6-linked sialic acid. These results indicated that PSaV recognizes both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids for viral attachment and infection. Treatment of cells with proteases or with benzyl 4-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (benzylGalNAc), which inhibits O-linked glycosylation, also reduced virus binding and infection, whereas inhibition of glycolipd synthesis or N-linked glycosylation had no such effect on virus binding or infection. These data suggest PSaV binds to cellular receptors that consist of α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids on glycoproteins attached via O-linked glycosylation.

  7. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists Modulate Neuropathic Pain: a Link to Chemokines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eFreitag

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain presents a widespread and intractable medical problem. While numerous pharmaceuticals are used to treat chronic pain, drugs that are safe for extended use and highly effective at treating the most severe pain do not yet exist. Chronic pain resulting from nervous system injury (neuropathic pain is common in conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to HIV-1 infection to type II diabetes. Inflammation caused by neuropathy is believed to contribute to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines are key inflammatory mediators, several of which (MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, fractalkine, SDF-1 among others have been linked to chronic, neuropathic pain in both human conditions and animal models. The important roles chemokines play in inflammation and pain make them an attractive therapeutic target. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are a family of nuclear receptors known for their roles in metabolism. Recent research has revealed that PPARs also play a role in inflammatory gene repression. PPAR agonists have wide-ranging effects including inhibition of chemokine expression and pain behavior reduction in animal models. Experimental evidence suggests a connection between PPAR agonists' pain ameliorating effects and suppression of inflammatory gene expression, including chemokines. In early clinical research, one PPARα agonist, palmitoylethanolamide, shows promise in relieving chronic pain. If this link can be better established, PPAR agonists may represent a new drug therapy for neuropathic pain.

  8. Imine-linked receptors decorated ZnO-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SATBIR SINGH; AMARPAL SINGH; NAVNEET KAUR

    2016-10-01

    This study reports the synthesis, characterization and photophysical properties of imine-linked receptors decorated ZnO nanoparticles using wet precipitation method. Initially, polymer dye 3 was synthesized usingcondensation reaction between 2-furancarboxaldehyde 1 and polyethylenimine 2. The decoration of imine-linked receptors on ZnO nanoparticles (sample A) was characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electronmicroscope and dynamic light scattering spectroscopic studies. Further, polymer dye 3 was added to ruthenium chloride (RuCl$_3$) to form a polymer–ruthenium-based composite dye-capped ZnO nanoparticles (sample B).The optical properties of sample A were evaluated by fluorescence and UV–Vis spectroscopy. The samples A and B were further processed to dye-sensitized solar cells using wet precipitation method. The results of observationsrevealed that the addition of ruthenium–polymer dye molecules increased the light harvesting capacity of ZnO-based DSSCs. A maximum solar power to electricity conversion efficiency ($\\eta$) of 3.83% was recorded for sample B-based DSSCs with ruthenium–metal complex dye as a good photosensitizer. The recorded photovoltaic efficiency of sample B-based DSSCs was enhanced by 1.36% compared to sample A-based DSSCs.

  9. Chitin receptor CERK1 links salt stress and chitin-triggered innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Catherine; Liang, Yan; Stacey, Gary

    2017-03-01

    In nature, plants need to respond to multiple environmental stresses that require the involvement and fine-tuning of different stress signaling pathways. Cross-tolerance, in which plants pre-treated with chitin (a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern) have improved salt tolerance, was observed in Arabidopsis, but is not well understood. Here, we show a unique link between chitin and salt signaling mediated by the chitin receptor CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (CERK1). Transcriptome analysis revealed that salt stress-induced genes are highly correlated with chitin-induced genes, although this was not observed with other microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) or with other abiotic stresses. The cerk1 mutant was more susceptible to NaCl than was the wild type. cerk1 plants had an irregular increase of cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+) ]cyt ) after NaCl treatment. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that CERK1 physically interacts with ANNEXIN 1 (ANN1), which was reported to form a calcium-permeable channel that contributes to the NaCl-induced [Ca(2+) ]cyt signal. In turn, ann1 mutants showed elevated chitin-induced rapid responses. In short, molecular components previously shown to function in chitin or salt signaling physically interact and intimately link the downstream responses to fungal attack and salt stress.

  10. Possible bi-directional link between ETA receptors and protein kinase C in rat blood vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Northover

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible links have been investigated between activation of protein kinase C (PKC and endothelin (ET production by small blood vessels. Perfusion pressures were recorded from rat isolated mesenteric artery, with or without the small intestine attached, before and after addition to the perfusate of either ET-1, ET-3 or the PKC activator 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate (DOPPA. Rises in perfusion pressure in response to ET-1 (10−8 Mor DOPPA (10−6 M were reduced significantly by pre-treatment with either the ETA receptor antagonist PD151242 (10−6 M or the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (10−6 M. ET-3 (10−8 M had a significant, albeit small, effect only when the gut was still attached to the mesentery. Inthis latter preparation ET-1 and DOPPA increased the permeability of villi microvessels to colloidal carbon in the perfusate. This effect of DOPPA was reduced by pre-treatment with either PD151242 or Ro 31-8220, but the effects of ET-1 were reduced significantly only by Ro 31-8220. ET-3 (10−8 M was without effect. The results suggest a possible bi-directional link between ETA receptors and PKC in the intestinal vasculature.

  11. Oxytocin and Vasopressin: Linking Pituitary Neuropeptides and their Receptors to Social Neurocircuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Andrea Baribeau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin and vasopressin are pituitary neuropeptides that have been shown to affect social processes in mammals. There is growing interest in these molecules and their receptors as potential precipitants of, and/or treatments for, social deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder. Numerous behavioral-genetic studies suggest that there is an association between these peptides and individual social abilities; however, an explanatory model that links hormonal activity at the receptor level to complex human behavior remains elusive. The following review summarizes the known associations between the oxytocin and vasopressin neuropeptide systems and social neurocircuits in the brain. Following a micro- to macro- level trajectory, current literature on the synthesis and secretion of these peptides, and the structure, function and distribution of their respective receptors is first surveyed. Next, current models regarding the mechanism of action of these peptides on microcircuitry and other neurotransmitter systems are discussed. Functional neuroimaging evidence on the acute effects of exogenous administration of these peptides on brain activity is then reviewed. Overall, a model in which the local neuromodulatory effects of pituitary neuropeptides on brainstem and basal forebrain regions strengthen signaling within social neurocircuits proves appealing. However, these findings are derived from animal models; more research is needed to clarify the relevance of these mechanisms to human behavior and treatment of social deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  12. Cyclic-di-GMP signalling meets extracellular polysaccharide synthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Jan; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-06-01

    In order to resist harmful environmental conditions, many bacteria form multicellular aggregates called biofilms. In these biofilms, they protect themselves in a self-produced matrix consisting of extracellular polysaccharides, proteins and DNA. In many bacteria, biofilm formation is stimulated in the presence of the second messenger cyclic di-GMP. In this issue of Environmental Microbiology Reports, Bedrunka and Graumann have studied matrix production by the proteins encoded in the Bacillus subtilis ydaJKLMN operon. For the first time, they were able to provide a link between c-di-GMP signalling and matrix production in this bacterium. The work demonstrates that the c-di-GMP receptor protein YdaK forms a membrane-bound complex with the YdaM and YdaN proteins, and that this interaction with YdaK is required for polysaccharide production by YdaL, YdaM and YdaN. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mutation of putative N-linked glycosylation sites on the human nucleotide receptor P2X7 reveals a key residue important for receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenertz, Lisa Y; Wang, Ziyi; Guadarrama, Arturo; Hill, Lindsay M; Gavala, Monica L; Bertics, Paul J

    2010-06-08

    The nucleotide receptor P2X(7) is an immunomodulatory cation channel and a potential therapeutic target. P2X(7) is expressed in immune cells such as monocytes and macrophages and is activated by extracellular ATP following tissue injury or infection. Ligand binding to P2X(7) can stimulate ERK1/2, the transcription factor CREB, enzymes linked to the production of reactive oxygen species and interleukin-1 isoforms, and the formation of a nonspecific pore. However, little is known about the biochemistry of P2X(7), including whether the receptor is N-linked glycosylated and if this modification affects receptor function. Here we provide evidence that P2X(7) is sensitive to the glycosidases EndoH and PNGase F and that the human receptor appears glycosylated at N187, N202, N213, N241, and N284. Mutation of N187 results in weakened P2X(7) agonist-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CREB, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, as well as a decreased level of pore formation. In further support of a role for glycosylation in receptor function, treatment of RAW 264.7 macrophages with the N-linked glycosylation synthesis inhibitor tunicamycin attenuates P2X(7) agonist-induced, but not phorbol ester-induced, ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Interestingly, residue N187 belongs to an N-linked glycosylation consensus sequence found in six of the seven P2X family members, suggesting this site is fundamentally important to P2X receptor function. To address the mechanism whereby N187 mutation attenuates receptor activity, we developed a live cell proteinase K digestion assay that demonstrated altered cell surface expression of P2X(7) N187A. This is the first report to map human P2X(7) glycosylation sites and reveal residue N187 is critical for receptor trafficking and function.

  14. Identification of a negative feedback loop between cyclic di-GMP-induced levels of IFI16 and p202 cytosolic DNA sensors and STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Xin, Duan; Choubey, Divaker

    2014-10-01

    A host type I IFN response is induced by cytosolic sensing of the bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) by STING (stimulator of IFN genes). Because the STING, an adaptor protein, links the cytosolic detection of DNA by the cytosolic DNA sensors such as the IFN-inducible human IFI16 and murine p202 proteins to the TBK1/IRF3 axis, we investigated whether c-di-GMP-induced signaling could regulate expression of IFI16 and p202 proteins. Here, we report that activation of c-di-GMP-induced signaling in human and murine cells increased steady-state levels of IFI16 and p202 proteins. The increase was c-di-GMP concentration- and time-dependent. Unexpectedly, treatment of cells with type I IFN decreased levels of the adaptor protein STING. Therefore, we investigated whether the IFI16 or p202 protein could regulate the expression of STING and activation of the TBK1/IRF3 axis. We found that constitutive knockdown of IFI16 or p202 expression in cells increased steady-state levels of STING. Additionally, the knockdown of IFI16 resulted in activation of the TBK1/IRF3 axis. Accordingly, increased levels of the IFI16 or p202 protein in cells decreased STING levels. Together, our observations identify a novel negative feedback loop between c-di-GMP-induced levels of IFI16 and p202 cytosolic DNA sensors and the adaptor protein STING.

  15. Anticonvulsant activity of artificial sweeteners: a structural link between sweet-taste receptor T1R3 and brain glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talevi, Alan; Enrique, Andrea V; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E

    2012-06-15

    A virtual screening campaign based on application of a topological discriminant function capable of identifying novel anticonvulsant agents indicated several widely-used artificial sweeteners as potential anticonvulsant candidates. Acesulfame potassium, cyclamate and saccharin were tested in the Maximal Electroshock Seizure model (mice, ip), showing moderate anticonvulsant activity. We hypothesized a probable structural link between the receptor responsible of sweet taste and anticonvulsant molecular targets. Bioinformatic tools confirmed a highly significant sequence-similarity between taste-related protein T1R3 and several metabotropic glutamate receptors from different species, including glutamate receptors upregulated in epileptogenesis and certain types of epilepsy.

  16. Genomic architecture of MHC-linked odorant receptor gene repertoires among 16 vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pablo Sandro Carvalho; Kellermann, Thomas; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    The recent sequencing and assembly of the genomes of different organisms have shown that almost all vertebrates studied in detail so far have one or more clusters of genes encoding odorant receptors (OR) in close physical linkage to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). It has been postulated that MHC-linked OR genes could be involved in MHC-influenced mate choice, comprising both pre- as well as post-copulatory mechanisms. We have therefore carried out a systematic comparison of protein sequences of these receptors from the genomes of man, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, mouse, rat, dog, cat, cow, pig, horse, elephant, opossum, frog and zebra fish (amounting to a total of 559 protein sequences) in order to identify OR families exhibiting evolutionarily conserved MHC linkage. In addition, we compared the genomic structure of this region within these 16 species, accounting for presence or absence of OR gene families, gene order, transcriptional orientation and linkage to the MHC or framework genes. The results are presented in the form of gene maps and phylogenetic analyses that reveal largely concordant repertoires of gene families, at least among tetrapods, although each of the eight taxa studied (primates, rodents, ungulates, carnivores, proboscids, marsupials, amphibians and teleosts) exhibits a typical architecture of MHC (or MHC framework loci)-linked OR genes. Furthermore, the comparison of the genomic organization of this region has implications for phylogenetic relationships between closely related taxa, especially in disputed cases such as the evolutionary history of even- and odd-toed ungulates and carnivores. Finally, the largely conserved linkage between distinct OR genes and the MHC supports the concept that particular alleles within a given haplotype function in a concerted fashion during self-/non-self-discrimination processes in reproduction.

  17. Mechanism linking atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes: increased expression of scavenger receptor CD36 in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-mei; ZHANG Xiao-lian; ZHOU Xin; LI Dong; GU Jin-gang; WU Juan-juan

    2005-01-01

    Background We investigated the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetes, and detected the expression of scavenger receptor CD36 in monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods According to the criteria by WHO, diabetic patients were classified into two groups: well controlled diabetic patients (WCP) and poorly controlled diabetic patients (PCP). The expression of CD36 protein and mRNA were evaluated by flow cytometry and reversal transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Plasma levels of accumulution of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were directly measured by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method.Results Flow cytometry and RT-PCR showed that the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CD36 in monocyte and CD36 mRNA were significantly higher in the PCP and WCP in comparison with healthy controls (P0.05). The concentrations of plasma oxLDL were higher in the PCP group compared to WCP and control group (P0.05). In the WCP and PCP groups, oxLDL levels were higher in patients with diabetic atherosclerosis than those without diabetic atherosclerosis (P<0.05).Conclusions The increased expression of scavenger receptor CD36 may be one of the mechanism of accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic. The poorly controlled diabetes patients are at higher risk for the vascular complications than the well controlled diabetic patients.

  18. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh, E-mail: sthalla@uark.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  19. VEGF receptor signaling links inflammation and tumorigenesis in colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, Maximilian J; Wirtz, Stefan; Jefremow, André; Warntjen, Moritz; Neufert, Clemens; Atreya, Raja; Becker, Christoph; Weigmann, Benno; Vieth, Michael; Rose-John, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F

    2010-12-20

    Whereas the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has shown promising results in sporadic colon cancer, the role of VEGF signaling in colitis-associated cancer (CAC) has not been addressed. We found that, unlike sporadic colorectal cancer and control patients, patients with CAC show activated VEGFR2 on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We then explored the function of VEGFR2 in a murine model of colitis-associated colon cancer characterized by increased VEGFR2 expression. Epithelial cells in tumor tissue expressed VEGFR2 and responded to VEGF stimulation with augmented VEGFR2-mediated proliferation. Blockade of VEGF function via soluble decoy receptors suppressed tumor development, inhibited tumor angiogenesis, and blocked tumor cell proliferation. Functional studies revealed that chronic inflammation leads to an up-regulation of VEGFR2 on IECs. Studies in conditional STAT3 mutant mice showed that VEGFR signaling requires STAT3 to promote epithelial cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Thus, VEGFR-signaling acts as a direct growth factor for tumor cells in CAC, providing a molecular link between inflammation and the development of colon cancer.

  20. Porcine Sapelovirus Uses α2,3-Linked Sialic Acid on GD1a Ganglioside as a Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Song; Son, Kyu-Yeol; Koo, Kyung-Min; Kim, Ji-Yun; Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Park, Jun-Gyu; Hosmillo, Myra; Soliman, Mahmoud; Baek, Yeong-Bin; Cho, Eun-Hyo; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Kang, Mun-Il

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The receptor(s) for porcine sapelovirus (PSV), which causes diarrhea, pneumonia, polioencephalomyelitis, and reproductive disorders in pigs, remains largely unknown. Given the precedent for other picornaviruses which use terminal sialic acids (SAs) as receptors, we examined the role of SAs in PSV binding and infection. Using a variety of approaches, including treating cells with a carbohydrate-destroying chemical (NaIO4), mono- or oligosaccharides (N-acetylneuraminic acid, galactose, and 6′-sialyllactose), linkage-specific sialidases (neuraminidase and sialidase S), lectins (Maakia amurensis lectin and Sambucus nigra lectin), proteases (trypsin and chymotrypsin), and glucosylceramide synthase inhibitors (dl-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol and phospholipase C), we demonstrated that PSV could recognize α2,3-linked SA on glycolipids as a receptor. On the other hand, PSVs had no binding affinity for synthetic histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), suggesting that PSVs could not use HBGAs as receptors. Depletion of cell surface glycolipids followed by reconstitution studies indicated that GD1a ganglioside, but not other gangliosides, could restore PSV binding and infection, further confirming α2,3-linked SA on GD1a as a PSV receptor. Our results could provide significant information on the understanding of the life cycle of sapelovirus and other picornaviruses. For the broader community in the area of pathogens and pathogenesis, these findings and insights could contribute to the development of affordable, useful, and efficient drugs for anti-sapelovirus therapy. IMPORTANCE The porcine sapelovirus (PSV) is known to cause enteritis, pneumonia, polioencephalomyelitis, and reproductive disorders in pigs. However, the receptor(s) that the PSV utilizes to enter host cells remains largely unknown. Using a variety of approaches, we showed that α2,3-linked terminal sialic acid (SA) on the cell surface GD1a ganglioside could be used for PSV

  1. Phosphoinositide system-linked serotonin receptor subtypes and their pharmacological properties and clinical correlates.

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, S. C.; Davis, J M; PANDEY, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission represents a complex mechanism involving pre- and post-synaptic events and distinct 5-HT receptor subtypes. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors have been classified into several categories, and they are termed as 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 type receptors. 5-HT1 receptors have been further subdivided into 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F. 5-HT2 receptors have been divided into 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors. All 5-HT2 receptor subtype...

  2. Vitamin D receptor expression is linked to potential markers of human thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izkhakov, Elena; Somjen, Dalia; Sharon, Orli; Knoll, Esther; Aizic, Asaf; Fliss, Dan M; Limor, Rona; Stern, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Genes regulated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been screened as potential markers of malignant thyroid nodules. The mRNA expression levels of two of them, the ECM protein-1 (ECM1) and the type II transmembrane serine protease-4 (TMPRSS4), were shown to be an independent predictor of an existing thyroid carcinoma. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in epithelial cells of the normal thyroid gland, as well as in malignant dividing cells, which respond to the active metabolite of vitamin D by decreased proliferative activity in vitro. We evaluated the relationship between mRNA gene expressions of TMPRSS4, ECM1 and VDR in 21 papillary thyroid carcinoma samples and compared it to 21 normal thyroid tissues from the same patients. Gene expression was considered as up- or down-regulated if it varied by more or less than 2-fold in the cancer tissue relative to the normal thyroid tissue (Ca/N) from the same patient. We found an overall significant adjusted correlation between the mRNA expression ratio (ExR) of VDR and that of ECM1 in Ca/N thyroid tissue (R=0.648, Pthyroid tissue from the same patient (3.06±2.9), which also exhibited a high Ca/N ExR of ECM1 and/or of TMPRSS4 (>2, P=0.05).The finding that increased VDR expression in human thyroid cancer cells is often linked to increased ECM1 and/or TPMRSS4 expression warrants further investigation into the potential role of vitamin D analogs in thyroid carcinoma.

  3. Arginine vasotocin, isotocin and nonapeptide receptor gene expression link to social status and aggression in sex-dependent patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lema, S C; Sanders, K E; Walti, K A

    2015-02-01

    Nonapeptide hormones of the vasopressin/oxytocin family regulate social behaviours. In mammals and birds, variation in behaviour also is linked to expression patterns of the V1a-type receptor and the oxytocin/mesotocin receptor in the brain. Genome duplications, however, expand the diversity of nonapeptide receptors in actinopterygian fishes, and two distinct V1a-type receptors (v1a1 and v1a2) for vasotocin, as well as at least two V2-type receptors (v2a and v2b), have been identified in these taxa. The present study investigates how aggression connected to social status relates to the abundance patterns of gene transcripts encoding four vasotocin receptors, an isotocin receptor (itr), pro-vasotocin (proVT) and pro-isotocin (proIT) in the brain of the pupfish Cyprinodon nevadensis amargosae. Sexually-mature pupfish were maintained in mixed-sex social groups and assessed for individual variation in aggressive behaviours. Males in these groups behaved more aggressively than females, and larger fish exhibited higher aggression relative to smaller fish of the same sex. Hypothalamic proVT transcript abundance was elevated in dominant males compared to subordinate males, and correlated positively with individual variation in aggression in both social classes. Transcripts encoding vasotocin receptor v1a1 were at higher levels in the telencephalon and hypothalamus of socially subordinate males than dominant males. Dominant males exhibited elevated hypothalamic v1a2 receptor transcript abundance relative to subordinate males and females, and telencephalic v1a2 mRNA abundance in dominant males was also associated positively with individual aggressiveness. Transcripts in the telencephalon encoding itr were elevated in females relative to males, and both telencephalic proIT and hypothalamic itr transcript abundance varied with female social status. Taken together, these data link hypothalamic proVT expression to aggression and implicate forebrain expression of the V1a

  4. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease.

  5. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  6. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Flores-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease.

  7. Oxidized LDL receptor 1 (OLR1) as a possible link between obesity, dyslipidemia and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Kang, Bum-Yong; Wang, Xianwei; Kadlubar, Susan; Novelli, Giuseppe; Raj, Vinay; Winters, Maria; Carter, Weleetka C; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have linked expression of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor 1 (OLR1) to tumorigenesis. We analyzed microarray data from Olr1 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice for genes involved in cellular transformation and evaluated effects of OLR1 over-expression in normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) and breast cancer cells (HCC1143) in terms of gene expression, migration, adhesion and transendothelial migration. Twenty-six out of 238 genes were inhibited in tissues of OLR1 KO mice; the vast majority of OLR1 sensitive genes contained NF-κB binding sites in their promoters. Further studies revealed broad inhibition of NF-kB target genes outside of the transformation-associated gene pool, with enrichment themes of defense response, immune response, apoptosis, proliferation, and wound healing. Transcriptome of Olr1 KO mice also revealed inhibition of de novo lipogenesis, rate-limiting enzymes fatty acid synthase (Fasn), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) and ELOVL family member 6 (Elovl6), as well as lipolytic phospholipase A2 group IVB (Pla2g4b). In studies comparing MCF10A and HCC1143, the latter displayed 60% higher OLR1 expression. Forced over-expression of OLR1 resulted in upregulation of NF-κB (p65) and its target pro-oncogenes involved in inhibition of apoptosis (BCL2, BCL2A1, TNFAIP3) and regulation of cell cycle (CCND2) in both cell lines. Basal expression of FASN, SCD1 and PLA2G4B, as well as lipogenesis transcription factors PPARA, SREBF2 and CREM, was higher in HCC1143 cells. Over-expression of OLR1 in HCC1143 cells also enhanced cell migration, without affecting their adherence to TNFα-activated endothelium or transendothelial migration. On the other hand, OLR1 neutralizing antibody inhibited both adhesion and transmigration of untreated HCC1143 cells. We conclude that OLR1 may act as an oncogene by activation of NF-kB target genes responsible for proliferation, migration and inhibition of apoptosis and de novo lipogenesis genes.

  8. Oxidized LDL receptor 1 (OLR1 as a possible link between obesity, dyslipidemia and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magomed Khaidakov

    Full Text Available Recent studies have linked expression of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor 1 (OLR1 to tumorigenesis. We analyzed microarray data from Olr1 knockout (KO and wild type (WT mice for genes involved in cellular transformation and evaluated effects of OLR1 over-expression in normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A and breast cancer cells (HCC1143 in terms of gene expression, migration, adhesion and transendothelial migration. Twenty-six out of 238 genes were inhibited in tissues of OLR1 KO mice; the vast majority of OLR1 sensitive genes contained NF-κB binding sites in their promoters. Further studies revealed broad inhibition of NF-kB target genes outside of the transformation-associated gene pool, with enrichment themes of defense response, immune response, apoptosis, proliferation, and wound healing. Transcriptome of Olr1 KO mice also revealed inhibition of de novo lipogenesis, rate-limiting enzymes fatty acid synthase (Fasn, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1 and ELOVL family member 6 (Elovl6, as well as lipolytic phospholipase A2 group IVB (Pla2g4b. In studies comparing MCF10A and HCC1143, the latter displayed 60% higher OLR1 expression. Forced over-expression of OLR1 resulted in upregulation of NF-κB (p65 and its target pro-oncogenes involved in inhibition of apoptosis (BCL2, BCL2A1, TNFAIP3 and regulation of cell cycle (CCND2 in both cell lines. Basal expression of FASN, SCD1 and PLA2G4B, as well as lipogenesis transcription factors PPARA, SREBF2 and CREM, was higher in HCC1143 cells. Over-expression of OLR1 in HCC1143 cells also enhanced cell migration, without affecting their adherence to TNFα-activated endothelium or transendothelial migration. On the other hand, OLR1 neutralizing antibody inhibited both adhesion and transmigration of untreated HCC1143 cells. We conclude that OLR1 may act as an oncogene by activation of NF-kB target genes responsible for proliferation, migration and inhibition of apoptosis and de novo lipogenesis genes.

  9. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: emerging links between cardiovascular disease and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although it is known that the central nervous system (CNS) contributes to this relationship, the detailed mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperone sigma-1 receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in the pathophysiology of CVD and depression. Several meta-analysis studies have showed that levels of BDNF in the blood of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are lower than normal controls, indicating that blood BDNF might be a biomarker for depression. Furthermore, blood levels of BDNF in patients with CVD are also lower than normal controls. A recent study using conditional BDNF knock-out mice in animal models of myocardial infarction highlighted the role of CNS-mediated mechanisms in the cardioprotective effects of BDNF. In addition, a recent study shows that decreased levels of sigma-1 receptor in the mouse brain contribute to the association between heart failure and depression. Moreover, sigma-1 receptor agonists, including the endogenous neurosteroid dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine, show potent cardioprotective and antidepressive effects in rodents, via sigma-1 receptor stimulation. Interestingly, agonist activation of sigma-1 receptors increased the secretion of mature BDNF from its precursor proBDNF via chaperone activity in the ER. Given the role of ER stress in the pathophysiology of CVD and MDD, the author will discuss the potential link between sigma-1 receptors and BDNF-TrkB pathway in the pathophysiology of these two diseases. Finally, the author will make a case for potent sigma-1 receptor agonists and TrkB agonists as new potential therapeutic drugs for depressive patients with CVD.

  10. Insulin/glucose induces natriuretic peptide clearance receptor in human adipocytes: a metabolic link with the cardiac natriuretic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordicchia, M; Ceresiani, M; Pavani, M; Minardi, D; Polito, M; Wabitsch, M; Cannone, V; Burnett, J C; Dessì-Fulgheri, P; Sarzani, R

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) are involved in cardiorenal regulation and in lipolysis. The NP activity is largely dependent on the ratio between the signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. Lipolysis increases when NPRC is reduced by starving or very-low-calorie diet. On the contrary, insulin is an antilipolytic hormone that increases sodium retention, suggesting a possible functional link with NP. We examined the insulin-mediated regulation of NP receptors in differentiated human adipocytes and tested the association of NP receptor expression in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with metabolic profiles of patients undergoing renal surgery. Differentiated human adipocytes from VAT and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell line were treated with insulin in the presence of high-glucose or low-glucose media to study NP receptors and insulin/glucose-regulated pathways. Fasting blood samples and VAT samples were taken from patients on the day of renal surgery. We observed a potent insulin-mediated and glucose-dependent upregulation of NPRC, through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, associated with lower lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. No effect was observed on NPRA. Low-glucose medium, used to simulate in vivo starving conditions, hampered the insulin effect on NPRC through modulation of insulin/glucose-regulated pathways, allowing atrial natriuretic peptide to induce lipolysis and thermogenic genes. An expression ratio in favor of NPRC in adipose tissue was associated with higher fasting insulinemia, HOMA-IR, and atherogenic lipid levels. Insulin/glucose-dependent NPRC induction in adipocytes might be a key factor linking hyperinsulinemia, metabolic syndrome, and higher blood pressure by reducing NP effects on adipocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Paradoxical proepileptic response to NMDA receptor blockade linked to cortical interneuron defect in stargazer mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul eMaheshwari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paradoxical seizure exacerbation by antiepileptic medication is a well-known clinical phenomenon in epilepsy, but the cellular mechanisms remain unclear. One possibility is enhanced network disinhibition by unintended suppression of inhibitory interneurons. We investigated this hypothesis in the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy, which bears a mutation in stargazin, an AMPA receptor trafficking protein. If AMPA signaling onto inhibitory GABAergic neurons is impaired, their activation by glutamate depends critically upon NMDA receptors. Indeed, we find that stargazer seizures are exacerbated by NMDA receptor blockade with CPP and MK-801, whereas other genetic absence epilepsy models are sensitive to these antagonists. To determine how an AMPA receptor trafficking defect could lead to paradoxical network activation, we analyzed stargazin and AMPA receptor localization and found that stargazin is detected exclusively in parvalbumin-positive (PV+ fast-spiking interneurons in somatosensory cortex, where it is co-expressed with the AMPA receptor subunit GluA4. PV+ cortical interneurons in stargazer show a near two-fold decrease in the dendrite:soma GluA4 expression ratio compared to wild type littermates. We explored the functional consequence of this trafficking defect on network excitability in neocortical slices. Both NMDA receptor antagonists suppressed 0 Mg2+ induced network discharges in wild type but augmented bursting in stargazer cortex. Interneurons mediate this paradoxical response, since the difference between genotypes was masked by GABA receptor blockade. Our findings provide a cellular locus for AMPA receptor-dependent signaling defects in stargazer cortex and define an interneuron-dependent mechanism for paradoxical seizure exacerbation in absence epilepsy.

  12. Increased rhythmicity in hypertensive arterial smooth muscle is linked to transient receptor potential canonical channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Dachun; Ma, Shuangtao

    2010-01-01

    Vasomotion describes oscillations of arterial vascular tone due to synchronized changes of intracellular calcium concentrations. Since increased calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) has been associated with variances of transient receptor...

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Link between Nuclear Receptor Function and Cholesterol Gallstone Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Carmen Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol gallstone disease is highly prevalent in western countries, particularly in women and some specific ethnic groups. The formation of water-insoluble cholesterol crystals is due to a misbalance between the three major lipids present in the bile: cholesterol, bile salts, and phospholipids. Many proteins implicated in biliary lipid secretion in the liver are regulated by several transcription factors, including nuclear receptors LXR and FXR. Human and murine genetic, physiological, pathophysiological, and pharmacological evidence is consistent with the relevance of these nuclear receptors in gallstone formation. In addition, there is emerging data that also suggests a role for estrogen receptor ESR1 in abnormal cholesterol metabolism leading to gallstone disease. A better comprehension of the role of nuclear receptor function in gallstone formation may help to design new and more effective therapeutic strategies for this highly prevalent disease condition.

  14. Two mutational hotspots in the interleukin-2 receptor {gamma} chain gene causing human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Buckley, R.H. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity, is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene for interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor {gamma} chain (IL2RG). For mutational analysis of IL2RG in males with SCID, SSCP screening was followed by DNA sequencing. Of 40 IL2RG mutations found in unrelated SCID patients, 6 were point mutations at the CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 690-691, encoding amino acid R226. This residue lies in the extracellular domain of the protein in a region not previously recognized to be significantly conserved in the cytokine receptor gene family, 11 amino acids upstream from the highly conserved WSXWS motif. Three additional instances of mutation at another CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 879 produced a premature termination signal in the intracellular domain of IL2RG, resulting in loss of the SH2-homologous intracellular domain known to be essential for signaling from the IL-2 receptor complex. Mutations at these two hotspots constitute >20% of the X-linked SCID mutations found by our group and a similar proportion of all reported IL2RG mutations. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Chemosensory receptors in tsetse flies provide link between chemical and behavioural ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiga, Daniel; Obiero, George; Macharia, Rosaline; Mireji, Paul; Christoffels, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Tsetse flies survive in a variety of environments across tropical Africa, often rising to large numbers, despite their low birth rate of one offspring every seven to nine days. They use olfactory receptors to process chemical signals in their environments to find food, escape from predators, and locate suitable larviposition sites. We discuss the identification of odorant and gustatory receptors in Glossina morsitans morsitans and the role genomics could play in management of nuisance insects.

  16. Linking ligand perception by PEPR pattern recognition receptors to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and downstream immune signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Walker, Robin K; Zhao, Yichen; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2012-11-27

    Little is known about molecular steps linking perception of pathogen invasion by cell surface sentry proteins acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to downstream cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, a critical step in plant immune signaling cascades. Some PRRs recognize molecules (such as flagellin) associated with microbial pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs), whereas others bind endogenous plant compounds (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) such as peptides released from cells upon attack. This work focuses on the Arabidopsis DAMPs plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors, PEPR1 and PEPR2. Pep application causes in vivo cGMP generation and downstream signaling that is lost when the predicted PEPR receptor guanylyl cyclase (GC) active site is mutated. Pep-induced Ca(2+) elevation is attributable to cGMP activation of a Ca(2+) channel. Some differences were identified between Pep/PEPR signaling and the Ca(2+)-dependent immune signaling initiated by the flagellin peptide flg22 and its cognate receptor Flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2). FLS2 signaling may have a greater requirement for intracellular Ca(2+) stores and inositol phosphate signaling, whereas Pep/PEPR signaling requires extracellular Ca(2+). Maximal FLS2 signaling requires a functional Pep/PEPR system. This dependence was evidenced as a requirement for functional PEPR receptors for maximal flg22-dependent Ca(2+) elevation, H(2)O(2) generation, defense gene [WRKY33 and Plant Defensin 1.2 (PDF1.2)] expression, and flg22/FLS2-dependent impairment of pathogen growth. In a corresponding fashion, FLS2 loss of function impaired Pep signaling. In addition, a role for PAMP and DAMP perception in bolstering effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is reported; loss of function of either FLS2 or PEPR receptors impaired the hypersensitive response (HR) to an avirulent pathogen.

  17. Adiponectin and its receptors in the ovary: further evidence for a link between obesity and hyperandrogenism in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comim, Fabio V; Hardy, Kate; Franks, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), characterized by ovarian androgen excess, is the commonest endocrine disorder in women. Obesity increases androgen synthesis, a phenomenon attributed to the accompanying hyperinsulinemia. Our hypothesis was that adipokines, fat cell-derived hormones, play a direct role in modulating ovarian androgen secretion. Therefore, the aims of this study were to explore the effects of adipokines (in particular, adiponectin) on ovarian steroidogenesis and compare the expression of adiponectin receptors in ovaries from women with and without PCO. Sections of archived human ovaries (nine from women with normal ovaries and 16 with PCOS, classified histologically, with reference to menstrual history and ultrasound) were analysed by quantitative morphometry and the proportion of positive-labelling cells compared. In addition, studies of androgen production in relation to adipokine function in primary bovine theca cell culture were also performed. A significantly lower proportion of theca cells expressed adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (AdipoR1, AdipoR2) in polycystic ovaries than in normal ovaries. In cultured theca cells, adiponectin suppressed androstenedione production and gene expression of LH receptor and key enzymes in the androgen synthesis pathway. Moreover, knockdown of genes for AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 was associated with increased androstenedione secretion by bovine theca cells. These results provide evidence for a direct link between fat cell metabolism and ovarian steroidogenesis, suggesting that disruption of adiponectin and/or its receptors plays a key role in pathogenesis of hyperandrogenism in PCOS.

  18. Central Serotonin-2A (5-HT2A Receptor Dysfunction in Depression and Epilepsy: The Missing Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pierre Guiard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A receptors (5-HT2A-Rs are G-protein coupled receptors. In agreement with their location in the brain, they have been implicated not only in various central physiological functions including memory, sleep, nociception, eating and reward behaviors, but also in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Interestingly, a bidirectional link between depression and epilepsy is suspected since patients with depression and especially suicide attempters have an increased seizure risk, while a significant percentage of epileptic patients suffer from depression. Such epidemiological data led us to hypothesize that both pathologies may share common anatomical and neurobiological alteration of the 5-HT2A signaling. After a brief presentation of the pharmacological properties of the 5-HT2A-Rs, this review illustrates how these receptors may directly or indirectly control neuronal excitability in most networks involved in depression and epilepsy through interactions with the monoaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmissions. It also synthetizes the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating the role of these receptors in antidepressant and antiepileptic responses.

  19. Dopamine D1-histamine H3 receptor heteromers provide a selective link to MAPK signaling in GABAergic neurons of the direct striatal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Hoffmann, Hanne; Gonzalez-Sepúlveda, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Vignes, Michel; McCormick, Peter J; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Moratalla, Rosario; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Franco, Rafael

    2011-02-18

    Previously, using artificial cell systems, we identified receptor heteromers between the dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptors and the histamine H(3) receptor. In addition, we demonstrated two biochemical characteristics of the dopamine D(1) receptor-histamine H(3) receptor heteromer. We have now extended this work to show the dopamine D(1) receptor-histamine H(3) receptor heteromer exists in the brain and serves to provide a novel link between the MAPK pathway and the GABAergic neurons in the direct striatal efferent pathway. Using the biochemical characteristics identified previously, we found that the ability of H(3) receptor activation to stimulate p44 and p42 extracellular signal-regulated MAPK (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation was only observed in striatal slices of mice expressing D(1) receptors but not in D(1) receptor-deficient mice. On the other hand, the ability of both D(1) and H(3) receptor antagonists to block MAPK activation induced by either D(1) or H(3) receptor agonists was also found in striatal slices. Taken together, these data indicate the occurrence of D(1)-H(3) receptor complexes in the striatum and, more importantly, that H(3) receptor agonist-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in striatal slices is mediated by D(1)-H(3) receptor heteromers. Moreover, H(3) receptor-mediated phospho-ERK 1/2 labeling co-distributed with D(1) receptor-containing but not with D(2) receptor-containing striatal neurons. These results indicate that D(1)-H(3) receptor heteromers work as processors integrating dopamine- and histamine-related signals involved in controlling the function of striatal neurons of the direct striatal pathway.

  20. A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO THE DETECTION OF ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE-MUTATIONS AND PEDIGREE ANALYSIS IN FAMILIES WITH X-LINKED ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RISSTALPERS, C; HOOGENBOEZEM, T; SLEDDENS, HFBM; VERLEUNMOOIJMAN, MCT; DEGENHART, HJ; DROP, SLS; HALLEY, DJJ; Oosterwijk, Jan; HODGINS, MB; TRAPMAN, J; BRINKMANN, AO

    1994-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked disorder in which defects in the androgen receptor gene have prevented the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46,XY individuals. This survey reports the analysis of 11 AIS subjects. The androgen receptor gene of th

  1. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra;

    2016-01-01

    of the TNF-RSC The predicted PUB domain in the N-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with the USP domain of CYLD, whereas the C-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with HOIP SPATA2 is required for recruitment of CYLD to the TNF-RSC Downregulation of SPATA2 augments transcriptional activation of NF-κB and inhibits TNF......TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry...... to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component...

