WorldWideScience

Sample records for by-product double-stranded rna

  1. MDA5 Detects the Double-Stranded RNA Replicative Form in Picornavirus-Infected Cells

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    Qian Feng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RIG-I and MDA5 are cytosolic RNA sensors that play a critical role in innate antiviral responses. Major advances have been made in identifying RIG-I ligands, but our knowledge of the ligands for MDA5 remains restricted to data from transfection experiments mostly using poly(I:C, a synthetic dsRNA mimic. Here, we dissected the IFN-α/β-stimulatory activity of different viral RNA species produced during picornavirus infection, both by RNA transfection and in infected cells in which specific steps of viral RNA replication were inhibited. Our results show that the incoming genomic plus-strand RNA does not activate MDA5, but minus-strand RNA synthesis and production of the 7.5 kbp replicative form trigger a strong IFN-α/β response. IFN-α/β production does not rely on plus-strand RNA synthesis and thus generation of the partially double-stranded replicative intermediate. This study reports MDA5 activation by a natural RNA ligand under physiological conditions.

  2. Induction of virus resistance by exogenous application of double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitter, Neena; Worrall, Elizabeth A; Robinson, Karl E; Xu, Zhi Ping; Carroll, Bernard J

    2017-10-01

    Exogenous application of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for virus resistance in plants represents a very attractive alternative to virus resistant transgenic crops or pesticides targeting virus vectors. However, the instability of dsRNA sprayed onto plants is a major challenge as spraying naked dsRNA onto plants provides protection against homologous viruses for only 5 days. Innovative approaches, such as the use of nanoparticles as carriers of dsRNA for improved stability and sustained release, are emerging as key disruptive technologies. Knowledge is still limited about the mechanism of entry, transport and processing of exogenously applied dsRNA in plants. Cost of dsRNA and regulatory framework will be key influencers towards practical adoption of this technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double

  4. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maina Huguette Joséphine

    2015-01-01

    ) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer......Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA......-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer...

  5. Down-Regulation of p53 by Double-Stranded RNA Modulates the Antiviral Response

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Joao T.; Rebouillat, Dominique; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Murakami, Junko; Hill, Jason E.; Gudkov, Andrei; Silverman, Robert H.; Stark, George R.; Williams, Bryan R. G.

    2005-01-01

    p53 has been well characterized as a tumor suppressor gene, but its role in antiviral defense remains unclear. A recent report has demonstrated that p53 can be induced by interferons and is activated after vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection. We observed that different nononcogenic viruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), induced down-regulation of p53 in infected cells. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and a mutant vaccinia virus la...

  6. siRNA-like double-stranded RNAs are specifically protected against degradation in human cell extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A H Hoerter

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a set of intracellular pathways in eukaryotes that controls both exogenous and endogenous gene expression. The power of RNAi to knock down (silence any gene of interest by the introduction of synthetic small-interfering (siRNAs has afforded powerful insight into biological function through reverse genetic approaches and has borne a new field of gene therapeutics. A number of questions are outstanding concerning the potency of siRNAs, necessitating an understanding of how short double-stranded RNAs are processed by the cell. Recent work suggests unmodified siRNAs are protected in the intracellular environment, although the mechanism of protection still remains unclear. We have developed a set of doubly-fluorophore labeled RNAs (more precisely, RNA/DNA chimeras to probe in real-time the stability of siRNAs and related molecules by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET. We find that these RNA probes are substrates for relevant cellular degradative processes, including the RNase H1 mediated degradation of an DNA/RNA hybrid and Dicer-mediated cleavage of a 24-nucleotide (per strand double-stranded RNA. In addition, we find that 21- and 24-nucleotide double-stranded RNAs are relatively protected in human cytosolic cell extract, but less so in blood serum, whereas an 18-nucleotide double-stranded RNA is less protected in both fluids. These results suggest that RNAi effector RNAs are specifically protected in the cellular environment and may provide an explanation for recent results showing that unmodified siRNAs in cells persist intact for extended periods of time.

  7. Synthesis of double-stranded RNA in a virus-enriched fraction from Agaricus bisporus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriskantha, A.; Wach, P.; Schlagnhaufer, B.; Romaine, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Partially purified virus preparations from sporophores of Agaricus bisporus affected with LaFrance disease had up to a 15-fold-higher RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity than did comparable preparations from health sporophores. Enzyme activity was dependent upon the presence of Mg 2+ and the four nucleoside triphosphates and was insensitive to actinomycin D, α-amanitin, and rifampin. The 3 H-labeled enzyme reaction products were double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as indicated by CF-11 cellulose column chromatography and by their ionic-strength-dependent sensitivity to hydrolysis by RNase A. The principal dsRNA products had estimated molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10 6 and 1.4 /times/ 10 6 . Cs 2 SO 4 equilibrium centrifugation of the virus preparation resolved a single peak of RNA polymerase activity that banded with a 35-nm spherical virus particle containing dsRNAs with molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10 6 and 1.4 /times/ 10 6 . The data suggest that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with the 35-nm spherical virus is a replicase which catalyzes the synthesis of the genomic dsRNAs

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV).

  9. Structure-spectrophotometric selectivity relationship in interactions of quercetin related flavonoids with double stranded and single stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantanida, Ivo; Mašić, Lozika; Rusak, Gordana

    2009-04-01

    Interactions of five flavonoids with dsRNA and single stranded ssRNA were studied by UV/vis titrations. The results obtained supported the intercalative binding mode as a dominant interaction of studied flavonoids with dsRNA as well as major interaction with ssRNA. Furthermore, changes of the UV/vis spectra of flavonoids induced by addition of poly G or poly C, respectively, are significantly stronger than changes induced by double stranded poly G-poly C, pointing to essential role of the free poly G or poly C sequence (not hydrogen bonded in double helix). Exclusively poly G caused significant batochromic shift of the UV/vis maxima of all studied flavonoids, whereby the intensity of batochromic shift is nicely correlated to the number of OH groups of flavonoid. Unlikely to poly G, addition of poly A and poly U induced measurable changes only in the UV/vis spectra of flavonoids characterised by no OH (galangin) or three OH groups (myricetin) on the phenyl part of the molecule. Consequently, flavonoids with one- or two-OH groups on the phenyl part of the molecule (luteolin, fisetin, kaempferol) specifically differentiate between poly A, poly U (negligible changes in the UV/Vis spectra) and poly G (strong changes in the UV/Vis spectra) as well as poly C (moderate changes in the UV/Vis spectra).

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV). PMID:22205720

  11. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

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    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  12. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  13. Detection of hepatitis A virus by hybridization with single-stranded RNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi, J.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.

    1987-01-01

    An improved method of dot-blot hybridization to detect hepatitis A virus (HAV) was developed with single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) probes. Radioactive and nonradioactive ssRNA probes were generated by in vitro transcription of HAV templates inserted into the plasmid pGEM-1. 32 P-labeled ssRNA probes were at least eightfold more sensitive than the 32 P-labeled double-stranded cDNA counterparts, whereas biotin-labeled ssRNA probes showed a sensitivity comparable with that of the 32 P-labeled double-stranded cDNA counterparts. Hybridization of HAV with the ssRNA probes at high stringency revealed specific reactions with a high signal-to-noise ratio. The differential hybridization reactions seen with probes of positive and negative sense (compared with HAV genomic RNA) were used to detect HAV in clinical and field samples. A positive/negative ratio was introduced as an indicator that permitted an semiquantitative expression of a positive HAV reaction. Good agreement of this indicator was observed with normal stool samples and with HAV-seeded samples. By using this system, HAV was detected in estuarine and freshwater samples collected from a sewage-polluted bayou in Houston and a saltwater tributary of Galveston Bay

  14. Down-Regulation of p53 by Double-Stranded RNA Modulates the Antiviral Response

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    Marques, Joao T.; Rebouillat, Dominique; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Murakami, Junko; Hill, Jason E.; Gudkov, Andrei; Silverman, Robert H.; Stark, George R.; Williams, Bryan R. G.

    2005-01-01

    p53 has been well characterized as a tumor suppressor gene, but its role in antiviral defense remains unclear. A recent report has demonstrated that p53 can be induced by interferons and is activated after vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection. We observed that different nononcogenic viruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), induced down-regulation of p53 in infected cells. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and a mutant vaccinia virus lacking the dsRNA binding protein E3L can also induce this effect, indicating that dsRNA formed during viral infection is likely the trigger for down-regulation of p53. The mechanism of down-regulation of p53 by dsRNA relies on translation inhibition mediated by the PKR and RNase L pathways. In the absence of p53, the replication of both EMCV and HPIV3 was retarded, whereas, conversely, VSV replication was enhanced. Cell cycle analysis indicated that wild-type (WT) but not p53 knockout (KO) fibroblasts undergo an early-G1 arrest following dsRNA treatment. Moreover, in WT cells the onset of dsRNA-induced apoptosis begins after p53 levels are down-regulated, whereas p53 KO cells, which lack the early-G1 arrest, rapidly undergo apoptosis. Hence, our data suggest that the down-regulation of p53 facilitates apoptosis, thereby limiting viral replication. PMID:16103161

  15. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Gang, Yi; Wang, Honghong; Wang, Jiayin; Zhao, Lina; Xu, Li; Liu, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity

  16. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

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    Xiao, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Gang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Honghong [No. 518 Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Xi’an 710043, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Jiayin [The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63108 (United States); Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Xu, Li, E-mail: lxuhelen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: liuzhiguo@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity.

  17. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum proliferation in vitro by double-stranded RNA directed against malaria histone deacetylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriwilaijaroen, N.; Boonma, S.; Attasart, P.; Pothikasikorn, J.; Panyim, S.; Noonpakdee, W.

    2009-01-01

    Acetylation and deacetylation of histones play important roles in transcription regulation, cell cycle progression and development events. The steady state status of histone acetylation is controlled by a dynamic equilibrium between competing histone acetylase and deacetylase (HDAC). We have used long PfHDAC-1 double-stranded (ds)RNA to interfere with its cognate mRNA expression and determined the effect on malaria parasite growth and development. Chloroquine- and pyrimethamine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain was exposed to 1-25 μg of dsRNA/ml of culture for 48 h and growth was determined by [ 3 H]-hypoxanthine incorporation and microscopic examination. Parasite culture treated with 10 μg/ml pfHDAC-1 dsRNA exhibited 47% growth inhibition when compared with either untreated control or culture treated with an unrelated dsRNA. PfHDAC-1 dsRNA specifically blocked maturation of trophozoite to schizont stages and decreased PfHDAC-1 transcript 44% in treated trophozoites. These results indicate the potential of HDAC-1 as a target for development of novel antimalarials.

  18. An Approach to Detect and Study DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Transcript RNA Using a Spliced-Antisense RNA Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Storici, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    A double-strand break (DSB) is one of the most dangerous DNA lesion, and its repair is crucial for genome stability. Homologous recombination is considered the safest way to repair a DNA DSB and requires an identical or nearly identical DNA template, such as a sister chromatid or a homologous chromosome for accurate repair. Can transcript RNA serve as donor template for DSB repair? Here, we describe an approach that we developed to detect and study DNA repair by transcript RNA. Key features of the method are: (i) use of antisense (noncoding) RNA as template for DSB repair by RNA, (ii) use of intron splicing to distinguish the sequence of the RNA template from that of the DNA that generates the RNA template, and (iii) use of a trans and cis system to study how RNA repairs a DSB in homologous but distant DNA or in its own DNA, respectively. This chapter provides details on how to use a spliced-antisense RNA template to detect and study DSB repair by RNA in trans or cis in yeast cells. Our approach for detection of DSB repair by RNA in cells can be applied to cell types other than yeast, such as bacteria, mammalian cells, or other eukaryotic cells. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Editing of HIV-1 RNA by the double-stranded RNA deaminase ADAR1 stimulates viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Margherita; Neri, Francesca; Gallo, Angela; Farace, Maria Giulia; Michienzi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on dsRNA (ADARs) are enzymes that target double-stranded regions of RNA converting adenosines into inosines (A-to-I editing) thus contributing to genome complexity and fine regulation of gene expression. It has been described that a member of the ADAR family, ADAR1, can target viruses and affect their replication process. Here we report evidence showing that ADAR1 stimulates human immuno deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by using both editing-dependent and editing-independent mechanisms. We show that over-expression of ADAR1 in HIV-1 producer cells increases viral protein accumulation in an editing-independent manner. Moreover, HIV-1 virions generated in the presence of over-expressed ADAR1 but not an editing-inactive ADAR1 mutant are released more efficiently and display enhanced infectivity, as demonstrated by challenge assays performed with T cell lines and primary CD4+ T lymphocytes. Finally, we report that ADAR1 associates with HIV-1 RNAs and edits adenosines in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) and the Rev and Tat coding sequence. Overall these results suggest that HIV-1 has evolved mechanisms to take advantage of specific RNA editing activity of the host cell and disclose a stimulatory function of ADAR1 in the spread of HIV-1. PMID:19651874

  20. X-ray induced DNA double strand break production and repair in mammalian cells as measured by neutral filter elution

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    Bradley, M O; Kohn, K W [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1979-10-01

    A neutral filter elution method was used for detecting DNA double strand breaks in mouse L1210 cells after X-ray. The assay detected the number of double strand breaks induced by as little as 1000 rad of X-ray. The rate of DNA elution through the filters under neutral conditions increased with X-ray dose. Certain conditions for deproteinization, pH, and filter type were shown to increase the assay's sensitivity. Hydrogen peroxide and Bleomycin also induced apparent DNA double strand breaks, although the ratios of double to single strand breaks varied from those produced by X-ray. The introduction of double strand cuts by HpA I restriction endonuclease in DNA lysed on filters resulted in a rapid rate of elution under neutral conditions, implying that the method can detect double strand breaks if they exist in the DNA. The eluted DNA banded with a double stranded DNA marker in cesium chloride. This evidence suggested that the assay detected DNA double strand breaks. L1210 cells were shown to rejoin most of the DNA double strand breaks induced by 5-10 krad of X-ray with a half-time of about 40 minutes. (author).

  1. Phenotypic silencing of cytoplasmic genes using sequence-specific double-stranded short interfering RNA and its application in the reverse genetics of wild type negative-strand RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS by short interfering RNA has opened up new directions in the phenotypic mutation of cellular genes. However, its efficacy on non-nuclear genes and its effect on the interferon pathway remain unexplored. Since directed mutation of RNA genomes is not possible through conventional mutagenesis, we have tested sequence-specific 21-nucleotide long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs for their ability to silence cytoplasmic RNA genomes. Results Short dsRNAs were generated against specific mRNAs of respiratory syncytial virus, a nonsegmented negative-stranded RNA virus with a cytoplasmic life cycle. At nanomolar concentrations, the dsRNAs specifically abrogated expression of the corresponding viral proteins, and produced the expected mutant phenotype ex vivo. The dsRNAs did not induce an interferon response, and did not inhibit cellular gene expression. The ablation of the viral proteins correlated with the loss of the specific mRNAs. In contrast, viral genomic and antigenomic RNA, which are encapsidated, were not directly affected. Conclusions Synthetic inhibitory dsRNAs are effective in specific silencing of RNA genomes that are exclusively cytoplasmic and transcribed by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. RNA-directed RNA gene silencing does not require cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of viral cDNA, and thus, will allow the generation of phenotypic null mutants of specific RNA viral genes under normal infection conditions and at any point in the infection cycle. This will, for the first time, permit functional genomic studies, attenuated infections, reverse genetic analysis, and studies of host-virus signaling pathways using a wild type RNA virus, unencumbered by any superinfecting virus.

  2. Scavenger receptors in human airway epithelial cells: role in response to double-stranded RNA.

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    Audrey Dieudonné

    Full Text Available Scavenger receptors and Toll-like receptors (TLRs cooperate in response to danger signals to adjust the host immune response. The TLR3 agonist double stranded (dsRNA is an efficient activator of innate signalling in bronchial epithelial cells. In this study, we aimed at defining the role played by scavenger receptors expressed by bronchial epithelial cells in the control of the innate response to dsRNA both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several scavenger receptor involved in pathogen recognition was first evaluated in human bronchial epithelial cells in steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Their implication in the uptake of dsRNA and the subsequent cell activation was evaluated in vitro by competition with ligand of scavenger receptors including maleylated ovalbumin and by RNA silencing. The capacity of maleylated ovalbumin to modulate lung inflammation induced by dsRNA was also investigated in mice. Exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α increased expression of the scavenger receptors LOX-1 and CXCL16 and the capacity to internalize maleylated ovalbumin, whereas activation by TLR ligands did not. In contrast, the expression of SR-B1 was not modulated in these conditions. Interestingly, supplementation with maleylated ovalbumin limited dsRNA uptake and inhibited subsequent activation of bronchial epithelial cells. RNA silencing of LOX-1 and SR-B1 strongly blocked the dsRNA-induced cytokine production. Finally, administration of maleylated ovalbumin in mice inhibited the dsRNA-induced infiltration and activation of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar spaces and lung draining lymph nodes. Together, our data characterize the function of SR-B1 and LOX-1 in bronchial epithelial cells and their implication in dsRNA-induced responses, a finding that might be relevant during respiratory viral infections.

  3. Non-Target Effects of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP-Derived Double-Stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP Used in Honey Bee RNA Interference (RNAi Assays

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    Francis M. F. Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference has been frequently applied to modulate gene function in organisms where the production and maintenance of mutants is challenging, as in our model of study, the honey bee, Apis mellifera. A green fluorescent protein (GFP-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP is currently commonly used as control in honey bee RNAi experiments, since its gene does not exist in the A. mellifera genome. Although dsRNA-GFP is not expected to trigger RNAi responses in treated bees, undesirable effects on gene expression, pigmentation or developmental timing are often observed. Here, we performed three independent experiments using microarrays to examine the effect of dsRNA-GFP treatment (introduced by feeding on global gene expression patterns in developing worker bees. Our data revealed that the expression of nearly 1,400 genes was altered in response to dsRNA-GFP, representing around 10% of known honey bee genes. Expression changes appear to be the result of both direct off-target effects and indirect downstream secondary effects; indeed, there were several instances of sequence similarity between putative siRNAs generated from the dsRNA-GFP construct and genes whose expression levels were altered. In general, the affected genes are involved in important developmental and metabolic processes associated with RNA processing and transport, hormone metabolism, immunity, response to external stimulus and to stress. These results suggest that multiple dsRNA controls should be employed in RNAi studies in honey bees. Furthermore, any RNAi studies involving these genes affected by dsRNA-GFP in our studies should use a different dsRNA control.

  4. Non-Target Effects of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-Derived Double-Stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP) Used in Honey Bee RNA Interference (RNAi) Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Francis M F; Aleixo, Aline C; Barchuk, Angel R; Bomtorin, Ana D; Grozinger, Christina M; Simões, Zilá L P

    2013-01-04

    RNA interference has been frequently applied to modulate gene function in organisms where the production and maintenance of mutants is challenging, as in our model of study, the honey bee, Apis mellifera. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-GFP) is currently commonly used as control in honey bee RNAi experiments, since its gene does not exist in the A. mellifera genome. Although dsRNA-GFP is not expected to trigger RNAi responses in treated bees, undesirable effects on gene expression, pigmentation or developmental timing are often observed. Here, we performed three independent experiments using microarrays to examine the effect of dsRNA-GFP treatment (introduced by feeding) on global gene expression patterns in developing worker bees. Our data revealed that the expression of nearly 1,400 genes was altered in response to dsRNA-GFP, representing around 10% of known honey bee genes. Expression changes appear to be the result of both direct off-target effects and indirect downstream secondary effects; indeed, there were several instances of sequence similarity between putative siRNAs generated from the dsRNA-GFP construct and genes whose expression levels were altered. In general, the affected genes are involved in important developmental and metabolic processes associated with RNA processing and transport, hormone metabolism, immunity, response to external stimulus and to stress. These results suggest that multiple dsRNA controls should be employed in RNAi studies in honey bees. Furthermore, any RNAi studies involving these genes affected by dsRNA-GFP in our studies should use a different dsRNA control.

  5. Immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma with small double-stranded RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabilova, Tatyana O; Chernolovskaya, Elena L; Kovtonyuk, Larisa V; Zonov, Evgeniy V; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Popova, Nelly A; Nikolin, Valeriy P; Kaledin, Vasiliy I; Zenkova, Marina A; Vlassov, Valentin V

    2014-01-01

    mice with HCC. Consequently, this short double-stranded RNA can be considered as a potential adjuvant for the therapy of HCC

  6. Toxin MqsR Cleaves Single-Stranded mRNA with Various 5 Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    either protein ORIGINAL RESEARCH Toxin MqsR cleaves single- stranded mRNA with various 5’ ends Nityananda Chowdhury1,*, Brian W. Kwan1,*, Louise C...in which a single 5′- GCU site was predicted to be single- stranded (ssRNA), double- stranded (dsRNA), in the loop of a stem - loop (slRNA), or in a...single- stranded 5′- GCU sites since cleavage was approximately 20- fold higher than cleavage seen with the 5′- GCU site in the stem - loop and

  7. Influence of RNA Strand Rigidity on Polyion Complex Formation with Block Catiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kotaro; Chaya, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Shigeto; Watanabe, Sumiyo; Takemoto, Hiroyasu; Osada, Kensuke; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Miyata, Kanjiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-03-01

    Polyion complexes (b-PICs) are prepared by mixing single- or double-stranded oligo RNA (aniomer) with poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-PLL) (block catiomer) to clarify the effect of aniomer chain rigidity on association behaviors at varying concentrations. Here, a 21-mer single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) (persistence length: 1.0 nm) and a 21-mer double-stranded RNA (small interfering RNA, siRNA) (persistence length: 62 nm) are compared. Both oligo RNAs form a minimal charge-neutralized ionomer pair with a single PEG-PLL chain, termed unit b-PIC (uPIC), at low concentrations (<≈ 0.01 mg mL(-1)). Above the critical association concentration (≈ 0.01 mg mL(-1)), ssRNA b-PICs form secondary associates, PIC micelles, with sizes up to 30-70 nm, while no such multimolecular assembly is observed for siRNA b-PICs. The entropy gain associated with the formation of a segregated PIC phase in the multimolecular PIC micelles may not be large enough for rigid siRNA strands to compensate with appreciably high steric repulsion derived from PEG chains. Chain rigidity appears to be a critical parameter in polyion complex association. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR of fishes and amphibians: Varying the number of double-stranded RNA binding domains and lineage-specific duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dever Thomas E

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Double-stranded (ds RNA, generated during viral infection, binds and activates the mammalian anti-viral protein kinase PKR, which phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2α leading to the general inhibition of protein synthesis. Although PKR-like activity has been described in fish cells, the responsible enzymes eluded molecular characterization until the recent discovery of goldfish and zebrafish PKZ, which contain Z-DNA-binding domains instead of dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs. Fish and amphibian PKR genes have not been described so far. Results Here we report the cloning and identification of 13 PKR genes from 8 teleost fish and amphibian species, including zebrafish, demonstrating the coexistence of PKR and PKZ in this latter species. Analyses of their genomic organization revealed up to three tandemly arrayed PKR genes, which are arranged in head-to-tail orientation. At least five duplications occurred independently in fish and amphibian lineages. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the kinase domains of fish PKR genes are more closely related to those of fish PKZ than to the PKR kinase domains of other vertebrate species. The duplication leading to fish PKR and PKZ genes occurred early during teleost fish evolution after the divergence of the tetrapod lineage. While two dsRBDs are found in mammalian and amphibian PKR, one, two or three dsRBDs are present in fish PKR. In zebrafish, both PKR and PKZ were strongly upregulated after immunostimulation with some tissue-specific expression differences. Using genetic and biochemical assays we demonstrate that both zebrafish PKR and PKZ can phosphorylate eIF2α in yeast. Conclusion Considering the important role for PKR in host defense against viruses, the independent duplication and fixation of PKR genes in different lineages probably provided selective advantages by leading to the recognition of an extended spectrum of viral nucleic acid structures, including both dsRNA

  9. Second-strand cDNA synthesis: classical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubler, U.

    1987-01-01

    The classical scheme for the synthesis of double-stranded cDNA as it was reported in 1976 is described. Reverse transcription of mRNA with oligo(dT) as the primer generates first strands with a small loop at the 3' end of the cDNA (the end that corresponds to the 5' end of the mRNA). Subsequent removal of the mRNA by alkaline hydrolysis leaves single-stranded cDNA molecules again with a small 3' loop. This loop can be used by either reverse transcriptase or Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I as a primer for second-strand synthesis. The resulting products are double-stranded cDNA molecules that are covalently closed at the end corresponding to the 5' end of the original mRNA. Subsequent cleavage of the short piece of single-stranded cDNA within the loop with the single-strand-specific S 1 nuclease generate open double-stranded molecules that can be used for molecular cloning in plasmids or in phage. Useful variations of this scheme have been described

  10. Mutations Abrogating VP35 Interaction with Double-Stranded RNA Render Ebola Virus Avirulent in Guinea Pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prins, Kathleen C.; Delpeut, Sebastien; Leung, Daisy W.; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkova, Valentina A.; Reid, St. Patrick; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Cárdenas, Washington B.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Basler, Christopher F. (CNRS-INSERM); (Mount Sinai Hospital); (LB-Ecuador); (Iowa State)

    2010-10-11

    Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding inhibitor of host interferon (IFN)-{alpha}/{beta} responses that also functions as a viral polymerase cofactor. Recent structural studies identified key features, including a central basic patch, required for VP35 dsRNA binding activity. To address the functional significance of these VP35 structural features for EBOV replication and pathogenesis, two point mutations, K319A/R322A, that abrogate VP35 dsRNA binding activity and severely impair its suppression of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} production were identified. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography reveal minimal structural perturbations in the K319A/R322A VP35 double mutant and suggest that loss of basic charge leads to altered function. Recombinant EBOVs encoding the mutant VP35 exhibit, relative to wild-type VP35 viruses, minimal growth attenuation in IFN-defective Vero cells but severe impairment in IFN-competent cells. In guinea pigs, the VP35 mutant virus revealed a complete loss of virulence. Strikingly, the VP35 mutant virus effectively immunized animals against subsequent wild-type EBOV challenge. These in vivo studies, using recombinant EBOV viruses, combined with the accompanying biochemical and structural analyses directly correlate VP35 dsRNA binding and IFN inhibition functions with viral pathogenesis. Moreover, these studies provide a framework for the development of antivirals targeting this critical EBOV virulence factor.

  11. Nucleic Acid Analogue Induced Transcription of Double Stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    RNA is transcribed from a double stranded DNA template by forming a complex by hybridizing to the template at a desired transcription initiation site one or more oligonucleic acid analogues of the PNA type capable of forming a transcription initiation site with the DNA and exposing the complex...... to the action of a DNA dependant RNA polymerase in the presence of nucleoside triphosphates. Equal length transcripts may be obtained by placing a block to transcription downstream from the initiation site or by cutting the template at such a selected location. The initiation site is formed by displacement...... of one strand of the DNA locally by the PNA hybridization....

  12. The production and repair of double strand breaks in cells from normal humans and patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, A.R.; Stevens, S.

    1977-01-01

    The production and repair of double strand breaks induced by γ-rays in the DNA of human fibroblasts have been measured by sedimentation in sucrose gradients under non-denaturing conditions. Unirradiated DNA formed a rapidly sedimenting gel. Low doses of radiation released freely sedimenting DNA molecules from this gel. Higher doses reduced the rate of sedimentation of the free DNA due to the introduction of double strand breaks. The breakage efficiency was 1 break/1.3x10 10 daltons of DNA/krad. Postirradiation incubation after a high dose of radiation resulted in an increase in molecular weight of the free DNA molecules, and after a low dose the rapidly-sedimenting gel was reformed. These data suggest that double strand breaks are repaired in human fibroblasts. No significant differences were found between fibroblasts from two normal donors and four patients with the radiosensitive disorder, ataxia telangiectasia, in either the production or repair of double strand breaks

  13. Double Stranded RNA in Human Seminal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim V. Zagoskin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, human semen was shown to contain cell-free nucleic acids, such as DNA, long single stranded RNA, and small RNAs–miRNA and piRNA. The RNAs have been suggested to have potential biological roles as communication molecules between cells and in the temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression in the male reproductive system. Here we demonstrate that human seminal plasma contains a variety of cell-free dsRNAs, describe a robust method to isolate this type of nucleic acid in preparative amounts, and discuss the potential biological roles of these molecules in inheritance. dsRNA plays a role in a variety of biological processes, including gene regulation, is extremely stable and can gain access to cells from the extracellular medium. We suggest that one of the possible functions of dsRNA in human seminal plasma may be to influence human oocytes and therefore, influence the offspring. It also remains possible that these dsRNAs might have potential use as biomarkers for the study of human physiopathological conditions and genetic variation.

  14. Crystallographic and Modeling Studies of RNase III Suggest a Mechanism for Double-Stranded RNA Cleavage | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Ribonuclease III belongs to the family of Mg2+-dependent endonucleases that show specificity for double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). RNase III is conserved in all known bacteria and eukaryotes and has 1–2 copies of a 9-residue consensus sequence, known as the RNase III signature motif. The bacterial RNase III proteins are the simplest, consisting of two domains: an

  15. Detection of bacteriophage phi 6 minus-strand RNA and novel mRNA isoconformers synthesized in vivo and in vitro, by strand-separating agarose gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagratis, N.; Revel, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two urea-free agarose gel protocols that resolve the six individual strands of bacteriophage phi 6 dsRNA were developed and used to analyze phage RNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro. Citrate gels separate strands of the large and medium chromosomes while Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) gels resolve the medium and small dsRNA segments. Minus strands migrate faster than plus strands on citrate gels but are retarded on TBE gels. A study of electrophoretic conditions showed that pH affects strand resolution on citrate gels, and that voltage gradient, agarose concentration, and ethidium bromide significantly alter strand migration on TBE gels. Analysis of native phi 6 RNA synthesized in vivo and in vitro showed that the large and medium message RNAs comigrate with the corresponding plus strands of denatured virion dsRNA. The small messenger RNA is exceptional. Native small mRNA was detected as three isoconformers in vivo and in vitro. The isoconformers were converted by heat denaturation to a single RNA species that comigrates with the virion s+ strand. Minus strands labeled in vivo were detected only after heat denaturation. Minus strand synthesis was detected also in heat-denatured samples from in vitro phi 6 nucleocapsid RNA polymerase reactions at pH values suboptimal for transcription

  16. Interspecific Transmission of Double-Stranded RNA and Hypovirulence from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum to S. minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, M S; Ikeda, S S; Boland, G J

    2002-07-01

    ABSTRACT Interspecific transmission of a hypovirulence-associated double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and hypovirulent phenotype was attempted from hypovirulent isolate Ss275 of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum to five virulent isolates of S. minor. dsRNA and the hypovirulent phenotype were successfully transmitted to one of the five isolates, Sm10. Three putative converted isolates of Sm10 were slow growing and developed atypical colony morphologies characteristic of the hypovirulent phenotype. These isolates were assayed for virulence and produced significantly smaller lesions than isolate Sm10 on detached leaves of Romaine lettuce. One of these putative converted isolates, designated Sm10T, was tested to confirm interspecific transmission of dsRNA. In northern hybridizations, dsRNA isolated from Sm10T hybridized with a digoxigenin-labeled cDNA probe prepared from dsRNA isolated from Ss275. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis confirmed that isolate Sm10T was derived from Sm10 and not from Ss275 or a hybrid of the two species. The dsRNA and hypovirulent phenotype were subsequently transmitted intraspecifically from Sm10T to Sm8. To our knowledge, this is the first report of interspecific transmission of dsRNA and an associated hypovirulent phenotype between fungal plant pathogens by hyphal anastomosis.

  17. IDN2 Interacts with RPA and Facilitates DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Ba, Zhaoqing; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Wei, Wei; Li, Lanxia; Kong, Fansi; Li, Yan; Chai, Jijie; Pontes, Olga; Qi, Yijun

    2017-03-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. We previously showed that DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) facilitate homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we show that INVOLVED IN DE NOVO2 (IDN2), a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in small RNA-directed DNA methylation, is required for DSB repair in Arabidopsis. We find that IDN2 interacts with the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex. Depletion of IDN2 or the diRNA binding ARGONAUTE2 leads to increased accumulation of RPA at DSB sites and mislocalization of the recombination factor RAD51. These findings support a model in which IDN2 interacts with RPA and facilitates the release of RPA from single-stranded DNA tails and subsequent recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites to promote DSB repair. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Disruption of Specific RNA-RNA Interactions in a Double-Stranded RNA Virus Inhibits Genome Packaging and Virus Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Teodoro; Sung, Po-Yu; Roy, Polly

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes hemorrhagic disease in economically important livestock. The BTV genome is organized into ten discrete double-stranded RNA molecules (S1-S10) which have been suggested to follow a sequential packaging pathway from smallest to largest segment during virus capsid assembly. To substantiate and extend these studies, we have investigated the RNA sorting and packaging mechanisms with a new experimental approach using inhibitory oligonucleotides. Putative packaging signals present in the 3'untranslated regions of BTV segments were targeted by a number of nuclease resistant oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and their effects on virus replication in cell culture were assessed. ORNs complementary to the 3' UTR of BTV RNAs significantly inhibited virus replication without affecting protein synthesis. Same ORNs were found to inhibit complex formation when added to a novel RNA-RNA interaction assay which measured the formation of supramolecular complexes between and among different RNA segments. ORNs targeting the 3'UTR of BTV segment 10, the smallest RNA segment, were shown to be the most potent and deletions or substitution mutations of the targeted sequences diminished the RNA complexes and abolished the recovery of viable viruses using reverse genetics. Cell-free capsid assembly/RNA packaging assay also confirmed that the inhibitory ORNs could interfere with RNA packaging and further substitution mutations within the putative RNA packaging sequence have identified the recognition sequence concerned. Exchange of 3'UTR between segments have further demonstrated that RNA recognition was segment specific, most likely acting as part of the secondary structure of the entire genomic segment. Our data confirm that genome packaging in this segmented dsRNA virus occurs via the formation of supramolecular complexes formed by the interaction of specific sequences located in the 3' UTRs. Additionally, the inhibition of packaging in-trans with inhibitory ORNs

  19. Reduction in deformed wing virus infection in larval and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) by double-stranded RNA ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S D; Eu, Y-J; Whyard, S; Currie, R W

    2012-08-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) is a serious pathogen of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L., vectored by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor. The virus is associated with wing deformity in symptomatic bees, and premature death and reduced colony performance in asymptomatic bees. In the present study we reduced DWV infection by feeding both first instar larvae and adult A. mellifera with a double-stranded (ds) RNA construct, DWV-dsRNA, which is specific to DWV in DWV-inoculated bees, by mixing it with their food. We showed that feeding DWV to larvae causes wing deformity in adult bees in the absence of varroa mites and decreases survival rates of adult bees relative to bees not fed DWV. Feeding larvae with DWV-dsRNA in advance of inoculation with virus reduced the DWV viral level and reduced wing deformity relative to larvae fed DWV or DWV with green fluorescent protein-dsRNA (probably a result of RNA silencing), but did not affect survival to the adult stage. Feeding DWV-dsRNA did not affect larval survival rates, which suggests that dsRNA is non-toxic to larvae. Feeding adult workers with DWV-dsRNA in advance of inoculation with virus increased their longevity and reduced DWV concentration relative to controls. © 2012 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  20. Toscana virus NSs protein promotes degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalveram, Birte; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-04-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV), which is transmitted by Phlebotomus spp. sandflies, is a major etiologic agent of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis in the Mediterranean. Like other members of the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, TOSV encodes a nonstructural protein (NSs) in its small RNA segment. Although the NSs of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has been identified as an important virulence factor, which suppresses host general transcription, inhibits transcription from the beta interferon promoter, and promotes the proteasomal degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), little is known about the functions of NSs proteins encoded by less-pathogenic members of this genus. In this study we report that TOSV is able to downregulate PKR with similar efficiency as RVFV, while infection with the other phleboviruses-i.e., Punta Toro virus, sandfly fever Sicilian virus, or Frijoles virus-has no effect on cellular PKR levels. In contrast to RVFV, however, cellular transcription remains unaffected during TOSV infection. TOSV NSs protein promotes the proteasome-dependent downregulation of PKR and is able to interact with kinase-inactive PKR in infected cells.

  1. The basic tilted helix bundle domain of the prolyl isomerase FKBP25 is a novel double-stranded RNA binding module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, David; Bonnafous, Pierre; Edoo, Amiirah Bibi; Bourbigot, Sarah; Pesek-Jardim, Francy; Gudavicius, Geoff; Serpa, Jason J.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Prolyl isomerases are defined by a catalytic domain that facilitates the cis–trans interconversion of proline residues. In most cases, additional domains in these enzymes add important biological function, including recruitment to a set of protein substrates. Here, we report that the N-terminal basic tilted helix bundle (BTHB) domain of the human prolyl isomerase FKBP25 confers specific binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). This binding is selective over DNA as well as single-stranded oligonucleotides. We find that FKBP25 RNA-association is required for its nucleolar localization and for the vast majority of its protein interactions, including those with 60S pre-ribosome and early ribosome biogenesis factors. An independent mobility of the BTHB and FKBP catalytic domains supports a model by which the N-terminus of FKBP25 is anchored to regions of dsRNA, whereas the FKBP domain is free to interact with neighboring proteins. Apart from the identification of the BTHB as a new dsRNA-binding module, this domain adds to the growing list of auxiliary functions used by prolyl isomerases to define their primary cellular targets. PMID:29036638

  2. Double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase Irc3p is directly involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Tiina; Gaidutšik, Ilja; Villemson, Karin; Hou, YingJian; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-12-01

    Nucleic acid-dependent ATPases are involved in nearly all aspects of DNA and RNA metabolism. Previous studies have described a number of mitochondrial helicases. However, double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPases, including translocases or enzymes remodeling DNA-protein complexes, have not been identified in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae. Here, we demonstrate that Irc3p is a mitochondrial double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase of the Superfamily II. In contrast to the other mitochondrial Superfamily II enzymes Mss116p, Suv3p and Mrh4p, which are RNA helicases, Irc3p has a direct role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Specific Irc3p-dependent mtDNA metabolic intermediates can be detected, including high levels of double-stranded DNA breaks that accumulate in irc3Δ mutants. irc3Δ-related topology changes in rho- mtDNA can be reversed by the deletion of mitochondrial RNA polymerase RPO41, suggesting that Irc3p counterbalances adverse effects of transcription on mitochondrial genome stability. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Antiviral RNA silencing initiated in the absence of RDE-4, a double-stranded RNA binding protein, in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xunyang; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Jeffrey; Lu, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) processed from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) of virus origins mediate potent antiviral defense through a process referred to as RNA interference (RNAi) or RNA silencing in diverse organisms. In the simple invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans, the RNAi process is initiated by a single Dicer, which partners with the dsRNA binding protein RDE-4 to process dsRNA into viral siRNAs (viRNAs). Notably, in C. elegans this RNA-directed viral immunity (RDVI) also requires a number of worm-specific genes for its full antiviral potential. One such gene is rsd-2 (RNAi spreading defective 2), which was implicated in RDVI in our previous studies. In the current study, we first established an antiviral role by showing that rsd-2 null mutants permitted higher levels of viral RNA accumulation, and that this enhanced viral susceptibility was reversed by ectopic expression of RSD-2. We then examined the relationship of rsd-2 with other known components of RNAi pathways and established that rsd-2 functions in a novel pathway that is independent of rde-4 but likely requires the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RRF-1, suggesting a critical role for RSD-2 in secondary viRNA biogenesis, likely through coordinated action with RRF-1. Together, these results suggest that RDVI in the single-Dicer organism C. elegans depends on the collective actions of both RDE-4-dependent and RDE-4-independent mechanisms to produce RNAi-inducing viRNAs. Our study reveals, for the first time, a novel siRNA-producing mechanism in C. elegans that bypasses the need for a dsRNA-binding protein.

  4. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2017-04-03

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate) can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells. Copyright © 2017 Zapotoczny and Sekelsky.

  5. Human Cell Assays for Synthesis-Dependent Strand Annealing and Crossing over During Double-Strand Break Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Zapotoczny

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are one of the most deleterious types of lesions to the genome. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA is thought to be a major pathway of DSB repair, but direct tests of this model have only been conducted in budding yeast and Drosophila. To better understand this pathway, we developed an SDSA assay for use in human cells. Our results support the hypothesis that SDSA is an important DSB repair mechanism in human cells. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the roles of a number of helicases suggested to promote SDSA. None of the helicase knockdowns reduced SDSA, but knocking down BLM or RTEL1 increased SDSA. Molecular analysis of repair products suggests that these helicases may prevent long-tract repair synthesis. Since the major alternative to SDSA (repair involving a double-Holliday junction intermediate can lead to crossovers, we also developed a fluorescent assay that detects crossovers generated during DSB repair. Together, these assays will be useful in investigating features and mechanisms of SDSA and crossover pathways in human cells.

  6. Distinct signaling pathways leading to the induction of human β-defensin 2 by stimulating an electrolyticaly-generated acid functional water and double strand RNA in oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojoubori, Takahiro; Nishio, Yukina; Asano, Masatake; Nishida, Tetsuya; Komiyama, Kazuo; Ito, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Defensins, a major family of cationic antimicrobial peptides, play important roles in innate immunity. In the present study, we investigated whether double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a by-product of RNA virus replication, can induce human β-defensins-2 (hBD-2) expression in oral epithelial cells (OECs). We also examined the hBD-2-inducible activity of acid-electrolyzed functional water (FW). The results indicated that both dsRNA- and FW-induced hBD-2 expression in OECs. The induction efficiency was much higher for FW than for dsRNA. FW-induced production of hBD-2 was clearly observed by immunofluorescence staining. A luciferase assay was performed with 1.2 kb of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the hBD-2 gene. The results indicated that the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-binding site proximal to the translation initiation site was indispensable for dsRNA-stimulated hBD-2 expression, but not in the case of FW. Moreover, FW-stimulated hBD-2 expression did not depend on NF-κB activity; instead, FW inhibited NF-κB activity. Pretreatment of the cells with specific inhibitors against NF-κB further confirmed NF-κB-independent hBD-2 induction by FW. In analogy to the results for intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), the dsRNA signal, but not FW, was sensed by toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in OECs. These results suggested that hBD-2 expression induced by dsRNA and FW is regulated by distinct mechanisms in OECs.

  7. [Investigation of RNA viral genome amplification by multiple displacement amplification technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zheng; Li, Jian-Dong; Li, Chuan; Liang, Mi-Fang; Li, De-Xin

    2013-06-01

    In order to facilitate the detection of newly emerging or rare viral infectious diseases, a negative-strand RNA virus-severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome bunyavirus, and a positive-strand RNA virus-dengue virus, were used to investigate RNA viral genome unspecific amplification by multiple displacement amplification technique from clinical samples. Series of 10-fold diluted purified viral RNA were utilized as analog samples with different pathogen loads, after a series of reactions were sequentially processed, single-strand cDNA, double-strand cDNA, double-strand cDNA treated with ligation without or with supplemental RNA were generated, then a Phi29 DNA polymerase depended isothermal amplification was employed, and finally the target gene copies were detected by real time PCR assays to evaluate the amplification efficiencies of various methods. The results showed that multiple displacement amplification effects of single-strand or double-strand cDNA templates were limited, while the fold increases of double-strand cDNA templates treated with ligation could be up to 6 X 10(3), even 2 X 10(5) when supplemental RNA existed, and better results were obtained when viral RNA loads were lower. A RNA viral genome amplification system using multiple displacement amplification technique was established in this study and effective amplification of RNA viral genome with low load was achieved, which could provide a tool to synthesize adequate viral genome for multiplex pathogens detection.

  8. Double-stranded RNA viral infection of Trichomonas vaginalis (TVV1) in Iranian isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanaliha, Khadijeh; Masoumi-Asl, Hossein; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Tabatabaei, Azardokht; Naghdalipoor, Mehri

    2017-08-01

    The Totiviridae family includes a number of viruses that can infect protozoan parasites such as Leishmania and Giardia and fungi like Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis are also infected with one or more double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. In this study, the frequency of Trichomonas vaginalis virus (TVV1) was evaluated in Iranian isolates of T. vaginalis in Tehran, Iran. One thousand five hundred vaginal samples were collected from patients attending obstetrics and gynaecology hospitals associated with Iran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran from October 2015 to September 2016. Trichomonas vaginalis isolates were cultured in Diamond's modified medium. Nucleic acids were extracted using a DNA/RNA extraction kit and RT-PCR was performed. Among 1500 collected vaginal samples, 8 (0.53%) cases of T. vaginalis infection were found. Half (4/8) of the T. vaginalis positive cases were infected with TVV1. Phylogenetic mapping indicated that the Iranian isolates were most closely related to TVV1-OC5, TVV1-UR1. Iranian isolates of T. vaginalis were infected with TVV1. The frequency of viral infection (TVV1) in T. vaginalis isolates found in this study is higher than previously reported in Iran. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling Toehold-Mediated RNA Strand Displacement

    OpenAIRE

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P.K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperat...

  10. Use of Cellular Decapping Activators by Positive-Strand RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Jungfleisch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses have evolved multiple strategies to not only circumvent the hostile decay machinery but to trick it into being a priceless collaborator supporting viral RNA translation and replication. In this review, we describe the versatile interaction of positive-strand RNA viruses and the 5′-3′ mRNA decay machinery with a focus on the viral subversion of decapping activators. This highly conserved viral trickery is exemplified with the plant Brome mosaic virus, the animal Flock house virus and the human hepatitis C virus.

  11. BrAD-seq: Breath Adapter Directional sequencing: a streamlined, ultra-simple and fast library preparation protocol for strand specific mRNA library construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Thomas Townsley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS is driving rapid advancement in biological understanding and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq has become an indispensable tool for biology and medicine. There is a growing need for access to these technologies although preparation of NGS libraries remains a bottleneck to wider adoption. Here we report a novel method for the production of strand specific RNA-seq libraries utilizing inherent properties of double-stranded cDNA to capture and incorporate a sequencing adapter. Breath Adapter Directional sequencing (BrAD-seq reduces sample handling and requires far fewer enzymatic steps than most available methods to produce high quality strand-specific RNA-seq libraries. The method we present is optimized for 3-prime Digital Gene Expression (DGE libraries and can easily extend to full transcript coverage shotgun (SHO type strand-specific libraries and is modularized to accommodate a diversity of RNA and DNA input materials. BrAD-seq offers a highly streamlined and inexpensive option for RNA-seq libraries.

  12. Modelling toehold-mediated RNA strand displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P K; Louis, Ard A

    2015-03-10

    We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5' end of the substrate; and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RNA synthesis is modulated by G-quadruplex formation in Hepatitis C virus negative RNA strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloé, Jaubert; Amina, Bedrat; Laura, Bartolucci; Carmelo, Di Primo; Michel, Ventura; Jean-Louis, Mergny; Samir, Amrane; Marie-Line, Andreola

    2018-05-25

    DNA and RNA guanine-rich oligonucleotides can form non-canonical structures called G-quadruplexes or "G4" that are based on the stacking of G-quartets. The role of DNA and RNA G4 is documented in eukaryotic cells and in pathogens such as viruses. Yet, G4 have been identified only in a few RNA viruses, including the Flaviviridae family. In this study, we analysed the last 157 nucleotides at the 3'end of the HCV (-) strand. This sequence is known to be the minimal sequence required for an efficient RNA replication. Using bioinformatics and biophysics, we identified a highly conserved G4-prone sequence located in the stem-loop IIy' of the negative strand. We also showed that the formation of this G-quadruplex inhibits the in vitro RNA synthesis by the RdRp. Furthermore, Phen-DC3, a specific G-quadruplex binder, is able to inhibit HCV viral replication in cells in conditions where no cytotoxicity was measured. Considering that this domain of the negative RNA strand is well conserved among HCV genotypes, G4 ligands could be of interest for new antiviral therapies.