  2. Mapping a molecular link between allosteric inhibition and activation of the glycine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul S; Topf, Maya; Smart, Trevor G

    2008-10-01

    Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels mediate rapid neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system. They possess agonist recognition sites and allosteric sites where modulators regulate ion channel function. Using strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, we identified a scaffold of hydrophobic residues enabling allosteric communication between glycine-agonist binding loops A and D, and the Zn(2+)-inhibition site. Mutating these hydrophobic residues disrupted Zn(2+) inhibition, generating novel Zn(2+)-activated receptors and spontaneous channel activity. Homology modeling and electrophysiology revealed that these phenomena are caused by disruption to three residues on the '-' loop face of the Zn(2+)-inhibition site, and to D84 and D86, on a neighboring beta3 strand, forming a Zn(2+)-activation site. We provide a new view for the activation of a Cys-loop receptor where, following agonist binding, the hydrophobic core and interfacial loops reorganize in a concerted fashion to induce downstream gating.

  3. Multiresidue Method for Analysis of β Agonists in Swine Urine by Enzyme Linked Receptor Assay Based on β2 Adrenergic Receptor Expressed in HEK293 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available A novel enzyme-linked receptor assay (ELRA based on β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR has been developed for rapid and high-throughput detection of β-adrenergic agonists (β-agonists in urine. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293 were introduced as the expression system to enhance the functionality of the recombinant β2-AR, and the attempt to detect β-agonists in swine urine using such approaches was accomplished unprecedentedly. In this article, a recombinant porcine β2-AR was produced in the inner membrane of HEK293 cells and purified from crude membrane protein by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. After activity identification, the recombinant receptor was used in the development of direct competitive ELRA. Several parameters such as blocking buffer and blocking process were optimized and the performance of the system was determined. The IC50 concentrations of clenbuterol, salbutamol, and ractopamine were 34, 53 and 63 μg/L, and the average recovery rates were 68.2%, 60.3% and 65.5%, respectively. ELRA based on β2-AR shows a series of advantages such as safety, easy operation, and high efficiency, making it promising for the rapid screening of β-agonists in animal urine.

  4. The C-terminus of human nucleotide receptor P2X7 is critical for receptor oligomerization and N-linked glycosylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa E Wickert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The P2X7 receptor binds extracellular ATP to mediate numerous inflammatory responses and is considered a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for diverse inflammatory and neurological diseases. P2X7 contains many single nucleotide polymorphisms, including several mutations located within its intracellular C-terminal trafficking domain. Mutations within the trafficking domain result in attenuated receptor activity and cell surface presentation, but the mechanisms by which amino acid changes within this region promote altered P2X7 function have not been elucidated. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the amino acid sequence of P2X7 for any potential trafficking signals and found that P2X7 contains putative Arg-X-Arg ER retention sequences. Alanine substitutions near or within these sequences were constructed, and we determined that single mutation of R574 and R578 but not R576 or K579 attenuates P2X7-stimulated activation of ERK1/2 and induction of the transcription factors FosB and ΔFosB. We found that mutation of R578 within the trafficking domain to the naturally occurring Gln substitution disrupts P2X7 localization at the plasma membrane and results in R578Q displaying a higher apparent molecular weight in comparison to wild-type receptor. We used the glycosidase endoglycosidase H to determine that this difference in mass is due in part to the R578Q mutant possessing a larger mass of oligosaccharides, indicative of improper N-linked glycosylation addition and/or trimming. Chemical cross-linking experiments were also performed and suggest that the R578Q variant also does not form trimers as well as wild-type receptor, a function required for its full activity. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the distal C-terminus of P2X7 is important for oligomerization and post-translational modification of the receptor, providing a mechanism by which mutations in the trafficking domain disrupt P2X7 activity and localization at the plasma

  5. Lactate Receptor Sites Link Neurotransmission, Neurovascular Coupling, and Brain Energy Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Morland, Cecilie; Puchades, Maja;

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled lactate receptor, GPR81 (HCA1), is known to promote lipid storage in adipocytes by downregulating cAMP levels. Here, we show that GPR81 is also present in the mammalian brain, including regions of the cerebral neocortex and hippocampus, where it can be activated by physiolog......The G-protein-coupled lactate receptor, GPR81 (HCA1), is known to promote lipid storage in adipocytes by downregulating cAMP levels. Here, we show that GPR81 is also present in the mammalian brain, including regions of the cerebral neocortex and hippocampus, where it can be activated...

  6. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2016-09-01

    TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component of the TNF-RSC The predicted PUB domain in the N-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with the USP domain of CYLD, whereas the C-terminus of SPATA2 interacts with HOIP SPATA2 is required for recruitment of CYLD to the TNF-RSC Downregulation of SPATA2 augments transcriptional activation of NF-κB and inhibits TNF-α-induced necroptosis, pointing to an important function of SPATA2 in modulating the outcomes of TNF-α signaling. Taken together, our study draws a detailed map of TNF-α signaling, identifies SPATA2 as a novel component of TNF-α signaling, and provides a rich resource for further functional investigations.

  7. Serotonin and the 5-HT7 receptor: the link between hepatocytes, IGF-1 and small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svejda, Bernhard; Kidd, Mark; Timberlake, Andrew; Harry, Kathy; Kazberouk, Alexander; Schimmack, Simon; Lawrence, Ben; Pfragner, Roswitha; Modlin, Irvin M

    2013-07-01

    Platelet-derived serotonin (5-HT) is involved in liver regeneration. The liver is also the metastatic site for malignant enterochromaffin (EC) cell "carcinoid" (neuroendocrine) neoplasms, the principal cellular source of 5-HT. We hypothesized that 5-HT produced by metastatic EC cells played a role in the hepatic tumor-microenvironment principally via 5-HT₇ receptor-mediated activation of hepatocyte IGF-1 synthesis and secretion. Using isolated rat hepatocytes, we evaluated 5-HT₇ receptor expression (using PCR, sequencing and western blot). ELISA, cell transfection and western blots delineated 5-HT-mediated signaling pathways (pCREB, AKT and ERK). IGF-1 synthesis/secretion was evaluated using QPCR and ELISA. IGF-1 was tested on small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasm proliferation, while IGF-1 production and 5-HT₇ expression were examined in an in vivo SCID metastasis model. Our results demonstrated evidence for a functional 5-HT₇ receptor. 5-HT activated cAMP/PKA activity, pCREB (130-205%, P < 0.05) and pERK/pAKT (1.2-1.75, P < 0.05). Signaling was reversed by the 5-HT₇ receptor antagonist SB269970. IGF-1 significantly stimulated proliferation of two small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasm cell lines (EC₅₀: 7-70 pg/mL) and could be reversed by the small molecule inhibitor BMS-754807. IGF-1 and 5-HT were elevated (40-300×) in peri-tumoral hepatic tissue in nude mice, while 5-HT₇ was increased fourfold compared to sham-operated animals. We conclude that hepatocytes express a cAMP-coupled 5-HT₇ receptor, which, at elevated 5-HT concentrations that occur in liver metastases, signals via CREB/AKT and is linked to IGF-1 synthesis and secretion. Because IGF-1 regulates NEN proliferation, identification of a role for 5-HT₇ in the hepatic metastatic tumor microenvironment suggests the potential for novel therapeutic strategies for amine-producing mid-gut tumors.

  8. Recombinant T-cell receptors : An immunologic link to cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calogero, A; de Leij, YFMH; Mulder, NH; Hospers, GAP

    2000-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells can specifically kill target cells that express antigens recognized by the T-cell receptor. These are membrane-bound proteins that are not ubiquitous and thus are difficult to purify and study at the protein level. The advent of recombinant DNA technology has facilitated these obje

  9. Amisulpride-induced seizurogenic effect: a potential role of opioid receptor-linked transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Thakur Gurjeet; Chand, Prem

    2011-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of opioid receptors, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, mast cells and histamine receptors (H(1) subtype) in the seizurogenic effect of amisulpride on mice. A single injection of amisulpride (180 mg/kg) was employed to evaluate the seizurogenicity of the drug in mice. Seizures were assessed in terms of a composite seizure severity score (SSS), time of the onset of straub-like tail, onset of jerky movements of whole body, convulsions and death. Amisulpride administration (180 mg/kg) induced a significant pro-convulsant effect in mice as measured in terms of the SSS (21.12 ± 2.71) and a significant decrease in the time latency of the onset of straub-like tail (132.45 ± 12.31), jerky movements of whole body (153.28 ± 14.12), convulsions (184.97 ± 13.11) and death (100%). Moreover, prior administration of naloxone, cetrizine, sodium cromoglycate and gabapentin, respectively, attenuated this seizurogenic activity that amisulpride exerted on mice (p amisulpride exerts a seizurogenic effect on mice possibly via an opioid receptor activation-dependent release of histamine from the mast cells and a simultaneous inhibition of GABA release.

  10. Linking structure to function: Recent lessons from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, David I; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Joseph, Suresh K

    2010-06-01

    Great insight has been gained into the structure and function of the inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor (InsP(3)R) by studies employing mutagenesis of the cDNA encoding the receptor. Notably, early studies using this approach defined the key constituents required for InsP(3) binding in the N-terminus and the membrane spanning regions in the C-terminal domain responsible for channel formation, targeting and function. In this article we evaluate recent studies which have used a similar approach to investigate key residues underlying the in vivo modulation by select regulatory factors. In addition, we review studies defining the structural requirements in the channel domain which comprise the conduction pathway and are suggested to be involved in the gating of the channel.

  11. Functional link between ETB receptors and eNOS maintain tissue oxygenation in the normal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxian, Markus; Keller, Steve A; Baveja, Rajiv; Korneszczuk, Katarzyna; Huynh, Toan T; Clemens, Mark G

    2004-01-01

    Endothelins and their receptors play a crucial role in regulating liver microcirculation in pathophysiological conditions. The authors investigated the functional significance of the coupling of ET(B) receptors and eNOS in maintaining regional perfusion and tissue oxygenation in the normal liver. The effect of endothelin-1 or the ET(B) agonist IRL1620 on oxygen consumption was determined in isolated perfused liver and isolated hepatocytes. Oxygen delivery to the liver tissue was determined in vivo. Following eNOS or iNOS blockade, either ET-1 or IRL1620 was infused via the portal vein. Hepatic tissue oxygenation, redox state, and microcirculation were investigated by intravital microscopy. Injury was estimated by serum LDH. Although IRL1620 and endothelin-1 increased oxygen consumption in isolated hepatocytes, in intact liver, endothelin decreased oxygen consumption while IRL1620 produced no change. In vivo, ET(B) stimulation modestly altered hepatic tissue P(O(2)), redox potential, and microcirculation. eNOS inhibition and ET(B) activation dramatically reduced microcirculatory blood flow, oxygen supply, and increased LDH release. Inhibition of iNOS resulted in small but not significant changes in these parameters. Concomitant ET(A)/ET(B) receptor activation increased microcirculatory failure and decreased tissue oxygen even without NOS inhibition. In contrast, hepatocellular injury was significantly increased following eNOS inhibition. Coupling between ET(B) receptor stimulation and eNOS activation decreases sinusoidal constriction and plays a functionally important role in maintaining microcirculation and tissue oxygenation in the normal liver.

  12. Identification of Novel G Protein-Coupled Receptor 143 Ligands as Pharmacologic Tools for Investigating X-Linked Ocular Albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Manga, Prashiela; Schiedel, Anke C

    2017-06-01

    GPR143 regulates melanosome biogenesis and organelle size in pigment cells. The mechanisms underlying receptor function remain unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are excellent pharmacologic targets; thus, we developed and applied a screening approach to identify potential GPR143 ligands and chemical modulators. GPR143 interacts with β-arrestin; we therefore established a β-arrestin recruitment assay to screen for compounds that modulate activity. Because GPR143 is localized intracellularly, screening with the wild-type receptor would be restricted to agents absorbed by the cell. For the screen we used a mutant receptor, which shows similar basal activity as the wild type but traffics to the plasma membrane. We tested two compound libraries and investigated validated hits for their effects on melanocyte pigmentation. GPR143, which showed high constitutive activity in the β-arrestin assay, was inhibited by several compounds. The three validated inhibitors (pimozide, niclosamide, and ethacridine lactate) were assessed for impact on melanocytes. Pigmentation and expression of tyrosinase, a key melanogenic enzyme, were reduced by all compounds. Because GPR143 appears to be constitutively active, these compounds may turn off its activity. X-linked ocular albinism type I, characterized by developmental eye defects, results from GPR143 mutations. Identifying pharmacologic agents that modulate GPR143 activity will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function and provide novel tools with which to study GPCRs in melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. Pimozide, one of three GPR143 inhibitors identified in this study, maybe be a good lead structure for development of more potent compounds and provide a platform for design of novel therapeutic agents.

  13. Identification of Novel G Protein–Coupled Receptor 143 Ligands as Pharmacologic Tools for Investigating X-Linked Ocular Albinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Manga, Prashiela; Schiedel, Anke C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose GPR143 regulates melanosome biogenesis and organelle size in pigment cells. The mechanisms underlying receptor function remain unclear. G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are excellent pharmacologic targets; thus, we developed and applied a screening approach to identify potential GPR143 ligands and chemical modulators. Methods GPR143 interacts with β-arrestin; we therefore established a β-arrestin recruitment assay to screen for compounds that modulate activity. Because GPR143 is localized intracellularly, screening with the wild-type receptor would be restricted to agents absorbed by the cell. For the screen we used a mutant receptor, which shows similar basal activity as the wild type but traffics to the plasma membrane. We tested two compound libraries and investigated validated hits for their effects on melanocyte pigmentation. Results GPR143, which showed high constitutive activity in the β-arrestin assay, was inhibited by several compounds. The three validated inhibitors (pimozide, niclosamide, and ethacridine lactate) were assessed for impact on melanocytes. Pigmentation and expression of tyrosinase, a key melanogenic enzyme, were reduced by all compounds. Because GPR143 appears to be constitutively active, these compounds may turn off its activity. Conclusions X-linked ocular albinism type I, characterized by developmental eye defects, results from GPR143 mutations. Identifying pharmacologic agents that modulate GPR143 activity will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function and provide novel tools with which to study GPCRs in melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. Pimozide, one of three GPR143 inhibitors identified in this study, maybe be a good lead structure for development of more potent compounds and provide a platform for design of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:28632878

  14. Reduced retinoids and retinoid receptors' expression in pancreatic cancer: A link to patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleul, Tim; Rühl, Ralph; Bulashevska, Svetlana; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents one of the deadliest cancers in the world. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is the major physiologically active form of vitamin A, regulating expression of many genes. Disturbances of vitamin A metabolism are prevalent in some cancer cells. The main aim of this work was to investigate deeply the components of retinoid signaling in PDAC compared to in the normal pancreas and to prove the clinical importance of retinoid receptor expression. For the study, human tumor tissues obtained from PDAC patients and murine tumors from the orthotopic Panc02 model were used for the analysis of retinoids, using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and real-time RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Survival probabilities in univariate analysis were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis. In this work, we showed for the first time that the ATRA and all-trans retinol concentration is reduced in PDAC tissue compared to their normal counterparts. The expression of RARα and β as well as RXRα and β are down-regulated in PDAC tissue. This reduced expression of retinoid receptors correlates with the expression of some markers of differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as of cancer stem cell markers. Importantly, the expression of RARα and RXRβ is associated with better overall survival of PDAC patients. Thus, reduction of retinoids and their receptors is an important feature of PDAC and is associated with worse patient survival outcomes.

  15. A genome wide association study links glutamate receptor pathway to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Bishop, Matthew T; Kovacs, Gabor G; Calero, Miguel; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Ladogana, Anna; Boyd, Alison; Lewis, Victoria; Ponto, Claudia; Calero, Olga; Poleggi, Anna; Carracedo, Ángel; van der Lee, Sven J; Ströbel, Thomas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Haïk, Stéphane; Combarros, Onofre; Berciano, José; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Collins, Steven J; Budka, Herbert; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean Louis; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Zerr, Inga; Knight, Richard S G; Will, Robert G; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2014-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9) a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP); and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8) tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8). Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967). The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8) and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5) remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis.

  16. A genome wide association study links glutamate receptor pathway to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascual Sanchez-Juan

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-wide association (GWA study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9 a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP; and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8 tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8. Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967. The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8 and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5 remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis.

  17. Unexpected novel relational links uncovered by extensive developmental profiling of nuclear receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Bertrand

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are transcription factors that are implicated in several biological processes such as embryonic development, homeostasis, and metabolic diseases. To study the role of NRs in development, it is critically important to know when and where individual genes are expressed. Although systematic expression studies using reverse transcriptase PCR and/or DNA microarrays have been performed in classical model systems such as Drosophila and mouse, no systematic atlas describing NR involvement during embryonic development on a global scale has been assembled. Adopting a systems biology approach, we conducted a systematic analysis of the dynamic spatiotemporal expression of all NR genes as well as their main transcriptional coregulators during zebrafish development (101 genes using whole-mount in situ hybridization. This extensive dataset establishes overlapping expression patterns among NRs and coregulators, indicating hierarchical transcriptional networks. This complete developmental profiling provides an unprecedented examination of expression of NRs during embryogenesis, uncovering their potential function during central nervous system and retina formation. Moreover, our study reveals that tissue specificity of hormone action is conferred more by the receptors than by their coregulators. Finally, further evolutionary analyses of this global resource led us to propose that neofunctionalization of duplicated genes occurs at the levels of both protein sequence and RNA expression patterns. Altogether, this expression database of NRs provides novel routes for leading investigation into the biological function of each individual NR as well as for the study of their combinatorial regulatory circuitry within the superfamily.

  18. Unexpected novel relational links uncovered by extensive developmental profiling of nuclear receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Bertrand

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are transcription factors that are implicated in several biological processes such as embryonic development, homeostasis, and metabolic diseases. To study the role of NRs in development, it is critically important to know when and where individual genes are expressed. Although systematic expression studies using reverse transcriptase PCR and/or DNA microarrays have been performed in classical model systems such as Drosophila and mouse, no systematic atlas describing NR involvement during embryonic development on a global scale has been assembled. Adopting a systems biology approach, we conducted a systematic analysis of the dynamic spatiotemporal expression of all NR genes as well as their main transcriptional coregulators during zebrafish development (101 genes using whole-mount in situ hybridization. This extensive dataset establishes overlapping expression patterns among NRs and coregulators, indicating hierarchical transcriptional networks. This complete developmental profiling provides an unprecedented examination of expression of NRs during embryogenesis, uncovering their potential function during central nervous system and retina formation. Moreover, our study reveals that tissue specificity of hormone action is conferred more by the receptors than by their coregulators. Finally, further evolutionary analyses of this global resource led us to propose that neofunctionalization of duplicated genes occurs at the levels of both protein sequence and RNA expression patterns. Altogether, this expression database of NRs provides novel routes for leading investigation into the biological function of each individual NR as well as for the study of their combinatorial regulatory circuitry within the superfamily.

  19. A multi-repeat adhesin of the phytopathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum, is secreted by a Type I pathway and is subject to complex regulation involving a non-canonical diguanylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Humphris, Sonia; Campbell, Emma; Welch, Martin; Toth, Ian K; Salmond, George P C

    2011-11-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger controlling many important bacterial processes. The phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 (Pba1043) possesses a Type I secretion system (T1SS) essential for the secretion of a proteinaceous multi-repeat adhesin (MRP) required for binding to the host plant. The genes encoding the MRP and the T1SS are tightly linked to genes encoding several putative c-di-GMP regulatory components. We show that c-di-GMP regulates secreted MRP levels in Pba1043 through the action of two genes encoding predicted diguanylate cyclase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase proteins (ECA3270 and ECA3271). Phenotypic analyses and quantification of c-di-GMP levels demonstrated that ECA3270 and ECA3271 regulate secreted MRP levels by increasing and decreasing, respectively, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP. Moreover, ECA3270 represents the first active DGC reported to have an alternative active-site motif from the 'canonical' GG[D/E]EF. ECA3270 has an A-site motif of SGDEF and analysis of single amino acid replacements demonstrated that the first position of this motif can tolerate functional substitution. Serine in position one of the A-site is also observed in many other DGCs. Finally, another T1SS-linked regulator (ECA3265) also plays an important role in regulating secreted MRP, with an altered localization of MRP observed in an ECA3265 mutant background. Mutants defective in these three T1SS-linked regulators exhibit a reduction in root binding and virulence, confirming that this complex, finely tuned regulation system is crucial in the interaction with host plants.

  20. TIF1alpha: a possible link between KRAB zinc finger proteins and nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Douarin, B; You, J; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    1998-01-01

    Ligand-induced gene activation by nuclear receptors (NRs) is thought to be mediated by transcriptional intermediary factors (TIFs), that interact with their ligand-dependent AF-2 activating domain. Included in the group of the putative AF-2 TIFs identified so far is TIF1alpha, a member of a new...... family of proteins which contains an N-terminal RBCC (RING finger-B boxes-coiled coil) motif and a C-terminal bromodomain preceded by a PHD finger. In addition to these conserved domains present in a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins, TIF1alpha was found to contain several protein......-protein interaction sites. Of these, one specifically interacts with NRs bound to their agonistic ligand and not with NR mutants that are defective in the AF-2 activity. Immediately adjacent to this 'NR box', TIF1alpha contains an interaction site for members of the chromatin organization modifier (chromo) family, HP...

  1. Quantitation of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, E; Behrendt, N; Ploug, M;

    1994-01-01

    variant of uPAR, suPAR, has been constructed by recombinant technique and the protein content of a purified suPAR standard preparation was determined by amino acid composition analysis. The sensitivity of the assay (0.6 ng uPAR/ml) is strong enough to measure uPAR in extracts of cultured cells and cancer......Binding of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) to a specific cell surface receptor (uPAR) plays a crucial role in proteolysis during tissue remodelling and cancer invasion. An immunosorbent assay for the quantitation of uPAR has now been developed. This assay is based on two monoclonal...... tissue. Recent studies have shown that a high uPA level in tumor extracts is in some cancers associated with poor prognosis. The present assay will now allow similar prognostic studies of uPAR levels....

  2. Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels and Their Link with Cardio/Cerebro-Vascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiong; Liu, Hui-Xia; Shen, Kuo; Cao, Wei; Li, Xiao-Qiang

    2017-03-10

    The canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) constitute a series of nonselective cation channels with variable degrees of Ca²⁺ selectivity. TRPCs consist of seven mammalian members, TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7, which are further divided into four subtypes, TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC4/5, and TRPC3/6/7. These channels take charge of various essential cell functions such as contraction, relaxation, proliferation, and dysfunction. This review, organized into seven main sections, will provide an overview of current knowledge about the underlying pathogenesis of TRPCs in cardio/cerebrovascular diseases, including hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, arrhythmia, and cerebrovascular ischemia reperfusion injury. Collectively, TRPCs could become a group of drug targets with important physiological functions for the therapy of human cardio/cerebro-vascular diseases.

  3. Sex-linked pheromone receptor genes of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, are in tandem arrays.

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    Yuji Yasukochi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuning of the olfactory system of male moths to conspecific female sex pheromones is crucial for correct species recognition; however, little is known about the genetic changes that drive speciation in this system. Moths of the genus Ostrinia are good models to elucidate this question, since significant differences in pheromone blends are observed within and among species. Odorant receptors (ORs play a critical role in recognition of female sex pheromones; eight types of OR genes expressed in male antennae were previously reported in Ostrinia moths. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened an O. nubilalis bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library by PCR, and constructed three contigs from isolated clones containing the reported OR genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis using these clones as probes demonstrated that the largest contig, which contained eight OR genes, was located on the Z chromosome; two others harboring two and one OR genes were found on two autosomes. Sequence determination of BAC clones revealed the Z-linked OR genes were closely related and tandemly arrayed; moreover, four of them shared 181-bp direct repeats spanning exon 7 and intron 7. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of tandemly arrayed sex pheromone receptor genes in Lepidoptera. The localization of an OR gene cluster on the Z chromosome agrees with previous findings for a Z-linked locus responsible for O. nubilalis male behavioral response to sex pheromone. The 181-bp direct repeats might enhance gene duplications by unequal crossovers. An autosomal locus responsible for male response to sex pheromone in Heliothis virescens and H. subflexa was recently reported to contain at least four OR genes. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that generation of additional copies of OR genes can increase the potential for male moths to acquire altered specificity for pheromone components, and accordingly

  4. The Gs-linked receptor GPR3 inhibits the proliferation of cerebellar granule cells during postnatal development.

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    Shigeru Tanaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During postnatal murine and rodent cerebellar development, cerebellar granule precursors (CGP gradually stop proliferating as they differentiate after migration to the internal granule layer (IGL. Molecular events that govern this program remain to be fully elucidated. GPR3 belongs to a family of Gs-linked receptors that activate cyclic AMP and are abundantly expressed in the adult brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the role of this orphan receptor in CGP differentiation, we determined that exogenous GPR3 expression in rat cerebellar granule neurons partially antagonized the proliferative effect of Sonic hedgehog (Shh, while endogenous GPR3 inhibition by siRNA stimulated Shh-induced CGP proliferation. In addition, exogenous GPR3 expression in CGPs correlated with increased p27/kip expression, while GPR3 knock-down led to a decrease in p27/kip expression. In wild-type mice, GPR3 expression increased postnatally and its expression was concentrated in the internal granular layer (IGL. In GPR3 -/- mice, the IGL was widened with increased proliferation of CGPs, as measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Cell cycle kinetics of GPR3-transfected medulloblastoma cells revealed a G0/G1 block, consistent with cell cycle exit. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results thus indicate that GPR3 is a novel antiproliferative mediator of CGPs in the postnatal development of murine cerebellum.

  5. MHC-dependent mate choice is linked to a trace-amine-associated receptor gene in a mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pablo S C; Courtiol, Alexandre; Heidel, Andrew J; Höner, Oliver P; Heckmann, Ilja; Nagy, Martina; Mayer, Frieder; Platzer, Matthias; Voigt, Christian C; Sommer, Simone

    2016-12-12

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a pivotal role in vertebrate self/nonself recognition, parasite resistance and life history decisions. In evolutionary terms, the MHC's exceptional diversity is likely maintained by sexual and pathogen-driven selection. Even though MHC-dependent mating preferences have been confirmed for many species, the sensory and genetic mechanisms underlying mate recognition remain cryptic. Since olfaction is crucial for social communication in vertebrates, variation in chemosensory receptor genes could explain MHC-dependent mating patterns. Here, we investigated whether female mate choice is based on MHC alleles and linked to variation in chemosensory trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs) in the greater sac-winged bat (Saccopteryx bilineata). We sequenced several MHC and TAAR genes and related their variation to mating and paternity data. We found strong evidence for MHC class I-dependent female choice for genetically diverse and dissimilar males. We also detected a significant interaction between mate choice and the female TAAR3 genotype, with TAAR3-heterozygous females being more likely to choose MHC-diverse males. These results suggest that TAARs and olfactory cues may be key mediators in mammalian MHC-dependent mate choice. Our study may help identify the ligands involved in the chemical communication between potential mates.

  6. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration.

  7. The vasopressin receptor of the blood-brain barrier in the rat hippocampus is linked to calcium signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, J.; Jensen, Claus V.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2......Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2...

  8. A hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine alpha 7-containing receptor complex is linked to memory retrieval in the multiple-T-maze in C57BL/6j mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Heo, Seok; Patil, Sudarshan; Li, Lin; Hoger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2014-08-15

    The link between the cholinergic and serotonergic system in cognitive function is well-documented. There is, however, limited information on spatial memory and this formed the rationale to carry out a study with the aim to show a specific link between nicotinic and serotonergic receptor complexes rather than the corresponding subunits, to spatial memory retrieval in a land maze. A total of 46 mice were used and divided into two groups, trained and untrained (yoked) in the multiple-T-Maze (MTM) and following training during the first four days, probe trials for memory retrieval were performed on days 8, 16 and 30. Six hours following scarification, hippocampi were taken for the analysis of native receptor complex levels using blue-native gels followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies. 5-HT1A-, 5-HT7-, nAChα4- and nACh-α7-containing receptor complexes were observed and were paralleling memory retrievals and receptor complex levels were shown to be significantly different between trained and yoked animals. Only levels of a nicotinic acetylcholine α7 receptor-containing complex at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 480kDa were shown to be linked to memory retrieval on day 8 but not to retrievals on days 16 and 30 when memory extinction has taken place. Correlation between nAChα4-, 5-HT1A- and 5-HT7-containing receptors and latencies on day 16 may point to a probable link in extinction mechanisms. A series of the abovementioned receptor complexes were correlating among each other probably indicating a serotonergic/cholinergic network paralleling spatial memory formation.

  9. Evaluation of the effect of c-di-GMP on acidogenicity and aciduricity of Streptococcus mutans%外源性C-di-GMP对变形链球菌产酸、耐酸能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫文娟; 吴补领; 屈铁军; 高杰; 赵红萍; 苏凌云; 余擎

    2009-01-01

    目的:初步探讨外源性c-di-GMP对变形链球菌产酸、耐酸能力的影响.方法:外源性c-di-GMP与生理盐水分别加入至含变形链球菌UA159菌液的BHI培养基中,比较两组对变形链球菌产酸、耐酸能力的影响.结果:c-di-GMP处理组与生理盐水组相比,产酸、耐酸能力明显下降,差异有统计学意义,经t检验,P<0.05.结论:c-di-GMP可以抑制变形链球菌的产酸、耐酸能力,可以单独也可以与其它的抗龋制剂联合应用控制龋病.

  10. Succinate receptor GPR91 provides a direct link between high glucose levels and renin release in murine and rabbit kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Ildikó; Kang, Jung Julie; Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah; Bansal, Eric; Hanner, Fiona; Meer, Elliott; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2008-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common and rapidly growing cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. A classic hallmark of early diabetes mellitus includes activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which may lead to hypertension and renal tissue injury, but the mechanism of RAS activation is elusive. Here we identified a paracrine signaling pathway in the kidney in which high levels of glucose directly triggered the release of the prohypertensive hormone renin. The signaling cascade involved the local accumulation of succinate and activation of the kidney-specific G protein-coupled metabolic receptor, GPR91, in the glomerular endothelium as observed in rat, mouse, and rabbit kidney sections. Elements of signal transduction included endothelial Ca2+, the production of NO and prostaglandin (PGE2), and their paracrine actions on adjacent renin-producing cells. This GPR91 signaling cascade may serve to modulate kidney function and help remove metabolic waste products through renal hyperfiltration, and it could also link metabolic diseases, such as diabetes, or metabolic syndrome with RAS overactivation, systemic hypertension, and organ injury.

  11. Analysis of the CAG repeat region of the androgen receptor gene in a kindred with X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsham, D D; Yee, W C; Greenberg, C R; Wrogemann, K

    1992-10-01

    Herein we describe a family with X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA or Kennedy's disease), an adult onset neuromuscular disease characterized by slow progression, predominant proximal and bulbar muscle weakness. One frequent association is the appearance of gynecomastia. This disorder was previously shown to be linked to the locus DXYS1 on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Recently, a report implicated a mutation at the N-terminus of the androgen receptor gene involving amplification of CAG repeats as the cause of X-linked SBMA. We studied this region of the androgen receptor in a kindred clinically suspected but not confirmed of having X-linked SBMA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by Southern analysis and DNA sequencing. The mutated allele was found to have an increased number of 51 CAG repeats confirming the clinical diagnosis of SBMA. Normal individuals revealed 23 repeat numbers within the normal range, while another unrelated X-linked SBMA patient had an enlarged CAG repeat region. The carrier or disease status could be established or confirmed in 12 individuals of this family on the basis of detecting normal and disease alleles reflected by the number of CAG repeats.

  12. Clathrin-dependent internalization of the angiotensin II AT₁A receptor links receptor internalization to COX-2 protein expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Walker, Linda P; Velez, Juan Carlos Q; Ullian, Michael E

    2015-02-05

    The major effects of Angiotensin II (AngII) in vascular tissue are mediated by AngII AT1A receptor activation. Certain effects initiated by AT1A receptor activation require receptor internalization. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC), AngII stimulates cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. We have previously shown this is mediated by β-arrestin-dependent receptor internalization and NF-κB activation. In this study, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), pitstop-2, was used to test the hypothesis that clathrin-dependent internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates NF-κB activation and subsequent cyclooxygenase 2 expression. Radioligand binding assays, real time qt-PCR and immunoblotting were used to document the effects of pitstop-2 on AngII binding and signaling in RASMC. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to image pitstop-2׳s effects on AT1 receptor/GFP internalization in HEK-293 cells and p65 NF-κB nuclear localization in RASMC. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited internalization of AT1A receptor (44.7% ± 3.1% Control vs. 13.2% ± 8.3% Pitstop-2; n=3) as determined by radioligand binding studies in RASMC. Studies utilizing AT1A receptor/GFP expressed in HEK 293 cells and LSCM confirmed these findings. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear localization, COX-2 message and protein expression in RASMC without altering activation of p42/44 ERK or TNFα signaling. Pitstop-2, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, confirms that internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates AngII activation of cyclooxygenase 2 expression in RASMC. These data provide support for additional intracellular signaling pathways activated through β-arrestin mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptors, such as AT1A receptors.

  13. Estrogen receptor (ER)α-regulated lipocalin 2 expression in adipose tissue links obesity with breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Brian G; Hamidi, Habib; Zhou, Zhenqi; Villanueva, Claudio J; Krum, Susan A; Calkin, Anna C; Parks, Brian W; Ribas, Vicent; Kalajian, Nareg Y; Phun, Jennifer; Daraei, Pedram; Christofk, Heather R; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Korach, Kenneth S; Tontonoz, Peter; Lusis, Aldons J; Slamon, Dennis J; Hurvitz, Sara A; Hevener, Andrea L

    2015-02-27

    Obesity is associated with increased breast cancer (BrCA) incidence. Considering that inactivation of estrogen receptor (ER)α promotes obesity and metabolic dysfunction in women and female mice, understanding the mechanisms and tissue-specific sites of ERα action to combat metabolic-related disease, including BrCA, is of clinical importance. To study the role of ERα in adipose tissue we generated fat-specific ERα knock-out (FERKO) mice. Herein we show that ERα deletion increased adipocyte size, fat pad weight, and tissue expression and circulating levels of the secreted glycoprotein, lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), an adipokine previously associated with BrCA development. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter studies showed that ERα binds the Lcn2 promoter to repress its expression. Because adipocytes constitute an important cell type of the breast microenvironment, we examined the impact of adipocyte ERα deletion on cancer cell behavior. Conditioned medium from ERα-null adipocytes and medium containing pure Lcn2 increased proliferation and migration of a subset of BrCA cells in culture. The proliferative and promigratory effects of ERα-deficient adipocyte-conditioned medium on BrCA cells was reversed by Lcn2 deletion. BrCA cell responsiveness to exogenous Lcn2 was heightened in cell types where endogenous Lcn2 expression was minimal, but components of the Lcn2 signaling pathway were enriched, i.e. SLC22A17 and 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH2). In breast tumor biopsies from women diagnosed with BrCA we found that BDH2 expression was positively associated with adiposity and circulating Lcn2 levels. Collectively these data suggest that reduction of ERα expression in adipose tissue promotes adiposity and is linked with the progression and severity of BrCA via increased adipocyte-specific Lcn2 production and enhanced tumor cell Lcn2 sensitivity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Estrogen Receptor (ER)α-regulated Lipocalin 2 Expression in Adipose Tissue Links Obesity with Breast Cancer Progression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Brian G.; Hamidi, Habib; Zhou, Zhenqi; Villanueva, Claudio J.; Krum, Susan A.; Calkin, Anna C.; Parks, Brian W.; Ribas, Vicent; Kalajian, Nareg Y.; Phun, Jennifer; Daraei, Pedram; Christofk, Heather R.; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Tontonoz, Peter; Lusis, Aldons J.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Hurvitz, Sara A.; Hevener, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased breast cancer (BrCA) incidence. Considering that inactivation of estrogen receptor (ER)α promotes obesity and metabolic dysfunction in women and female mice, understanding the mechanisms and tissue-specific sites of ERα action to combat metabolic-related disease, including BrCA, is of clinical importance. To study the role of ERα in adipose tissue we generated fat-specific ERα knock-out (FERKO) mice. Herein we show that ERα deletion increased adipocyte size, fat pad weight, and tissue expression and circulating levels of the secreted glycoprotein, lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), an adipokine previously associated with BrCA development. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter studies showed that ERα binds the Lcn2 promoter to repress its expression. Because adipocytes constitute an important cell type of the breast microenvironment, we examined the impact of adipocyte ERα deletion on cancer cell behavior. Conditioned medium from ERα-null adipocytes and medium containing pure Lcn2 increased proliferation and migration of a subset of BrCA cells in culture. The proliferative and promigratory effects of ERα-deficient adipocyte-conditioned medium on BrCA cells was reversed by Lcn2 deletion. BrCA cell responsiveness to exogenous Lcn2 was heightened in cell types where endogenous Lcn2 expression was minimal, but components of the Lcn2 signaling pathway were enriched, i.e. SLC22A17 and 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH2). In breast tumor biopsies from women diagnosed with BrCA we found that BDH2 expression was positively associated with adiposity and circulating Lcn2 levels. Collectively these data suggest that reduction of ERα expression in adipose tissue promotes adiposity and is linked with the progression and severity of BrCA via increased adipocyte-specific Lcn2 production and enhanced tumor cell Lcn2 sensitivity. PMID:25468909

  15. An X-linked channelopathy with cardiomegaly due to a CLIC2 mutation enhancing ryanodine receptor channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kyoko; Liu, Dan; Tarpey, Patrick; Gallant, Esther; Lam, Alex; Witham, Shawn; Alexov, Emil; Chaubey, Alka; Stevenson, Roger E; Schwartz, Charles E; Board, Philip G; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2012-10-15

    Chloride intracellular channel 2 (CLIC2) protein is a member of the glutathione transferase class of proteins. Its' only known function is the regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) intracellular Ca(2+) release channels. These RyR proteins play a major role in the regulation of Ca(2+) signaling in many cells. Utilizing exome capture and deep sequencing of genes on the X-chromosome, we have identified a mutation in CLIC2 (c.303C>G, p.H101Q) which is associated with X-linked intellectual disability (ID), atrial fibrillation, cardiomegaly, congestive heart failure (CHF), some somatic features and seizures. Functional studies of the H101Q variant indicated that it stimulated rather than inhibited the action of RyR channels, with channels remaining open for longer times and potentially amplifying Ca(2+) signals dependent on RyR channel activity. The overly active RyRs in cardiac and skeletal muscle cells and neuronal cells would result in abnormal cardiac function and trigger post-synaptic pathways and neurotransmitter release. The presence of both cardiomegaly and CHF in the two affected males and atrial fibrillation in one are consistent with abnormal RyR2 channel function. Since the dysfunction of RyR2 channels in the brain via 'leaky mutations' can result in mild developmental delay and seizures, our data also suggest a vital role for the CLIC2 protein in maintaining normal cognitive function via its interaction with RyRs in the brain. Therefore, our patients appear to suffer from a new channelopathy comprised of ID, seizures and cardiac problems because of enhanced Ca(2+) release through RyRs in neuronal cells and cardiac muscle cells.