  14. Double-stranded DNA translocase activity of transcription factor TFIIH and the mechanism of RNA polymerase II open complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, James; Tomko, Eric; Galburt, Eric; Hahn, Steven

    2015-03-31

    Formation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) open complex (OC) requires DNA unwinding mediated by the transcription factor TFIIH helicase-related subunit XPB/Ssl2. Because XPB/Ssl2 binds DNA downstream from the location of DNA unwinding, it cannot function using a conventional helicase mechanism. Here we show that yeast TFIIH contains an Ssl2-dependent double-stranded DNA translocase activity. Ssl2 tracks along one DNA strand in the 5' → 3' direction, implying it uses the nontemplate promoter strand to reel downstream DNA into the Pol II cleft, creating torsional strain and leading to DNA unwinding. Analysis of the Ssl2 and DNA-dependent ATPase activity of TFIIH suggests that Ssl2 has a processivity of approximately one DNA turn, consistent with the length of DNA unwound during transcription initiation. Our results can explain why maintaining the OC requires continuous ATP hydrolysis and the function of TFIIH in promoter escape. Our results also suggest that XPB/Ssl2 uses this translocase mechanism during DNA repair rather than physically wedging open damaged DNA.

  15. PI3K-delta mediates double-stranded RNA-induced upregulation of B7-H1 in BEAS-2B airway epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan-o, Keiko; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Asai-Tajiri, Yukari; Fukuyama, Satoru; Hamano, Saaka; Seki, Nanae; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Double-stranded RNA upregulates B7-H1 on BEAS-2B airway epithelial cells. •The upregulation of B7-H1 is attenuated by inhibition of PI3Kδ isoform. •PI3Kδ-mediated upregulation of B7-H1 is independent of NF-κB activation. •Inhibition of PI3Kδ may prevent persistent viral infection induced by B7-H1. -- Abstract: Airway viral infection disturbs the health-related quality of life. B7-H1 (also known as PD-L1) is a coinhibitory molecule associated with the escape of viruses from the mucosal immunity, leading to persistent infection. Most respiratory viruses generate double-stranded (ds) RNA during replication. The stimulation of cultured airway epithelial cells with an analog of viral dsRNA, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC) upregulates the expression of B7-H1 via activation of the nuclear factor κB(NF-κB). The mechanism of upregulation was investigated in association with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks). Poly IC-induced upregulation of B7-H1 was profoundly suppressed by a pan-PI3K inhibitor and partially by an inhibitor or a small interfering (si)RNA for PI3Kδ in BEAS-2B cells. Similar results were observed in the respiratory syncytial virus-infected cells. The expression of p110δ was detected by Western blot and suppressed by pretreatment with PI3Kδ siRNA. The activation of PI3Kδ is typically induced by oxidative stress. The generation of reactive oxygen species was increased by poly IC. Poly IC-induced upregulation of B7-H1 was attenuated by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, or by oxypurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. Poly IC-induced activation of NF-κB was suppressed by a pan-PI3K inhibitor but not by a PI3Kδ inhibitor. These results suggest that PI3Kδ mediates dsRNA-induced upregulation of B7-H1 without affecting the activation of NF-κB

  16. RNA STRAND: The RNA Secondary Structure and Statistical Analysis Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andronescu Mirela

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. Results In this paper we describe RNA STRAND – the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. Conclusion RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at http://www.rnasoft.ca/strand.

  17. 15-lipoxygenase metabolites play an important role in the development of a T-helper type 1 allergic inflammation induced by double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, S G; Moon, H-G; Kim, Y-S; Choi, J-P; Shin, T-S; Hong, S-W; Tae, Y-M; Kim, S-H; Zhu, Z; Gho, Y S; Kim, Y-K

    2009-06-01

    We recently demonstrated that the T-helper type 1 (Th1) immune response plays an important role in the development of non-eosinophilic inflammation induced by airway exposure of an allergen plus double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). However, the role of lipoxygenase (LO) metabolites in the development of Th1 inflammation is poorly understood. To evaluate the role of LO metabolites in the development of Th1 inflammation induced by sensitization with an allergen plus dsRNA. A Th2-allergic inflammation mouse model was created by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide-depleted ovalbumin (OVA, 75 microg) and alum (2 mg) twice, and the Th1 model was created by intranasal application of OVA (75 microg) and synthetic dsRNA [10 microg of poly(I : C)] four times, followed by an intranasal challenge with 50 microg of OVA four times. The role of LO metabolites was evaluated using two approaches: a transgenic approach using 5-LO(-/-) and 15-LO(-/-) mice, and a pharmacological approach using inhibitors of cysteinyl leucotriene receptor-1 (cysLTR1), LTB4 receptor (BLT1), and 15-LO. We found that the Th1-allergic inflammation induced by OVA+dsRNA sensitization was similar between 5-LO(-/-) and wild-type (WT) control mice, although Th2 inflammation induced by sensitization with OVA+alum was reduced in the former group. In addition, dsRNA-induced Th1 allergic inflammation, which is associated with down-regulation of 15-hydroxyeicosateraenoic acids production, was not affected by treatment with cysLTR1 or BLT1 inhibitors, whereas it was significantly lower in 12/15-LO(-/-) mice compared with WT control mice. Moreover, dsRNA-induced allergic inflammation and the recruitment of T cells following an allergen challenge were significantly inhibited by treatment with a specific 15-LO inhibitor (PD146176). 15-LO metabolites appear to be important mediators in the development of Th1-allergic inflammation induced by sensitization with an allergen plus dsRNA. Our findings suggest that the

  18. The double-stranded RNA binding protein RDE-4 can act cell autonomously during feeding RNAi in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Pravrutha; Zaghab, Soriayah M; Traver, Edward C; Jose, Antony M

    2017-08-21

    Long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can silence genes of matching sequence upon ingestion in many invertebrates and is therefore being developed as a pesticide. Such feeding RNA interference (RNAi) is best understood in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, where the dsRNA-binding protein RDE-4 initiates silencing by recruiting an endonuclease to process long dsRNA into short dsRNA. These short dsRNAs are thought to move between cells because muscle-specific rescue of rde-4 using repetitive transgenes enables silencing in other tissues. Here, we extend this observation using additional promoters, report an inhibitory effect of repetitive transgenes, and discover conditions for cell-autonomous silencing in animals with tissue-specific rescue of rde-4. While expression of rde-4(+) in intestine, hypodermis, or neurons using a repetitive transgene can enable silencing also in unrescued tissues, silencing can be inhibited wihin tissues that express a repetitive transgene. Single-copy transgenes that express rde-4(+) in body-wall muscles or hypodermis, however, enable silencing selectively in the rescued tissue but not in other tissues. These results suggest that silencing by the movement of short dsRNA between cells is not an obligatory feature of feeding RNAi in C. elegans. We speculate that similar control of dsRNA movement could modulate tissue-specific silencing by feeding RNAi in other invertebrates. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Coronavirus minus-strand RNA synthesis and effect of cycloheximide on coronavirus RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, S.G.; Sawicki, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The temporal sequence of coronavirus plus-strand and minus-strand RNA synthesis was determined in 17CL1 cells infected with the A59 strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). MHV-induced fusion was prevented by keeping the pH of the medium below pH 6.8. This had no effect on the MHV replication cycle, but gave 5- to 10-fold-greater titers of infectious virus and delayed the detachment of cells from the monolayer which permitted viral RNA synthesis to be studied conveniently until at least 10 h postinfection. Seven species of poly(A)-containing viral RNAs were synthesized at early and late times infection, in nonequal but constant ratios. MHV minus-strand RNA synthesis was first detected at about 3 h after infection and was found exclusively in the viral replicative intermediates and was not detected in 60S single-stranded form in infected cells. Early in the replication cycle, from 45 to 65% of the [ 3 H]uridine pulse-labeled RF core of purified MHV replicative intermediates was in minus-strand RNA. The rate of minus-strand synthesis peaked at 5 to 6 h postinfection and then declined to about 20% of the maximum rate. The addition of cycloheximide before 3 h postinfection prevented viral RNA synthesis, whereas the addition of cycloheximide after viral RNA synthesis had begun resulted in the inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. The synthesis of both genome and subgenomic mRNAs and of viral minus strands required continued protein synthesis, and minis-strand RNA synthesis was three- to fourfold more sensitive to inhibition of cycloheximide than was plus-strand synthesis

  20. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes

  1. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  2. Enhanced whitefly resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing double stranded RNA of v-ATPase A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verma, Praveen C; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Tuli, Rakesh; Singh, Pradhyumna K

    2014-01-01

    Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA) designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi), thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA) coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops.

  3. Enhanced whitefly resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing double stranded RNA of v-ATPase A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Thakur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi, thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops.

  4. Single-stranded DNA cleavage by divergent CRISPR-Cas9 enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Enbo; Harrington, Lucas B.; O’Connell, Mitchell R.; Zhou, Kaihong; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) cleavage by Cas9 is a hallmark of type II CRISPR-Cas immune systems. Cas9–guide RNA complexes recognize 20-base-pair sequences in DNA and generate a site-specific double-strand break, a robust activity harnessed for genome editing. DNA recognition by all studied Cas9 enzymes requires a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) next to the target site. We show that Cas9 enzymes from evolutionarily divergent bacteria can recognize and cleave single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by an RNA-guided, PAM-independent recognition mechanism. Comparative analysis shows that in contrast to the type II-A S. pyogenes Cas9 that is widely used for genome engineering, the smaller type II-C Cas9 proteins have limited dsDNA binding and unwinding activity and promiscuous guide-RNA specificity. These results indicate that inefficiency of type II-C Cas9 enzymes for genome editing results from a limited ability to cleave dsDNA, and suggest that ssDNA cleavage was an ancestral function of the Cas9 enzyme family. PMID:26545076

  5. Fragmentation in DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhiyong; Suzhou Univ., Suzhou; Zhang Lihui; Li Ming; Fan Wo; Xu Yujie

    2005-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are important lesions induced by irradiations. Random breakage model or quantification supported by this concept is suitable to analyze DNA double strand break data induced by low LET radiation, but deviation from random breakage model is more evident in high LET radiation data analysis. In this work we develop a new method, statistical fragmentation model, to analyze the fragmentation process of DNA double strand breaks. After charged particles enter the biological cell, they produce ionizations along their tracks, and transfer their energies to the cells and break the cellular DNA strands into fragments. The probable distribution of the fragments is obtained under the condition in which the entropy is maximum. Under the approximation E≅E 0 + E 1 l + E 2 l 2 , the distribution functions are obtained as exp(αl + βl 2 ). There are two components, the one proportional to exp(βl 2 ), mainly contributes to the low mass fragment yields, the other component, proportional to exp(αl), decreases slowly as the mass of the fragments increases. Numerical solution of the constraint equations provides parameters α and β. Experimental data, especially when the energy deposition is higher, support the statistical fragmentation model. (authors)

  6. Time-lapse crystallography snapshots of a double-strand break repair polymerase in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsen, Joonas A; Beard, William A; Pedersen, Lars C; Shock, David D; Moon, Andrea F; Krahn, Juno M; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2017-08-15

    DNA polymerase (pol) μ is a DNA-dependent polymerase that incorporates nucleotides during gap-filling synthesis in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of double-strand break repair. Here we report time-lapse X-ray crystallography snapshots of catalytic events during gap-filling DNA synthesis by pol μ. Unique catalytic intermediates and active site conformational changes that underlie catalysis are uncovered, and a transient third (product) metal ion is observed in the product state. The product manganese coordinates phosphate oxygens of the inserted nucleotide and PP i . The product metal is not observed during DNA synthesis in the presence of magnesium. Kinetic analyses indicate that manganese increases the rate constant for deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate insertion compared to magnesium. The likely product stabilization role of the manganese product metal in pol μ is discussed. These observations provide insight on structural attributes of this X-family double-strand break repair polymerase that impact its biological function in genome maintenance.DNA polymerase (pol) μ functions in DNA double-strand break repair. Here the authors use time-lapse X-ray crystallography to capture the states of pol µ during the conversion from pre-catalytic to product complex and observe a third transiently bound metal ion in the product state.

  7. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker.......A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  8. Defective double-strand DNA break repair and chromosomal translocations by MYC overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Asa; Deb-Basu, Debabrita; Cherry, Athena; Turner, Stephanie; Ford, James; Felsher, Dean W

    2003-08-19

    DNA repair mechanisms are essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Disruption of gene products responsible for DNA repair can result in chromosomal damage. Improperly repaired chromosomal damage can result in the loss of chromosomes or the generation of chromosomal deletions or translocations, which can lead to tumorigenesis. The MYC protooncogene is a transcription factor whose overexpression is frequently associated with human neoplasia. MYC has not been previously implicated in a role in DNA repair. Here we report that the overexpression of MYC disrupts the repair of double-strand DNA breaks, resulting in a several-magnitude increase in chromosomal breaks and translocations. We found that MYC inhibited the repair of gamma irradiation DNA breaks in normal human cells and blocked the repair of a single double-strand break engineered to occur in an immortal cell line. By spectral karyotypic analysis, we found that MYC even within one cell division cycle resulted in a several-magnitude increase in the frequency of chromosomal breaks and translocations in normal human cells. Hence, MYC overexpression may be a previously undescribed example of a dominant mutator that may fuel tumorigenesis by inducing chromosomal damage.

  9. The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase mediates viral-induced encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuner, Donalyn; Gromeier, Matthias; Davies, Monique V.; Dorner, Andrew J.; Song Benbo; Patel, Rupali V.; Wimmer, Eckard J.; McLendon, Roger E.; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2003-01-01

    The double-stranded (ds) RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) plays an important role in control of viral infections and cell growth. We have studied the role of PKR in viral infection in mice that are defective in the PKR signaling pathway. Transgenic mice were derived that constitutively express a trans-dominant-negative kinase-defective mutant PKR under control of the β-actin promoter. The trans-dominant-negative PKR mutant expressing transgenic mice do not have a detectable phenotype, similar to observations with PKR knock-out mice. The requirement for PKR in viral pathogenesis was studied by intracerebral infection of mice with a mouse-adapted poliovirus. Histopathological analysis revealed diffuse encephalomyelitis with severe inflammatory lesions throughout the central nervous system (CNS) in infected wild-type mice. In contrast, histopathological evaluation of virus-injected trans-dominant-negative PKR transgenic mice as well as PKR knock-out mice yielded no signs of tissue damage associated with inflammatory host responses. However, the virus did replicate in both models of PKR-deficient mice at a level equal to that observed in wild-type infected mice. Although the results indicate a clear difference in susceptibility to poliovirus-induced encephalitis, this difference manifests clinically as a slight delay in fatal neuropathy in trans-dominant-negative PKR transgenic and PKR knock-out animals. Our observations support the finding that viral-induced PKR activation may play a significant role in pathogenesis by mediating the host response to viral CNS infection. They support PKR to be an effective target to control tissue damage due to deleterious host responses to viral infection

  10. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecue, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G•U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G•U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  11. Identification of cis-acting elements on positive-strand subgenomic mRNA required for the synthesis of negative-strand counterpart in bovine coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Po-Yuan; Wu, Hung-Yi

    2014-07-30

    It has been demonstrated that, in addition to genomic RNA, sgmRNA is able to serve as a template for the synthesis of the negative-strand [(-)-strand] complement. However, the cis-acting elements on the positive-strand [(+)-strand] sgmRNA required for (-)-strand sgmRNA synthesis have not yet been systematically identified. In this study, we employed real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to analyze the cis-acting elements on bovine coronavirus (BCoV) sgmRNA 7 required for the synthesis of its (-)-strand counterpart by deletion mutagenesis. The major findings are as follows. (1) Deletion of the 5'-terminal leader sequence on sgmRNA 7 decreased the synthesis of the (-)-strand sgmRNA complement. (2) Deletions of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) bulged stem-loop showed no effect on (-)-strand sgmRNA synthesis; however, deletion of the 3' UTR pseudoknot decreased the yield of (-)-strand sgmRNA. (3) Nucleotides positioned from -15 to -34 of the sgmRNA 7 3'-terminal region are required for efficient (-)-strand sgmRNA synthesis. (4) Nucleotide species at the 3'-most position (-1) of sgmRNA 7 is correlated to the efficiency of (-)-strand sgmRNA synthesis. These results together suggest, in principle, that the 5'- and 3'-terminal sequences on sgmRNA 7 harbor cis-acting elements are critical for efficient (-)-strand sgmRNA synthesis in BCoV.

  12. Identification of Cis-Acting Elements on Positive-Strand Subgenomic mRNA Required for the Synthesis of Negative-Strand Counterpart in Bovine Coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Yeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that, in addition to genomic RNA, sgmRNA is able to serve as a template for the synthesis of the negative-strand [(−-strand] complement. However, the cis-acting elements on the positive-strand [(+-strand] sgmRNA required for (−-strand sgmRNA synthesis have not yet been systematically identified. In this study, we employed real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to analyze the cis-acting elements on bovine coronavirus (BCoV sgmRNA 7 required for the synthesis of its (−-strand counterpart by deletion mutagenesis. The major findings are as follows. (1 Deletion of the 5'-terminal leader sequence on sgmRNA 7 decreased the synthesis of the (−-strand sgmRNA complement. (2 Deletions of the 3' untranslated region (UTR bulged stem-loop showed no effect on (−-strand sgmRNA synthesis; however, deletion of the 3' UTR pseudoknot decreased the yield of (−-strand sgmRNA. (3 Nucleotides positioned from −15 to −34 of the sgmRNA 7 3'-terminal region are required for efficient (−-strand sgmRNA synthesis. (4 Nucleotide species at the 3'-most position (−1 of sgmRNA 7 is correlated to the efficiency of (−-strand sgmRNA synthesis. These results together suggest, in principle, that the 5'- and 3'-terminal sequences on sgmRNA 7 harbor cis-acting elements are critical for efficient (−-strand sgmRNA synthesis in BCoV.

  13. Distinct genetic control of homologous recombination repair of Cas9-induced double-strand breaks, nicks and paired nicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Prakash, Rohit; Chen, Chun-Chin; Vanoli, Fabio; Cavallo, Francesca; Zhang, Yu; Jasin, Maria; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are known to be powerful inducers of homologous recombination (HR), but single-strand breaks (nicks) have also been shown to trigger HR. Both DSB- and nick-induced HR ((nick)HR) are exploited in advanced genome-engineering approaches based on the bacterial RNA-guided

  14. The Regulatory and Kinase Domains but Not the Interdomain Linker Determine Human Double-stranded RNA-activated Kinase (PKR) Sensitivity to Inhibition by Viral Non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunita, S; Schwartz, Samantha L; Conn, Graeme L

    2015-11-20

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) is an important component of the innate immune system that presents a crucial first line of defense against viral infection. PKR has a modular architecture comprising a regulatory N-terminal dsRNA binding domain and a C-terminal kinase domain interposed by an unstructured ∼80-residue interdomain linker (IDL). Guided by sequence alignment, we created IDL deletions in human PKR (hPKR) and regulatory/kinase domain swap human-rat chimeric PKRs to assess the contributions of each domain and the IDL to regulation of the kinase activity by RNA. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy, limited proteolysis, kinase assays, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that each PKR protein is properly folded with similar domain boundaries and that each exhibits comparable polyinosinic-cytidylic (poly(rI:rC)) dsRNA activation profiles and binding affinities for adenoviral virus-associated RNA I (VA RNAI) and HIV-1 trans-activation response (TAR) RNA. From these results we conclude that the IDL of PKR is not required for RNA binding or mediating changes in protein conformation or domain interactions necessary for PKR regulation by RNA. In contrast, inhibition of rat PKR by VA RNAI and TAR RNA was found to be weaker than for hPKR by 7- and >300-fold, respectively, and each human-rat chimeric domain-swapped protein showed intermediate levels of inhibition. These findings indicate that PKR sequence or structural elements in the kinase domain, present in hPKR but absent in rat PKR, are exploited by viral non-coding RNAs to accomplish efficient inhibition of PKR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Optimization of the Alkyl Linker of TO Base Surrogate in Triplex-Forming PNA for Enhanced Binding to Double-Stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaya; Sato, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Seiichi

    2017-03-23

    A series of triplex-forming peptide nucleic acid (TFP) probes carrying a thiazole orange (TO) base surrogate through an alkyl linker was synthesized, and the interactions between these so-called tFIT probes and purine-rich sequences within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were examined. We found that the TO base surrogate linker significantly affected both the binding affinity and the fluorescence response upon triplex formation with the target dsRNA. Among the probes examined, the TO base surrogate connected through the propyl linker in the tFIT probes increased the binding affinity by a factor of ten while maintaining its function as the fluorescent universal base. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed that the increased binding affinity resulted from the gain in the binding enthalpy, which could be explained by the enhanced π-stacking interaction between the TO base surrogate and the dsRNA part of the triplex. We expect that these results will provide a molecular basis for designing strong binding tFIT probes for fluorescence sensing of various kinds of purine-rich dsRNAs sequences including those carrying a pyrimidine-purine inversion. The obtained data also offers a new insight into further development of the universal bases incorporated in TFP. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  17. Induction of double-strand breaks in DNA of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their repair. 1. Application of elastoviscosimetry for studying double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli induced by. gamma. -irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresler, S E; Noskin, L A; Suslov, A V [AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1980-11-01

    It is shown that the method of elastoviscosimetry gives a possibility to record the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli cells induced by ..gamma.. irradiation at doses close to D/sub 37/. The dependence of changes of elastoviscosity parameter on the dose (tau/sub 0/) passes through the maximum. It is shown that the ascending section of this curve (at minimum ..gamma.. irradiation doses) characterizes the relaxation process of the superspiralised chromosome in nucleotide of the E. coli. This relaxation is observed due to ..gamma.. induced damages which are not double-strand breaks. By the maximum position one can judge on a dose yield of the first DNA double-strand break, the descending part of the dose curve describes the kinetics of accumulation of breaks with the dose increase. The analysis of the data obtained gives the possibility to come to the conclusion that when applying a usual technique of irradiation and lysis of cells not providing for special measures on inhibition of endo-and exonuclease activity in ..gamma.. irradiated cells, the dose yield of double-strand breaks noticeably increases (by 4.2 times). In the case of an essential, though incomplete, inhibition of nuclease activities in ..gamma.. irradiated cells the dose yield of breaks approximately corresponds to the dose curve of inactivation of these cells (D/sub 37/12.5+-3.0 krad, the first double-strand break -at 14.5+-2.4 krad).

  18. Induction of double-strand breaks in DNA of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their repair. 1. Application of elastoviscosimetry for studying double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli induced by γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresler, S.E.; Noskin, L.A.; Suslov, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the method of elastoviscosimetry gives a possibility to record the formation of DNA double-strand breaks in Escherichia coli cells induced by γ irradiation at doses close to D 37 . The dependence of changes of elastoviscosity parameter on the dose (tau 0 ) passes through the maximum. It is shown that the ascending section of this curve (at minimum γ irradiation doses) characterizes the relaxation process of the superspiralised chromosome in nucleotide of the E. coli. This relaxation is observed due to γ induced damages which are not double-strand breaks. By the maximum position one can judge on a dose yield of the first DNA double-strand break, the descending part of the dose curve describes the kinetics of accumulation of breaks with the dose increase. The analysis of the data obtained gives the possibility to come to the conclusion that when applying a usual technique of irradiation and lysis of cells not providing for special measures on inhibition of endo-and exonuclease activity in γ irradiated cells, the dose yield of double-strand breaks noticeably increases (by 4.2 times). In the case of an essential, though incomplete, inhibition of nuclease activities in γ irradiated cells the dose yield of breaks approximately corresponds to the dose curve of inactivation of these cells (D 37 12.5+-3.0 krad, the first double-strand break -at 14.5+-2.4 krad)

  19. A single-strand specific lesion drives MMS-induced hyper-mutability at a double-strand break in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A

    2010-08-05

    Localized hyper-mutability (LHM) can be important in evolution, immunity, and genetic diseases. We previously reported that single-strand DNA (ssDNA) can be an important source of damage-induced LHM in yeast. Here, we establish that the generation of LHM by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) during repair of a chromosomal double-strand break (DSB) can result in over 0.2 mutations/kb, which is approximately 20,000-fold higher than the MMS-induced mutation density without a DSB. The MMS-induced mutations associated with DSB repair were primarily due to substitutions via translesion DNA synthesis at damaged cytosines, even though there are nearly 10 times more MMS-induced lesions at other bases. Based on this mutation bias, the promutagenic lesion dominating LHM is likely 3-methylcytosine, which is single-strand specific. Thus, the dramatic increase in mutagenesis at a DSB is concluded to result primarily from the generation of non-repairable lesions in ssDNA associated with DSB repair along with efficient induction of highly mutagenic ssDNA-specific lesions. These findings with MMS-induced LHM have broad biological implications for unrepaired damage generated in ssDNA and possibly ssRNA. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. TALEN-Induced Double-Strand Break Repair of CTG Trinucleotide Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Mosbach

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansions involving CTG/CAG triplets are responsible for several neurodegenerative disorders, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington’s disease. Because expansions trigger the disease, contracting repeat length could be a possible approach to gene therapy for these disorders. Here, we show that a TALEN-induced double-strand break was very efficient at contracting expanded CTG repeats in yeast. We show that RAD51, POL32, and DNL4 are dispensable for double-strand break repair within CTG repeats, the only required genes being RAD50, SAE2, and RAD52. Resection was totally abolished in the absence of RAD50 on both sides of the break, whereas it was reduced in a sae2Δ mutant on the side of the break containing the longest repeat tract, suggesting that secondary structures at double-strand break ends must be removed by the Mre11-Rad50 complex and Sae2. Following the TALEN double-strand break, single-strand annealing occurred between both sides of the repeat tract, leading to repeat contraction.

  1. Importance of the efficiency of double-stranded DNA formation in cDNA synthesis for the imprecision of microarray expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormar, Hans G; Gudmundsson, Bjarki; Eiriksdottir, Freyja; Kil, Siyoen; Gunnarsson, Gudmundur H; Magnusson, Magnus Karl; Hsu, Jason C; Jonsson, Jon J

    2013-04-01

    The causes of imprecision in microarray expression analysis are poorly understood, limiting the use of this technology in molecular diagnostics. Two-dimensional strandness-dependent electrophoresis (2D-SDE) separates nucleic acid molecules on the basis of length and strandness, i.e., double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and RNA·DNA hybrids. We used 2D-SDE to measure the efficiency of cDNA synthesis and its importance for the imprecision of an in vitro transcription-based microarray expression analysis. The relative amount of double-stranded cDNA formed in replicate experiments that used the same RNA sample template was highly variable, ranging between 0% and 72% of the total DNA. Microarray experiments showed an inverse relationship between the difference between sample pairs in probe variance and the relative amount of dsDNA. Approximately 15% of probes showed between-sample variation (P cDNA synthesized can be an important component of the imprecision in T7 RNA polymerase-based microarray expression analysis. © 2013 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  2. Cisplatin enhances the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks by hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Sanche, Léon; Hunting, Darel J

    2013-03-01

    The synergistic interaction of cisplatin with ionizing radiation is the clinical rationale for the treatment of several cancers including head and neck, cervical and lung cancer. The underlying molecular mechanism of the synergy has not yet been identified, although both DNA damage and repair processes are likely involved. Here, we investigate the indirect effect of γ rays on strand break formation in a supercoiled plasmid DNA (pGEM-3Zf-) covalently modified by cisplatin. The yields of single- and double-strand breaks were determined by irradiation of DNA and cisplatin/DNA samples with (60)Co γ rays under four different scavenging conditions to examine the involvement of hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals in inducing the DNA damage. At 5 mM tris in an N2 atmosphere, the presence of an average of two cisplatins per plasmid increased the yields of single- and double-strand breaks by factors of 1.9 and 2.2, respectively, relative to the irradiated unmodified DNA samples. Given that each plasmid of 3,200 base pairs contained an average of two cisplatins, this represents an increase in radiosensitivity of 3,200-fold on a per base pair basis. When hydrated electrons were scavenged by saturating the samples with N2O, these enhancement factors decreased to 1.5 and 1.2, respectively, for single- and double-strand breaks. When hydroxyl radicals were scavenged using 200 mM tris, the respective enhancement factors were 1.2 and 1.6 for single- and double-strand breaks, respectively. Furthermore, no enhancement in DNA damage by cisplatin was observed after scavenging both hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons. These findings show that hydrated electrons can induce both single- and double-strand breaks in the platinated DNA, but not in unmodified DNA. In addition, cisplatin modification is clearly an extremely efficient means of increasing the formation of both single- and double-strand breaks by the hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals created by ionizing

  3. Repair and gamma radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Studies in the kinetics of repair of γ-radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of E. coli cells showed that double-strand DNA breaks are rejoined by the following two ways. The first way is conditioned by repair of single-strand breaks and represents the repair of ''oblique'' double-strand breaks in DNA, whereas the second way is conditioned by functioning of the recombination mechanisms and, to all appearance, represents the repair of ''direct'' double-strand breaks in DNA

  4. Characterizing the mechanism of action of double-stranded RNA activity against western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bolognesi

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi has previously been shown to be effective in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte larvae via oral delivery of synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA in an artificial diet bioassay, as well as by ingestion of transgenic corn plant tissues engineered to express dsRNA. Although the RNAi machinery components appear to be conserved in Coleopteran insects, the key steps in this process have not been reported for WCR. Here we characterized the sequence of events that result in mortality after ingestion of a dsRNA designed against WCR larvae. We selected the Snf7 ortholog (DvSnf7 as the target mRNA, which encodes an essential protein involved in intracellular trafficking. Our results showed that dsRNAs greater than or equal to approximately 60 base-pairs (bp are required for biological activity in artificial diet bioassays. Additionally, 240 bp dsRNAs containing a single 21 bp match to the target sequence were also efficacious, whereas 21 bp short interfering (si RNAs matching the target sequence were not. This result was further investigated in WCR midgut tissues: uptake of 240 bp dsRNA was evident in WCR midgut cells while a 21 bp siRNA was not, supporting the size-activity relationship established in diet bioassays. DvSnf7 suppression was observed in a time-dependent manner with suppression at the mRNA level preceding suppression at the protein level when a 240 bp dsRNA was fed to WCR larvae. DvSnf7 suppression was shown to spread to tissues beyond the midgut within 24 h after dsRNA ingestion. These events (dsRNA uptake, target mRNA and protein suppression, systemic spreading, growth inhibition and eventual mortality comprise the overall mechanism of action by which DvSnf7 dsRNA affects WCR via oral delivery and provides insights as to how targeted dsRNAs in general are active against insects.

  5. Intervention of radiation‐induced skin fibrosis by RNA interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawroth, Isabel

    ‐α (TNFα) production by macrophages might promote RIF. RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionary conserved gene‐silencing mechanism capable of degrading mRNA containing a homologous sequence to an exogenously introduced double stranded small interfering RNA (siRNA). These siRNAs can induce RNAi...... and inhibit the expression of target proteins. Therefore, siRNAs are considered as promising therapeutics for treatment of various diseases including genetic and viral diseases, and cancer. In this study, the therapeutic potential of RNA interference was investigated as an intervention strategy for radiation......‐induced skin fibrosis. Chitosan‐based nanoparticles (or polyplexes) formed by self‐assembly with siRNA were applied to overcome extracellular and intracellular barriers and deliver siRNA site‐specific. In this work we show that intraperitoneal administration of chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles targeting TNFα...

  6. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication

  7. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Richard E., E-mail: rlloyd@bcm.edu

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  8. A link between double-strand break-related repair and V(D)J recombination: the scid mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, E.A.; Qin, X.Q.; Bump, E.A.; Schatz, D.G.; Oettinger, M.; Weaver, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    We show here that mammalian site-specific recombination and DNA-repair pathways share a common factor. The effects of DNA-damaging agents on cell lines derived from mice homozygous for the scid (severe combined immune deficiency) mutation were studied. Surprisingly, all scid cell lines exhibited a profound hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that caused double-strand breaks (x-irradiation and bleomycin) but not to other chemicals that caused single-strand breaks or cross-links. Neutral filter elution assays demonstrated that the x-irradiation hypersensitivity could be correlated with a deficiency in repairing double-strand breaks. These data suggest that the scid gene product is involved in two pathways: DNA repair of random double-strand breaks and the site-specific and lymphoid-restricted variable-(diversity)-joining [V(D)J] DNA rearrangement process. We propose that the scid gene product performs a similar function in both pathways and may be a ubiquitous protein

  9. Three methods to determine the yields of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzgraeber, G.; Lapidus, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    A possibility of determining the yield of DNA double-strand breaks in cells of the Chinese hamster (V79-4) by finding the amount of DNA released as a result of breaks and by determining the relative sedimentation velocity of DNA-membrane complexes affected by ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics is discussed. Results of the analysis are compared with the data obtained by a traditional method of sedimentation in the neutral sucrose density gradient. Comparative characterization of the methods is discussed. The yields of DNA double-strand breaks determined by the suggested independent methods are in good agreement, which opens possibilities of studying induction and repair of double-strand breaks by means of simpler and more reliable methods

  10. Enzymatic induction of DNA double-strand breaks in γ-irradiated Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonura, T.; Smith, K.C.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    The polA1 mutation increases the sensitivity of E. coli K-12 to killing by γ-irradiation in air by a factor of 2.9 and increases the yield of DNA double-strand breaks by a factor of 2.5. These additional DNA double-strand breaks appear to be due to the action of nucleases in the polA1 strain rather than to the rejoining of radiation-induced double-strand breaks in the pol + strain. This conclusion is based upon the observation that γ-irradiation at 3 0 did not affect the yield of DNA double-strand breaks in the pol + strain, but decreased the yield in the polA1 strain by a factor of 2.2. Irradiation of the polA1 strain at 3 0 followed by incubation at 3 0 for 20 min before plating resulted in approximately a 1.5-fold increase in the D 0 . The yield of DNA double-strand breaks was reduced by a factor of 1.5. The pol + strain, however, did not show the protective effect of the low temperature incubation upon either survival or DNA double-strand breakage. We suggest that the increased yield of DNA double-strand breaks in the polA 1 strain may be the result of the unsuccessful excision repair of ionizing radiation-induced dna base damage

  11. Genetic recombination induced by DNA double-strand break in bacteriophage T4: nature of the left/right bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Plugina, Lidiya; Sizova, Svetlana; Kudryashova, Elena; Granovsky, Igor

    2008-06-01

    The experimental system combining double-strand breaks (DSBs), produced site-specifically by SegC endonuclease, with the famous advantages of the bacteriophage T4 rII mutant recombination analysis was used here to elucidate the origin of the recombination bias on two sides of the DSB, especially pronounced in gene 39 (topoisomerase II) and gene 59 (41-helicase loader) mutants. Three sources were found to contribute to the bias: (1) the SegC endonuclease may remain bound to the end of the broken DNA and thus protect it from exonuclease degradation; (2) in heteroduplex heterozygotes (HHs), arising as the recombinant products in the left-hand crosses, the transcribed strands are of rII mutant phenotype, so they, in contrast to the right-hand HHs, do not produce plaques on the lawn of the lambda-lysogenic host; and (3) the intrinsic polarity of T4 chromosome, reflected in transcription, may be a cause for discrimination of promoter-proximal and promoter-distal DNA sequences. It is shown that the apparent recombination bias does not imply one-sidedness of the DSB repair but just reflects a different depth of the end processing. It is inferred that the cause, underlying the "intrinsic" bias, might be interference between strand exchange and transcription. Topoisomerase and helicase functions are necessary to turn the process in favor of strand exchange. The idea is substantiated that the double-stranded to single-stranded DNA transition edge (not ss-DNA tip) serves as an actual recombinogenic element.

  12. New insights into the promoterless transcription of DNA coligo templates by RNA polymerase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Lodoe; Seidl, Christine I; Ryan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Chemically synthesized DNA can carry small RNA sequence information but converting that information into small RNA is generally thought to require large double-stranded promoters in the context of plasmids, viruses and genes. We previously found evidence that circularized oligodeoxynucleotides (coligos) containing certain sequences and secondary structures can template the synthesis of small RNA by RNA polymerase III in vitro and in human cells. By using immunoprecipitated RNA polymerase III we now report corroborating evidence that this enzyme is the sole polymerase responsible for coligo transcription. The immobilized polymerase enabled experiments showing that coligo transcripts can be formed through transcription termination without subsequent 3' end trimming. To better define the determinants of productive transcription, a structure-activity relationship study was performed using over 20 new coligos. The results show that unpaired nucleotides in the coligo stem facilitate circumtranscription, but also that internal loops and bulges should be kept small to avoid secondary transcription initiation sites. A polymerase termination sequence embedded in the double-stranded region of a hairpin-encoding coligo stem can antagonize transcription. Using lessons learned from new and old coligos, we demonstrate how to convert poorly transcribed coligos into productive templates. Our findings support the possibility that coligos may prove useful as chemically synthesized vectors for the ectopic expression of small RNA in human cells.

  13. Direct detection of RNA in vitro and in situ by target-primed RCA: The impact of E. coli RNase III on the detection efficiency of RNA sequences distanced far from the 3'-end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkiene, Egle; Gaidamaviciute, Edita; Riauba, Laurynas; Janulaitis, Arvydas; Lagunavicius, Arunas

    2010-08-01

    We improved the target RNA-primed RCA technique for direct detection and analysis of RNA in vitro and in situ. Previously we showed that the 3' --> 5' single-stranded RNA exonucleolytic activity of Phi29 DNA polymerase converts the target RNA into a primer and uses it for RCA initiation. However, in some cases, the single-stranded RNA exoribonucleolytic activity of the polymerase is hindered by strong double-stranded structures at the 3'-end of target RNAs. We demonstrate that in such hampered cases, the double-stranded RNA-specific Escherichia coli RNase III efficiently assists Phi29 DNA polymerase in converting the target RNA into a primer. These observations extend the target RNA-primed RCA possibilities to test RNA sequences distanced far from the 3'-end and customize this technique for the inner RNA sequence analysis.

  14. Torsional regulation of hRPA-induced unwinding of double-stranded DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vlaminck, I.; Vidic, I.; Van Loenhout, M.T.J.; Kanaar, R.; Lebbink, J.H.G.; Dekker, C.

    2010-01-01

    All cellular single-stranded (ss) DNA is rapidly bound and stabilized by single stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs). Replication protein A, the main eukaryotic SSB, is able to unwind double-stranded (ds) DNA by binding and stabilizing transiently forming bubbles of ssDNA. Here, we study the

  15. In vitro synthesis of minus-strand RNA by an isolated cereal yellow dwarf virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase requires VPg and a stem-loop structure at the 3' end of the virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Toba A M; Coutts, Robert H A; Buck, Kenneth W

    2006-11-01

    Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV) RNA has a 5'-terminal genome-linked protein (VPg). We have expressed the VPg region of the CYDV genome in bacteria and used the purified protein (bVPg) to raise an antiserum which was able to detect free VPg in extracts of CYDV-infected oat plants. A template-dependent RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) has been produced from a CYDV membrane-bound RNA polymerase by treatment with BAL 31 nuclease. The RdRp was template specific, being able to utilize templates from CYDV plus- and minus-strand RNAs but not those of three unrelated viruses, Red clover necrotic mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, and Tobacco mosaic virus. RNA synthesis catalyzed by the RdRp required a 3'-terminal GU sequence and the presence of bVPg. Additionally, synthesis of minus-strand RNA on a plus-strand RNA template required the presence of a putative stem-loop structure near the 3' terminus of CYDV RNA. The base-paired stem, a single-nucleotide (A) bulge in the stem, and the sequence of a tetraloop were all required for the template activity. Evidence was produced showing that minus-strand synthesis in vitro was initiated by priming by bVPg at the 3' end of the template. The data are consistent with a model in which the RdRp binds to the stem-loop structure which positions the active site to recognize the 3'-terminal GU sequence for initiation of RNA synthesis by the addition of an A residue to VPg.

  16. Folate deficiency facilitates recruitment of upstream binding factor to hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks of rRNA genes and promotes its transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiu; Li, Caihua; Song, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lihua; Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Zhiyong; Cao, Haiyan; Yu, Kaihui; Wan, Chunlei; Li, Jianting; Yang, Feng; Huang, Zebing; Niu, Bo; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Ting

    2017-03-17

    The biogenesis of ribosomes in vivo is an essential process for cellular functions. Transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis controlled by environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the role of folate antagonist on changes of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) landscape in mouse embryonic stem cells. A significant DSB enhancement was detected in the genome of these cells and a large majority of these DSBs were found in rRNA genes. Furthermore, spontaneous DSBs in cells under folate deficiency conditions were located exclusively within the rRNA gene units, representing a H3K4me1 hallmark. Enrichment H3K4me1 at the hot spots of DSB regions enhanced the recruitment of upstream binding factor (UBF) to rRNA genes, resulting in the increment of rRNA genes transcription. Supplement of folate resulted in a restored UBF binding across DNA breakage sites of rRNA genes, and normal rRNA gene transcription. In samples from neural tube defects (NTDs) with low folate level, up-regulation of rRNA gene transcription was observed, along with aberrant UBF level. Our results present a new view by which alterations in folate levels affects DNA breakage through epigenetic control leading to the regulation of rRNA gene transcription during the early stage of development. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Single and double strand breaks induced by 3H incorporated in DNA of cultured human kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisljar-Lentulis, G.; Henneberg, P.; Mielke, T.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of the investigations of the biological effects of radionuclides incorporated in DNA single (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) caused tritium-decay were measured and compared with respective data resulting from 125 I. Tritium bound to thymidine and iododeoxyuridine seems to be more effective than tritium bound to other DNA-precursors. On the basis of decay, methyl- 3 H thymidine appears to be more effective with regard to the production of strand breaks than 3 H in position 6 of the pyrimidine ring. Based on the numbers of strand-breaks per rad, position 6 is more effective in accordance with data obtained by F. Krasin et al. The ratio of SSBs to DSBs per tritium decay appears to be approximately 8 in mammlian cells. Not only SSBs but also DSBs induced by 3 H in mammalian cells are reapairable. (orig./AJ) [de

  18. Molecular characterization of double-stranded RNA virus in Trichomonas vaginalis Egyptian isolates and its association with pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gayar, Eman K; Mokhtar, Amira B; Hassan, Wael A

    2016-10-01

    Trichomoniasis is a common human sexually transmitted infection caused by Trichomonas vaginalis. The parasite can be infected with double-stranded RNA viruses (TVV). This viral infection may have important implications on trichomonal virulence and disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of T. vaginalis virus among isolates obtained from infected (symptomatic and asymptomatic) women in Ismailia City, Egypt, and to correlate the virus-infected isolates with the clinical manifestations of patients. In addition, the pathogenicity of TVV infected isolates on mice was also evaluated. T. vaginalis isolates were obtained from symptomatic and asymptomatic female patients followed by axenic cultivation in Diamond's TYM medium. The presence of T. vaginalis virus was determined from total extraction of nucleic acids (DNA-RNA) followed by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Representative samples were inoculated intraperitoneally in female albino/BALB mice to assess the pathogenicity of different isolates. A total of 110 women were examined; 40 (36.3 %) samples were positive for T. vaginalis infection. Of these 40 isolates, 8 (20 %) were infected by TVV. Five isolates contained TVV-2 virus species, and the remaining three isolates were infected withTVV-4 variant. A significant association was found between the presence of TVV and particular clinical manifestations of trichomoniasis. Experimental mice infection showed varying degrees of pathogenicity. This is the first report on T. vaginalis infection by TVV in Egypt. The strong association detected between TVV and particular clinical features of trichomoniasis and also the degree of pathogenicity in experimentally infected mice may indicate a possible clinical significance of TVV infection of T. vaginalis isolates.

  19. Cellular La protein shields nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viral leader RNA from RIG-I and enhances virus growth by diverse mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitko, Vira; Musiyenko, Alla; Bayfield, Mark A; Maraia, Richard J; Barik, Sailen

    2008-08-01

    The La antigen (SS-B) associates with a wide variety of cellular and viral RNAs to affect gene expression in multiple systems. We show that La is the major cellular protein found to be associated with the abundant 44-nucleotide viral leader RNA (leRNA) early after infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. Consistent with this, La redistributes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in RSV-infected cells. Upon RNA interference knockdown of La, leRNA is redirected to associate with the RNA-binding protein RIG-I, a known activator of interferon (IFN) gene expression, and this is accompanied by the early induction of IFN mRNA. These results suggest that La shields leRNA from RIG-I, abrogating the early viral activation of type I IFN. We mapped the leRNA binding function to RNA recognition motif 1 of La and showed that while wild-type La greatly enhanced RSV growth, a La mutant defective in RSV leRNA binding also did not support RSV growth. Comparative studies of RSV and Sendai virus and the use of IFN-negative Vero cells indicated that La supports the growth of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses by both IFN suppression and a potentially novel IFN-independent mechanism.

  20. 75 FR 62820 - Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Providers of Synthetic Double- Stranded DNA AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the.... Government has developed Guidance that provides a framework for screening synthetic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This document, the Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA...

  1. A Co-Opted DEAD-Box RNA helicase enhances tombusvirus plus-strand synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kovalev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. In this paper, we show that an essential translation factor, Ded1p DEAD-box RNA helicase of yeast, directly affects replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV. To separate the role of Ded1p in viral protein translation from its putative replication function, we utilized a cell-free TBSV replication assay and recombinant Ded1p. The in vitro data show that Ded1p plays a role in enhancing plus-strand synthesis by the viral replicase. We also find that Ded1p is a component of the tombusvirus replicase complex and Ded1p binds to the 3'-end of the viral minus-stranded RNA. The data obtained with wt and ATPase deficient Ded1p mutants support the model that Ded1p unwinds local structures at the 3'-end of the TBSV (-RNA, rendering the RNA compatible for initiation of (+-strand synthesis. Interestingly, we find that Ded1p and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, which is another host factor for TBSV, play non-overlapping functions to enhance (+-strand synthesis. Altogether, the two host factors enhance TBSV replication synergistically by interacting with the viral (-RNA and the replication proteins. In addition, we have developed an in vitro assay for Flock house virus (FHV, a small RNA virus of insects, that also demonstrated positive effect on FHV replicase activity by the added Ded1p helicase. Thus, two small RNA viruses, which do not code for their own helicases, seems to recruit a host RNA helicase to aid their replication in infected cells.

  2. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Induction and repair of double- and single-strand DNA breaks in bacteriophage lambda superinfecting Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boye, E.; Krisch, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Induction and repair of double-and single-strand DNA breaks have been measured after decays of 125 I and 3 H incorporated into the DNA and after external irradiation with 4 MeV electrons. For the decay experiments, cells of wild type Escherichia coli K-12 were superinfected with bacteriophage lambda DNA labelled with 5'-( 125 I)iodo-2'-deoxyuridine or with (methyl- 3 H)thymidine and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Aliquots were thawed at intervals and lysed at neutral pH, and the phage DNA was assayed for double- and single-strand breakage by neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation. The gradients used allowed measurements of both kinds of breaks in the same gradient. Decays of 125 I induced 0.39 single-strand breaks per double-strand break. No repair of either break type could be detected. Each 3 H disintegration caused 0.20 single-strand breaks and very few double-strand breaks. The single-strand breaks were rapidly rejoined after the cells were thawed. For irradiation with 4 MeV electrons, cells of wild type E. coli K-12 were superinfected with phage lambda and suspended in growth medium. Irradiation induced 42 single-strand breaks per double-strand break. The rates of break induction were 6.75 x 10 -14 (double-strand breaks) and 2.82 x 10 -12 (single-strand breaks) per rad and per dalton. The single-strand breaks were rapidly repaired upon incubation whereas the double-strand breaks seemed to remain unrepaired. It is concluded that double-strand breaks in superinfecting bacteriophage lambda DNA are repaired to a very small extent, if at all. (Author)

  4. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  5. On the linearity of the dose-effect relationship of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, K.H.; Leenhouts, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    Most radiation biologists believe that DNA double-strand breaks are induced linearly with radiation dose for all types of radiation. Since 1985, with the advent of elution and gel electrophoresis techniques which permit the measurement of DNA double-strand breaks induced in mammalian cells at doses having radiobiological relevance, the true nature of the dose-effect relationship has been brought into some doubt. Many investigators measured curvilinear dose-effect relationships and a few found good correlations between the induction of the DNA double-strand breaks and cell survival. We approach the problem pragmatically by assuming that the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by 125 I Auger electron emitters incorporated into the DNA of the cells is a linear function of the number of 125 I decays, and by comparing the dose-effect relationship for sparsely ionizing radiation against this standard. The conclusion drawn that the curvilinear dose-effect relationships and the correlations with survival are real. (Author)

  6. Specific RNA Interference in Caenorhabditis elegans by Ingested dsRNA Expressed in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lezzerini, M.; van de Ven, K.; Veerman, M.; Brul, S.; Budovskaya, Y.V.

    2015-01-01

    In nematodes, genome-wide RNAi-screening has been widely used as a rapid and efficient method to identify genes involved in the aging processes. By far the easiest way of inducing RNA interference (RNAi) in Caenorhabditis elegans is by feeding Escherichia coli that expresses specific double stranded

  7. Multiple pathways of DNA double-strand break processing in a mutant Indian muntjac cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouffler, S.D.; Jha, B.; Johnson, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    DNA break processing is compared in the Indian muntjac cell lines, SVM and DM. The initial frequencies and resealing of X-ray generated single- and double-strand breaks are similar in the two cell lines. Inhibiting the repair of UV damage leads to greater double-strand breakage in SVM than in DM, and some of these breaks are not repaired; however, repair-associated single-strand breakage and resealing are normal. Dimethylsulfate also induces excess double-strand breakage in SVM, and these breaks are irreparable. Restricted plasmids are reconstituted correctly in SVM at approximately 30% of the frequency observed in DM. Thus SVM has a reduced capacity to repair certain types of double-strand break. This defect is not due to a DNA ligase deficiency. We conclude that DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by a variety of pathways within mammalian cells and that the structure of the break or its mode of formation determines its subsequent fate

  8. A Polyamide Inhibits Replication of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Targeting RNA in the Nucleocapsid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumpper, Ryan H.; Li, Weike; Castañeda, Carlos H.; Scuderi, M. José; Bashkin, James K.; Luo, Ming; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2018-02-07

    Polyamides have been shown to bind double-stranded DNA by complementing the curvature of the minor groove and forming various hydrogen bonds with DNA. Several polyamide molecules have been found to have potent antiviral activities against papillomavirus, a double-stranded DNA virus. By analogy, we reason that polyamides may also interact with the structured RNA bound in the nucleocapsid of a negative-strand RNA virus. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was selected as a prototype virus to test this possibility since its genomic RNA encapsidated in the nucleocapsid forms a structure resembling one strand of an A-form RNA duplex. One polyamide molecule, UMSL1011, was found to inhibit infection of VSV. To confirm that the polyamide targeted the nucleocapsid, a nucleocapsid-like particle (NLP) was incubated with UMSL1011. The encapsidated RNA in the polyamide-treated NLP was protected from thermo-release and digestion by RNase A. UMSL1011 also inhibits viral RNA synthesis in the intracellular activity assay for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The crystal structure revealed that UMSL1011 binds the structured RNA in the nucleocapsid. The conclusion of our studies is that the RNA in the nucleocapsid is a viable antiviral target of polyamides. Since the RNA structure in the nucleocapsid is similar in all negative-strand RNA viruses, polyamides may be optimized to target the specific RNA genome of a negative-strand RNA virus, such as respiratory syncytial virus and Ebola virus.

    IMPORTANCENegative-strand RNA viruses (NSVs) include several life-threatening pathogens, such as rabies virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Ebola virus. There are no effective antiviral drugs against these viruses. Polyamides offer an exceptional opportunity because they may be optimized to target each NSV. Our studies on vesicular stomatitis virus, an NSV, demonstrated that a polyamide molecule could specifically target the viral RNA in the nucleocapsid and inhibit

  9. An alternative mechanism for radioprotection by dimethyl sulfoxide. Possible facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashino, Genro; Liu, Yong; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Ono, Koji; Tano, Keizo; Watanabe, Masami

    2010-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been known for many years, and the suppression of hydroxyl (OH) radicals induced by ionizing radiation has been thought to be the main cause of this effect. However, the DMSO concentration used was very high, and might be toxic, in earlier studies. In the present study, we administered a lower, non-toxic concentration (0.5%, id est (i.e.), 64 mM) of DMSO before irradiation and examined its radioprotective effects. Colony formation assay and micronucleus assay showed significant radioprotective effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO), but not in xrs5, which is defective in the repair function of DNA double-strand breaks. The levels of phosphorylated H2AX and the formation of 53BP1 foci 15 minutes after irradiation, which might reflect initial DNA double-strand breaks, in DMSO-treated CHO cells were similar to those in non-treated cells, suggesting that the radioprotective effects were not attributable to the suppression of general indirect action in the lower concentration of DMSO. On the other hand, 2 hours after irradiation, the average number of 53BP1 foci, which might reflect residual DNA double-strand breaks, was significantly decreased in DMSO-treated CHO cells compared to non-treated cells. The results indicated that low concentration of DMSO exerts radioprotective effects through the facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair rather than through the suppression of indirect action. (author)

  10. An alternative mechanism for radioprotection by dimethyl sulfoxide; possible facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashino, Genro; Liu, Yong; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Ono, Koji; Tano, Keizo; Watanabe, Masami

    2010-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been known for many years, and the suppression of hydroxyl (OH) radicals induced by ionizing radiation has been thought to be the main cause of this effect. However, the DMSO concentration used was very high, and might be toxic, in earlier studies. In the present study, we administered a lower, non-toxic concentration (0.5%, i.e., 64 mM) of DMSO before irradiation and examined its radioprotective effects. Colony formation assay and micronucleus assay showed significant radioprotective effects in CHO, but not in xrs5, which is defective in the repair function of DNA double-strand breaks. The levels of phosphorylated H2AX and the formation of 53BP1 foci 15 minutes after irradiation, which might reflect initial DNA double-strand breaks, in DMSO-treated CHO cells were similar to those in non-treated cells, suggesting that the radioprotective effects were not attributable to the suppression of general indirect action in the lower concentration of DMSO. On the other hand, 2 hours after irradiation, the average number of 53BP1 foci, which might reflect residual DNA double-strand breaks, was significantly decreased in DMSO-treated CHO cells compared to non-treated cells. The results indicated that low concentration of DMSO exerts radioprotective effects through the facilitation of DNA double-strand break repair rather than through the suppression of indirect action.

  11. A role for small RNAs in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, W.; Ba, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex mechanisms to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through coordinated actions of protein sensors, transducers, and effectors. Here we show that ∼21-nucleotide small RNAs are produced from the sequences in the vicinity of DSB sites in Arabidopsis and in human cells....... We refer to these as diRNAs for DSB-induced small RNAs. In Arabidopsis, the biogenesis of diRNAs requires the PI3 kinase ATR, RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), and Dicer-like proteins. Mutations in these proteins as well as in Pol V cause significant reduction in DSB repair efficiency. In Arabidopsis, di...

  12. Replication protein A and γ-H2AX foci assembly is triggered by cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Geard, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    Human replication protein A (RPA p34), a crucial component of diverse DNA excision repair pathways, is implicated in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. To evaluate its role in DSB repair, the intranuclear dynamics of RPA was investigated after DNA damage and replication blockage in human cells. Using two different agents [ionizing radiation (IR) and hydroxyurea (HU)] to generate DSBs, we found that RPA relocated into distinct nuclear foci and colocalized with a well-known DSB binding factor, γ-H2AX, at the sites of DNA damage in a time-dependent manner. Colocalization of RPA and γ-H2AX foci peaked at 2 h after IR treatment and subsequently declined with increasing postrecovery times. The time course of RPA and γ-H2AX foci association correlated well with the DSB repair activity detected by a neutral comet assay. A phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, completely abolished both RPA and γ-H2AX foci formation triggered by IR. Additionally, radiosensitive ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells harboring mutations in ATM gene product were found to be deficient in RPA and γ-H2AX colocalization after IR. Transfection of AT cells with ATM cDNA fully restored the association of RPA foci with γ-H2AX illustrating the requirement of ATM gene product for this process. The exact coincidence of RPA and γ-H2AX in response to HU specifically in S-phase cells supports their role in DNA replication checkpoint control. Depletion of RPA by small interfering RNA (SiRNA) substantially elevated the frequencies of IR-induced micronuclei (MN) and apoptosis in human cells suggestive of a role for RPA in DSB repair. We propose that RPA in association with γ-H2AX contributes to both DNA damage checkpoint control and repair in response to strand breaks and stalled replication forks in human cells

  13. Formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of γ-irradiated bacteria depending on the function of fast repair processes of DNA single-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, S.I.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of γ-irradiated ( 60 Co)Ex coli bacteria depending on the function of fast repair processes of DNA single-strand breaks, is investigated. The profiles of sedimentation of DNA Ex coli cells, irradiated at 0-2 deg C in the salt medium and in EDTA-borate buffer, are presented. It is shown that when irradiating cells in EDTA-borate buffer, the output of single- and double strand breaks in DNA is much higher than in the case of their irradiation in the minimum salt medium. The dependence of output of single-strand and double-strand breaks depending on the radiatier doze of E coli cells in the salt medium and EDTA-borate buffer, is studied. The supposition is made on the presence of a regulative interaction between the accumulation of DNA single-breaks and their repair with the formation of double-strand breaks. The functionating of fast and superfast repair processes considerably affects the formation of double-strand breaks in DNA of a bacterium cell. A considerable amount of double-breaks registered immediately after irradiation forms due to a close position of single-strand breaks on the opposite DNA strands

  14. An oligonucleotide complementary to the SL-B1 domain in the 3'-end of the minus-strand RNA of the hepatitis C virus inhibits in vitro initiation of RNA synthesis by the viral polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigadas, Sandrine; Ventura, Michel; Andreola, Marie-Line; Michel, Justine; Gryaznov, Sergei; Tarrago-Litvak, Laura; Litvak, Simon; Astier-Gin, Therese

    2003-01-01

    We describe oligonucleotides (ODNs) that inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis in vitro. From a series of 13 ODNs complementary to the 3'-end of the minus-strand HCV RNA, only 4 inhibited RNA synthesis with IC 50 values lower than 1 μM. The inhibition was sequence-specific, since no effect was observed when the ODNs were used with a noncomplementary template. The introduction of a 2'-O-methyl modification increased the inhibitor activity 11-fold (IC 50 = 50 nM) in just 1 (ODN7) of the 4 inhibitory ODNs. ODNs did not inhibit RNA synthesis by interfering with the elongation process as no short RNAs products were detected. We also show that ODN7 did not prevent binding of NS5B to the template or cause polymerase trapping by the duplex RNA/ODN. Our data demonstrate that ODN7 inhibits the initiation process, most probably by modifying structural features present at the 3'-end of the minus-strand RNA

  15. Excess single-stranded DNA inhibits meiotic double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Johnson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis, self-inflicted DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are created by the protein Spo11 and repaired by homologous recombination leading to gene conversions and crossovers. Crossover formation is vital for the segregation of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division and requires the RecA orthologue, Dmc1. We analyzed repair during meiosis of site-specific DSBs created by another nuclease, VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE, in cells lacking Dmc1 strand-exchange protein. Turnover and resection of the VDE-DSBs was assessed in two different reporter cassettes that can repair using flanking direct repeat sequences, thereby obviating the need for a Dmc1-dependent DNA strand invasion step. Access of the single-strand binding complex replication protein A, which is normally used in all modes of DSB repair, was checked in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, using antibody against Rfa1. Repair of the VDE-DSBs was severely inhibited in dmc1Delta cells, a defect that was associated with a reduction in the long tract resection required to initiate single-strand annealing between the flanking repeat sequences. Mutants that either reduce Spo11-DSB formation or abolish resection at Spo11-DSBs rescued the repair block. We also found that a replication protein A component, Rfa1, does not accumulate to expected levels at unrepaired single-stranded DNA (ssDNA in dmc1Delta cells. The requirement of Dmc1 for VDE-DSB repair using flanking repeats appears to be caused by the accumulation of large quantities of ssDNA that accumulate at Spo11-DSBs when Dmc1 is absent. We propose that these resected DSBs sequester both resection machinery and ssDNA binding proteins, which in wild-type cells would normally be recycled as Spo11-DSBs repair. The implication is that repair proteins are in limited supply, and this could reflect an underlying mechanism for regulating DSB repair in wild-type cells, providing protection from potentially harmful effects

  16. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation

  17. Comparison of the oxygen enhancement ratio for γ-ray-induced double-strand breaks in the DNA of bacteriophage T7 as determined by two different methods of analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Drift, A.C.M. van der.

    1975-01-01

    Bacteriophage T7 was irradiated in a protecting medium under nitrogen and oxygen with 60 Co gamma rays. Double-strand breaks were measured by sucrose gradient sedimentation and by boundary sedimentation analysis. Both methods showed that the presence of oxygen during irradiation enhances the production of double-strand breaks. This is in contrast to a recent report which suggests that boundary sedimentation analysis does not show the effect of oxygen. The discrepancy must be ascribed to differences in the interpretation of the sedimentation data

  18. Postreplicational formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli uvrB cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tzuchien V.; Smith, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    The number of DNA double-strand breaks formed in UV-irradiated uvrB recF recB cells correlates with the number of unrepaired DNA daughter-strand gaps, and is dependent on DNA synthesis after UV-irradiation. These results are consistent with the model that the DNA double-strand breaks that are produced in UV-irradiated excision-deficient cells occur as the result of breaks in the parental DNA opposite unrepaired DNA daughter-strand gaps. By employing a temperature-sensitive recA200 mutation, we have devised an improved assay for studying the formation and repair of these DNA double-strand breaks. Possible mechanisms for the postreplication repair of DNA double-strand breaks are discussed. (Auth.)

  19. Activation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits proliferation of pancreatic β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shan-Shan [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Jiang, Teng [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wang, Yi; Gu, Li-Ze [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Hui-Wen [Laboratory Center for Basic Medical Sciences, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tan, Lan [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Guo, Jun, E-mail: Guoj@njmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in β-cells. •Activated PKR inhibited β-cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. •Activated PKR fully abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I on β-cells. -- Abstract: Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is revealed to participate in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Meanwhile, PKR is also characterized as a critical regulator of cell proliferation. To date, no study has focused on the impact of PKR on the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. Here, we adopted insulinoma cell lines and mice islet β-cells to investigate: (1) the effects of glucolipotoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines on PKR activation; (2) the effects of PKR on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and its underlying mechanisms; (3) the actions of PKR on pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I and its underlying pathway. Our results provided the first evidence that PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in pancreatic β-cells, and activated PKR significantly inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. Reductions in cyclin D1 and D2 as well as increases in p27 and p53 were associated with the anti-proliferative effects of PKR, and proteasome-dependent degradation took part in the reduction of cyclin D1 and D2. Besides, PKR activation abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I by activating JNK and disrupting IRS1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of PKR on pancreatic β-cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  20. Activation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits proliferation of pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Teng; Wang, Yi; Gu, Li-Ze; Wu, Hui-Wen; Tan, Lan; Guo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in β-cells. •Activated PKR inhibited β-cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. •Activated PKR fully abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I on β-cells. -- Abstract: Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is revealed to participate in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Meanwhile, PKR is also characterized as a critical regulator of cell proliferation. To date, no study has focused on the impact of PKR on the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. Here, we adopted insulinoma cell lines and mice islet β-cells to investigate: (1) the effects of glucolipotoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines on PKR activation; (2) the effects of PKR on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and its underlying mechanisms; (3) the actions of PKR on pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I and its underlying pathway. Our results provided the first evidence that PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in pancreatic β-cells, and activated PKR significantly inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. Reductions in cyclin D1 and D2 as well as increases in p27 and p53 were associated with the anti-proliferative effects of PKR, and proteasome-dependent degradation took part in the reduction of cyclin D1 and D2. Besides, PKR activation abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I by activating JNK and disrupting IRS1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of PKR on pancreatic β-cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM

  1. Association of the Endobiont Double-Stranded RNA Virus LRV1 With Treatment Failure for Human Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis in Peru and Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaui, Vanessa; Lye, Lon-Fye; Akopyants, Natalia S.; Zimic, Mirko; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Garcia, Lineth; Maes, Ilse; De Doncker, Simonne; Dobson, Deborah E.; Arevalo, Jorge; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis, caused in South America by Leishmania braziliensis, is difficult to cure by chemotherapy (primarily pentavalent antimonials [SbV]). Treatment failure does not correlate well with resistance in vitro, and the factors responsible for treatment failure in patients are not well understood. Many isolates of L. braziliensis (>25%) contain a double-stranded RNA virus named Leishmaniavirus 1 (LRV1), which has also been reported in Leishmania guyanensis, for which an association with increased pathology, metastasis, and parasite replication was found in murine models. Here we probed the relationship of LRV1 to drug treatment success and disease in 97 L. braziliensis–infected patients from Peru and Bolivia. In vitro cultures were established, parasites were typed as L. braziliensis, and the presence of LRV1 was determined by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, followed by sequence analysis. LRV1 was associated significantly with an increased risk of treatment failure (odds ratio, 3.99; P = .04). There was no significant association with intrinsic SbV resistance among parasites, suggesting that treatment failure arises from LRV1-mediated effects on host metabolism and/or parasite survival. The association of LRV1 with clinical drug treatment failure could serve to guide more-effective treatment of tegumentary disease caused by L. braziliensis. PMID:26123565

  2. Purification of Single-Stranded cDNA Based on RNA Degradation Treatment and Adsorption Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Franco, Bernardo; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2016-08-02

    Analysis of gene expression is a common research tool to study networks controlling gene expression, the role of genes with unknown function, and environmentally induced responses of organisms. Most of the analytical tools used to analyze gene expression rely on accurate cDNA synthesis and quantification to obtain reproducible and quantifiable results. Thus far, most commercial kits for isolation and purification of cDNA target double-stranded molecules, which do not accurately represent the abundance of transcripts. In the present report, we provide a simple and fast method to purify single-stranded cDNA, exhibiting high purity and yield. This method is based on the treatment with RNase H and RNase A after cDNA synthesis, followed by separation in silica spin-columns and ethanol precipitation. In addition, our method avoids the use of DNase I to eliminate genomic DNA from RNA preparations, which improves cDNA yield. As a case report, our method proved to be useful in the purification of single-stranded cDNA from the pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  3. A model treating the DNA double-strand break repair inhibition by damage clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, M.; Abel, H.; Regel, K.

    1992-01-01

    A microdosimetric model for the interpretation of radiation induced irreparable DNA double-strand breaks was applied to the biological endpoint of chromosomal aberrations. The model explains irreparable DNA double-strand breaks in terms of break clustering in DNA subunits. The model predicts quite good chromosomal aberrations in gamma- and X-ray irradiated V79 cells and human lymphocytes. In the case of α-particle irradiation the presumption had to be made, that only the cells with indirect events in the nucleus (due to delta-electrons) reach the metaphase and are analysed. With the help of this model we are able to explain the peculiar effectiveness of ultrasoft C-X-rays in human lymphocytes. In addition, an interpretation of experiments with accelerated and spatially correlated particles is given. (author)

  4. Study in regularities in the formation of double stranded DNA breaks in irradiated rat thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivannik, B.P.; ProskuryakoV, S.Ya.; Ryabchenko, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    Using low-gradient viscosimetry of neutral detergent nuclear lysates a study was made of postradiation changes in the molecular weight of double-stranded DNA of thymocytes. It was established that 375 eV are needed for one double-stranded break to appear, and a dose of 1 rad is required for 0.275 double-stranded break to occur at the site of DNA with m.w. 10 12 dalton. The repair of double-stranded breaks is only observed when rats are exposed to a dose of 500 R. It is assumed that the absence of repair of double-stranded DNA breaks and the presence of secondary postradiation degradation of DNA are responsible for thymocyte death

  5. How short RNAs impact the human ribonuclease Dicer activity: putative regulatory feedback-loops and other RNA-mediated mechanisms controlling microRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralewska, Natalia; Hoffmann, Weronika; Pokornowska, Maria; Milewski, Marek; Lipinska, Andrea; Bienkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna; Figlerowicz, Marek; Kurzynska-Kokorniak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Ribonuclease Dicer plays a pivotal role in RNA interference pathways by processing long double-stranded RNAs and single-stranded hairpin RNA precursors into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), respectively. While details of Dicer regulation by a variety of proteins are being elucidated, less is known about non-protein factors, e.g. RNA molecules, that may influence this enzyme's activity. Therefore, we decided to investigate the question of whether the RNA molecules can function not only as Dicer substrates but also as its regulators. Our previous in vitro studies indicated that the activity of human Dicer can be influenced by short RNA molecules that either bind to Dicer or interact with its substrates, or both. Those studies were carried out with commercial Dicer preparations. Nevertheless, such preparations are usually not homogeneous enough to carry out more detailed RNA-binding studies. Therefore, we have established our own system for the production of human Dicer in insect cells. In this manuscript, we characterize the RNA-binding and RNA-cleavage properties of the obtained preparation. We demonstrate that Dicer can efficiently bind single-stranded RNAs that are longer than ~20-nucleotides. Consequently, we revisit possible scenarios of Dicer regulation by single-stranded RNA species ranging from ~10- to ~60-nucleotides, in the context of their binding to this enzyme. Finally, we show that siRNA/miRNA-sized RNAs may affect miRNA production either by binding to Dicer or by participating in regulatory feedback-loops. Altogether, our studies suggest a broad regulatory role of short RNAs in Dicer functioning.

  6. Measurement of intracellular DNA double-strand break induction and rejoining along the track of carbon and neon particle beams in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, Johannes; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Haberer, Thomas; Scholz, Michael; Kraft, Gerhard

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The study was aimed at the measurement of effect-depth distributions of intracellularly induced DNA damage in water as tissue equivalent after heavy ion irradiation with therapy particle beams. Methods and Materials: An assay involving embedding of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells in large agarose plugs and electrophoretic elution of radiation induced DNA fragments by constant field gel electrophoresis was developed. Double-strand break production was quantified by densitometric analysis of DNA-fluorescence after staining with ethidium-bromide and determination of the fraction of DNA eluted out of the agarose plugs. Intracellular double-strand break induction and the effect of a 3 h rejoining incubation were investigated following irradiation with 250 kV x-rays and 190 MeV/u carbon- and 295 MeV/u neon-ions. Results and Conclusion: While the DNA damage induced by x-irradiation decreased continuously with penetration depth, a steady increase in the yield of double-strand breaks was observed for particle radiation, reaching distinct maxima at the position of the physical Bragg peaks. Beyond this, the extent of radiation damage dropped drastically. From comparison of DNA damage and calculated dose profiles, relative biological efficiencies (RBEs) for both double-strand break induction and unrejoined strand breaks after 3 h were determined. While RBE for the induction of DNA double-strand breaks decreased continuously with penetration depth, RBE maxima greater than unity were found with carbon- and neon-ions for double-strand break rejoining near the maximum range of the particles. The method presented here allows for a fast and accurate determination of depth profiles of relevant radiobiological effects for mixed particle fields in tissue equivalent

  7. Slicer-independent mechanism drives small-RNA strand separation during human RISC assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, June Hyun; Shin, Chanseok

    2015-10-30

    Small RNA silencing is mediated by the effector RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) that consists of an Argonaute protein (AGOs 1-4 in humans). A fundamental step during RISC assembly involves the separation of two strands of a small RNA duplex, whereby only the guide strand is retained to form the mature RISC, a process not well understood. Despite the widely accepted view that 'slicer-dependent unwinding' via passenger-strand cleavage is a prerequisite for the assembly of a highly complementary siRNA into the AGO2-RISC, here we show by careful re-examination that 'slicer-independent unwinding' plays a more significant role in human RISC maturation than previously appreciated, not only for a miRNA duplex, but, unexpectedly, for a highly complementary siRNA as well. We discovered that 'slicer-dependency' for the unwinding was affected primarily by certain parameters such as temperature and Mg(2+). We further validate these observations in non-slicer AGOs (1, 3 and 4) that can be programmed with siRNAs at the physiological temperature of humans, suggesting that slicer-independent mechanism is likely a common feature of human AGOs. Our results now clearly explain why both miRNA and siRNA are found in all four human AGOs, which is in striking contrast to the strict small-RNA sorting system in Drosophila. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. The 3'-terminal 55 nucleotides of bovine coronavirus defective interfering RNA harbor cis-acting elements required for both negative- and positive-strand RNA synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yu Liao

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the negative-strand [(--strand] complement of the ∼30 kilobase, positive-strand [(+-strand] coronaviral genome is a necessary early step for genome replication. The identification of cis-acting elements required for (--strand RNA synthesis in coronaviruses, however, has been hampered due to insufficiencies in the techniques used to detect the (--strand RNA species. Here, we employed a method of head-to-tail ligation and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR to detect and quantitate the synthesis of bovine coronavirus (BCoV defective interfering (DI RNA (- strands. Furthermore, using the aforementioned techniques along with Northern blot assay, we specifically defined the cis-acting RNA elements within the 3'-terminal 55 nucleotides (nts which function in the synthesis of (-- or (+-strand BCoV DI RNA. The major findings are as follows: (i nts from -5 to -39 within the 3'-terminal 55 nts are the cis-acting elements responsible for (--strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis, (ii nts from -3 to -34 within the 3'-terminal 55 nts are cis-acting elements required for (+-strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis, and (iii the nucleotide species at the 3'-most position (-1 is important, but not critical, for both (-- and (+-strand BCoV DI RNA synthesis. These results demonstrate that the 3'-terminal 55 nts in BCoV DI RNA harbor cis-acting RNA elements required for both (-- and (+-strand DI RNA synthesis and extend our knowledge on the mechanisms of coronavirus replication. The method of head-to-tail ligation and qRT-PCR employed in the study may also be applied to identify other cis-acting elements required for (--strand RNA synthesis in coronaviruses.

  9. Combined Triplex/Duplex Invasion of Double-Stranded DNA by "Tail-Clamp" Peptide Nucleic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, Thomas; Larsen, H. J.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2003-01-01

    as determined by T-m measurements. Binding to double-stranded (ds) DNA occurred by combined triplex and duplex invasion as analyzed by permanganate probing. Furthermore, C-50 measurements revealed that tail-clamp PNAs consistently bound the dsDNA target more efficiently, and kinetics experiments revealed...

  10. Double Strand Break Repair, one mechanism can hide another: Alternative non-homologous end joining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rass, E.; Grabarz, A.; Bertrand, P.; Lopez, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are major cytotoxic lesions encountered by the cells. They can be induced by ionizing radiation or endogenous stress and can lead to genetic instability. Two mechanisms compete for the repair of DNA double strand breaks: homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Homologous recombination requires DNA sequences homology and is initiated by single strand resection. Recently, advances have been made concerning the major steps and proteins involved in resection. NHEJ, in contrast, does not require sequence homology. The existence of a DNA double strand break repair mechanism, independent of KU and ligase IV, the key proteins of the canonical non homologous end joining pathway, has been revealed lately and named alternative non homologous end joining. The hallmarks of this highly mutagenic pathway are deletions at repair junctions and frequent use of distal micro-homologies. This mechanism is also initiated by a single strand resection of the break. The aim of this review is firstly to present recent data on single strand resection, and secondly the alternative NHEJ pathway, including a discussion on the fidelity of NHEJ. Based on current knowledge, canonical NHEJ does not appear as an intrinsically mutagenic mechanism, but in contrast, as a conservative one. The structure of broken DNA ends actually dictates the quality repair of the alternative NHEJ and seems the actual responsible for the mutagenesis attributed beforehand to the canonical NHEJ. The existence of this novel DNA double strand breaks repair mechanism needs to be taken into account in the development of radiosensitizing strategies in order to optimise the efficiency of radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. Human RECQ5 helicase promotes repair of DNA double-strand breaks by synthesis-dependent strand annealing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paliwal, S.; Kanagaraj, R.; Sturzenegger, A.; Burdová, Kamila; Janščák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2014), s. 2380-2390 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/0565; GA ČR GAP305/10/0281 Grant - others:Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A-129747; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A_146206 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Human RECQ5 helicase * DNA double-strand breaks * mitotic homologous recombination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.112, year: 2014

  12. A single-stranded architecture for cotranscriptional folding of RNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geary, Cody; Rothemund, Paul; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    Artificial DNA and RNA structures have been used as scaffolds for a variety of nanoscale devices. In comparison to DNA structures, RNA structures have been limited in size, but they also have advantages: RNA can fold during transcription and thus can be genetically encoded and expressed in cells....... We introduce an architecture for designing artificial RNA structures that fold from a single strand, in which arrays of antiparallel RNA helices are precisely organized by RNA tertiary motifs and a new type of crossover pattern. We constructed RNA tiles that assemble into hexagonal lattices...

  13. Breaks in plasmid DNA strand induced by laser radiation at a wavelength of 193 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurzadyan, G.G.; Shul'te Frolinde, D.

    1996-01-01

    DNA of plasmid pB322 irradiated with laser at a wavelength of 193 nm was treated with an extract containing proteins from E.coli K12 AB1157 (wild-type). The enzymes were found to produce single- and double-strand DNA breaks, which was interpreted as a transformation of a portion of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts into nonrepairable single-strand DNA breaks. The products resulted from ionization of DNA, in particular, single-strand breaks, transform to double-strand breaks. A comparison of these data with the data on survival of plasmid upon transformation of E.coli K12 AB1157 enables one to assess the biological significance of single- and double-strand breaks. The inactivation of the plasmid is mainly determined by the number of directly formed laser-induced single-strand breaks. 26 refs.; 2 figs

  14. What is DNA damage? Risk of double-strand break and its individual variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaoka, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses about the title subject in an aspect of possible spreading of Fukushima radioactive substances mainly in eastern north area of Japan where carcinogenic incidence may be increased as the ionizing radiation injures the gene (DNA). At first, explained is that cancer is a disease of genes with infinitive proliferation of cells, there are systems to prevent it by repairing the damaged DNA and by other mechanisms like exclusion of cells damaged too much or killing cancer cells with immunity, and individual difference of the repairing capability exists. DNA is always damaged even under ordinary living conditions by sunlight UV ray, cosmic radiation and chemicals externally and by active oxygen species and thermal water movement internally. Concomitantly, DNA damaged by many mechanisms like deletion, dimmer formation, chemical modification of bases, single and double strand breaks is always repaired by concerned enzymes. Double-strand damage by high-energy radiation like gamma ray is quite risky because its repair sometimes accompanies error as concerned enzymes are from more multiple genes. There are many syndromes derived from gene deficit of those repairing enzymes. The diseases concerned with repair of the double-strand damage teach that fetus and infant are more sensitive to radiation than adult as their young body cells are more actively synthesizing DNA, during which, if DNA is injured by radiation, risk of repairing error is higher as the double strand break more frequently occurs. It cannot be simply said that a certain radiation dose limit is generally permissible. There is an individual difference of radiation sensitivity and a possible method to find out an individual weak to radiation is the lymphocyte screening in vitro using anticancer bleomycin which breaks the double strand. (T.T.)

  15. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Adrian; Busnadiego, Idoia; Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  16. DNA double-strand breaks as potential indicators for the biological effects of ionising radiation exposure from cardiac CT and conventional coronary angiography: a randomised, controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisel, Dominik; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Laule, Michael; Knebel, Fabian [Charite Medical School, Department of Cardiology, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Charite Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    To prospectively compare induced DNA double-strand breaks by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). 56 patients with suspected coronary artery disease were randomised to undergo either CCA or cardiac CT. DNA double-strand breaks were assessed in fluorescence microscopy of blood lymphocytes as indicators of the biological effects of radiation exposure. Radiation doses were estimated using dose-length product (DLP) and dose-area product (DAP) with conversion factors for CT and CCA, respectively. On average there were 0.12 {+-} 0.06 induced double-strand breaks per lymphocyte for CT and 0.29 {+-} 0.18 for diagnostic CCA (P < 0.001). This relative biological effect of ionising radiation from CCA was 1.9 times higher (P < 0.001) than the effective dose estimated by conversion factors would have suggested. The correlation between the biological effects and the estimated radiation doses was excellent for CT (r = 0.951, P < 0.001) and moderate to good for CCA (r = 0.862, P < 0.001). One day after radiation, a complete repair of double-strand breaks to background levels was found in both groups. Conversion factors may underestimate the relative biological effects of ionising radiation from CCA. DNA double-strand break assessment may provide a strategy for individualised assessments of radiation. (orig.)

  17. Lack of close relationship between three strains of human rhinoviruses as determined by their RNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, F H; Lonberg-Holm, K; Chan, S P

    1973-07-01

    The possible genomic homologies between three serotypes of human rhinoviruses (HRV 1A, HRV 2, and HRV 14) were investigated. First we confirmed that these viruses were unrelated by the criterion of the absence of common antigenic determinants on the surfaces of the native virions, as detected by cross-neutralization of complementfixation. RNA-RNA hybridization was then examined with purified, highly radioactive, double-stranded, replicative-form RNA and excess single-stranded virion RNA. Single-stranded RNA showed 100% homology with the minus strand from the replicative-form RNA of the same type of virus. HRV 1A, HRV 2, and HRV 14 showed low intertypic homologies; these were not significantly greater than those found between the rhinoviruses and polivirus, which were used as a negative control. The immunological relationship and the RNA homology between HRV 1A and HRV 1B were also examined by the above techniques. It was confirmed that HRV 1A and HRV 1B share some surface determinants and it was also found that HRV 1B RNA shares 70% homology with HRV 1A RNA.

  18. RDE-1 slicer activity is required only for passenger-strand cleavage during RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Florian A; Okihara, Kristy L; Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Sijen, Titia; Ketting, René F

    2009-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process in which double-stranded RNA is cleaved into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that induce the destruction of homologous single-stranded mRNAs. Argonaute proteins are essential components of this silencing process; they bind siRNAs directly and can cleave RNA targets using a conserved RNase H motif. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute protein RDE-1 has a central role in RNAi. In animals lacking RDE-1, the introduction of double-stranded RNA does not trigger any detectable level of RNAi. Here we show that RNase H activity of RDE-1 is required only for efficient removal of the passenger strand of the siRNA duplex and not for triggering the silencing response at the target-mRNA level. These results uncouple the role of the RDE-1 RNase H activity in small RNA maturation from its role in target-mRNA silencing in vivo.

  19. Mechanism of duplex DNA destabilization by RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease during target interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Severinov, Konstantin

    2017-05-23

    The prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated 9 (Cas9) endonuclease cleaves double-stranded DNA sequences specified by guide RNA molecules and flanked by a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and is widely used for genome editing in various organisms. The RNA-programmed Cas9 locates the target site by scanning genomic DNA. We sought to elucidate the mechanism of initial DNA interrogation steps that precede the pairing of target DNA with guide RNA. Using fluorometric and biochemical assays, we studied Cas9/guide RNA complexes with model DNA substrates that mimicked early intermediates on the pathway to the final Cas9/guide RNA-DNA complex. The results show that Cas9/guide RNA binding to PAM favors separation of a few PAM-proximal protospacer base pairs allowing initial target interrogation by guide RNA. The duplex destabilization is mediated, in part, by Cas9/guide RNA affinity for unpaired segments of nontarget strand DNA close to PAM. Furthermore, our data indicate that the entry of double-stranded DNA beyond a short threshold distance from PAM into the Cas9/single-guide RNA (sgRNA) interior is hindered. We suggest that the interactions unfavorable for duplex DNA binding promote DNA bending in the PAM-proximal region during early steps of Cas9/guide RNA-DNA complex formation, thus additionally destabilizing the protospacer duplex. The mechanism that emerges from our analysis explains how the Cas9/sgRNA complex is able to locate the correct target sequence efficiently while interrogating numerous nontarget sequences associated with correct PAMs.

  20. Trans-activation of the 5' to 3' viral DNA strand transfer by nucleocapsid protein during reverse transcription of HIV1 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlix, J L; Vincent, A; Gabus, C; de Rocquigny, H; Roques, B

    1993-08-01

    Two DNA strand transfer reactions take place during reverse transcription of the retroviral genome. The first transfer, that of the minus-strand strong stop DNA from the 5' end of the viral RNA to the 3' end, has been studied in vitro with two RNAs mimicking the 5' and 3' regions of the HIV1 genome and with nucleocapsid protein, NCp7, and reverse transcriptase. The results show that NCp7 strongly activates the 5' to 3' DNA strand transfer during reverse transcription while a basic peptide resembling NCp7 is inactive. Activation of the first transfer by several NCp7 derived peptides and the influence of the terminal redundancies (R) present at the 5' and 3' ends of HIV1 RNA were also examined. The first transfer is optimal in the presence of intact NCp7 and necessitates R on both the 5' and 3' RNAs. Sequencing of full length viral DNA products reveals approximately 40% misincorporations at the first nucleotide beyond the transfer point. If such base misincorporations occur during proviral DNA synthesis with possible homologous recombinations it may well contribute to the high level of genetic variability of HIV.

  1. The adsorption-desorption transition of double-stranded DNA interacting with an oppositely charged dendrimer induced by multivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yaoyang; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-05-28

    The adsorption-desorption transition of DNA in DNA-dendrimer solutions is observed when high-valence anions, such as hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions. In the DNA-dendrimer solutions with low-valence anions, dendrimers bind tightly with the V-shaped double-stranded DNA. When high-valence anions, such as pentavalent or hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions, the double-stranded DNA chains can be stretched straightly and the dendrimers are released from the double-stranded DNA chains. In fact, adding high-valence anions to the solutions can change the charge spatial distribution in the DNA-dendrimer solutions, and weaken the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged dendrimers and the oppositely charged DNA chains. Adsorption-desorption transition of DNA is induced by the overcharging of dendrimers. This investigation is capable of helping us understand how to control effectively the release of DNA in gene/drug delivery because an effective gene delivery for dendrimers includes non-covalent DNA-dendrimer binding and the effective release of DNA in gene therapy.

  2. Recognition of RNA by amide modified backbone nucleic acids: molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-RNA hybrids in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, Mafalda; Fonné-Pfister, Raymonde; Beaudegnies, Renaud; Chekatt, Habiba; Jung, Pierre M J; Murphy-Kessabi, Fiona; De Mesmaeker, Alain; Wendeborn, Sebastian

    2005-04-27

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of a chemically modified DNA-RNA hybrid in which a phosphodiester linkage is replaced by a neutral amide-3 linkage (3'-CH(2)-CONH-5') were investigated using UV melting experiments, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, and continuum solvent models. van't Hoff analysis of the experimental UV melting curves suggests that the significant increase of the thermodynamic stability of a 15-mer DNA-RNA with seven alternated amide-3 modifications (+11 degrees C) is mainly due to an increased binding enthalpy. To further evaluate the origin in the observed affinities differences, the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy was calculated by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation numerically. The nonelectrostatic contribution was estimated as the product of a hydrophobic surface tension coefficient and the surface area that is buried upon double strand formation. Structures were taken from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations computed in a consistent fashion using explicit solvent, counterions, and the particle-mesh Ewald procedure. The present preliminary thermodynamic study suggests that the favorable binding free energy of the amide-3 DNA single strand to the complementary RNA is equally driven by electrostatic and nonpolar contributions to the binding compared to their natural analogues. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water were performed on an amide-3 DNA single strand and the corresponding natural DNA. Results from the conformations cluster analysis of the simulated amide-3 DNA single strand ensembles suggest that the 25% of the population sampled within 10 ns has a pre-organized conformation where the sugar C3' endo pucker is favored at the 3'-flanking nucleotides. These structural and thermodynamic features contribute to the understanding of the observed increased affinities of the amide-3 DNA-RNA hybrids at the microscopic level.

  3. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23 0 )> rad51-1(30 0 )> rad54-3(36 0 ). At 36 0 , rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23 0 , they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36 0 shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation

  5. The fidelity of reverse transcription differs in reactions primed with RNA versus DNA primers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Essink, B. B.; Berkhout, B.

    1999-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase enzymes (RT) convert single-stranded retroviral RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA. The RT enzyme can use both RNA and DNA primers, the former being used exclusively during initiation of minus- and plus-strand synthesis. Initiation of minus-strand DNA synthesis occurs by

  6. Normal formation and repair of γ-radiation-induced single and double strand DNA breaks in Down syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.E.; Woods, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) were examined for repair capability of γ-radiation-induced single strand and double strand DNA breaks. Formation and repair of DNA breaks were determined by DNA alkaline and non-denaturing elution techniques. Down syndrome fibroblasts were found to repair single strand and double strand breaks as well as fibroblasts from normal controls. (orig.)

  7. Protected DNA strand displacement for enhanced single nucleotide discrimination in double-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakov, Dmitriy A; Khodakova, Anastasia S; Huang, David M; Linacre, Adrian; Ellis, Amanda V

    2015-03-04

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a prime source of genetic diversity. Discriminating between different SNPs provides an enormous leap towards the better understanding of the uniqueness of biological systems. Here we report on a new approach for SNP discrimination using toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement. The distinctiveness of the approach is based on the combination of both 3- and 4-way branch migration mechanisms, which allows for reliable discrimination of SNPs within double-stranded DNA generated from real-life human mitochondrial DNA samples. Aside from the potential diagnostic value, the current study represents an additional way to control the strand displacement reaction rate without altering other reaction parameters and provides new insights into the influence of single nucleotide substitutions on 3- and 4-way branch migration efficiency and kinetics.

  8. Strand Analysis, a free online program for the computational identification of the best RNA interference (RNAi targets based on Gibbs free energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Campos Pereira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The RNA interference (RNAi technique is a recent technology that uses double-stranded RNA molecules to promote potent and specific gene silencing. The application of this technique to molecular biology has increased considerably, from gene function identification to disease treatment. However, not all small interfering RNAs (siRNAs are equally efficient, making target selection an essential procedure. Here we present Strand Analysis (SA, a free online software tool able to identify and classify the best RNAi targets based on Gibbs free energy (deltaG. Furthermore, particular features of the software, such as the free energy landscape and deltaG gradient, may be used to shed light on RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC activity and RNAi mechanisms, which makes the SA software a distinct and innovative tool.

  9. Mouse RAD54 affects DNA double-strand break repair and sister chromatid exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.B. Beverloo (Berna); R.D. Johnson (Roger); M. Jasin (Maria); R. Kanaar (Roland); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); M.L.G. Dronkert (Mies)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractCells can achieve error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination through gene conversion with or without crossover. In contrast, an alternative homology-dependent DSB repair pathway, single-strand annealing (SSA), results in deletions. In this study, we

  10. RNA interference and Register Machines (extended abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Hamano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a mechanism whereby small RNAs (siRNAs directly control gene expression without assistance from proteins. This mechanism consists of interactions between RNAs and small RNAs both of which may be single or double stranded. The target of the mechanism is mRNA to be degraded or aberrated, while the initiator is double stranded RNA (dsRNA to be cleaved into siRNAs. Observing the digital nature of RNAi, we represent RNAi as a Minsky register machine such that (i The two registers hold single and double stranded RNAs respectively, and (ii Machine's instructions are interpreted by interactions of enzyme (Dicer, siRNA (with RISC com- plex and polymerization (RdRp to the appropriate registers. Interpreting RNAi as a computational structure, we can investigate the computational meaning of RNAi, especially its complexity. Initially, the machine is configured as a Chemical Ground Form (CGF, which generates incorrect jumps. To remedy this problem, the system is remodeled as recursive RNAi, in which siRNA targets not only mRNA but also the machine instructional analogues of Dicer and RISC. Finally, probabilistic termination is investigated in the recursive RNAi system.

  11. Double-Strand DNA Break Repair in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Discontinuity of both strands of the chromosome is a lethal event in all living organisms because it compromises chromosome replication. As such, a diversity of DNA repair systems has evolved to repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In part, this diversity of DSB repair systems has evolved to repair breaks that arise in diverse physiologic circumstances or sequence contexts, including cellular states of nonreplication or breaks that arise between repeats. Mycobacteria elaborate a set of three genetically distinct DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, nonhomologous end joining, and single-strand annealing. As such, mycobacterial DSB repair diverges substantially from the standard model of prokaryotic DSB repair and represents an attractive new model system. In addition, the presence in mycobacteria of a DSB repair system that can repair DSBs in nonreplicating cells (nonhomologous end joining) or when DSBs arise between repeats (single-strand annealing) has clear potential relevance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis, although the exact role of these systems in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis is still being elucidated. In this article we will review the genetics of mycobacterial DSB repair systems, focusing on recent insights.