  16. Cross-linking of the beta-glucan receptor on human monocytes results in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist but not interleukin-1 production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poutsiaka, D D; Mengozzi, M; Vannier, E; Sinha, B; Dinarello, C A

    1993-01-01

    The beta-glucan receptor, found on monocytes and neutrophils, binds glucose polymers derived from fungi. Ligands for the receptor have various immunomodulatory effects, including increased microbicidal killing activity. We have investigated the effect of beta-glucans on the production of

  17. A computational analysis of non-genomic plasma membrane progestin binding proteins: signaling through ion channel-linked cell surface receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2013-12-11

    A number of plasma membrane progestin receptors linked to non-genomic events have been identified. These include: (1) α1-subunit of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (ATP1A1), (2) progestin binding PAQR proteins, (3) membrane progestin receptor alpha (mPRα), (4) progesterone receptor MAPR proteins and (5) the association of nuclear receptor (PRB) with the plasma membrane. This study compares: the pore-lining regions (ion channels), transmembrane (TM) helices, caveolin binding (CB) motifs and leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of putative progesterone receptors. ATP1A1 contains 10 TM helices (TM-2, 4, 5, 6 and 8 are pores) and 4 CB motifs; whereas PAQR5, PAQR6, PAQR7, PAQRB8 and fish mPRα each contain 8 TM helices (TM-3 is a pore) and 2-4 CB motifs. MAPR proteins contain a single TM helix but lack pore-lining regions and CB motifs. PRB contains one or more TM helices in the steroid binding region, one of which is a pore. ATP1A1, PAQR5/7/8, mPRα, and MAPR-1 contain highly conserved leucine-rich repeats (LRR, common to plant membrane proteins) that are ligand binding sites for ouabain-like steroids associated with LRR kinases. LRR domains are within or overlap TM helices predicted to be ion channels (pore-lining regions), with the variable LRR sequence either at the C-terminus (PAQR and MAPR-1) or within an external loop (ATP1A1). Since ouabain-like steroids are produced by animal cells, our findings suggest that ATP1A1, PAQR5/7/8 and mPRα represent ion channel-linked receptors that respond physiologically to ouabain-like steroids (not progestin) similar to those known to regulate developmental and defense-related processes in plants.

  18. Expansion of microsatellite in the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene linked to increased receptor expression and less aggressive thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onda, Masamitsu; Li, Daisy; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2002-01-01

    involvement, distant metastasis, extrathyroidal invasion and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. RESULTS: A statistically significant correlation between the length of THRA1 and thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 expression was observed in both cell lines and primary thyroid cancers. Thyroid tumors...... that displayed higher than average thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 expression had expanded THRA1 microsatellites and were less aggressive as judged by TNM ranking. A statistically significant correlation was also found between low thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 expression and more aggressive thyroid cancer...

  19. Honey bee dopamine and octopamine receptors linked to intracellular calcium signaling have a close phylogenetic and pharmacological relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle T Beggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three dopamine receptor genes have been identified that are highly conserved among arthropod species. One of these genes, referred to in honey bees as Amdop2, shows a close phylogenetic relationship to the a-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor family. In this study we examined in parallel the functional and pharmacological properties of AmDOP2 and the honey bee octopamine receptor, AmOA1. For comparison, pharmacological properties of the honey bee dopamine receptors AmDOP1 and AmDOP3, and the tyramine receptor AmTYR1, were also examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using HEK293 cells heterologously expressing honey bee biogenic amine receptors, we found that activation of AmDOP2 receptors, like AmOA1 receptors, initiates a rapid increase in intracellular calcium levels. We found no evidence of calcium signaling via AmDOP1, AmDOP3 or AmTYR1 receptors. AmDOP2- and AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular calcium were inhibited by 10 µM edelfosine indicating a requirement for phospholipase C-β activity in this signaling pathway. Edelfosine treatment had no effect on AmDOP2- or AmOA1-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP. The synthetic compounds mianserin and epinastine, like cis-(Z-flupentixol and spiperone, were found to have significant antagonist activity on AmDOP2 receptors. All 4 compounds were effective antagonists also on AmOA1 receptors. Analysis of putative ligand binding sites offers a possible explanation for why epinastine acts as an antagonist at AmDOP2 receptors, but fails to block responses mediated via AmDOP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that AmDOP2, like AmOA1, is coupled not only to cAMP, but also to calcium-signalling and moreover, that the two signalling pathways are independent upstream of phospholipase C-β activity. The striking similarity between the pharmacological properties of these 2 receptors suggests an underlying conservation of structural properties related to receptor

  20. Monocyte and plasma expression of TAM ligand and receptor in renal failure: Links to unregulated immunity and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Iris J; Hilliard, Brendan A; Ulas, Mehriban; Yu, Daohai; Vangala, Chandan; Rao, Swati; Lee, Jean; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Cohen, Philip L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Specific immune mechanisms and pathways that drive and maintain chronic inflammation in CKD are not well described. The TAM ligands (Gas6 and protein S) and receptors (Axl and Mer) have been recently recognized as playing a prominent role in immune regulation. The receptors exist in both soluble and cell-bound forms; the soluble receptors (sAxl and sMer) are believed to compete with the bound receptors and thus inhibit their function. In this study, we determined the expression of cell-bound and soluble TAM proteins in patients with CKD. CKD patients had significantly lower expression of Mer in monocytes, yet increased expression of soluble TAM receptors sAxl and sMer in plasma compared to controls. The metalloproteinase ADAM 17, responsible for cleavage of Mer to its soluble form, was increased in patient monocytes. Elevated levels of soluble TAM receptors were more evident in patients with progressive renal failure. These observations suggest that functional deficiency of TAM receptor-mediated regulation of inflammation may contribute to chronic inflammation in patients with CKD.

  1. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-06-30

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways.

  2. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Ca2+-Linked Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Are Essential for Endothelial/Leukocyte Adherence▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Brian J.; Solt, Laura A.; Chowdhury, Ibrul; Kazi, Altaf S.; Abid, M. Ruhul; Aird, William C.; May, Michael J.; Foskett, J. Kevin; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2007-01-01

    Receptor-mediated signaling is commonly associated with multiple functions, including the production of reactive oxygen species. However, whether mitochondrion-derived superoxide (mROS) contributes directly to physiological signaling is controversial. Here we demonstrate a previously unknown mechanism in which physiologic Ca2+-evoked mROS production plays a pivotal role in endothelial cell (EC) activation and leukocyte firm adhesion. G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and tyrosine kinase-media...

  3. 2D-ELDOR study of heterogeneity and domain structure changes in plasma membrane vesicles upon cross-linking of receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Baird, Barbara; Freed, Jack H

    2011-09-08

    2D electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) with the "full Sc-" method of analysis is applied to the study of plasma membrane vesicles. Membrane structural changes upon antigen cross-linking of IgE receptors (IgE-FcεRI) in plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) isolated from RBL-2H3 mast cells are investigated, for the first time, by means of these 2D-ELDOR techniques. Spectra of 1-palmitoyl-2-(16-doxyl stearoyl) phosphatidylcholine (16-PC) from PMVs before and after this stimulation at several temperatures are reported. The results demonstrate a coexistence of liquid-ordered (L(o)) and liquid-disordered (L(d)) components. We find that upon cross-linking, the membrane environment is remodeled to become more disordered, as shown by a moderate increase in the population of the L(d) component. This change in the relative amount of the L(o) versus L(d) components upon cross-linking is consistent with a model wherein the IgE receptors, which when clustered by antigen to cause cell stimulation, lead to more disordered lipids, and their dynamic and structural properties are slightly altered. This study demonstrates that 2D-ELDOR, analyzed by the full Sc- method, is a powerful approach for capturing the molecular dynamics in biological membranes. This is a particular case showing how 2D-ELDOR can be applied to study physical processes in complex systems that yield subtle changes.

  4. Expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its receptor in microglia activation is linked to teratogen-induced neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, A-J; Dheen, S T; Ling, E-A

    2002-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to teratogen agents is linked to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopment disorders, but the mechanisms leading to the neurodevelopmental disturbance are poorly understood. To elucidate this, an in vitro model of microglial activation induced by neuronal injury has been characterized. In this connection, exposure of primary microglial cells to the conditioned medium from the neuronal damage induced by teratogen, cyclophosphamide, is accompanied by a reactive microgliosis as assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lectin histochemistry, double labeling immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results showed that reactive microglia were capable of releasing various cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-beta and nitric oxide. Also, we have shown that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was in fact produced by the reactive microglia. Concomitant to this was the increased expression of M-CSF receptor in these cells following the teratogen-induced neuronal injury. The up-regulation of M-CSF receptor suggests that the cells are capable of responding to self-derived M-CSF in an autocrine fashion. Results with antibody neutralization further suggest that microglial proinflammatory response, as manifested by cytokine expression in culture, is mediated by M-CSF, which acts as a molecular signal that initiates a microglial reaction. We therefore suggest that microglial activation following cyclophosphamide treatment is not only a response to the neuronal damage, but is also a cause of the damage during pathogenesis of neurodevelopment disorders. To this end, the increased expression of M-CSF and its receptor on microglia would be directly linked to the active cell proliferation and proinflammatory response in the teratogen-induced injury.

  5. Two unique mutations in the interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency arising in opposite parental germ lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puck, J.M.; Pepper, A.E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2 lies in human X13.1 and is mutated in males with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). 27 X-linked SCID mutations have been found in our laboratory. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of genomic DNA using primers flanking each of the 8 exons was followed by direct sequencing of abnormally migrating fragments from SCID patients and family members. A 9 bp in-frame duplication insertion was found in IL2RG exon 5 of a patient from a large X-linked SCID pedigree; the resulting duplication of 3 extracellular amino acids, including the first tryptophan of the {open_quotes}WSXWS{close_quotes} cytokine binding motif, is predicted to disrupt interaction of the cytokine receptor chain with its ligand. Genetic linkage studies demonstrated that the grandmaternal X chromosome associated with SCID was contributed to 3 daughters, 2 obligate carriers and 1 woman of unknown status. However, this grandmother`s genomic DNA did not contain the insertion mutation, nor did she have skewed X-chromosome inactivation in her lymphocytes. That both obligate carrier daughters, but not the third daughter, had the insertion proved the grandmother to be a germline mosaic. A second proband had X-linked SCID with a branch point mutation due to substitution of T for A 15 bp 5{prime} of the start of IL2RG exon 3. This mutation resulted in undetectable IL2RG mRNA by Northern blot. Linkage analysis and sequencing of IL2RG DNA in this family proved the mutation to have originated in the germline of the proband`s grandfather, an immunocompetent individual who contributed an X chromosome with normal IL2RG to one daughter and a mutated X to the another.

  6. A previously unidentified deletion in G protein-coupled receptor 143 causing X-linked congenital nystagmus in a Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital nystagmus (CN is characterized by conjugated, spontaneous, and involuntary ocular oscillations. It is an inherited disease and the most common inheritance pattern is X-linked CN. In this study, our aim is to identify the disease-causing mutation in a large sixth-generation Chinese family with X-linked CN. Methods: It has been reported that mutations in four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin domain-containing 7 gene (FRMD7 and G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143 account for the majority patients of X-linked nystagmus. We collected 8 ml blood samples from members of a large sixth-generation pedigree with X-linked CN and 100 normal controls. FRMD7 and GPR143 were scanned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based DNA sequencing assays, and multiplex PCR assays were applied to detect deletions. Results: We identified a previously unreported deletion covering 7 exons in GPR143 in a Chinese family. The heterozygous deletion from exon 3 to exon 9 of GPR143 was detected in all affected males in the family, while it was not detected in other unaffected relatives or 100 normal controls. Conclusions: This is the first report of molecular characterization in GPR143 gene in the CN family. Our results expand the spectrum of GPR143 mutations causing CN and further confirm the role of GPR143 in the pathogenesis of CN.

  7. CelR, an Ortholog of the Diguanylate Cyclase PleD of Caulobacter, Regulates Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    OpenAIRE

    Barnhart, D. Michael; Su, Shengchang; Baccaro, Brenna E.; Banta, Lois M.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose fibrils play a role in attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to its plant host. While the genes for cellulose biosynthesis in the bacterium have been identified, little is known concerning the regulation of the process. The signal molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) has been linked to the regulation of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in many bacterial species, including A. tumefaciens. In this study, we identified two putative diguanylate cyclase genes, celR (atu1297) and atu1060, th...

  8. PGE2 And Its Cognate EP Receptors Control Human Adult Articular Cartilage Homeostasis and Are Linked to the Pathophysiology of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Ellman, Michael; Muddasani, Prasuna; Wang, James H-C; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the pathophysiologic links between prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and osteoarthritis by characterizing the catabolic effects of PGE2 and its unique receptors in human adult articular chondrocytes. Methods Human adult articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer or alginate beads with and without PGE2 and/or agonist, antagonist of EP receptors and cytokines. Cell survival, proliferation, and total proteoglycan synthesis and accumulation were measured in alginate beads. Chondrocyte-related gene expression and PI3k/Akt signaling were assessed by real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively, using a monolayer cell culture model. Results Stimulation of human articular chondrocytes with PGE2 through the EP2 receptor (i) suppresses proteoglycan accumulation and synthesis, (ii) suppresses aggrecan gene expression, (iii) does not appreciably affect expression of matrix-degrading enzymes; and (iv) decreases the collagen II:I ratio. EP2 and EP4 receptors are expressed at higher levels in knee compared to ankle cartilage, and in a grade-dependent fashion. PGE2 titration combined with IL-1 synergistically accelerates expression of pain-associated molecules such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and IL-6. Finally, stimulation with exogenous PGE2 or an EP2 agonist inhibits activation of Akt that is induced by insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). Conclusion PGE2 exerts an anti-anabolic effect on human adult articular cartilage in vitro, and EP2/4 receptor antagonists may represent effective therapeutic agents for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:19180509

  9. [Detection of Autoantibodies Against the 1-Adrenergic Receptor in the Sera of Patients via the Competitive cell-Based Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelev, A Y; Kostiukevich, M V; Efremov, E E; Vlasik, T N; Mironova, N A; Zykov, K A; Kashirina, N M; Kuznetsova, I B; Sharf, T V; Mamochkina, E N; Lipatova, L N; Peklo, M M; Rutkevich, P N; Yanushevskaya, E V; Rybalkin, I N; Stukalova, O V; Malkina, T A; Belyaeva, M M; Kuznetsova, T V; Tkachev, G A; Zinchenko, L V; Gupalo, E M; Agapova, O Y; Yureneva-Tkhorzhevskaya, T V; Rvacheva, A V; Sidorova, M V; Sadgyan, A S; Tereshchenko, S N; Golitsyn, S P

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the level of anti-1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in patients with ventricular arrhythmias with no signs of organic heart disease and with presence of cardiovascular pathology in comparison with a group of healthy volunteers. The study included 44 patients with ventricular arrhythmias with no signs of organic heart disease ("idiopathic"), 34 patients with diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) of inflammatory origin, 35 patients with coronary heart disease and ventricular arrhythmias, 12patients with coronary heart disease with no ventricular arrhythmias, and 19 healthy volunteers (control group). The level of autoantibodies against the 1-adrenergic receptor was determined by the developed competitive cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by the standard ELISA using peptides corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the 1-adrenergic receptor. Elevated level of autoantibodies detected by a competitive cell-based ELISA was observed in 62% of patients with DCM compared to 21% of healthy volunteers (p=0.0006). In patients with "idiopathic" ventricular arrhythmias, the level of 1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies was lower than in healthy subjects (p=0.003). Coronary heart disease patients with or without ventricular arrhythmias exhibited no differences from the control group. The number of significantly positive signals in peptide-based ELISA did not exceed 10% in any of the groups. No correlation between the data from competitive cell-based ELISA and peptide-based ELISA was found. This study demonstrated that competitive cell-based ELISA technique can be applied for detection of 1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies. The results in DCM patients generally correspond to the expected. Decreased level of autoantibodies in patients with "idiopathic" ventricular arrhythmias indicates that this disease is related to changes in the immune system. Such relation is not observed in the case of coronary heart disease

  10. A novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia linked to a mutation in the human insulin receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Hansen, Torben; Lajer, Maria

    2004-01-01

    a missense mutation (Arg1174Gln) in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene that cosegregated with the disease phenotype (logarithm of odds [LOD] score 3.21). In conclusion, we report a novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The findings demonstrate...

  11. Glucocorticoid-induced glucocorticoid-receptor expression and promoter usage is not linked to glucocorticoid resistance in childhood ALL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tissing, Wim J. E.; Meijerink, Jules P. P.; Brinkhof, Bas; Broekhuis, Mathilde J. C.; Menezes, Renee X.; den Boer, Monique L.; Pieters, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) resistance is an adverse prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but little is known about causes of GC resistance. Up-regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has been suggested as an essential step to the induction of apoplosis in leukemic cells

  12. Epigenetic modification of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is linked to traumatic memory and post-traumatic stress disorder risk in genocide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevic, Vanja; Kolassa, Iris-T; Fastenrath, Matthias; Gschwind, Leo; Spalek, Klara; Milnik, Annette; Heck, Angela; Vogler, Christian; Wilker, Sarah; Demougin, Philippe; Peter, Fabian; Atucha, Erika; Stetak, Attila; Roozendaal, Benno; Elbert, Thomas; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2014-07-30

    Recent evidence suggests that altered expression and epigenetic modification of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) are related to the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Because glucocorticoid receptor signaling is known to regulate emotional memory processes, particularly in men, epigenetic modifications of NR3C1 might affect the strength of traumatic memories. Here, we found that increased DNA methylation at the NGFI-A (nerve growth factor-induced protein A) binding site of the NR3C1 promoter was associated with less intrusive memory of the traumatic event and reduced PTSD risk in male, but not female survivors of the Rwandan genocide. NR3C1 methylation was not significantly related to hyperarousal or avoidance symptoms. We further investigated the relationship between NR3C1 methylation and memory functions in a neuroimaging study in healthy subjects. Increased NR3C1 methylation-which was associated with lower NR3C1 expression-was related to reduced picture recognition in male, but not female subjects. Furthermore, we found methylation-dependent differences in recognition memory-related brain activity in men. Together, these findings indicate that an epigenetic modification of the glucocorticoid receptor gene promoter is linked to interindividual and gender-specific differences in memory functions and PTSD risk.

  13. LARG links histamine-H1-receptor-activated Gq to Rho-GTPase-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreimer, Mariana; Vatter, Petra; Langer, Torben; Wieland, Thomas; Gierschik, Peter; Moepps, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    Activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, such as G(12/13) and G(q), by cell surface receptors is coupled to the regulation of numerous cellular functions controlled by activated Rho GTPases. Previous studies have implicated the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) as a regulatory protein receiving stimulatory inputs from activated Gα(12/13) and Gα(q). However, the molecular mechanisms of the Gα(q)-mediated LARG activation are not fully understood and the structural elements of LARG involved in this process have remained unclear. In the present work, the specific coupling of the histamine H1 receptor (HRH1) exogenously expressed in COS-7 cells to G(q), but not to G(12/13), was used to conduct a detailed analysis of receptor- and Gα(q)-mediated LARG activation and to define its structural requirements. The results show that HRH1-mediated activation of the strictly Rho-dependent transcriptional activity of serum response factor requires the PDZ domain of LARG and can be mimicked by activated Gα(q)(Q209L). The functional interaction between activated Gα(q) and LARG requires no more than the catalytic DH-PH tandem of LARG, and is independent of PLCβ activation and distinct from the mechanisms of Gα(q)-mediated p63RhoGEF and PLCβ(3) activation. Activated Gα(q) physically interacts with the relevant portions of LARG in COS-7 cells and histamine causes activation of LARG in native HeLa cells endogenously expressing HRH1, G(q), and LARG. This work is the first positive demonstration of a stimulatory effect of LARG on the ability of a strictly G(q)-coupled receptor to cause activation of a Rho-GTPase-dependent signaling pathway.

  14. ARF6-Regulated Endocytosis of Growth Factor Receptors Links Cadherin-Based Adhesion to Canonical Wnt Signaling in Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular ...

  15. G-CSF receptor (CSF3R) mutations in X-linked neutropenia evolving to acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows for the first time that patients with X-linked neutropenia, caused by mutations in the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome gene, developed myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia with acquisition of mutations in the CSF3R gene and loss of chromosome 7. See related perspective article on page 1333.

  16. Discovery of the elusive leptin in birds: identification of several 'missing links' in the evolution of leptin and its receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy W Prokop

    Full Text Available Leptin is a pleiotropic protein best known for regulation of appetite and fat storage in mammals. While many leptin orthologs have been identified among vertebrates, an authentic leptin in birds has remained elusive and controversial. Here we identify leptin sequence from the Peregrine falcon, Falco peregrinus (pfleptin, and identify sequences from two other birds (mallard and zebra finch, and 'missing' vertebrates (elephant shark, alligator, Indian python, Chinese soft-shelled turtle, and coelacanth. The pattern of genes surrounding leptin (snd1, rbm28 is syntenic between the falcon and mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of all known leptin protein sequences improves our understanding of leptin's evolution. Structural modeling of leptin orthologs highlights a highly conserved hydrophobic core in the four-helix cytokine packing domain. A docked model of leptin with the leptin receptor for Peregrine falcon reveals several conserved amino acids important for the interaction and possible coevolution of leptin with its receptor. We also show for the first time, an authentic avian leptin sequence that activates the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These newly identified sequences, structures, and tools for avian leptin and its receptor will allow elucidation of the function of these proteins in feral and domestic birds.

  17. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  18. Mechanisms linking depression co-morbid with obesity: An approach for serotonergic type 3 receptor antagonist as novel therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan

    2015-10-01

    Despite of the enormous research, therapeutic treatment for depression has always been a serious issue. Even though depression and obesity are individual abnormal health conditions, each act as a triggering factor for the other. Obese individuals are twice prone to develop depression than that of non-obese persons. The exact mechanism how obesity increases the risk for depression still remains an area of interest for research in neuropsychopharmacology. Depression and obesity share some common pathological pathways such as hyperactivity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, dysregulation of oxidant/antioxidant system balance, higher level of inflammatory cytokines, leptin resistance, altered plasma glucose, insulin resistance, reduced neuronal brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and decreased serotonergic neurotransmission in various regions of brain. The antidepressant-like effect of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists through allosteric modulation of serotonergic pathways is well evident from several research investigations belonging to our and some in other laboratories. Furthermore, serotonin regulates diet intake, leptin, corticosterone, inflammatory mechanisms, altered plasma glucose, insulin resistance and BDNF concentration in brain. The present review deals with various biological mechanisms involved in depression co-morbid with obesity and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists by modulation of serotonergic system as a therapeutic target for such co-morbid disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. G protein-linked receptors labeled by [3H]histamine in guinea pig cerebral cortex. I. Pharmacological characterization [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkins, W G; Kandel, M; Kandel, S I; Schunack, W; Wells, J W

    1993-04-01

    Binding of histamine to washed membranes from guinea pig cerebral cortex can be described empirically as two classes of distinct and independent sites (log IP1 = -8.45 +/- 0.02, R1;t = 98 +/- 6 pmol/g of protein; log KP2 = -6.34 +/- 0.22, R2.t = 990 +/- 60 pmol/g of protein). At 1.4 nm [3H]histamine, the kinetics of association and dissociation are biexponential. The values of k-Pj/k+Pj calculated for parallel one-step processes agree well with the corresponding values of KPj. Both k-p1 and k-P2 are increased by 0.1 mM guanylylimidodiphosphate; apparent capacity at equilibrium is reduced for both classes of sites, with little or no change in KP1 or KP2. Twenty-six H2 and H3 agonists and antagonists block access of [3H]histamine to the same sites, and the binding patterns reveal either one or two hyperbolic terms [i.e., sigma nj = 1 F' jKj/(Kj+[L])]. Two terms are required for six agonists and six antagonists, and F'2 varies widely from ligand to ligand. Also, the quantity log (K2/K1) is correlated with F'1 among agonists but with F'2 among antagonists (K1 < K2). The pharmacological selectivity is suggestive of both H2 and H3 receptors. An H2 specificity emerges from the appropriate values of Kj for 12 H2 agonists (i.e., K1 when n = 1 and K2 when n = 2; p = 0.00045), although a specificity distinct from that of H2 receptors is found with H2 antagonists. An H3 specificity emerges from the inhibitory potencies (IC50) of eight H3 agonists (p = 0.00025) and eight H3 antagonists (p = 0.0019); also, the sites labeled by [3H]histamine resemble H3 receptors reportedly labeled by N alpha-[3H]methylhistamine and (R)-alpha-[3H]methylhistamine. Ligand-dependent differences in F'2 are inconsistent with the notion of distinct and independent sites, and the tendency of antagonists to promote the sites of weaker affinity (F'2) argues against a ligand-regulated equilibrium between two states. The physical significance of the binding parameters is therefore unclear. The failure to

  20. Promising link between selenium and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma in the treatment protocols of obesity as well as depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donma, M M; Donma, O

    2016-04-01

    Considerable interest has been given to the significance of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) in macronutrient metabolism, however, there is not sufficient data concerning the interactions between PPARs and micronutrients. Investigations performed on PPARγ and one of the essential micronutrients selenium (Se) have shown that both parameters may lead to alterations in obesity-related or mood disorders. Therefore, it is plausible to consider PPARγ and Se together as a powerful combination during the treatment of two associated diseases; obesity and depression. PPARγ has been shown to be involved in the antidepressant-like activity. It is also an important parameter to be considered in obesity as the master regulator of adipogenesis. The mechanism of action of PPARγ is initiated by ligand binding which induces a conformational change in the receptor. Se is capable of alleviating inflammatory signaling pathways. Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Depression is also defined as an inflammatory disorder. Inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) participate in the progression of depression. They are also obesity-associated parameters. Due to TNFα induced depressive-like behaviors and the positive association between this proinflammatory cytokine and obesity, TNFα-activated signaling pathways and those inhibiting them have recently gained importance as potential targets and therapeutic tools, respectively. More studies are necessary to develop compounds with therapeutic nature against depressive disorders and obesity. PPARγ is an important signaling pathway that occurs at the crossroads of depression and obesity. Se, aside from its anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and antioxidative nature, affects also the way of PPARγ action. Se supplementation or fortification as well as the development of the partial agonists of PPARγ in which lipophilic Se compounds are used as ligand followed by

  1. Mac-1 directly binds to the endothelial protein C-receptor: a link between the protein C anticoagulant pathway and inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Katrin; Busch, Hans-Jörg; Bourgeois, Natascha; Schwarz, Meike; Wolf, Dennis; Zirlik, Andreas; Peter, Karlheinz; Bode, Christoph; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial protein C-receptor (EPCR) is an endothelial transmembrane protein that binds protein C and activated protein C (APC) with equal affinity, thereby facilitating APC formation. APC has anticoagulant, antiapoptotic and antiinflammatory properties. Soluble EPCR, released by the endothelium, may bind activated neutrophils, thereby modulating cell adhesion. EPCR is therefore considered as a possible link between the anticoagulant properties of protein C and the inflammatory response of neutrophils. In the present study, we aimed to provide proof of concept for a direct binding of EPCR to the β2-integrin Mac-1 on monocytic cells under static and physiological flow conditions. Under static conditions, human monocytes bind soluble EPCR in a concentration dependent manner, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. Binding can be inhibited by specific antibodies (anti-EPCR and anti-Mac-1). Specific binding was confirmed by a static adhesion assay, where a transfected Mac-1 expressing CHO cell line (Mac-1+ cells) bound significantly more recombinant EPCR compared to Mac-1+ cells blocked by anti-Mac-1-antibody and native CHO cells. Under physiological flow conditions, monocyte binding to the endothelium could be significantly blocked by both, anti-EPCR and anti-Mac-1 antibodies in a dynamic adhesion assay at physiological flow conditions. Pre-treatment of endothelial cells with APC (drotrecogin alfa) diminished monocyte adhesion significantly in a comparable extent to anti-EPCR. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct binding of Mac-1 on monocytes to the endothelial protein C receptor under static and flow conditions. This binding suggests a link between the protein C anticoagulant pathway and inflammation at the endothelium side, such as in acute vascular inflammation or septicaemia.

  2. Molecular mechanism linking BDNF/TrkB signaling with the NMDA receptor in memory: the role of Girdin in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Norimichi; Enomoto, Atsushi; Nagai, Taku; Takahashi, Masahide; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that synaptic plasticity is the cellular mechanism underlying learning and memory. Activity-dependent synaptic changes in electrical properties and morphology, including synaptogenesis, lead to alterations of synaptic strength, which is associated with long-term potentiation (LTP). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) signaling is involved in learning and memory formation by regulating synaptic plasticity. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt pathway is one of the key signaling cascades downstream BDNF/TrkB and is believed to modulate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the connection between these two key players in synaptic plasticity remains largely unknown. Girders of actin filament (Girdin), an Akt substrate that directly binds to actin filaments, has been shown to play a role in neuronal migration and neuronal development. Recently, we identified Girdin as a key molecule involved in regulating long-term memory. It was demonstrated that phosphorylation of Girdin by Akt contributed to the maintenance of LTP by linking the BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway with NMDA receptor activity. These findings indicate that Girdin plays a pivotal role in a variety of processes in the CNS. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding about the roles of Girdin in the CNS and focus particularly on neuronal migration and memory.

  3. The interleukin-20 receptor axis in early rheumatoid arthritis: novel links between disease-associated autoantibodies and radiographic progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Nielsen, Morten Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    synovial fluid compared with monocytes from both RA and healthy control peripheral blood. The plasma concentrations of IL-20 and IL-24 were increased in rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibody positive compared with negative early RA patients (all P stimulated...... cytokine levels and clinical disease. METHODS: Plasma IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 levels were measured in early RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The IL-20R1 and IL-22R1 levels in paired peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial fluid mononuclear cells...... from a different cohort of RA patients were evaluated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Monocytes/macrophages were stimulated with heat-aggregated human immunoglobulin immune complexes and immune complexes containing citrullinated fibrinogen, and osteoclasts were incubated with IL-19, IL-20...

  4. O-linked-N-acetylglucosamine modification of mammalian Notch receptors by an atypical O-GlcNAc transferase Eogt1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaidani, Yuta [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Ichiyanagi, Naoki [Department of Applied Molecular Biosciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Saito, Chika; Nomura, Tomoko [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Ito, Makiko [Department of Applied Molecular Biosciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Nishio, Yosuke [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Nadano, Daita; Matsuda, Tsukasa [Department of Applied Molecular Biosciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Furukawa, Koichi [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Okajima, Tetsuya, E-mail: tokajima@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Department of Applied Molecular Biosciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterized A130022J15Rik (Eogt1)-a mouse gene homologous to Drosophila Eogt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eogt1 encodes EGF domain O-GlcNAc transferase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Eogt1 in Drosophila rescued the cell-adhesion defect in the Eogt mutant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer O-GlcNAcylation reaction in the secretory pathway is conserved through evolution. -- Abstract: O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification is a unique cytoplasmic and nuclear protein modification that is common in nearly all eukaryotes, including filamentous fungi, plants, and animals. We had recently reported that epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats of Notch and Dumpy are O-GlcNAcylated by an atypical O-GlcNAc transferase, EOGT, in Drosophila. However, no study has yet shown whether O-GlcNAcylation of extracellular proteins is limited to insects such as Drosophila or whether it occurs in other organisms, including mammals. Here, we report the characterization of A130022J15Rik, a mouse gene homolog of Drosophila Eogt (Eogt 1). Enzymatic analysis revealed that Eogt1 has a substrate specificity similar to that of Drosophila EOGT, wherein the Thr residue located between the fifth and sixth conserved cysteines of the folded EGF-like domains is modified. This observation is supported by the fact that the expression of Eogt1 in Drosophila rescued the cell-adhesion defect caused by Eogt downregulation. In HEK293T cells, Eogt1 expression promoted modification of Notch1 EGF repeats by O-GlcNAc, which was further modified, at least in part, by galactose to generate a novel O-linked-N-acetyllactosamine structure. These results suggest that Eogt1 encodes EGF domain O-GlcNAc transferase and that O-GlcNAcylation reaction in the secretory pathway is a fundamental biochemical process conserved through evolution.

  5. An Alzheimer Disease-linked Rare Mutation Potentiates Netrin Receptor Uncoordinated-5C-induced Signaling That Merges with Amyloid β Precursor Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Toyama, Yuka; Kusakari, Shinya; Nawa, Mikiro; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2016-06-03

    A missense mutation (T835M) in the uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) netrin receptor gene increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and also the vulnerability of neurons harboring the mutation to various insults. The molecular mechanisms underlying T835M-UNC5C-induced death remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that overexpression of wild-type UNC5C causes low-grade death, which is intensified by an AD-linked mutation T835M. An AD-linked survival factor, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), and a natural ligand of UNC5C, netrin1, inhibit this death. T835M-UNC5C-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by an intracellular death-signaling cascade, consisting of death-associated protein kinase 1/protein kinase D/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)/JNK/NADPH oxidase/caspases, which merges at ASK1 with a death-signaling cascade, mediated by amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Notably, netrin1 also binds to APP and partially inhibits the death-signaling cascade, induced by APP. These results may provide new insight into the amyloid β-independent pathomechanism of AD.

  6. MicroRNAs and Androgen Receptor 3′ Untranslated Region: A Missing Link in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikand, Kavleen; Barik, Sailen; Shukla, Girish C.

    2012-01-01

    The ligand-activated transcription factor, androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer initiates as an androgen-dependent disease and further accumulation of multiple sequential genetic and epigenetic alterations transform it into an aggressive, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The molecular basis of the transition from androgen-dependent prostate cancer to CRPC remains unclear. However, it is apparent that AR plays a pivotal role in this alteration. The recent discovery that microRNAs (miRNAs) can target the function of AR suggests a functional role of these non-coding RNAs in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. miRNAs usually function by targeting the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of a mRNA by base-pairing interactions and modulate translation either by destabilizing the message or by repression of protein synthesis in actively translating ribosomes. Here, we discuss the potential molecular pathways through which AR targeting miRNAs may promote CRPC. Modulation of AR expression by miRNAs presents a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer, albeit it will likely be used in combination with the existing therapies. PMID:22468168

  7. Synthesis and purification of a toxin-linked conjugate targeting epidermal growth factor receptor in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chengyuan; Li, Yang; Li, Zhixin; Huang, Haiyan; Xu, Kan; Xu, Haiyang; Bai, Jieying; Li, Xiao; Zhao, Gang

    2012-05-01

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is a common feature of multiple tumor types, including glioblastoma (GBM). As such, EGFR has emerged as an attractive target for antitumor therapy. In the present study, we sought to develop an immunotoxin capable of specifically targeting EGFR-expressing cells and mediating inhibition of cell growth and cell killing. The Luffin P1 (LP1) ribosome inactivating protein was chosen to generate a fusion protein, antiEGFR/LP1, based upon its potent protein synthesis inhibition and small size (5 kDa). LP1 was fused to the C-terminus of an anti-EGFR single-chain antibody (scFv). The recombinant antiEGFR/LP1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and refolded and purified on an immobilized Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting analysis revealed that antiEGFR/LP1 was sufficiently expressed. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated that antiEGFR/LP1 bound specifically to EGFR-positive cells (U251), as almost no binding to EGFR-negative (Jurkat cells) was observed under identical time and dosage conditions. Finally, the MTT cell viability assay showed that antiEGFR/LP1 elicited obvious cytotoxicity toward EGFR-positive tumor cells. Collectively, these results suggest that antiEGFR/LP1 is biologically active and specific toward EGFR-positive tumor cells and may represent an effective EGFR-targeted cancer therapy.

  8. Secretion-Positive LGI1 Mutations Linked to Lateral Temporal Epilepsy Impair Binding to ADAM22 and ADAM23 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Belluzzi, Elisa; Malacrida, Sandro; Vitiello, Libero; Greggio, Elisa; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADTLE) is a focal epilepsy syndrome caused by mutations in the LGI1 gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Most ADLTE-causing mutations inhibit LGI1 protein secretion, and only a few secretion-positive missense mutations have been reported. Here we describe the effects of four disease-causing nonsynonymous LGI1 mutations, T380A, R407C, S473L, and R474Q, on protein secretion and extracellular interactions. Expression of LGI1 mutant proteins in cultured cells shows that these mutations do not inhibit protein secretion. This finding likely results from the lack of effects of these mutations on LGI1 protein folding, as suggested by 3D protein modelling. In addition, immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that all four mutations significantly impair interaction of LGI1 with the ADAM22 and ADAM23 receptors on the cell surface. These results support the existence of a second mechanism, alternative to inhibition of protein secretion, by which ADLTE-causing LGI1 mutations exert their loss-of-function effect extracellularly, and suggest that interactions of LGI1 with both ADAM22 and ADAM23 play an important role in the molecular mechanisms leading to ADLTE. PMID:27760137

  9. Using click chemistry toward novel 1,2,3-triazole-linked dopamine D3 receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Thomas M; Banala, Ashwini K; Slack, Rachel D; Burzynski, Caitlin; Bonifazi, Alessandro; Okunola-Bakare, Oluyomi M; Moore, Martin; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Rais, Rana; Slusher, Barbara S; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2015-07-15

    The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) is a target of pharmacotherapeutic interest in a variety of neurological disorders including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, restless leg syndrome, and drug addiction. A common molecular template used in the development of D3R-selective antagonists and partial agonists incorporates a butylamide linker between two pharmacophores, a phenylpiperazine moiety and an extended aryl ring system. The series of compounds described herein incorporates a change to that chemical template, replacing the amide functional group in the linker chain with a 1,2,3-triazole group. Although the amide linker in the 4-phenylpiperazine class of D3R ligands has been previously deemed critical for high D3R affinity and selectivity, the 1,2,3-triazole moiety serves as a suitable bioisosteric replacement and maintains desired D3R-binding functionality of the compounds. Additionally, using mouse liver microsomes to evaluate CYP450-mediated phase I metabolism, we determined that novel 1,2,3-triazole-containing compounds modestly improves metabolic stability compared to amide-containing analogues. The 1,2,3-triazole moiety allows for the modular attachment of chemical subunit libraries using copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry, increasing the range of chemical entities that can be designed, synthesized, and developed toward D3R-selective therapeutic agents.

  10. ARF6-regulated endocytosis of growth factor receptors links cadherin-based adhesion to canonical Wnt signaling in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2013-08-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). ERK promotes casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation of α-catenin, leading to destabilization of the adherens junctions and a subsequent increase in cytoplasmic pools of active β-catenin and E-cadherin. ERK also phosphorylates LRP6 to amplify the Wnt transduction pathway. The aforementioned Wnt-ERK signaling pathway initiates lumen filling of epithelial cysts by promoting cell proliferation in three-dimensional cell cultures. This study elucidates a mechanism responsible for the switch in β-catenin functions in cell adhesion at the adherens junctions and Wnt-induced nuclear signaling.