  12. Negative-strand RNA viruses: the plant-infecting counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormelink, Richard; Garcia, Maria Laura; Goodin, Michael; Sasaya, Takahide; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2011-12-01

    While a large number of negative-strand (-)RNA viruses infect animals and humans, a relative small number have plants as their primary host. Some of these have been classified within families together with animal/human infecting viruses due to similarities in particle morphology and genome organization, while others have just recently been/or are still classified in floating genera. In most cases, at least two striking differences can still be discerned between the animal/human-infecting viruses and their plant-infecting counterparts which for the latter relate to their adaptation to plants as hosts. The first one is the capacity to modify plasmodesmata to facilitate systemic spread of infectious viral entities throughout the plant host. The second one is the capacity to counteract RNA interference (RNAi, also referred to as RNA silencing), the innate antiviral defence system of plants and insects. In this review an overview will be presented on the negative-strand RNA plant viruses classified within the families Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Ophioviridae and floating genera Tenuivirus and Varicosavirus. Genetic differences with the animal-infecting counterparts and their evolutionary descendants will be described in light of the above processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Valli

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  14. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-03-06

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  15. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  16. Lack of a Close Relationship Between Three Strains of Human Rhinoviruses as Determined by Their RNA Sequences 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fay H.; Lonberg-Holm, K.; Chan, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The possible genomic homologies between three serotypes of human rhinoviruses (HRV 1A, HRV 2, and HRV 14) were investigated. First we confirmed that these viruses were unrelated by the criterion of the absence of common antigenic determinants on the surfaces of the native virions, as detected by cross-neutralization of complementfixation. RNA-RNA hybridization was then examined with purified, highly radioactive, double-stranded, replicative-form RNA and excess single-stranded virion RNA. Single-stranded RNA showed 100% homology with the minus strand from the replicative-form RNA of the same type of virus. HRV 1A, HRV 2, and HRV 14 showed low intertypic homologies; these were not significantly greater than those found between the rhinoviruses and polivirus, which were used as a negative control. The immunological relationship and the RNA homology between HRV 1A and HRV 1B were also examined by the above techniques. It was confirmed that HRV 1A and HRV 1B share some surface determinants and it was also found that HRV 1B RNA shares 70% homology with HRV 1A RNA. PMID:4126194

  17. Prevention of the β-amyloid peptide-induced inflammatory process by inhibition of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in primary murine mixed co-cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terro F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There has been little success with anti-inflammatory drugs in AD, while the promise of anti-inflammatory treatment is more evident in experimental models. A new anti-inflammatory strategy requires a better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Among the plethora of signaling pathways activated by β-amyloid (Aβ peptides, the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB pathway could be an interesting target. In virus-infected cells, double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR controls the NF-κB signaling pathway. It is well-known that PKR is activated in AD. This led us to study the effect of a specific inhibitor of PKR on the Aβ42-induced inflammatory response in primary mixed murine co-cultures, allowing interactions between neurons, astrocytes and microglia. Methods Primary mixed murine co-cultures were prepared in three steps: a primary culture of astrocytes and microglia for 14 days, then a primary culture of neurons and astrocytes which were cultured with microglia purified from the first culture. Before exposure to Aβ neurotoxicity (72 h, co-cultures were treated with compound C16, a specific inhibitor of PKR. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, interleukin (IL-1β, and IL-6 were assessed by ELISA. Levels of PT451-PKR and activation of IκB, NF-κB and caspase-3 were assessed by western blotting. Apoptosis was also followed using annexin V-FITC immunostaining kit. Subcellular distribution of PT451-PKR was assessed by confocal immunofluorescence and morphological structure of cells by scanning electron microscopy. Data were analysed using one-way ANOVA followed by a Newman-Keuls' post hoc test Results In these co-cultures, PKR inhibition prevented Aβ42-induced activation of IκB and NF-κB, strongly decreased production and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα and interleukin (IL-1β, and limited apoptosis. Conclusion In spite of the

  18. Association of the Endobiont Double-Stranded RNA Virus LRV1 With Treatment Failure for Human Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis in Peru and Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaui, Vanessa; Lye, Lon-Fye; Akopyants, Natalia S; Zimic, Mirko; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Garcia, Lineth; Maes, Ilse; De Doncker, Simonne; Dobson, Deborah E; Arevalo, Jorge; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Beverley, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis, caused in South America by Leishmania braziliensis, is difficult to cure by chemotherapy (primarily pentavalent antimonials [Sb(V)]). Treatment failure does not correlate well with resistance in vitro, and the factors responsible for treatment failure in patients are not well understood. Many isolates of L. braziliensis (>25%) contain a double-stranded RNA virus named Leishmaniavirus 1 (LRV1), which has also been reported in Leishmania guyanensis, for which an association with increased pathology, metastasis, and parasite replication was found in murine models. Here we probed the relationship of LRV1 to drug treatment success and disease in 97 L. braziliensis-infected patients from Peru and Bolivia. In vitro cultures were established, parasites were typed as L. braziliensis, and the presence of LRV1 was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, followed by sequence analysis. LRV1 was associated significantly with an increased risk of treatment failure (odds ratio, 3.99; P = .04). There was no significant association with intrinsic Sb(V) resistance among parasites, suggesting that treatment failure arises from LRV1-mediated effects on host metabolism and/or parasite survival. The association of LRV1 with clinical drug treatment failure could serve to guide more-effective treatment of tegumentary disease caused by L. braziliensis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. RDE-1 slicer activity is required only for passenger-strand cleavage during RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiner, F.A.; Okihara, K.L.; Hoogstrate, S.W.; Sijen, T.; Ketting, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process in which double-stranded RNA is cleaved into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that induce the destruction of homologous single-stranded mRNAs. Argonaute proteins are essential components of this silencing process; they bind siRNAs directly and can cleave RNA

  20. Double strand breaks in DNA in vivo and in vitro after 60Co-γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huelsewede, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The questions of what the correlation is between double strand breaks in DNA in the cell and lethal radiation damage and by means of which possible mechanisms DNA double strand breaks could occur were studied. E. coli served as test system. In addition to this the molecular weight of the DNA from irradiated E. coli as a function of the radiation dose under various conditions was measured. This data was compared on the one hand to the survival of the cell and on the other hand to the formation of DNA double strand breaks in an aqueous buffer system, which in its ionic characteristics was similar to cell fluids. (orig./MG) [de

  1. DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy neon and iron ions in human fibroblasts. I. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydberg, B.; Loebrich, M.; Cooper, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of high-energy neon and iron ions for the production of DNA double-strand breaks was measured in one transformed and one nontransformed human fibroblast cell line using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The DNA released from the gel plug (fraction of activity released: FAR) as well as the size distribution of the DNA entering the gel were used to compare the effects of the heavy-ion exposure with X-ray exposure. Both methods gave similar results, indicating similar distributions of breaks over megabase-pair distances for the heavy ions and the X rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to 225 kVp X rays of initially induced DNA double-strand breaks was found to be 0.85 for 425 MeV/u neon ions (LET 32 keV/μm) and 0.42-0.55 for 250-600 MeV/u iron ions (LET 190-350 keV/μm). Postirradiation incubation showed less efficient repair of breaks induced by the neon ions and the 600 MeV/u iron ions compared to X rays. Survival experiments demonstrated RBE values larger than one for cell killing by the heavy ions in parallel experiments (neon: RBE = 1.2, iron: RBE = 2.3-3.0, based on D 10 values). It is concluded that either the initial yield of DNA double-strand breaks induced by the high-energy particles is lower than the yield for X rays, or the breaks induced by heavy ions are present in clusters that cannot be resolved with the technique used. These results are confirmed in the accompanying paper. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Protein kinase CK2 localizes to sites of DNA double-strand break regulating the cellular response to DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Birgitte B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a nuclear complex composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and a heterodimeric DNA-targeting subunit Ku. DNA-PK is a major component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair mechanism, which is activated in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and radiomimetic drugs. We have recently reported that down-regulation of protein kinase CK2 by siRNA interference results in enhanced cell death specifically in DNA-PKcs-proficient human glioblastoma cells, and this event is accompanied by decreased autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 and delayed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Results In the present study, we show that CK2 co-localizes with phosphorylated histone H2AX to sites of DNA damage and while CK2 gene knockdown is associated with delayed DNA damage repair, its overexpression accelerates this process. We report for the first time evidence that lack of CK2 destabilizes the interaction of DNA-PKcs with DNA and with Ku80 at sites of genetic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CK2 regulates the phosphorylation levels of DNA-PKcs only in response to direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions Taken together, these results strongly indicate that CK2 plays a prominent role in NHEJ by facilitating and/or stabilizing the binding of DNA-PKcs and, possibly other repair proteins, to the DNA ends contributing to efficient DNA damage repair in mammalian cells.

  3. Colocalization of multiple DNA double-strand breaks at a single Rad52 repair centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M.; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Rothstein, R.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an essential process for preserving genomic integrity in all organisms. To investigate this process at the cellular level, we engineered a system of fluorescently marked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to visualize in ...

  4. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 is not involved in DNA double-strand break recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernet Marie

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytotoxicity and the rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks induced by γ-rays, H2O2 and neocarzinostatin, were investigated in normal and PARP-1 knockout mouse 3T3 fibroblasts to determine the role of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 in DNA double-strand break repair. Results PARP-1-/- were considerably more sensitive than PARP-1+/+ 3T3s to induced cell kill by γ-rays and H2O2. However, the two cell lines did not show any significant difference in the susceptibility to neocarzinostatin below 1.5 nM drug. Restoration of PARP-1 expression in PARP-1-/- 3T3s by retroviral transfection of the full PARP-1 cDNA did not induce any change in neocarzinostatin response. Moreover the incidence and the rejoining kinetics of neocarzinostatin-induced DNA double-strand breaks were identical in PARP-1+/+ and PARP-1-/- 3T3s. Poly(ADP-ribose synthesis following γ-rays and H2O2 was observed in PARP-1-proficient cells only. In contrast neocarzinostatin, even at supra-lethal concentration, was unable to initiate PARP-1 activation yet it induced H2AX histone phosphorylation in both PARP1+/+ and PARP-1-/- 3T3s as efficiently as γ-rays and H2O2. Conclusions The results show that PARP-1 is not a major determinant of DNA double-strand break recovery with either strand break rejoining or cell survival as an endpoint. Even though both PARP-1 and ATM activation are major determinants of the cell response to γ-rays and H2O2, data suggest that PARP-1-dependent poly(ADP-ribose synthesis and ATM-dependent H2AX phosphorylation, are not inter-related in the repair pathway of neocarzinostatin-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

  5. Detection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by mass spectrometry procedures in doping controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andreas; Walpurgis, Katja; Delahaut, Philippe; Kohler, Maxie; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering manipulation of athletic performance via small interfering (si)RNA is an emerging field in sports drug testing. Due to the potential to principally knock down every target gene in the organism by means of the RNA interference pathway, this facet of gene doping has become a realistic scenario. In the present study, two distinct model siRNAs comprising 21 nucleotides were designed as double strands which were perfect counterparts to a sequence of the respective messenger RNA coding the muscle regulator myostatin of Rattus norvegicus. Several modified nucleotides were introduced in both the sense and the antisense strand comprising phosphothioates, 2'-O-methylation, 2'-fluoro-nucleotides, locked nucleic acids and a cholesterol tag at the 3'-end. The model siRNAs were applied to rats at 1 mg/kg (i.v.) and blood as well as urine samples were collected. After isolation of the RNA by means of a RNA purification kit, the target analytes were detected by liquid chromatography - high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Analytes were detected as modified nucleotides after alkaline hydrolysis, as intact oligonucleotide strands (top-down) and by means of denaturing SDS-PAGE analysis. The gel-separated siRNA was further subjected to in-gel hydrolysis with different RNases and subsequent identification of the fragments by untargeted LC-HRMS analysis (bottom-up, 'experimental RNomics'). Combining the results of all approaches, the identification of several 3'-truncated urinary metabolites was accomplished and target analytes were detected up to 24 h after a single administration. Simultaneously collected blood samples yielded no promising results. The methods were validated and found fit-for-purpose for doping controls. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Programmable RNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Mitchell R; Oakes, Benjamin L; Sternberg, Samuel H; East-Seletsky, Alexandra; Kaplan, Matias; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-12-11

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA complementarity to identify target sites for sequence-specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) cleavage. In its native context, Cas9 acts on DNA substrates exclusively because both binding and catalysis require recognition of a short DNA sequence, known as the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), next to and on the strand opposite the twenty-nucleotide target site in dsDNA. Cas9 has proven to be a versatile tool for genome engineering and gene regulation in a large range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell types, and in whole organisms, but it has been thought to be incapable of targeting RNA. Here we show that Cas9 binds with high affinity to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) targets matching the Cas9-associated guide RNA sequence when the PAM is presented in trans as a separate DNA oligonucleotide. Furthermore, PAM-presenting oligonucleotides (PAMmers) stimulate site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage of ssRNA targets, similar to PAM-mediated stimulation of Cas9-catalysed DNA cleavage. Using specially designed PAMmers, Cas9 can be specifically directed to bind or cut RNA targets while avoiding corresponding DNA sequences, and we demonstrate that this strategy enables the isolation of a specific endogenous messenger RNA from cells. These results reveal a fundamental connection between PAM binding and substrate selection by Cas9, and highlight the utility of Cas9 for programmable transcript recognition without the need for tags.

  7. Dissimilar kinetic behavior of electrically manipulated single- and double-stranded DNA tethered to a gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rant, Ulrich; Arinaga, Kenji; Tornow, Marc; Kim, Yong Woon; Netz, Roland R; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Abstreiter, Gerhard

    2006-05-15

    We report on the electrical manipulation of single- and double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides that are end tethered to gold surfaces in electrolyte solution. The response to alternating repulsive and attractive electric surface fields is studied by time-resolved fluorescence measurements, revealing markedly distinct dynamics for the flexible single-stranded and stiff double-stranded DNA, respectively. Hydrodynamic simulations rationalize this finding and disclose two different kinetic mechanisms: stiff polymers undergo rotation around the anchoring pivot point; flexible polymers, on the other hand, are pulled onto the attracting surface segment by segment.

  8. DNA double-strand breaks & poptosis in the testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, Geert

    2003-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, DNA damage is a naturally occurring event. At a certain stage, during the first meiotic prophase, DNA breaks are endogenously induced and even required for meiotic recombination. We studied these DNA breaks but also used ionizing radiation (IR) to induce DNA double-strand

  9. RNA Interference and its therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available RNAi is a potent method, requiring only a few molecules of dsRNA per cell to silence the expression. Long molecules of double stranded RNA (dsRNA trigger the process. The dsRNA comes from virus and transposon activity in natural RNAi process, while it can be injected in the cells in experimental processes. The strand of the dsRNA that is identical in sequence to a region in target mRNA molecule is called the sense strand, and the other strand which is complimentary is termed the antisense strand. An enzyme complex called DICER thought to be similar to RNAase III then recognizes dsRNA, and cuts it into roughly 22- nucleotide long fragments. These fragments termed siRNAs for “small interfering RNAs” remain in double stranded duplexes with very short 3' overhangs. However, only one of the two strands, known as the guide strand or antisense strand binds the argonaute protein of RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC and target the complementary mRNA resulting gene silencing. The other anti-guide strand or passenger strand is degraded as a RISC substrate during the process of RISC activation. This form of RNAi is termed as post transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS; other forms are also thought to operate at the genomic or transcriptional level in some organisms. In mammals dsRNA longer than 30 base pairs induces a nonspecific antiviral response. This so-called interferon response results in a nonspecific arrest in translation and induction of apoptosis. This cascade induces a global non-specific suppression of translation, which in turn triggers apoptosis. Interestingly, dsRNAs less than 30 nt in length do not activate the antiviral response and specifically switched off genes in human cells without initiating the acute phase response. Thus these siRNAs are suitable for gene target validation and therapeutic applications in many species, including humans. [Vet. World 2011; 4(5.000: 225-229

  10. Expression of the double-stranded RNA of the soybean pod borer Leguminivora glycinivorella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) ribosomal protein P0 gene enhances the resistance of transgenic soybean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanli; Li, Yang; Zang, Zhenyuan; Li, Na; Ran, Ruixue; Cao, Yingxue; Li, Tianyu; Zhou, Quan; Li, Wenbin

    2017-12-01

    The soybean pod borer [SPB; Leguminivora glycinivorella (Matsumura) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)] is the most important soybean pest in northeastern Asia. Silencing genes using plant-mediated RNA-interference is a promising strategy for controlling SPB infestations. The ribosomal protein P0 is important for protein translation and DNA repair in the SPB. Thus, transferring P0 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into plants may help prevent SPB-induced damage. We investigated the effects of SpbP0 dsRNA injections and SpbP0 dsRNA-expressing transgenic soybean plants on the SPB. Larval mortality rates were greater for SpbP0 dsRNA-injected larvae (96%) than for the control larvae (31%) at 14 days after injections. Transgenic T 2 soybean plants expressing SpbP0 dsRNA sustained less damage from SPB larvae than control plants. In addition, the expression level of the SpbP0 gene decreased and the mortality rate increased when SPB larvae were fed on T 3 transgenic soybean pods. Moreover, the surviving larvae were deformed and exhibited inhibited growth. Silencing SpbP0 expression is lethal to the SPB. Transgenic soybean plants expressing SpbP0 dsRNA are more resistant to the SPB than wild-type plants. Thus, SpbP0 dsRNA-expressing transgenic plants may be useful for controlling insect pests. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Double-stranded endonuclease activity in Bacillus halodurans clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-19

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5'-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1-α1 loop.

  12. Double-stranded RNA promotes CTL-independent tumor cytolysis mediated by CD11b+Ly6G+ intratumor myeloid cells through the TICAM-1 signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shime, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2017-01-01

    PolyI:C, a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, acts as an immune-enhancing adjuvant that regresses tumors in cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-dependent and CTL-independent manner, the latter of which remains largely unknown. Tumors contain CD11b+Ly6G+ cells, known as granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSCs) or tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) that play a critical role in tumor progression and development. Here, we demonstrate that CD11b+Ly6G+ cells respond to polyI:C and exhibit tumoricidal activity in an EL4 tumor implant model. PolyI:C-induced inhibition of tumor growth was attributed to caspase-8/3 cascade activation in tumor cells that occurred independently of CD8α+/CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) and CTLs. CD11b+Ly6G+ cells was essential for the antitumor effect because depletion of CD11b+Ly6G+ cells totally abrogated tumor regression and caspase activation after polyI:C treatment. CD11b+Ly6G+ cells that had been activated with polyI:C showed cytotoxicity and inhibited tumor growth through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS). These responses were abolished in either Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1)−/− or interferon (IFN)-αβ receptor 1 (IFNAR1)−/− mice. Thus, our results suggest that polyI:C activates the TLR3/TICAM-1 and IFNAR signaling pathways in CD11b+Ly6G+ cells in tumors, thereby eliciting their antitumor activity, independent of those in CD8α+/CD103+ DCs that prime CTLs. PMID:27834952

  13. Negative-strand RNA viruses: The plant-infecting counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kormelink, R.J.M.; Garcia, M.L.; Goodin, M.; Sasaya, T.; Haenni, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    While a large number of negative-strand (-)RNA viruses infect animals and humans, a relative small number have plants as their primary host. Some of these have been classified within families together with animal/human infecting viruses due to similarities in particle morphology and genome

  14. Genetic relatedness of orbiviruses by RNA-RNA blot hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodkin, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    RNA-RNA blot hybridization was developed in order to identify type-specific genes among double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, to assess the genetic relatedness of dsRNA viruses and to classify new strains. Viral dsRNA segments were electrophoresed through 10% polyacrylamide gels, transferred to membranes, and hybridized to [5' 32 P]-pCp labeled genomic RNA from a related strain. Hybridization was performed at 52 0 C, 50% formamide, 5X SSC. Under these conditions heterologous RNA species must share ≥ 74% sequence homology in order to form stable dsRNA hybrids. Cognate genes of nine members of the Palyam serogroup of orbiviruses were identified and their sequence relatedness to the prototype. Palyam virus, was determined. Reciprocal blot hybridizations were performed using radiolabeled genomic RNA of all members of the Palyam serogroup. Unique and variant genes were identified by lack of cross-homology or by weak homology between segments. Since genes 2 and 6 exhibited the highest degree of sequence variability, response to the vertebrate immune system may be a major cause of sequence divergence among members of a single serogroup. Changuinola serogroup isolates were compared by dot-blot hybridization, while Colorado tick fever (CTF) serogroup isolates were compared by the RNA-RNA blot hybridization procedure described for reovirus and Palyam serogroup isolates. Preliminary blot hybridization data were also obtained on the relatedness of members of different Orbivirus serogroups

  15. Citrus psorosis virus RNA 1 is of negative polarity and potentially encodes in its complementary strand a 24K protein of unknown function and 280K putative RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naum-Onganía, Gabriela; Gago-Zachert, Selma; Peña, Eduardo; Grau, Oscar; Garcia, Maria Laura

    2003-10-01

    Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), the type member of genus Ophiovirus, has three genomic RNAs. Complete sequencing of CPsV RNA 1 revealed a size of 8184 nucleotides and Northern blot hybridization with chain specific probes showed that its non-coding strand is preferentially encapsidated. The complementary strand of RNA 1 contains two open reading frames (ORFs) separated by a 109-nt intergenic region, one located near the 5'-end potentially encoding a 24K protein of unknown function, and another of 280K containing the core polymerase motifs characteristic of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). Comparison of the core RdRp motifs of negative-stranded RNA viruses, supports grouping CPsV, Ranunculus white mottle virus (RWMV) and Mirafiori lettuce virus (MiLV) within the same genus (Ophiovirus), constituting a monophyletic group separated from all other negative-stranded RNA viruses. Furthermore, RNAs 1 of MiLV, CPsV and RWMV are similar in size and those of MiLV and CPsV also in genomic organization and sequence.

  16. The Human L1 Element Causes DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    cancer is complex. However, defects in DNA repair genes in the double-strand break repair pathway are cancer predisposing. My lab has characterized...a new potentially important source of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells and are interested in characterizing which DNA repair genes act on...this particular source of DNA damage. Selfish DNA accounts for 45% of the human genome. We have recently demonstrated that one particular selfish

  17. Characterization of a novel single-stranded RNA mycovirus in pleurotus ostreatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hyun Jae; Lim, Dongbin; Lee, Hyun-Sook

    2003-01-01

    A mycovirus, named oyster mushroom spherical virus (OMSV), was isolated from cultivated oyster mushrooms with a severe epidemic of oyster mushroom Die-back disease. OMSV was a 27-nm spherical virus encapsidating a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) of 5.784 kb with a coat protein of approximately 28.5 kDa. The nucleotide sequence of the virus revealed that its genomic RNA was positive strand, containing 5784 bases with seven open reading frames (ORF). ORF1 had the motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) and helicase. ORF2 encoded a coat protein. ORF3 to 7 could encode putative polypeptides of approximately 12, 12.5, 21, 14.5, and 23 kDa, respectively, but none of them showed significant similarity to any other known polypeptides. The 5' end of the viral RNA was uncapped and the 3' end was polyadenylated with 74 bases. Genomic structure and organization and the derived amino acid sequence of RdRp and helicase domain were similar to those of tymoviruses, a plant virus group

  18. Inhibition of APOBEC3G activity impedes double-stranded DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Ponnandy; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Adi; Schiffer, Celia A; Kotler, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) was first described as an anti-HIV-1 restriction factor, acting by directly deaminating reverse transcripts of the viral genome. HIV-1 Vif neutralizes the activity of A3G, primarily by mediating degradation of A3G to establish effective infection in host target cells. Lymphoma cells, which express high amounts of A3G, can restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1. Interestingly, these cells are more stable in the face of treatments that result in double-stranded DNA damage, such as ionizing radiation and chemotherapies. Previously, we showed that the Vif-derived peptide (Vif25-39) efficiently inhibits A3G deamination, and increases the sensitivity of lymphoma cells to ionizing radiation. In the current study, we show that additional peptides derived from Vif, A3G, and APOBEC3F, which contain the LYYF motif, inhibit deamination activity. Each residue in the Vif25-39 sequence moderately contributes to the inhibitory effect, whereas replacing a single residue in the LYYF motif completely abrogates inhibition of deamination. Treatment of A3G-expressing lymphoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation with the new inhibitory peptides reduces double-strand break repair after irradiation. Incubation of cultured irradiated lymphoma cells with peptides that inhibit double-strand break repair halts their propagation. These results suggest that A3G may be a potential therapeutic target that is amenable to peptide and peptidomimetic inhibition. © 2015 FEBS.

  19. Repair of double-strand breaks in Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, A.D.; Dean, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    Micrococcus radiodurans has been shown to sustain double-strand breaks in its DNA after exposure to x-radiation. Following sublethal doses of x-rays (200 krad in oxygen or less), the cells were able to repair these breaks, and an intermediate fast-sedimenting DNA component seemed to be involved in the repair process

  20. Universal, colorimetric microRNA detection strategy based on target-catalyzed toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonkyung; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kang, Shinyoung; Kim, Hansol; Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we developed a novel, label-free, and enzyme-free strategy for the colorimetric detection of microRNA (miRNA), which relies on a target-catalyzed toehold-mediated strand displacement (TMSD) reaction. The system employs a detection probe that specifically binds to the target miRNA and sequentially releases a catalyst strand (CS) intended to trigger the subsequent TMSD reaction. Thus, the presence of target miRNA releases the CS that mediates the formation of an active G-quadruplex DNAzyme which is initially caged and inactivated by a blocker strand. In addition, a fuel strand that is supplemented for the recycling of the CS promotes another TMSD reaction, consequently generating a large number of active G-quadruplex DNAzymes. As a result, a distinct colorimetric signal is produced by the ABTS oxidation promoted by the peroxidase mimicking activity of the released G-quadruplex DNAzymes. Based on this novel strategy, we successfully detected miR-141, a promising biomarker for human prostate cancer, with high selectivity. The diagnostic capability of this system was also demonstrated by reliably determining target miR-141 in human serum, showing its great potential towards real clinical applications. Importantly, the proposed approach is composed of separate target recognition and signal transduction modules. Thus, it could be extended to analyze different target miRNAs by simply redesigning the detection probe while keeping the same signal transduction module as a universal signal amplification unit, which was successfully demonstrated by analyzing another target miRNA, let-7d.

  1. Fragment-based modelling of single stranded RNA bound to RNA recognition motif containing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beauchene, Isaure Chauvot; de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protein-RNA complexes are important for many biological processes. However, structural modeling of such complexes is hampered by the high flexibility of RNA. Particularly challenging is the docking of single-stranded RNA (ssRNA). We have developed a fragment-based approach to model the structure of ssRNA bound to a protein, based on only the protein structure, the RNA sequence and conserved contacts. The conformational diversity of each RNA fragment is sampled by an exhaustive library of trinucleotides extracted from all known experimental protein–RNA complexes. The method was applied to ssRNA with up to 12 nucleotides which bind to dimers of the RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), a highly abundant eukaryotic RNA-binding domain. The fragment based docking allows a precise de novo atomic modeling of protein-bound ssRNA chains. On a benchmark of seven experimental ssRNA–RRM complexes, near-native models (with a mean heavy-atom deviation of <3 Å from experiment) were generated for six out of seven bound RNA chains, and even more precise models (deviation < 2 Å) were obtained for five out of seven cases, a significant improvement compared to the state of the art. The method is not restricted to RRMs but was also successfully applied to Pumilio RNA binding proteins. PMID:27131381

  2. Role of the Pepino mosaic virus 3'-untranslated region elements in negative-strand RNA synthesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Toba A M; Olsthoorn, René C L; Livieratos, Ioannis C

    2014-09-22

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is a mechanically-transmitted positive-strand RNA potexvirus, with a 6410 nt long single-stranded (ss) RNA genome flanked by a 5'-methylguanosine cap and a 3' poly-A tail. Computer-assisted folding of the 64 nt long PepMV 3'-untranslated region (UTR) resulted in the prediction of three stem-loop structures (hp1, hp2, and hp3 in the 3'-5' direction). The importance of these structures and/or sequences for promotion of negative-strand RNA synthesis and binding to the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) was tested in vitro using a specific RdRp assay. Hp1, which is highly variable among different PepMV isolates, appeared dispensable for negative-strand synthesis. Hp2, which is characterized by a large U-rich loop, tolerated base-pair changes in its stem as long as they maintained the stem integrity but was very sensitive to changes in the U-rich loop. Hp3, which harbours the conserved potexvirus ACUUAA hexamer motif, was essential for template activity. Template-RNA polymerase binding competition experiments showed that the ACUUAA sequence represents a high-affinity RdRp binding element. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of siRNA Mediated Target mRNA Cleavage Activities in Human Cells by a Novel Stem-Loop Array RT-PCR Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    sequences of the target mRNA, and a double stranded stem at the 5′ end that forms a stem -loop to function as a forceps to stabilize the secondary...E-mjournal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bbrepDetection of siRNA-mediated target mRNA cleavage activities in human cells by a novel stem -loop...challenges for the accurate and efficient detection and verification of cleavage sites on target mRNAs. Here we used a sensitive stem -loop array reverse

  4. Quantitation of the repair of gamma-radiation-induced double-strand DNA breaks in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The quantitation and repair of double-strand DNA breaks in human fibroblasts has been determined using a method involving the nondenaturing elution of DNA from a filter. DNA from cells from two human fibroblast lines exposed to γ-radiation from 0 to 10000 rad showed increasing retention on a filter with decreasing radiation dose, and the data suggest a linear relationship between double-strand breaks induced and radiation dose. The ability of normal human fibroblasts to repair double-strand breaks with various doses of radiation was demonstrated, with a tsub(1/2) of 10 min for repair of 5000 rad exposure and 39 min for repair of 10000 rad damage. The kinetics of the DNA rejoining were not linear and suggest that, as in the repair of single-strand breaks, both an initial fast and a later slow mechanism may be involved. (Auth.)

  5. Meta-analysis of DNA double-strand break response kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochan, Jakub A.; Desclos, Emilie C. B.; Bosch, Ruben; Meister, Luna; Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Attikum, Haico V.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2017-01-01

    Most proteins involved in the DNA double-strand break response (DSBR) accumulate at the damage sites, where they perform functions related to damage signaling, chromatin remodeling and repair. Over the last two decades, studying the accumulation of many DSBR proteins provided information about their

  6. Methods for the preparation of large quantities of complex single-stranded oligonucleotide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf E; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan

    2014-01-01

    Custom-defined oligonucleotide collections have a broad range of applications in fields of synthetic biology, targeted sequencing, and cytogenetics. Also, they are used to encode information for technologies like RNA interference, protein engineering and DNA-encoded libraries. High-throughput parallel DNA synthesis technologies developed for the manufacture of DNA microarrays can produce libraries of large numbers of different oligonucleotides, but in very limited amounts. Here, we compare three approaches to prepare large quantities of single-stranded oligonucleotide libraries derived from microarray synthesized collections. The first approach, alkaline melting of double-stranded PCR amplified libraries with a biotinylated strand captured on streptavidin coated magnetic beads results in little or no non-biotinylated ssDNA. The second method wherein the phosphorylated strand of PCR amplified libraries is nucleolyticaly hydrolyzed is recommended when small amounts of libraries are needed. The third method combining in vitro transcription of PCR amplified libraries to reverse transcription of the RNA product into single-stranded cDNA is our recommended method to produce large amounts of oligonucleotide libraries. Finally, we propose a method to remove any primer binding sequences introduced during library amplification.

  7. Natural minus-strand RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus as in vitro templates for viral RNA polymerase. 3'-Terminal non-coded guanosine and coat protein are insufficient factors for full-size plus-strand synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, C.J.; Huis in 't Veld, M.; Zuidema, D.; Graaff, de M.; Jaspars, E.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Replication complexes of alfalfa mosaic virus produce in vivo large quantities of plus-strand RNAs, but this production is fully dependent on the presence of coat protein. In order to study this process of RNA-dependent and coat protein-regulated RNA synthesis we have isolated the three natural

  8. Molecular Basis for DNA Double-Strand Break Annealing and Primer Extension by an NHEJ DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel C. Brissett

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathways. The mechanisms by which breaks are competently brought together and extended during NHEJ is poorly understood. As polymerases extend DNA in a 5′-3′ direction by nucleotide addition to a primer, it is unclear how NHEJ polymerases fill in break termini containing 3′ overhangs that lack a primer strand. Here, we describe, at the molecular level, how prokaryotic NHEJ polymerases configure a primer-template substrate by annealing the 3′ overhanging strands from opposing breaks, forming a gapped intermediate that can be extended in trans. We identify structural elements that facilitate docking of the 3′ ends in the active sites of adjacent polymerases and reveal how the termini act as primers for extension of the annealed break, thus explaining how such DSBs are extended in trans. This study clarifies how polymerases couple break-synapsis to catalysis, providing a molecular mechanism to explain how primer extension is achieved on DNA breaks.

  9. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of hepatitis C virus binds to its coding region RNA stem-loop structure, 5BSL3.2, and its negative strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Hiroshi; Yuhashi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko

    2010-05-01

    The hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a key enzyme involved in viral replication. Interaction between NS5B RdRp and the viral RNA sequence is likely to be an important step in viral RNA replication. The C-terminal half of the NS5B-coding sequence, which contains the important cis-acting replication element, has been identified as an NS5B-binding sequence. In the present study, we confirm the specific binding of NS5B to one of the RNA stem-loop structures in the region, 5BSL3.2. In addition, we show that NS5B binds to the complementary strand of 5BSL3.2 (5BSL3.2N). The bulge structure of 5BSL3.2N was shown to be indispensable for tight binding to NS5B. In vitro RdRp activity was inhibited by 5BSL3.2N, indicating the importance of the RNA element in the polymerization by RdRp. These results suggest the involvement of the RNA stem-loop structure of the negative strand in the replication process.

  10. A new wine Torulaspora delbrueckii killer strain with broad antifungal activity and its toxin-encoding double-stranded RNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Manuel; Velázquez, Rocío; Maqueda, Matilde; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Ribas, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Wine Torulaspora delbrueckii strains producing a new killer toxin (Kbarr-1) were isolated and selected for wine making. They killed all the previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains, in addition to other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The Kbarr-1 phenotype is encoded by a medium-size 1.7 kb dsRNA, TdV-Mbarr-1, which seems to depend on a large-size 4.6 kb dsRNA virus (TdV-LAbarr) for stable maintenance and replication. The TdV-Mbarr-1 dsRNA was sequenced by new generation sequencing techniques. Its genome structure is similar to those of S. cerevisiae killer M dsRNAs, with a 5′-end coding region followed by an internal A-rich sequence and a 3′-end non-coding region. Mbarr-1 RNA positive strand carries cis acting signals at its 5′ and 3′ termini for transcription and replication respectively, similar to those RNAs of yeast killer viruses. The ORF at the 5′ region codes for a putative preprotoxin with an N-terminal secretion signal, potential Kex2p/Kexlp processing sites, and N-glycosylation sites. No relevant sequence identity was found either between the full sequence of Mbarr-1 dsRNA and other yeast M dsRNAs, or between their respective toxin-encoded proteins. However, a relevant identity of TdV-Mbarr-1 RNA regions to the putative replication and packaging signals of most of the M-virus RNAs suggests that they are all evolutionarily related. PMID:26441913

  11. Mécanismes et fonctions de la voie d'ARN interférence induite par ARN double brin chez Paramecium tetraurelia

    OpenAIRE

    Carradec , Quentin

    2014-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia is an interesting model to study the diversity and evolution of RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. One of the vegetative RNAi pathways is induced by feeding cells with bacteria producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) homologous to a given gene, which is then post-transcriptionally silenced through the production of 23-nt siRNAs. A forward genetic screen allowed us to obtain Mendelian mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced RNAi, and mutated genes were identified by ...

  12. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing Using a Chimeric Single-Guide RNA Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Butt, Haroon

    2017-08-24

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in diverse eukaryotic organisms for targeted mutagenesis. However, targeted gene editing is inefficient and requires the simultaneous delivery of a DNA template for homology-directed repair (HDR). Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to generate targeted double-strand breaks and to deliver an RNA repair template for HDR in rice (Oryza sativa). We used chimeric single-guide RNA (cgRNA) molecules carrying both sequences for target site specificity (to generate the double-strand breaks) and repair template sequences (to direct HDR), flanked by regions of homology to the target. Gene editing was more efficient in rice protoplasts using repair templates complementary to the non-target DNA strand, rather than the target strand. We applied this cgRNA repair method to generate herbicide resistance in rice, which showed that this cgRNA repair method can be used for targeted gene editing in plants. Our findings will facilitate applications in functional genomics and targeted improvement of crop traits.

  13. Differences in heavy-ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks in a mouse DNA repair-deficient mutant cell line (SL3-147) before and after chromatin proteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masahiro; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Sato, Koki; Minohara, Shinichi; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yatagai, Fumio.

    1995-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks induced by X- or neon beam-irradiation in a DNA double-strand break-repair-deficient mutant cell line (SL3-147) were examined. The increase in the number of DNA double-strand breaks was dose-depend after irradiation with X-rays and neon beams and was enhanced by chromatin-proteolysis treatment before irradiation. These results suggest that the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation, including heavy-ions, is influenced by the chromatin structure. (author)

  14. Protected DNA strand displacement for enhanced single nucleotide discrimination in double-stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Khodakova, Anastasia S.; Huang, David M.; Linacre, Adrian; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a prime source of genetic diversity. Discriminating between different SNPs provides an enormous leap towards the better understanding of the uniqueness of biological systems. Here we report on a new approach for SNP discrimination using toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement. The distinctiveness of the approach is based on the combination of both 3- and 4-way branch migration mechanisms, which allows for reliable discrimination of SNPs within doubl...

  15. Mechanisms of DNA Packaging by Large Double-Stranded DNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Venigalla B.; Feiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into the icosahedral prohead shell is catalyzed by TerL, a motor protein that has ATPase, endonuclease, and translocase activities. TerL, following endonucleolytic cleavage of immature viral DNA concatemer recognized by TerS, assembles into a pentameric ring motor on the prohead’s portal vertex and uses ATP hydrolysis energy for DNA translocation. TerL’s N-terminal ATPase is connected by a hinge to the C-terminal endonuclease. Inchworm models propose that modest domain motions accompanying ATP hydrolysis are amplified, through changes in electrostatic interactions, into larger movements of the C-terminal domain bound to DNA. In phage φ29, four of the five TerL subunits sequentially hydrolyze ATP, each powering translocation of 2.5 bp. After one viral genome is encapsidated, the internal pressure signals termination of packaging and ejection of the motor. Current focus is on the structures of packaging complexes and the dynamics of TerL during DNA packaging, endonuclease regulation, and motor mechanics. PMID:26958920

  16. Small Molecule Modifiers of the microRNA and RNA Interference Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Deiters, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway has become the target of small molecule inhibitors and activators. RNAi has been well established as a research tool in the sequence-specific silencing of genes in eukaryotic cells and organisms by using exogenous, small, double-stranded RNA molecules of approximately 20 nucleotides. Moreover, a recently discovered post-transcriptional gene regulatory mechanism employs microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of endogenously expressed small RNA molecules, whic...

  17. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of novel totivirus-like double-stranded RNAs from field-collected powdery mildew fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Hideki; Hisano, Sakae; Chiba, Sotaro; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Andika, Ida Bagus; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Fujimori, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-02

    The identification of mycoviruses contributes greatly to understanding of the diversity and evolutionary aspects of viruses. Powdery mildew fungi are important and widely studied obligate phytopathogenic agents, but there has been no report on mycoviruses infecting these fungi. In this study, we used a deep sequencing approach to analyze the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments isolated from field-collected samples of powdery mildew fungus-infected red clover plants in Japan. Database searches identified the presence of at least ten totivirus (genus Totivirus)-like sequences, termed red clover powdery mildew-associated totiviruses (RPaTVs). The majority of these sequences shared moderate amino acid sequence identity with each other (powdery mildew fungus populations infecting red clover plants in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell-type specific role of the RNA-binding protein, NONO, in the DNA double-strand break response in the mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Shu, Feng-Jue; Li, Zhentian; Jaafar, Lahcen; Zhao, Shourong; Dynan, William S

    2017-03-01

    The tandem RNA recognition motif protein, NONO, was previously identified as a candidate DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor in a biochemical screen for proteins with end-joining stimulatory activity. Subsequent work showed that NONO and its binding partner, SFPQ, have many of the properties expected for bona fide repair factors in cell-based assays. Their contribution to the DNA damage response in intact tissue in vivo has not, however, been demonstrated. Here we compare DNA damage sensitivity in the testes of wild-type mice versus mice bearing a null allele of the NONO homologue (Nono gt ). In wild-type mice, NONO protein was present in Sertoli, peritubular myoid, and interstitial cells, with an increase in expression following induction of DNA damage. As expected for the product of an X-linked gene, NONO was not detected in germ cells. The Nono gt/0 mice had at most a mild testis developmental phenotype in the absence of genotoxic stress. However, following irradiation at sublethal, 2-4 Gy doses, Nono gt/0 mice displayed a number of indicators of radiosensitivity as compared to their wild-type counterparts. These included higher levels of persistent DSB repair foci, increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the seminiferous tubules, and partial degeneration of the blood-testis barrier. There was also an almost complete loss of germ cells at later times following irradiation, evidently arising as an indirect effect reflecting loss of stromal support. Results demonstrate a role for NONO protein in protection against direct and indirect biological effects of ionizing radiation in the whole animal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of Subolesin and Cystatin Knockdown by RNA Interference in Adult Female Haemaphysalis longicornis (Acari: Ixodidae on Blood Engorgement and Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Khalesur Rahman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, multi-antigenic vaccine use is the method of choice for the strategic control of ticks. Therefore, determining the efficacy of combined antigens is a promising avenue of research in the development of anti-tick vaccines. The antigen responsible for blood intake and reproduction has proven suitable as a vaccine antigen. It has been shown to silence Haemaphysalis longicornis salivary cystatin (HlSC-1 and subolesin by RNA interference. Adult unfed female ticks were injected with double-stranded RNA of (A subolesin, (B cystatin, (C subolesin plus cystatin, and (D injection buffer, then fed alongside normal unfed males up to spontaneous drop-down. The percentage of knockdowns was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Sixty-three percent and 53% knockdown rates were observed in subolesin and cystatin double-stranded RNA-injected ticks respectively, while 32 and 26% knockdown rates of subolesin and cystatin transcript were observed in subolesin plus cystatin double-stranded RNA-injected ticks. Subolesin and/or cystatin knockdown causes a significant (p < 0.05 reduction in tick engorgement, egg mass weight, and egg conversion ratio. Most importantly, combined silencing did not act synergistically, but caused a similarly significant (p < 0.05 reduction in tick engorgement, egg mass weight, and egg conversion ratio. Therefore, the elucidation of multiple antigens may be helpful in the future of vaccines.

  20. Coordinated leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis by using the herpes simplex virus 1 replication complex and minicircle DNA templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Gudrun; Kuchta, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    The origin-specific replication of the herpes simplex virus 1 genome requires seven proteins: the helicase-primase (UL5-UL8-UL52), the DNA polymerase (UL30-UL42), the single-strand DNA binding protein (ICP8), and the origin-binding protein (UL9). We reconstituted these proteins, excluding UL9, on synthetic minicircular DNA templates and monitored leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis using the strand-specific incorporation of dTMP and dAMP. Critical features of the assays that led to efficient leading and lagging stand synthesis included high helicase-primase concentrations and a lagging strand template whose sequence resembled that of the viral DNA. Depending on the nature of the minicircle template, the replication complex synthesized leading and lagging strand products at molar ratios varying between 1:1 and 3:1. Lagging strand products (∼0.2 to 0.6 kb) were significantly shorter than leading strand products (∼2 to 10 kb), and conditions that stimulated primer synthesis led to shorter lagging strand products. ICP8 was not essential; however, its presence stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the length of both leading and lagging strand products. Curiously, human DNA polymerase α (p70-p180 or p49-p58-p70-p180), which improves the utilization of RNA primers synthesized by herpesvirus primase on linear DNA templates, had no effect on the replication of the minicircles. The lack of stimulation by polymerase α suggests the existence of a macromolecular assembly that enhances the utilization of RNA primers and may functionally couple leading and lagging strand synthesis. Evidence for functional coupling is further provided by our observations that (i) leading and lagging strand synthesis produce equal amounts of DNA, (ii) leading strand synthesis proceeds faster under conditions that disable primer synthesis on the lagging strand, and (iii) conditions that accelerate helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding stimulate decoupled leading strand synthesis but not

  1. General method for labeling siRNA by click chemistry with fluorine-18 for the purpose of PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Frédéric; Paris, Jérôme; Kaisin, Geoffroy; Thonon, David; Flagothier, Jessica; Teller, Nathalie; Lemaire, Christian; Luxen, André

    2011-01-19

    The alkyne-azide Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition, a click-type reaction, was used to label a double-stranded oligonucleotide (siRNA) with fluorine-18. An alkyne solid support CPG for the preparation of monostranded oligonucleotides functionalized with alkyne has been developed. Two complementary azide labeling agents (1-(azidomethyl)-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzene) and 1-azido-4-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropoxy)benzene have been produced with 41% and 35% radiochemical yields (decay-corrected), respectively. After annealing with the complementary strand, the siRNA was directly labeled by click chemistry with [(18)F]fluoroazide to produce the [(18)F]-radiolabeled siRNA with excellent radiochemical yield and purity.

  2. Production of Cyclin D1 specific siRNAs by double strand processing for gene therapy of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Mottaghi-Dastjerdi

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion: dsRNA digestion method includes several steps which the product of each step is used as the precursor for the next step. So optimization and increasing the specificity and product yield should be in the most important goals of the study, because the yield of each step has a direct relationship with the final product yield which is siRNA. Optimizing and increasing the yield, dsRNA digestion method could be a rapid, available and profitable method for siRNA generation, providing large amounts of siRNA.

  3. Efficacy of double-stranded RNA against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV non-structural (orf89, wsv191 and structural (vp28, vp26 genes in the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César M. Escobedo-Bonilla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. RNA interference (RNAi is a promising tool against viral infections. Previous works with RNAi showed different antiviral efficacies depending on the silenced gene. This work evaluated the antiviral efficacy of double-stranded (ds RNA against two non-structural (orf89, wsv191 WSSV genes compared to structural (vp26, vp28 genes to inhibit an experimental WSSV infection. Gene orf89 encodes a putative regulatory protein and gene white spot virus (wsv191 encodes a nonspecific nuclease; whereas genes vp26 and vp28 encode envelope proteins, respectively. Molecules of dsRNA against each of the WSSV genes were intramuscularly injected (4 μg per shrimp into a group of shrimp 48 h before a WSSV challenge. The highest antiviral activity occurred with dsRNA against orf89, vp28 and vp26 (cumulative mortalities 10%, 10% and 21%, respectively. In contrast, the least effective treatment was wsv191 dsRNA (cumulative mortality 83%. All dead animals were WSSV-positive by one-step PCR, whereas reverse-transcription PCR of all surviving shrimp confirmed inhibition of virus replication. This study showed that dsRNA against WSSV genes orf89, vp28 and vp26 were highly effective to inhibit virus replication and suggest an essential role in WSSV infection. Non-structural WSSV genes such as orf89 can be used as novel targets to design therapeutic RNAi molecules against WSSV infection.

  4. Detection of negative and positive RNA strand of poliovirus Sabin 1 and echovirus E19 by a stem-loop reverse transcription PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikatas, A; Dimitriou, T G; Kyriakopoulou, Z; Moschonas, G D; Amoutzias, G D; Mossialos, D; Gartzonika, C; Levidiotou-Stefanou, S; Markoulatos, P

    2017-09-01

    In this report a strand specific RT-PCR was established for the detection of the replicative negative RNA strand of poliovirus sabin 1 (Sabin1) and Echovirus 19 (E19) strains. The key for the successful conduction of the assay was the use of a specific reverse transcription primer targeting the 5'-UTR of enteroviruses that consisted of a stem-loop structure at the 5'-end and an enteroviral-specific sequence at the 3'-end. The stem loop RT-PCR was found to be an accurate and sensitive method, detecting even 10 -2 CCID 50 of poliovirus sabin 1 (Sabin1) and E19 strains 6 h postinfection (p.i.), while CPE appeared 3 days later. This assay was also validated in SiHa and Caski cell lines that are not used for the detection of enteroviruses. The negative RNA strand was detected 6 h and 12 h p.i. in SiHa and Caski cells, when these cell lines were inoculated with 10 5 and 1 CCID 50 respectively, whereas CPE was observed 5 days p.i for SiHa cells and 8 days p.i for Caski cells and that only at 10 5 CCID 50 . The results show that this approach may be used for replacing the time-consuming cell cultures in order to detect the active replication of enteroviruses. Enteroviruses are positive stranded RNA viruses that may cause severe diseases. The conventional method for detection of active viral replication involves virus isolation in sensitive cell cultures followed by titration and seroneutralization. In this report, we describe the use of a stem-loop secondary structured oligonucleotide in RT-PCR assay for the detection of the replicative negative strand of the positive-stranded RNA of poliovirus sabin 1 and E19 strains. This approach proved to be a useful tool that may be used for replacing the time-consuming cell culture assays in order to detect the active replication of enteroviruses. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. NSs protein of rift valley fever virus induces the specific degradation of the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habjan, Matthias; Pichlmair, Andreas; Elliott, Richard M; Overby, Anna K; Glatter, Timo; Gstaiger, Matthias; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Unger, Hermann; Weber, Friedemann

    2009-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) continues to cause large outbreaks of acute febrile and often fatal illness among humans and domesticated animals in Africa, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. The high pathogenicity of this bunyavirus is mainly due to the viral protein NSs, which was shown to prevent transcriptional induction of the antivirally active type I interferons (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-alpha/beta]). Viruses lacking the NSs gene induce synthesis of IFNs and are therefore attenuated, whereas the noninducing wild-type RVFV strains can only be inhibited by pretreatment with IFN. We demonstrate here in vitro and in vivo that a substantial part of the antiviral activity of IFN against RVFV is due to a double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). PKR-mediated virus inhibition, however, was much more pronounced for the strain Clone 13 with NSs deleted than for the NSs-expressing strain ZH548. In vivo, Clone 13 was nonpathogenic for wild-type (wt) mice but could regain pathogenicity if mice lacked the PKR gene. ZH548, in contrast, killed both wt and PKR knockout mice indiscriminately. ZH548 was largely resistant to the antiviral properties of PKR because RVFV NSs triggered the specific degradation of PKR via the proteasome. The NSs proteins of the related but less virulent sandfly fever Sicilian virus and La Crosse virus, in contrast, had no such anti-PKR activity despite being efficient suppressors of IFN induction. Our data suggest that RVFV NSs has gained an additional anti-IFN function that may explain the extraordinary pathogenicity of this virus.