  11. PDZ-RhoGEF and LARG are essential for embryonic development and provide a link between thrombin and LPA receptors and Rho activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikelis, Constantinos M; Palmby, Todd R; Simaan, May; Li, Wenling; Szabo, Roman; Lyons, Ruth; Martin, Daniel; Yagi, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Chikumi, Hiroki; Galisteo, Rebeca; Mukouyama, Yoh-Suke; Bugge, Thomas H; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2013-04-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to both members of the Gα12 family of heterotrimeric G proteins α subunits, Gα12 and Gα13, regulate the activation of Rho GTPases, thereby contributing to many key biological processes. Multiple Rho GEFs have been proposed to link Gα12/13 GPCRs to Rho activation, including PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), leukemia-associated Rho GEF (LARG), p115-RhoGEF (p115), lymphoid blast crisis (Lbc), and Dbl. PRG, LARG, and p115 share the presence of a regulator of G protein signaling homology (RGS) domain. There is limited information on the biological roles of this RGS-containing family of RhoGEFs in vivo. p115-deficient mice are viable with some defects in the immune system and gastrointestinal motor dysfunctions, whereas in an initial study we showed that mice deficient for Larg are viable and resistant to salt-induced hypertension. Here, we generated knock-out mice for Prg and observed that these mice do not display any overt phenotype. However, deficiency in Prg and Larg leads to complex developmental defects and early embryonic lethality. Signaling from Gα11/q-linked GPCRs to Rho was not impaired in mouse embryonic fibroblasts defective in all three RGS-containing RhoGEFs. However, a combined lack of Prg, Larg, and p115 expression abolished signaling through Gα12/13 to Rho and thrombin-induced cell proliferation, directional migration, and nuclear signaling through JNK and p38. These findings provide evidence of an essential role for the RGS-containing RhoGEF family in signaling to Rho by Gα12/13-coupled GPCRs, which may likely play a critical role during embryonic development.

  12. Ovarian cycle-linked plasticity of δ-GABAA receptor subunits in hippocampal interneurons affects γ oscillations in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Miklos Barth

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors containing δ subunits (δ-GABAARs are GABA-gated ion channels with extra- and perisynaptic localization, strong sensitivity to neurosteroids (NS, and a high degree of plasticity. In selective brain regions they are expressed on specific principal cells and interneurons (INs, and generate a tonic conductance that controls neuronal excitability and oscillations. Plasticity of δ-GABAARs in principal cells has been described during states of altered NS synthesis including acute stress, puberty, ovarian cycle, pregnancy and the postpartum period, with direct consequences on neuronal excitability and network dynamics. The defining network events implicated in cognitive function, memory formation and encoding are γ oscillations (30-120 Hz, a well-timed loop of excitation and inhibition between principal cells and PV-expressing INs (PV+INs. The δ-GABAARs of INs can modify γ oscillations, and a lower expression of δ-GABAARs on INs during pregnancy alters γ frequency recorded in vitro. The ovarian cycle is another physiological event with large fluctuations in NS levels and δ-GABAARs. Stages of the cycle are paralleled by swings in memory performance, cognitive function, and mood in both humans and rodents. Here we show δ-GABAARs changes during the mouse ovarian cycle in hippocampal cell types, with enhanced expression during diestrus in principal cells and specific INs. The plasticity of δ-GABAARs on PV-INs decreases the magnitude of γ oscillations continuously recorded in area CA1 throughout several days in vivo during diestrus and increases it during estrus. Such recurring changes in γ magnitude were not observed in non-cycling wild-type (WT females, cycling females lacking δ-GABAARs only on PV-INs (PV-Gabrd-/-, and in male mice during a time course equivalent to the ovarian cycle. Our findings may explain the impaired memory and cognitive performance experienced by women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS or premenstrual

  13. Cancer immunoediting and dioxin-activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor: a missing link in the shift toward tumor immunoescape?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruggero Ridolfi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, a member of the PAS protein family, is found in organisms as diverse as Drosophila melano­gaster, nematodes, and mammals. While several reviews have reported that AhR, once activated by agonist ligands, causes long-term effects such as modification of cell growth through cell cycle control, there is also recent evidence of its decisive role in immunosuppression. The most widely studied AhR agonist is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, which binds AhR with the highest known affinity, leading to profound suppression of both humoral and cellular immune responses, with praecox thymus involution, consequent thymocyte loss, and induction of T-cell apoptosis. Dioxin-AhR binding causes a decline in the number of dendritic cells and enhances apoptosis following their inappropriate activation. Dioxin-mediated activation of AhR also has a direct influence on the expansion of regula­tory T-cells CD4+CD25+ FoxP3+ (T-regs and an adverse affect on CD8+ T-cell responses. Dioxin released from industrial and waste incinerators over the last few decades has caused widespread contamination of food, leading to its accumulation in fatty tissue in animals and humans. The elimination half-life of dioxin in humans (7-10 years may favor the potentially continuous and long-lasting activation of AhR, leading to perpetual immune suppression and facilitating the onset, growth, and diffusion of tumors, especially in young people. In the cancer immunoediting hypoth­esis, which subdivides the relationship between tumor and immune system into three phases: elimination, equilibrium, and escape, it is thought that dioxin accumulation may cause an inevitable shift toward tumor escape.

  14. NCI-H295R, a human adrenal cortex-derived cell line, expresses purinergic receptors linked to Ca²⁺-mobilization/influx and cortisol secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhisa Nishi

    Full Text Available Purinergic receptor expression and involvement in steroidogenesis were examined in NCI-H295R (H295R, a human adrenal cortex cell line which expresses all the key enzymes necessary for steroidogenesis. mRNA/protein for multiple P1 (A(2A and A(2B, P2X (P2X₅ and P2X₇, and P2Y (P2Y₁, P2Y₂, P2Y₆, P2Y₁₂, P2Y₁₃, and P2Y₁₄ purinergic receptors were detected in H295R. 2MeS-ATP (10-1000 µM, a P2Y₁ agonist, induced glucocorticoid (GC secretion in a dose-dependent manner, while other extracellular purine/pyrimidine agonists (1-1000 µM had no distinct effect on GC secretion. Extracellular purines, even non-steroidogenic ones, induced Ca²⁺-mobilization in the cells, independently of the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration. Increases in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration induced by extracellular purine agonists were transient, except when induced by ATP or 2MeS-ATP. Angiotensin II (AngII: 100 nM and dibutyryl-cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 500 µM induced both GC secretion and Ca²⁺-mobilization in the presence of extracellular Ca²⁺ (1.2 mM. GC secretion by AngII was reduced by nifedipine (10-100 µM; whereas the Ca²⁺ channel blocker did not inhibit GC secretion by 2MeS-ATP. Thapsigargin followed by extracellular Ca²⁺ exposure induced Ca²⁺-influx in H295R, and the cells expressed mRNA/protein of the component molecules for store-operated calcium entry (SOCE: transient receptor C (TRPC channels, calcium release-activated calcium channel protein 1 (Orai-1, and the stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1. In P2Y₁-knockdown, 2MeS-ATP-induced GC secretion was significantly inhibited. These results suggest that H295R expresses a functional P2Y₁ purinergic receptor for intracellular Ca²⁺-mobilization, and that P2Y₁ is linked to SOCE-activation, leading to Ca²⁺-influx which might be necessary for glucocorticoid secretion.

  15. A Potential Link between the C5a Receptor 1 and the β1-Adrenoreceptor in the Mouse Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Hua Khor

    Full Text Available Inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of specific cardiovascular diseases, but it is uncertain if mediators released during the inflammatory process will affect the continued efficacy of drugs used to treat clinical signs of the cardiac disease. We investigated the role of the complement 5a receptor 1 (C5aR1/CD88 in the cardiac response to inflammation or atenolol, and the effect of C5aR1 deletion in control of baseline heart rate in an anesthetized mouse model.An initial study showed that PMX53, an antagonist of C5aR1 in normal C57BL6/J (wild type, WT mice reduced heart rate (HR and appeared to have a protective effect on the heart following induced sepsis. C5aR1 knockout (CD88-/- mice had a lower HR than wild type mice, even during sham surgery. A model to assess heart rate variability (HRV in anesthetized mice was developed to assess the effects of inhibiting the β1-adrenoreceptor (β1-AR in a randomized crossover study design.HR and LF Norm were constitutively lower and SDNN and HF Norm constitutively higher in the CD88-/- compared with WT mice (P 0.05, except for the reduced LF/HF (Lower frequency/High frequency ratio (P< 0.05 at 60 min post-atenolol, suggesting increased parasympathetic tone of the heart due to the effect of atenolol administration. The HR of the WT mice were lower post atenolol compared to the CD88-/- mice (P = 0.001 but the HRV of CD88-/- mice were significantly increased (P< 0.05, compared with WT mice.Knockout of the C5aR1 attenuated the effect of β1-AR in the heart, suggesting an association between the β1-AR and C5aR1, although further investigation is required to determine if this is a direct or causal association.

  16. Insulin up-regulates natriuretic peptide clearance receptor expression in the subcutaneous fat depot in obese subjects: a missing link between CVD risk and obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Olga; Gögebakan, Özlem; Klöting, Nora; Sparwasser, Andrea; Weickert, Martin O; Haddad, Isam; Nikiforova, Victoria J; Bergmann, Andreas; Kruse, Michael; Seltmann, Anne-Cathrin; Blüher, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Rudovich, Natalia

    2012-05-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) regulate cardiovascular homeostasis and have multiple metabolic properties. Decreased levels of NP or "natriuretic handicap" are signs of insulin resistance such as central obesity. Increased expression of NP clearance receptor (NPRC) in sc adipose tissue (SAT) was observed in insulin-resistant subjects. We hypothesized that insulin acutely regulates NP receptor expression in adipose tissue. NPRA, NPRB, and NPRC mRNA expression was measured in paired samples of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and SAT from 157 subjects (108 with type 2 diabetes). The effect of insulin on NPR gene expression in SAT was studied in euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp experiments. Additionally, the effect of insulin and glucose on NPR expression in the culture of primary human monocytes and macrophages was tested. NPRA and NPRC gene expression was higher in VAT compared with SAT (P < 0.01), but only NPRC gene expression strongly correlated with fasting insulin levels (r = 0.65, P = 0.04 × 10(-3); and r = 0.54, P = 0.002, for VAT and SAT, respectively). NPRB expression was lower in VAT than in SAT in subjects with type 2 diabetes and was lower compared with nondiabetic subjects. NPRC gene expression was up-regulated in SAT during both euglycemic- and hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps (P = 0.038 and P = 0.048, respectively), and was increased in high glucose and insulin treatment in monocytes (70.2%; P = 0.01), but not in mature macrophages. Insulin increased expression of NPRC in SAT independently of circulating glucose concentrations. Thus, insulin might suppress circulating NP via up-regulation of NPRC expression in obesity, providing a novel link between hyperinsulinemia and obesity.

  17. The adapter protein APPL1 links FSH receptor to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production and is implicated in intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Richard M; Nechamen, Cheryl A; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Dias, James A

    2011-04-01

    FSH binds to its receptor (FSHR) on target cells in the ovary and testis, to regulate oogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. The signaling cascades activated after ligand binding are extremely complex and have been shown to include protein kinase A, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium signaling pathways. The adapter protein APPL1 (Adapter protein containing Pleckstrin homology domain, Phosphotyrosine binding domain and Leucine zipper motif), which has been linked to an assortment of other signaling proteins, was previously identified as an interacting protein with FSHR. Thus, alanine substitution mutations in the first intracellular loop of FSHR were generated to determine which residues are essential for FSHR-APPL1 interaction. Three amino acids were essential; when any one of them was altered, APPL1 association with FSHR mutants was abrogated. Two of the mutants (L377A and F382A) that displayed poor cell-surface expression were not studied further. Substitution of FSHR-K376A did not affect FSH binding or agonist-stimulated cAMP production in either transiently transfected human embryonic kidney cells or virally transduced human granulosa cells (KGN). In the KGN line, as well as primary cultures of rat granulosa cells transduced with wild type or mutant receptor, FSH-mediated progesterone or estradiol production was not affected by the mutation. However, in human embryonic kidney cells inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production was curtailed and KGN cells transduced with FSHR-K376A evidenced reduced Ca(2+) mobilization from intracellular stores after FSH treatment.

  18. Activation of eosinophils via Toll-like receptor (TLR3, TLR7 and TLR9: link between viral infection and asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Månsson

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is disease characterized by a massive accumulation of eosinophils that release an array of tissue-damaging mediators. Respiratory viral infections are thought to be a leading cause of exacerbations of asthma. One possible explanation might be a direct activation of viral components through Toll-like receptors (TLRs, a receptor family comprising 10 different pathogen-recognizing members (TLR1-TLR10. The virus-recognizing TLRs are TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, which respond to viral dsRNA, ssRNA and CpG-DNA. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of these TLRs and their functions in human eosinophils. Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood using magnetic beads (purity >97%. Cells were incubated with or without poly(I:C, R-837 or CpG alone, the synthetic ligands of TLR3, TLR7 and TLR9, respectively, or combined with IL-4 or histamine. Flow cytometry, and ELISA were used to analyze expression of TLRs and various surface markers, viability and secretion of inflammatory mediators. Eosinophils expressed proteins for TLR3, TLR7 and TLR9. Poly(I:C, R-837 and CpG prolonged survival, up-regulated expression of the adhesion molecule CD11b and increased secretion of IL-8 compared to unstimulated controls. These effects were affected by the presence of IL-4 and histamine. This study shows that several viral products directly activate eosinophils through their TLRs. Since eosinophils are central in asthma, the TLR system may be an important mechanism of eosinophil activation linking viral infections with exacerbations. Consequently, this system represents a future clinical target for the resolution of asthmatic disease.

  19. Truncating Mutations in the Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor G2 Gene ADGRG2 Cause an X-Linked Congenital Bilateral Absence of Vas Deferens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patat, Olivier; Pagin, Adrien; Siegfried, Aurore; Mitchell, Valérie; Chassaing, Nicolas; Faguer, Stanislas; Monteil, Laetitia; Gaston, Véronique; Bujan, Louis; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique; Marcelli, François; Lalau, Guy; Rigot, Jean-Marc; Mieusset, Roger; Bieth, Eric

    2016-08-04

    In 80% of infertile men with obstructive azoospermia caused by a congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD), mutations are identified in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). For the remaining 20%, the origin of the CBAVD is unknown. A large cohort of azoospermic men with CBAVD was retrospectively reassessed with more stringent selection criteria based on consistent clinical data, complete description of semen and reproductive excurrent ducts, extensive CFTR testing, and kidney ultrasound examination. To maximize the phenotypic prioritization, men with CBAVD and with unilateral renal agenesis were considered ineligible for the present study. We performed whole-exome sequencing on 12 CFTR-negative men with CBAVD and targeted sequencing on 14 additional individuals. We identified three protein-truncating hemizygous mutations, c.1545dupT (p.Glu516Ter), c.2845delT (p.Cys949AlafsTer81), and c.2002_2006delinsAGA (p.Leu668ArgfsTer21), in ADGRG2, encoding the epididymal- and efferent-ducts-specific adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G2, in four subjects, including two related individuals with X-linked transmission of their infertility. Previous studies have demonstrated that Adgrg2-knockout male mice develop obstructive infertility. Our study confirms the crucial role of ADGRG2 in human male fertility and brings new insight into congenital obstructive azoospermia pathogenesis. In men with CBAVD who are CFTR-negative, ADGRG2 testing could allow for appropriate genetic counseling with regard to the X-linked transmission of the molecular defect.

  20. Novel urea-linked cinchona-calixarene hybrid-type receptors for efficient chromatographic enantiomer separation of carbamate-protected cyclic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawinkler, Karl Heinz; Maier, Norbert M; Sajovic, Elisabeth; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2004-10-22

    Two novel diastereomeric cinchona-calixarene hybrid-type receptors (SOs) were synthesized by inter-linking 9-amino(9-deoxy)-quinine (AQN)/9-amino(9-deoxy)-epiquinine (eAQN) and a calix[4]arene scaffold via an urea functional unit. Silica-supported chiral stationary phases (CSPs) derived from these SOs revealed, for N-protected amino acids, complementary chiral recognition profiles in terms of elution order and substrate specificity. The AQN-derived CSP showed narrow-scoped enantioselectivity for open-chained amino acids bearing pi-acidic aromatic protecting groups, preferentially binding the (S)-enantiomers. In contrast, the eAQN congener exhibited broad chiral recognition capacity for open-chained as well as cyclic amino acids, and preferential binding of the (R)-enantiomers. Exceedingly strong retention due to nonenantioselective hydrophobic analyte-calixarene interactions observed with hydro-organic mobile phases could be largely suppressed with organic mobile phases containing small amounts of acetic acid as acidic modifier. With the eAQN-calixarene hybrid-type CSP particularly high levels of enantioselectivity could be achieved for tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-, benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)- and fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-protected cyclic amino acids using chloroform as mobile phase, e.g. an enantioselectivty factor alpha >5.0 for Boc-proline. Increasing amounts of acetic acid compromised enantioselectivity, indicating the crucial contributions of hydrogen bonding to chiral recognition. Comparison of the performance characteristics of the urea-linked eAQN-calixarene hybrid-type CSP with those of structurally closely related mutants provided evidence for the active involvement of the urea and calixarene units in the chiral recognition process. The urea linker motif was shown to contribute to analyte binding via multiple hydrogen bonding interactions, while the calixarene module is believed to support stereodiscrimination by enhancing the shape complementarity of the

  1. Bisphenol A promotes X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein-dependent angiogenesis via G protein-coupled estrogen receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Jin, Xin; Zhao, Nana; Ye, Xiaolei; Ying, Chenjiang

    2015-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), one of the high-volume chemicals worldwide, has a core structure resembling that of natural estradiol. Recent evidence has demonstrated that exposure to BPA has a relationship with the risk of cancer. The objective of our study is to investigate the mechanisms underlying the pro-angiogenic effects of BPA. We demonstrated that BPA markedly induces endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation by activating endothelial nitric oxide synthase. BPA-induced nitric oxide generation appeared to be associated with the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), which competes with endothelial nitric oxide synthase for caveolin-1. BPA was shown to exert its pro-angiogenic effect by upregulating XIAP expression via G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (ER) activation but not via ERα or ERβ. Our data suggest that 100 nM BPA promote angiogenesis in a G protein-coupled ER-dependent genomic pathway, and provide a novel insight into the potential role of XIAP in mediating the pro-angiogenic effects of BPA in endothelial cells.

  2. Obesity-induced miR-15b is linked causally to the development of insulin resistance through the repression of the insulin receptor in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Won-Mo; Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Park, Se-Whan; Lee, Wan

    2015-11-01

    Obesity increases intracellular lipid accumulation in key tissues or organs, which often leads to metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance. Diets rich in saturated fatty acid (SFA) exacerbate obesity and hepatic steatosis, which accentuate the risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Although microRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in the regulation of gene expression, the implication of obesity-induced miRNAs in metabolic disorders particularly in the development of insulin resistance is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the implication of miR-15b, which is induced by SFA palmitate or obesity, in hepatic insulin resistance. Diet-induced obesity (DIO) in mice developed hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, accompanying with a reduction of insulin receptor (INSR) expression. Palmitate impaired insulin signaling as well as a decrease of INSR in hepatocytes. The expression of miR-15b was upregulated by DIO or palmitate in hepatocytes. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-15b suppressed the protein expression of INSR through targeting INSR 3' untranslated region directly, resulting in an impairment of the insulin signaling and glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes. These results unveil a novel mechanism whereby miR-15b is linked causally to the pathogenesis of hepatic insulin resistance in SFA-induced obesity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Assessment of the link between Vitamin D receptor TaqI gene polymorphism and periodontitis: a meta-analysis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, X W; Wang, Y; Cao, C; Zhong, L J

    2016-10-06

    Although a number of studies have been conducted to determine the association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) TaqI polymorphism and periodontitis in the Chinese population, this association remains elusive. To assess the influence of VDR TaqI polymorphism on the risk of periodontitis, a meta-analysis was performed in a Chinese population. Relevant studies were identified using the databases PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biology Medicine, through January 2016. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the strength of the associations. This meta-analysis identified 9 studies, which included 1014 periodontitis cases and 907 controls. In both overall and subgroup analyses, VDR TaqI polymorphism was not associated with the risk of periodontitis. Cumulative analysis also suggested a lack of association between VDR TaqI polymorphism and the risk of periodontitis in the Chinese population. In conclusion, our meta-analysis showed that VDR TaqI polymorphism is not associated with the risk of periodontitis in the Chinese population. Further studies in other ethnic groups are required for definite conclusions.

  4. Differential splicing of human androgen receptor pre-mRNA in X-linked reifenstein syndrome, because of a deletion involving a putative branch site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Verleun-Mooijman, M.C.T.; Blaeij, T.J.P. de; Brinkmann, A.O.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, mRNA, and protein in a subject with X-linked Reifenstein syndrome (partial androgen insensitivity) is reported. The presence of two mature AR transcripts in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient is established, and, by reverse transcriptase-PCR and RNase transcription analysis, the wild-type transcript and a transcript in which exon 3 sequences are absent without disruption of the translational reading frame are identified. Sequencing and hybridization analysis show a deletion of >6 kb in intron 2 of the human AR gene, starting 18 bp upstream of exon 3. The deletion includes the putative branch-point sequence (BPS) but not the acceptor splice site on the intron 2/exon 3 boundary. The deletion of the putative intron 2 BPS results in 90% inhibition of wild-type splicing. The mutant transcript encodes an AR protein lacking the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Western/immunoblotting analysis is used to show that the mutant AR protein is expressed in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The residual 10% wild-type transcript can be the result of the use of a cryptic BPS located 63 bp upstream of the intron 2/exon 3 boundary of the mutant AR gene. The mutated AR protein has no transcription-activating potential and does not influence the transactivating properties of the wild-type AR, as tested in cotransfection studies. It is concluded that the partial androgen-insensitivity syndrome of this patient is the consequence of the limited amount of wild-type AR protein expressed in androgen target cells, resulting from the deletion of the intron 2 putative BPS. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Female Bias in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is Associated with the Differential Expression of X-Linked Toll-Like Receptor 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gabrielle; Cabal, Nicholas; Vannier, Augustin; Umiker, Benjamin; Yin, Raymund H; Orjalo, Arturo V; Johansson, Hans E; Han, Jin-Hwan; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of anti-nuclear antibodies. SLE is one of many autoimmune disorders that have a strong gender bias, with 70-90% of SLE patients being female. Several explanations have been postulated to account for the severity of autoimmune diseases in females, including hormonal, microbiota, and gene dosage differences. X-linked toll-like receptors (TLRs) have recently been implicated in disease progression in females. Our previous studies using the 564Igi mouse model of SLE on a Tlr7 and Tlr9 double knockout background showed that the presence of Tlr8 on both X chromosomes was required for the production of IgG autoantibodies, Ifn-I expression and granulopoiesis in females. Here, we show the results of our investigation into the role of Tlr8 expression in SLE pathogenesis in 564Igi females. Female mice have an increase in serum pathogenic anti-RNA IgG2a and IgG2b autoantibodies. 564Igi mice have also been shown to have an increase in neutrophils in vivo, which are major contributors to Ifn-α expression. Here, we show that neutrophils from C57BL/6 mice express Ifn-α in response to 564 immune complexes and TLR8 activation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from 564Igi females have a significant increase in Tlr8 expression compared to male-derived cells, and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization data suggest that Tlr8 may escape X-inactivation in female-derived macrophages. These results propose a model by which females may be more susceptible to SLE pathogenesis due to inefficient inactivation of Tlr8.

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent activation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase occurs upstream of Ca^(2+)-signalling induced by Fcy receptor cross-linking in human neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossebeld, Paula J. M.; Homburg, Christa H. E.; Schweizer, R.C.; Ibarrola, Iñaki; Kessler, Jan; Koenderman, L.; Roos, Dirk; Verhoeven, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of wortmannin on IgG-receptor (FcyR)-mediated stimulation of human neutrophils was investigated. The Ca^(2+) influx induced by clustering of both Fcy receptors was inhibited by wortmannin, as was the release of Ca^(2+) from intracellular stores. Wortmannin also inhibited, with the same ef

  7. Epigenetic modification of the glucocorticoid receptor gene is linked to traumatic memory and post-traumatic stress disorder risk in genocide survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukojevic, V.; Kolassa, I.T.; Fastenrath, M.; Gschwind, L.; Spalek, K.; Milnik, A.; Heck, A.; Vogler, C.; Wilker, S.; Demougin, P.; Peter, F.; Atucha, E.; Stetak, A.; Roozendaal, B.; Elbert, T.; Papassotiropoulos, A.; Quervain, D.J. de

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that altered expression and epigenetic modification of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) are related to the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Because glucocorticoid receptor signaling is known to regulat

  8. Neuroprotective effects of the Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) agonist PRE-084, in a mouse model of motor neuron disease not linked to SOD1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peviani, Marco; Salvaneschi, Eleonora; Bontempi, Leonardo; Petese, Alessandro; Manzo, Antonio; Rossi, Daniela; Salmona, Mario; Collina, Simona; Bigini, Paolo; Curti, Daniela

    2014-02-01

    The identification of novel molecular targets crucially involved in motor neuron degeneration/survival is a necessary step for the development of hopefully more effective therapeutic strategies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. In this view, S1R, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident receptor with chaperone-like activity, has recently attracted great interest. S1R is involved in several processes leading to acute and chronic neurodegeneration, including ALS pathology. Treatment with the S1R agonist PRE-084 improves locomotor function and motor neuron survival in presymptomatic and early symptomatic mutant SOD1-G93A ALS mice. Here, we tested the efficacy of PRE-084 in a model of spontaneous motor neuron degeneration, the wobbler mouse (wr) as a proof of concept that S1R may be regarded as a key therapeutic target also for ALS cases not linked to SOD1 mutation. Increased staining for S1R was detectable in morphologically spared cervical spinal cord motor neurons of wr mice both at early (6th week) and late (12th week) phases of clinical progression. S1R signal was also detectable in hypertrophic astrocytes and reactive microglia of wr mice. Chronic treatment with PRE-084 (three times a week, for 8weeks), starting at symptom onset, significantly increased the levels of BDNF in the gray matter, improved motor neuron survival and ameliorated paw abnormality and grip strength performance. In addition, the treatment significantly reduced the number of reactive astrocytes whereas, that of CD11b+ microglial cells was increased. A deeper evaluation of microglial markers revealed significant increased number of cells positive for the pan-macrophage marker CD68 and of CD206+ cells, involved in tissue restoration, in the white matter of PRE-084-treated mice. The mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were not affected by PRE-084 treatment. Thus, our results support pharmacological manipulation of S1R as a promising strategy to cure ALS and point to increased

  9. Establishing a cellular FRET-based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor proNGF-induced cross-linking of sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeldal, Sune; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Alwasel, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    the vps10p domain receptor sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). However, proNGF-induced receptor complex formation has been difficult to directly assess other than by western blotting. We here describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescence plate reader assay...... to monitor the interaction between fluorescently tagged sortilin and p75(NTR) in live cells. The method is based on a standard fluorescent plate reader found in many biochemical laboratories and the results are evaluated using a microscopy-based quantified sensitized acceptor emission FRET approach making...

  10. Scandinavian links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    centres, one joins more thinly populated regions, and the last one links peripheral areas. Two of them (The Great Belt Link and the Oresund Link) have been constructed and are in full operation. The third (the Fehmarnbelt Link) has been decided 2008 on bilateral government level. The three links...

  11. The link in Linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "linking" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block. PMID:23840106

  12. Linking supply to demand: the neuronal monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor GluR2/3 subunit are associated in a common trafficking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Karin; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Parent, Annabelle; Repond, Cendrine; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Di Luca, Monica; Pellerin, Luc

    2009-05-01

    MCT2 is the major neuronal monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) that allows the supply of alternative energy substrates such as lactate to neurons. Recent evidence obtained by electron microscopy has demonstrated that MCT2, like alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors, is localized in dendritic spines of glutamatergic synapses. Using immunofluorescence, we show in this study that MCT2 colocalizes extensively with GluR2/3 subunits of AMPA receptors in neurons from various mouse brain regions as well as in cultured neurons. It also colocalizes with GluR2/3-interacting proteins, such as C-kinase-interacting protein 1, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 and clathrin adaptor protein. Coimmunoprecipitation of MCT2 with GluR2/3 and C-kinase-interacting protein 1 suggests their close interaction within spines. Parallel changes in the localization of both MCT2 and GluR2/3 subunits at and beneath the plasma membrane upon various stimulation paradigms were unraveled using an original immunocytochemical and transfection approach combined with three-dimensional image reconstruction. Cell culture incubation with AMPA or insulin triggered a marked intracellular accumulation of both MCT2 and GluR2/3, whereas both tumor necrosis factor alpha and glycine (with glutamate) increased their cell surface immunolabeling. Similar results were obtained using Western blots performed on membrane or cytoplasm-enriched cell fractions. Finally, an enhanced lactate flux into neurons was demonstrated after MCT2 translocation on the cell surface. These observations provide unequivocal evidence that MCT2 is linked to AMPA receptor GluR2/3 subunits and undergoes a similar translocation process in neurons upon activation. MCT2 emerges as a novel component of the synaptic machinery putatively linking neuroenergetics to synaptic transmission.

  13. Attenuation of chemokine receptor function and surface expression as an immunomodulatory strategy employed by human cytomegalovirus is linked to vGPCR US28

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Theresa; Reichel, Anna; Larsen, Olav;

    2016-01-01

    and constitutive surface expression in HEK293T cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this effect is not mediated by receptor heteromerization but via signaling crosstalk. Additionally, we show that in HCMV, strain TB40E, infected HUVEC the surface expression of CXCR4 is strongly downregulated, whereas in TB40E...

  14. Potential of nonpeptide (ant)agonists to rescue vasopressin V2 receptor mutants for the treatment of X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E.L.; Deen, P.M.T.; Robben, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    According to the body's need, water is reabsorbed from the pro-urine that is formed by ultrafiltration in the kidney. This process is regulated by the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP), which binds to its type 2 receptor (V2R) in the kidney. Mutations in the gene encoding the V2R often

  15. Establishing a cellular FRET-based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor proNGF-induced cross-linking of sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldal, Sune; Kjaergaard, Maj M; Alwasel, Saleh; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the proform of the nerve growth factor (proNGF) is crucial for eliminating superfluous cells during neuronal development it also promotes apoptosis following brain trauma and neuronal injury. The apoptotic signal is elicited upon formation of a trimeric receptor complex also containing the vps10p domain receptor sortilin and the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). However, proNGF-induced receptor complex formation has been difficult to directly assess other than by western blotting. We here describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescence plate reader assay to monitor the interaction between fluorescently tagged sortilin and p75(NTR) in live cells. The method is based on a standard fluorescent plate reader found in many biochemical laboratories and the results are evaluated using a microscopy-based quantified sensitized acceptor emission FRET approach making use of a pair of FRET standard constructs. As a result, the effect of proNGF on the interaction between sortilin and p75(NTR) can be evaluated in live cells allowing for screening and selection of therapeutic compounds interfering with proNGF-induced cell death.

  16. Binding Mode of an α-Amino Acid-Linked Quinoxaline-2,3-dione Analogue at Glutamate Receptor Subtype GluK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demmer, Charles S; Møller, Charlotte; Brown, Patricia M G E;

    2015-01-01

    Two α-amino acid-functionalized quinoxalines, 1a (CNG-10301) and 1b (CNG-10300), of a quinoxaline moiety coupled to an amino acid moiety were designed, synthesized, and characterized pharmacologically. While 1a displayed low affinity at native AMPA, KA, and NMDA receptors, and at homomeric GluK1,...

  17. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    treatment did not lead to formation of low affinity GABA receptors. Studies of the ultrastructure of the cells (4-day-old cultures) showed that exposure to bromide or valinomycin mimicked the ability of THIP to enhance the cytoplasmic density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles...

  18. Heat-stable enterotoxin receptor/guanylyl cyclase C is an oligomer consisting of functionally distinct subunits, which are non-covalently linked in the intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); E. van der Wiel; M.L. Hom; L.H. Luthjens; H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractGuanylyl cyclase (GC) C is a heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) receptor with a monomeric M(r) of approximately 140,000. We calculated from its hydrodynamic parameters that an active GC-C complex has a M(r) of 393,000, suggesting that GC-C is a trimer under nativ

  19. Non-charged amino acids from three different domains contribute to link agonist binding to channel gating in alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Marcos; Mulet, José; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco; Criado, Manuel

    2007-10-01

    Binding of agonists to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors results in channel opening. Previously, we have shown that several charged residues at three different domains of the alpha7 nicotinic receptor are involved in coupling binding and gating, probably through a network of electrostatic interactions. This network, however, could also be integrated by other residues. To test this hypothesis, non-charged amino acids were mutated and expression levels and electrophysiological responses of mutant receptors were determined. Mutants at positions Asn47 and Gln48 (loop 2), Ile130, Trp134, and Gln140 (loop 7), and Thr264 (M2-M3 linker) showed poor or null functional responses, despite significant membrane expression. By contrast, mutants F137A and S265A exhibited a gain of function effect. In all cases, changes in dose-response relationships were small, EC(50) values being between threefold smaller and fivefold larger, arguing against large modifications of agonist binding. Peak currents decayed at the same rate in all receptors except two, excluding large effects on desensitization. Thus, the observed changes could be mostly caused by alterations of the gating characteristics. Moreover, analysis of double mutants showed an interconnection between some residues in these domains, especially Gln48 with Ile130, suggesting a potential coupling between agonist binding and channel gating through these amino acids.

  20. The small GTP-binding protein Rho links G protein-coupled receptors and Gα12 to the serum response element and to cellular transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Christian; Coso, Omar A.; Montaner, Silvia; Xu, Ningzhi; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    1997-01-01

    Receptors coupled to heterotrimeric G proteins can effectively stimulate growth promoting pathways in a large variety of cell types, and if persistently activated, these receptors can also behave as dominant-acting oncoproteins. Consistently, activating mutations for G proteins of the Gαs and Gαi2 families were found in human tumors; and members of the Gαq and Gα12 families are fully transforming when expressed in murine fibroblasts. In an effort aimed to elucidate the molecular events involved in proliferative signaling through heterotrimeric G proteins we have focused recently on gene expression regulation. Using NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors as a model system, we have observed that activation of this transforming G protein-coupled receptors induces the rapid expression of a variety of early responsive genes, including the c-fos protooncogene. One of the c-fos promoter elements, the serum response element (SRE), plays a central regulatory role, and activation of SRE-dependent transcription has been found to be regulated by several proteins, including the serum response factor and the ternary complex factor. With the aid of reporter plasmids for gene expression, we observed here that stimulation of m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors potently induced SRE-driven reporter gene activity in NIH 3T3 cells. In these cells, only the Gα12 family of heterotrimeric G protein α subunits strongly induced the SRE, while Gβ1γ2 dimers activated SRE to a more limited extent. Furthermore, our study provides strong evidence that m1, Gα12 and the small GTP-binding protein RhoA are components of a novel signal transduction pathway that leads to the ternary complex factor-independent transcriptional activation of the SRE and to cellular transformation. PMID:9294169

  1. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    GABA has been shown to exert a neurotrophic like activity by enhancing the morphological and functional maturation of neurons. Mechanisms involved in this effect of GABA are largely unknown but since GABA has been shown to mediate a hyperpolarizing action on neurons it can be assumed...... that this action might be important. In order to investigate this possibility, the ability to mimic the trophic actions of GABA of different agents known to influence the membrane potential or the GABA gated chloride channels was studied. Hence, GABA receptor expression as well as the ultrastructure of cerebellar...... granule cells were monitored after exposure of the cells in culture to either bromide, valinomycin or picrotoxin. It was found that cells which at early developmental stages (4 days in culture) were exposed to bromide or valinomycin expressed low affinity GABA receptors similar to cells treated...

  2. Minireview: Toward the establishment of a link between melatonin and glucose homeostasis: association of melatonin MT2 receptor variants with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitri, Angeliki; Renault, Nicolas; Clement, Nathalie; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2013-08-01

    The existence of interindividual variations in G protein-coupled receptor sequences has been recognized early on. Recent advances in large-scale exon sequencing techniques are expected to dramatically increase the number of variants identified in G protein-coupled receptors, giving rise to new challenges regarding their functional characterization. The current minireview will illustrate these challenges based on the MTNR1B gene, which encodes the melatonin MT2 receptor, for which exon sequencing revealed 40 rare nonsynonymous variants in the general population and in type 2 diabetes (T2D) cohorts. Functional characterization of these MT2 mutants revealed 14 mutants with loss of Gi protein activation that associate with increased risk of T2D development. This repertoire of disease-associated mutants is a rich source for structure-activity studies and will help to define the still poorly understood role of melatonin in glucose homeostasis and T2D development in humans. Defining the functional defects in carriers of rare MT2 mutations will help to provide personalized therapies to these patients in the future.

  3. Preferential effects of leptin on CD4 T cells in central and peripheral immune system are critically linked to the expression of leptin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Yong; Lim, Ju Hyun [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung Won [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Arts and Sciences (S.W.C), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 18450 (United States); Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Seong-Tae [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seon; Cho, You Sook [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-600 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Eunyoung, E-mail: chun.eunyoung@gmail.com [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Young, E-mail: thylee@med.skku.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-09

    Leptin can enhance thymopoiesis and modulate the T-cell immune response. However, it remains controversial whether these effects correlate with the expression of leptin receptor, ObR. We herein addressed this issue by using in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems. Leptin treatment in both ob/ob mice and normal young mice induced increases of CD4 SP thymocytes in thymus and CD4 T cells in the periphery. Interestingly, expression of the long form ObR was significantly restricted to DN, DP and CD4 SP, but not CD8 SP thymocytes. Moreover, in the reaggregated DP thymocyte cultures with leptin plus TSCs, leptin profoundly induced differentiation of CD4 SP but not CD8 SP thymocytes, suggesting that the effects of leptin on thymocyte differentiation might be closely related to the expression of leptin receptor in developing thymocytes. Surprisingly, ObR expression was markedly higher in peripheral CD4 T cells than that in CD8 T cells. Furthermore, leptin treatment with or without IL-2 and PHA had preferential effects on cell proliferation of CD4 T cells compared to that of CD8 T cells. Collectively, these data provide evidence that the effects of leptin on differentiation and proliferation of CD4 T cells might be closely related to the expression of leptin receptor.