  6. 125I-induced DNA double strand breaks: use in calibration of the neutral filter elution technique and comparison with X-ray induced breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.; Hodgson, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The neutral filter elution assay, for measurement of DNA double strand breakage, has been calibrated using mouse L cells and Chinese hamster V79 cells labelled with [ 125 I]dUrd and then held at liquid nitrogen temperature to accumulate decays. The basis of the calibration is the observation that each 125 I decay, occurring in DNA, produces a DNA double strand break. Linear relationships between 125 I decays per cell and lethal lesions per cell (minus natural logarithm survival) and the level of elution, were found. Using the calibration data, it was calculated that the yield of DNA double strand breaks after X-irradiation of both cell types was from 6 to 9 x 10 -12 DNA double strand breaks per Gy per dalton of DNA, for doses greater than 6 Gy. Neutral filter elution and survival data for X-irradiated and 125 I-labelled cells suggested that the relationships between lethal lesions and DNA double strand breakage were significantly different for both cell types. An attempt was made to study the repair kinetics for 125 I-induced DNA double strand breaks, but was frustrated by the rapid DNA degradation which occurs in cells that have been killed by the freezing-thawing process. (author)

  7. Transmission of Turnip yellows virus by Myzus persicae Is Reduced by Feeding Aphids on Double-Stranded RNA Targeting the Ephrin Receptor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulot, Michaël; Monsion, Baptiste; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Rastegar, Maryam; Meyer, Sophie; Bochet, Nicole; Brault, Véronique

    2018-01-01

    Aphid-transmitted plant viruses are a threat for major crops causing massive economic loss worldwide. Members in the Luteoviridae family are transmitted by aphids in a circulative and non-replicative mode. Virions are acquired by aphids when ingesting sap from infected plants and are transported through the gut and the accessory salivary gland (ASG) cells by a transcytosis mechanism relying on virus-specific receptors largely unknown. Once released into the salivary canal, virions are inoculated to plants, together with saliva, during a subsequent feeding. In this paper, we bring in vivo evidence that the membrane-bound Ephrin receptor (Eph) is a novel aphid protein involved in the transmission of the Turnip yellows virus (TuYV, Polerovirus genus, Luteoviridae family) by Myzus persicae . The minor capsid protein of TuYV, essential for aphid transmission, was able to bind the external domain of Eph in yeast. Feeding M. persicae on in planta - or in vitro -synthesized dsRNA targeting Eph -mRNA (dsRNA Eph ) did not affect aphid feeding behavior but reduced accumulation of TuYV genomes in the aphid's body. Consequently, TuYV transmission efficiency by the dsRNA Eph -treated aphids was reproducibly inhibited and we brought evidence that Eph is likely involved in intestinal uptake of the virion. The inhibition of virus uptake after dsRNA Eph acquisition was also observed for two other poleroviruses transmitted by M. persicae , suggesting a broader role of Eph in polerovirus transmission. Finally, dsRNA Eph acquisition by aphids did not affect nymph production. These results pave the way toward an ecologically safe alternative of insecticide treatments that are used to lower aphid populations and reduce polerovirus damages.

  8. REV7 counteracts DNA double-strand break resection and affects PARP inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Guotai; Chapman, J. Ross; Brandsma, Inger; Yuan, Jingsong; Mistrik, Martin; Bouwman, Peter; Bartkova, Jirina; Gogola, Ewa; Warmerdam, Daniël; Barazas, Marco; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Watanabe, Kenji; Pieterse, Mark; Kersbergen, Ariena; Sol, Wendy; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Schouten, Philip C.; van den Broek, Bram; Salman, Ahmed; Nieuwland, Marja; de Rink, Iris; de Ronde, Jorma; Jalink, Kees; Boulton, Simon J.; Chen, Junjie; van Gent, Dik C.; Bartek, Jiri; Jonkers, Jos; Borst, Piet; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is achieved by homologous recombination (HR), and BRCA1 is an important factor for this repair pathway(1). In the absence of BRCA1-mediated HR, the administration of PARP inhibitors induces synthetic lethality of tumour cells of patients with

  9. Probing electronic coupling between adenine bases in RNA strands from synchrotron radiation circular dichroism experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Munksgård; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2012-01-01

    Circular dichroism spectra (176–330 nm) of RNA adenine oligomers, (rA)n (n = 1–10, 12, 15, and 20), reveal electronic coupling between two bases in short strands. The number of interacting bases in long strands is more and larger than that reported previously for the corresponding DNA strands....

  10. Photosensitization by iodinated DNA minor groove binding ligands: Evaluation of DNA double-strand break induction and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Benjamin; Ververis, Katherine; Rodd, Annabelle L; Foong, Laura J L; Silva, Fernando M Da; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-05-03

    Iodinated DNA minor groove binding bibenzimidazoles represent a unique class of UVA photosensitizer and their extreme photopotency has been previously characterized. Earlier studies have included a comparison of three isomers, referred to as ortho-, meta- and para-iodoHoechst, which differ only in the location of the iodine substituent in the phenyl ring of the bibenzimidazole. DNA breakage and clonogenic survival studies in human erythroleukemic K562 cells have highlighted the higher photo-efficiency of the ortho-isomer (subsequently designated UV(A)Sens) compared to the meta- and para-isomers. In this study, the aim was to compare the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by the three isomers in K562 cells. Further, we examined the effects of the prototypical broad-spectrum histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A, on ortho-iodoHoechst/UVA-induced double-strand breaks in K562 cells. Using γH2AX as a molecular marker of the DNA lesions, our findings indicate a disparity in the induction and particularly, in the repair kinetics of double-strand breaks for the three isomers. The accumulation of γH2AX foci induced by the meta- and para-isomers returned to background levels within 24 and 48 h, respectively; the number of γH2AX foci induced by ortho-iodoHoechst remained elevated even after incubation for 96 h post-irradiation. These findings provide further evidence that the extreme photopotency of ortho-iodoHoechst is due to not only to the high quantum yield of dehalogenation, but also to the severity of the DNA lesions which are not readily repaired. Finally, our findings which indicate that Trichostatin A has a remarkable potentiating effect on ortho-iodoHoechst/UVA-induced DNA lesions are encouraging, particularly in the context of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, for which a histone deacetylase inhibitor is already approved for therapy. This finding prompts further evaluation of the potential of combination therapies. Copyright © 2011

  11. Evidence for multiple repair pathways of double-strand DNA breaks in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaccia, A.J.; Weistein, R.; Stamato, T.D.; Roosa, R.

    1984-01-01

    XR-1 is a mutant of the Chinese hamster cell (CHO-K1) which is abnormally sensitive to killing by gamma rays in G/sub 1/ (D37 = 27 rads vs. 318 for parent) and early S phases of the cell cycle but has near normal resistance in late S and early G/sub 2/ (Somatic Cell Genetics, 9:165-173, 1983). Complementation studies between XR-1 and its parent indicate that this sensitivity to gamma rays is a recessive phenotype. Both the XR-1 and its parent cell are able to repair single strand DNA breaks. However, in comparison to its parental cell, the XR-1 cell is markedly deficient in the repair of double strand DNA breaks introduced by gamma irradiation during the sensitive G/sub 1/-early S period, while in the late S-G/sub 2/ resistant period the repair is similar in both cells. This correlation suggests that an unrepaired double strand DNA break is the lethal lesion and that at least two pathways for the repair of these lesions exist in mammalian cells

  12. Computer-Aided Design of RNA Origami Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparvath, Steffen L; Geary, Cody W; Andersen, Ebbe S

    2017-01-01

    RNA nanostructures can be used as scaffolds to organize, combine, and control molecular functionalities, with great potential for applications in nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The single-stranded RNA origami method allows RNA nanostructures to be folded as they are transcribed by the RNA polymerase. RNA origami structures provide a stable framework that can be decorated with functional RNA elements such as riboswitches, ribozymes, interaction sites, and aptamers for binding small molecules or protein targets. The rich library of RNA structural and functional elements combined with the possibility to attach proteins through aptamer-based binding creates virtually limitless possibilities for constructing advanced RNA-based nanodevices.In this chapter we provide a detailed protocol for the single-stranded RNA origami design method using a simple 2-helix tall structure as an example. The first step involves 3D modeling of a double-crossover between two RNA double helices, followed by decoration with tertiary motifs. The second step deals with the construction of a 2D blueprint describing the secondary structure and sequence constraints that serves as the input for computer programs. In the third step, computer programs are used to design RNA sequences that are compatible with the structure, and the resulting outputs are evaluated and converted into DNA sequences to order.

  13. Evaluation of the antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects of a double-stranded RNA mimic complexed with polycations in an experimental mouse model of leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pascual, Carmen Maria; Ferrero, Hortensia; Juarez, Irene; Martínez, Jessica; Villanueva, Ana; Pozuelo-Rubio, Mercedes; Soengas, Marisol; Tormo, Damiá; Simón, Carlos; Gómez, Raúl; Pellicer, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    To assess the antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects of the double-stranded RNA mimic polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (pIC) complexed with polyethylenimine [pIC(PEI)] in xenografted human leiomyomas. Heterologous leiomyoma mouse model. University-affiliated infertility center. Ovariectomized and hormone-replaced nude mice (n = 16) who received human leiomyoma fragment transplantation. Leiomyoma fragments placed in the peritoneum of 5-week-old nude female mice and treated with the vehicle (n = 8) or 0.6 mg/kg [pIC(PEI)] (n = 8) for 4 weeks. The size of the leiomyoma implants, and cellular proliferation (Ki67), vascularization (PECAM), and apoptosis (OH-ends) assessed by quantitative immunohistochemical/immunofluorescent analysis of the recovered implants. No significant differences were observed in the size of the leiomyoma implants between groups. Vascularization and proliferation were significantly decreased, and apoptosis was increased in the [pIC(PEI)]-treated group versus control. We hypothesize that the antiangiogenic and apoptotic effects exerted by [pIC(PEI)] might lead to a decrease in lesion size in this animal model if the compound is administered for longer periods of time. This study provides promising data on [pIC(PEI)] as a potential novel therapeutic agent against human leiomyoma. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of Laser Micro-irradiation for Examination of Single and Double Strand Break Repair in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Nathaniel W; Andrews, Joel F; Gassman, Natalie R

    2017-09-05

    Highly coordinated DNA repair pathways exist to detect, excise and replace damaged DNA bases, and coordinate repair of DNA strand breaks. While molecular biology techniques have clarified structure, enzymatic functions, and kinetics of repair proteins, there is still a need to understand how repair is coordinated within the nucleus. Laser micro-irradiation offers a powerful tool for inducing DNA damage and monitoring the recruitment of repair proteins. Induction of DNA damage by laser micro-irradiation can occur with a range of wavelengths, and users can reliably induce single strand breaks, base lesions and double strand breaks with a range of doses. Here, laser micro-irradiation is used to examine repair of single and double strand breaks induced by two common confocal laser wavelengths, 355 nm and 405 nm. Further, proper characterization of the applied laser dose for inducing specific damage mixtures is described, so users can reproducibly perform laser micro-irradiation data acquisition and analysis.

  15. Electrophoresis examination of strand breaks in plasmid DNA induced by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yong; Tan Zheng; Du Yanhua; Qiu Guanying

    2003-01-01

    To study the effect on plasmid DNA of heavy ion in the energy range of keV where nuclear stopping interaction becomes more important or even predominant, thin film of plasmid pGEM-3Zf(-) DNA was prepared on aluminum surface and irradiated in vacuum ( -3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with energy of 30 keV (LET=285 keV/μm) at various fluence ranging from 2 x 10 10 to 8.2 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . DNA strand breaks were analyzed by neutral electrophoresis followed by quantification with image analysis software. Low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation induced single-, double- and multiple double-strand breaks (DSB) and multiple DSB as the dominating form of DNA damages. Moreover, the linear fluence-response relationship at a low fluence range suggests that DSBs are induced predominantly by single ion track. However, strand break production is limited to a short range in the irradiated samples

  16. FBH1 co-operates with MUS81 in inducing DNA double-strand breaks and cell death following replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Chu, Wai Kit; Haahr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The molecular events occurring following the disruption of DNA replication forks are poorly characterized, despite extensive use of replication inhibitors such as hydroxyurea in the treatment of malignancies. Here, we identify a key role for the FBH1 helicase in mediating DNA double-strand break...... formation following replication inhibition. We show that FBH1-deficient cells are resistant to killing by hydroxyurea, and exhibit impaired activation of the pro-apoptotic factor p53, consistent with decreased DNA double-strand break formation. Similar findings were obtained in murine ES cells carrying...... of replication stress. Our data suggest that FBH1 helicase activity is required to eliminate cells with excessive replication stress through the generation of MUS81-induced DNA double-strand breaks....

  17. Oral delivery of double-stranded RNAs induces mortality in nymphs and adults of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdeano, Diogo Manzano; Breton, Michèle Claire; Lopes, João Roberto Spotti; Falk, Bryce W; Machado, Marcos Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is one of the most important citrus pests. ACP is the vector of the phloem-limited bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter americanus and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agents of the devastating citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB). The management of HLB is based on the use of healthy young plants, eradication of infected plants and chemical control of the vector. RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a promising tool to control pests and explore gene functions. Recently, studies have reported that target mRNA knockdown in many insects can be induced through feeding with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). In the current study, we targeted the cathepsin D, chitin synthase and inhibitor of apoptosis genes of adult and nymph ACP by feeding artificial diets mixed with dsRNAs and Murraya paniculata leaves placed in dsRNAs solutions, respectively. Adult ACP mortality was positively correlated with the amount of dsRNA used. Both nymphs and adult ACP fed dsRNAs exhibited significantly increased mortality over time compared with that of the controls. Moreover, qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the dsRNA-mediated RNAi effects on target mRNAs. These results showed that RNAi can be a powerful tool for gene function studies in ACP and perhaps for HLB control.

  18. Visualization of DNA double-strand break repair: From molecules to cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, Przemek M.; Stap, Jan; Aten, Jacob A.

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair processes are positioned at the crossroad of nuclear pathways that regulate DNA replication, cell division, senescence and apoptosis. Importantly, errors in DSB repair may lead to lethal or potentially tumorigenic chromosome rearrangements.

  19. Determination and analysis of site-specific 125I decay-induced DNA double-strand break end-group structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Kamal; Weinfeld, Michael; Neumann, Ronald D; Winters, Thomas A

    2007-02-01

    End groups contribute to the structural complexity of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). As such, end-group structures may affect a cell's ability to repair DSBs. The 3'-end groups of strand breaks caused by gamma radiation, or oxidative processes, under oxygenated aqueous conditions have been shown to be distributed primarily between 3'-phosphoglycolate and 3'-phosphate, with 5'-phosphate ends in both cases. In this study, end groups of the high-LET-like DSBs caused by 125I decay were investigated. Site-specific DNA double-strand breaks were produced in plasmid pTC27 in the presence or absence of 2 M DMSO by 125I-labeled triplex-forming oligonucleotide targeting. End-group structure was assessed enzymatically as a function of the DSB end to serve as a substrate for ligation and various forms of end labeling. Using this approach, we have demonstrated 3'-hydroxyl (3'-OH) and 3'-phosphate (3'-P) end groups and 5'-ends (> or = 42%) terminated by phosphate. A 32P postlabeling assay failed to detect 3'-phosphoglycolate in a restriction fragment terminated by the 125I-induced DNA double-strand break, and this is likely due to restricted oxygen diffusion during irradiation as a frozen aqueous solution. Even so, end-group structure and relative distribution varied as a function of the free radical scavenging capacity of the irradiation buffer.

  20. Novel double-stranded RNA viruses of plant-feeding insects encode a serine-alanine-proline rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to fungal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel double stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from the three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genome organization of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and ...

  1. RNA polymerase of the killer virus of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgopoulos, D.E.; Leibowitz, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The L/sub A/ and M double-stranded (ds) RNA segments of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encapsidated in virions that contain a DNA-independent transcriptase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of full-length (+) stranded copies of the genomic dsRNA segments, denoted l/sub A/ and m. The L/sub A/ dsRNA segment appears to encode the major capsid protein in which both dsRNA molecules are encapsidated, while M dsRNA encodes products responsible for the two killer phenotypes of toxin production and resistance to toxin. Proteins extracted from transcriptionally active virions fail to cross-react with antibody to yeast DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, suggesting that none of the subunits of the host cell polymerases are active in viral transcription. Sequence analysis of the in vitro transcripts reveals neither to be 3'-terminally polyadenylated, although m contains an apparent internal polyA-like tract. In the presence of any three ribonucleoside triphosphates (0.5 mM), the fourth ribonucleoside triphosphate shows an optimal rate of incorporation into transcript at a concentration of 20 μM. However, in a 3-hour reaction, the yield of a product RNA increases with the concentration of the limiting ribonucleotide up to 0.5 mM. Gel electrophoresis of the reaction products reveals that increasing the substrate concentration accelerates the appearance of radioactivity in full-length l/sub A/ and m transcripts

  2. A critical role for topoisomerase IIb and DNA double strand breaks in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Stuart K

    2016-05-26

    Recent studies have indicated a novel role for topoisomerase IIb in transcription. Transcription of heat shock genes, serum-induced immediate early genes and nuclear receptor-activated genes, each required DNA double strands generated by topoisomerase IIb. Such strand breaks seemed both necessary and sufficient for transcriptional activation. In addition, such transcription was associated with initiation of the DNA damage response pathways, including the activation of the enzymes: ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase 1. DNA damage response signaling was involved both in transcription and in repair of DNA breaks generated by topoisomerase IIb.

  3. Deficiency of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair Does Not Impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence in Multiple Animal Models of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Brook E.; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA bre...

  4. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break signaling and repair pathway in infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, S.; Collin-Faure, V.; Gidrol, X.; Lemercier, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highly hazardous DNA double-strand breaks can be induced in eukaryotic cells by a number of agents including pathogenic bacterial strains. We have investigated the genotoxic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen causing devastating nosocomial infections in cystic fibrosis or immunocompromised patients. Our data revealed that infection of immune or epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa triggered DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Moreover, it induced formation of discrete nuclear repair foci similar to gamma-irradiation-induced foci, and containing γH2AX and 53BP1, an adaptor protein mediating the DNA-damage response pathway. Gene deletion, mutagenesis, and complementation in P. aeruginosa identified ExoS bacterial toxin as the major factor involved in γH2AX induction. Chemical inhibition of several kinases known to phosphorylate H2AX demonstrated that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) was the principal kinase in P. aeruginosa-induced H2AX phosphorylation. Finally, infection led to ATM kinase activation by an auto-phosphorylation mechanism. Together, these data show for the first time that infection by P. aeruginosa activates the DNA double-strand break repair machinery of the host cells. This novel information sheds new light on the consequences of P. aeruginosa infection in mammalian cells. As pathogenic Escherichia coli or carcinogenic Helicobacter pylori can alter genome integrity through DNA double-strand breaks, leading to chromosomal instability and eventually cancer, our findings highlight possible new routes for further investigations of P. aeruginosa in cancer biology and they identify ATM as a potential target molecule for drug design. (authors)

  5. Chromatin mobility is increased at sites of DNA double-strand breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Borovski, T.; Stap, J.; Cijsouw, T.; ten Cate, R.; Medema, J. P.; Kanaar, R.; Franken, N. A. P.; Aten, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can efficiently kill cancer cells, but they can also produce unwanted chromosome rearrangements when DNA ends from different DSBs are erroneously joined. Movement of DSB-containing chromatin domains might facilitate these DSB interactions and promote the formation of

  6. Screening of Modified RNA duplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Kjems, Jørgen

    protection against a fish pathogenic virus. This protection corresponded with an interferon response in the fish. Here we use this fish model to screen siRNAs containing various chemical modifications of the RNA backbone for their antiviral activity, the overall aim being identification of an siRNA form......Because of sequence specific gene targeting activity siRNAs are regarded as promising active compounds in gene medicine. But one serious problem with delivering siRNAs as treatment is the now well-established non-specific activities of some RNA duplexes. Cellular reactions towards double stranded...... RNAs include the 2´-5´ oligoadenylate synthetase system, the protein kinase R, RIG-I and Toll-like receptor activated pathways all resulting in antiviral defence mechanism. We have previously shown that antiviral innate immune reactions against double stranded RNAs could be detected in vivo as partial...

  7. Modeling the yield of double-strand breaks due to formation of multiply damaged sites in irradiated plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xapsos, M.A.; Pogozelski, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    Although double-strand breaks have long been recognized as an important type of DNa lesion, it is well established that this broad class of damage does not correlate well with indicators of the effectiveness of radiation as the cellular level. Assays of double-strand breaks do not distinguish the degree of complexity or clustering of singly damaged sites produced in a single energy deposition event, which is currently hypothesized to be key to understanding cellular end points. As a step toward this understanding, double-strand breaks that are formed proportionally to dose in plasmid DNA are analyzed from the mechanistic aspect to evaluate the yield that arises from multiply damaged sites as hypothesized by Ward (Prog. Nucleic Acid Res. Mol. Biol. 35, 95-125, 1988) and Goodhead (Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 65, 7-17, 1994) as opposed to the yield that arises form single hydroxyl radicals as hypothesized by Siddiqi and Bothe (Radiat. Res. 112, 449-463, 1987). For low-LET radiation such as γ rays, the importance of multiply damaged sites is shown to increase with the solution's hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity. For moderately high-LET radiation such as 100 keV/μm helium ions, a much different behavior is observed. In this case, a large fraction of double-strand breaks are formed as a result of multiply damaged sties over a broad range of scavenging conditions. Results also indicate that the RBE for common cellular end points correlates more closely with the RBE for common cellular end points correlates more closely with the RBE for multiply damaged sites than with the RBE for total double-strand breaks over a range of LET up to at least 100 keV/μm. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Current topics in DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Junya; Takata, Minoru; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) is one of the most critical types of damage which is induced by ionizing radiation. In this review, we summarize current progress in investigations on the function of DSB repair-related proteins. We focused on recent findings in the analysis of the function of proteins such as 53BP1, histone H2AX, Mus81-Eme1, Fanc complex, and UBC13, which are found to be related to homologous recombination repair or to non-homologous end joining. In addition to the function of these proteins in DSB repair, the biological function of nuclear foci formation following DSB induction is discussed. (author)

  9. Accurate quantification of microRNA via single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    Full Text Available DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs.

  10. Accurate Quantification of microRNA via Single Strand Displacement Reaction on DNA Origami Motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jingyu; Li, Weidong; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Hongxin; Yang, Lun; Zhang, Aiping; He, Lin; Li, Can

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs) labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs. PMID:23990889

  11. Accurate quantification of microRNA via single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Feng, Xiaolu; Lou, Jingyu; Li, Weidong; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Hongxin; Yang, Lun; Zhang, Aiping; He, Lin; Li, Can

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami is an emerging technology that assembles hundreds of staple strands and one single-strand DNA into certain nanopattern. It has been widely used in various fields including detection of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in post-transcriptional gene repression as well as many other biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations of miRNAs' expression contribute to many human diseases. However, it is still a challenge to quantitatively detect miRNAs by origami technology. In this study, we developed a novel approach based on streptavidin and quantum dots binding complex (STV-QDs) labeled single strand displacement reaction on DNA origami to quantitatively detect the concentration of miRNAs. We illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of an exemplary miRNA as miRNA-133 and the STV-QDs hybridization efficiency; the results demonstrated that it is an accurate nano-scale miRNA quantifier motif. In addition, both symmetrical rectangular motif and asymmetrical China-map motif were tested. With significant linearity in both motifs, our experiments suggested that DNA Origami motif with arbitrary shape can be utilized in this method. Since this DNA origami-based method we developed owns the unique advantages of simple, time-and-material-saving, potentially multi-targets testing in one motif and relatively accurate for certain impurity samples as counted directly by atomic force microscopy rather than fluorescence signal detection, it may be widely used in quantification of miRNAs.

  12. Reprint of "Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of novel totivirus-like double-stranded RNAs from field-collected powdery mildew fungi".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Hideki; Hisano, Sakae; Chiba, Sotaro; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Andika, Ida Bagus; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Fujimori, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-02

    The identification of mycoviruses contributes greatly to understanding of the diversity and evolutionary aspects of viruses. Powdery mildew fungi are important and widely studied obligate phytopathogenic agents, but there has been no report on mycoviruses infecting these fungi. In this study, we used a deep sequencing approach to analyze the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments isolated from field-collected samples of powdery mildew fungus-infected red clover plants in Japan. Database searches identified the presence of at least ten totivirus (genus Totivirus)-like sequences, termed red clover powdery mildew-associated totiviruses (RPaTVs). The majority of these sequences shared moderate amino acid sequence identity with each other (powdery mildew fungus populations infecting red clover plants in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A strand-specific RNA-Seq analysis of the transcriptome of the typhoid bacillus Salmonella typhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy T Perkins

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available High-density, strand-specific cDNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq was used to analyze the transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi. By mapping sequence data to the entire S. Typhi genome, we analyzed the transcriptome in a strand-specific manner and further defined transcribed regions encoded within prophages, pseudogenes, previously un-annotated, and 3'- or 5'-untranslated regions (UTR. An additional 40 novel candidate non-coding RNAs were identified beyond those previously annotated. Proteomic analysis was combined with transcriptome data to confirm and refine the annotation of a number of hpothetical genes. ssRNA-seq was also combined with microarray and proteome analysis to further define the S. Typhi OmpR regulon and identify novel OmpR regulated transcripts. Thus, ssRNA-seq provides a novel and powerful approach to the characterization of the bacterial transcriptome.

  14. Diverging affinity of tospovirus RNA silencing suppressor proteins, NSs, for various RNA duplex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Esther; Hemmes, Hans; Huismann, Rik; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel; Kormelink, Richard

    2010-11-01

    The tospovirus NSs protein was previously shown to suppress the antiviral RNA silencing mechanism in plants. Here the biochemical analysis of NSs proteins from different tospoviruses, using purified NSs or NSs containing cell extracts, is described. The results showed that all tospoviral NSs proteins analyzed exhibited affinity to small double-stranded RNA molecules, i.e., small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNA (miRNA)/miRNA* duplexes. Interestingly, the NSs proteins from tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) also showed affinity to long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), whereas tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV) NSs did not. The TSWV NSs protein was shown to be capable of inhibiting Dicer-mediated cleavage of long dsRNA in vitro. In addition, it suppressed the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-specific siRNAs during coinfiltration with an inverted-repeat-GFP RNA construct in Nicotiana benthamiana. In vivo interference of TSWV NSs in the miRNA pathway was shown by suppression of an enhanced GFP (eGFP) miRNA sensor construct. The ability to stabilize miRNA/miRNA* by different tospovirus NSs proteins in vivo was demonstrated by increased accumulation and detection of both miRNA171c and miRNA171c* in tospovirus-infected N. benthamiana. All together, these data suggest that tospoviruses interfere in the RNA silencing pathway by sequestering siRNA and miRNA/miRNA* molecules before they are uploaded into their respective RNA-induced silencing complexes. The observed affinity to long dsRNA for only a subset of the tospoviruses studied is discussed in light of evolutional divergence and their ancestral relation to the animal-infecting members of the Bunyaviridae.

  15. SAMHD1 Sheds Moonlight on DNA Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Lobato, Maria Jose; Wang, Siyue; Schmidt, Christine Katrin

    2017-12-01

    SAMHD1 (sterile α motif and histidine (H) aspartate (D) domain-containing protein 1) is known for its antiviral activity of hydrolysing deoxynucleotides required for virus replication. Daddacha et al. identify a hydrolase-independent, moonlighting function of SAMHD1 that facilitates homologous recombination of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by promoting recruitment of C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CTIP), a DNA-end resection factor, to damaged DNA. These findings could benefit anticancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Transportable data from non-target arthropod field studies for the environmental risk assessment of genetically modified maize expressing an insecticidal double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aqeel; Negri, Ignacio; Oliveira, Wladecir; Brown, Christopher; Asiimwe, Peter; Sammons, Bernard; Horak, Michael; Jiang, Changjian; Carson, David

    2016-02-01

    As part of an environmental risk assessment, the potential impact of genetically modified (GM) maize MON 87411 on non-target arthropods (NTAs) was evaluated in the field. MON 87411 confers resistance to corn rootworm (CRW; Diabrotica spp.) by expressing an insecticidal double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) transcript and the Cry3Bb1 protein and tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate by producing the CP4 EPSPS protein. Field trials were conducted at 14 sites providing high geographic and environmental diversity within maize production areas from three geographic regions including the U.S., Argentina, and Brazil. MON 87411, the conventional control, and four commercial conventional reference hybrids were evaluated for NTA abundance and damage. Twenty arthropod taxa met minimum abundance criteria for valid statistical analysis. Nine of these taxa occurred in at least two of the three regions and in at least four sites across regions. These nine taxa included: aphid, predatory earwig, lacewing, ladybird beetle, leafhopper, minute pirate bug, parasitic wasp, sap beetle, and spider. In addition to wide regional distribution, these taxa encompass the ecological functions of herbivores, predators and parasitoids in maize agro-ecosystems. Thus, the nine arthropods may serve as representative taxa of maize agro-ecosystems, and thereby support that analysis of relevant data generated in one region can be transportable for the risk assessment of the same or similar GM crop products in another region. Across the 20 taxa analyzed, no statistically significant differences in abundance were detected between MON 87411 and the conventional control for 123 of the 128 individual-site comparisons (96.1%). For the nine widely distributed taxa, no statistically significant differences in abundance were detected between MON 87411 and the conventional control. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were detected between MON 87411 and the conventional control for 53 out of 56 individual

  17. A thermodynamic investigation on the binding of phenothiazinium dyes azure A and azure B to double stranded RNA polynucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Asma Yasmeen; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The binding affinity of azure B was higher than azure A to the RNAs. • The binding of dyes stabilized the melting of poly(A).poly(U) and poly(I).poly(C). • Binding of azure A was enthalpy dominated but azure B binding was favoured by both enthalpy and entropy. • Nonpolyelectrolytic forces were found to play a crucial role in the binding process. • Enthalpy–entropy compensation phenomenon was seen in all the systems. - Abstract: The thermodynamics of the reactions of the two phenothiazinium dyes azure A and azure B with the three double stranded ribonucleic acids, poly(A).poly(U), poly(C).poly(G), poly(I).poly(C) were investigated using DSC and ITC. The bound dyes stabilized the RNAs against thermal strand separation. The binding of azure A to the RNAs was predominantly enthalpy dominated while the binding of azure B was favoured by both negative enthalpy and favourable entropy changes. Although electrostatic interaction had a significant role in the binding, non-polyelectrolytic forces dominated the binding process. The negative values of heat capacity changes for the binding suggested a substantial hydrophobic contribution to the binding process. The overall binding affinity of both the dyes to the RNAs varied in the order, poly(A).poly(U) > poly(C).poly(G) > poly(I).poly(C).

  18. C3PO, an endoribonuclease that promotes RNAi by facilitating RISC activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Ye, Xuecheng; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chunyang; Chen, Dongmei; Peng, Junmin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V; Liu, Qinghua

    2009-08-07

    The catalytic engine of RNA interference (RNAi) is the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), wherein the endoribonuclease Argonaute and single-stranded small interfering RNA (siRNA) direct target mRNA cleavage. We reconstituted long double-stranded RNA- and duplex siRNA-initiated RISC activities with the use of recombinant Drosophila Dicer-2, R2D2, and Ago2 proteins. We used this core reconstitution system to purify an RNAi regulator that we term C3PO (component 3 promoter of RISC), a complex of Translin and Trax. C3PO is a Mg2+-dependent endoribonuclease that promotes RISC activation by removing siRNA passenger strand cleavage products. These studies establish an in vitro RNAi reconstitution system and identify C3PO as a key activator of the core RNAi machinery.

  19. Use of orthogonal field alternational gel electrophoresis (OFAGE) for studying DNA double strand breakage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contopoulou, C.R.; Cook, V.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The study of DNA double strand breakage and repair has normally been carried by using neutral sucrose gradient or neutral elution techniques. The authors have applied OFAGE procedures to study x-ray induced double strand breaks and repair. Breakage of chromosomes is seen by a decrease in intensity of individual chromosome bands; as expected, this decrease becomes more pronounced as chromosome size increases. The fragments of broken chromosomes appears as a broad smear in the size range 100 kb to 1000 kb. Following repair, these fragments partially disappear and the chromosomal bands increase in intensity. In four repair deficient mutants, rad51, rad52, rad54, rad55, no increase in chromosomal band intensity was seen. These results have been confirmed by blotting for a specific chromosome

  20. Regulatory RNA design through evolutionary computation and strand displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostain, William; Landrain, Thomas E; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and study of a vast number of regulatory RNAs in all kingdoms of life over the past decades has allowed the design of new synthetic RNAs that can regulate gene expression in vivo. Riboregulators, in particular, have been used to activate or repress gene expression. However, to accelerate and scale up the design process, synthetic biologists require computer-assisted design tools, without which riboregulator engineering will remain a case-by-case design process requiring expert attention. Recently, the design of RNA circuits by evolutionary computation and adapting strand displacement techniques from nanotechnology has proven to be suited to the automated generation of DNA sequences implementing regulatory RNA systems in bacteria. Herein, we present our method to carry out such evolutionary design and how to use it to create various types of riboregulators, allowing the systematic de novo design of genetic control systems in synthetic biology.

  1. Conservation of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA double-strand break repair gene in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, Michael J.; Spek, Peter van der; Kanaar, Roland; Smit, Bep; Bootsma, Dirk; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Genetic factors are likely to be major determinants of human cellular ionizing radiation sensitivity. DNA double strand breaks (dsbs) are significant ionizing radiation-induced lesions; cellular DNA dsb processing is also important in a number of other contexts. To further the understanding of DNA dsb processing in mammalian cells, we cloned and sequenced mammalian homologs of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA dsb repair gene. Materials and Methods: The genes were cloned by evolutionary walking, exploiting sequence homology between the yeast and mammalian genes. Results: No major motifs indicative of a particular function were present in the predicted amino acid sequences of the mammalian genes. Alignment of the Rad21 amino acid sequence with its putative homologs showed that similarity was distributed across the length of the proteins, with more highly conserved regions at both termini. The mHR21 sp (mouse homolog ofR ad21, S. pombe) and hHR21 sp (humanh omolog of Rad21, S. pombe) predicted proteins were 96% identical, whereas the human and S. pombe proteins were 25% identical and 47% similar. RNA blot analysis showed that mHR21 sp mRNA was abundant in all adult mouse tissues examined, with highest expression in testis and thymus. In addition to a 3.1kb mRNA transcript in all tissues, an additional 2.2kb transcript was present at a high level in post-meiotic spermatids, white expression of the 3.1kb mRNA in testis was confined to the meiotic compartment. hHR21 sp mRNA was cell cycle regulated in human cells, increasing in late S phase to a peak in G2 phase. The level of hHR21 sp transcripts was not altered by exposure of normal diploid fibroblasts to 10 Gy ionizing radiation. In situ hybridization showed mHR21 sp resided on chromosome 15D3, whereashHR21 sp localized to the syntenic 8q24 region. Conclusion: Cloning these novel mammalian genes and characterization of their protein products should contribute to the understanding of cellular

  2. Plant-feeding insects harbor double-stranded RNA viruses encoding a novel proline-alanine rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to that of fungal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel double-stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genomes of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and Circulifer tenell...

  3. Programmable autonomous synthesis of single-stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Jocelyn Y.; Schaus, Thomas E.; Gopalkrishnan, Nikhil; Xuan, Feng; Yin, Peng

    2018-02-01

    DNA performs diverse functional roles in biology, nanotechnology and biotechnology, but current methods for autonomously synthesizing arbitrary single-stranded DNA are limited. Here, we introduce the concept of primer exchange reaction (PER) cascades, which grow nascent single-stranded DNA with user-specified sequences following prescribed reaction pathways. PER synthesis happens in a programmable, autonomous, in situ and environmentally responsive fashion, providing a platform for engineering molecular circuits and devices with a wide range of sensing, monitoring, recording, signal-processing and actuation capabilities. We experimentally demonstrate a nanodevice that transduces the detection of a trigger RNA into the production of a DNAzyme that degrades an independent RNA substrate, a signal amplifier that conditionally synthesizes long fluorescent strands only in the presence of a particular RNA signal, molecular computing circuits that evaluate logic (AND, OR, NOT) combinations of RNA inputs, and a temporal molecular event recorder that records in the PER transcript the order in which distinct RNA inputs are sequentially detected.

  4. Combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics dynamics simulation of A-DNA double strands irradiated by ultra-low-energy carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngaojampa, C.; Nimmanpipug, P. [Computer Simulation and Modeling Laboratory (CSML), Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.t [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Lee, V.S., E-mail: vannajan@gmail.co [Computer Simulation and Modeling Laboratory (CSML), Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2011-02-15

    In order to promote understanding of the fundamentals of ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA, molecular dynamics simulations using combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics of poly-AT and poly-GC A-DNA double strands irradiated by <200 eV carbon ions were performed to investigate the molecular implications of mutation bias. The simulations were focused on the responses of the DNA backbones and nitrogenous bases to irradiation. Analyses of the root mean square displacements of the backbones and non-hydrogen atoms of base rings of the simulated DNA structure after irradiation revealed a potential preference of DNA double strand separation, dependent on the irradiating energy. The results show that for the backbones, the large difference in the displacement between poly-GC and poly-AT in the initial time period could be the reason for the backbone breakage; for the nitrogenous base pairs, A-T is 30% more sensitive or vulnerable to ion irradiation than G-C, demonstrating a preferential, instead of random, effect of irradiation-induced mutation.

  5. Combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics dynamics simulation of A-DNA double strands irradiated by ultra-low-energy carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngaojampa, C.; Nimmanpipug, P.; Yu, L.D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Lee, V.S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to promote understanding of the fundamentals of ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA, molecular dynamics simulations using combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics of poly-AT and poly-GC A-DNA double strands irradiated by <200 eV carbon ions were performed to investigate the molecular implications of mutation bias. The simulations were focused on the responses of the DNA backbones and nitrogenous bases to irradiation. Analyses of the root mean square displacements of the backbones and non-hydrogen atoms of base rings of the simulated DNA structure after irradiation revealed a potential preference of DNA double strand separation, dependent on the irradiating energy. The results show that for the backbones, the large difference in the displacement between poly-GC and poly-AT in the initial time period could be the reason for the backbone breakage; for the nitrogenous base pairs, A-T is 30% more sensitive or vulnerable to ion irradiation than G-C, demonstrating a preferential, instead of random, effect of irradiation-induced mutation.

  6. Temperature-dependent conformations of exciton-coupled Cy3 dimers in double-stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringle, Loni; Sawaya, Nicolas P. D.; Widom, Julia; Adams, Carson; Raymer, Michael G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the properties of electronically interacting molecular chromophores, which involve internally coupled electronic-vibrational motions, is important to the spectroscopy of many biologically relevant systems. Here we apply linear absorption, circular dichroism, and two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy to study the polarized collective excitations of excitonically coupled cyanine dimers (Cy3)2 that are rigidly positioned within the opposing sugar-phosphate backbones of the double-stranded region of a double-stranded (ds)-single-stranded (ss) DNA fork construct. We show that the exciton-coupling strength of the (Cy3)2-DNA construct can be systematically varied with temperature below the ds-ss DNA denaturation transition. We interpret spectroscopic measurements in terms of the Holstein vibronic dimer model, from which we obtain information about the local conformation of the (Cy3)2 dimer, as well as the degree of static disorder experienced by the Cy3 monomer and the (Cy3)2 dimer probe locally within their respective DNA duplex environments. The properties of the (Cy3)2-DNA construct we determine suggest that it may be employed as a useful model system to test fundamental concepts of protein-DNA interactions and the role of electronic-vibrational coherence in electronic energy migration within exciton-coupled bio-molecular arrays.

  7. Oral delivery of double-stranded RNAs induces mortality in nymphs and adults of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Manzano Galdeano

    Full Text Available The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is one of the most important citrus pests. ACP is the vector of the phloem-limited bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter americanus and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agents of the devastating citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB. The management of HLB is based on the use of healthy young plants, eradication of infected plants and chemical control of the vector. RNA interference (RNAi has proven to be a promising tool to control pests and explore gene functions. Recently, studies have reported that target mRNA knockdown in many insects can be induced through feeding with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA. In the current study, we targeted the cathepsin D, chitin synthase and inhibitor of apoptosis genes of adult and nymph ACP by feeding artificial diets mixed with dsRNAs and Murraya paniculata leaves placed in dsRNAs solutions, respectively. Adult ACP mortality was positively correlated with the amount of dsRNA used. Both nymphs and adult ACP fed dsRNAs exhibited significantly increased mortality over time compared with that of the controls. Moreover, qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the dsRNA-mediated RNAi effects on target mRNAs. These results showed that RNAi can be a powerful tool for gene function studies in ACP and perhaps for HLB control.

  8. Theoretical investigation of the production of strand breaks in DNA by water radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Magee, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    A calculation has been made of the indirect action of radiation on SV40 DNA in dilute aqueous solution, including the extent of OH reaction with both the sugar moiety and the bases. A realistic DNA model is used along with a track model that gives the correct decay rates of hydrated electrons and OH radicals in pure water with the same calculational techniques. It was found, in agreement with experiment, that 80% of the OH attack on DNA is on the bases and 20% is on the sugar. It is estimated that the probability is almost non-existent ( -6 ) for two OH radicals from the same track or from two tracks to reach sugars on opposite strands within 12 base pairs from each other. Thus double strand breaks that depend linearly on the dose (as we find in a companion experimental programme) must arise from some other mechanism. The calculated single strand break probabilities are in good agreement with experiment. (author)

  9. Velocity and processivity of helicase unwinding of double-stranded nucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betterton, M D; Juelicher, F

    2005-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motors which unwind double-stranded nucleic acids (dsNA) in cells. Many helicases move with directional bias on single-stranded (ss) nucleic acids, and couple their directional translocation to strand separation. A model of the coupling between translocation and unwinding uses an interaction potential to represent passive and active helicase mechanisms. A passive helicase must wait for thermal fluctuations to open dsNA base pairs before it can advance and inhibit NA closing. An active helicase directly destabilizes dsNA base pairs, accelerating the opening rate. Here we extend this model to include helicase unbinding from the nucleic-acid strand. The helicase processivity depends on the form of the interaction potential. A passive helicase has a mean attachment time which does not change between ss translocation and ds unwinding, while an active helicase in general shows a decrease in attachment time during unwinding relative to ss translocation. In addition, we describe how helicase unwinding velocity and processivity vary if the base-pair binding free energy is changed

  10. Studies of the effects of ultraviolet radiation on the structural integrities of ribosomal RNA components of the Escherichia coli 50S ribosomal subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelic, L.; Parker, D.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of 254-nm radiation on the structural integrities of free and 50S ribosome-bound 5S and 23S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNA) have been elucidated. Irradiation of aqueous solutions of Escherichia coli 50S ribosomes with 253.7-nm radiation results in the formation of single-strand breaks in double-stranded regions of the 23S rRNA component, but not in rRNA chain scission, and destabilization of the secondary structure of the 23S rRNA toward denaturation. The minimum doses of 253.7-nm radiation required for the first detection of the two effects are 7 x 10 19 quanta for the production of single-strand breaks in double-stranded regions of the 23S rRNA, and 19 quanta for destabilization of the 23S rRNA secondary structure. Free 23S rRNA is resistant toward photoinduced chain breakage at doses of 253.7-nm radiation up to at least 2.3 x 10 20 and is much less sensitive toward destabilization of secondary structure than ribosome-bound 23S rRNA. In contrast to the photosensitivity of 50S ribosome-bound 23S rRNA toward chain breakage, 50S ribosome-bound 5S rRNA is resistant toward chain breakage at doses of 253.7-nm radiation up to at least 2.3 x 10 20 quanta. Ribosome-bound 5S and 23S rRNA are also not photosensitive toward intermolecular 5S/23S rRNA cross-linkage

  11. A plasmonic colorimetric strategy for visual miRNA detection based on hybridization chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jie; Wang, Jingsheng; Guo, Jinyang; Gao, Huiguang; Han, Kun; Jiang, Chengmin; Miao, Peng

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a novel colorimetric strategy for miRNA analysis is proposed based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR)-mediated localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) variation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). miRNA in the sample to be tested is able to release HCR initiator from a solid interface to AgNPs colloid system by toehold exchange-mediated strand displacement, which then triggers the consumption of fuel strands with single-stranded tails for HCR. The final produced long nicked double-stranded DNA loses the ability to protect AgNPs from salt-induced aggregation. The stability variation of the colloid system can then be monitored by recording corresponding UV-vis spectrum and initial miRNA level is thus determined. This sensing system involves only four DNA strands which is quite simple. The practical utility is confirmed to be excellent by employing different biological samples.

  12. Mutation of mapped TIA-1/TIAR binding sites in the 3' terminal stem-loop of West Nile virus minus-strand RNA in an infectious clone negatively affects genomic RNA amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Mohamed M; Liu, Hsuan; Davis, William G; Brinton, Margo A

    2008-11-01

    Previous data showed that the cellular proteins TIA-1 and TIAR bound specifically to the West Nile virus 3' minus-strand stem-loop [WNV3'(-)SL] RNA (37) and colocalized with flavivirus replication complexes in WNV- and dengue virus-infected cells (21). In the present study, the sites on the WNV3'(-)SL RNA required for efficient in vitro T-cell intracellular antigen-related (TIAR) and T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) protein binding were mapped to short AU sequences (UAAUU) located in two internal loops of the WNV3'(-)SL RNA structure. Infectious clone RNAs with all or most of the binding site nucleotides in one of the 3' (-)SL loops deleted or substituted did not produce detectable virus after transfection or subsequent passage. With one exception, deletion/mutation of a single terminal nucleotide in one of the binding sequences had little effect on the efficiency of protein binding or virus production, but mutation of a nucleotide in the middle of a binding sequence reduced both the in vitro protein binding efficiency and virus production. Plaque size, intracellular genomic RNA levels, and virus production progressively decreased with decreasing in vitro TIAR/TIA-1 binding activity, but the translation efficiency of the various mutant RNAs was similar to that of the parental RNA. Several of the mutant RNAs that inefficiently interacted with TIAR/TIA-1 in vitro rapidly reverted in vivo, indicating that they could replicate at a low level and suggesting that an interaction between TIAR/TIA-1 and the viral 3'(-)SL RNA is not required for initial low-level symmetric RNA replication but instead facilitates the subsequent asymmetric amplification of genome RNA from the minus-strand template.

  13. Compound Poisson Processes and Clustered Damage of Radiation Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Ritter, S.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental data have demonstrated that DNA damage induced by densely ionizing radiation in mammalian cells is distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters. The principal constituent of DNA damage are double-strand breaks (DSB) which are formed when the breaks occur in both DNA strands and are directly opposite or separated by only a few base pairs. DSBs are believed to be most important lesions produced in chromosomes by radiation; interaction between DSBs can lead to cell killing, mutation or carcinogenesis. The paper discusses a model of clustered DSB formation viewed in terms of compound Poisson process along with the predictive essay of the formalism in application to experimental data. (author)

  14. Clinical Results of Flexor Tendon Repair in Zone II Using a six Strand Double Loop Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidou, Christiana; Tsai, Tsu-Min

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the clinical results after repair of flexor tendon zone II injuries utilizing a 6-strand double-loop technique and early post-operative active rehabilitation. We retrospectively reviewed 22 patients involving 51 cases with zone II flexor tendon repair using a six strand double loop technique from September 1996 to December 2012. Most common mechanism of injuries was sharp lacerations (86.5 %). Tendon injuries occurred equally in manual and non-manual workers and were work-related in 33 % of the cases. The Strickland score for active range of motion (ROM) postoperatively was excellent and good in the majority of the cases (81 %). The rupture rate was 1.9 %. The six strand double loop technique for Zone II flexor tendon repair leads to good and excellent motion in the majority of patients and low re- rupture rate. It is clinically effective and allows for early postoperative active rehabilitation.

  15. Sub-ensemble monitoring of DNA strand displacement using multiparameter single-molecule FRET

    OpenAIRE

    Baltierra Jasso, Laura; Morten, Michael; Magennis, Steven William

    2018-01-01

    Non-enzymatic DNA strand displacement is an important mechanism in dynamic DNA nanotechnology. Here we show that the large parameter space that is accessible by single-molecule FRET is ideal for the simultaneous monitoring of multiple reactants and products of DNA strand exchange reactions. We monitored the strand displacement from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at 37 °C; the data were modelled as a second-order reaction approaching equilibrium, with a rate constan...

  16. Inhibition of DNA-double strand break repair by antimony compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Sentaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Utsumi, Hiroshi; Bedford, Joel S.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2002-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by γ-irradiation in Chinese hamster ovary cells, were used to examine whether antimony compounds affect the repair of DNA damage. The cells were first incubated with antimony trichloride or antimony potassium tartrate (both Sb(III)) for 2 h, and then irradiated with γ-rays at a dose of 40 Gy. The DNA DSB was quantified with pulsed field gel electrophoresis immediately after irradiation (non-repair group) as well as at 30 min post-irradiation (repair group). The degree of repair inhibition was determined by the differences in the amount of DNA DSB between non-repair and repair groups. Both antimony compounds inhibited repair of DNA DSB in a dose dependent manner. In trichloride, 0.2 mM antimony significantly inhibited the rejoining of DSB, while 0.4 mM was necessary in potassium antimony tartrate. The mean lethal doses, D 0 , for the treatment with antimony trichloride and antimony potassium tartrate, were approximately 0.21 and 0.12 mM, respectively. This indicates that the repair inhibition by antimony trichloride occurred in the dose range near D 0 , but the antimony potassium tartrate inhibited the repair at doses where most cells lost their proliferating ability. This is the first report to indicate that antimony compounds may inhibit the repair of radiation-induced DNA DSB

  17. Investigation on accordance of DNA double-strand break of blood between in vivo and in vitro irradiation using single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiang; Jiang Enhai; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan; Zhao Yongcheng; Fan Feiyue

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the consistency of DNA double-strand break between in vivo and in vitro irradiation, as a prophase study in radiation biodosimetry using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Methods: Detect DNA double-strand break after whole-body and in vitro radiation in mice lymphocytes using neutral single cell gel electrophoresis. The comet images were processed by CASP software and all the data were analysed by SPSS12.0. Results: There is no difference between in vivo and in vitro irradiation group in HDNA%, TDNA%, CL, TL, TM and OTM. Conclusion: The result of neutral single cell gel electrophoresis shortly after in vitro irradiation can precisely reflect the DNA double-strand break of lymphocytes in whole-body irradiation. (authors)

  18. The importance of becoming double-stranded: Innate immunity and the kinetic model of HIV-1 central plus strand synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeschla, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Central initiation of plus strand synthesis is a conserved feature of lentiviruses and certain other retroelements. This complication of the standard reverse transcription mechanism produces a transient “central DNA flap” in the viral cDNA, which has been proposed to mediate its subsequent nuclear import. This model has assumed that the important feature is the flapped DNA structure itself rather than the process that produces it. Recently, an alternative kinetic model was proposed. It posits that central plus strand synthesis functions to accelerate conversion to the double-stranded state, thereby helping HIV-1 to evade single-strand DNA-targeting antiviral restrictions such as APOBEC3 proteins, and perhaps to avoid innate immune sensor mechanisms. The model is consistent with evidence that lentiviruses must often synthesize their cDNAs when dNTP concentrations are limiting and with data linking reverse transcription and uncoating. There may be additional kinetic advantages for the artificial genomes of lentiviral gene therapy vectors. - Highlights: • Two main functional models for HIV central plus strand synthesis have been proposed. • In one, a transient central DNA flap in the viral cDNA mediates HIV-1 nuclear import. • In the other, multiple kinetic consequences are emphasized. • One is defense against APOBEC3G, which deaminates single-stranded DNA. • Future questions pertain to antiviral restriction, uncoating and nuclear import

  19. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer treatment is the development of therapies that target cancer cells with little or no toxicity to normal tissues and cells. Alterations in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair in cancer cells include both elevated and reduced levels of key repair proteins and changes in the relative contributions of the various DSB repair pathways. These differences can result in increased sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and increased genomic instability. The development of agent...

  20. Different responses to muon implantation in single- and double-stranded DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Penny L.; Tani, Akiko; Oganesyan, Vasily S.; Butt, Julea N.; Cottrell, Stephen P.; Jayasooriya, Upali A.

    2006-01-01

    A model-free analysis of the longitudinal muon spin relaxation of muons implanted into single- and double-stranded DNA samples is reported. These samples show distinctly different responses to implanted muons with discontinuities of the integrated asymmetries at temperatures where these molecules are likely to have onset of molecular and electron dynamics

  1. Calibration of pulsed field gel electrophoresis for measurement of DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, D.D.; Dewey, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay was calibrated for the measurement of X-ray induced DNA double-strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Calibration was conducted by incorporating [ 125 I] deoxyuridine into DNA, which induces one double-strand break for every disintegration that occurs in frozen cells. Based on the percentage of DNA migrating into the gel, the number of breaks/dalton/Gy was estimated to be (9.3±1.0) x 10 -12 . This value is close to (10 to 12) x 10 -12 determined by neutral filter elution using similar cell lysis procedures at 24 o C and at pH8.0. The estimate is in good agreement with the value of (11.7±2) x 10 -12 breaks/dalton/Gy as measured in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells using the neutral sucrose gradient method (Bloecher 1988), and (6 to 9) x 10 -12 breaks/dalton/Gy as measured in mouse L and Chinese hamster V79 cells using neutral filter elution (Radford and Hodgson 1985). (author)

  2. Binding to the minor groove of the double-strand, tau protein prevents DNA from damage by peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan; Qu, Mei-Hua; Wang, Xing-Sheng; Chen, Lan; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Hua, Qian; He, Rong-Qiao

    2008-07-02

    Tau, an important microtubule associated protein, has been found to bind to DNA, and to be localized in the nuclei of both neurons and some non-neuronal cells. Here, using electrophoretic mobility shifting assay (EMSA) in the presence of DNA with different chain-lengths, we observed that tau protein favored binding to a 13 bp or a longer polynucleotide. The results from atomic force microscopy also showed that tau protein preferred a 13 bp polynucleotide to a 12 bp or shorter polynucleotide. In a competitive assay, a minor groove binder distamycin A was able to replace the bound tau from the DNA double helix, indicating that tau protein binds to the minor groove. Tau protein was able to protect the double-strand from digestion in the presence of DNase I that was bound to the minor groove. On the other hand, a major groove binder methyl green as a negative competitor exhibited little effect on the retardation of tau-DNA complex in EMSA. This further indicates the DNA minor groove as the binding site for tau protein. EMSA with truncated tau proteins showed that both the proline-rich domain (PRD) and the microtubule-binding domain (MTBD) contributed to the interaction with DNA; that is to say, both PRD and MTBD bound to the minor groove of DNA and bent the double-strand, as observed by electron microscopy. To investigate whether tau protein is able to prevent DNA from the impairment by hydroxyl free radical, the chemiluminescence emitted by the phen-Cu/H(2)O(2)/ascorbate was measured. The emission intensity of the luminescence was markedly decreased when tau protein was present, suggesting a significant protection of DNA from the damage in the presence of hydroxyl free radical.

  3. Establishment of a markerless mutation delivery system in Bacillus subtilis stimulated by a double-strand break in the chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Shi

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis has been a model for gram-positive bacteria and it has long been exploited for industrial and biotechnological applications. However, the availability of facile genetic tools for physiological analysis has generally lagged substantially behind traditional genetic models such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this work, we have developed an efficient, precise and scarless method for rapid multiple genetic modifications without altering the chromosome of B. subtilis. This method employs upp gene as a counter-selectable marker, double-strand break (DSB repair caused by exogenous endonuclease I-SceI and comK overexpression for fast preparation of competent cell. Foreign dsDNA can be simply and efficiently integrated into the chromosome by double-crossover homologous recombination. The DSB repair is a potent inducement for stimulating the second intramolecular homologous recombination, which not only enhances the frequency of resolution by one to two orders of magnitude, but also selects for the resolved product. This method has been successfully and reiteratively used in B. subtilis to deliver point mutations, to generate in-frame deletions, and to construct large-scale deletions. Experimental results proved that it allowed repeated use of the selectable marker gene for multiple modifications and could be a useful technique for B. subtilis.

  4. Effects of garlic on cellular doubling time and DNA strand breaks caused by UV light and BPL, enhanced with catechol and TPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baturay, N.Z.; Gayle, F.; Liu, S.; Kreidinger, C.

    1995-01-01

    3T3 cell cultures were exposed to UV light and Beta-Propiolactone. Neoplastic cell transformation (TF) was demonstrated after concurrent addition of catechol, or repeated addition of TPA. Addition of garlic to all fluences/concentrations of the carcinogen/cocarcinogen/promoter groups reduced the number of transformed foci/dish by at least 40%. Since the cell cycle is prolonged following exposure to carcinogens, it is likely the cell requires a longer time to repair this damage. The doubling time (DT) was extended from 12 to 36 hrs. when cells were exposed to BPL and from 12 o 28 hrs. when cells were exposed to 3.0J/M2/sec. If an anticarcinogenic compound is also added, it is reasonable to assume that the cell cycle may be further elongated. The cell cycle, denoted by DT was lengthened from 12 to 47 hrs and from 12 to 86 hrs for BPL and UVC, respectively. The extensions occurred in a dope dependent manner. The concentrations of the cocarcinogen and promoter remained constant throughout the experiment. When strand breaks were determined at the same dose sequences, by alkaline elution, more repair was seen with garlic where the lowest and middle doses of BPL were used and almost no decrease in % DNA eluted was seen with UVC exposed cells. With catechol, there was a two-fold decrease in % DNA eluted at the lowest and middle fluences. When TPA was added, all three fluences of UVC showed more than a threefold decrease in % DNA eluted. BPS with both TPA and catechol, again showed a reduction in strand breaks only low and middle doses. Both a direct-acting alkylating agent, BPL, and a physical carcinogen, UVC, were homogeneously affected, in terms of doubling time, but not when strand break repair was examined. A separate mechanism may be responsible for repair, and the mechanism associated with combinations of physical carcinogen enhancing agents combined with some non-carcinogens may be more profoundly affected by some natural products

  5. Methylproamine protects against ionizing radiation by preventing DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, Carl N.; Vasireddy, Raja S.; Karagiannis, Tom C.; Loveridge, Shanon J.; Martin, Roger F.; McKay, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The majority of cancer patients will receive radiotherapy (RT), therefore, investigations into advances of this modality are important. Conventional RT dose intensities are limited by adverse responses in normal tissues and a primary goal is to ameliorate adverse normal tissue effects. The aim of these experiments is to further our understanding regarding the mechanism of radioprotection by the DNA minor groove binder, methylproamine, in a cellular context at the DNA level. Materials and methods: We used immunocytochemical methods to measure the accumulation of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci following ionizing radiation (IR) in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells exposed to methylproamine. Furthermore, we performed pulsed field gel electrophoresis DNA damage and repair assays to directly interrogate the action of methylproamine on DNA in irradiated cells. Results: We found that methylproamine-treated cells had fewer γH2AX foci after IR compared to untreated cells. Also, the presence of methylproamine decreased the amount of lower molecular weight DNA entering the gel as shown by the pulsed field gel electrophoresis assay. Conclusions: These results suggest that methylproamine acts by preventing the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) and support the hypothesis that radioprotection by methylproamine is mediated, at least in part, by decreasing initial DNA damage.

  6. Double strand DNA breaks response in Huntington´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Petr; Valášek, Jan; Rausová, Petra; Juhásová, Jana; Juhás, Štefan; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 15-15 ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Huntington ´s disease * DNA damage * double strand DNA breaks Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. DNA strand breaks, repair, and survival in x-irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugle, D.L.; Gillespie, C.J.; Chapman, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The yields of unrepairable single- and double-strand breaks in the DNA of x-irradiated Chinese hamster cells were measured by low-speed neutral and alkaline sucrose density gradient sedimentation in order to investigate the relation between these lesions and reproductive death. After maximal single-strand rejoining, at all doses, the number of residual single-strand breaks was twice the number of residual double-strand breaks. Both double-strand and unrepairable single-strand breaks were proportional to the square of absorbed dose, in the range 10-50 krad. No rejoining of double-strand breaks was observed. These observations suggest that, in mammalian cells, most double-strand breaks are not repairable, while all single-strand breaks are repaired except those that are sufficiently close on complementary strands to constitute double-strand breaks. Comparison with cell survival measurements at much lower doses suggests that loss of reproductive capacity corresponds to induction of approximately one double-strand break

  8. RNA-Seq of Bacillus licheniformis: active regulatory RNA features expressed within a productive fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The production of enzymes by an industrial strain requires a complex adaption of the bacterial metabolism to the conditions within the fermenter. Regulatory events within the process result in a dynamic change of the transcriptional activity of the genome. This complex network of genes is orchestrated by proteins as well as regulatory RNA elements. Here we present an RNA-Seq based study considering selected phases of an industry-oriented fermentation of Bacillus licheniformis. Results A detailed analysis of 20 strand-specific RNA-Seq datasets revealed a multitude of transcriptionally active genomic regions. 3314 RNA features encoded by such active loci have been identified and sorted into ten functional classes. The identified sequences include the expected RNA features like housekeeping sRNAs, metabolic riboswitches and RNA switches well known from studies on Bacillus subtilis as well as a multitude of completely new candidates for regulatory RNAs. An unexpectedly high number of 855 RNA features are encoded antisense to annotated protein and RNA genes, in addition to 461 independently transcribed small RNAs. These antisense transcripts contain molecules with a remarkable size range variation from 38 to 6348 base pairs in length. The genome of the type strain B. licheniformis DSM13 was completely reannotated using data obtained from RNA-Seq analyses and from public databases. Conclusion The hereby generated data-sets represent a solid amount of knowledge on the dynamic transcriptional activities during the investigated fermentation stages. The identified regulatory elements enable research on the understanding and the optimization of crucial metabolic activities during a productive fermentation of Bacillus licheniformis strains. PMID:24079885

  9. RNA-Seq of Bacillus licheniformis: active regulatory RNA features expressed within a productive fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Sandra; Dietrich, Sascha; Hertel, Robert; Bongaerts, Johannes; Evers, Stefan; Volland, Sonja; Daniel, Rolf; Liesegang, Heiko

    2013-10-01

    The production of enzymes by an industrial strain requires a complex adaption of the bacterial metabolism to the conditions within the fermenter. Regulatory events within the process result in a dynamic change of the transcriptional activity of the genome. This complex network of genes is orchestrated by proteins as well as regulatory RNA elements. Here we present an RNA-Seq based study considering selected phases of an industry-oriented fermentation of Bacillus licheniformis. A detailed analysis of 20 strand-specific RNA-Seq datasets revealed a multitude of transcriptionally active genomic regions. 3314 RNA features encoded by such active loci have been identified and sorted into ten functional classes. The identified sequences include the expected RNA features like housekeeping sRNAs, metabolic riboswitches and RNA switches well known from studies on Bacillus subtilis as well as a multitude of completely new candidates for regulatory RNAs. An unexpectedly high number of 855 RNA features are encoded antisense to annotated protein and RNA genes, in addition to 461 independently transcribed small RNAs. These antisense transcripts contain molecules with a remarkable size range variation from 38 to 6348 base pairs in length. The genome of the type strain B. licheniformis DSM13 was completely reannotated using data obtained from RNA-Seq analyses and from public databases. The hereby generated data-sets represent a solid amount of knowledge on the dynamic transcriptional activities during the investigated fermentation stages. The identified regulatory elements enable research on the understanding and the optimization of crucial metabolic activities during a productive fermentation of Bacillus licheniformis strains.

  10. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Weyler

    Full Text Available The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  11. Restriction endonucleases from invasive Neisseria gonorrhoeae cause double-strand breaks and distort mitosis in epithelial cells during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyler, Linda; Engelbrecht, Mattias; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Brehwens, Karl; Vare, Daniel; Vielfort, Katarina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Aro, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The host epithelium is both a barrier against, and the target for microbial infections. Maintaining regulated cell growth ensures an intact protective layer towards microbial-induced cellular damage. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections disrupt host cell cycle regulation machinery and the infection causes DNA double strand breaks that delay progression through the G2/M phase. We show that intracellular gonococci upregulate and release restriction endonucleases that enter the nucleus and damage human chromosomal DNA. Bacterial lysates containing restriction endonucleases were able to fragment genomic DNA as detected by PFGE. Lysates were also microinjected into the cytoplasm of cells in interphase and after 20 h, DNA double strand breaks were identified by 53BP1 staining. In addition, by using live-cell microscopy and NHS-ester stained live gonococci we visualized the subcellular location of the bacteria upon mitosis. Infected cells show dysregulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins MAD1 and MAD2, impaired and prolonged M-phase, nuclear swelling, micronuclei formation and chromosomal instability. These data highlight basic molecular functions of how gonococcal infections affect host cell cycle regulation, cause DNA double strand breaks and predispose cellular malignancies.

  12. Initiation of poliovirus plus-strand RNA synthesis in a membrane complex of infected HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, N.; Kuhn, R.J.; Yang, C.F.; Takegami, T.; Wimmer, E.

    1986-01-01

    An in vitro poliovirus RNA-synthesizing system derived from a crude membrance fraction of infected HeLa cells was used to analyze the mechanism of initiation of poliovirus plus-strand RNA synthesis. This system contains an activity that synthesizes the nucleotidyl proteins VPg-pU and VPg-pUpU. These molecules represent the 5'-terminal structure of nascent RNA molecules and of virion RNA. The membranous replication complex is also capable of synthesizing mucleotidyl proteins containing nine or more of the poliovirus 5'-proximal nucleotides as assayed by the formation of the RNase T 1 -resistant oligonucleotide VPg-pUUAAAACAGp or by fingerprint analysis of the in vitro-synthesized 32 P-RNA. Incubation of preformed VPg-pUpU with unlabeled nucleoside triphosphates resulted in the formation of VPg-pUUAAAACAGp. This reaction, which appeared to be an elongation of VPg-pUpU, was stimulated by the addition of a soluble fraction (S-10) obtained from uninfected HeLa cells. Preformed VPg-pU could be chased into VPg-pUpU in the presence of UTP. The data are consistent with a model that VPg-pU can function as a primer for poliovirus plus-strand RNA synthesis in the membranous replication complex and that the elongation reaction may be stimulated by a host cellular factor

  13. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes and glioma susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Peng; Zou, Peng; Zhao, Lin; Yan, Wei; Kang, Chunsheng; Jiang, Tao; You, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in DNA double-strand break repair genes can influence the ability of a cell to repair damaged DNA and alter an individual’s susceptibility to cancer. We studied whether polymorphisms in DNA double-strand break repair genes are associated with an increased risk of glioma development. We genotyped 10 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes (XRCC3, BRCA2, RAG1, XRCC5, LIG4, XRCC4 and ATM) in a case–control study including 384 glioma patients and 384 cancer-free controls in a Chinese Han population. Genotypes were determined using the OpenArray platform. In the single-locus analysis there was a significant association between gliomas and the LIG4 rs1805388 (Ex2 +54C>T, Thr9Ile) TT genotype (adjusted OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.87-5.71), as well as the TC genotype (adjusted OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20-2.18). We also found that the homozygous variant genotype (GG) of XRCC4 rs1805377 (IVS7-1A>G, splice-site) was associated with a significantly increased risk of gliomas (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.12-2.80). Interestingly, we detected a significant additive and multiplicative interaction effect between the LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377 polymorphisms with an increasing risk of gliomas. When we stratified our analysis by smoking status, LIG4 rs1805388 was associated with an increased glioma risk among smokers. These results indicate for the first time that LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377, alone or in combination, are associated with a risk of gliomas

  14. Clinical Improvement by Switching to an Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor in Hemophiliac Patients with HIV: The Japan Cohort Study of HIV Patients Infected through Blood Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawado, Miyuki; Hashimoto, Shuji; Oka, Shin-Ichi; Fukutake, Katsuyuki; Higasa, Satoshi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Ogane, Miwa; Okamoto, Manabu; Shirasaka, Takuma

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine improvement in HIV RNA levels and the CD4 cell count by switching to an antiretroviral regimen with an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) in patients with HIV. This study was conducted on Japanese patients with HIV who were infected by blood products in the 1980s. Data were collected between 2007 and 2014. Data of 564 male hemophiliac patients with HIV from the Japan Cohort Study of HIV Patients Infected through Blood Products were available. Changes in antiretroviral regimen use, HIV RNA levels, and the CD4 cell count between 2007 and 2014 were examined. From 2007 to 2014, the proportion of use of a regimen with an INSTI increased from 0.0% to 41.0%. For patients with HIV who used a regimen, including an INSTI, the proportion of HIV RNA levels products. This suggests that performing this switch in clinical practice will lead to favorable effects.

  15. Towards quantitative viromics for both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roux

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Viruses strongly influence microbial population dynamics and ecosystem functions. However, our ability to quantitatively evaluate those viral impacts is limited to the few cultivated viruses and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA viral genomes captured in quantitative viral metagenomes (viromes. This leaves the ecology of non-dsDNA viruses nearly unknown, including single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses that have been frequently observed in viromes, but not quantified due to amplification biases in sequencing library preparations (Multiple Displacement Amplification, Linker Amplification or Tagmentation. Methods Here we designed mock viral communities including both ssDNA and dsDNA viruses to evaluate the capability of a sequencing library preparation approach including an Adaptase step prior to Linker Amplification for quantitative amplification of both dsDNA and ssDNA templates. We then surveyed aquatic samples to provide first estimates of the abundance of ssDNA viruses. Results Mock community experiments confirmed the biased nature of existing library preparation methods for ssDNA templates (either largely enriched or selected against and showed that the protocol using Adaptase plus Linker Amplification yielded viromes that were ±1.8-fold quantitative for ssDNA and dsDNA viruses. Application of this protocol to community virus DNA from three freshwater and three marine samples revealed that ssDNA viruses as a whole represent only a minor fraction (<5% of DNA virus communities, though individual ssDNA genomes, both eukaryote-infecting Circular Rep-Encoding Single-Stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA viruses and bacteriophages from the Microviridae family, can be among the most abundant viral genomes in a sample. Discussion Together these findings provide empirical data for a new virome library preparation protocol, and a first estimate of ssDNA virus abundance in aquatic systems.

  16. Ionizing-radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks: A direct and indirect lighting up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignard, Julien; Mirey, Gladys; Salles, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation has been extensively studied by biochemical or cell imaging techniques. Cell imaging development relies on technical advances as well as our knowledge of the cell DNA damage response (DDR) process. The DDR involves a complex network of proteins that initiate and coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair activities. As some DDR proteins assemble at DSBs in an established spatio-temporal pattern, visible nuclear foci are produced. In addition, post-translational modifications are important for the signaling and the recruitment of specific partners at damaged chromatin foci. We briefly review here the most widely used methods to study DSBs. We also discuss the development of indirect methods, using reporter expression or intra-nuclear antibodies, to follow the production of DSBs in real time and in living cells

  17. Highly selective and sensitive detection of miRNA based on toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction and DNA tetrahedron substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Ding, Yongshun; Wang, Lei

    2015-09-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in a variety of biological processes and have been regarded as tumor biomarkers in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In this work, a single-molecule counting method for miRNA analysis was proposed based on toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (SDR) and DNA tetrahedron substrate. Firstly, a specially designed DNA tetrahedron was assembled with a hairpin at one of the vertex, which has an overhanging toehold domain. Then, the DNA tetrahedron was immobilized on the epoxy-functional glass slide by epoxy-amine reaction, forming a DNA tetrahedron substrate. Next, the target miRNA perhybridized with the toehold domain and initiated a strand displacement reaction along with the unfolding of the hairpin, realizing the selective recognization of miRNA. Finally, a biotin labeled detection DNA was hybridized with the new emerging single strand and the streptavidin coated QDs were used as fluorescent probes. Fluorescent images were acquired via epi-fluorescence microscopy, the numbers of fluorescence dots were counted one by one for quantification. The detection limit is 5 fM, which displayed an excellent sensitivity. Moreover, the proposed method which can accurately be identified the target miRNA among its family members, demonstrated an admirable selectivity. Furthermore, miRNA analysis in total RNA samples from human lung tissues was performed, suggesting the feasibility of this method for quantitative detection of miRNA in biomedical research and early clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA strand breakage by 125I-decay in oligoDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobachevsky, P.; Martin, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: A double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide containing 125 I-dC in a defined location, with 5'- or 3'- 32 P-end-labelling of either strand, was used to investigate DNA strand breakage resulting from 125 I decay. Samples of the 32 P-end-labelled and 125 I-dC containing oligoDNA were incubated in 20 mM phosphate buffer (PB), or PB + 2 M dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) at 4 deg during 18-20 days. The 32 P-end-labelled DNA fragments produced by 125 I decays were separated on denaturing polyacrylamide gels, and the 3P activity in each fragment was determined by scintillation counting after elution from the gel. The fragment size distribution was then converted to a distribution of single stranded break probabilities at each nucleotide position. The results indicate that each 125 I decay event produces at least one break in the 125 I-dC containing strand, and causes breakage of the opposite strand in 75-80% of events. Thus, the double stranded break is produced by 125 I decay with probability ∼0.8. Most of single stranded breaks (around 90%) occurred within 5-6 nucleotides of the 125 I-dC, however DNA breaks were detected up to 18-20 nucleotides from the decay site. The average numbers of single stranded breaks per decay are 3.7 (PB) and 3.3 (PB+DMSO) in 125 I-dC containing strand, and 1.5 (PB) and 1.3 (PB+DMSO) in the opposite strand. Deconvolution of strand break probabilities as a function of separation from the 125 I, in terms of both distance (to target deoxyribosyl carbon atoms, in B-DNA) and nucleotide number, show that the latter is an important parameter for the shorter-range damage. This could indicate a role for attenuation/dissipation of damage through the stacked bases. In summary, the results represent a much more extensive set of data than available from earlier experiments on DNA breakage from l25 I-decay, and may provide new mechanistic insights

  19. Dengue virus type 2 infections of Aedes aegypti are modulated by the mosquito's RNA interference pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Sánchez-Vargas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that both innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms greatly influence the course of human dengue virus (DENV infections, but little is known about the innate immune response of the mosquito vector Aedes aegypti to arbovirus infection. We present evidence here that a major component of the mosquito innate immune response, RNA interference (RNAi, is an important modulator of mosquito infections. The RNAi response is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, which occurs in the cytoplasm as a result of positive-sense RNA virus infection, leading to production of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs. These siRNAs are instrumental in degradation of viral mRNA with sequence homology to the dsRNA trigger and thereby inhibition of virus replication. We show that although dengue virus type 2 (DENV2 infection of Ae. aegypti cultured cells and oral infection of adult mosquitoes generated dsRNA and production of DENV2-specific siRNAs, virus replication and release of infectious virus persisted, suggesting viral circumvention of RNAi. We also show that DENV2 does not completely evade RNAi, since impairing the pathway by silencing expression of dcr2, r2d2, or ago2, genes encoding important sensor and effector proteins in the RNAi pathway, increased virus replication in the vector and decreased the extrinsic incubation period required for virus transmission. Our findings indicate a major role for RNAi as a determinant of DENV transmission by Ae. aegypti.

  20. Identification of the gene encoding a type 1 RNase H with an N-terminal double-stranded RNA binding domain from a psychrotrophic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Chon, Hyongi; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2007-07-01

    The gene encoding a bacterial type 1 RNase H, termed RBD-RNase HI, was cloned from the psychrotrophic bacterium Shewanella sp. SIB1, overproduced in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified and biochemically characterized. SIB1 RBD-RNase HI consists of 262 amino acid residues and shows amino acid sequence identities of 26% to SIB1 RNase HI, 17% to E. coli RNase HI, and 32% to human RNase H1. SIB1 RBD-RNase HI has a double-stranded RNA binding domain (RBD) at the N-terminus, which is commonly present at the N-termini of eukaryotic type 1 RNases H. Gel mobility shift assay indicated that this domain binds to an RNA/DNA hybrid in an isolated form, suggesting that this domain is involved in substrate binding. SIB1 RBD-RNase HI exhibited the enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Its optimum pH and metal ion requirement were similar to those of SIB1 RNase HI, E. coli RNase HI, and human RNase H1. The specific activity of SIB1 RBD-RNase HI was comparable to that of E. coli RNase HI and was much higher than those of SIB1 RNase HI and human RNase H1. SIB1 RBD-RNase HI showed poor cleavage-site specificity for oligomeric substrates. SIB1 RBD-RNase HI was less stable than E. coli RNase HI but was as stable as human RNase H1. Database searches indicate that several bacteria and archaea contain an RBD-RNase HI. This is the first report on the biochemical characterization of RBD-RNase HI.

  1. RNA secondary structures of the bacteriophage phi6 packaging regions.

    OpenAIRE

    Pirttimaa, M J; Bamford, D H

    2000-01-01

    Bacteriophage phi6 genome consists of three segments of double-stranded RNA. During maturation, single-stranded copies of these segments are packaged into preformed polymerase complex particles. Only phi6 RNA is packaged, and each particle contains only one copy of each segment. An in vitro packaging and replication assay has been developed for phi6, and the packaging signals (pac sites) have been mapped to the 5' ends of the RNA segments. In this study, we propose secondary structure models ...

  2. scid mutation in mice confers hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and a deficiency in DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, K.A.; Sun, J.R.; Giaccia, A.J.; Tosto, L.M.; Brown, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    C.B-17 severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice carry the scid mutation and are severely deficient in both T cell- and B cell-mediated immunity, apparently as a result of defective V(D)J joining of the immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene elements. In the present studies, we have defined the tissue, cellular, and molecular basis of another characteristic of these mice: their hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Bone marrow stem cells, intestinal crypt cells, and epithelial skin cells from scid mice are 2- to 3-fold more sensitive when irradiated in situ than are congenic BALB/c or C.B-17 controls. Two independently isolated embryo fibroblastic scid mouse cell lines display similar hypersensitivities to gamma-rays. In addition, these cell lines are sensitive to cell killing by bleomycin, which also produces DNA strand breaks, but not by the DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C or UV irradiation. Measurement of the rejoining of gamma-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicates that these animals are defective in this repair system. This suggests that the gamma-ray sensitivity of the scid mouse fibroblasts could be the result of reduced repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Therefore, a common factor may participate in both the repair of DNA double-strand breaks as well as V(D)J rejoining during lymphocyte development. This murine autosomal recessive mutation should prove extremely useful in fundamental studies of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair

  3. Protection against {sup 131}I-induced Double Strand DNA Breaks in Thyroid Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershman, J.M.; Okunyan, A.; Cannon, S.; Hogen, V. [Endocrinology, UCLA-VA, Los Angeles (United States); Rivina, Y. [Radiation Biology, UCLA, Los Angeles (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Radioiodine-131 (I{sup 131}) released from nuclear reactor accidents has dramatically increased the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer in exposed individuals, especially young children. The accepted measure for prevention of radiation-induced thyroid cancer is potassium iodide tablets that contain 100 mg iodide taken daily to block thyroid uptake of I{sup 131}. The deposition of ionizing radiation in cells results in double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) at fragile sites, and this early event can generate oncogenic rearrangements that eventually cause the cancer. We have developed a thyroid cell model to quantify the mitogenic effect of I{sup 131}. I{sup 131} causes double strand DNA breaks in FRTL-5 cells detected by 53BP1 or gamma H2AX and had no effect on cells that do not transport iodide. Perchlorate, iodide, and thiocyanate protect against DSB induced by I{sup 131}. Preincubation with the anion or radioprotective compounds prevents DSB; delayed addition of the anion is much less effective. These data provide a basis for studies of radioprotection against DSB induced by I{sup 131} in animals in order to refine the prevention of thyroid cancer resulting from nuclear fallout

  4. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks in hepatoma cell SMMC-7721 by accelerated carbon ion 12C6+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Suwen; Su Xu; Wang Jufang; Zhao Jing; Li Wenjian

    2004-01-01

    DNA lesions, especially DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs), are looked upon as the dominant molecular effect of radiation action. Dsbs mark the beginning of a cascade of cellular processes that either results in complete repair of the DNA damage or lead to deleterious stages such as mutation, transformation or even cell death. Changing the radiation quality can influence the radiosensitivity of cells in culture. Accelerated particles provide an excellent means of varying the ionization density of the test radiation. With ion beams, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological consequences of high linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation can be studied and describing radiation action with biophysical models can be tested. In this paper, radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) were measured in hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells by means of an experimental approach involving pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and densitometric scanning of ethidium bromide stained gels. With this set-up, the induction of dsbs was investigated in SMMC-7721 cells after irradiation with accelerated carbon ions with specific LET 70 keV/μm. The fraction of DNA retained was taken as quantitative measure to calculate absolute yields of induced DNA dsbs. Experimental data shows that the induction of DNA dsbs increasing with the dose of irradiation. Data are compared with published results on dsbs induction in mammalian cells by radiations of comparable LET

  5. Improved annotation of 3' untranslated regions and complex loci by combination of strand-specific direct RNA sequencing, RNA-Seq and ESTs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Schurch

    Full Text Available The reference annotations made for a genome sequence provide the framework for all subsequent analyses of the genome. Correct and complete annotation in addition to the underlying genomic sequence is particularly important when interpreting the results of RNA-seq experiments where short sequence reads are mapped against the genome and assigned to genes according to the annotation. Inconsistencies in annotations between the reference and the experimental system can lead to incorrect interpretation of the effect on RNA expression of an experimental treatment or mutation in the system under study. Until recently, the genome-wide annotation of 3' untranslated regions received less attention than coding regions and the delineation of intron/exon boundaries. In this paper, data produced for samples in Human, Chicken and A. thaliana by the novel single-molecule, strand-specific, Direct RNA Sequencing technology from Helicos Biosciences which locates 3' polyadenylation sites to within +/- 2 nt, were combined with archival EST and RNA-Seq data. Nine examples are illustrated where this combination of data allowed: (1 gene and 3' UTR re-annotation (including extension of one 3' UTR by 5.9 kb; (2 disentangling of gene expression in complex regions; (3 clearer interpretation of small RNA expression and (4 identification of novel genes. While the specific examples displayed here may become obsolete as genome sequences and their annotations are refined, the principles laid out in this paper will be of general use both to those annotating genomes and those seeking to interpret existing publically available annotations in the context of their own experimental data.

  6. Double K-vacancy production by x-ray photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S. H.; Dunford, R. W.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Young, L.; Armen, G. B.; Levin, J. C.; Chen, M. H.; Ederer, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied double K-shell photoionization of Ne and Mo (Z = 10 and 42) at the Advanced Photon Source. Double K-vacancy production in Ne was observed by recording the KK-KLL Auger hypersatellite spectrum. Comparison is made with calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. For Mo, double K-vacancy production was observed by recording the Kα, β fluorescence hypersatellite and satellite x rays in coincidence. From the intensities of the Auger or x-ray hypersatellites relative to diagram lines, the probabilities for double K-vacancy production relative to single K-vacancies were determined. These results, along with reported measurements on other atoms, are compared with Z-scaling calculations of the high-energy limits of the double-to-single K-shell photoionization ratio

  7. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettier, Gaëlle; Feng, Q.; Mayolo, A.A. de

    2006-01-01

    of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most...

  8. Molecular characterization of a complex site-specific radiation-induced DNA double-strand break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, K.; Dizdaroglu, M.; Jaruga, P.; Neumann, R.D.; Winters, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation lethality is a function of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Current models propose the lethality of a DSB to be a function of its structural complexity. We present here for the first time a map of damage associated with a site-specific double-strand break produced by decay of 125 I in a plasmid bound by a 125 I-labeled triplex forming oligonucleotide ( 125 I-TFO). The E. coli DNA repair enzymes, endonuclease IV (endo IV), endonuclease III (endo III), and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), which recognize AP sites, and pyrimidine and purine base damage respectively, were used as probes in this study. 125 I-TFO bound plasmid was incubated with and without DMSO at -80 deg C for 1 month. No significant difference in DSB yield was observed under these conditions. A 32 base pair fragment from the upstream side of the decay site was isolated by restriction digestion and enzymatically probed to identify damage sites. Endo IV treatment of the 5'-end labeled upper strand indicated clustering of AP sites within 3 bases downstream and 7 bases upstream of the targeted base. Also, repeated experiments consistently detected an AP site 4 bases upstream of the 125 Itarget base. This was further supported by complementary results with the 3'-end labeled upper strand. Endo IV analysis of the lower strand also shows clustering of AP sites near the DSB end. Endo III and Fpg probing demonstrated that base damage is also clustered near the targeted break site. DSBs produced in the absence of DMSO displayed a different pattern of enzyme sensitive damage than those produced in the presence of DMSO. Identification of specific base damage types within the restriction fragment containing the DSB end was achieved with GC/MS. Base damage consisted of 8-hydroguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5-hydroxycytosine. These lesions were observed at relative yields of 8-hydroguanine and 5-hydroxycytosine to 8-hydroxyadenine of 7.4:1 and 4.7:1, respectively, in the absence

  9. Cascaded strand displacement for non-enzymatic target recycling amplification and label-free electronic detection of microRNA from tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Kai; Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun, E-mail: yunatswu@swu.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    The monitoring of microRNA (miRNA) expression levels is of great importance in cancer diagnosis. In the present work, based on two cascaded toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions (TSDRs), we have developed a label- and enzyme-free target recycling signal amplification approach for sensitive electronic detection of miRNA-21 from human breast cancer cells. The junction probes containing the locked G-quadruplex forming sequences are self-assembled on the senor surface. The presence of the target miRNA-21 initiates the first TSDR and results in the disassembly of the junction probes and the release of the active G-quadruplex forming sequences. Subsequently, the DNA fuel strand triggers the second TSDR and leads to cyclic reuse of the target miRNA-21. The cascaded TSDRs thus generate many active G-quadruplex forming sequences on the sensor surface, which associate with hemin to produce significantly amplified current response for sensitive detection of miRNA-21 at 1.15 fM. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to monitor miRNA-21 from human breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Amplified and sensitive detection of microRNA from tumor cells is achieved. • Signal amplification is realized by two cascaded strand displacement reactions. • The developed sensor is selective and label-free without involving any enzymes.

  10. Yellow fever virus capsid protein is a potent suppressor of RNA silencing that binds double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Wiley, Michael R; Badawi, Atif; Adelman, Zach N; Myles, Kevin M

    2016-11-29

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus (YFV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and West Nile virus (WNV), profoundly affect human health. The successful transmission of these viruses to a human host depends on the pathogen's ability to overcome a potentially sterilizing immune response in the vector mosquito. Similar to other invertebrate animals and plants, the mosquito's RNA silencing pathway comprises its primary antiviral defense. Although a diverse range of plant and insect viruses has been found to encode suppressors of RNA silencing, the mechanisms by which flaviviruses antagonize antiviral small RNA pathways in disease vectors are unknown. Here we describe a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) encoded by the prototype flavivirus, YFV. We show that the YFV capsid (YFC) protein inhibits RNA silencing in the mosquito Aedes aegypti by interfering with Dicer. This VSR activity appears to be broadly conserved in the C proteins of other medically important flaviviruses, including that of ZIKV. These results suggest that a molecular "arms race" between vector and pathogen underlies the continued existence of flaviviruses in nature.

  11. Similarities between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in RNA kissing complexes found by means of cross-correlated relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, Jens; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    The bond lengths and dynamics of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in an RNA kissing complex have been characterized by determining the NMR relaxation rates of various double- and triple-quantum coherences that involve an imino proton and two neighboring nitrogen-15 nuclei belonging to opposite bases. New experiments allow one to determine the chemical shift anisotropy of the imino protons. The bond lengths derived from dipolar relaxation and the lack of modulations of the nitrogen chemical shifts indicate that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds which hold the kissing complex together are very similar to the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the double-stranded stem of the RNA

  12. RNA interference of pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide receptor suppresses mating behavior by inhibiting sex pheromone production in Plutella xylostella (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Weon; Shrestha, Sony; Kim, A Young; Park, Seok Joo; Yang, Chang Yeol; Kim, Yonggyun; Koh, Young Ho

    2011-04-01

    Sex pheromone production is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) in many lepidopteran species. We cloned a PBAN receptor (Plx-PBANr) gene from the female pheromone gland of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Plx-PBANr encodes 338 amino acids and has conserved structural motifs implicating in promoting G protein coupling and tyrosine-based sorting signaling along with seven transmembrane domains, indicating a typical G protein-coupled receptor. The expression of Plx-PBANr was found only in the pheromone gland of female adults among examined tissues and developmental stages. Heterologous expression in human uterus cervical cancer cells revealed that Plx-PBANr induced significant calcium elevation when challenged with Plx-PBAN. Female P. xylostella injected with double-stranded RNA specific to Plx-PBANr showed suppression of the receptor gene expression and exhibited significant reduction in pheromone biosynthesis, which resulted in loss of male attractiveness. Taken together, the identified PBAN receptor is functional in PBAN signaling via calcium secondary messenger, which leads to activation of pheromone biosynthesis and male attraction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An RNA editing/dsRNA binding-independent gene regulatory mechanism of ADARs and its clinical implication in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lihua; Song, Yangyang; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Yang, Henry; Lin, Chi Ho; Tay, Daryl Jin Tai; Hong, HuiQi; Tang, Sze Jing; Tan, Kar Tong; Huang, Xi Xiao; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Ng, Vanessa Hui En; Maury, Julien Jean Pierre; Tenen, Daniel G; Chen, Leilei

    2017-10-13

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, catalyzed by Adenosine DeAminases acting on double-stranded RNA(dsRNA) (ADAR), occurs predominantly in the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of spliced mRNA. Here we uncover an unanticipated link between ADARs (ADAR1 and ADAR2) and the expression of target genes undergoing extensive 3'UTR editing. Using METTL7A (Methyltransferase Like 7A), a novel tumor suppressor gene with multiple editing sites at its 3'UTR, we demonstrate that its expression could be repressed by ADARs beyond their RNA editing and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding functions. ADARs interact with Dicer to augment the processing of pre-miR-27a to mature miR-27a. Consequently, mature miR-27a targets the METTL7A 3'UTR to repress its expression level. In sum, our study unveils that the extensive 3'UTR editing of METTL7A is merely a footprint of ADAR binding, and there are a subset of target genes that are equivalently regulated by ADAR1 and ADAR2 through their non-canonical RNA editing and dsRNA binding-independent functions, albeit maybe less common. The functional significance of ADARs is much more diverse than previously appreciated and this gene regulatory function of ADARs is most likely to be of high biological importance beyond the best-studied editing function. This non-editing side of ADARs opens another door to target cancer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Signal-off Electrochemiluminescence Biosensor Based on Phi29 DNA Polymerase Mediated Strand Displacement Amplification for MicroRNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anyi; Gui, Guo-Feng; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-06-16

    A target induced cycling strand displacement amplification (SDA) mediated by phi29 DNA polymerase (phi29) was first investigated and applied in a signal-off electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for microRNA (miRNA) detection. Herein, the target miRNA triggered the phi29-mediated SDA which could produce amounts of single-stranded DNA (assistant probe) with accurate and comprehensive nucleotide sequence. Then, the assistant probe hybridized with the capture probe and the ferrocene-labeled probe (Fc-probe) to form a ternary "Y" structure for ECL signal quenching by ferrocene. Therefore, the ECL intensity would decrease with increasing concentration of the target miRNA, and the sensitivity of biosensor would be promoted on account of the efficient signal amplification of the target induced cycling reaction. Besides, a self-enhanced Ru(II) ECL system was designed to obtain a stable and strong initial signal to further improve the sensitivity. The ECL assay for miRNA-21 detection is developed with excellent sensitivity of a concentration variation from 10 aM to 1.0 pM and limit of detection down to 3.3 aM.

  15. Dose-ranging evaluation of intravitreal siRNA PF-04523655 for diabetic macular edema (the DEGAS study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Schachar, Ronald A; Nduaka, Chudy I

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three doses of PF-04523655, a 19-nucleotide methylated double stranded siRNA targeting the RTP801 gene, for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) compared to focal/grid laser photocoagulation.......To evaluate the safety and efficacy of three doses of PF-04523655, a 19-nucleotide methylated double stranded siRNA targeting the RTP801 gene, for the treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) compared to focal/grid laser photocoagulation....

  16. Effect of cellular glutathione content on the induction of DNA double strand breaks by 25 MeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenberg, D.; Kistler, M.; Eckhardt-Schupp, F.

    1987-08-01

    The effect of endogenous glutathione (GSH) on the induction of DNA double strand breaks (dsb) by 25 MeV electrons was investigated using stationary haploid yeast cells defective in ..gamma..-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (gsh 1) containing less than 5 per cent of the normal GSH content. In gsh 1 cells the induction of dsb is increased by a factor of 1.5 under oxic and 1.8 under anoxic irradiation conditions whereas the oxygen enhancement ratio was only slightly decreased (1.9) compared to wild-type cells (2.4).

  17. Effect of cellular glutathione content on the induction of DNA double strand breaks by 25 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenberg, D.; Kistler, M.; Eckhardt-Schupp, F.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of endogenous glutathione (GSH) on the induction of DNA double strand breaks (dsb) by 25 MeV electrons was investigated using stationary haploid yeast cells defective in γ-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase (gsh 1) containing less than 5 per cent of the normal GSH content. In gsh 1 cells the induction of dsb is increased by a factor of 1.5 under oxic and 1.8 under anoxic irradiation conditions whereas the oxygen enhancement ratio was only slightly decreased (1.9) compared to wild-type cells (2.4). (author)

  18. Isothermal circular-strand-displacement polymerization of DNA and microRNA in digital microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Maria Chiara; Zanoli, Laura Maria; D'Agata, Roberta; Finotti, Alessia; Gambari, Roberto; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic-acid amplification is a crucial step in nucleic-acid-sequence-detection assays. The use of digital microfluidic devices to miniaturize amplification techniques reduces the required sample volume and the analysis time and offers new possibilities for process automation and integration in a single device. The recently introduced droplet polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) amplification methods require repeated cycles of two or three temperature-dependent steps during the amplification of the nucleic-acid target sequence. In contrast, low-temperature isothermal-amplification methods have no need for thermal cycling, thus requiring simplified microfluidic-device features. Here, the combined use of digital microfluidics and molecular-beacon (MB)-assisted isothermal circular-strand-displacement polymerization (ICSDP) to detect microRNA-210 sequences is described. MicroRNA-210 has been described as the most consistently and predominantly upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor. The nmol L(-1)-pmol L(-1) detection capabilities of the method were first tested by targeting single-stranded DNA sequences from the genetically modified Roundup Ready soybean. The ability of the droplet-ICSDP method to discriminate between full-matched, single-mismatched, and unrelated sequences was also investigated. The detection of a range of nmol L(-1)-pmol L(-1) microRNA-210 solutions compartmentalized in nanoliter-sized droplets was performed, establishing the ability of the method to detect as little as 10(-18) mol of microRNA target sequences compartmentalized in 20 nL droplets. The suitability of the method for biological samples was tested by detecting microRNA-210 from transfected K562 cells.

  19. The Affinity of the S9.6 Antibody for Double-Stranded RNAs Impacts the Accurate Mapping of R-Loops in Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartono, Stella R; Malapert, Amélie; Legros, Pénélope; Bernard, Pascal; Chédin, Frédéric; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2018-02-02

    R-loops, which result from the formation of stable DNA:RNA hybrids, can both threaten genome integrity and act as physiological regulators of gene expression and chromatin patterning. To characterize R-loops in fission yeast, we used the S9.6 antibody-based DRIPc-seq method to sequence the RNA strand of R-loops and obtain strand-specific R-loop maps at near nucleotide resolution. Surprisingly, preliminary DRIPc-seq experiments identified mostly RNase H-resistant but exosome-sensitive RNAs that mapped to both DNA strands and resembled RNA:RNA hybrids (dsRNAs), suggesting that dsRNAs form widely in fission yeast. We confirmed in vitro that S9.6 can immuno-precipitate dsRNAs and provide evidence that dsRNAs can interfere with its binding to R-loops. dsRNA elimination by RNase III treatment prior to DRIPc-seq allowed the genome-wide and strand-specific identification of genuine R-loops that responded in vivo to RNase H levels and displayed classical features associated with R-loop formation. We also found that most transcripts whose levels were altered by in vivo manipulation of RNase H levels did not form detectable R-loops, suggesting that prolonged manipulation of R-loop levels could indirectly alter the transcriptome. We discuss the implications of our work in the design of experimental strategies to probe R-loop functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Accumulation of dsRNA in endosomes contributes to inefficient RNA interference in the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, June-Sun; Gurusamy, Dhandapani; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2017-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) efficiency varies among insects studied. The barriers for successful RNAi include the presence of double-stranded ribonucleases (dsRNase) in the lumen and hemolymph that could potentially digest double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and the variability in the transport of dsRNA into and within the cells. We recently showed that the dsRNAs are transported into lepidopteran cells, but they are not processed into small interference RNAs (siRNAs) because they are trapped in acidic bodies. In the current study, we focused on the identification of acidic bodies in which dsRNAs accumulate in Sf9 cells. Time-lapse imaging studies showed that dsRNAs enter Sf9 cells and accumulate in acidic bodies within 20 min after their addition to the medium. CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA also accumulated in the midgut and fat body dissected from Spodoptera frugiperda larvae with similar patterns observed in Sf9 cells. Pharmacological inhibitor assays showed that the dsRNAs use clathrin mediated endocytosis pathway for transport into the cells. We investigated the potential dsRNA accumulation sites employing LysoTracker and double labeling experiments using the constructs to express a fusion of green fluorescence protein with early or late endosomal marker proteins and CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA. Interestingly, CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA accumulated predominantly in early and late endosomes. These data suggest that entrapment of internalized dsRNA in endosomes is one of the major factors contributing to inefficient RNAi response in lepidopteran insects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strand displacement activated peroxidase activity of hemin for fluorescent DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanbo; Xu, Nan; Gui, Zhen; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian; Yan, Feng

    2015-10-07

    To efficiently regulate the catalytic activity of the peroxidase mimic hemin, this work designs a double-stranded DNA probe containing an intermolecular dimer of hemin, whose peroxidase activity can be activated by a DNA strand displacement reaction. The double-stranded probe is prepared by annealing two strands of hemin labelled DNA oligonucleotides. Using the fluorescent oxidation product of tyramine by H2O2 as a tracing molecule, the low peroxidase activity of the hemin dimer ensures a low fluorescence background. The strand displacement reaction of the target DNA dissociates the hemin dimer and thus significantly increases the catalytic activity of hemin to produce a large amount of dityramine for fluorescence signal readout. Based on the strand displacement regulated peroxidase activity, a simple and sensitive homogeneous fluorescent DNA sensing method is proposed. The detection can conveniently be carried out in a 96-well plate within 20 min with a detection limit of 0.18 nM. This method shows high specificity, which can effectively distinguish single-base mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA. The DNA strand displacement regulated catalytic activity of hemin has promising application in the determination of various DNA analytes.