  4. N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide cross-linking suggests a central core of helices II in oligomers of URF13, the pore-forming T-toxin receptor of cms-T maize mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads, D.M. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)]|[North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Kaspi, C.I.; Siedow, J.N. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Levings, C.S. III [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1994-08-16

    URF13 is a mitochondrially encoded, integral membrane protein found only in maize carrying the cms-T cytoplasm. URF13 is associated with cytoplasmic male sterility, Texas type, and causes susceptibility to the fungal pathogens Bipolaris maydis race T and Phyllosticta maydis. URF13 is predicted to contain three transmembrane {alpha}-helices and is a receptor for the pathotoxins (T-toxins) produced by B. maydis race T and P. maydis. Binding of T-toxin to URF13 leads to membrane permeability. Cross-linking of URF13 oligomers with N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) protects Escherichia coli cells expressing URF13 and cms-T mitochondria from the permeability caused by T-toxin or methomyl. Using mutated forms of URF13 expressed in E. coli cells, the authors determined the molecular mechanism of DCCD protection. They separately changed Lys-37 in helix II to isoleucine (K37I-URF13) and Lys-32 in the helix I/helix II loop region to alanine (K32A-URF13). DCCD treatment of K37I-URF13-expressing cells did not protect the cells from permeability caused by T-toxin or methomyl. DCCD cross-linking was greatly reduced in K37I-URF13 and in D39V-URF13-expressing cells, but it was unaffected in K32A-URF13-expressing cells. Binding of methomyl or T-toxin decreases DCCD cross-linking of URF13 oligomers expressed in either E. coli or cms-T mitochondria. They conclude that Asp-39 in helix II is cross-linked by DCCD to Lys-37 in helix II of an adjacent URF13 molecule and that this cross-linking protects against toxin-mediated permeabilization. The results also indicate that helices II form a central core in URF13 oligomers.

  5. Binding mode of an α-amino acid-linked quinoxaline-2,3-dione analogue at glutamate receptor subtype GluK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Charles S; Møller, Charlotte; Brown, Patricia M G E; Han, Liwei; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte; Bowie, Derek; Frydenvang, Karla; Kastrup, Jette S; Bunch, Lennart

    2015-06-17

    Two α-amino acid-functionalized quinoxalines, 1a (CNG-10301) and 1b (CNG-10300), of a quinoxaline moiety coupled to an amino acid moiety were designed, synthesized, and characterized pharmacologically. While 1a displayed low affinity at native AMPA, KA, and NMDA receptors, and at homomeric GluK1,3 receptors, the affinity for GluK2 was in the midmicromolar range (Ki = 136 μM), 1b displayed low to midmicromolar range binding affinity at all the iGluRs (Ki = 9-126 μM). In functional experiments (outside-out patches excised from transfected HEK293T cells), 100 μM 1a partially blocked GluK1 (33% peak response), while GluK2 was unaffected (96% peak response). Furthermore, 1a was shown not to be an agonist at GluK1 and GluK2 at 100 μM. On the other hand, 100 μM 1b fully antagonized GluK1 (8% peak response) but only partially blocked GluK2 (33% peak response). An X-ray structure at 2.3 Å resolution of 1b in the GluK1-LBD (ligand-binding domain) disclosed an unexpected binding mode compared to the predictions made during the design phase; the quinoxaline moiety remains to act as an amino acid bioisostere, but the amino acid moiety is oriented into a new area within the GluK1 receptor. The structure of the GluK1-LBD with 1b showed a large variation in domain openings of the three molecules from 25° to 49°, demonstrating that the GluK1-LBD is capable of undergoing major domain movements.

  6. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and tracazolate, and a diaryltriazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin and LY81067 on the saturable binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS in cortical membranes are compared. The present findings are consistent with the interpretation that /sup 35/S-TBPS bind at or near the picrotoxin-sensitive anion recognition sites of the GABA/benzodiazepine/picrotoxin receptor complex.

  7. Loss of somatostatin receptor subtype 2 in prostate cancer is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype, high tumor cell proliferation and predicts early metastatic and biochemical relapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan K Hennigs

    Full Text Available Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2 is the most frequently expressed SSTR subtype in normal human tissues. SSTR2 expression is differentially regulated in various tumor types and therapeutic somatostatin analogs binding to SSTR2 are in clinical use. In prostate cancers highly contradictory results in terms of SSTR2 expression and its consequences have been published over the past years. The aim of this study was to clarify prevalence and clinical significance of SSTR2 expression in prostate cancer. Therefore, quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC using a tissue microarray containing samples from 3,261 prostate cancer patients with extensive clinical and molecular cancer characteristics and oncological follow-up data was performed. IHC data was compared to publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus datasets of human prostate cancer gene expression arrays. While membranous SSTR2 staining was always seen in normal prostate epithelium, SSTR2 staining was absent in more than half (56.1% of 2,195 interpretable prostate cancer samples. About 13% of all analyzed prostate cancers showed moderate to strong cytoplasmic and membranous SSTR2 staining. Staining intensities were inversely correlated with high Gleason grade, advanced pT category, high tumor cell proliferation (p<0.0001 each, high pre-operative PSA levels, (p = 0.0011 and positive surgical margins (p = 0.006. In silico analysis confirmed lower SSTR2 gene expression in prostate cancers vs. normal adjacent tissue (p = 0.0424, prostate cancer metastases vs. primary cancers (p = 0.0011 and recurrent vs. non-recurrent prostate cancers (p = 0.0438. PSA-free survival gradually declined with SSTR2 staining intensity (p<0.0001. SSTR2-negative cancers were more likely to develop metastases over time (p<0.05. In conclusion, most prostate cancers are indeed SSTR2-negative and loss of SSTR2 strongly predicts an unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis. Therefore, SSTR2

  8. Distinct α subunit variations of the hypothalamic GABAA receptor triplets (αβγ are linked to hibernating state in hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alò Raffaella

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural arrangement of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR is known to be crucial for the maintenance of cerebral-dependent homeostatic mechanisms during the promotion of highly adaptive neurophysiological events of the permissive hibernating rodent, i.e the Syrian golden hamster. In this study, in vitro quantitative autoradiography and in situ hybridization were assessed in major hypothalamic nuclei. Reverse Transcription Reaction-Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR tests were performed for specific GABAAR receptor subunit gene primers synthases of non-hibernating (NHIB and hibernating (HIB hamsters. Attempts were made to identify the type of αβγ subunit combinations operating during the switching ON/OFF of neuronal activities in some hypothalamic nuclei of hibernators. Results Both autoradiography and molecular analysis supplied distinct expression patterns of all α subunits considered as shown by a strong (p 1 ratio (over total α subunits considered in the present study in the medial preoptic area (MPOA and arcuate nucleus (Arc of NHIBs with respect to HIBs. At the same time α2 subunit levels proved to be typical of periventricular nucleus (Pe and Arc of HIB, while strong α4 expression levels were detected during awakening state in the key circadian hypothalamic station, i.e. the suprachiasmatic nucleus (Sch; 60%. Regarding the other two subunits (β and γ, elevated β3 and γ3 mRNAs levels mostly characterized MPOA of HIBs, while prevalently elevated expression concentrations of the same subunits were also typical of Sch, even though this time during the awakening state. In the case of Arc, notably elevated levels were obtained for β3 and γ2 during hibernating conditions. Conclusion We conclude that different αβγ subunits are operating as major elements either at the onset of torpor or during induction of the arousal state in the Syrian golden hamster. The identification of a brain regional

  9. Is There a Link between Human Herpesvirus Infection and Toll-like Receptors in the Pathogenesis of Pityriasis Rosea? A Case-control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ela, Mostafa Abou; Shaarawy, Eman; El-Komy, Mohamed; Fawzy, Marwa; Hay, Rania Abdel; Hegazy, Rehab; Sharobim, Amin; Moustafa, Nadine; Rashed, Laila; Sayed Amr, Khalda Sayed

    2016-12-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV) 6 and 7 are involved in the pathogenesis of pityriasis rosea (PR). Our aim was to evaluate the role of the innate immune response in PR through the detection of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 expression in the skin of affected patients and to detect the possibility of being induced by HHV-6 and/or HHV-7 viral coexistence in these patients. Twenty-four patients with PR and 24 healthy controls were included in this case-control study. Biopsy was obtained from the PR lesion and from the healthy skin of controls for detection of HHV-6 and 7 as well as TLRs 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 gene expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Significantly elevated expression of all studied TLRs and significantly higher viral load of HHV-6 and 7 in PR cases were detected. A significant higher expression of TLR2 and 4 in HHV-7 positive cases and a significant positive correlation between TLR9 and HHV-7 viral load were documented. HHV6 and 7 may also be involved in the pathogenesis of PR via TLR pathways.

  10. Downregulation of retinoic acid receptor-β2expression is linked to aberrant methylation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Min Liu; Fang Ding; Ming-Zhou Guo; Li-Yong Zhang; Min Wu; Zhi-Hua Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of hypermethylation in the loss ofretinoic acid receptorβ2(RARβ2) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).METHODS: The role of hypermethylation in RAR,β2 gene silencing in 6 ESCC cell lines was determined by methylationspecific PCR (MSP), and its methylation status was compared with RARβ2 mRNA expression by RT-PCR. The MSP results were confirmed by bisulfite sequencing of RARβ2promoter regions. RESULTS: Methylation was detected in 4 of the 6 cell lines, and the expression of RARβ2was markedly downregulated in 3 of the 4 methylated cell lines. The expression of RARβ2was restored in one RARβ2-downregulated cell line with the partial demethylation of promoter region of RARβ after 5aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dc) treatment.CONCLUSION: The methylation of the 5' region may play an important role in the downregulation of RARβ2 in someESCC cell lines, suggesting that multiple mechanisms contribute to the loss of RARβ2expression in ESCC cell lines. This study may have clinical applications for treatment and prevention of ESCC.

  11. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/-S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and trazolate, and a diaryl-triazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin

  12. Communication Links

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This interactive tutorial helps learners to: Identify key upward, lateral, downward, and informal communication links in their organizations. , Reflect on the benefits, control, satisfaction, information filters, and feedback mechanism of various communication links in the organizations. OCL1000 Communicating Change in Complex Organizations

  13. Operative links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2010-01-01

    as networks: second, a semantic perspective on discourses and concepts of health, and, third, a health pedagogical perspective on participation, intervention, and roles. This paper argues for the importance of 'operative links' between different levels in health strategies. It is proposed that such links...

  14. In-depth neuropharmacokinetic analysis of antipsychotics based on a novel approach to estimate unbound target-site concentration in CNS regions: link to spatial receptor occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loryan, I; Melander, E; Svensson, M; Payan, M; König, F; Jansson, B; Hammarlund-Udenaes, M

    2016-11-01

    The current study provides a novel in-depth assessment of the extent of antipsychotic drugs transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into various brain regions, as well as across the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). This is combined with an estimation of cellular barrier transport and a systematic evaluation of nonspecific brain tissue binding. The study is based on the new Combinatory Mapping Approach (CMA), here further developed for the assessment of unbound drug neuropharmacokinetics in regions of interest (ROI), referred as CMA-ROI. We show that differences exist between regions in both BBB transport and in brain tissue binding. The most dramatic spatial differences in BBB transport were found for the P-glycoprotein substrates risperidone (5.4-fold) and paliperidone (4-fold). A higher level of transporter-mediated protection was observed in the cerebellum compared with other brain regions with a more pronounced efflux for quetiapine, risperidone and paliperidone. The highest BBB penetration was documented in the frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus (haloperidol, olanzapine), indicating potential influx mechanisms. BSCB transport was in general characterized by more efficient efflux compared with the brain regions. Regional tissue binding was significantly different for haloperidol, clozapine, risperidone and quetiapine (maximally 1.9-fold). Spatial differences in local unbound concentrations were found to significantly influence cortical 5-HT2A receptor occupancy for risperidone and olanzapine. In conclusion, the observed regional differences in BBB penetration may potentially be important factors contributing to variations in therapeutic effect and side effect profiles among antipsychotic drugs.

  15. Integrative analysis of deep sequencing data identifies estrogen receptor early response genes and links ATAD3B to poor survival in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Ovaska

    Full Text Available Identification of responsive genes to an extra-cellular cue enables characterization of pathophysiologically crucial biological processes. Deep sequencing technologies provide a powerful means to identify responsive genes, which creates a need for computational methods able to analyze dynamic and multi-level deep sequencing data. To answer this need we introduce here a data-driven algorithm, SPINLONG, which is designed to search for genes that match the user-defined hypotheses or models. SPINLONG is applicable to various experimental setups measuring several molecular markers in parallel. To demonstrate the SPINLONG approach, we analyzed ChIP-seq data reporting PolII, estrogen receptor α (ERα, H3K4me3 and H2A.Z occupancy at five time points in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line after estradiol stimulus. We obtained 777 ERa early responsive genes and compared the biological functions of the genes having ERα binding within 20 kb of the transcription start site (TSS to genes without such binding site. Our results show that the non-genomic action of ERα via the MAPK pathway, instead of direct ERa binding, may be responsible for early cell responses to ERα activation. Our results also indicate that the ERα responsive genes triggered by the genomic pathway are transcribed faster than those without ERα binding sites. The survival analysis of the 777 ERα responsive genes with 150 primary breast cancer tumors and in two independent validation cohorts indicated the ATAD3B gene, which does not have ERα binding site within 20 kb of its TSS, to be significantly associated with poor patient survival.

  16. A link between high serum levels of human chorionic gonadotrophin and chorionic expression of its mature functional receptor (LHCGR in Down's syndrome pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer Kevin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG is released from placental trophoblasts and is involved in establishing pregnancy by maintaining progesterone secretion from the corpus luteum. Serum hCG is detected in the maternal circulation within the first 2–3 wks of gestation and peaks at the end of the first trimester before declining. In Down's syndrome (DS pregnancies, serum hCG remains significantly high compared to gestation age-matched uncompromised pregnancies. It has been proposed that increased serum hCG levels could be due to transcriptional hyper-activation of the CGB (hCG beta gene, or an increased half life of glycosylated hCG hormone, or both. Another possibility is that serum hCG levels remain high due to reduced availability of the hormone's cognate receptor, LHCGR, leading to lack of hormone utilization. We have tested this hypothesis by quantifying the expression of the hCG beta (CGB RNA, LHCGR RNA and LHCGR proteins in chorionic villous samples. We demonstrate that chorionic expression of hCG beta (CGB mRNA directly correlates with high serum hCG levels. The steady-state synthesis of LHCGR mRNA (exons 1–5 in DS pregnancies was significantly higher than that of controls, but the expression of full-length LHCGR mRNA (exons 1–11 in DS was comparable to that of uncompromised pregnancies. However, the synthesis of high molecular weight mature LHCGR proteins was significantly reduced in DS compared to uncompromised pregnancies, suggesting a lack of utilization of circulating hCG in DS pregnancies.

  17. Optineurin is an autophagy receptor for damaged mitochondria in parkin-mediated mitophagy that is disrupted by an ALS-linked mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yvette C.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular quality control pathway in which the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin targets damaged mitochondria for degradation by autophagosomes. We examined the role of optineurin in mitophagy, as mutations in optineurin are causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and glaucoma, diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate the parkin-dependent recruitment of optineurin to mitochondria damaged by depolarization or reactive oxygen species. Parkin’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity is required to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins, allowing optineurin to stably associate with ubiquitinated mitochondria via its ubiquitin binding domain; in the absence of parkin, optineurin transiently localizes to damaged mitochondrial tips. Following optineurin recruitment, the omegasome protein double FYVE-containing protein 1 (DFCP1) transiently localizes to damaged mitochondria to initialize autophagosome formation and the recruitment of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3). Optineurin then induces autophagosome formation around damaged mitochondria via its LC3 interaction region (LIR) domain. Depletion of endogenous optineurin inhibits LC3 recruitment to mitochondria and inhibits mitochondrial degradation. These defects are rescued by expression of siRNA-resistant wild-type optineurin, but not by an ALS-associated mutant in the ubiquitin binding domain (E478G), or by optineurin with a mutation in the LIR domain. Optineurin and p62/SQSTM1 are independently recruited to separate domains on damaged mitochondria, and p62 is not required for the recruitment of either optineurin or LC3 to damaged mitochondria. Thus, our study establishes an important role for optineurin as an autophagy receptor in parkin-mediated mitophagy and demonstrates that defects in a single pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases with distinct pathologies. PMID:25294927

  18. Evaluation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in normal and breast tumor tissues and their link with breast cancer prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Daniela; Lemieux, Julie; Côté, Marc-André; Provencher, Louise; Laflamme, Christian; Barabé, Frédéric; Jacob, Simon; Michaud, Annick; Diorio, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene is associated with worse prognosis and decreased overall survival in breast cancer patients. The HER2 gene contains several polymorphisms; two of the best-characterized HER2 polymorphisms are Ile655Val and Ala1170Pro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between these two HER2 polymorphisms in normal breast and breast cancer tissues and known breast cancer prognostic factors in a retrospective cohort study of 73 women with non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. HER2 polymorphisms were assessed in breast cancer tissue and normal breast tissue using TaqMan assay. Ala1170Pro polymorphism in normal breast tissue was associated with age at diagnosis (p = 0.007), tumor size (p = 0.004) and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.06). Similar significant associations in cancer tissues were observed. No association between the Ile655Val polymorphism and prognostic factors were observed. However, we found significant differences in the distribution of Ile655Val (p = 0.03) and Ala1170Pro (p = 0.01) genotypes between normal breast and breast tumor tissues. This study demonstrates that only the Ala1170Pro polymorphism is associated with prognostic factors in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Moreover, our results suggest that both HER2 polymorphisms could play a significant role in carcinogenesis in non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer women.

  19. Aberrant localization of fusion receptors involved in regulated exocytosis in salivary glands of Sjögren's syndrome patients is linked to ectopic mucin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, María-José; Sánchez, Marianela; Aguilera, Sergio; Alliende, Cecilia; Bahamondes, Verónica; Molina, Claudio; Quest, Andrew F G; Urzúa, Ulises; Castro, Isabel; González, Sergio; Sung, Hsiao Hsin; Albornoz, Amelina; Hermoso, Marcela; Leyton, Cecilia; González, María-Julieta

    2012-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that mainly affects tear and salivary glands, whereby SS-patients frequently complain of eye and mouth dryness. Salivary acinar cells of SS-patients display alterations in their cell polarity; which may affect the correct localization and function of proteins involved in regulated exocytosis. Here we determined whether the expression and localization of SNARE proteins (membrane fusion receptors) involved in regulated secretion, such as VAMP8, syntaxin 3 (STX3), STX4 and SNAP-23 were altered in salivary glands (SG) from SS-patients. Additionally, we investigated SNARE proteins function, by evaluating their ability to form SNARE complexes under basal conditions. In SG from SS-patients and control subjects mRNA and proteins levels of SNARE complex components were determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. SNARE protein distribution and mucin exocytosis were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. In SS-patients, the expression levels of mRNA and protein for VAMP8, STX4 and STX3 were altered. STX4, STX3, SNAP-23 and VAMP8 relocated from the apical to the basal region of acinar cells. Increased formation of SNARE complexes in a manner independent of external stimuli for secretion was detected. Mucins were detected in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Presence of mucins in the ECM, together with the observed alterations in SNARE protein localization is indicative of ectopic exocytosis. In the context of SS, such aberrantly localized mucins are likely to favor a pro-inflammatory response, which may represent an important initial step in the pathogenesis of this disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrative analysis of deep sequencing data identifies estrogen receptor early response genes and links ATAD3B to poor survival in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Ovaska

    Full Text Available Identification of responsive genes to an extra-cellular cue enables characterization of pathophysiologically crucial biological processes. Deep sequencing technologies provide a powerful means to identify responsive genes, which creates a need for computational methods able to analyze dynamic and multi-level deep sequencing data. To answer this need we introduce here a data-driven algorithm, SPINLONG, which is designed to search for genes that match the user-defined hypotheses or models. SPINLONG is applicable to various experimental setups measuring several molecular markers in parallel. To demonstrate the SPINLONG approach, we analyzed ChIP-seq data reporting PolII, estrogen receptor α (ERα, H3K4me3 and H2A.Z occupancy at five time points in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line after estradiol stimulus. We obtained 777 ERa early responsive genes and compared the biological functions of the genes having ERα binding within 20 kb of the transcription start site (TSS to genes without such binding site. Our results show that the non-genomic action of ERα via the MAPK pathway, instead of direct ERa binding, may be responsible for early cell responses to ERα activation. Our results also indicate that the ERα responsive genes triggered by the genomic pathway are transcribed faster than those without ERα binding sites. The survival analysis of the 777 ERα responsive genes with 150 primary breast cancer tumors and in two independent validation cohorts indicated the ATAD3B gene, which does not have ERα binding site within 20 kb of its TSS, to be significantly associated with poor patient survival.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α and γ are linked with alcohol consumption in mice and withdrawal and dependence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blednov, Yuri A; Benavidez, Jillian M; Black, Mendy; Ferguson, Laura B; Schoenhard, Grant L; Goate, Alison M; Edenberg, Howard J; Wetherill, Leah; Hesselbrock, Victor; Foroud, Tatiana; Harris, R Adron

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists reduce voluntary ethanol (EtOH) consumption in rat models and are promising therapeutics in the treatment for drug addictions. We studied the effects of different classes of PPAR agonists on chronic EtOH intake and preference in mice with a genetic predisposition for high alcohol consumption and then examined human genomewide association data for polymorphisms in PPAR genes in alcohol-dependent subjects. Two different behavioral tests were used to measure intake of 15% EtOH in C57BL/6J male mice: 24-hour 2-bottle choice and limited access (3-hour) 2-bottle choice, drinking in the dark. We measured the effects of pioglitazone (10 and 30 mg/kg), fenofibrate (50 and 150 mg/kg), GW0742 (10 mg/kg), tesaglitazar (1.5 mg/kg), and bezafibrate (25 and 75 mg/kg) on EtOH intake and preference. Fenofibric acid, the active metabolite of fenofibrate, was quantified in mouse plasma, liver, and brain by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Data from a human genome-wide association study (GWAS) completed in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) were then used to analyze the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different PPAR genes (PPARA, PPARD, PPARG, and PPARGC1A) with 2 phenotypes: DSM-IV alcohol dependence (AD) and the DSM-IV criterion of withdrawal. Activation of 2 isoforms of PPARs, α and γ, reduced EtOH intake and preference in the 2 different consumption tests in mice. However, a selective PPARδ agonist or a pan agonist for all 3 PPAR isoforms did not decrease EtOH consumption. Fenofibric acid, the active metabolite of the PPARα agonist fenofibrate, was detected in liver, plasma, and brain after 1 or 8 days of oral treatment. The GWAS from COGA supported an association of SNPs in PPARA and PPARG with alcohol withdrawal and PPARGC1A with AD but found no association for PPARD with either phenotype. We provide convergent evidence using both mouse and human

  2. Dopamine receptors and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees Ahmad; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2008-08-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in regulating renal function and blood pressure. Dopamine synthesis and dopamine receptor subtypes have been shown in the kidney. Dopamine acts via cell surface receptors coupled to G proteins; the receptors are classified via pharmacologic and molecular cloning studies into two families, D1-like and D2-like. Two D1-like receptors cloned in mammals, the D1 and D5 receptors (D1A and D1B in rodents), are linked to adenylyl cyclase stimulation. Three D2-like receptors (D2, D3, and D4) have been cloned and are linked mainly to adenylyl cyclase inhibition. Activation of D1-like receptors on the proximal tubules inhibits tubular sodium reabsorption by inhibiting Na/H-exchanger and Na/K-adenosine triphosphatase activity. Reports exist of defective renal dopamine production and/or dopamine receptor function in human primary hypertension and in genetic models of animal hypertension. In humans with essential hypertension, renal dopamine production in response to sodium loading is often impaired and may contribute to hypertension. A primary defect in D1-like receptors and an altered signaling system in proximal tubules may reduce dopamine-mediated effects on renal sodium excretion. The molecular basis for dopamine receptor dysfunction in hypertension is being investigated, and may involve an abnormal posttranslational modification of the dopamine receptor.

  3. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Koestler, Benjamin J.; Waters, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase ...

  4. Link Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, Steve

    Link analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and links. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.

  5. Cyclic di-GMP riboswitch-regulated type IV pili contribute to aggregation of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Eric; Purcell, Erin B; Lafontaine, Daniel A; Fortier, Louis-Charles; Tamayo, Rita; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium that causes intestinal infections with symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that typically regulates the switch from motile, free-living to sessile and multicellular behaviors in Gram-negative bacteria. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP concentration in C. difficile was recently shown to reduce flagellar motility and to increase cell aggregation. In this work, we investigated the role of the primary type IV pilus (T4P) locus in c-di-GMP-dependent cell aggregation. Inactivation of two T4P genes, pilA1 (CD3513) and pilB1 (CD3512), abolished pilus formation and significantly reduced cell aggregation under high c-di-GMP conditions. pilA1 is preceded by a putative c-di-GMP riboswitch, predicted to be transcriptionally active upon c-di-GMP binding. Consistent with our prediction, high intracellular c-di-GMP concentration increased transcript levels of T4P genes. In addition, single-round in vitro transcription assays confirmed that transcription downstream of the predicted transcription terminator was dose dependent and specific to c-di-GMP binding to the riboswitch aptamer. These results support a model in which T4P gene transcription is upregulated by c-di-GMP as a result of its binding to an upstream transcriptionally activating riboswitch, promoting cell aggregation in C. difficile.

  6. Cross-talk between a regulatory small RNA, cyclic-di-GMP signalling and flagellar regulator FlhDC for virulence and bacterial behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, Fenghuan; Biener, Gabriel; Koestler, Benjamin J; Raicu, Valerica; He, Chenyang; Waters, Christopher M; Sundin, George W; Tian, Fang; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a globally dispersed phytopathogen which causes diseases on a wide range of host plants. This pathogen utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress host defense responses, and secretes pectate lyase (Pel) to degrade the plant cell wall. Although the regulatory small RNA (sRNA) RsmB, cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) and flagellar regulator have been reported to affect the regulation of these two virulence factors or multiple cell behaviours such as motility and biofilm formation, the linkage between these regulatory components that coordinate the cell behaviours remain unclear. Here, we revealed a sophisticated regulatory network that connects the sRNA, c-di-GMP signalling and flagellar master regulator FlhDC. We propose multi-tiered regulatory mechanisms that link the FlhDC to the T3SS through three distinct pathways including the FlhDC-FliA-YcgR3937 pathway; the FlhDC-EcpC-RpoN-HrpL pathway; and the FlhDC-rsmB-RsmA-HrpL pathway. Among these, EcpC is the most dominant factor for FlhDC to positively regulate T3SS expression.

  7. CelR, an ortholog of the diguanylate cyclase PleD of Caulobacter, regulates cellulose synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, D Michael; Su, Shengchang; Baccaro, Brenna E; Banta, Lois M; Farrand, Stephen K

    2013-12-01

    Cellulose fibrils play a role in attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to its plant host. While the genes for cellulose biosynthesis in the bacterium have been identified, little is known concerning the regulation of the process. The signal molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) has been linked to the regulation of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in many bacterial species, including A. tumefaciens. In this study, we identified two putative diguanylate cyclase genes, celR (atu1297) and atu1060, that influence production of cellulose in A. tumefaciens. Overexpression of either gene resulted in increased cellulose production, while deletion of celR, but not atu1060, resulted in decreased cellulose biosynthesis. celR overexpression also affected other phenotypes, including biofilm formation, formation of a polar adhesion structure, plant surface attachment, and virulence, suggesting that the gene plays a role in regulating these processes. Analysis of celR and Δcel mutants allowed differentiation between phenotypes associated with cellulose production, such as biofilm formation, and phenotypes probably resulting from c-di-GMP signaling, which include polar adhesion, attachment to plant tissue, and virulence. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that species containing both celR and celA, which encodes the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase, adapted the CelR protein to regulate cellulose production while those that lack celA use CelR, called PleD, to regulate specific processes associated with polar localization and cell division.

  8. Two CpG mutational hot spots in the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) may cause 15% of all human severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M. [National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethseda, MD (United States); Liu, X. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immune function, is caused by various autosomal gene defects, including adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, as well as mutations in the X-linked IL2RG gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Mutational analysis of IL2RG was performed using genomic DNA from males with SCID referred from genetics and immunology centers. Single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) were sought by PCR amplification of each of the 8 IL2RG exons using labelled flanking primers. Sequence of exons with aberrant SSCP detected a majority of unique deleterious IL2RG mutations in 30 unrelated SCID patients. However, multiple mutations were seen at CpG dinucleotides, known to be C{yields}T transversion sites. cDNA 690-691 in exon 5 was mutated in 4 patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690}{yields}T causing an Arg{yields}Cys substitution, and 1 with G{sub 691}{yields}A causing Arg{yields}His. Two other patients had SCID caused by a single mutation in IL2RG exon 7. This C{sub 879}{yields}T, also in a CpG, changed an Arg to STOP, resulting in loss of the SH2-related intracellular domain. In addition to our patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690} and the C{sub 879} mutations have been reported by others, giving an overall incidence of 20% from our lab and 21% from all reported IL2RG SCID mutations. While ADA defects account for approximately 15% of SCID, a striking male SCID predominance suggest up to 70% of the cases are X-linked, due to IL2RG mutation. Thus, screening for mutations at the 2 CpG hot spots we have found in IL2RG can identify the genotype of as many SCID cases as are found by ADA testing.

  9. Prevalence and influence of cys407* Grm2 mutation in Hannover-derived Wistar rats: mGlu2 receptor loss links to alcohol intake, risk taking and emotional behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christian M; Nicolas, Celine S; Choi, Sun-Lim; Roman, Erika; Nylander, Ingrid; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; de Jong, Trynke R; Colombo, Giancarlo; Chastagnier, Denis; Wafford, Keith A; Collingridge, Graham L; Wildt, Sheryl J; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; Robinson, Emma S J; Lodge, David

    2017-03-15

    Modulation of metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) receptor function has huge potential for treating psychiatric and neurological diseases. Development of drugs acting on mGlu2 receptors depends on the development and use of translatable animal models of disease. We report here a stop codon mutation at cysteine 407 in Grm2 (cys407*) that is common in some Wistar rats. Therefore, researchers in this field need to be aware of strains with this mutation. Our genotypic survey found widespread prevalence of the mutation in commercial Wistar strains, particularly those known as Han Wistar. Such Han Wistar rats are ideal for research into the separate roles of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors in CNS function. Previous investigations, unknowingly using such mGlu2 receptor-lacking rats, provide insights into the role of mGlu2 receptors in behaviour. The Grm2 mutant rats, which dominate some selectively bred lines, display characteristics of altered emotionality, impulsivity and risk-related behaviours and increased voluntary alcohol intake compared with their mGlu2 receptor-competent counterparts. In addition, the data further emphasize the potential therapeutic role of mGlu2 receptors in psychiatric and neurological disease, and indicate novel methods of studying the role of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors, 5 years on'. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Transatlantic link

    Science.gov (United States)

    (left) European Geophysical Society (EGS) President Rolf Meissner at AGU Headquarters with (center) Executive Director Fred Spilhaus and (right) Foreign Secretary Juan Roederer. Meissner attended the meeting of AGU's Committee on International Participation (CIP) on February 26, 1988. At that meeting, specific ways of fostering close links between AGU and EGS were discussed.A few weeks later, Roederer and AGU staff, working with EGS Secretary-General Arne Richter at the EGS meeting in Bologna, Italy, March 21-25, planned details of the establishment of an AGU office in Europe. The Copernicus Gesellschaft, a new entity located on the premises of the Max Planck Institute for Aeronomy in Lindau, Federal Republic of Germany, will provide the administrative staff and handle logistics.

  11. Dancing links

    CERN Document Server

    Knuth, Donald E

    2009-01-01

    The author presents two tricks to accelerate depth-first search algorithms for a class of combinatorial puzzle problems, such as tiling a tray by a fixed set of polyominoes. The first trick is to implement each assumption of the search with reversible local operations on doubly linked lists. By this trick, every step of the search affects the data incrementally. The second trick is to add a ghost square that represents the identity of each polyomino. Thus puts the rule that each polyomino be used once on the same footing as the rule that each square be covered once. The coding simplifies to a more abstract form which is equivalent to 0-1 integer programming. More significantly for the total computation time, the search can naturally switch between placing a fixed polyomino or covering a fixed square at different stages, according to a combined heuristic. Finally the author reports excellent performance for his algorithm for some familiar puzzles. These include tiling a hexagon by 19 hexiamonds and the N queen...

  12. Stimulation of innate immunity by in vivo cyclic di-GMP synthesis using adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Seregin, Sergey S; Rastall, David P W; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) stimulates inflammation by initiating innate immune cell recruitment and triggering the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. These properties make c-di-GMP a promising candidate for use as a vaccine adjuvant, and numerous studies have demonstrated that administration of purified c-di-GMP with different antigens increases protection against infection in animal models. Here, we have developed a novel approach to produce c-di-GMP inside host cells as an adjuvant to exploit a host-pathogen interaction and initiate an innate immune response. We have demonstrated that c-di-GMP can be synthesized in vivo by transducing a diguanylate cyclase (DGC) gene into mammalian cells using an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector. Expression of DGC led to the production of c-di-GMP in vitro and in vivo, and this was able to alter proinflammatory gene expression in murine tissues and increase the secretion of numerous cytokines and chemokines when administered to animals. Furthermore, coexpression of DGC modestly increased T-cell responses to a Clostridium difficile antigen expressed from an adenovirus vaccine, although no significant differences in antibody titers were observed. This adenovirus c-di-GMP delivery system offers a novel method to administer c-di-GMP as an adjuvant to stimulate innate immunity during vaccination.

  13. Liposomes loaded with a STING pathway ligand, cyclic di-GMP, enhance cancer immunotherapy against metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Miyabe, Hiroko; Hyodo, Mamoru; Sato, Yusuke; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-10-28

    Malignant melanomas escape immunosurveillance via the loss/down-regulation of MHC-I expression. Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to function as essential effector cells for eliminating melanomas. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a ligand of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signal pathway, can be thought of as a new class of adjuvant against cancer. However, it is yet to be tested, because technologies for delivering c-di-GMP to the cytosol are required. Herein, we report that c-di-GMP efficiently activates NK cells and induces antitumor effects against malignant melanomas when loaded in YSK05 lipid containing liposomes, by assisting in the efficient delivery of c-di-GMP to the cytosol. The intravenous administration of c-di-GMP encapsulated within YSK05-liposomes (c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip) into mice efficiently induced the production of type I interferon (IFN) as well as the activation of NK cells, resulting in a significant antitumor effect in a lung metastasis mouse model using B16-F10. This antitumor effect was dominated by NK cells. The infiltration of NK cells was observed in the lungs with B16-F10 melanomas. These findings indicate that the c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip induces MHC-I non-restricted antitumor immunity mediated by NK cells. Consequently, c-di-GMP/YSK05-Lip represents a potentially new adjuvant system for use in immunotherapy against malignant melanomas.

  14. Multiple diguanylate cyclase-coordinated regulation of pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yicai; Yuan, Mingjun; Mohanty, Anee

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide signalling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays an essential role in regulating microbial virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and degraded by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes. One intri...

  15. The Bacterial Second Messenger Cyclic di-GMP Regulates Brucella Pathogenesis and Leads to Altered Host Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mike; Harms, Jerome S; Marim, Fernanda M; Armon, Leah; Hall, Cherisse L; Liu, Yi-Ping; Banai, Menachem; Oliveira, Sergio C; Splitter, Gary A; Smith, Judith A

    2016-12-01

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, a chronic debilitating disease significantly impacting global health and prosperity. Much remains to be learned about how Brucella spp. succeed in sabotaging immune host cells and how Brucella spp. respond to environmental challenges. Multiple types of bacteria employ the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) to coordinate responses to shifting environments. To determine the role of c-di-GMP in Brucella physiology and in shaping host-Brucella interactions, we utilized c-di-GMP regulatory enzyme deletion mutants. Our results show that a ΔbpdA phosphodiesterase mutant producing excess c-di-GMP displays marked attenuation in vitro and in vivo during later infections. Although c-di-GMP is known to stimulate the innate sensor STING, surprisingly, the ΔbpdA mutant induced a weaker host immune response than did wild-type Brucella or the low-c-di-GMP guanylate cyclase ΔcgsB mutant. Proteomics analysis revealed that c-di-GMP regulates several processes critical for virulence, including cell wall and biofilm formation, nutrient acquisition, and the type IV secretion system. Finally, ΔbpdA mutants exhibited altered morphology and were hypersensitive to nutrient-limiting conditions. In summary, our results indicate a vital role for c-di-GMP in allowing Brucella to successfully navigate stressful and shifting environments to establish intracellular infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    as a direct result of elevated c-di-GMP content. Overproduction of c-di-GMP causes a decrease in the transcription of virulence factor genes that are regulated by the global virulence regulator Vfr. The low level of Vfr-dependent transcription is caused by a low level of its coactivator, cyclic AMP (c...