  2. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  3. Design of a Sensitive and Selective Electrochemical Aptasensor for the Determination of the Complementary cDNA of miRNA-145 Based on the Intercalation and Electrochemical Reduction of Doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadi, Maryam; Mostafavi, Ali; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this research was the determination of a microRNA (miRNA) using a DNA electrochemical aptasensor. In this biosensor, the complementary complementary DNA (cDNA) of miRNA-145 (a sense RNA transcript) was the target strand and the cDNA of miRNA-145 was the probe strand. Both cDNAs can be the product of the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction of miRNA. The proposed aptasensor's function was based on the hybridization of target strands with probes immobilized on the surface of a working electrode and the subsequent intercalation of doxorubicin (DOX) molecules functioning as the electroactive indicators of any double strands that formed. Electrochemical transduction was performed by measuring the cathodic current resulting from the electrochemical reduction of the intercalated molecules at the electrode surface. In the experiment, because many DOX molecules accumulated on each target strand on the electrode surface, amplification was inherently easy, without a need for enzymatic or complicated amplification strategies. The proposed aptasensor also had the excellent ability to regenerate as a result of the melting of the DNA duplex. Moreover, the use of DNA probe strands obviated the challenges of working with an RNA probe, such as sensitivity to RNase enzyme. In addition to the linear relationship between the electrochemical signal and the concentration of the target strands that ranged from 2.0 to 80.0 nM with an LOD of 0.27 nM, the proposed biosensor was clearly capable of distinguishing between complementary (target strand) and noncomplementary sequences. The presented biosensor was successfully applied for the quantification of DNA strands corresponding to miRNA-145 in human serum samples.

  4. The Ku Heterodimer and the Metabolism of Single-Ended DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Balestrini (Alessia); D. Ristic (Dejan); I. Dionne (Isabelle); X.Z. Liu (Xiao); C. Wyman (Claire); R.J. Wellinger (Raymund); J.H.J. Petrini (John)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSingle-ended double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a common form of spontaneous DNA break, generated when the replisome encounters a discontinuity in the DNA template. Given their prevalence, understanding the mechanisms governing the fate(s) of single-ended DSBs is important. We describe the

  5. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, which if left unrepaired can lead to mutations or gross chromosomal aberrations, and promote the onset of diseases associated with genomic instability such as cancer. One of the most discernible hallmarks...

  6. Focused genetic recombination of bacteriophage t4 initiated by double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Victor; Granovsky, Igor; Plugina, Lidiya; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Sizova, Svetlana; Pyatkov, Konstantin; Shlyapnikov, Michael; Shubina, Olga

    2002-10-01

    A model system for studying double-strand-break (DSB)-induced genetic recombination in vivo based on the ets1 segCDelta strain of bacteriophage T4 was developed. The ets1, a 66-bp DNA fragment of phage T2L containing the cleavage site for the T4 SegC site-specific endonuclease, was inserted into the proximal part of the T4 rIIB gene. Under segC(+) conditions, the ets1 behaves as a recombination hotspot. Crosses of the ets1 against rII markers located to the left and to the right of ets1 gave similar results, thus demonstrating the equal and symmetrical initiation of recombination by either part of the broken chromosome. Frequency/distance relationships were studied in a series of two- and three-factor crosses with other rIIB and rIIA mutants (all segC(+)) separated from ets1 by 12-2100 bp. The observed relationships were readily interpretable in terms of the modified splice/patch coupling model. The advantages of this localized or focused recombination over that distributed along the chromosome, as a model for studying the recombination-replication pathway in T4 in vivo, are discussed.

  7. Sequestration of DROSHA and DGCR8 by Expanded CGG RNA Repeats Alters MicroRNA Processing in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Sellier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of 55–200 CGG repeats in the 5′ UTR of FMR1. These expanded CGG repeats are transcribed and accumulate in nuclear RNA aggregates that sequester one or more RNA-binding proteins, thus impairing their functions. Here, we have identified that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 binds to expanded CGG repeats, resulting in the partial sequestration of DGCR8 and its partner, DROSHA, within CGG RNA aggregates. Consequently, the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs is reduced, resulting in decreased levels of mature miRNAs in neuronal cells expressing expanded CGG repeats and in brain tissue from patients with FXTAS. Finally, overexpression of DGCR8 rescues the neuronal cell death induced by expression of expanded CGG repeats. These results support a model in which a human neurodegenerative disease originates from the alteration, in trans, of the miRNA-processing machinery.

  8. Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Analyses of Fruiting Body Development in Coprinopsis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Muraguchi

    Full Text Available The basidiomycete fungus Coprinopsis cinerea is an important model system for multicellular development. Fruiting bodies of C. cinerea are typical mushrooms, which can be produced synchronously on defined media in the laboratory. To investigate the transcriptome in detail during fruiting body development, high-throughput sequencing (RNA-seq was performed using cDNA libraries strand-specifically constructed from 13 points (stages/tissues with two biological replicates. The reads were aligned to 14,245 predicted transcripts, and counted for forward and reverse transcripts. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs between two adjacent points and between vegetative mycelium and each point were detected by Tag Count Comparison (TCC. To validate RNA-seq data, expression levels of selected genes were compared using RPKM values in RNA-seq data and qRT-PCR data, and DEGs detected in microarray data were examined in MA plots of RNA-seq data by TCC. We discuss events deduced from GO analysis of DEGs. In addition, we uncovered both transcription factor candidates and antisense transcripts that are likely to be involved in developmental regulation for fruiting.

  9. Clustering of double strand break-containing chromosome domains is not inhibited by inactivation of major repair proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Stap, C.; Van Oven, C.; Hoebe, R.; Aten, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    For efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) cells rely on a process that involves the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, which may help to protect non-repaired DNA ends from separating until they can be rejoined by DNA repair proteins. It has been observed that as a secondary effect, this process can lead to unintended clustering of multiple, initially separate, DSB-containing chromosome domains. This work demonstrates that neither inactivation of the major repair proteins XRCC3 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) nor inhibition of DNA-PK by vanillin influences the aggregation of DSB-containing chromosome domains. (authors)

  10. In vivo quantification of DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonsson, M.; Qvarnstroem, F.; Turesson, I.; Johansson, K.-A.; Nyman, J.; Hermansson, I.; Oden, A.; Book, M.

    2003-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) can be introduced in the genome by exposure to exogenous agents such as ionising radiation and radio-mimetic chemicals. The biological importance of these breaks is significant even at low numbers. Inaccurate repair or lack of repair of a single DSB has the potential to kill a cell or lead to tumourigenesis. Thus the induction and repair of DSBs are crucial events in the onset of malignancies. Following the induction of DSBs, the core histone H2AX is rapidly phosphorylated at residue serine 139. This phosphorylated form of H2AX is referred to as gH2AX. Histones wrapped in megabase regions flanking these breaks are involved in this process, which results in the formation of discrete nuclear foci. It has previously been shown that a single DSB is sufficient to produce a detectable focus. So far there has been a lack of methods capable of measuring the amount of DSBs at clinically relevant quantities. Such a method would embrace a wide field of applications. It could be applied as a biological dosimeter when studying carcinogenic effects and provide the basis for an assay predicting individual radiosensitivity. We describe a measurement procedure that detects and quantifies small amounts of DSBs in vivo. This is accomplished using immunofluorescence detection of the molecular marker gH2AX. The gH2AX foci are quantified in histological sections using basic digital image analysis methods as the main component. In a primary assessment of the procedure we analysed the in vivo dose response of prostate cancer patients in clinical practice undergoing radiotherapy. Epidermal nucleated cells in skin biopsies taken 30 minutes following the first single dose delivered show linear dose response for low doses ranging from 0 - 1.2 Gy. The described procedure for double strand break quantification can detect dose changes as low as 0.18 Gy

  11. The 5'-end heterogeneity of adenovirus virus-associated RNAI contributes to the asymmetric guide strand incorporation into the RNA-induced silencing complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Gkountela, Sofia; Saeed, Khalid; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2009-11-01

    Human Adenovirus type 5 encodes two short RNA polymerase III transcripts, the virus-associated (VA) RNAI and VA RNAII, which can adopt stable hairpin structures that resemble micro-RNA precursors. The terminal stems of the VA RNAs are processed into small RNAs (mivaRNAs) that are incorporated into RISC. It has been reported that VA RNAI has two transcription initiation sites, which produce two VA RNAI species; a major species, VA RNAI(G), which accounts for 75% of the VA RNAI pool, and a minor species, VA RNAI(A), which initiates transcription three nucleotides upstream compared to VA RNAI(G). We show that this 5'-heterogeneity results in a dramatic difference in RISC assembly. Thus, both VA RNAI(G) and VA RNAI(A) are processed by Dicer at the same position in the terminal stem generating the same 3'-strand mivaRNA. This mivaRNA is incorporated into RISC with 200-fold higher efficiency compared to the 5'-strand of mivaRNAI. Of the small number of 5'-strands used in RISC assembly only VA RNAI(A) generated active RISC complexes. We also show that the 3'-strand of mivaRNAI, although being the preferred substrate for RISC assembly, generates unstable RISC complexes with a low in vitro cleavage activity, only around 2% compared to RISC assembled on the VA RNAI(A) 5'-strand.

  12. DNA double-strand break rejoining in human follicular lymphoma and glioblastoma tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macann, AMJ; Britten, RA; Poppema, S; Pearcey, R; Rosenberg, E; Allalunis-Turner, MJ; Murray, D

    2000-01-01

    Follicle center cell lymphoma is among the most radioresponsive of human cancers. To assess whether this radioresponsiveness might be a result of a compromised ability of the tumor cells to accomplish the biologically-effective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), we have measured i) the

  13. DNA double strand breaks in the acute phase after synchrotron pencilbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Palomo, C; Trippel, M; Schroll, C; Nikkhah, G; Schültke, E; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Requardt, H; Bartzsch, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. At the biomedical beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we have established a method to study pencilbeam irradiation in-vivoin small animal models. The pencilbeam irradiation technique is based on the principle of microbeam irradiation, a concept of spatially fractionated high-dose irradiation. Using γH2AX as marker, we followed the development of DNA double strand breaks over 48 hrs after whole brain irradiation with the pencilbeam technique. Method. Almost square pencilbeams with an individual size of 51 × 50 μm were produced with an MSC collimator using a step and shoot approach, while the animals were moved vertically through the beam. The center-to-center distance (ctc) was 400 μm, with a peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) of about 400. Five groups of healthy adult mice received peak irradiation doses of either 330 Gy or 2,460 Gy and valley doses of 0.82 Gy and 6.15 Gy, respectively. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 12 and 48 hrs after irradiation. Results. DNA double strand breaks are observed in the path of the pencilbeam. The size of the damaged volume undergoes changes within the first 48 hours after irradiation. Conclusions. The extent of DNA damage caused by pencilbeam irradiation, as assessed by H2AX antibody staining, is dose- dependent

  14. RNA secondary structures of the bacteriophage phi6 packaging regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirttimaa, M J; Bamford, D H

    2000-06-01

    Bacteriophage phi6 genome consists of three segments of double-stranded RNA. During maturation, single-stranded copies of these segments are packaged into preformed polymerase complex particles. Only phi6 RNA is packaged, and each particle contains only one copy of each segment. An in vitro packaging and replication assay has been developed for phi6, and the packaging signals (pac sites) have been mapped to the 5' ends of the RNA segments. In this study, we propose secondary structure models for the pac sites of phi6 single-stranded RNA segments. Our models accommodate data from structure-specific chemical modifications, free energy minimizations, and phylogenetic comparisons. Previously reported pac site deletion studies are also discussed. Each pac site possesses a unique architecture, that, however, contains common structural elements.

  15. A robust network of double-strand break repair pathways governs genome integrity during C. elegans development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, D.B.; Tijsterman, M.

    2009-01-01

    To preserve genomic integrity, various mechanisms have evolved to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Depending on cell type or cell cycle phase, DSBs can be repaired error-free, by homologous recombination, or with concomitant loss of sequence information, via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)

  16. Partial strands synthesizing leads to inevitable aborting and complicated products in consecutive polymerase chain reactions (PCRs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Rui; ZHANG DaMing

    2007-01-01

    Various abnormal phenomena have been observed during PCR so far. The present study performed a series of consecutive PCRs (including many rounds of re-amplification continuously) and found that the abortion of re-amplification was inevitable as long as a variety of complicated product appeared.The aborting stages varied, according to the lengths of targets. Longer targets reached the abortion earlier than the shorter ones, marked by appearance of the complex that was immobile in electrophoresis. Denatured gel-electrophoresis revealed that the complex was mainly made up of shorter or partially synthesized strands, together with small amounts of full-length ones. Able to be digested by S1 nuclease but unable by restriction endonucleases (REs), the complex was proved to consist of both single regions and double-helix regions that kept the complex stable thermodynamically. Simulations gave evidence that partial strands, even at lower concentration, could disturb re-amplification effectively and lead to the abortion of re-amplifications finally. It was pointed out that the partial strands formed chiefly via polymerase's infidelity, and hence the solution to lighten the abnormality was also proposed.

  17. Packaging signals in single-stranded RNA viruses: nature?s alternative to a purely electrostatic assembly mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Stockley, Peter G.; Twarock, Reidun; Bakker, Saskia E.; Barker, Amy M.; Borodavka, Alexander; Dykeman, Eric; Ford, Robert J.; Pearson, Arwen R.; Phillips, Simon E. V.; Ranson, Neil A.; Tuma, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The formation of a protective protein container is an essential step in the life-cycle of most viruses. In the case of single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, this step occurs in parallel with genome packaging in a co-assembly process. Previously, it had been thought that this process can be explained entirely by electrostatics. Inspired by recent single-molecule fluorescence experiments that recapitulate the RNA packaging specificity seen in vivo for two model viruses, we present an alternative the...

  18. Spectroelectrochemical detection of microRNA-155 based on functional RNA immobilization onto ITO/GNP nanopattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadniaei, Mohsen; Yoon, Jinho; Lee, Taek; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2018-05-20

    We fabricated a microRNA biosensor using the combination of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and electrochemical (EC) techniques. For the first time, the weaknesses of each techniques for microRNA detection was compensated by the other ones to give rise to the specific and wide-range detection of miR-155. A single stranded 3' methylene blue (MB) and 5' thiol-modified RNA (MB-ssRNA-SH) was designed to detect the target miR-155 and immobilized onto the gold nanoparticle-modified ITO (ITO/GNP). Upon the invasion of target strand, the double-stranded RNA transformed rapidly to an upright structure resulting in a notable decrease in SERS and redox signals of the MB. For the first time, by combination of SERS and EC techniques in a single platform we extended the dynamic range of both techniques from 10 pM to 450 nM (SERS: 10 pM-5 nM and EC: 5 nM-450 nM). As well, the SERS technique improved the detection limit of the EC method from 100 pM to 100 fM, while the EC method covered single-mismatch detection which was the SERS deficiency. The fabricated single-step biosensor possessing a good capability of miRNA detection in human serum, could be employed throughout the broad ranges of biomedical and bioelectronics applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modified beacon probe assisted dual signal amplification for visual detection of microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuwei; Ying, Na; Ju, Chuanjing; Li, Zhongyi; Xu, Na; Qu, Guijuan; Liu, Wensen; Wan, Jiayu

    2018-04-21

    In a recent study, we reported a novel assay for the detection of microRNA-21 based on duplex-specific nuclease (DSN)-assisted isothermal cleavage and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) dual signal amplification. The Fam modified double-stranded DNA products were generated after the HCR, another biotin modified probe was digested by DSN and released from the magnetic beads after the addition of the target miRNA. The released sequence was then combined with HCR products to form a double-tagging dsDNA, which can be recognized by the lateral flow strips. In this study, we introduced a 2-OMethyl-RNA modified beacon probe (2-OMe-MB) to make some improvements based on the previous study. Firstly, the substitution of modified probe combined on magnetic beads avoids the fussy washing steps for the separation of un-reacted probes. Furthermore, the modification of 2-OMe on the stem of the probe avoided the unnecessary cleavage by DSN, which greatly reduce the background signal. Compared to the previous work, these improvements save us a lot of steps but possess the comparable sensitivity and selectivity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A dsRNA-binding protein MdDRB1 associated with miRNA biogenesis modifies adventitious rooting and tree architecture in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chun-Xiang; Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xie, Xing-Bin; Feng, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Shu, Huai-Rui; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2014-02-01

    Although numerous miRNAs have been already isolated from fruit trees, knowledge about miRNA biogenesis is largely unknown in fruit trees. Double-strand RNA-binding (DRB) protein plays an important role in miRNA processing and maturation; however, its role in the regulation of economically important traits is not clear yet in fruit trees. EST blast and RACE amplification were performed to isolate apple MdDRB1 gene. Following expression analysis, RNA binding and protein interaction assays, MdDRB1 was transformed into apple callus and in vitro tissue cultures to characterize the functions of MdDRB1 in miRNA biogenesis, adventitious rooting, leaf development and tree growth habit. MdDRB1 contained two highly conserved DRB domains. Its transcripts existed in all tissues tested and are induced by hormones. It bound to double-strand RNAs and interacted with AtDCL1 (Dicer-Like 1) and MdDCL1. Chip assay indicated its role in miRNA biogenesis. Transgenic analysis showed that MdDRB1 controls adventitious rooting, leaf curvature and tree architecture by modulating the accumulation of miRNAs and the transcript levels of miRNA target genes. Our results demonstrated that MdDRB1 functions in the miRNA biogenesis in a conserved way and that it is a master regulator in the formation of economically important traits in fruit trees. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing Using a Chimeric Single-Guide RNA Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Butt, Haroon; Eid, Ayman; Ali, Zahir; Atia, Mohamed A. M.; Mokhtar, Morad M.; Hassan, Norhan; Lee, Ciaran M.; Bao, Gang; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2017-01-01

    used CRISPR/Cas9 to generate targeted double-strand breaks and to deliver an RNA repair template for HDR in rice (Oryza sativa). We used chimeric single-guide RNA (cgRNA) molecules carrying both sequences for target site specificity (to generate

  2. Processing of nuclear viroids in vivo: an interplay between RNA conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Eugenia Gas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Replication of viroids, small non-protein-coding plant pathogenic RNAs, entails reiterative transcription of their incoming single-stranded circular genomes, to which the (+ polarity is arbitrarily assigned, cleavage of the oligomeric strands of one or both polarities to unit-length, and ligation to circular RNAs. While cleavage in chloroplastic viroids (family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, where and how cleavage of oligomeric (+ RNAs of nuclear viroids (family Pospiviroidae occurs in vivo remains controversial. Previous in vitro data indicated that a hairpin capped by a GAAA tetraloop is the RNA motif directing cleavage and a loop E motif ligation. Here we have re-examined this question in vivo, taking advantage of earlier findings showing that dimeric viroid (+ RNAs of the family Pospiviroidae transgenically expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana are processed correctly. Using this methodology, we have mapped the processing site of three members of this family at equivalent positions of the hairpin I/double-stranded structure that the upper strand and flanking nucleotides of the central conserved region (CCR can form. More specifically, from the effects of 16 mutations on Citrus exocortis viroid expressed transgenically in A. thaliana, we conclude that the substrate for in vivo cleavage is the conserved double-stranded structure, with hairpin I potentially facilitating the adoption of this structure, whereas ligation is determined by loop E and flanking nucleotides of the two CCR strands. These results have deep implications on the underlying mechanism of both processing reactions, which are most likely catalyzed by enzymes different from those generally assumed: cleavage by a member of the RNase III family, and ligation by an RNA ligase distinct from the only one characterized so far in plants, thus predicting the existence of at least a second plant RNA ligase.

  3. Global organization of a positive-strand RNA virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong Wu

    Full Text Available The genomes of plus-strand RNA viruses contain many regulatory sequences and structures that direct different viral processes. The traditional view of these RNA elements are as local structures present in non-coding regions. However, this view is changing due to the discovery of regulatory elements in coding regions and functional long-range intra-genomic base pairing interactions. The ∼4.8 kb long RNA genome of the tombusvirus tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV contains these types of structural features, including six different functional long-distance interactions. We hypothesized that to achieve these multiple interactions this viral genome must utilize a large-scale organizational strategy and, accordingly, we sought to assess the global conformation of the entire TBSV genome. Atomic force micrographs of the genome indicated a mostly condensed structure composed of interconnected protrusions extending from a central hub. This configuration was consistent with the genomic secondary structure model generated using high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (i.e. SHAPE, which predicted different sized RNA domains originating from a central region. Known RNA elements were identified in both domain and inter-domain regions, and novel structural features were predicted and functionally confirmed. Interestingly, only two of the six long-range interactions known to form were present in the structural model. However, for those interactions that did not form, complementary partner sequences were positioned relatively close to each other in the structure, suggesting that the secondary structure level of viral genome structure could provide a basic scaffold for the formation of different long-range interactions. The higher-order structural model for the TBSV RNA genome provides a snapshot of the complex framework that allows multiple functional components to operate in concert within a confined context.

  4. Effects of 3-Deoxyadenosine (Cordycepin) on the repair of X-ray-induced DNA single- and double-strand breaks in chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Sato, Fumiaki

    1990-01-01

    The ability of cordycepin to inhibit the repair of DNA strand breaks was examined with X-irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells in log-phase culture. A filter elution technique revealed that 70 μM cordycepin did not inhibit the repair of single-strand breaks but inhibited the repair of double-strand breaks. These findings confirmed the fact that the increase in the lethality of cordycepin in X-irradiated cultured mammalian cells was attributable to unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks. (author)

  5. Synthesis and optical resolution of a Cu(I) double-stranded helicate with ketimine-bridged tris(bipyridine) ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusho, Yoshio; Goto, Hidetoshi; Itomi, Ken; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Miyagawa, Toyoharu; Yashima, Eiji

    2011-09-21

    A tetranuclear Cu(I) double-stranded helicate was synthesized from ketimine-bridged tris(bipyridine) ligands and Cu(I) ions, and the racemate was successfully resolved by diastereomeric salt formation using an optically pure phosphate anion followed by anion exchange with NaPF(6) without racemization.

  6. Structural Analyses of Avocado sunblotch viroid Reveal Differences in the Folding of Plus and Minus RNA Strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Delan-Forino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viroids are small pathogenic circular single-stranded RNAs, present in two complementary sequences, named plus and minus, in infected plant cells. A high degree of complementarities between different regions of the RNAs allows them to adopt complex structures. Since viroids are naked non-coding RNAs, interactions with host factors appear to be closely related to their structural and catalytic characteristics. Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd, a member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates via a symmetric RNA-dependant rolling-circle process, involving self-cleavage via hammerhead ribozymes. Consequently, it is assumed that ASBVd plus and minus strands adopt similar structures. Moreover, by computer analyses, a quasi-rod-like secondary structure has been predicted. Nevertheless, secondary and tertiary structures of both polarities of ASBVd remain unsolved. In this study, we analyzed the characteristic of each strand of ASBVd through biophysical analyses. We report that ASBVd transcripts of plus and minus polarities exhibit differences in electrophoretic mobility under native conditions and in thermal denaturation profiles. Subsequently, the secondary structures of plus and minus polarities of ASBVd were probed using the RNA-selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE method. The models obtained show that both polarities fold into different structures. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a kissing-loop interaction within the minus strand that may play a role in in vivo viroid life cycle.

  7. The Globular State of the Single-Stranded RNA: Effect of the Secondary Structure Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Zareh A.; Karapetian, Armen T.

    2015-01-01

    The mutual influence of the slow rearrangements of secondary structure and fast collapse of the long single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in approximation of coarse-grained model is studied with analytic calculations. It is assumed that the characteristic time of the secondary structure rearrangement is much longer than that for the formation of the tertiary structure. A nonequilibrium phase transition of the 2nd order has been observed. PMID:26345143

  8. The Globular State of the Single-Stranded RNA: Effect of the Secondary Structure Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareh A. Grigoryan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mutual influence of the slow rearrangements of secondary structure and fast collapse of the long single-stranded RNA (ssRNA in approximation of coarse-grained model is studied with analytic calculations. It is assumed that the characteristic time of the secondary structure rearrangement is much longer than that for the formation of the tertiary structure. A nonequilibrium phase transition of the 2nd order has been observed.

  9. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.

  10. The occurrence of double strand DNA breaks is not the sole condition for meiotic crossing over in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, P; Rantanen, M

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the interchromosomal effects of In(2L + 2R)Cy, In(3L + 3R)LVM and their joint effect on the frequencies of single and double crossovers in the cv-v-f region of the X chromosome as well as interference showed that both inversions, occurring separately, increased the frequency of single as well as double crossovers and the coefficient of coincidence. However, when the inversions occurred together the frequencies of single crossovers no longer increased, but the frequency of double crossovers, as well as the coefficient of coincidence did increase. These results indicate firstly that the interchromosomal effects influence some precondition of exchange, but that this precondition is not an occurrence of double strand DNA breaks. Thus, the occurrence of double strand DNA breaks is not the sole condition for crossing over in Drosophila melanogaster.

  11. Acid polypeptides as inhibitors of the repair of double-strand DNA breaks induced by γ-irradiation of Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, A.I.; Revina, G.I.; Kuzin, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of natural modificator's synthetic analogue -polyaspartylglytamate (AG) - on the repair of radiation-induced double-strand DNA breaks is studies. The radiation and modificator effects were determined by the criterion of the formation of chromosome recombinations and reproductive death of cells on Hela cell culture and in Chinese hamsters. It is shown that the incubation of Hela cells with AG doubles and triples the degradation effect of rdiation at 50 and 10 Gy doses. When radiation dose equals 1 Gy and repair time is G-22 h, 1.5 - 3 time - increased yield of chromotide and chromosome abberations is detected in Chinese hamster cells in the presence of the modificator during all periods of cell fixation. The effect of radiation mutagenic action enhancement by the modificator is not observed during the incubation of cells with AG 30-45 min after irradiation

  12. Backbone and sidechain methyl Ile (δ1), Leu and Val chemical shift assignments of RDE-4 (1-243), an RNA interference initiation protein in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiliveri, Sai Chaitanya; Kumar, Sonu; Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Deshmukh, Mandar V

    2012-10-01

    The RNAi pathway of several organisms requires presence of double stranded RNA binding proteins for functioning of Dicer in gene regulation. In C. elegans, a double stranded RNA binding protein, RDE-4 (385 aa, 44 kDa) recognizes long exogenous dsRNA and initiates the RNAi pathway. We have achieved complete backbone and stereospecific methyl sidechain Ile (δ1), Leu and Val chemical shifts of first 243 amino acids of RDE-4, namely RDE-4ΔC.

  13. γ-ray dose rate effect in DNA double-strand break repair deficient murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liya; Li Peiwen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the dose rate effect and potentially lethal damage repair in DNA double-strand break repair deficient murine cells (SCID) irradiated by γ-ray. Methods: The wild type (CB.17+/+) and SCID cells were exposed to γ-ray at high and low dose rates. The high dose rate exposure was fractionated into two equal doses at 24 h intervals. The survival rates of irradiated cells were calculated by clone-forming analysis. Results: When γ-ray was given to wild type (CB.17+/+) cells in two fractions at 24 h intervals, the survival rate was significantly higher than that when the same total dose was given singly. In contrast, there was no difference in the survival rates between the single and fractionated exposure in SCID cells. SCID cells were more sensitive than CB.17+/+ cells to both low and high dose rates γ-ray exposure for cell killing. The survival rate by low dose rate exposure was significantly higher than that by high dose rate exposure, not only in CB.17+/+ cells but also in SCID cells. Conclusions: SCID cells are deficient in repairing γ-ray induced double-strand breaks. There is dose rate effect in both SCID and CB.17+/+ cells

  14. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in Escherichia coli and constitute the major pathway of error-free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalysed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Analysis of intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination by rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Sandra D.; Tzeng, W.-P.; Chen, M.-H.; Frey, Teryl K.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether rubella virus (RUB) undergoes intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination, cells were cotransfected with pairs of in vitro transcripts from genomic cDNA plasmid vectors engineered to contain nonoverlapping deletions: the replicative transcript maintained the 5'-proximal nonstructural (NS) ORF (which contained the replicase, making it RNA replication competent), had a deletion in the 3'-proximal structural protein (SP) ORF, and maintained the 3' end of the genome, including the putative 3' cis-acting elements (CSE), while the nonreplicative transcript consisted of the 3' half of the genome including the SP-ORF and 3' CSE. Cotransfection yielded plaque-forming virus that synthesized the standard genomic and subgenomic RNAs and thus was generated by RNA-RNA recombination. Using transcripts tagged with a 3'-terminal deletion, it was found that recombinants contained the 3' end derived from the replicative strand, indicating a cis-preference for initiation of negative-strand synthesis. In cotransfections in which the replicative transcript lacked the 3' CSE, recombination occurred, albeit at lower efficiency, indicating that initiation in trans from the NS-ORF can occur. The 3' CSE was sufficient as a nonreplicative transcript, showing that it can serve as a promoter for negative-strand RNA synthesis. While deletion mutagenesis showed that the presence of the junction untranslated region (J-UTR) between the ORFs appeared to be necessary on both transcripts for recombination in this region of the genome, analysis with transcripts tagged with restriction sites showed that the J-UTR was not a hot spot for recombination compared to neighboring regions in both ORFs. Sequence analysis of recombinants revealed that both precise (homologous) and imprecise recombination (aberrant, homologous resulting in duplications) occurred; however, imprecise recombination only involved the J-UTR or the 3' end of the NS-ORF and the J-UTR (maintaining the NS-ORF), indicating

  16. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint

  17. Correlation between residual level of DNA double-strand breaks and the radiosensitivity of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jianxiang; Sun Weijian; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To understand the variation of the DNA double-strand break rejoining capacity among different cultured cancer cell lines and the primary cancer cells from brain cancer patients, and to explore the predictor of radiotherapy responses of cancers. Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were induced by 60 Co γ-irradiation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the initial production and rejoining of DNA DSBs. Radiosensitivity was determined by in vitro assay of clonogenic-forming capacity. Results: A wide variation of radiosensitivity, e.g. the survival parameter of Do varied from 0.65 to 2.15 Gy, was displayed among the eight cell lines derived from different type of cancers. Although differential level of initial DNA DSBs induced by 20 Gy γ-rays was observed among various cell lines, it was not correlated with the radiosensitivity. The deficiency of DNA DSB rejoining in radiosensitive cell lines was shown either in the early rapid-rejoining phase (SX-10 cells) or in the late slow-rejoining phase (A2780 cells). A significant relationship was observed between the residual level of DNA DSBs measured at 2 h post-20 Gy irradiation and the cellular radiosensitivity (D 0 or SF 2 ). The kinetic curves of rejoining DNA DSBs in the primary human brain tumor cells indicated a variation on DSB rejoining capacity among different individual tumor. The residual level of DNA DSBs after 2 h of rejoining post 20 Gy irradiation in primary human brain tumor cells is compatible to the results obtained in vitro culture cancer cell lines. Conclusions: The residual level of DNA DSBs is correlated with radioresistance of cancer cells, and the residual DNA damage is a useful parameter in predicting the response of tumor tissue to radiotherapy. (authors)

  18. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Audemard, Eric; Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells

  19. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Audemard, Eric [McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rak, Janusz, E-mail: janusz.rak@mcgill.ca [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells.

  20. TH-CD-201-11: Optimizing the Response and Cost of a DNA Double-Strand Break Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A DNA double-strand break (DSB) dosimeter was developed to measure the biological effect of radiation. The goal here is to refine the fabrication method of this dosimeter to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation (CoV) and reduce the cost for the dosimeter. Methods: Our dosimeter consists of 4 kilo-base pair DNA strands (labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein) attached to streptavidin magnetic beads. The final step of the DNA dosimeter fabrication is to suspend these attached beads in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The amount of PBS used to suspend the attached beads and the relative volume of the DNA strands to the beads both affect the CoV and dosimeter cost. We diluted the beads attached with DNA in different volumes of PBS (100, 200, and 400 µL) to create different concentrations of the DNA dosimeter. Then we irradiated these dosimeters (50 µL samples) in a water-equivalent plastic phantom at 25 and 50 Gy (three samples per dose) and calculated the CoV for each dosimeter concentration. Also, we used different masses of DNA strands (1, 2, 8, 16, 24, and 32 µg) to attach to the same volume of magnetic beads (100 µL) to explore how this affects the cost of the dosimeter. Results: The lowest CoV was produced for the highest concentration of dosimeter (100 µL of PBS), which created CoV of 2.0 and 1.0% for 25 and 50 Gy, respectively. We found that the lowest production cost for the dosimeter occurs by attaching 16 µg of DNA strands with 100 µL of beads. Conclusion: : We optimized the fabrication of the DNA dosimeter to produce low CoV and cost, but we still need to explore ways to further improve the dosimeter for use at lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  1. Virtual Cross-Linking of the Active Nemorubicin Metabolite PNU-159682 to Double-Stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalabrin, Matteo; Quintieri, Luigi; Palumbo, Manlio; Riccardi Sirtori, Federico; Gatto, Barbara

    2017-02-20

    The DNA alkylating mechanism of PNU-159682 (PNU), a highly potent metabolite of the anthracycline nemorubicin, was investigated by gel-electrophoretic, HPLC-UV, and micro-HPLC/mass spectrometry (MS) measurements. PNU quickly reacted with double-stranded oligonucleotides, but not with single-stranded sequences, to form covalent adducts which were detectable by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (DPAGE). Ion-pair reverse-phase HPLC-UV analysis on CG rich duplex sequences having a 5'-CCCGGG-3' central core showed the formation of two types of adducts with PNU, which were stable and could be characterized by micro-HPLC/MS. The first type contained one alkylated species (and possibly one reversibly bound species), and the second contained two alkylated species per duplex DNA. The covalent adducts were found to produce effective bridging of DNA complementary strands through the formation of virtual cross-links reminiscent of those produced by classical anthracyclines in the presence of formaldehyde. Furthermore, the absence of reactivity of PNU with CG-rich sequence containing a TA core (CGTACG), and the minor reactivity between PNU and CGC sequences (TACGCG·CGCGTA) pointed out the importance of guanine sequence context in modulating DNA alkylation.

  2. Evaluation of the neutral comet assay for detection of alpha-particle induced DNA-double-strand-breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofbauer, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study was to differentiate DNA-double-strand-breaks from DNA-single-strand-breaks on a single cell level, using the comet assay after α- and γ-irradiation. Americium-241 was used as a alpha-irradiation-source, Caesium-137 was used for γ-irradiation. Because of technical problems with both the neutral and alkaline comet assay after irradiation of gastric cancer cells and human lymphocytes, no definite differentiation of DNA-damage was possible.

  3. Multispectroscopic and Theoretical Exploration of the Comparative Binding Aspects of Bioflavonoid Fisetin with Triple- and Double-Helical Forms of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Haque, Lucy; Goswami, Rapti; Das, Suman

    2017-12-14

    The interactions of RNA triplex (U.A*U) and duplex (A.U) with naturally occurring flavonoid fisetin (FTN) have been examined at pH 7.0 using various spectroscopic, viscometric, and theoretical studies. Experimental observations showed that the ligand binds with both double- and triple-helical forms of RNA, although the binding affinity is greater for the triplex structure (5.94 × 10 6 M -1 ) compared to that for the duplex counterpart (1.0 × 10 5 M -1 ). Thermal melting experiments revealed that the Hoogsteen base-paired third strand of triplex was stabilized to a greater extent (∼14 °C) compared with the Watson-Crick base-paired second strand (∼4 °C) in the presence of FTN. From fluorimetric study, we observed that U.A*U and A.U primarily bind to the photoproduced tautomer of FTN in the excited state. Steady-state and time-resolved anisotropy measurements illustrate considerable modulations of the spectroscopic properties of the tautomeric FTN within the RNA environment. Viscometric, fluorescence quenching, and thermal melting studies all together support the mode of binding to be intercalation. Theoretical study explains the experimental absorption and emission (dual fluorescence) behavior of FTN along with the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process.

  4. Bacterial RNA induces myocyte cellular dysfunction through the activation of PKR

    OpenAIRE

    Bleiblo, Farag; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Tai, TC; Saleh, Mazen; Parrillo, Joseph E.; Kumar, Anand; Kumar, Aseem

    2012-01-01

    Severe sepsis and the ensuing septic shock are serious life threatening conditions. These diseases are triggered by the host's over exuberant systemic response to the infecting pathogen. Several surveillance mechanisms have evolved to discriminate self from foreign RNA and accordingly trigger effective cellular responses to target the pathogenic threats. The RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is a key component of the cytoplasmic RNA sensors involved in the recognition of viral double-strande...

  5. Evaluation of carrier-mediated siRNA delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Stefano; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Foged, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    RNA delivery. An in vitro cell culture model system expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was used to develop the assay, which was based on the intracellular quantification of a full-length double-stranded Dicer substrate siRNA by stem-loop RT qPCR. The result is a well-documented protocol......RNA delivered by use of carriers remains an analytical challenge. The purpose of the present study was to optimize and validate an analytical protocol based on stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT qPCR) to quantitatively monitor the carrier-mediated intracellular si...

  6. Primary structure of the α-subunit of Na+, K+-ATPase. II. Isolation, reverse transcription, and cloning of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, K.E.; Broude, N.E.; Arsenyan, S.G.; Grishin, A.V.; Dzhandzhugazyan, K.N.; Modyanov, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The messenger RNA coding the α-subunit of Na + ,K + -ATPase has been isolated from the outer medullary layer of porcine kidneys. The mRNA gives a specific hybridization band in the 25S-26S region with three oligonucleotide probes synthesized on the basis of information on the structure of three peptides isolated from a tryptic hydrolyzate of the α-subunit of Na + ,K + -ATPase. The translation of the mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by immunochemical identification of the products of synthesis confirmed the presence of the mRNA of the α-subunit of Na + ,K + -ATPase in an enriched fraction of poly(A + )-RNA. This preparation has been used for the synthesis of cloning of double-stranded cDNA

  7. DNA double-strand break and apoptosis induction in human lymphocytes in different cycle cell phases by 60Co gamma rays and Bragg peak protons of a medical beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachenkova, A.A.; Boreyko, A.V.; Mozhaeva, A.V.; Chausov, V.N.; Ravnachka, I.I.; Amov, I.; Tiunchik, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative analysis is made of the regularities in the formation of DNA double-strand break and apoptosis induction in peripheral human blood lymphocytes in different cell cycle phases after 60 Co gamma and extended Bragg peak proton irradiation. It is shown that the formation of apoptotic cells in a lymphocyte population increases linearly in all the cell cycle stages after proton irradiation. The maximal DNA double-strand break and apoptosis yield in lymphocytes is observed in the S phase of the cell cycle

  8. Phosphate-methylated DNA aimed at HIV-1 RNA loops and integrated DNA inhibits viral infectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, H. M.; Koole, L. H.; van Genderen, M. H.; Smit, L.; Geelen, J. L.; Jurriaans, S.; Goudsmit, J.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphate-methylated DNA hybridizes strongly and specifically to natural DNA and RNA. Hybridization to single-stranded and double-stranded DNA leads to site-selective blocking of replication and transcription. Phosphate-methylated DNA was used to interrupt the life cycle of the human

  9. Partial strands synthesizing leads to inevitable aborting and complicated products in consecutive polymerase chain reactions (PCRs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Various abnormal phenomena have been observed during PCR so far. The present study performed a series of consecutive PCRs (including many rounds of re-amplification continuously) and found that the abortion of re-amplification was inevitable as long as a variety of complicated product appeared. The aborting stages varied, according to the lengths of targets. Longer targets reached the abortion earlier than the shorter ones, marked by appearance of the complex that was immobile in electropho-resis. Denatured gel-electrophoresis revealed that the complex was mainly made up of shorter or partially synthesized strands, together with small amounts of full-length ones. Able to be digested by S1 nuclease but unable by restriction endonucleases (REs), the complex was proved to consist of both single regions and double-helix regions that kept the complex stable thermodynamically. Simulations gave evidence that partial strands, even at lower concentration, could disturb re-amplification effec- tively and lead to the abortion of re-amplifications finally. It was pointed out that the partial strands formed chiefly via polymerase’s infidelity, and hence the solution to lighten the abnormality was also proposed.

  10. Ku recruits XLF to DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Wang, Shih-Ya; Uematsu, Naoya; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2008-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF)--also known as Cernunnos--has recently been shown to be involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the main pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. XLF is likely to enhance NHEJ by stimulating XRCC4-ligase IV-mediated joining of DSBs. Here, we report mechanistic details of XLF recruitment to DSBs. Live cell imaging combined with laser micro-irradiation showed that XLF is an early responder to DSBs and that Ku is essential for XLF recruitment to DSBs. Biochemical analysis showed that Ku-XLF interaction occurs on DNA and that Ku stimulates XLF binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, XRCC4 is dispensable for XLF recruitment to DSBs, although photobleaching analysis showed that XRCC4 stabilizes the binding of XLF to DSBs. Our observations showed the direct involvement of XLF in the dynamic assembly of the NHEJ machinery and provide mechanistic insights into DSB recognition.

  11. The Molecular Basis of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair: The Critical Structure of the RAD52/RPA Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, Dobra

    2001-01-01

    .... RAD52 has specific interactions with RAD51, RPA and DNA (1,2,3). The binding of RAD52 to ends of double-strand breaks has been found to be a key initiation step to DNA repair by homologous recombination...

  12. Processing of DNA double strand breaks by alternative non-homologous end-joining in hyperacetylated chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manova, Vasilissa; Singh, Satyendra K; Iliakis, George

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian cells employ at least two subpathways of non-homologous end-joining for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks: The canonical DNA-PK-dependent form of non-homologous end-joining (D-NHEJ) and an alternative, slowly operating, error-prone backup pathway (B-NHEJ). In contrast to D-NHEJ, which operates with similar efficiency throughout the cell cycle, B-NHEJ operates more efficiently in G2-phase. Notably, B-NHEJ also shows strong and as of yet unexplained dependency on growth activity and is markedly compromised in serum-deprived cells, or in cells that enter the plateau-phase of growth. The molecular mechanisms underpinning this response remain unknown. Since chromatin structure or changes in chromatin structure are prime candidate-B-NHEJ-modulators, we study here the role of chromatin hyperacetylation, either by HDAC2 knockdown or treatment with the HDAC inhibitor TSA, on the repair by B-NHEJ of IR-induced DSBs. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HDAC2 fails to provoke histone hyperacetylation in Lig4-/- MEFs and has no detectable effect on B-NHEJ function. Treatment with TSA that inhibits multiple HDACs causes efficient, reversible chromatin hyperacetylation in Lig4-/- MEFs, as well as in human HCT116 Lig4-/- cells and the human glioma cell line M059K. The IR yield of DSBs in TSA-treated cells remains similar to that of untreated cells despite the expected chromatin relaxation. In addition, chromatin hyperacetylation leaves unchanged repair of DSBs by B-NHEJ in irradiated exponentially growing, or plateau-phase cells. Notably, under the experimental conditions employed here, chromatin hyperacetylation fails to detectably modulate B-NHEJ in M059K cells as well. In summary, the results show that chromatin acetylation or deacetylation does not affect the kinetics of alternative NHEJ in all types of cells examined both in exponentially growing and serum deprived cultures. We conclude that parameters beyond chromatin acetylation determine B

  13. Production of DNA strand breaks by ionizing radiation of different quality and their consequences for cell inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampf, G.

    1983-07-01

    The production of single- and double-strand breaks (DSB) in the DNA of Chinese hamster cells (V 79) was studied by use of 11 radiation qualities, with some also under hypoxic conditions. The aim was to find relations between the induction of lesions on the molecular level and the expression of this damage on the cellular level. The results suggest that release of DNA from the nuclear-membrane complex, induction of chromosome breaks, and cell inactivation are triggered by DSB. However, not simply a certain number of DSB in the DNA of the nucleus, but their cooperation within a small structural section of DNA is required for cell inactivation. Such sections may be the membrane-associated superstructure units. DSB produced under hypoxic conditions show a greater effectiveness than those produced under oxic conditions. The investigations with eukaryotic cells and bacteria suggest that not the entire DNA of all organisms but a structural unit common to them represents the critical target for radiation action. (author)

  14. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz, E-mail: gchojnowski@genesilico.pl [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Waleń, Tomasz [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); University of Warsaw, Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Bujnicki, Janusz M. [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2015-03-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx.

  15. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Waleń, Tomasz; Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2015-01-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx

  16. HDAC4 and HDAC6 sustain DNA double strand break repair and stem-like phenotype by promoting radioresistance in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marampon, Francesco; Megiorni, Francesca; Camero, Simona; Crescioli, Clara; McDowell, Heather P; Sferra, Roberta; Vetuschi, Antonella; Pompili, Simona; Ventura, Luca; De Felice, Francesca; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Dominici, Carlo; Maggio, Roberto; Festuccia, Claudio; Gravina, Giovanni Luca

    2017-07-01

    The role of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4 and 6 in glioblastoma (GBM) radioresistance was investigated. We found that tumor samples from 31 GBM patients, who underwent temozolomide and radiotherapy combined treatment, showed HDAC4 and HDAC6 expression in 93.5% and 96.7% of cases, respectively. Retrospective clinical data analysis demonstrated that high-intensity HDAC4 and/or HDAC6 immunostaining was predictive of poor clinical outcome. In vitro experiments revealed that short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of HDAC4 or HDAC6 radiosensitized U87MG and U251MG GBM cell lines by promoting DNA double-strand break (DSBs) accumulation and by affecting DSBs repair molecular machinery. We found that HDAC6 knock-down predisposes to radiation therapy-induced U251MG apoptosis- and U87MG autophagy-mediated cell death. HDAC4 silencing promoted radiation therapy-induced senescence, independently by the cellular context. Finally, we showed that p53 WT expression contributed to the radiotherapy lethal effects and that HDAC4 or HDAC6 sustained GBM stem-like radioresistant phenotype. Altogether, these observations suggest that HDAC4 and HDAC6 are guardians of irradiation-induced DNA damages and stemness, thus promoting radioresistance, and may represent potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in GBM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks after computed tomography examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Löbrich, Markus; Rief, Nicole; Kühne, Martin; Heckmann, Martina; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Rübe, Christian; Uder, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can lead to a variety of deleterious effects in humans, most importantly to the induction of cancer. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most significant genetic lesions introduced by ionizing radiation that can initiate carcinogenesis. We have enumerated γ-H2AX foci as a measure for DSBs in lymphocytes from individuals undergoing computed tomography examination of the thorax and/or the abdomen. The number of DSBs induced by computed tomography examination was fou...