  17. N-(4-(4-(2,3-Dichloro- or 2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-butyl)-heterobiarylcarboxamides with Functionalized Linking Chains as High Affinity and Enantioselective D3 Receptor Antagonistsγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Cyriac, George; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Taylor, Michelle; Kumar, Rakesh; Ho, David; Luedtke, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    In the present report, the D3 receptor pharmacophore is modified in the 2,3-diCl-and 2-OCH3-phenyl piperazine class of compounds with the goal to improve D3 receptor affinity and selectivity. This extension of structure-activity relationships (SAR) has resulted in the identification of the first enantioselective D3 antagonists (R- and S-22) to be reported, wherein enantioselectivity is more pronounced at D3 than at D2, and that a binding region on the second extracellular loop (E2) may play a role in both enantioselectivity and D3 receptor selectivity. Moreover, we have discovered some of the most D3-selective compounds reported to date that show high affinity (Ki =1 nM) for D3 and ∼400-fold selectivity over the D2 receptor subtype. Several of these analogues showed exquisite selectivity for D3 receptors over >60 other receptors further underscoring their value as in vivo research tools. These lead compounds also have appropriate physical characteristics for in vivo exploration and therefore will be useful in determining how intrinsic activity at D3 receptors tested in vitro is related to behaviors in animal models of addiction and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19331412

  18. Sex-linked dominant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  19. Comprehensive overexpression analysis of cyclic-di-GMP signalling proteins in the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum reveals diverse effects on motility and virulence phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, H; West, J A; Ramsay, J P; Monson, R E; Griffin, J L; Toth, I K; Salmond, G P C

    2014-07-01

    Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial signalling molecule produced by diguanylate cyclases of the GGDEF-domain family. Elevated c-di-GMP levels or increased GGDEF protein expression is frequently associated with the onset of sessility and biofilm formation in numerous bacterial species. Conversely, phosphodiesterase-dependent diminution of c-di-GMP levels by EAL- and HD-GYP-domain proteins is often accompanied by increased motility and virulence. In this study, we individually overexpressed 23 predicted GGDEF, EAL or HD-GYP-domain proteins encoded by the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum strain SCRI1043. MS-based detection of c-di-GMP and 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'-5')-guanosine in these strains revealed that overexpression of most genes promoted modest 1-10-fold changes in cellular levels of c-di-GMP, with the exception of the GGDEF-domain proteins ECA0659 and ECA3374, which induced 1290- and 7660-fold increases, respectively. Overexpression of most EAL domain proteins increased motility, while overexpression of most GGDEF domain proteins reduced motility and increased poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-glucosamine-dependent flocculation. In contrast to domain-based predictions, overexpression of the EAL protein ECA3549 or the HD-GYP protein ECA3548 increased c-di-GMP concentrations and reduced motility. Most overexpression constructs altered the levels of secreted cellulases, pectinases and proteases, confirming c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in Pe. atrosepticum. However, there was no apparent correlation between virulence-factor induction and the domain class expressed or cellular c-di-GMP levels, suggesting that regulation was in response to specific effectors within the network, rather than total c-di-GMP concentration. Finally, we demonstrated that the cellular localization patterns vary considerably for GGDEF/EAL/HD-GYP proteins, indicating it is a likely factor restricting specific interactions within the c-di-GMP

  20. Occurrence of Cyclic di-GMP-Modulating Output Domains in Cyanobacteria: an Illuminating Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Marco; Koestler, Benjamin J.; Waters, Christopher M.; Williams, Barry L.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microorganisms use a variety of metabolites to respond to external stimuli, including second messengers that amplify primary signals and elicit biochemical changes in a cell. Levels of the second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) are regulated by a variety of environmental stimuli and play a critical role in regulating cellular processes such as biofilm formation and cellular motility. Cyclic di-GMP signaling systems have been largely characterized in pathogenic bacteria; however, proteins that can impact the synthesis or degradation of c-di-GMP are prominent in cyanobacterial species and yet remain largely underexplored. In cyanobacteria, many putative c-di-GMP synthesis or degradation domains are found in genes that also harbor light-responsive signal input domains, suggesting that light is an important signal for altering c-di-GMP homeostasis. Indeed, c-di-GMP-associated domains are often the second most common output domain in photoreceptors—outnumbered only by a histidine kinase output domain. Cyanobacteria differ from other bacteria regarding the number and types of photoreceptor domains associated with c-di-GMP domains. Due to the widespread distribution of c-di-GMP domains in cyanobacteria, we investigated the evolutionary origin of a subset of genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that c-di-GMP signaling systems were present early in cyanobacteria and c-di-GMP genes were both vertically and horizontally inherited during their evolution. Finally, we compared intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in two cyanobacterial species under different light qualities, confirming that light is an important factor for regulating this second messenger in vivo. PMID:23943760

  1. Risk of cardiovascular disease events in patients with type 2 diabetes prescribed the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exenatide twice daily or other glucose-lowering therapies: a retrospective analysis of the LifeLink database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Jennie H; Hoogwerf, Byron J; Herman, William H; Pelletier, Elise M; Smith, Daniel B; Wenten, Made; Hussein, Mohamed A

    2011-01-01

    ...) events among patients with type 2 diabetes compared with other glucose-lowering agent(s). A retrospective database analysis was performed of the LifeLink database of medical and pharmaceutical insurance claims for June 2005 through March 2009...

  2. Linked alternating forms and linked symplectic Grassmannians

    CERN Document Server

    Osserman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by applications to higher-rank Brill-Noether theory and the Bertram-Feinberg-Mukai conjecture, we introduce the concepts of linked alternating and linked symplectic forms on a chain of vector bundles, and show that the linked symplectic Grassmannians parametrizing chains of subbundles isotropic for a given linked symplectic form has good dimensional behavior analogous to that of the classical symplectic Grassmannian.

  3. Angiotensin II, a neuropeptide at the frontier between endocrinology and neuroscience: Is there a link between the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R and Alzheimer’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eGallo-Payet

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β peptide deposition, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, as well as inflammation and vascular damage, are associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Angiotensin II (Ang II is a peripheral hormone, as well as a neuropeptide, which binds two major receptors, namely the Ang II type-1 receptor (AT1R and the type-2 receptor (AT2R. Activation of the AT2R counteracts most of the AT1R-mediated actions, promoting vasodilation, decreasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, both in the brain and in the cardiovascular system. There is evidence that treatment with AT1R blockers (ARBs attenuates learning and memory deficits. Studies suggest that the therapeutic effects of ARBs may reflect this unopposed activation of the AT2R in addition to the inhibition of the AT1R. Within the context of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, modulation of AT2R signaling could improve cognitive performance not only through its action on blood flow/brain microcirculation but also through more specific effects on neurons. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge and potential therapeutic relevance of central actions of this enigmatic receptor. In particular, we highlight the possibility that selective AT2R activation by nonpeptide and highly selective agonists, acting on neuronal plasticity, could represent new pharmacological tools that may help improve impaired cognitive performance in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological cognitive disorders.

  4. Structure and organization of heteromeric AMPA-type glutamate receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herguedas, Beatriz; García-Nafría, Javier; Cais, Ondrej; Fernández-Leiro, Rafael; Krieger, James; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-01-01

    .... This organization is confirmed by cysteine cross-linking in full-length receptors, and it permitted us to determine the structure of an intact GluA2/3 receptor by cryogenic electron microscopy...

  5. The Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Gene Rv1357c/BCG1419c Affects BCG Pellicle Production and In Vivo Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Pedroza-Roldán, César; Vega-Domínguez, Perla Jazmín; Prado-Montes de Oca, Ernesto; Bravo-Madrigal, Jorge; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Koestler, Ben; Waters, Christopher M

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria living in a surface-attached community that contains a heterogeneous population, coated with an extracellular matrix, and showing drug tolerance (biofilms) are often linked to chronic infections. In mycobacteria, the pellicle mode of growth has been equated to an in vitro biofilm and meets several of the criteria mentioned above, while tuberculosis infection presents a chronic (latent) phase of infection. As mycobacteria lack most genes required to control biofilm production by other microorganisms, we deleted or expressed from the hsp60 strong promoter the only known c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. We found changes in pellicle production, cellular protein profiles, lipid production, resistance to nitrosative stress and maintenance in lungs and spleens of immunocompetent BALB/mice. Our results show that pellicle production and capacity to remain within the host are linked in BCG. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing....... The generation of knock-out (KO) mice, intended as a means to define the contributions made by individual receptor subtypes, necessarily marks but an approximation. Furthermore, we must now take into account the stunning complexity of receptor co-operation indicated by the observation of receptor homo......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  7. Control of bacterial exoelectrogenesis by c-AMP-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Phillips, Grace E; Stav, Shira; Lünse, Christina E; McCown, Phillip J; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-28

    Major changes in bacterial physiology including biofilm and spore formation involve signaling by the cyclic dinucleotides c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Recently, another second messenger dinucleotide, c-AMP-GMP, was found to control chemotaxis and colonization by Vibrio cholerae. We have identified a superregulon of genes controlled by c-AMP-GMP in numerous Deltaproteobacteria, including Geobacter species that use extracellular insoluble metal oxides as terminal electron acceptors. This exoelectrogenic process has been studied for its possible utility in energy production and bioremediation. Many genes involved in adhesion, pilin formation, and others that are important for exoelectrogenesis are controlled by members of a variant riboswitch class that selectively bind c-AMP-GMP. These RNAs constitute, to our knowledge, the first known specific receptors for c-AMP-GMP and reveal that this molecule is used by many bacteria to control specialized physiological processes.

  8. Drug discovery targeting heme-based sensors and their coupled activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Eduardo Henrique Silva; Lopes, Luiz Gonzaga de França; Gonzalez, Gonzalo; Gilles-Gonzalez, Marie-Alda

    2017-02-01

    Heme-based sensors have emerged during the last 20years as being a large family of proteins that occur in all kingdoms of life. A myriad of biological adaptations are associated with these sensors, which include vasodilation, bacterial virulence, dormancy, chemotaxis, biofilm formation, among others. Due to the key activities regulated by these proteins along with many other systems that use similar output domains, there is a growing interest in developing small molecules as their regulators. Here, we review the development of potential activators and inhibitors for many of these systems, including human soluble guanylate cyclase, c-di-GMP-related enzymes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis DevR/DevS/DosT (differentially expressed in virulent strain response regulator/sensor/dormancysurvival sensorT), the Rev-erb-α and β nuclear receptor, among others. The possible roles of these molecules as biochemical tools, therapeutic agents, and novel antibiotics are critically examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Linked data management

    CERN Document Server

    Hose, Katja; Schenkel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Linked Data Management presents techniques for querying and managing Linked Data that is available on today’s Web. The book shows how the abundance of Linked Data can serve as fertile ground for research and commercial applications. The text focuses on aspects of managing large-scale collections of Linked Data. It offers a detailed introduction to Linked Data and related standards, including the main principles distinguishing Linked Data from standard database technology. Chapters also describe how to generate links between datasets and explain the overall architecture of data integration systems based on Linked Data. A large part of the text is devoted to query processing in different setups. After presenting methods to publish relational data as Linked Data and efficient centralized processing, the book explores lookup-based, distributed, and parallel solutions. It then addresses advanced topics, such as reasoning, and discusses work related to read-write Linked Data for system interoperation. Desp...

  10. Environmental factors that shape biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyofuku, Masanori; Inaba, Tomohiro; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Obana, Nozomu; Yawata, Yutaka; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to the environment and alter gene expression. Recent studies have revealed the social aspects of bacterial life, such as biofilm formation. Biofilm formation is largely affected by the environment, and the mechanisms by which the gene expression of individual cells affects biofilm development have attracted interest. Environmental factors determine the cell's decision to form or leave a biofilm. In addition, the biofilm structure largely depends on the environment, implying that biofilms are shaped to adapt to local conditions. Second messengers such as cAMP and c-di-GMP are key factors that link environmental factors with gene regulation. Cell-to-cell communication is also an important factor in shaping the biofilm. In this short review, we will introduce the basics of biofilm formation and further discuss environmental factors that shape biofilm formation. Finally, the state-of-the-art tools that allow us investigate biofilms under various conditions are discussed.

  11. The cyclic-di-GMP signaling pathway in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Novak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In nature, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi cycles between the unrelated environments of the Ixodes tick vector and mammalian host. In order to survive transmission between hosts, B. burgdorferi must be able to not only detect changes in its environment, but also rapidly and appropriately respond to these changes. One manner in which this obligate parasite regulates and adapts to its changing environment is through cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP signaling. c-di-GMP has been shown to be instrumental in orchestrating the adaptation of B. burgdorferi to the tick environment. B. burgdorferi possesses only one set of c-di-GMP-metabolizing genes (one diguanylate cyclase and two distinct phosphodiesterases and one c-di-GMP-binding PilZ-domain protein designated as PlzA. While studies in the realm of c-di-GMP signaling in B. burgdorferi have exploded in the last few years, there are still many more questions than answers. Elucidation of the importance of c-di-GMP signaling to B. burgdorferi may lead to the identification of mechanisms that are critical for the survival of B. burgdorferi in the tick phase of the enzootic cycle as well as potentially delineate a role (if any c-di-GMP may play in the transmission and virulence of B. burgdorferi during the enzootic cycle, thereby enabling the development of effective drugs for the prevention and/or treatment of Lyme disease.

  12. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters.

  13. Cyclic Di-GMP modulates the disease progression of Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Adam C; Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W; Waters, Christopher M

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a nearly ubiquitous intracellular signal molecule known to regulate various cellular processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is inversely governed by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, which synthesize and degrade c-di-GMP, respectively. The role of c-di-GMP in the plant pathogen and causal agent of fire blight disease Erwinia amylovora has not been studied previously. Here we demonstrate that three of the five predicted DGC genes in E. amylovora (edc genes, for Erwinia diguanylate cyclase), edcA, edcC, and edcE, are active diguanylate cyclases. We show that c-di-GMP positively regulates the secretion of the main exopolysaccharide in E. amylovora, amylovoran, leading to increased biofilm formation, and negatively regulates flagellar swimming motility. Although amylovoran secretion and biofilm formation are important for the colonization of plant xylem tissues and the development of systemic infections, deletion of the two biofilm-promoting DGCs increased tissue necrosis in an immature-pear infection assay and an apple shoot infection model, suggesting that c-di-GMP negatively regulates virulence. In addition, c-di-GMP inhibited the expression of hrpA, a gene encoding the major structural component of the type III secretion pilus. Our results are the first to describe a role for c-di-GMP in E. amylovora and suggest that downregulation of motility and type III secretion by c-di-GMP during infection plays a key role in the coordination of pathogenesis.

  14. Weierstrass polynomials for links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1997-01-01

    There is a natural way of identifying links in3-space with polynomial covering spaces over thecircle. Thereby any link in 3-space can be definedby a Weierstrass polynomial over the circle. Theequivalence relation for covering spaces over thecircle is, however, completely different from...... that for links in 3-space. This paper initiates a study of the connections between polynomial covering spaces over the circle and links in 3-space....

  15. Structure of STING bound to cyclic di-GMP reveals the mechanism of cyclic dinucleotide recognition by the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Watts, Tylan; Kao, C Cheng; Li, Pingwei

    2012-06-24

    STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is an innate immune sensor of cyclic dinucleotides that regulates the induction of type I interferons. STING's C-terminal domain forms a V-shaped dimer and binds a cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) at the dimer interface by both direct and solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds. Guanines of c-di-GMP stack against the phenolic rings of a conserved tyrosine, and mutations at the c-di-GMP binding surface reduce nucleotide binding and affect signaling.

  16. Linking open vocabularies

    CERN Document Server

    Greifender, Elke; Seadle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Linked Data (LD), Linked Open Data (LOD) and generating a web of data, present the new knowledge sharing frontier. In a philosophical context, LD is an evolving environment that reflects humankinds' desire to understand the world by drawing on the latest technologies and capabilities of the time. LD, while seemingly a new phenomenon did not emerge overnight; rather it represents the natural progression by which knowledge structures are developed, used, and shared. Linked Open Vocabularies is a significant trajectory of LD. Linked Open Vocabularies targets vocabularies that have traditionally b

  17. Ryanodine receptor channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are intracellular Ca2+-permeable channels that provide the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release required for skeletal and cardiac muscle contractions. RyR1 underlies skeletal muscle contraction, and RyR2 fulfills this role in cardiac muscle. Over the past 20 years, numerous mutations in both RyR isoforms have been identified and linked to skeletal and cardiac diseases. Malignant hyperthermia, central core disease, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia have been genetically linked to mutations in either RyR1 or RyR2. Thus, RyR channelopathies are both of interest because they cause significant human diseases and provide model systems that can be studied to elucidate important structure–function relationships of these ion channels. PMID:20179962

  18. Lipoxin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Romano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxins (LXs represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL. In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1. This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed.

  19. Let's "Downscale" Linked Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gueret, Christophe; de Boer, Victor; Schlobach, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Open data policies and linked data publication are powerful tools for increasing transparency, participatory governance, and accountability. A closer look at linked data technologies, however, proves that their design and deployment exclude the majority of the world’s population. It will take small

  20. Typed links in Webvise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    We extended the Webvise open hypermedia system with support for typed links.  The ECDL'99 paper describes these extensions.......We extended the Webvise open hypermedia system with support for typed links.  The ECDL'99 paper describes these extensions....

  1. A cannabinoid link between mitochondria and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Desprez, Tifany; Serrat, Román; Bellocchio, Luigi; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Delamarre, Anna; Cannich, Astrid; Vincent, Peggy; Varilh, Marjorie; Robin, Laurie M; Terral, Geoffrey; García-Fernández, M Dolores; Colavita, Michelangelo; Mazier, Wilfrid; Drago, Filippo; Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Dupuy, Jean-William; Cota, Daniela; Lopez-Rodriguez, Maria-Luz; Barreda-Gómez, Gabriel; Massa, Federico; Grandes, Pedro; Bénard, Giovanni; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-11-24

    Cellular activity in the brain depends on the high energetic support provided by mitochondria, the cell organelles which use energy sources to generate ATP. Acute cannabinoid intoxication induces amnesia in humans and animals, and the activation of type-1 cannabinoid receptors present at brain mitochondria membranes (mtCB1) can directly alter mitochondrial energetic activity. Although the pathological impact of chronic mitochondrial dysfunctions in the brain is well established, the involvement of acute modulation of mitochondrial activity in high brain functions, including learning and memory, is unknown. Here, we show that acute cannabinoid-induced memory impairment in mice requires activation of hippocampal mtCB1 receptors. Genetic exclusion of CB1 receptors from hippocampal mitochondria prevents cannabinoid-induced reduction of mitochondrial mobility, synaptic transmission and memory formation. mtCB1 receptors signal through intra-mitochondrial Gαi protein activation and consequent inhibition of soluble-adenylyl cyclase (sAC). The resulting inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of specific subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport system eventually leads to decreased cellular respiration. Hippocampal inhibition of sAC activity or manipulation of intra-mitochondrial PKA signalling or phosphorylation of the Complex I subunit NDUFS2 inhibit bioenergetic and amnesic effects of cannabinoids. Thus, the G protein-coupled mtCB1 receptors regulate memory processes via modulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. By directly linking mitochondrial activity to memory formation, these data reveal that bioenergetic processes are primary acute regulators of cognitive functions.

  2. Il progetto Linked Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Piccininno

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ItLinked Heritage è uno dei progetti di punta finanziati dalla Commissione europea per alimentare Europeana, il portale dei contenuti culturali digitali europei. Linked Heritage raccoglie, sotto il coordinamento dell’ICCU, un consorzio molto vasto i cui partner provengono da quasi tutti i paesi dell’Unione più Russia e Israele; essi forniranno a Europeana ben 3 milioni di risorse digitali. Oltre al tema dell’aggregazione di contenuti culturali digitali, Linked Heritage sta esplorando altri temi fondamentali per Europeana come il multilinguismo, i linked data e il rapporto con possibili partner commerciali. Linked Heritage è l’ultimo in ordine di tempo di una serie di iniziative progettuali avviate da un consorzio europeo di istituzioni che opera insieme da oltre dieci anni nell’ambito del patrimonio culturale digitale.EnLinked Heritage is one of the flagship projects funded by the European commission to feed Europeana, the portal of the European digital cultural content. Linked Heritage has a very large partnership, coordinated by ICCU, whose members come from many European countries, Russia and Israel; they will supply Europeana with 3 million digital resources. Beyond the aggregation of digital cultural content, Linked Heritage is exploring other topics which are essential for Europeana, like multilingualism, linked data and the relationship with the commercial partners. Linked Heritage is the last one in time of a series of projects made up by a European consortium of institutions that has been working for over ten years in the field of digital cultural heritage.

  3. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP–dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y.; Krasteva, Petya V.; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S.; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V.A. S. (UWASH); (U. Sao Paulo); (Cornell); (CNRS-UMR)

    2016-07-05

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause fatal chronic infections, relies on the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP to form robust multicellular biofilms during host tissue colonization. c-di-GMP is sensed directly by the transcription regulator FleQ, which inversely regulates flagellar motility and exopolysaccharide secretion to secure a planktonic to sessile life-form transition. FleQ belongs to the diverse family of AAA+ ATPase enhancer-binding proteins, but how its noncanonical function on transcriptional regulation is controlled by c-di-GMP remains enigmatic. Here, we report structural and functional data that identify an unusual mode of c-di-GMP recognition accompanied by a major quaternary structure reorganization. Our analyses offer a consensus to previous studies and unique insights into the mechanism of action of FleQ and FleQ-like proteins.

  4. Secreted Cyclic Di-GMP Induces Stalk Cell Differentiation in the Eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-hui; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is currently recognized as the most widely used intracellular signal molecule in prokaryotes, but roles in eukaryotes were only recently discovered. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, c-di-GMP, produced by a prokaryote-type diguanylate cyclase, induces the differentiation of stalk cells, thereby enabling the formation of spore-bearing fruiting bodies. In this review, we summarize the currently known mechanisms that control the major life cycle transitions of Dictyostelium and focus particularly on the role of c-di-GMP in stalk formation. Stalk cell differentiation has characteristics of autophagic cell death, a process that also occurs in higher eukaryotes. We discuss the respective roles of c-di-GMP and of another signal molecule, differentiation-inducing factor 1, in autophagic cell death in vitro and in stalk formation in vivo.

  5. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors increases 5-HT2A receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Krey, Gesa;

    2009-01-01

    Major depression is associated with both dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and serotonergic deficiency, not the least of the 5-HT2A receptor. However, how these phenomena are linked to each other, and whether a low 5-HT2A receptor level is a state or a trait marker...... of depression is unknown. In mice with altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression we investigated 5-HT2A receptor levels by Western blot and 3H-MDL100907 receptor binding. Serotonin fibre density was analyzed by stereological quantification of serotonin transporter immunopositive fibers. To establish...... an effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A levels, mature organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to corticosterone with or without GR antagonist mifepristone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone. In GR under-expressing mice, hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor protein levels were decreased...

  6. Opioid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the oldest and most potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g., postoperative) and cancer pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met increasing scrutiny. This article reviews mechanisms underlying opioid analgesia and other opioid actions. It discusses the structure, function, and plasticity of opioid receptors; the central and peripheral sites of analgesic actions and side effects; endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands; and conventional and novel opioid compounds. Challenging clinical situations, such as the tension between chronic pain and addiction, are also illustrated.

  7. Dynamical fat link fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Kamleh, W; Williams, A G; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.; 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2003.12.058

    2004-01-01

    The use of APE smearing or other blocking techniques in fermion actions can provide many advantages. There are many variants of these fat link actions in lattice QCD currently, such as FLIC fermions. Frequently, fat link actions make use of the APE blocking technique in combination with a projection of the blocked links back into the special unitary group. This reunitarisation is often performed using an iterative maximisation of a gauge invariant measure. This technique is not differentiable with respect to the gauge field and thus prevents the use of standard Hybrid Monte Carlo simulation algorithms. The use of an alternative projection technique circumvents this difficulty and allows the simulation of dynamical fat link fermions with standard HMC and its variants.

  8. Link to paper

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Link to the paper. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Naile, J., A.W. Garrison, J. Avants, and J. Washington. Isomers/enantiomers of...

  9. Latest Research: Genetic Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Latest Research: Genetic Links Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents ... inside the eye is a risk factor for glaucoma. Summer 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 3 Page ...

  10. Three cdg Operons Control Cellular Turnover of Cyclic Di-GMP in Acetobacter xylinum: Genetic Organization and Occurrence of Conserved Domains in Isoenzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Tal, Rony; Wong, Hing C; Calhoon, Roger; Gelfand, David; Fear, Anna Lisa; Volman, Gail; Mayer, Raphael; Ross, Peter; Amikam, Dorit; Weinhouse, Haim; Cohen, Avital; Sapir, Shai; Ohana, Patricia; Benziman, Moshe

    1998-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is the specific nucleotide regulator of β-1,4-glucan (cellulose) synthase in Acetobacter xylinum. The enzymes controlling turnover of c-di-GMP are diguanylate cyclase (DGC), which catalyzes its formation, and phosphodiesterase A (PDEA), which catalyzes its degradation. Following biochemical purification of DGC and PDEA, genes encoding isoforms of these enzymes have been isolated and found to be located on three distinct yet highly homologous operons for cyclic diguany...

  11. Soluble and cell surface receptors for tumor necrosis factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach, D; Engelmann, H; Nophar, Y

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) initiates its multiple effects on cell function by binding at a high affinity to specific cell surface receptors. Two different molecular species of these receptors, which are expressed differentially in different cells, have been identified. The cDNAs of both receptor...... have recently been cloned. Antibodies to one of these receptor species (the p55, type I receptor) can trigger a variety of TNF like effects by cross-linking of the receptor molecules. Thus, it is not TNF itself but its receptors that provide the signal for the response to this cytokine...... in certain pathological situations. Release of the soluble receptors from the cells seems to occur by proteolytic cleavage of the cell surface forms and appears to be a way of down-regulating the cell response to TNF. Because of their ability to bind TNF, the soluble receptors exert an inhibitory effect...

  12. Linked Ocean Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, Adam; Arko, Robert; Chandler, Cynthia; Shepherd, Adam

    2014-05-01

    "Linked Data" is a term used in Computer Science to encapsulate a methodology for publishing data and metadata in a structured format so that links may be created and exploited between objects. Berners-Lee (2006) outlines the following four design principles of a Linked Data system: Use Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) as names for things. Use HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) URIs so that people can look up those names. When someone looks up a URI, provide useful information, using the standards (Resource Description Framework [RDF] and the RDF query language [SPARQL]). Include links to other URIs so that they can discover more things. In 2010, Berners-Lee revisited his original design plan for Linked Data to encourage data owners along a path to "good Linked Data". This revision involved the creation of a five star rating system for Linked Data outlined below. One star: Available on the web (in any format). Two stars: Available as machine-readable structured data (e.g. An Excel spreadsheet instead of an image scan of a table). Three stars: As two stars plus the use of a non-proprietary format (e.g. Comma Separated Values instead of Excel). Four stars: As three stars plus the use of open standards from the World Wide Web Commission (W3C) (i.e. RDF and SPARQL) to identify things, so that people can point to your data and metadata. Five stars: All the above plus link your data to other people's data to provide context Here we present work building on the SeaDataNet common vocabularies served by the NERC Vocabulary Server, connecting projects such as the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) and the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) and other vocabularies such as the Marine Metadata Interoperability Ontology Register and Repository and the NASA Global Change Master Directory to create a Linked Ocean Data cloud. Publishing the vocabularies and metadata in standard RDF XML and exposing SPARQL endpoints renders them five-star Linked

  13. Cyclic di-GMP acts as a cell cycle oscillator to drive chromosome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, C; Ozaki, S; Steiner, S; Böhm, R; Abel, S; Dubey, B N; Schirmer, T; Hiller, S; Jenal, U

    2015-07-01

    Fundamental to all living organisms is the capacity to coordinate cell division and cell differentiation to generate appropriate numbers of specialized cells. Whereas eukaryotes use cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases to balance division with cell fate decisions, equivalent regulatory systems have not been described in bacteria. Moreover, the mechanisms used by bacteria to tune division in line with developmental programs are poorly understood. Here we show that Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium with an asymmetric division cycle, uses oscillating levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) to drive its cell cycle. We demonstrate that c-di-GMP directly binds to the essential cell cycle kinase CckA to inhibit kinase activity and stimulate phosphatase activity. An upshift of c-di-GMP during the G1-S transition switches CckA from the kinase to the phosphatase mode, thereby allowing replication initiation and cell cycle progression. Finally, we show that during division, c-di-GMP imposes spatial control on CckA to install the replication asymmetry of future daughter cells. These studies reveal c-di-GMP to be a cyclin-like molecule in bacteria that coordinates chromosome replication with cell morphogenesis in Caulobacter. The observation that c-di-GMP-mediated control is conserved in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens suggests a general mechanism through which this global regulator of bacterial virulence and persistence coordinates behaviour and cell proliferation.

  14. Cyclic diguanylate signaling in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Erin B; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The nucleotide second messenger 3'-5' cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of the transition between motile and non-motile lifestyles in bacteria, favoring sessility. Most research investigating the functions of c-di-GMP has focused on Gram-negative species, especially pathogens. Recent work in Gram-positive species has revealed that c-di-GMP plays similar roles in Gram-positives, though the precise targets and mechanisms of regulation may differ. The majority of bacterial life exists in a surface-associated state, with motility allowing bacteria to disseminate and colonize new environments. c-di-GMP signaling regulates flagellum biosynthesis and production of adherence factors and appears to be a primary mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to surfaces. Ultimately, c-di-GMP influences the ability of a bacterium to alter its transcriptional program, physiology and behavior upon surface contact. This review discusses how bacteria are able to sense a surface via flagella and type IV pili, and the role of c-di-GMP in regulating the response to surfaces, with emphasis on studies of Gram-positive bacteria.

  15. The Structural Basis of Cyclic Diguanylate Signal Transduction by PilZ Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benach,J.; Swaminathan, S.; Tamayo, R.; Handelman, S.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Ramos, J.; Forouhar, F.; Neely, H.; Seetharaman, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between motile and sessile growth in eubacteria, but little is known about the proteins that sense its concentration. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that PilZ domains bind c-di-GMP and allosterically modulate effector pathways. We have determined a 1.9 Angstroms crystal structure of c-di-GMP bound to VCA0042/PlzD, a PilZ domain-containing protein from Vibrio cholerae. Either this protein or another specific PilZ domain-containing protein is required for V. cholerae to efficiently infect mice. VCA0042/PlzD comprises a C-terminal PilZ domain plus an N-terminal domain with a similar beta-barrel fold. C-di-GMP contacts seven of the nine strongly conserved residues in the PilZ domain, including three in a seven-residue long N-terminal loop that undergoes a conformational switch as it wraps around c-di-GMP. This switch brings the PilZ domain into close apposition with the N-terminal domain, forming a new allosteric interaction surface that spans these domains and the c-di-GMP at their interface. The very small size of the N-terminal conformational switch is likely to explain the facile evolutionary diversification of the PilZ domain.

  16. Hierarchical involvement of various GGDEF domain proteins in rdar morphotype development of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Abdul; Simm, Roger; Gerstel, Ulrich; Morr, Michael; Römling, Ute

    2006-05-01

    GGDEF and EAL domain proteins are involved in the turnover of the novel secondary messenger cyclic-di(3'-->5')-guanylic acid (c-di-GMP) in many bacteria. In this work the role of the 12 GGDEF domain proteins encoded by the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) chromosome in rdar morphotype development was investigated. Previously, it was shown that the GGDEF domain protein AdrA activated the biosynthesis of cellulose by production of c-di-GMP. Enhancement of the c-di-GMP levels by overexpression of the GGDEF domain protein AdrA did lead to the activation of curli fimbriae biosynthesis through the elevated expression of CsgD and CsgA. Although knock-out of the chromosomal copy of adrA influenced CsgA expression, CsgD expression was not altered, although more than half of the total cellular c-di-GMP was produced by AdrA at 16 h of growth. On the other hand, chromosomally encoded GGDEF-EAL domain proteins STM2123 and STM3388 were required to additively activate CsgD expression on a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels did overcome temperature regulation of rdar morphotype expression by activation of curli fimbriae as well as cellulose biosynthesis through CsgD expression. Thus in the regulatory cascade leading to rdar morphotype expression c-di-GMP activates several subsequent steps in the network.

  17. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis.

  18. Biofilm formation and antibiotic production in Ruegeria mobilis are influenced by intracellular concentrations of cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Magdenoska, Olivera; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nielsen, Kristian F; Gram, Lone

    2014-05-01

    In many species of the marine Roseobacter clade, periods of attached life, in association with phytoplankton or particles, are interspersed with planktonic phases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether shifts between motile and sessile life in the globally abundant Roseobacter clade species Ruegeria mobilis are associated with intracellular concentrations of the signal compound cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate (c-di-GMP), which in bacteria regulates transitions between motile and sessile life stages. Genes for diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are involved in c-di-GMP signalling, were found in the genome of R. mobilis strain F1926. Ion pair chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed 20-fold higher c-di-GMP concentrations per cell in biofilm-containing cultures than in planktonic cells. An introduced diguanylate cyclase gene increased c-di-GMP and enhanced biofilm formation and production of the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA). An introduced phosphodiesterase gene decreased c-di-GMP and reduced biofilm formation and TDA production. tdaC, a key gene for TDA biosynthesis, was expressed only in attached or biofilm-forming cells, and expression was induced immediately after initial attachment. In conclusion, c-di-GMP signalling controls biofilm formation and biofilm-associated traits in R. mobilis and, as suggested by presence of GGDEF and EAL domain protein genes, also in other Roseobacter clade species. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Genetic moderation of child maltreatment effects on depression and internalizing symptoms by serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter (NET), and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes in African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

    2014-11-01

    Genetic moderation of the effects of child maltreatment on depression and internalizing symptoms was investigated in a sample of low-income maltreated and nonmaltreated African American children (N = 1,096). Lifetime child maltreatment experiences were independently coded from Child Protective Services records and maternal report. Child depression and internalizing problems were assessed in the context of a summer research camp by self-report on the Children's Depression Inventory and adult counselor report on the Teacher Report Form. DNA was obtained from buccal cell or saliva samples and genotyped for polymorphisms of the following genes: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter, and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1. Analyses of covariance with age and gender as covariates were conducted, with maltreatment status and respective polymorphism as main effects and their Gene × Environment (G × E) interactions. Maltreatment consistently was associated with higher Children's Depression Inventory and Teacher Report Form symptoms. The results for child self-report symptoms indicated a G × E interaction for BDNF and maltreatment. In addition, BDNF and triallelic 5-HTTLPR interacted with child maltreatment in a G × G × E interaction. Analyses for counselor report of child anxiety/depression symptoms on the Teacher Report Form indicated moderation of child maltreatment effects by triallelic 5-HTTLPR. These effects were elaborated based on variation in developmental timing of maltreatment experiences. Norepinephrine transporter was found to further moderate the G × E interaction of 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment status, revealing a G × G × E interaction. This G × G × E was extended by consideration of variation in maltreatment subtype experiences. Finally, G × G × E effects were observed for the co-action of BDNF and the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1

  20. Chemokine Systems Link Obesity to Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuguhito Ota

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation. This chronic inflammation is deeply involved in insulin resistance, which is the underlying condition of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. A significant advance in our understanding of obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance has been recognition of the critical role of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs. Chemokines are small proteins that direct the trafficking of immune cells to sites of inflammation. In addition, chemokines activate the production and secretion of inflammatory cytokines through specific G protein-coupled receptors. ATM accumulation through C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 and its ligand monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is considered pivotal in the development of insulin resistance. However, chemokine systems appear to exhibit a high degree of functional redundancy. Currently, more than 50 chemokines and 18 chemokine receptors exhibiting various physiological and pathological properties have been discovered. Therefore, additional, unidentified chemokine/chemokine receptor pathways that may play significant roles in ATM recruitment and insulin sensitivity remain to be fully identified. This review focuses on some of the latest findings on chemokine systems linking obesity to inflammation and subsequent development of insulin resistance.

  1. HER-2 peptides p776 and F7, N-terminal-linked with Ii-Key tetramer (LRMK) help the proliferation of E75-TCR+ cells: The dependency of help on the side chains of LRMK-extended peptide pointed towards the T cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yufeng; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Matsueda, Satoko; Tsuda, Naotake; Ioannides, Constantin G

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether peptides consisting of the Ii-Key peptide LRMK linked to the N-terminal ends of HER-2 peptides would stimulate the expansion of antigen-specific E75-TCR+CD8+ cells. The peptides tested were N-acetylated and linked to an alpha-amide at the C-terminus; some of the peptides contained epsilon-aminovaleric acid (Ava) between the LRMK and the HER-2 peptide. Of the seven LRMK-HER-2 peptides tested to date, three effectively induced IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors and women with ductal carcinoma in situ. A fusion peptide, LRMK-Ava-HER-2(777-789), was more immunogenic than the natural HER-2(777-789) antigen, G89, with regard to IFN-gamma production. In combination with the CD8-activating peptide E75 [HER-2(369-377)] LRMK-p776 and LRMK-Ava-F7 induced the proliferation of E75-TCR(Med+Hi) CD8+ cells to a greater extent than did 1,000 or 5,000 nM of E75 alone, respectively. The induction effects were strongest at 600 nM for LRMK-p776 and 3,000 nM for LRMK-Ava-F7. At 3,000 nM, LRMK-p776 was cytotoxic to PBMCs. LRMK-p776 and F7 had a similar specificity and preferences for binding HLA-DR molecules. The molecular modeling of HLA-DR:LRMK-p776 and HLA-DR:LRMK-Ava-F7 complexes revealed the side chains of the peptides, which pointed towards the T-cell receptor. Differences in side chain orientation introduced by various N-terminal extensions of MHC class II-bound peptides should be important for directing CD4+ cells to stimulate CD8+ cells or for eliminating regulatory T cells in cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  3. Activation Mechanism and Cellular Localization of Membrane-Anchored Alginate Polymerase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradali, M Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2017-05-01

    The exopolysaccharide alginate, produced by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, confers a survival advantage to the bacterium by contributing to the formation of characteristic biofilms during infection. Membrane-anchored proteins Alg8 (catalytic subunit) and Alg44 (copolymerase) constitute the alginate polymerase that is being activated by the second messenger molecule bis-(3', 5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), but the mechanism of activation remains elusive. To shed light on the c-di-GMP-mediated activation of alginate polymerization in vivo, an in silico structural model of Alg8 fused to the c-di-GMP binding PilZ domain informed by the structure of cellulose synthase, BcsA, was developed. This structural model was probed by site-specific mutagenesis and different cellular levels of c-di-GMP. Results suggested that c-di-GMP-mediated activation of alginate polymerization involves amino acids residing at two loops, including H323 (loop A) and T457 and E460 (loop B), surrounding the catalytic site in the predicted model. The activities of the respective Alg8 variants suggested that c-di-GMP-mediated control of substrate access to the catalytic site of Alg8 is dissimilar to the known activation mechanism of BcsA. Alg8 variants responded differently to various c-di-GMP levels, while MucR imparted c-di-GMP for activation of alginate polymerase. Furthermore, we showed that Alg44 copolymerase constituted a stable dimer, with its periplasmic domains required for protein localization and alginate polymerization and modification. Superfolder green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of Alg8 and Alg44 showed a nonuniform, punctate, and patchy arrangement of both proteins surrounding the cell. Overall, this study provides insights into the c-di-GMP-mediated activation of alginate polymerization while assigning functional roles to Alg8 and Alg44, including their subcellular localization and distribution.IMPORTANCE The exopolysaccharide alginate is an

  4. Links, Exchanges, Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, James

    1992-01-01

    Describes the international activities of the Thames Valley University's Department of Information Management, including formal academic links with overseas institutions, development of short courses for practitioners, discussion meetings, staff and student visits, and enrollment of international students. Topics addressed include personnel,…

  5. Response model parameter linking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, Michelle Derbenwick

    2015-01-01

    With a few exceptions, the problem of linking item response model parameters from different item calibrations has been conceptualized as an instance of the problem of equating observed scores on different test forms. This thesis argues, however, that the use of item response models does not require

  6. Linking Literacy and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  7. Linking place and mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Møller

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the salience of vernacular Tyneside forms on the basis of theories of enregisterment and exemplar processing. On one level, exemplar theory provides a psycholinguistic account of how the link between social value and linguistic features is possible. Conversely, integrating...

  8. Link Influence Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priti; Chakraborty, Abhishek; Manoj, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new metric, Link Influence Entropy (LInE), which describes importance of each node based on the influence of each link present in a network. Influence of a link can neither be effectively estimated using betweenness centrality nor using degree based probability measures. The proposed LInE metric which provides an effective way to estimate the influence of a link in the network and incorporates this influence to identify nodal characteristics, performs better compared to degree based entropy. We found that LInE can differentiate various network types which degree-based or betweenness centrality based node influence metrics cannot. Our findings show that spatial wireless networks and regular grid networks, respectively, have lowest and highest LInE values. Finally, performance analysis of LInE is carried out on a real-world network as well as on a wireless mesh network testbed to study the influence of our metric as well as influence stability of nodes in dynamic networks.

  9. Secure Link Middleware

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Secure Link middleware as specified by the circled ‘sld’, sld . Using a network traffic analyzer (e.g., tcpdump) at router bulldog and tiger, ARL...or nfs (remote accessing file systems) to be securely operated and used among networked computer systems without any bulldog (router3) bear (router2

  10. Phosphorylation of the autophagy receptor optineurin restricts Salmonella growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Philipp; Farhan, Hesso; McEwan, David G;

    2011-01-01

    Selective autophagy can be mediated via receptor molecules that link specific cargoes to the autophagosomal membranes decorated by ubiquitin-like microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) modifiers. Although several autophagy receptors have been identified, little is known about mechanisms...... be a general mechanism for regulation of cargo-selective autophagy....

  11. Volumes of chain links

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, James; Rollins, Clint

    2011-01-01

    Agol has conjectured that minimally twisted n-chain links are the smallest volume hyperbolic manifolds with n cusps, for n at most 10. In his thesis, Venzke mentions that these cannot be smallest volume for n at least 11, but does not provide a proof. In this paper, we give a proof of Venzke's statement. The proof for n at least 60 is completely rigorous. The proof for n between 11 and 59 uses a computer calculation, and can be made rigorous for manifolds of small enough complexity, using methods of Moser and Milley. Finally, we prove that the n-chain link with 2m or 2m+1 half-twists cannot be the minimal volume hyperbolic manifold with n cusps, provided n is at least 60 or |m| is at least 8, and we give computational data indicating this remains true for smaller n and |m|.

  12. Linking assumptions in amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEVI, DENNIS M.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 35 years or so, there has been substantial progress in revealing and characterizing the many interesting and sometimes mysterious sensory abnormalities that accompany amblyopia. A goal of many of the studies has been to try to make the link between the sensory losses and the underlying neural losses, resulting in several hypotheses about the site, nature, and cause of amblyopia. This article reviews some of these hypotheses, and the assumptions that link the sensory losses to specific physiological alterations in the brain. Despite intensive study, it turns out to be quite difficult to make a simple linking hypothesis, at least at the level of single neurons, and the locus of the sensory loss remains elusive. It is now clear that the simplest notion—that reduced contrast sensitivity of neurons in cortical area V1 explains the reduction in contrast sensitivity—is too simplistic. Considerations of noise, noise correlations, pooling, and the weighting of information also play a critically important role in making perceptual decisions, and our current models of amblyopia do not adequately take these into account. Indeed, although the reduction of contrast sensitivity is generally considered to reflect “early” neural changes, it seems plausible that it reflects changes at many stages of visual processing. PMID:23879956

  13. Collaboratively Patching Linked Data

    CERN Document Server

    Knuth, Magnus; Sack, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Today's Web of Data is noisy. Linked Data often needs extensive preprocessing to enable efficient use of heterogeneous resources. While consistent and valid data provides the key to efficient data processing and aggregation we are facing two main challenges: (1st) Identification of erroneous facts and tracking their origins in dynamically connected datasets is a difficult task, and (2nd) efforts in the curation of deficient facts in Linked Data are exchanged rather rarely. Since erroneous data often is duplicated and (re-)distributed by mashup applications it is not only the responsibility of a few original publishers to keep their data tidy, but progresses to be a mission for all distributers and consumers of Linked Data too. We present a new approach to expose and to reuse patches on erroneous data to enhance and to add quality information to the Web of Data. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated by example of a collaborative game that patches statements in DBpedia data and provides notifications ...

  14. X linked mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeb, Imen; Ben Jemaa, Lamia; Chaabouni, Habiba

    2009-05-01

    Mental retardation (MR) is a group of heterogeneous clinical conditions. There are more than 900 genetic disorders associated with MR and it affects around 3% of the general population. Many MR conditions described are syndromic, fragile X syndrome being the most common clinical entity among them. X linked mental retardation (XLMR) is subdivided in two categories: syndromic XLMR (MRXS) when MR is associated with clinical features and non-syndromic XLMR (MRX) when MR is isolated. The aim of this systematic review of the literature was to join together the results of several studies related to X linked mental retardation and to present various genes implicated in this disease. In this review, focus has been given on genes implicated in mental retardation, the clinical data and on phenotype-genotype correlations. An exhaustive electronic and library research of the recent literature was carried out on the Web sites "Science Direct" and "Interscience Wiley". The key words used were "mental retardation", "X chromosome", "gene", "syndromic mental retardation", "non-syndromic mental retardation". In this review a number of X linked genes, the clinical features associated with the gene abnormality, and the prevalence of the disease gene are discussed. We classified these genes by order of their first implication in MR. A table presented on the XLMR Update Web site who list the 82 known XLMR genes is available as XLMR Genes and corresponding proteins.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity? National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Active at Any Size! Educational Resources (6 links) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Obesity and Genetics Disease InfoSearch: Leptin receptor deficiency MalaCards: obesity, morbid, due to leptin ...

  16. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  17. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Cedrick D; Zhang, Lan; Xu, Hong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Vigues, Stephan; Ott, Sandra H; Elson, Amanda E T; Choi, Hyun Jin; Shaw, Hillary; Egan, Josephine M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Li, Xiaodong; Steinle, Nanette I; Munger, Steven D

    2008-01-01

    TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease.

  18. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedrick D Dotson

    Full Text Available TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+ and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease.

  19. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...

  20. Knots and links

    CERN Document Server

    Rolfsen, Dale

    2003-01-01

    Rolfsen's beautiful book on knots and links can be read by anyone, from beginner to expert, who wants to learn about knot theory. Beginners with a basic background find an inviting introduction to the elements of topology, emphasizing the tools needed for understanding knots, the fundamental group and van Kampen's theorem, for example, which are then applied to concrete problems, such as computing knot groups. For experts, Rolfsen explains advanced topics, such as the connections between knot theory and surgery and how they are useful to understanding three-manifolds. Besides providing a guide

  1. The weakest link

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumley, G. [GBI Consulting, Qld. (Australia)

    2005-08-01

    In part seven of his series on dragline productivity, the author tackles the subject of the dump rope, the weakest link in the operation of the dragline, is traded. Five factors have been identified as critical to dump life: ratio of dump block to dump rope diameter; excessive loads in dumps rope; rope abrasion against dump block; rope abrasion against bucket; dump rope construction. These factors are considered in the article. The author comments that in the drive to increase dragline productivity, rope life has been sacrificed. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Linking consumer experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Karina Madsen

    Consumers consume products in various ways serving a number of purposes. Much attention has been paid to experiences attached to consumption, sometimes very explicitly, e.g. in tourism, the essence of which is experiences of various sorts, but often also implicitly as internalised experiences...... become part of the individual self, worldview, and behaviour. This paper seeks to explore links between consumer experiences through the exploration of narrative sequences in travel blogs. Findings indicate that non-consumption is a central element to the bloggers and also indicative of a community...

  3. EEE Links. Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Robert (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The EEE Links Newsletter is a quarterly publication produced by Code 562 in support of the NASA HQ funded NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. The newsletter is produced as an electronic format deliverable made available via the referenced www site administered by Code 562, The newsletter publishes brief articles on topics of interest to NASA programs and projects in the area of electronic parts and packaging. The newsletter does not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. The information provided is at the level of that produced by industry and university researchers and is published at national and international conferences.

  4. Evolution of the receptor binding properties of the influenza A(H3N2) hemagglutinin

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yi Pu; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wharton, Stephen A.; Martin, Stephen R.; Coombs, Peter J.; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Liu, Junfeng; John J Skehel; Gamblin, Steven J.; Hay, Alan J.; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A(H3N2) virus responsible for the 1968 influenza pandemic derived from an avian virus. On introduction into humans, its receptor binding properties had changed from a preference for avian receptors (α2,3-linked sialic acid) to a preference for human receptors (α2,6-linked sialic acid). By 2001, the avidity of human H3 viruses for avian receptors had declined, and since then the affinity for human receptors has also decreased significantly. These changes in ...

  5. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty acids,

  6. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 – ... and to help us Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human ...

  8. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the link between drug abuse and HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and teachers, ... present time. The virus (HIV) and the disease it causes (AIDS) are often linked and referred to ...

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved June 2012 How are Drug Abuse and HIV Related? Drug abuse and addiction ...

  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved June 2012 How are Drug Abuse and HIV Related? Drug abuse and addiction ...

  11. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the link between drug abuse and HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and teachers, ... present time. The virus (HIV) and the disease it causes (AIDS) are often linked and referred to ...

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 – ... and to help us Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human ...

  13. ABP: a novel AMPA receptor binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Ziff, E B

    1999-04-30

    We review the cloning of a novel AMPA receptor binding protein (ABP) that interacts with GluR2/3 and is homologous to GRIP. ABP is enriched in the PSD with GluR2 and is localized to the PSD by EM. ABP binds GluR2 via the C-terminal VXI motif through a Class I PDZ interaction. ABP and GRIP can also homo- and heteromultimerize. Thus, ABP and GRIP may be involved in AMPA receptor regulation and localization, by linking it to other cytoskeletal or signaling molecules. We suggest that the ABP/GRIP and PSD-95 families form distinct scaffolds that anchor, respectively, AMPA and NMDA receptors. We are currently investigating proteins that bind ABP and that may regulate the AMPA receptor.

  14. ITK optical links backup document

    CERN Document Server

    Huffman, B T; The ATLAS collaboration; Flick, T; Ye, J

    2013-01-01

    This document describes the proposed optical links to be used for the ITK in the phase II upgrade. The current R&D for optical links pursued in the Versatile Link group is reviewed. In particular the results demonstrating the radiation tolerance of all the on-detector components are documented. The bandwidth requirements and the resulting numerology are given.

  15. Hyperbolic semi-adequate links

    OpenAIRE

    Futer, David; Kalfagianni, Efstratia; Purcell, Jessica S.

    2013-01-01

    We provide a diagrammatic criterion for semi-adequate links to be hyperbolic. We also give a conjectural description of the satellite structures of semi-adequate links. One application of our result is that the closures of sufficiently complicated positive braids are hyperbolic links.

  16. Martel's links with USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Shaw

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the 29% foreign members in the Société de Spéléologie, five lived in USA. They were Luella Owen (the only woman member of the Société, R. Ellsworth Cali, H.C. Hovey, E Van Epps and C. R. Blackall. E.S. Balch, though not a member, also knew Martel. These members, between them, published ten papers in Spelunca, which also reviewed their other work. The activities of these six, and their links with France, are discussed. Martel actively encouraged cave work in America, as elsewhere, and Hovey, who had been with him during the survey of Aven Armand, he knew quite well. In 1912 Martel at last visited USA himself and the barometer readings he took in Mamoth Cave to measure altitude enabled him to draw the first longitudinal section of the cave since 1835.

  17. Linking place and mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Møller

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the salience of vernacular Tyneside forms on the basis of theories of enregisterment and exemplar processing. On one level, exemplar theory provides a psycholinguistic account of how the link between social value and linguistic features is possible. Conversely, integrating...... the notion of social value into exemplar theory extends the value of this originally cognitive theory to social domains. It is suggested that the association of social value and particular local, linguistic forms may contribute to the salience of these forms among local speakers. The empirical work reported...... here takes the form of a questionnaire study, which aims to uncover Tyneside inhabitants' awareness of forms as well as their affiliation with the local community. Results showed differences in frequency perceptions between participants themselves and others which indicate that speakers can identify...

  18. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Fact Sheet GLP-1 Receptor Agonists May, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Silvio ... are too high or too low. What are GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines? GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines, also called ...

  19. Cyclic di-GMP-mediated repression of swarming motility by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 requires the MotAB stator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchma, S L; Delalez, N J; Filkins, L M; Snavely, E A; Armitage, J P; O'Toole, G A

    2015-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) plays a critical role in the regulation of motility. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, c-di-GMP inversely controls biofilm formation and surface swarming motility, with high levels of this dinucleotide signal stimulating biofilm formation and repressing swarming. P. aeruginosa encodes two stator complexes, MotAB and MotCD, that participate in the function of its single polar flagellum. Here we show that the repression of swarming motility requires a functional MotAB stator complex. Mutating the motAB genes restores swarming motility to a strain with artificially elevated levels of c-di-GMP as well as stimulates swarming in the wild-type strain, while overexpression of MotA from a plasmid represses swarming motility. Using point mutations in MotA and the FliG rotor protein of the motor supports the conclusion that MotA-FliG interactions are critical for c-di-GMP-mediated swarming inhibition. Finally, we show that high c-di-GMP levels affect the localization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MotD fusion, indicating a mechanism whereby this second messenger has an impact on MotCD function. We propose that when c-di-GMP level is high, the MotAB stator can displace MotCD from the motor, thereby affecting motor function. Our data suggest a newly identified means of c-di-GMP-mediated control of surface motility, perhaps conserved among Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, and other organisms that encode two stator systems.

  20. Molecular and cellular pathogenesis of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kim E; Ma, Cindy S; Cannons, Jennifer L; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Tangye, Stuart G

    2005-02-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immune defect caused by mutations in the Src homology 2 domain-containing gene 1A, which encodes the adapter protein, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP). SAP is expressed in T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and NKT cells, where it binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the surface receptor SLAM (CD150) and the related receptors, 2B4 (CD244), CD84, Ly9 (CD229), NK-T-B-antigen, and CD2-like receptor-activating cytotoxic T cells. SAP also binds to the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn and recruits it to SLAM, which leads to the generation of downstream phosphotyrosine signals. While the roles of the SLAM family receptors are only beginning to be understood, experiments suggest that these molecules regulate important aspects of lymphocyte function, such as proliferation, cytokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and antibody production. Thus, in XLP patients who lack functional SAP, the SLAM family receptors may not signal properly. This property likely contributes to the phenotypes of XLP, including fulminant infectious mononucleosis, lymphoma, and hypogammaglobulinemia. Further studies of SAP and the SLAM family receptors will provide insights into XLP and elucidate the signaling events regulating lymphocyte ontogeny and function.

  1. A link between inflammation and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M. T.; Forst, B.; Cremers, N.

    2015-01-01

    S100A4 is implicated in metastasis and chronic inflammation, but its function remains uncertain. Here we establish an S100A4-dependent link between inflammation and metastatic tumor progression. We found that the acute-phase response proteins serum amyloid A (SAA) 1 and SAA3 are transcriptional...... targets of S100A4 via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB signaling. SAA proteins stimulated the transcription of RANTES (regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted), G-CSF (granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor) and MMP2 (matrix metalloproteinase 2), MMP3, MMP9...... and MMP13. We have also shown for the first time that SAA stimulate their own transcription as well as that of proinflammatory S100A8 and S100A9 proteins. Moreover, they strongly enhanced tumor cell adhesion to fibronectin, and stimulated migration and invasion of human and mouse tumor cells...

  2. Linking to the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1999-09-01

    of JCE in the mail each month, and I expect you do too. I can glance at the cover to get an overview of an issue's content, and I usually am enticed inside by intriguing cover art. I can scan the table of contents to find articles I want to read, or I can just browse through the issue to see what looks interesting. Usually the editors have juxtaposed related articles so that I often find a small treasure trove. The printed Journal is quite portable and can be read in a car or airplane. It will last a long time, and until the paper deteriorates, I will never have a problem reading back issues. I have almost every issue from the first day I subscribed and have even added some older ones from collections of retired colleagues who no longer had shelf space for them. I certainly would not want to give up my printed copies, and I want to keep getting them. I find that JCE Online provides a different kind of resource that is equally valuable. It contains more information, and information that is more appropriate in electronic form. It links related ideas into a much more complex web of information than is possible in print. And it opens pathways to lots of information that is not part of JCE but resides elsewhere. Using this issue as an example, let's take a tour of what JCE Online can do. Point your Web browser to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu Click on Journal and then on Current Issue (unless September 1999 is no longer the current issue, in which case you will find it in Past Issues). In the table of contents, find the article "UV Catalysis, Cyanotype Photography, and Sunscreens". Click on the title. When the abstract appears, click on Full Text (PDF) to see the article, just as it appears on page 1199 in this issue. When you are prompted, enter the name and subscriber number from your address label. At the end of the article you will find that supplementary materials are available (including a procedure for testing sunscreens) and you can click on the link to view them

  3. [Hospitals as vital links].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klink, A

    2013-01-01

    The reform of the system in 2006 aimed at reducing waiting lists in an efficient manner. Performance-linked funding and regulated competition did indeed lead to improved efficiency. The other side of the coin is overtreatment, and expensive and not infrequently damaging growth in volume. In order to control costs, three strategies have been determined: agreements with an annual cap on volume; (b) collaboration of regional health-care providers with the mission of improving results in health care (with profit-sharing if costs fall); and (c) fusions reducing the number of hospitals which reduces the burden of injuries (supply no longer creates its own demand). This article comments on these strategies. The author argues for a fourth approach: if the quality of health care improves, the number of complications will fall, overtreatment will decline and the outcome will be a decrease in burden of injuries. This requires the health care insurers to modify the way they manage their contracts and methods of payment, and stimulates competition based on quality.

  4. Covalent crosslinking of thyrotropin to thyroid plasma membrane receptors: subunit composition of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, R; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1986-04-01

    The subunit composition of the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor has been characterized using the bifunctional crosslinking agent, disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), to covalently link [125I]TSH to its receptor. Purified thyroid membranes were labeled with [125I]TSH, and the hormone-receptor complex was crosslinked by incubation with 0.1 mM DSS. Analysis of this crosslinked complex by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) under reducing conditions indicated the presence of a specifically labeled hormone-receptor complex, corresponding to a Mr of 68,000 +/- 3000 before correction for the relative molecular mass of TSH. When reducing agents were absent during SDS solubilization, the mobility of the band increased slightly, suggesting the presence of intramolecular disulfide bonds. The labeling of the 68,000 band was specifically inhibited by TSH, but not by other glycoprotein hormones. Specific labeling occurred only in thyroid, and not in liver or muscle plasma membranes. Protease-free immunoglobulin G, isolated from sera of patients with Graves' disease and capable of competing with TSH for binding to its receptor, inhibited the labeling of the 68,000 complex. When the hormone-receptor complex was crosslinked with higher concentrations of DSS (greater than 0.3 mM), a second specifically labeled band was observed, with a Mr of 80,000 +/- 5000. This complex exhibited hormone, tissue, and immunologic specificities similar to those of the 68,000 band. Continuous sucrose density gradient analysis indicated that the intact solubilized receptor possessed a sedimentation coefficient of 10.5 S prior to correction for detergent binding. However, this value increased to 16 S when determined under conditions which took into account the change in hydrodynamic properties attributable to bound Triton X-100. These data suggest that the 80,000 and 68,000 bands represent binding components of the TSH receptor and that the receptor molecule most likely contains

  5. GABAA receptors modulate cannabinoid-evoked hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, S M; Tallarida, R J; Kon, D A; Geller, E B; Adler, Martin W

    2004-05-01

    Cannabinoids evoke hypothermia by stimulating central CB(1) receptors. GABA induces hypothermia via GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptor activation. CB(1) receptor activation increases GABA release in the hypothalamus, a central locus for thermoregulation, suggesting that cannabinoid and GABA systems may be functionally linked in body temperature regulation. We investigated whether GABA receptors modulate the hypothermic actions of [4,5-dihydro-2-methyl-4(4-morpholinylmethyl)-1-(1-naphthalenyl-carbonyl)-6H-pyrrolo[3,2,1ij]quinolin-6-one] (WIN 55212-2), a selective cannabinoid agonist, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. WIN 55212-2 (2.5 mg/kg im) produced a rapid hypothermia that peaked 45-90 min postinjection. The hypothermia was attenuated by bicuculline (2 mg/kg ip), a GABA(A) antagonist. However, SCH 50911 (1-10 mg/kg ip), a GABA(B) blocker, did not antagonize the hypothermia. Neither bicuculline (2 mg/kg) nor SCH 50911 (10 mg/kg) by itself altered body temperature. We also investigated a possible role for CB(1) receptors in GABA-generated hypothermia. Muscimol (2.5 mg/kg ip), a GABA(A) agonist, or baclofen (5 mg/kg ip), a GABA(B) agonist, evoked a significant hypothermia. Blockade of CB(1) receptors with SR141716A (2.5 mg/kg im) did not antagonize muscimol- or baclofen-induced hypothermia, indicating that GABA-evoked hypothermia does not contain a CB(1)-sensitive component. Our results implicate GABA(A) receptors in the hypothermic actions of cannabinoids and provide further evidence of a functional link between cannabinoid and GABA systems.

  6. Regulation of blood pressure by dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Pedro A; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A

    2003-01-01

    Dopamine is an important regulator of blood pressure. Its actions on renal hemodynamics, epithelial transport and humoral agents such as aldosterone, catecholamines, endothelin, prolactin, pro-opiomelanocortin, renin and vasopressin place it in central homeostatic position for regulation of extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. Dopamine also modulates fluid and sodium intake via actions in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract, and by regulation of cardiovascular centers that control the functions of the heart, arteries and veins. Abnormalities in dopamine production and receptor function accompany a high percentage of human essential hypertension and several forms of rodent genetic hypertension. Some dopamine receptor genes and their regulators are in loci linked to hypertension in humans and in rodents. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes that regulate dopamine receptors, alone or via the interaction with SNPs of genes that regulate the renin-angiotensin system, are associated with human essential hypertension. Each of the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5) participates in the regulation of blood pressure by mechanisms specific for the subtype. Some receptors (D2 and D5) influence the central and/or peripheral nervous system; others influence epithelial transport and regulate the secretion and receptors of several humoral agents (e.g., the D1, D3 and D4 receptors interact with the renin-angiotensin system). Modifications of the usual actions of the receptor can produce blood pressure changes. In addition, abnormal functioning of these dopamine receptor subtypes impairs their antioxidant function.

  7. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  8. Using ATM over SATCOM links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparetto, Gary M.

    1995-01-01

    The Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) protocol is studied from the standpoint of determining what limitations, if any, exist in using it over satellite links. It is concluded that, while there is nothing intrinsic about ATM that would generally preclude its use over satellite links, there are, however, several intrinsic characteristics of satellite links, as well as some satellite system configuration-specific issues, that must be taken into account.

  9. "Conjectural" links in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarskii, A. A.; Zorinets, D. I.; Lande, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduces the concept of Conjectural Link for Complex Networks, in particular, social networks. Conjectural Link we understand as an implicit link, not available in the network, but supposed to be present, based on the characteristics of its topology. It is possible, for example, when in the formal description of the network some connections are skipped due to errors, deliberately hidden or withdrawn (e.g. in the case of partial destruction of the network). Introduced a parameter that allows ranking the Conjectural Link. The more this parameter - the more likely that this connection should be present in the network. This paper presents a method of recovery of partially destroyed Complex Networks using Conjectural Links finding. Presented two methods of finding the node pairs that are not linked directly to one another, but have a great possibility of Conjectural Link communication among themselves: a method based on the determination of the resistance between two nodes, and method based on the computation of the lengths of routes between two nodes. Several examples of real networks are reviewed and performed a comparison to know network links prediction methods, not intended to find the missing links in already formed networks.

  10. Link Clustering with Extended Link Similarity and EQ Evaluation Division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Huang

    Full Text Available Link Clustering (LC is a relatively new method for detecting overlapping communities in networks. The basic principle of LC is to derive a transform matrix whose elements are composed of the link similarity of neighbor links based on the Jaccard distance calculation; then it applies hierarchical clustering to the transform matrix and uses a measure of partition density on the resulting dendrogram to determine the cut level for best community detection. However, the original link clustering method does not consider the link similarity of non-neighbor links, and the partition density tends to divide the communities into many small communities. In this paper, an Extended Link Clustering method (ELC for overlapping community detection is proposed. The improved method employs a new link similarity, Extended Link Similarity (ELS, to produce a denser transform matrix, and uses the maximum value of EQ (an extended measure of quality of modularity as a means to optimally cut the dendrogram for better partitioning of the original network space. Since ELS uses more link information, the resulting transform matrix provides a superior basis for clustering and analysis. Further, using the EQ value to find the best level for the hierarchical clustering dendrogram division, we obtain communities that are more sensible and reasonable than the ones obtained by the partition density evaluation. Experimentation on five real-world networks and artificially-generated networks shows that the ELC method achieves higher EQ and In-group Proportion (IGP values. Additionally, communities are more realistic than those generated by either of the original LC method or the classical CPM method.

  11. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  12. Game Changer: Linked Learning Detroit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career, 2016

    2016-01-01

    JP Morgan Chase joins the Skillman Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the Ford Motor Company Fund, whose grants total $7 million and will connect 10,000 Detroit high school students to career education and work experiences over the next three years through Linked Learning Detroit. Learn about Linked Learning Detroit through interviews with…

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging ... Badges Other Resources Strategic Plan Search Share Print Home » News & Events » Public Education Projects » Learn the Link - ...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plan Search Share Print Home » News & Events » Public Education Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug abuse are among the main factors in the spread of HIV infection in the ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plus Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs of Abuse Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Emerging ... Badges Other Resources Strategic Plan Search Share Print Home » News & Events » Public Education Projects » Learn the Link - ...

  16. Optimizing pointer linked data structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holm, Carl Wilhelm Mattias

    2013-01-01

    The thesis explores different ways of optimizing pointer linked data structures, and especially restructuring them. The mechanisms are based on compiler technology, theory, computer languages and hardware architecture that are capable of optimizing the memory layout of complex pointer linked data st

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... link between drug abuse and HIV. http://1.usa.gov/1z20ww6 How many of us think about ... can’t ignore. Learn the Link: http://1.usa.gov/1uSUAI3 Think you’re not at risk? ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs ... HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug abuse ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Link campaign. This campaign shows teens and young adults that non-injection drug use and alcohol use can lead to poor decision making, which ... message to America's youth that using drugs and alcohol even once can have ... in the lives of young people-with the Learn the Link message. Campaign ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in your posts! Learn the link between drug abuse and HIV. http://1.usa.gov/1z20ww6 How many of us ... not at risk? Learn the link between drug abuse and HIV. http://1.usa.gov/VF4sGf [Tag friends, colleagues, partners] ...

  1. [Sex-linked juvenile retinoschisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, P; Turut, P; Soltysik, C; Hache, J C

    1976-02-01

    About 13 observations of sexe linked juvenile retinoschisis, the authors describe the ophthalmoscopic, fluorographic and functional aspects of the disease whose caracteristics are:--its sexe linked recessive heredity; --its clinical characterestics associating: a microcystic macular degeneration, peripheral retinal lesions, vitreous body alterations, --an electroretinogram of the negative type.

  2. Linking Information for Mobile Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    interface after reading the XML. .. 30 Figure 8. Display of an item’s content with linked items one click away. ........... 31 Figure 9. Movement...related, but the user has not viewed recently. Figure 8. Display of an item’s content with linked items one click away. Figure 9 shows the

  3. Amsterdam Museum Linked Open Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, V. de; Wielemaker, J.; Gent, J. van; O'Connell, J.; Oosterbroek, M; Hildebrand, M.; Isaac, A.; Ossenbruggen, J.R. van; Schreiber, G.

    2013-01-01

    In this document we describe the Amsterdam Museum Linked Open Data set. The dataset is a five-star Linked Data representation and comprises the entire collection of the Amsterdam Museum consisting of more than 70,000 object descriptions. Furthermore, the institution's thesaurus and person authority

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Google Plus Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs ... HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug abuse ...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... site. Please link these banners back to this site at: http://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/public-education-projects/learn-link-drugs-hiv . 120x90 460x80 486x60 Social Media Send the message to young people and ...

  6. Platelet P2 receptors: from curiosity to clinical targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, N J; Hourani, S M

    2000-07-01

    Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) is a paracrine mediator that activates human blood platelets, causing them to become adhesive and thereby contributing to their role in hemostasis. The actions of ADP were initially thought to be mediated by a unique ADP receptor termed P2(T) found only on platelets and antagonized by ATP, but it appears that at least two P2Y receptor subtypes are involved, a P2Y(1) receptor linked in some way to control of intracellular-free calcium levels and another P2Y receptor linked via an inhibitory G protein to adenylate cyclase. In addition, the presence of excitatory P2X(1) receptors that mediate the influx of monovalent and divalent cations in response to both ADP and ATP has been demonstrated. The precise contribution that each of these P2 receptors make to the overall phenomena associated with platelet aggregation, adhesion and hemostasis is yet to be defined. Antithrombotic agents that interfere with the actions of ADP are marketed, and P2 receptor antagonists are entering clinical trials for acute treatments of thrombosis. This review seeks to summarize the present state of knowledge of platelet P2 receptor pharmacology and therapeutics.

  7. Oligoribonuclease is the primary degradative enzyme for pGpG in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that is required for cyclic-di-GMP turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mona W; Donaldson, Gregory P; Severin, Geoffrey B; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O; Waters, Christopher M; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-09-01

    The bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls biofilm formation and other phenotypes relevant to pathogenesis. Cyclic-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs). Phosphodiesterases (PDE-As) end signaling by linearizing c-di-GMP to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3',5')-guanosine (pGpG), which is then hydrolyzed to two GMP molecules by yet unidentified enzymes termed PDE-Bs. We show that pGpG inhibits a PDE-A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In a dual DGC and PDE-A reaction, excess pGpG extends the half-life of c-di-GMP, indicating that removal of pGpG is critical for c-di-GMP homeostasis. Thus, we sought to identify the PDE-B enzyme(s) responsible for pGpG degradation. A differential radial capillary action of ligand assay-based screen for pGpG binding proteins identified oligoribonuclease (Orn), an exoribonuclease that hydrolyzes two- to five-nucleotide-long RNAs. Purified Orn rapidly converts pGpG into GMP. To determine whether Orn is the primary enzyme responsible for degrading pGpG, we assayed cell lysates of WT and ∆orn strains of P. aeruginosa PA14 for pGpG stability. The lysates from ∆orn showed 25-fold decrease in pGpG hydrolysis. Complementation with WT, but not active site mutants, restored hydrolysis. Accumulation of pGpG in the ∆orn strain could inhibit PDE-As, increasing c-di-GMP concentration. In support, we observed increased transcription from the c-di-GMP-regulated pel promoter. Additionally, the c-di-GMP-governed auto-aggregation and biofilm phenotypes were elevated in the ∆orn strain in a pel-dependent manner. Finally, we directly detect elevated pGpG and c-di-GMP in the ∆orn strain. Thus, we identified that Orn serves as the primary PDE-B enzyme that removes pGpG, which is necessary to complete the final step in the c-di-GMP degradation pathway.

  8. Novel histamine H3 receptor antagonists: affinities in an H3 receptor binding assay and potencies in two functional H3 receptor models.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlicker, E.; Kathmann, M; Reidemeister, S.; Stark, H.; Schunack, W

    1994-01-01

    1. We determined the affinities of ten novel H3 receptor antagonists in an H3 receptor binding assay and their potencies in two functional H3 receptor models. The novel compounds differ from histamine in that the aminoethyl side chain is replaced by a propyl or butyl chain linked to a polar group (amide, thioamide, ester, guanidine, guanidine ester or urea) which, in turn, is connected to a hexocyclic ring or to an alicyclic ring-containing alkyl residue [corrected]. 2. The specific binding o...

  9. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)], E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer medizinische Forschung, Abteilung Biomolekulare Mechanismen, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2008-12-10

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1{sub B}LUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD{sub ox}) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1{sub B}LUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD{sub ox} cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD{sub ox} in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD{sub red}H{sup -} and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  10. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2008-12-01

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1_BLUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD ox) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1_BLUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD ox cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD ox in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD redH - and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  11. Nullification of knots and links

    CERN Document Server

    Diao, Yuanan; Montemayor, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study a geometric/topological measure of knots and links called the nullification number. The nullification of knots/links is believed to be biologically relevant. For example, in DNA topology, one can intuitively regard it as a way to measure how easily a knotted circular DNA can unknot itself through recombination of its DNA strands. It turns out that there are several different ways to define such a number. These definitions lead to nullification numbers that are related, but different. Our aim is to explore the mathematical properties of these nullification numbers. First, we give specific examples to show that the nullification numbers we defined are different. We provide detailed analysis of the nullification numbers for the well known 2-bridge knots and links. We also explore the relationships among the three nullification numbers, as well as their relationships with other knot invariants. Finally, we study a special class of links, namely those links whose general nullification numbe...

  12. D5 dopamine receptor knockout mice and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiwei; Sibley, David R; Jose, Pedro A

    2004-08-01

    Abnormalities in dopamine production and receptor function have been described in human essential hypertension and rodent models of genetic hypertension. All of the five dopamine receptor genes (D1, D2, D3, D4, and D5) expressed in mammals and some of their regulators are in loci linked to hypertension in humans and in rodents. Under normal conditions, D1-like receptors (D1 and D5) inhibit sodium transport in the kidney and the intestine. However, in the Dahl salt-sensitive and spontaneously hypertensive rats, and humans with essential hypertension, the D1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of sodium transport is impaired because of an uncoupling of the D1-like receptor from its G protein/effector complex. The uncoupling is genetic, and receptor-, organ-, and nephron segment-specific. In human essential hypertension, the uncoupling of the D1 receptor from its G protein/effector complex is caused by an agonist-independent serine phosphorylation/desensitization by constitutively active variants of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase type 4. The D5 receptor is also important in blood pressure regulation. Disruption of the D5 or the D1 receptor gene in mice increases blood pressure. However, unlike the D1 receptor, the hypertension in D5 receptor null mice is caused by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system, apparently due to activation of oxytocin, V1 vasopressin, and non-N-methyl D-aspartate receptors in the central nervous system. The cause of the activation of these receptors remains to be determined.

  13. Posttranslational Modification Biology of Glutamate Receptors and Drug Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min eMao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational covalent modifications of glutamate receptors remain a hot topic. Early studies have established that this family of receptors, including almost all ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes, undergoes active phosphorylation at serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues on their intracellular domains. Recent evidence identifies several glutamate receptor subtypes to be direct substrates for palmitoylation at cysteine residues. Other modifications such as ubiquitination and sumoylation at lysine residues also occur to certain glutamate receptors. These modifications are dynamic and reversible in nature and are regulatable by changing synaptic inputs. The regulated modifications significantly impact the receptor in many ways, including interrelated changes in biochemistry (synthesis, subunit assembling and protein-protein interactions, subcellular redistribution (trafficking, endocytosis, synaptic delivery and clustering, and physiology, usually associated with changes in synaptic plasticity. Glutamate receptors are enriched in the striatum and cooperate closely with dopamine to regulate striatal signaling. Emerging evidence shows that modification processes of striatal glutamate receptors are sensitive to addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamines. Altered modifications are believed to be directly linked to enduring receptor/synaptic plasticity and drug-seeking. This review summarizes several major types of modifications of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of these modifications in striatal signaling and in the pathogenesis of psychostimulant addiction.

  14. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of t

  15. Mammalian Sweet Taste Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Greg; Hoon, Mark A; Chandrashekar, Jayaram; Zhang, Yifeng; Ryba, Nicholas J.P; Zuker, Charles S

    2001-01-01

    ... and information coding, and have focused on the isolation and characterization of genes encoding sweet and bitter taste receptors. The identification of taste receptors generates powerful molecular tools to investigate not only the function of taste receptor cells, but also the logic of taste coding. For example, defining the size and diversity of the re...

  16. Cellular approaches to the interaction between cannabinoid receptor ligands and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Murat; Al Kury, Lina; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-05-15

    Cannabinoids are among the earliest known drugs to humanity. Cannabis plant contains various phytochemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors. In addition, synthetic and endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) constitute other classes of cannabinoid receptor ligands. Although many pharmacological effects of these cannabinoids are mediated by the activation of cannabinoid receptors, recent studies indicate that cannabinoids also modulate the functions of various integral membrane proteins including ion channels, receptors, neurotransmitter transporters, and enzymes by mechanism(s) not involving the activation of known cannabinoid receptors. Currently, the mechanisms of these effects were not fully understood. However, it is likely that direct actions of cannabinoids are closely linked to their lipophilic structures. This report will focus on the actions of cannabinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and will examine the results of recent studies in this field. In addition some mechanistic approaches will be provided. The results discussed in this review indicate that, besides cannabinoid receptors, further molecular targets for cannabinoids exist and that these targets may represent important novel sites to alter neuronal excitability.

  17. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2006-12-12

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  18. Gastrin Receptor-Avid Peptide Conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Timothy J. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Li, Ning (Baltimore, MD); Sieckman, Gary (Ashland, MO); Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann (Columbia, MO)

    2005-07-26

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  19. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  20. NMDA receptor activity in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E Lakhan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors play a variety of physiologic roles and their proper signaling is essential for cellular homeostasis. Any disruption in this pathway, leading to either enhanced or decreased activity, may result in the manifestation of neuropsychiatric pathologies such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance induced psychosis, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we explore the notion that the overlap in activity of at least one biochemical pathway, the NMDA receptor pathway, may be the link to understanding the overlap in psychotic symptoms between diseases. This review intends to present a broad overview of those neuropsychiatric disorders for which alternations in NMDA receptor activity is prominent thus suggesting that continued direction of pharmaceutical intervention to this pathway may present a viable option for managing symptoms.

  1. Cyclic di-GMP sensing via the innate immune signaling protein STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian; Tian, Yuan; Kabaleeswaran, Venkataraman; Jiang, Xiaomo; Tu, Daqi; Eck, Michael J; Chen, Zhijian J; Wu, Hao

    2012-06-29

    Detection of foreign materials is the first step of successful immune responses. Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) was shown to directly bind cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger, and to elicit strong interferon responses. Here we elucidate the structural features of the cytosolic c-di-GMP binding domain (CBD) of STING and its complex with c-di-GMP. The CBD exhibits an α + β fold and is a dimer in the crystal and in solution. Surprisingly, one c-di-GMP molecule binds to the central crevice of a STING dimer, using a series of stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. We show that STING is autoinhibited by an intramolecular interaction between the CBD and the C-terminal tail (CTT) and that c-di-GMP releases STING from this autoinhibition by displacing the CTT. The structures provide a remarkable example of pathogen-host interactions in which a unique microbial molecule directly engages the innate immune system.

  2. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa.

  3. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein.

  4. ChIP-seq reveals the global regulator AlgR mediating cyclic di-GMP synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weina; Zhao, Jingru; Kang, Huaping; Zhu, Miao; Zhou, Tianhong; Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua

    2015-09-30

    AlgR is a key transcriptional regulator required for the expression of multiple virulence factors, including type IV pili and alginate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the regulon and molecular regulatory mechanism of AlgR have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, among 157 loci that were identified by a ChIP-seq assay, we characterized a gene, mucR, which encodes an enzyme that synthesizes the intracellular second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). A ΔalgR strain produced lesser biofilm than did the wild-type strain, which is consistent with a phenotype controlled by c-di-GMP. AlgR positively regulates mucR via direct binding to its promoter. A ΔalgRΔmucR double mutant produced lesser biofilm than did the single ΔalgR mutant, demonstrating that c-di-GMP is a positive regulator of biofilm formation. AlgR controls the levels of c-di-GMP synthesis via direct regulation of mucR. In addition, the cognate sensor of AlgR, FimS/AlgZ, also plays an important role in P. aeruginosa virulence. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the AlgR regulon and reveals the involvement of c-di-GMP in the mechanism underlying AlgR regulation.

  5. Structure of a diguanylate cyclase from Thermotoga maritima: insights into activation, feedback inhibition and thermostability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Deepthi

    Full Text Available Large-scale production of bis-3'-5'-cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP would facilitate biological studies of numerous bacterial signaling pathways and phenotypes controlled by this second messenger molecule, such as virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP constitutes also a potentially interesting molecule as a vaccine adjuvant. Even though chemical synthesis of c-di-GMP can be done, the yields are incompatible with mass-production. tDGC, a stand-alone diguanylate cyclase (DGC or GGDEF domain from Thermotoga maritima, enables the robust enzymatic production of large quantities of c-di-GMP. To understand the structural correlates of tDGC thermostability, its catalytic mechanism and feedback inhibition, we determined structures of an active-like dimeric conformation with both active (A sites facing each other and of an inactive dimeric conformation, locked by c-di-GMP bound at the inhibitory (I site. We also report the structure of a single mutant of tDGC, with the R158A mutation at the I-site, abolishing product inhibition and unproductive dimerization. A comparison with structurally characterized DGC homologues from mesophiles reveals the presence of a higher number of salt bridges in the hyperthermophile enzyme tDGC. Denaturation experiments of mutants disrupting in turn each of the salt bridges unique to tDGC identified three salt-bridges critical to confer thermostability.

  6. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ling Lo

    Full Text Available The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA, a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa.

  7. The overlapping host responses to bacterial cyclic dinucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Sater, Ali A; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Plumlee, Courtney; Levi, Assaf; Schreiber, Michael T; Lee, Carolyn; Shuman, Howard; Beaucage, Serge L; Schindler, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Macrophages respond to infection with Legionella pneumophila by the induction of inflammatory mediators, including type I Interferons (IFN-Is). To explore whether the bacterial second messenger cyclic 3'-5' diguanylate (c-diGMP) activates some of these mediators, macrophages were infected with L. pneumophila strains in which the levels of bacterial c-diGMP had been altered. Intriguingly, there was a positive correlation between c-diGMP levels and IFN-I expression. Subsequent studies with synthetic derivatives of c-diGMP, and newly described cyclic 3'-5' diadenylate (c-diAMP), determined that these molecules activate overlapping inflammatory responses in human and murine macrophages. Moreover, UV crosslinking studies determined that both dinucleotides physically associate with a shared set of host proteins. Fractionation of macrophage extracts on a biotin-c-diGMP affinity matrix led to the identification of a set of candidate host binding proteins. These studies suggest that mammalian macrophages can sense and mount a specific inflammatory response to bacterial dinucleotides.

  8. Carbamate Insecticides Target Human Melatonin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V

    2017-02-20

    Carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) and carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate) are among the most toxic insecticides, implicated in a variety of diseases including diabetes and cancer among others. Using an integrated pharmacoinformatics based screening approach, we have identified these insecticides to be structural mimics of the neurohormone melatonin and were able to bind to the putative melatonin binding sites in MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in silico. Carbaryl and carbofuran then were tested for competition with 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin (300 pM) binding to hMT1 or hMT2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells. Carbaryl and carbofuran showed higher affinity for competition with 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin binding to the hMT2 compared to the hMT1 melatonin receptor (33 and 35-fold difference, respectively) as predicted by the molecular modeling. In the presence of GTP (100 μM), which decouples the G-protein linked receptors to modulate signaling, the apparent efficacy of carbaryl and carbofuran for 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin binding for the hMT1 melatonin receptor was not affected but significantly decreased for the hMT2 melatonin receptor compatible with receptor antagonist/inverse agonist and agonist efficacy, respectively. Altogether, our data points to a potentially new mechanism through which carbamate insecticides carbaryl and carbofuran could impact human health by altering the homeostatic balance of key regulatory processes by directly binding to melatonin receptors.

  9. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) amplifies the signals induced by the NACHT-LRR (NLR) pattern recognition receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Azam, T.; Ferwerda, G.; Girardin, S.E.; Kim, S.H.; Dinarello, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a member of a new family of myeloid receptors, encoded by a gene cluster linked to the MHC. Engagement of TREM-1 stimulates intracellular signals, resulting in activation of phagocytosis, neutrophil degranulation, and amplification of cyto

  10. [Melatonin receptor agonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland and is involved in the regulation of human sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms. The melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus play a pivotal role in the sleep-wake regulation. Based on the fact that MT1 receptors are involved in human sleep onset process, melatonin receptor agonists have been developed to treat insomnia. In this article, we first reviewed functions of melatonin receptors with special reference to MT1 and MT2, and properties and clinical application of melatonin receptor agonists as hypnotics.

  11. Integrating Linked Data into Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Götz Hatop

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the Linked Data paradigm has evolved from a research idea to a practical approach for publishing structured data on the web, the performance gap between currently available RDF data stores and the somewhat older search technologies could not be closed. The combination of Linked Data with a search engine can help to improve ad-hoc retrieval. This article presents and documents the process of building a search index for the Solr search engine from bibliographic records published as linked open data.

  12. Dopamine receptor repertoire of human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunz Lars

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High levels of dopamine (DA were described in human ovary and recently evidence for DA receptors in granulosa and luteal cells has been provided, as well. However, neither the full repertoire of ovarian receptors for DA, nor their specific role, is established. Human granulosa cells (GCs derived from women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF are an adequate model for endocrine cells of the follicle and the corpus luteum and were therefore employed in an attempt to decipher their DA receptor repertoire and functionality. Methods Cells were obtained from patients undergoing IVF and examined using cDNA-array, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. In addition, calcium measurements (with FLUO-4 were employed. Expression of two DA receptors was also examined by in-situ hybridization in rat ovary. Effects of DA on cell viability and cell volume were studied by using an ATP assay and an electronic cell counter system. Results We found members of the two DA receptor families (D1- and D2 -like associated with different signaling pathways in human GCs, namely D1 (as expected and D5 (both are Gs coupled and linked to cAMP increase and D2, D4 (Gi/Gq coupled and linked to IP3/DAG. D3 was not found. The presence of the trophic hormone hCG (10 IU/ml in the culture medium for several days did not alter mRNA (semiquantitative RT-PCR or protein levels (immunocytochemistry/Western blotting of D1,2,4,5 DA receptors. Expression of prototype receptors for the two families, D1 and D2, was furthermore shown in rat granulosa and luteal cells by in situ hybridization. Among the DA receptors found in human GCs, D2 expression was marked both at mRNA and protein levels and it was therefore further studied. Results of additional RT-PCR and Western blots showed two splice variants (D2L, D2S. Irrespective of these variants, D2 proved to be functional, as DA raised intracellular calcium levels. This calcium mobilizing effect of DA was observed

  13. YfiBNR mediates cyclic di-GMP dependent small colony variant formation and persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob G Malone

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During long-term cystic fibrosis lung infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes genetic adaptation resulting in progressively increased persistence and the generation of adaptive colony morphotypes. This includes small colony variants (SCVs, auto-aggregative, hyper-adherent cells whose appearance correlates with poor lung function and persistence of infection. The SCV morphotype is strongly linked to elevated levels of cyclic-di-GMP, a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates the transition between motile and sessile, cooperative lifestyles. A genetic screen in PA01 for SCV-related loci identified the yfiBNR operon, encoding a tripartite signaling module that regulates c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent analysis determined that YfiN is a membrane-integral diguanylate cyclase whose activity is tightly controlled by YfiR, a small periplasmic protein, and the OmpA/Pal-like outer-membrane lipoprotein YfiB. Exopolysaccharide synthesis was identified as the principal downstream target for YfiBNR, with increased production of Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides responsible for many characteristic SCV behaviors. An yfi-dependent SCV was isolated from the sputum of a CF patient. Consequently, the effect of the SCV morphology on persistence of infection was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using the YfiN-mediated SCV as a representative strain. The SCV strain exhibited strong, exopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to nematode scavenging and macrophage phagocytosis. Furthermore, the SCV strain effectively persisted over many weeks in mouse infection models, despite exhibiting a marked fitness disadvantage in vitro. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics significantly decreased both the number of suppressors arising, and the relative fitness disadvantage of the SCV mutant in vitro, suggesting that the SCV persistence phenotype may play a more important role during antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study establishes Yfi

  14. YfiBNR mediates cyclic di-GMP dependent small colony variant formation and persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob G Malone

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During long-term cystic fibrosis lung infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes genetic adaptation resulting in progressively increased persistence and the generation of adaptive colony morphotypes. This includes small colony variants (SCVs, auto-aggregative, hyper-adherent cells whose appearance correlates with poor lung function and persistence of infection. The SCV morphotype is strongly linked to elevated levels of cyclic-di-GMP, a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates the transition between motile and sessile, cooperative lifestyles. A genetic screen in PA01 for SCV-related loci identified the yfiBNR operon, encoding a tripartite signaling module that regulates c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent analysis determined that YfiN is a membrane-integral diguanylate cyclase whose activity is tightly controlled by YfiR, a small periplasmic protein, and the OmpA/Pal-like outer-membrane lipoprotein YfiB. Exopolysaccharide synthesis was identified as the principal downstream target for YfiBNR, with increased production of Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides responsible for many characteristic SCV behaviors. An yfi-dependent SCV was isolated from the sputum of a CF patient. Consequently, the effect of the SCV morphology on persistence of infection was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using the YfiN-mediated SCV as a representative strain. The SCV strain exhibited strong, exopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to nematode scavenging and macrophage phagocytosis. Furthermore, the SCV strain effectively persisted over many weeks in mouse infection models, despite exhibiting a marked fitness disadvantage in vitro. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics significantly decreased both the number of suppressors arising, and the relative fitness disadvantage of the SCV mutant in vitro, suggesting that the SCV persistence phenotype may play a more important role during antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study establishes Yfi

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prevention Recovery Substance Use and SUDs in LGBT Populations Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Search ... the link between drug abuse and HIV/AIDS, populations most at risk, trends in HIV/AIDS, and ...

  16. Medicare and Medicaid Linked Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare-Medicaid Linked Enrollee Analytic Data Source (MMLEADS) has been developed to allow for the examination of all Medicare and Medicaid enrollment and...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect anyone. Watch the “d’cisions” Videos Campaign Materials After the Party Posters: We have developed posters ... the Learn the Link message. Campaign messages and materials were tested among various groups of young people, ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with ... Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other organizations in your tweets to spread the word even further. Tweet About Learn the Link To ... other organizations in your tweets to spread the word even further. Share with Flickr, Pinterest or Instagram ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & Families Parents & Educators Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Facebook LinkedIn Twitter ... Network TV Organizations: AIDS.gov AIDS Alliance for Children, Youth and Families The American Academy of Child & ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with ... Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the ...

  3. Decouplink: Dynamic Links for Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Lykke Rytter; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    -based systems: On the one hand, violating the open/closed principle by allowing for modification compromises independent extensibility. On the other hand, trying to enforce the open/closed principle by prohibiting modification precludes unanticipated dimensions of extension. Dynamic links increase the number...... of dimensions of extension that can be exploited without performing modification of existing types. Thus, dynamic links make it possible to enforce the open/closed principle in situations where it would otherwise not be possible. We present Decouplink – a library-based implementation of dynamic links for Java.......We also present experience with the use of dynamic links during the evolution of a component-based control system....

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIDA’s "Learn the Link" campaign continues to raise awareness among this generation of the real risks of ... Collaborators Thanks to Those Who Have Helped Raise Awareness of Our Campaign! NIDA acknowledges the following television ...

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, Evzio) Pain Prevention Recovery Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs ... to your Web site. Please link these banners back to this site at: http://www.drugabuse.gov/ ...

  6. Advanced solderless flexible thermal link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian G.; Jensen, Scott M.; Batty, J. Clair

    1996-10-01

    Flexible thermal links play an important role int he thermal management of cryogenically cooled components. The purpose of these links is to provide a means of transferring heat from a cooled component to a cooler reservoir with little increase in temperature. The standard soldered approach although effective proves to be time consuming and contributes to added thermal impedances which degrade the performance of the link. For system with little tolerance for temperature differences between cooled components and a cooling source this is undesirable. The authors of this paper have developed a technique by which thin metal foil or braided wire can be attached to metal end blocks without any solder using the swaging process. Swaging provides a fast, simple method for providing a low thermal impedance between the foils and blocks. This paper describes the characteristics of these thermal links in terms of length, mass, thermal resistance, flexibility, and survivability.

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the message to young people and to parents, teachers, and the media about the link between ... status updates that you can easily copy and paste to help show your support for ...

  8. Linking Ethics and Economic Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2012-01-01

    Hunt (2012) builds on his work concerning ethics and resource-advantage theory to link personal ethical standards, societal norms, and economic growth but offers few details concerning the precise mechanisms that link ethics and growth. This comment suggests a number of such mechanisms – for exam......Hunt (2012) builds on his work concerning ethics and resource-advantage theory to link personal ethical standards, societal norms, and economic growth but offers few details concerning the precise mechanisms that link ethics and growth. This comment suggests a number of such mechanisms...... – for example, the influence of prevailing ethical norms on the aggregate elasticity of substitution and, therefore, total factor productivity and growth....

  9. Study Links Disasters to Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_161672.html Study Links Disasters to Dementia Losing home was tied to greater mental decline ... Earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters may raise dementia risk for seniors forced to leave their homes, ...

  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect anyone. Watch the “d’cisions” Videos Campaign Materials After the Party Posters: We have developed posters ... behaviors. NIDA researchers have studied and continue to study the links between drug abuse and HIV/AIDS. ...

  11. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abuse and HIV infection. It contains information for young people, parents and teachers, and the media with links ... 177(1):355-361. How are Teens Affected? Young people are at risk for contracting HIV. In general, ...

  12. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a ... in mice suggests that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type ...

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patients who do not abuse drugs. In animal studies, methamphetamine has been shown to increase the amount ... behaviors. NIDA researchers have studied and continue to study the links between drug abuse and HIV/AIDS. ...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and ... Link campaign. This campaign shows teens and young adults that non-injection drug use and alcohol use ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... are at risk for contracting HIV. In general, middle and late teen years are when young people ... link between drug abuse and HIV. Post on Facebook or Twitter ; add photos to your Flickr , Pinterest , ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, disrupting the ... linked and referred to as "HIV/AIDS." HIV can be transferred between people if an infected person's ...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other organizations in your tweets to spread the word even further. Tweet About Learn the Link To ... other organizations in your tweets to spread the word even further. Share with Flickr, Pinterest or Instagram ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teens and young adults have never known a world without it. NIDA’s "Learn the Link" campaign continues ... NIDA TV PEERx Drugs & Health Blog The NIDA Science Fair Award for Addiction Science USA Science & Engineering ...

  19. Study Links Celiac Disease, Anorexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164453.html Study Links Celiac Disease, Anorexia Chances of being diagnosed with eating ... April 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young women with celiac disease may face a heightened risk of being ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). AIDS is a disease of the immune system for which there ... causes (AIDS) are often linked and referred to as "HIV/AIDS." HIV can be transferred between people ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increasingly at risk for HIV infection through risky sexual behaviors. NIDA researchers have studied and continue to study the links between drug abuse and HIV/AIDS. In the early years of ...

  2. Intermediate links of line arrangements

    CERN Document Server

    Bodin, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    We investigate several topological properties of line arrangements. The first result is that two generic complex line arrangements are equivalent. In fact for a line arrangement A we associate its defining polynomial f= prod_i (a_ix+b_iy+c_i), so that A = (f=0). We even prove that the defining polynomials of two generic line arrangements are topologically equivalent. In higher dimension the related result is that within a family of equivalent hyperplane arrangements the defining polynomials are topologically equivalent. A second type of objects associated to a line arrangement are links A cap S^3_r(0) obtained by intersecting the arrangement with some spheres. Several topics are discussed: (a) some link configurations can be realized by complex line arrangements but not by real line arrangements; (b) if we intersect the arrangements with a vertical band instead of a sphere, what link configurations can be obtained? (c) relations between link configurations obtained by bands and spheres.

  3. Linking DC together with TRSL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Yong, X.

    2000-01-01

    Duration Calculus (DC) is an interval-based real-time logic, which can be used in capturing and eliciting users' real-time requirements. The Timed RAISE Specification Language (TRSL) is an extension of the RAISE Specification Language with real-time features. This paper links DC and TRSL together...... approach for linking state-based real-time logics together with event-based, timed process algebra languages....

  4. Linked data and user interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Cervone, H Frank

    2015-01-01

    This collection of research papers provides extensive information on deploying services, concepts, and approaches for using open linked data from libraries and other cultural heritage institutions. With a special emphasis on how libraries and other cultural heritage institutions can create effective end user interfaces using open, linked data or other datasets. These papers are essential reading for any one interesting in user interface design or the semantic web.

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Link . Be sure to check out the NIDA Facebook page and tag us in your posts! Learn the link between drug abuse and HIV. http://1.usa.gov/1z20ww6 How many of us think about HIV/AIDS when we’re at parties or hanging out with friends? It’s a topic you can’t ignore. Learn ...

  6. Linking Ethics and Economic Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2012-01-01

    Hunt (2012) builds on his work concerning ethics and resource-advantage theory to link personal ethical standards, societal norms, and economic growth but offers few details concerning the precise mechanisms that link ethics and growth. This comment suggests a number of such mechanisms...... – for example, the influence of prevailing ethical norms on the aggregate elasticity of substitution and, therefore, total factor productivity and growth....

  7. Commentary: IL-4 and IL-13 receptors and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Sarah M; Heller, Nicola M

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 were discovered approximately 30years ago and were immediately linked to allergy and atopic diseases. Since then, new roles for IL-4 and IL-13 and their receptors in normal gestation, fetal development and neurological function and in the pathogenesis of cancer and fibrosis have been appreciated. Studying IL-4/-13 and their receptors has revealed important clues about cytokine biology and led to the development of numerous experimental therapeutics. Here we aim to highlight new discoveries and consolidate concepts in the field of IL-4 and IL-13 structure, receptor regulation, signaling and experimental therapeutics.

  8. Influencia de la cocaína en la transcripción de receptores con la adicción: expresión de receptores dopaminérgicos

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    [ES]Este trabajo trata sobre la influencia en la transcripción de receptores relacionados con la adicción: expresión de receptores dopaminérgicos [EN]This paper deals with the influence on the transcription of receptors linked to addiction: dopamine receptor expression. Trabajo de Fin de Máster del Máster en Neurociencias, curso 2008-2009.

  9. Dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer signaling pathway in the brain: emerging physiological relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasbi Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine is an important catecholamine neurotransmitter modulating many physiological functions, and is linked to psychopathology of many diseases such as schizophrenia and drug addiction. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are the most abundant dopaminergic receptors in the striatum, and although a clear segregation between the pathways expressing these two receptors has been reported in certain subregions, the presence of D1-D2 receptor heteromers within a unique subset of neurons, forming a novel signaling transducing functional entity has been shown. Recently, significant progress has been made in elucidating the signaling pathways activated by the D1-D2 receptor heteromer and their potential physiological relevance.

  10. Molecular size of different neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhanin, J; Schmid, A; Lombet, A; Wheeler, K P; Lazdunski, M; Ellory, J C

    1983-01-25

    Measurements were made of the molecular sizes of two distinct receptors on the Na+ channel in rat brain synaptosomes that are specific for different neurotoxins. Radiation inactivation of the binding of radiolabeled derivatives of the toxins was consistent with Mr = 260,000 for the tetrodotoxin receptor and Mr = 266,000 for the receptor specific for two scorpion toxins, toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus and toxin gamma from Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. Covalent cross-linking of the latter to its receptor similarly indicated Mr = 270,000. It seems most likely that these two distinct receptors reside on the same molecule.

  11. P2X7 receptor in epilepsy; role in pathophysiology and potential targeting for seizure control.

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Tobias; Jimenez-Pacheco, Alba; Miras-Portugal, Maria Teresa; Diaz-Hernandez, Miguel; Henshall, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is an ATP-gated non-selective cation-permeable ionotropic receptor selectively expressed in neurons and glia in the brain. Activation of the P2X7 receptor has been found to modulate neuronal excitability in the hippocampus and it has also been linked to microglia activation and neuroinflammatory responses. Accordingly, interest developed on the P2X7 receptor in disorders of the nervous system, including epilepsy. Studies show that expression of the P2X7 receptor is elevated ...

  12. RIME proteomics of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive D’Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors play an important role in transcriptional regulation of diverse cellular processes and is also relevant in diseases such as cancer. In breast cancer, the nuclear receptors – estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR are classical markers of the disease and are used to classify breast cancer subtypes. Using a recently developed affinity purification MS technique (RIME [1], we investigate the protein interactors of ER and PR in breast cancer cell lines upon stimulation by the ligands – estrogen and progesterone. The data is deposited at proteomeXchange (PXD002104 and is part of a publication [2] that explains the link between the two nuclear receptors and potential consequences of this in breast cancer. In this manuscript, we describe the methodology used and provide details on experimental procedures, analysis methods and analysis of raw data. The purpose of this article is to enable reproducibility of the data and provide technical recommendations on performing RIME in hormonal contexts.

  13. The importance of the adenosine A(2A) receptor-dopamine D(2) receptor interaction in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, M; Zaniewska, M; Frankowska, M; Wydra, K; Fuxe, K

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction is a serious brain disorder with somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and legal implications in the developed world. Illegal (e.g., psychostimulants, opioids, cannabinoids) and legal (alcohol, nicotine) drugs of abuse create a complex behavioral pattern composed of drug intake, withdrawal, seeking and relapse. One of the hallmarks of drugs that are abused by humans is that they have different mechanisms of action to increase dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the mesolimbic circuitry of the brain and indirectly activate DA receptors. Among the DA receptors, D(2) receptors are linked to drug abuse and addiction because their function has been proven to be correlated with drug reinforcement and relapses. The recognition that D(2) receptors exist not only as homomers but also can form heteromers, such as with the adenosine (A)(2A) receptor, that are pharmacologically and functionally distinct from their constituent receptors, has significantly expanded the range of potential drug targets and provided new avenues for drug design in the search for novel drug addiction therapies. The aim of this review is to bring current focus on A(2A) receptors, their physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, and to discuss the therapeutic relevance of these receptors to drug addiction. We concentrate on the contribution of A(2A) receptors to the effects of different classes of drugs of abuse examined in preclinical behavioral experiments carried out with pharmacological and genetic tools. The consequences of chronic drug treatment on A(2A) receptor-assigned functions in preclinical studies are also presented. Finally, the neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between A(2A) receptors and drugs of abuse in the context of the heteromeric A(2A)-D(2) receptor complex is discussed. Taken together, a significant amount of experimental analyses provide evidence that targeting A(2A) receptors may offer innovative translational strategies

  14. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  15. HIGH AFFINITY ACYLATING ANTAGONISTS FOR MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgold, Jesse; Karton, Yishai; Malka, Naftali; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The muscarinic antagonists pirenzepine and telenzepine were derivitized as alkylamino derivatives at a site on the molecules corresponding to a region of bulk tolerance in receptor binding. The distal primary amino groups were coupled to the cross-linking reagent meta-phenylene diisothiocyanate, resulting in two isothiocyanate derivatives that were found to inhibit muscarinic receptors irreversibly and in a dose-dependent fashion. Preincubation of rat forebrain membranes with an isothiocyanate derivative followed by radioligand binding using [3H]N-methylscopolamine diminished the Bmax value, but did not affect the Kd value. The receptor binding site was not restored upon repeated washing, indicating that irreversible inhibition had occurred. IC50 values for the irreversible inhibition at rat forebrain muscarinic receptors were 0.15 nM and 0.19 nM, for derivatives of pirenzepine and telenzepine, respectively. The isothiocyanate derivative of pirenzepine was non-selective as an irreversible muscarinic inhibitor, and the corresponding derivative prepared from telenzepine was 5-fold selective for forebrain (mainly m1) vs. heart (m2) muscarinic receptors. PMID:1625525

  16. Amylin receptor: a common pathophysiological target in Alzheimer’s Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen eFu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Amylin (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid beta protein (Abeta, which are deposited within pancreatic islets of diabetics and brains of Alzheimer’s patients respectively, share many biophysical and physiological properties. Emerging evidence indicates that the amylin receptor is a putative target receptor for the actions of human amylin and Abeta in the brain. The amylin receptor consists of the calcitonin receptor dimerized with a receptor activity-modifying protein and is widely distributed within central nervous system. Both amylin and Abeta directly activate this G protein-coupled receptor and trigger multiple common intracellular signal transduction pathways that can culminate in apoptotic cell death. Moreover, amylin receptor antagonists can block both the biological and neurotoxic effects of human amylin and Abeta. Amylin receptors thus appear to be involved in the pathophysiology of AD and diabetes, and could serve as a molecular link between the two conditions that are associated epidemiologically.

  17. LinkMind: link optimization in swarming mobile sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Trung Dung

    2011-01-01

    A swarming mobile sensor network is comprised of a swarm of wirelessly connected mobile robots equipped with various sensors. Such a network can be applied in an uncertain environment for services such as cooperative navigation and exploration, object identification and information gathering. One of the most advantageous properties of the swarming wireless sensor network is that mobile nodes can work cooperatively to organize an ad-hoc network and optimize the network link capacity to maximize the transmission of gathered data from a source to a target. This paper describes a new method of link optimization of swarming mobile sensor networks. The new method is based on combination of the artificial potential force guaranteeing connectivities of the mobile sensor nodes and the max-flow min-cut theorem of graph theory ensuring optimization of the network link capacity. The developed algorithm is demonstrated and evaluated in simulation.

  18. LinkMind: Link Optimization in Swarming Mobile Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Dung Ngo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A swarming mobile sensor network is comprised of a swarm of wirelessly connected mobile robots equipped with various sensors. Such a network can be applied in an uncertain environment for services such as cooperative navigation and exploration, object identification and information gathering. One of the most advantageous properties of the swarming wireless sensor network is that mobile nodes can work cooperatively to organize an ad-hoc network and optimize the network link capacity to maximize the transmission of gathered data from a source to a target. This paper describes a new method of link optimization of swarming mobile sensor networks. The new method is based on combination of the artificial potential force guaranteeing connectivities of the mobile sensor nodes and the max-flow min-cut theorem of graph theory ensuring optimization of the network link capacity. The developed algorithm is demonstrated and evaluated in simulation.

  19. Chicken NK cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Christian; Neulen, Marie-Luise; Sperling, Beatrice; Windau, Katharina; Zechmann, Maria; Jansen, Christine A; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Göbel, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer cells are innate immune cells that destroy virally infected or transformed cells. They recognize these altered cells by a plethora of diverse receptors and thereby differ from other lymphocytes that use clonally distributed antigen receptors. To date, several receptor families that play a role in either activating or inhibiting NK cells have been identified in mammals. In the chicken, NK cells have been functionally and morphologically defined, however, a conclusive analysis of receptors involved in NK cell mediated functions has not been available. This is partly due to the low frequencies of NK cells in blood or spleen that has hampered their intensive characterization. Here we will review recent progress regarding the diverse NK cell receptor families, with special emphasis on novel families identified in the chicken genome with potential as chicken NK cell receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Computational studies of ligand-receptor interactions in bitter taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguet, Laurence; Zhang, Ziding; Grigorov, Martin G

    2006-01-01

    Phenylthiocarbamide tastes intensely bitter to some individuals, but others find it completely tasteless. Recently, it was suggested that phenylthiocarbamide elicits bitter taste by interacting with a human G protein-coupled receptor (hTAS2R38) encoded by the PTC gene. The phenylthiocarbamide nontaster trait was linked to three single nucleotide polymorphisms occurring in the PTC gene. Using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin as template, we generated the 3D structure of hTAS2R38 bitter taste receptor. We were able to map on the receptor structure the amino acids affected by the genetic polymorphisms and to propose molecular functions for two of them that explained the emergence of the nontaster trait. We used molecular docking simulations to find that phenylthiocarbamide exhibited a higher affinity for the target receptor than the structurally similar molecule 6-n-propylthiouracil, in line with recent experimental studies. A 3D model was constructed for the hTAS2R16 bitter taste receptor as well, by applying the same protocol. We found that the recently published experimental ligand binding affinity data for this receptor correlated well with the binding scores obtained from our molecular docking calculations.

  1. Prorenin receptor in kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosypiv, Ihor V

    2017-03-01

    Prorenin receptor (PRR), a receptor for renin and prorenin and an accessory subunit of the vacuolar proton pump H(+)-ATPase, is expressed in the developing kidney. Global loss of PRR is lethal in mice, and PRR mutations are associated with a high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and X-linked mental retardation in humans. With the advent of modern gene targeting techniques, including conditional knockout approaches, several recent studies have demonstrated critical roles for the PRR in several lineages of the developing kidney. PRR signaling has been shown to be essential for branching morphogenesis of the ureteric bud (UB), nephron progenitor survival and nephrogenesis. PRR regulates these developmental events through interactions with other transcription and growth factors. Several targeted PRR knockout animal models have structural defects mimicking congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract observed in humans. The aim of this review, is to highlight new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which PRR may regulate UB branching, terminal differentiation and function of UB-derived collecting ducts, nephron progenitor maintenance, progression of nephrogenesis and normal structural kidney development and function.

  2. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  3. Novel cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A J

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids have numerous physiological effects. In the years since the molecular identification of the G protein-coupled receptors CB1 and CB2, the ion channel TRPV1, and their corresponding endogenous ligand systems, many cannabinoid-evoked actions have been shown conclusively to be mediated by one of these specific receptor targets. However, there remain several examples where these classical cannabinoid receptors do not explain observed pharmacology. Studies using mice genetically delete...

  4. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs).

  5. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Faical Ramdani; Omar Kettani; Benaissa Tadili

    2015-06-01

    Seismic triggering at plate boundaries has a very complex nature that includes seismic events at varying distances. The spatial orientation of triggering cannot be reduced to sequences from the main shocks. Seismic waves propagate at all times in all directions, particularly in highly active zones. No direct evidence can be obtained regarding which earthquakes trigger the shocks. The first approach is to determine the potential linked zones where triggering may occur. The second step is to determine the causality between the events and their triggered shocks. The spatial orientation of the links between events is established from pre-ordered networks and the adapted dependence of the spatio-temporal occurrence of earthquakes. Based on a coefficient of synchronous seismic activity to grid couples, we derive a network link by each threshold. The links of high thresholds are tested using the coherence of time series to determine the causality and related orientation. The resulting link orientations at the plate boundary conditions indicate that causal triggering seems to be localized along a major fault, as a stress transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension.

  6. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...

  7. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A; Jenkins, Andrew; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases.

  8. Driving Cellular Plasticity and Survival Through the Signal Transduction Pathways of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) share a common molecular morphology with other G protein–linked receptors, but there expression throughout the mammalian nervous system places these receptors as essential mediators not only for the initial development of an organism, but also for the vital determination of a cell’s fate during many disorders in the nervous system that include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Multiple Scler...

  9. Estrogen, male dominance and esophageal adenocarcinoma: Is there a link?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqi Yang; Olga A Sukocheva; Damian J Hussey; David I Watson

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a cancer with poor prognosis, and its incidence has risen sharply over recent decades. Obesity is a major risk factor for developing this cancer and there is a clear male gender bias in the incidence that cannot be fully explained by known risk factors. It is possible that a difference in the expression of estrogen, or its signaling axes, may contribute to this gender bias. We undertook a comprehensive literature search and analyzed the available data regarding estrogen and estrogen receptor expression, and the possible sex-specific links with esophageal adenocarcinoma development. Potentially relevant associations between visceral vs subcutaneous fat deposition and estrogen expression, and the effect of crosstalk between estrogen and leptin signaling were identified. We also found limited studies suggesting a role for estrogen receptor β expression in esophageal adenocarcinoma development. The current literature supports speculation on an etiological role for estrogen in the male gender bias in esophageal adenocarcinoma, but further studies are required.

  10. Links

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Russo

    2006-01-01

    La lista de enlaces ofrecida a continuación tiene como objetivo la creación de una base de datos sobre los principales sitios de interés para el estudio de la imagen (en America Latina y más allá). Se ha tratado de incluir una vasta gama de instituciones (museos, colecciones, institutos), representando sin embargo también a revistas, proyectos de investigación, y catálogos en línea. Sin tener la pretensión de ser exhaustiva, esta selección es evolutiva y se pone al día continuamente. MuseosI...

  11. Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Russo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La lista de enlaces ofrecida a continuación tiene como objetivo la creación de una base de datos sobre los principales sitios de interés para el estudio de la imagen (en America Latina y más allá. Se ha tratado de incluir una vasta gama de instituciones (museos, colecciones, institutos, representando sin embargo también a revistas, proyectos de investigación, y catálogos en línea. Sin tener la pretensión de ser exhaustiva, esta selección es evolutiva y se pone al día continuamente. MuseosI...

  12. On ω-Linked Overrings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin XIE; Fang Gui WANG; Yan TIAN

    2011-01-01

    Let R (C) T be an extension of commutative rings. T is called ω-linked over R if T as an R-module is a ω-module. In the case of R (C) T (C) Q0(R), T is called a ω-linked overring of R. As a generalization of Wang-McCsland-Park-Chang Theorem, we show that if R is a reduced ring, then R is a ω-Noetherian ring with ω-dim(R) ≤1 if and only if each ω-linked overring T of R is a ω-Noetherian ring with ω-dim(T) ≤ 1. In particular, R is a ω-Noetherian ring with ω-dim(R) = 0 if and only if R is an Artinian ring.

  13. Deformation of Linked Polymer Coils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董朝霞; 李明远; 吴肇亮; 林梅钦

    2003-01-01

    Linked polymer solution (LPS) is defined as the solution of linked polymer coils (LPCs) dispersed in water, composed of low concentration partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) and aluminum citrate (crosslinker). In the work, the conformational changes of LPCs under different conditions were investigated by the methods of membrane filtering under low pressure, dynamic light scattering and core flooding experiments. The results showed that in some conditions the LPCs could be compressed mechanically to 1/158.5 of their original volume because of relatively lower HPAM cross-linking. The hydration property of LPCs was similar to that of normal polymer coils. The deformation of LPCs was more restricted than that of ordinary polymer coils under the flow shear stress or the shift of hydration equilibrium caused in the variation of the electrolyte concentration which is responsible for the effective plugging in the throats of porous media when LPCs are used for deep diverting.

  14. Link Prediction via Matrix Completion

    CERN Document Server

    Pech, Ratha; Pan, Liming; Cheng, Hong; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by practical importance of social networks, economic networks, biological networks and so on, studies on large and complex networks have attracted a surge of attentions in the recent years. Link prediction is a fundamental issue to understand the mechanisms by which new links are added to the networks. We introduce the method of robust principal component analysis (robust PCA) into link prediction, and estimate the missing entries of the adjacency matrix. On one hand, our algorithm is based on the sparsity and low rank property of the matrix, on the other hand, it also performs very well when the network is dense. This is because a relatively dense real network is also sparse in comparison to the complete graph. According to extensive experiments on real networks from disparate fields, when the target network is connected and sufficiently dense, whatever it is weighted or unweighted, our method is demonstrated to be very effective and with prediction accuracy being considerably improved comparing wit...

  15. The OceanLink Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, T.; Arko, R. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Chandler, C. L.; Cheatham, M.; Finin, T.; Hitzler, P.; Krisnadhi, A.; Raymond, L. M.; Shepherd, A.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    A wide spectrum of maturing methods and tools, collectively characterized as the Semantic Web, is helping to vastly improve the dissemination of scientific research. Creating semantic integration requires input from both domain and cyberinfrastructure scientists. OceanLink, an NSF EarthCube Building Block, is demonstrating semantic technologies through the integration of geoscience data repositories, library holdings, conference abstracts, and funded research awards. Meeting project objectives involves applying semantic technologies to support data representation, discovery, sharing and integration. Our semantic cyberinfrastructure components include ontology design patterns, Linked Data collections, semantic provenance, and associated services to enhance data and knowledge discovery, interoperation, and integration. We discuss how these components are integrated, the continued automated and semi-automated creation of semantic metadata, and techniques we have developed to integrate ontologies, link resources, and preserve provenance and attribution.

  16. When He Said Linking, He Really Meant Linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnov, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    There are many reasons to improve web links, starting with their design. The author tends to think about "design" on the web in terms of two things: (1) graphic/industrial design; and (2) human usability. A nice, clean URI (uniform resource identifier) that does not change, is readable to humans, is amenable to common web behaviors such as…

  17. LinkMind: Link Optimization in Swarming Mobile Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Trung Dung

    2012-01-01

    optimization of swarming mobile sensor networks. The new method is based on combination of the artificial potential force guaranteeing connectivities of the mobile sensor nodes and the max-flow min-cut theorem of graph theory ensuring optimization of the network link capacity. The developed algorithm...

  18. Vibrio cholerae VpsT Regulates Matrix Production and Motility by Directly Sensing Cyclic di-GMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasteva, P.; Fong, J; Shikuma, N; Beyhan, S; Navarro, M; Yildiz, F; Sondermann, H

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms can switch from a planktonic, free-swimming life-style to a sessile, colonial state, called a biofilm, which confers resistance to environmental stress. Conversion between the motile and biofilm life-styles has been attributed to increased levels of the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), yet the signaling mechanisms mediating such a global switch are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcriptional regulator VpsT from Vibrio cholerae directly senses c-di-GMP to inversely control extracellular matrix production and motility, which identifies VpsT as a master regulator for biofilm formation. Rather than being regulated by phosphorylation, VpsT undergoes a change in oligomerization on c-di-GMP binding.

  19. Cyclic-di-GMP signaling in the Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Eric; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    The anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile causes intestinal infections responsible for symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Like other bacteria, C. difficile needs to sense and integrate environmental signals in order to adapt to changes and thrive in its environment. The second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) was recently recognized as a quasi-ubiquitous phenotype coordinator in bacteria. Mostly known to be involved in the transition from motile to sessile and multicellular behaviors in Gammaproteobacteria, c-di-GMP is now known to regulate many other phenotypes from cell morphogenesis to virulence, in many Gram-negative and a few Gram-positive bacteria. Herein, we review recent advances in our understanding of c-di-GMP signaling in the lifecycle of C. difficile.

  20. Mutational analysis of structural elements in a class-I cyclic di-GMP riboswitch to elucidate its regulatory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuzuka, Saki; Nishimura, Kei-Ichiro; Kakizawa, Hitoshi; Fujita, Yuki; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2016-09-01

    The Vc2 riboswitch possesses an aptamer domain belonging to the class-I c-di-GMP riboswitch family. This domain has been analysed and the molecular mechanism by which it recognizes the c-di-GMP ligand has been elucidated. On the other hand, the regulatory mechanism of the full-length Vc2 riboswitch to control its downstream open reading frame (ORF) remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed in vivo reporter assays and in vitro biochemical analyses of the full-length riboswitch and its aptamer domain. We evaluated the results of in vivo and in vitro analyses to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of the Vc2 riboswitch. The present results suggest that recognition of c-di-GMP ligand by the Vc2 riboswitch aptamer domain downregulates expression of its downstream ORF primarily at the translational level.