  18. Characterization of purified Sindbis virus nsP4 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubach, Jon K.; Wasik, Brian R.; Rupp, Jonathan C.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Hardy, Richard W.; Smith, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    The Sindbis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsP4) is responsible for the replication of the viral RNA genome. In infected cells, nsP4 is localized in a replication complex along with the other viral non-structural proteins. nsP4 has been difficult to homogenously purify from infected cells due to its interactions with the other replication proteins and the fact that its N-terminal residue, a tyrosine, causes the protein to be rapidly turned over in cells. We report the successful expression and purification of Sindbis nsP4 in a bacterial system, in which nsP4 is expressed as an N-terminal SUMO fusion protein. After purification the SUMO tag is removed, resulting in the isolation of full-length nsP4 possessing the authentic N-terminal tyrosine. This purified enzyme is able to produce minus-strand RNA de novo from plus-strand templates, as well as terminally add adenosine residues to the 3' end of an RNA substrate. In the presence of the partially processed viral replicase polyprotein, P123, purified nsP4 is able to synthesize discrete template length minus-strand RNA products. Mutations in the 3' CSE or poly(A) tail of viral template RNA prevent RNA synthesis by the replicase complex containing purified nsP4, consistent with previously reported template requirements for minus-strand RNA synthesis. Optimal reaction conditions were determined by investigating the effects of time, pH, and the concentrations of nsP4, P123 and magnesium on the synthesis of RNA

  19. MO-AB-BRA-04: Radiation Measurements with a DNA Double-Strand-Break Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Many types of dosimeters are used to measure radiation, but none of them directly measures the biological effect of this dose. The purpose here is to create a dosimeter that can measure the probability of double-strand breaks (DSB) for DNA, which is directly related to the biological effect of radiation. Methods: The dosimeter has DNA strands, which are labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein. The biotin attaches these strands to magnetic beads. We suspended the DNA dosimeter in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as it matches the internal environment of the body. We placed small volumes (50µL) of the DNA dosimeter into tubes and irradiated these samples in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with several doses (three samples per dose). After irradiating the samples, a magnet was placed against the tubes. The fluorescein attached to broken DNA strands was extracted (called the supernatant) and placed into a different tube. The fluorescein on the unbroken strands remained attached to the beads in the tube and was re-suspended with 50µL of PBS. A fluorescence reader was used to measure the fluorescence for both the re-suspended beads and supernatant. To prove that we are measuring DSB, we tested dosimeter response with two different lengths of attached DNA strands (1 and 4 kilo-base pair). Results: The probability of DSB at the dose levels of 5, 10, 25, and 50 Gy were 0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.19, respectively, while the coefficients of variation were 0.14, 0.07, 0.02, and 0.01, respectively. The 4 kilo-base-pair dosimeter produced 5.3 times the response of the 1 kilo-base-pair dosimeter. Conclusion: The DNA dosimeter yields a measurable response to dose that scales with the DNA strand length. The goal now is to refine the dosimeter fabrication to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation for the lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  20. MO-AB-BRA-04: Radiation Measurements with a DNA Double-Strand-Break Dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N; Rasmussen, K; Gutierrez, A; Ha, CS; Lee, SE; Shim, EY; Kirby, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Many types of dosimeters are used to measure radiation, but none of them directly measures the biological effect of this dose. The purpose here is to create a dosimeter that can measure the probability of double-strand breaks (DSB) for DNA, which is directly related to the biological effect of radiation. Methods: The dosimeter has DNA strands, which are labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein. The biotin attaches these strands to magnetic beads. We suspended the DNA dosimeter in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as it matches the internal environment of the body. We placed small volumes (50µL) of the DNA dosimeter into tubes and irradiated these samples in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with several doses (three samples per dose). After irradiating the samples, a magnet was placed against the tubes. The fluorescein attached to broken DNA strands was extracted (called the supernatant) and placed into a different tube. The fluorescein on the unbroken strands remained attached to the beads in the tube and was re-suspended with 50µL of PBS. A fluorescence reader was used to measure the fluorescence for both the re-suspended beads and supernatant. To prove that we are measuring DSB, we tested dosimeter response with two different lengths of attached DNA strands (1 and 4 kilo-base pair). Results: The probability of DSB at the dose levels of 5, 10, 25, and 50 Gy were 0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.19, respectively, while the coefficients of variation were 0.14, 0.07, 0.02, and 0.01, respectively. The 4 kilo-base-pair dosimeter produced 5.3 times the response of the 1 kilo-base-pair dosimeter. Conclusion: The DNA dosimeter yields a measurable response to dose that scales with the DNA strand length. The goal now is to refine the dosimeter fabrication to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation for the lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)

  1. The deubiquitylating enzyme USP44 counteracts the DNA double-strand break response mediated by the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Anna; Lukas, Claudia; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Protein recruitment to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) relies on ubiquitylation of the surrounding chromatin by the RING finger ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168. Flux through this pathway is opposed by several deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), including OTUB1 and USP3. By analyzing the effect...... of individually overexpressing the majority of human DUBs on RNF8/RNF168-mediated 53BP1 retention at DSB sites, we found that USP44 and USP29 powerfully inhibited this response at the level of RNF168 accrual. Both USP44 and USP29 promoted efficient deubiquitylation of histone H2A, but unlike USP44, USP29...... displayed non-specific reactivity towards ubiquitylated substrates. Moreover, USP44 but not other H2A DUBs was recruited to RNF168-generated ubiquitylation products at DSB sites. Individual depletion of these DUBs only mildly enhanced accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates and 53BP1 at DSBs, suggesting...

  2. RNA and DNA Targeting by a Reconstituted Thermus thermophilus Type III-A CRISPR-Cas System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Y Liu

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated systems are RNA-guided adaptive immunity pathways used by bacteria and archaea to defend against phages and plasmids. Type III-A systems use a multisubunit interference complex called Csm, containing Cas proteins and a CRISPR RNA (crRNA to target cognate nucleic acids. The Csm complex is intriguing in that it mediates RNA-guided targeting of both RNA and transcriptionally active DNA, but the mechanism is not well understood. Here, we overexpressed the five components of the Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus Type III-A Csm complex (TthCsm with a defined crRNA sequence, and purified intact TthCsm complexes from E. coli cells. The complexes were thermophilic, targeting complementary ssRNA more efficiently at 65°C than at 37°C. Sequence-independent, endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA by TthCsm was triggered by recognition of a complementary ssRNA, and required a lack of complementarity between the first 8 nucleotides (5' tag of the crRNA and the 3' flanking region of the ssRNA. Mutation of the histidine-aspartate (HD nuclease domain of the TthCsm subunit, Cas10/Csm1, abolished DNA cleavage. Activation of DNA cleavage was dependent on RNA binding but not cleavage. This leads to a model in which binding of an ssRNA target to the Csm complex would stimulate cleavage of exposed ssDNA in the cell, such as could occur when the RNA polymerase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA during transcription. Our findings establish an amenable, thermostable system for more in-depth investigation of the targeting mechanism using structural biology methods, such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography.

  3. RNA and DNA Targeting by a Reconstituted Thermus thermophilus Type III-A CRISPR-Cas System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tina Y; Iavarone, Anthony T; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) systems are RNA-guided adaptive immunity pathways used by bacteria and archaea to defend against phages and plasmids. Type III-A systems use a multisubunit interference complex called Csm, containing Cas proteins and a CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target cognate nucleic acids. The Csm complex is intriguing in that it mediates RNA-guided targeting of both RNA and transcriptionally active DNA, but the mechanism is not well understood. Here, we overexpressed the five components of the Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus) Type III-A Csm complex (TthCsm) with a defined crRNA sequence, and purified intact TthCsm complexes from E. coli cells. The complexes were thermophilic, targeting complementary ssRNA more efficiently at 65°C than at 37°C. Sequence-independent, endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by TthCsm was triggered by recognition of a complementary ssRNA, and required a lack of complementarity between the first 8 nucleotides (5' tag) of the crRNA and the 3' flanking region of the ssRNA. Mutation of the histidine-aspartate (HD) nuclease domain of the TthCsm subunit, Cas10/Csm1, abolished DNA cleavage. Activation of DNA cleavage was dependent on RNA binding but not cleavage. This leads to a model in which binding of an ssRNA target to the Csm complex would stimulate cleavage of exposed ssDNA in the cell, such as could occur when the RNA polymerase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during transcription. Our findings establish an amenable, thermostable system for more in-depth investigation of the targeting mechanism using structural biology methods, such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography.

  4. A novel single fluorophore-labeled double-stranded oligonucleotide probe for fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection based on the inherent quenching ability of deoxyguanosine bases and competitive strand-displacement reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingwei; Tian, Jingqi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Lei; Sun, Xuping

    2012-01-01

    We develop a novel single fluorophore-labeled double-stranded oligonucleotide (OND) probe for rapid, nanostructure-free, fluorescence-enhanced nucleic acid detection for the first time. We further demonstrate such probe is able to well discriminate single-base mutation in nucleic acid. The design takes advantage of an inherent quenching ability of guanine bases. The short strand of the probe is designed with an end-labeled fluorophore that is placed adjacent to two guanines as the quencher located on the long opposite strand, resulting in great quenching of dye fluorescence. In the presence of a target complementary to the long strand of the probe, a competitive strand-displacement reaction occurs and the long strand forms a more stable duplex with the target, resulting in the two strands of the probe being separated from each other. As a consequence of this displacement, the fluorophore and the quencher are no longer in close proximity and dye fluorescence increases, signaling the presence of target.

  5. Direct, rapid RNA sequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peattie, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The original methods of RNA sequence analysis were based on enzymatic production and chromatographic separation of overlapping oligonucleotide fragments from within an RNA molecule followed by identification of the mononucleotides comprising the oligomer. Over the past decade the field of nucleic acid sequencing has changed dramatically, however, and RNA molecules now can be sequenced in a variety of more streamlined fashions. Most of the more recent advances in RNA sequencing have involved one-dimensional electrophoretic separation of 32 P-end-labeled oligoribonucleotides on polyacrylamide gels. In this chapter the author discusses two of these methods for determining the nucleotide sequences of RNA molecules rapidly: the chemical method and the enzymatic method. Both methods are direct and degradative, i.e., they rely on fragmatic and chemical approaches should be utilized. The single-strand-specific ribonucleases (A, T 1 , T 2 , and S 1 ) provide an efficient means to locate double-helical regions rapidly, and the chemical reactions provide a means to determine the RNA sequence within these regions. In addition, the chemical reactions allow one to assign interactions to specific atoms and to distinguish secondary interactions from tertiary ones. If the RNA molecule is small enough to be sequenced directly by the enzymatic or chemical method, the probing reactions can be done easily at the same time as sequencing reactions

  6. Stimulation of poliovirus RNA synthesis and virus maturation in a HeLa cell-free in vitro translation-RNA replication system by viral protein 3CDpro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimmer Eckard

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poliovirus protein 3CDpro possesses both proteinase and RNA binding activities, which are located in the 3Cpro domain of the protein. The RNA polymerase (3Dpol domain of 3CDpro modulates these activities of the protein. We have recently shown that the level of 3CDpro in HeLa cell-free in vitro translation-RNA replication reactions is suboptimal for efficient virus production. However, the addition of either 3CDpro mRNA or of purified 3CDpro protein to in vitro reactions, programmed with viral RNA, results in a 100-fold increase in virus yield. Mutational analyses of 3CDpro indicated that RNA binding by the 3Cpro domain and the integrity of interface I in the 3Dpol domain of the protein are both required for function. The aim of these studies was to determine the exact step or steps at which 3CDpro enhances virus yield and to determine the mechanism by which this occurs. Our results suggest that the addition of extra 3CDpro to in vitro translation RNA-replication reactions results in a mild enhancement of both minus and plus strand RNA synthesis. By examining the viral particles formed in the in vitro reactions on sucrose gradients we determined that 3CDpro has only a slight stimulating effect on the synthesis of capsid precursors but it strikingly enhances the maturation of virus particles. Both the stimulation of RNA synthesis and the maturation of the virus particles are dependent on the presence of an intact RNA binding site within the 3Cpro domain of 3CDpro. In addition, the integrity of interface I in the 3Dpol domain of 3CDpro is required for efficient production of mature virus. Surprisingly, plus strand RNA synthesis and virus production in in vitro reactions, programmed with full-length transcript RNA, are not enhanced by the addition of extra 3CDpro. Our results indicate that the stimulation of RNA synthesis and virus maturation by 3CDpro in vitro is dependent on the presence of a VPg-linked RNA template.

  7. Global Analysis of RNA Secondary Structure in Two Metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The secondary structure of RNA is necessary for its maturation, regulation, processing, and function. However, the global influence of RNA folding in eukaryotes is still unclear. Here, we use a high-throughput, sequencing-based, structure-mapping approach to identify the paired (double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] and unpaired (single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] components of the Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans transcriptomes, which allows us to identify conserved features of RNA secondary structure in metazoans. From this analysis, we find that ssRNAs and dsRNAs are significantly correlated with specific epigenetic modifications. Additionally, we find key structural patterns across protein-coding transcripts that indicate that RNA folding demarcates regions of protein translation and likely affects microRNA-mediated regulation of mRNAs in animals. Finally, we identify and characterize 546 mRNAs whose folding pattern is significantly correlated between these metazoans, suggesting that their structure has some function. Overall, our findings provide a global assessment of RNA folding in animals.

  8. Analysis of native cellular DNA after heavy ion irradiation: DNA double-strand breaks in CHO-K1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, J.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-11-01

    A fast assay for the detection of DNA double-strand breaks was developed involving constant field gel electrophoresis (Taucher-Scholz et al., 1994) and densitometric scanning of agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. With this technique, DSB induction was investigated after irradiation of CHO cells with carbon ions with LET values between 14 keV/μm and 400 keV/μm. In parallel, a computer code was developed to simulate both the principle of the electrophoretic detection of DNA double-strand breaks and the action of radiations of different ionization density. The results of the experiments and the calculations are presented here and compared with each other. (orig./HSI)

  9. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrau, Danilo; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Rey, Félix A; Tautz, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS) proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132), which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region) suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation.

  10. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Félix A.

    2017-01-01

    The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS) proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132), which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region) suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation. PMID:28151973

  11. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Dubrau

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132, which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation.

  12. Synapsis-Defective Mutants Reveal a Correlation Between Chromosome Conformation and the Mode of Double-Strand Break Repair During Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Smolikov, Sarit; Eizinger, Andreas; Hurlburt, Allison; Rogers, Eric; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Colaiácovo, Mónica P.

    2007-01-01

    SYP-3 is a new structural component of the synaptonemal complex (SC) required for the regulation of chromosome synapsis. Both chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization are altered throughout the germlines of syp-3 mutants. Here, our analysis of syp-3 mutants provides insights into the relationship between chromosome conformation and the repair of meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although crossover recombination is severely reduced in syp-3 mutants, the production of viable offspri...

  13. Overaccumulation of the chloroplast antisense RNA AS5 is correlated with decreased abundance of 5S rRNA in vivo and inefficient 5S rRNA maturation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Hotto, Amber M.; Bollenbach, Thomas J.; Stern, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation in the chloroplast is exerted by nucleus-encoded ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. One of these ribonucleases is RNR1, a 3′-to-5′ exoribonuclease of the RNase II family. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis rnr1-null mutants exhibit specific abnormalities in the expression of the rRNA operon, including the accumulation of precursor 23S, 16S, and 4.5S species and a concomitant decrease in the mature species. 5S rRNA transcripts, however, accumulate to a very low level in both precursor and mature forms, suggesting that they are unstable in the rnr1 background. Here we demonstrate that rnr1 plants overaccumulate an antisense RNA, AS5, that is complementary to the 5S rRNA, its intergenic spacer, and the downstream trnR gene, which encodes tRNAArg, raising the possibility that AS5 destabilizes 5S rRNA or its precursor and/or blocks rRNA maturation. To investigate this, we used an in vitro system that supports 5S rRNA and trnR processing. We show that AS5 inhibits 5S rRNA maturation from a 5S-trnR precursor, and shorter versions of AS5 demonstrate that inhibition requires intergenic sequences. To test whether the sense and antisense RNAs form double-stranded regions in vitro, treatment with the single-strand-specific mung bean nuclease was used. These results suggest that 5S–AS5 duplexes interfere with a sense-strand secondary structure near the endonucleolytic cleavage site downstream from the 5S rRNA coding region. We hypothesize that these duplexes are degraded by a dsRNA-specific ribonuclease in vivo, contributing to the 5S rRNA deficiency observed in rnr1. PMID:21148395

  14. The dynamics and efficacy of antiviral RNA silencing: A model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogeweg Paulien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical modeling is important to provide insight in the complicated pathway of RNA silencing. RNA silencing is an RNA based mechanism that is widely used by eukaryotes to fight viruses, and to control gene expression. Results We here present the first mathematical model that combines viral growth with RNA silencing. The model involves a plus-strand RNA virus that replicates through a double-strand RNA intermediate. The model of the RNA silencing pathway consists of cleavage of viral RNA into siRNA by Dicer, target cleavage of viral RNA via the RISC complex, and a secondary response. We found that, depending on the strength of the silencing response, different viral growth patterns can occur. Silencing can decrease viral growth, cause oscillations, or clear the virus completely. Our model can explain various observed phenomena, even when they seem contradictory at first: the diverse responses to the removal of RNA dependent RNA polymerase; different viral growth curves; and the great diversity in observed siRNA ratios. Conclusion The model presented here is an important step in the understanding of the natural functioning of RNA silencing in viral infections.

  15. Assessment of DNA double-strand breaks induced by intravascular iodinated contrast media following in vitro irradiation and in vivo, during paediatric cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Richard; McFadden, Sonyia L; Horn, Simon; Prise, Kevin M; Doyle, Philip; Hughes, Ciara M

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric cardiac catheterizations may result in the administration of substantial amounts of iodinated contrast media and ionizing radiation. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of iodinated contrast media in combination with in vitro and in vivo X-ray radiation on lymphocyte DNA. Six concentrations of iodine (15, 17.5, 30, 35, 45, and 52.5 mg of iodine per mL blood) represented volumes of iodinated contrast media used in the clinical setting. Blood obtained from healthy volunteers was mixed with iodinated contrast media and exposed to radiation doses commonly used in paediatric cardiac catheterizations (0 mGy, 70 mGy, 140 mGy, 250 mGy and 450 mGy). Control samples contained no iodine. For in vivo experimentation, pre and post blood samples were collected from children undergoing cardiac catheterization, receiving iodine concentrations of up to 51 mg of iodine per mL blood and radiation doses of up to 400 mGy. Fluorescence microscopy was performed to assess γH2AX-foci induction, which corresponded to the number of DNA double-strand breaks. The presence of iodine in vitro resulted in significant increases of DNA double-strand breaks beyond that induced by radiation for ≥ 17.5 mg/mL iodine to blood. The in vivo effects of contrast media on children undergoing cardiac catheterization resulted in a 19% increase in DNA double-strand breaks in children receiving an average concentration of 19 mg/mL iodine to blood. A larger investigation is required to provide further information of the potential benefit of lowering the amount of iodinated contrast media received during X-ray radiation investigations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  17. Intermolecular RNA Recombination Occurs at Different Frequencies in Alternate Forms of Brome Mosaic Virus RNA Replication Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Garcia-Ruiz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-bound replication compartments. Brome mosaic virus (BMV replicates in vesicular invaginations of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. BMV has served as a productive model system to study processes like virus-host interactions, RNA replication and recombination. Here we present multiple lines of evidence showing that the structure of the viral RNA replication compartments plays a fundamental role and that recruitment of parental RNAs to a common replication compartment is a limiting step in intermolecular RNA recombination. We show that a previously defined requirement for an RNA recruitment element on both parental RNAs is not to function as a preferred crossover site, but in order for individual RNAs to be recruited into the replication compartments. Moreover, modulating the form of the replication compartments from spherular vesicles (spherules to more expansive membrane layers increased intermolecular RNA recombination frequency by 200- to 1000-fold. We propose that intermolecular RNA recombination requires parental RNAs to be recruited into replication compartments as monomers, and that recruitment of multiple RNAs into a contiguous space is much more common for layers than for spherules. These results could explain differences in recombination frequencies between viruses that replicate in association with smaller spherules versus larger double-membrane vesicles and convoluted membranes.

  18. The ubiquitin-selective segregase VCP/p97 orchestrates the response to DNA double-strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meerang, Mayura; Ritz, Danilo; Paliwal, Shreya

    2011-01-01

    Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signalling and repair proteins to the site of lesion. Protein modification with ubiquitin is crucial for the signalling ...

  19. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Francisco Esteban; Moxon, Simon; de Haro, Juan P.; Calo, Silvia; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M.; Dalmay, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi. PMID:20427422

  20. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor; Nicolas, Francisco; Moxon, Simon; Haro, Juan de; Calo, Silvia; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa; Dalmay, Tamas

    2011-09-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi

  1. MicroRNA-target binding structures mimic microRNA duplex structures in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    Full Text Available Traditionally, researchers match a microRNA guide strand to mRNA sequences using sequence comparisons to predict its potential target genes. However, many of the predictions can be false positives due to limitations in sequence comparison alone. In this work, we consider the association of two related RNA structures that share a common guide strand: the microRNA duplex and the microRNA-target binding structure. We have analyzed thousands of such structure pairs and found many of them share high structural similarity. Therefore, we conclude that when predicting microRNA target genes, considering just the microRNA guide strand matches to gene sequences may not be sufficient--the microRNA duplex structure formed by the guide strand and its companion passenger strand must also be considered. We have developed software to translate RNA binding structure into encoded representations, and we have also created novel automatic comparison methods utilizing such encoded representations to determine RNA structure similarity. Our software and methods can be utilized in the other RNA secondary structure comparisons as well.

  2. Breaking DNA strands by extreme-ultraviolet laser pulses in vacuum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Eva; Vyšín, Luděk; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie; Múčka, V.; Čuba, V.; Grisham, M. E.; Heinbuch, S.; Rocca, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 4 (2015), "042718-1"-"042718-8" ISSN 1539-3755 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GA13-28721S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : XUV * DNA damages * single- strand breaks (SSBs) * double- strand breaks (DSBs) Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2014

  3. Double-strand breaks in genome-sized DNA caused by mechanical stress under mixing: Quantitative evaluation through single-molecule observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hayato; Nose, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2018-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that changes in the higher-order structure of genome-sized DNA molecules of more than several tens kbp play important roles in the self-control of genome activity in living cells. Unfortunately, it has been rather difficult to prepare genome-sized DNA molecules without damage or fragmentation. Here, we evaluated the degree of double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by mechanical mixing by single-molecule observation with fluorescence microscopy. The results show that DNA breaks are most significant for the first second after the initiation of mechanical agitation. Based on such observation, we propose a novel mixing procedure to significantly decrease DSBs.

  4. Transmission of Turnip yellows virus by Myzus persicae Is Reduced by Feeding Aphids on Double-Stranded RNA Targeting the Ephrin Receptor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Mulot

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aphid-transmitted plant viruses are a threat for major crops causing massive economic loss worldwide. Members in the Luteoviridae family are transmitted by aphids in a circulative and non-replicative mode. Virions are acquired by aphids when ingesting sap from infected plants and are transported through the gut and the accessory salivary gland (ASG cells by a transcytosis mechanism relying on virus-specific receptors largely unknown. Once released into the salivary canal, virions are inoculated to plants, together with saliva, during a subsequent feeding. In this paper, we bring in vivo evidence that the membrane-bound Ephrin receptor (Eph is a novel aphid protein involved in the transmission of the Turnip yellows virus (TuYV, Polerovirus genus, Luteoviridae family by Myzus persicae. The minor capsid protein of TuYV, essential for aphid transmission, was able to bind the external domain of Eph in yeast. Feeding M. persicae on in planta- or in vitro-synthesized dsRNA targeting Eph-mRNA (dsRNAEph did not affect aphid feeding behavior but reduced accumulation of TuYV genomes in the aphid's body. Consequently, TuYV transmission efficiency by the dsRNAEph-treated aphids was reproducibly inhibited and we brought evidence that Eph is likely involved in intestinal uptake of the virion. The inhibition of virus uptake after dsRNAEph acquisition was also observed for two other poleroviruses transmitted by M. persicae, suggesting a broader role of Eph in polerovirus transmission. Finally, dsRNAEph acquisition by aphids did not affect nymph production. These results pave the way toward an ecologically safe alternative of insecticide treatments that are used to lower aphid populations and reduce polerovirus damages.

  5. Formation of plasmid DNA strand breaks induced by low-energy ion beam: indication of nuclear stopping effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Jiang Bingyao; Chen Youshan; Ding Xingzhao; Liu Xianghuai; Chen Ceshi; Guo Xinyou; Yin Guanglin

    1998-01-01

    Plasmid pGEM 3zf(+) was irradiated by nitrogen ion beam with energies between 20 and 100 keV and the fluence kept as 1 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 . The irradiated plasmid was assayed by neutral electrophoresis and quantified by densitometry. The yields of DNA with single-strand and double-strand breaks first increased then decreased with increasing ion energy. There was a maximal yield value in the range of 20-100 keV. The relationship between DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) cross-section and linear energy transfer (LET) also showed a peak-shaped distribution. To understand the physical process during DNA strand breaks, a Monte Carlo calculation code known as TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) was used to simulate energy losses due to nuclear stopping and to electronic stopping. It can be assumed that nuclear stopping plays a more important role in DNA strand breaks than electronic stopping in this energy range. The physical mechanisms of DNA strand breaks induced by a low-energy ion beam are also discussed. (orig.)

  6. Fumarase is involved in DNA double-strand break resection through a functional interaction with Sae2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leshets, Michael; Ramamurthy, Dharanidharan; Lisby, Michael

    2018-01-01

    One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are the......One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ......) are the main DSB repair pathways. Fumarase is a mitochondrial enzyme which functions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Intriguingly, the enzyme can be readily detected in the cytosolic compartment of all organisms examined, and we have shown that cytosolic fumarase participates in the DNA damage response...

  7. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, María Belén; Vallerga, María Belén; Radl, Analía; Paviolo, Natalia Soledad; Bocco, José Luis; Di Giorgio, Marina; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs). FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress.

  8. Interaction between the cellular protein eEF1A and the 3'-terminal stem-loop of West Nile virus genomic RNA facilitates viral minus-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William G; Blackwell, Jerry L; Shi, Pei-Yong; Brinton, Margo A

    2007-09-01

    RNase footprinting and nitrocellulose filter binding assays were previously used to map one major and two minor binding sites for the cell protein eEF1A on the 3'(+) stem-loop (SL) RNA of West Nile virus (WNV) (3). Base substitutions in the major eEF1A binding site or adjacent areas of the 3'(+) SL were engineered into a WNV infectious clone. Mutations that decreased, as well as ones that increased, eEF1A binding in in vitro assays had a negative effect on viral growth. None of these mutations affected the efficiency of translation of the viral polyprotein from the genomic RNA, but all of the mutations that decreased in vitro eEF1A binding to the 3' SL RNA also decreased viral minus-strand RNA synthesis in transfected cells. Also, a mutation that increased the efficiency of eEF1A binding to the 3' SL RNA increased minus-strand RNA synthesis in transfected cells, which resulted in decreased synthesis of genomic RNA. These results strongly suggest that the interaction between eEF1A and the WNV 3' SL facilitates viral minus-strand synthesis. eEF1A colocalized with viral replication complexes (RC) in infected cells and antibody to eEF1A coimmunoprecipitated viral RC proteins, suggesting that eEF1A facilitates an interaction between the 3' end of the genome and the RC. eEF1A bound with similar efficiencies to the 3'-terminal SL RNAs of four divergent flaviviruses, including a tick-borne flavivirus, and colocalized with dengue virus RC in infected cells. These results suggest that eEF1A plays a similar role in RNA replication for all flaviviruses.

  9. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. ©2013 AACR.

  10. Measurement of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in major immunoglobulin classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aotsuka, S; Okawa, M; Ikebe, K; Yokohari, R [Division of Clinical Immunology, Clinical Research Institute, National Medical Center Hospital, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan

    1979-07-10

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay for quantitating anti-double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid antibodies (anti-dsDNA) in IgG, IgM and IgA classes has been devised. A distinct feature of the method is an application of polystyrene tubes coated with poly-L-lysine, through which dsDNA could be bound firmly to a solid phase. Studies on patients sera as well as normal sera revealed that anti-dsDNA was not qualitatively but quantitatively characteristic of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and that IgG anti-dsDNA levels correlated well with the disease activity.

  11. Enhancement of RNA synthesis by promoter duplication in tombusviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panavas, T.; Panaviene, Z.; Pogany, J.; Nagy, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    Replication of tombusviruses, small plus-strand RNA viruses of plants, is regulated by cis-acting elements present in the viral RNA. The role of cis-acting elements can be studied in vitro by using a partially purified RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) preparation obtained from tombusvirus-infected plants , Virology 276, 279- 288). Here, we demonstrate that the minus-strand RNA of tombusviruses contains, in addition to the 3'-terminal minimal plus-strand initiation promoter, a second cis-acting element, termed the promoter proximal enhancer (PPE). The PPE element enhanced RNA synthesis by almost threefold from the adjacent minimal promoter in the in vitro assay. The sequence of the PPE element is 70% similar to the minimal promoter, suggesting that sequence duplication of the minimal promoter may have been the mechanism leading to the generation of the PPE. Consistent with this proposal, replacement of the PPE element with the minimal promoter, which resulted in a perfectly duplicated promoter region, preserved its enhancer-like function. In contrast, mutagenesis of the PPE element or its replacement with an artificial G/C-rich sequence abolished its stimulative effect on initiation of RNA synthesis in vitro. In vivo experiments are also consistent with the role of the PPE element in enhancement of tombusvirus replication. Sequence comparison of several tombusviruses and related carmoviruses further supports the finding that duplication of minimal promoter sequences may have been an important mechanism during the evolution of cis-acting elements in tombusviruses and related RNA viruses

  12. Transformation frequency of γ irradiated plasmid DNA and the enzymatic double strand break formation by incubation in a protein extract of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Mark, F.; Ventur, Y.

    1994-01-01

    It was found that incubation of γ-irradiated or DNaseI-treated plasmid DNA in a protein extract of Escherichia coli leads to enzyme-induced formation of double strand breaks (dsb) in competition with repair of precursors of these dsb. A survival curve of the plasmid DNA (as determined by transformation of E. coli) was calculated on the basis of enzyme-induced dsb as well as those produced by irradiation assuming that they are lethal. The calculated D O value was the same as that measured directly by transformation of irradiated plasmid DNA. Two models are presented that fit the experimental survival data as a function of dose. One is based on damage formation in the plasmid DNA including enzymatic conversion of single strand damage into dsb (U-model), the other is an enzymatic repair saturation model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Author)

  13. New Insights into the Biological Role of Mammalian ADARs; the RNA Editing Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamh Mannion

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The ADAR proteins deaminate adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA which is one of the most abundant modifications present in mammalian RNA. Inosine can have a profound effect on the RNAs that are edited, not only changing the base-pairing properties, but can also result in recoding, as inosine behaves as if it were guanosine. In mammals there are three ADAR proteins and two ADAR-related proteins (ADAD expressed. All have a very similar modular structure; however, both their expression and biological function differ significantly. Only two of the ADAR proteins have enzymatic activity. However, both ADAR and ADAD proteins possess the ability to bind double-strand RNA. Mutations in ADARs have been associated with many diseases ranging from cancer, innate immunity to neurological disorders. Here, we will discuss in detail the domain structure of mammalian ADARs, the effects of RNA editing, and the role of ADARs in human diseases.

  14. New Insights into the Biological Role of Mammalian ADARs; the RNA Editing Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Niamh; Arieti, Fabiana; Gallo, Angela; Keegan, Liam P.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    The ADAR proteins deaminate adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA which is one of the most abundant modifications present in mammalian RNA. Inosine can have a profound effect on the RNAs that are edited, not only changing the base-pairing properties, but can also result in recoding, as inosine behaves as if it were guanosine. In mammals there are three ADAR proteins and two ADAR-related proteins (ADAD) expressed. All have a very similar modular structure; however, both their expression and biological function differ significantly. Only two of the ADAR proteins have enzymatic activity. However, both ADAR and ADAD proteins possess the ability to bind double-strand RNA. Mutations in ADARs have been associated with many diseases ranging from cancer, innate immunity to neurological disorders. Here, we will discuss in detail the domain structure of mammalian ADARs, the effects of RNA editing, and the role of ADARs in human diseases. PMID:26437436

  15. Radiation-induced DNA Double Strand Breaks and Their Modulations by Treatments with Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaf Extracts: A Cancer Cell Culture Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Jetawattana, S.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma radiation brings deleterious effects upon human cells by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damages. Antioxidants have been shown to confer protective effects on irradiated normal cells. Moringa oleifera Lam. is a widely used nutritional supplement with antioxidant activities. This report showed that antioxidant-containing supplements, in addition to protecting normal cells, could protect cancer cells against genotoxic effects of gamma radiation. γ-H2AX immunofluorescent foci were utilized as an indicator of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells were irradiated with 2-8 Gy gamma radiation. A linear relationship between the formation of γ-H2AX foci and radiation dose was observed with an average of 10 foci per cell per Gy. A 30-minute pretreatment of the cells with either the aqueous or the ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves could partially protect the cells from radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. A pretreatment with 500 µg/mL aqueous extract reduced the number of foci formed by 15% when assayed at 30 minutes post-irradiation. The ethanolic extract was more effective; 500 µg/mL of its concentration reduced the number of foci among irradiated cells by 30%. The results indicated that irradiated cancer cells responded similarly to nutritional supplements containing antioxidants as irradiated normal cells. These natural antioxidants could confer protective effects upon cancer cells against gamma radiation. (author)

  16. Repair pathways for heavy ion-induced complex DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Hirohiko; Nakajima, Nakako; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) is a deleterious damage leading to cell death and genome instability if not properly repaired. It is well known that DSB is repaired by two major pathways, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). It is also known that NHEJ is dominant throughout the cell cycle after X- or gamma-ray irradiation in mammalian cells, Meanwhile, it is thought that heavy-ion radiation (e.g., carbon-ions, iron-ions) gives rise to clustered DNA damages consisting of not only strand breaks but also aberrant bases in the vicinity of DSBs (complex DSBs). Our previous work suggested that the efficiency of NHEJ is diminished for repair of complex DSBs induced by heavy-ion radiation. We thought that this difficulty in NHEJ process associated with heavy ion induced complex DNA damage might be extended to HR process in cells exposed to heavy ions. In order to find out if this notion is true or not, exposed human cells to X-rays and heavy-ions, and studied HR associated processes at the molecular level. Our result indicates that complex DSBs induced by heavy ions effectively evoke DNA end resection activity during the HR process. Together with our results, a relevant recent progress in the field of DNA DSB repair will be discussed. (author)

  17. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  18. Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery mediates ATP-dependent RISC loading of small RNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shintaro; Kobayashi, Maki; Yoda, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Katsuma, Susumu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Tomari, Yukihide

    2010-07-30

    Small silencing RNAs--small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or microRNAs (miRNAs)--direct posttranscriptional gene silencing of their mRNA targets as guides for the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Both siRNAs and miRNAs are born double stranded. Surprisingly, loading these small RNA duplexes into Argonaute proteins, the core components of RISC, requires ATP, whereas separating the two small RNA strands within Argonaute does not. Here we show that the Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery is required to load small RNA duplexes into Argonaute proteins, but not for subsequent strand separation or target cleavage. We envision that the chaperone machinery uses ATP and mediates a conformational opening of Ago proteins so that they can receive bulky small RNA duplexes. Our data suggest that the chaperone machinery may serve as the driving force for the RISC assembly pathway. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Creating Directed Double-strand Breaks with the Ref Protein: A Novel Rec A-Dependent Nuclease from Bacteriophage P1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L.; Manlick, Angela J.; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M. (UW)

    2012-03-16

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded {beta}-hairpin that is sandwiched between several {alpha}-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the 3' ends of the double-stranded RNAs of grapevine chrome mosaic nepovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, O; Candresse, T; Dunez, J

    1988-02-01

    Attempts were made to label the termini of dsRNAs corresponding to the two genomic RNAs of grapevine chrome mosaic nepovirus (GCMV). It was not possible to label the 5' ends of the dsRNAs with [gamma-32P]ATP, which suggests that a genome-linked protein blocks their 5' ends. Both dsRNA species were labelled at their 3' ends with pCp. The 3'-terminal sequences were determined by 'wandering spot' or by partial enzymic cleavage analysis. One strand (presumably positive) ended in a poly(A) 30 to 50 nucleotides long whereas the other (presumably negative) ended in 3'-ACCUUUUAAAAAG (RNA1) or 3'-ACCUUUUAAUAAAG (RNA2). The sequences resemble closely those complementary to the 5' ends of the RNAs of tomato black ring virus (strain S), which is distantly related to GCMV.

  1. Exposure to the viral by-product dsRNA or Coxsackievirus B5 triggers pancreatic beta cell apoptosis via a Bim / Mcl-1 imbalance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikel L Colli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The rise in type 1 diabetes (T1D incidence in recent decades is probably related to modifications in environmental factors. Viruses are among the putative environmental triggers of T1D. The mechanisms regulating beta cell responses to viruses, however, remain to be defined. We have presently clarified the signaling pathways leading to beta cell apoptosis following exposure to the viral mimetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and a diabetogenic enterovirus (Coxsackievirus B5. Internal dsRNA induces cell death via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In this process, activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR promotes eIF2α phosphorylation and protein synthesis inhibition, leading to downregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1. Mcl-1 decrease results in the release of the BH3-only protein Bim, which activates the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Indeed, Bim knockdown prevented both dsRNA- and Coxsackievirus B5-induced beta cell death, and counteracted the proapoptotic effects of Mcl-1 silencing. These observations indicate that the balance between Mcl-1 and Bim is a key factor regulating beta cell survival during diabetogenic viral infections.

  2. Flap Endonuclease 1 Limits Telomere Fragility on the Leading Strand*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasley, Daniel C.; Parajuli, Shankar; Nguyen, Mai; Moore, Hayley R.; Alspach, Elise; Lock, Ying Jie; Honaker, Yuchi; Saharia, Abhishek; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Stewart, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of redundant replication and repair systems that ensure genome stability underscores the importance of faithful DNA replication. Nowhere is this complexity more evident than in challenging DNA templates, including highly repetitive or transcribed sequences. Here, we demonstrate that flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), a canonical lagging strand DNA replication protein, is required for normal, complete leading strand replication at telomeres. We find that the loss of FEN1 nuclease activity, but not DNA repair activities, results in leading strand-specific telomere fragility. Furthermore, we show that FEN1 depletion-induced telomere fragility is increased by RNA polymerase II inhibition and is rescued by ectopic RNase H1 expression. These data suggest that FEN1 limits leading strand-specific telomere fragility by processing RNA:DNA hybrid/flap intermediates that arise from co-directional collisions occurring between the replisome and RNA polymerase. Our data reveal the first molecular mechanism for leading strand-specific telomere fragility and the first known role for FEN1 in leading strand DNA replication. Because FEN1 mutations have been identified in human cancers, our findings raise the possibility that unresolved RNA:DNA hybrid structures contribute to the genomic instability associated with cancer. PMID:25922071

  3. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang; Axtell, Michael J.; Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2012-01-01

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display

  4. Rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks in human fibroblasts and its impairment in one ataxia telangiectasia and two Fanconi strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquerelle, T.M.; Weibezahn, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Using the technique of neutral elution through polycarbonate filters as a measure of DNA length, and hence of the number of double-strand breaks incurred as a result of radiation damage, we found that normal human fibroblasts rejoin 50% of all breaks within only 3 min (37 degrees C). This fast rejoining was impaired in fibroblasts from one patient with Ataxia telangiectasia and in fibroblasts from two patients with Fanconi's anemia. Also the number of residual breaks after several hours of repair was higher than in control cells. Other cases with the same diseases were normal in their rejoining of double-strand breaks

  5. Predicting and Modeling RNA Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhof, Eric; Masquida, Benoît; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY A general approach for modeling the architecture of large and structured RNA molecules is described. The method exploits the modularity and the hierarchical folding of RNA architecture that is viewed as the assembly of preformed double-stranded helices defined by Watson-Crick base pairs and RNA modules maintained by non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Despite the extensive molecular neutrality observed in RNA structures, specificity in RNA folding is achieved through global constraints like lengths of helices, coaxiality of helical stacks, and structures adopted at the junctions of helices. The Assemble integrated suite of computer tools allows for sequence and structure analysis as well as interactive modeling by homology or ab initio assembly with possibilities for fitting within electronic density maps. The local key role of non-Watson-Crick pairs guides RNA architecture formation and offers metrics for assessing the accuracy of three-dimensional models in a more useful way than usual root mean square deviation (RMSD) values. PMID:20504963

  6. Novel Positive-Sense, Single-Stranded RNA (+ssRNA) Virus with Di-Cistronic Genome from Intestinal Content of Freshwater Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankovics, Péter; Simmonds, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A novel positive-sense, single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) virus (Halastavi árva RNA virus, HalV; JN000306) with di-cistronic genome organization was serendipitously identified in intestinal contents of freshwater carps (Cyprinus carpio) fished by line-fishing from fishpond “Lőrinte halastó” located in Veszprém County, Hungary. The complete nucleotide (nt) sequence of the genomic RNA is 9565 nt in length and contains two long - non-in-frame - open reading frames (ORFs), which are separated by an intergenic region. The ORF1 (replicase) is preceded by an untranslated sequence of 827 nt, while an untranslated region of 139 nt follows the ORF2 (capsid proteins). The deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the ORFs showed only low (less than 32%) and partial similarity to the non-structural (2C-like helicase, 3C-like cystein protease and 3D-like RNA dependent RNA polymerase) and structural proteins (VP2/VP4/VP3) of virus families in Picornavirales especially to members of the viruses with dicistronic genome. Halastavi árva RNA virus is present in intestinal contents of omnivorous freshwater carps but the origin and the host species of this virus remains unknown. The unique viral sequence and the actual position indicate that Halastavi árva RNA virus seems to be the first member of a new di-cistronic ssRNA virus. Further studies are required to investigate the specific host species (and spectrum), ecology and role of Halastavi árva RNA virus in the nature. PMID:22195010

  7. Relative frequency of formation of base radioproduct, single and double strand breaks on irradiation of diluted aqueous solution of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryznar, L.; Drasil, V.

    1975-01-01

    Diluted aqueous solution of DNA labelled with 6- 3 H-TdR was irradiated in the absence of oxygen and numbers of formed single and double strand breaks and the 5,6-dihydrothymine (DHT) yield were determined. The results indicate that, under given conditions, a molecule of a base radioproduct is formed approximately 10 times more frequently than one single strand break. The occurence of a single strand break is 20 times higher than that of a double strand break. The DNA labelled with 6- 3 H-TdR was isolated from mice fibroblasts of L-strain according to Marmur (specific activity 3.0 MBq/82 μCi/mg DNA, molecular weight M/sub n/=9.32x10 6 dalton). Solution of DNA was irradiated in the absence of oxygen (180 Gy /1.8x10 4 rads/, absorbed dose rate 0.3 Gy/s). It was lyophilized with an addition of non-labelled thymine, thymidine and DHT and then hydrolysed with 90% formic acid. The dried hydrolysate was chromatographed with irradiated non-labelled thymine added as a carrier. (F.G.)

  8. CRISPRstrand: predicting repeat orientations to determine the crRNA-encoding strand at CRISPR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhnbashi, Omer S.; Costa, Fabrizio; Shah, Shiraz Ali

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The discovery of CRISPR-Cas systems almost 20 years ago rapidly changed our perception of the bacterial and archaeal immune systems. CRISPR loci consist of several repetitive DNA sequences called repeats, inter-spaced by stretches of variable length sequences called spacers. This CRISPR...... array is transcribed and processed into multiple mature RNA species (crRNAs). A single crRNA is integrated into an interference complex, together with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, to bind and degrade invading nucleic acids. Although existing bioinformatics tools can recognize CRISPR loci...... by their characteristic repeat-spacer architecture, they generally output CRISPR arrays of ambiguous orientation and thus do not determine the strand from which crRNAs are processed. Knowledge of the correct orientation is crucial for many tasks, including the classification of CRISPR conservation, the detection...

  9. Isolation of RNA for dot hybridization by heparin-DNase I treatment of whole cell lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Z; Wu, C

    1987-08-15

    We have developed a new procedure for the rapid preparation of undegraded total RNA from cultured cells for specific quantitation by dot blotting analysis. Pelleted cells are resuspended in hypotonic solution containing a ribonuclease inhibitor and heparin and disrupted by freeze-thaw. Heparin is employed as an agent for nuclear lysis, dissociation of chromosomal protein, and release of mRNA from rough endoplasmic reticulum. We eliminate chromosomal DNA by digestion with DNase I and denature the RNA in the lysate with formaldehyde. After centrifugation to remove debris, the supernatant is used directly for dot blotting. All manipulations are performed in the same microfuge tube and recovery of RNA is quantitative. The procedure is especially useful for processing large numbers of samples. We illustrate its versatility by analysis of specific RNAs in Drosophila, rat, and human cell lines. In reconstruction experiments, less than 80 molecules per cell of a small RNA (beta-globin) can be detected under highly stringent hybridization conditions, using only moderately labeled double-stranded plasmid DNA probes and short film exposures.

  10. Packaging signals in two single-stranded RNA viruses imply a conserved assembly mechanism and geometry of the packaged genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Eric C; Stockley, Peter G; Twarock, Reidun

    2013-09-09

    The current paradigm for assembly of single-stranded RNA viruses is based on a mechanism involving non-sequence-specific packaging of genomic RNA driven by electrostatic interactions. Recent experiments, however, provide compelling evidence for sequence specificity in this process both in vitro and in vivo. The existence of multiple RNA packaging signals (PSs) within viral genomes has been proposed, which facilitates assembly by binding coat proteins in such a way that they promote the protein-protein contacts needed to build the capsid. The binding energy from these interactions enables the confinement or compaction of the genomic RNAs. Identifying the nature of such PSs is crucial for a full understanding of assembly, which is an as yet untapped potential drug target for this important class of pathogens. Here, for two related bacterial viruses, we determine the sequences and locations of their PSs using Hamiltonian paths, a concept from graph theory, in combination with bioinformatics and structural studies. Their PSs have a common secondary structure motif but distinct consensus sequences and positions within the respective genomes. Despite these differences, the distributions of PSs in both viruses imply defined conformations for the packaged RNA genomes in contact with the protein shell in the capsid, consistent with a recent asymmetric structure determination of the MS2 virion. The PS distributions identified moreover imply a preferred, evolutionarily conserved assembly pathway with respect to the RNA sequence with potentially profound implications for other single-stranded RNA viruses known to have RNA PSs, including many animal and human pathogens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mouse but not human embryonic stem cells are deficient in rejoining of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos, C A; Banáth, J P; MacPhail, S H; Zhao, J; Eaves, C A; O'Connor, M D; Lansdorp, P M; Olive, P L

    2008-09-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells will give rise to all of the cells of the adult mouse, but they failed to rejoin half of the DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) produced by high doses of ionizing radiation. A deficiency in DNA-PK(cs) appears to be responsible since mES cells expressed strand breaks more rapidly. Consistent with more rapid dsb rejoining, H2AX(-/-) mES cells also expressed 6 times more DNA-PK(cs) than wild-type mES cells. Similar results were obtained for ATM(-/-) mES cells. Differentiation of mES cells led to an increase in DNA-PK(cs), an increase in dsb rejoining rate, and a decrease in Ku70/80. Unlike mouse ES, human ES cells were proficient in rejoining of dsb and expressed high levels of DNA-PK(cs). These results confirm the importance of homologous recombination in the accurate repair of double-strand breaks in mES cells, they help explain the chromosome abnormalities associated with deficiencies in H2AX and ATM, and they add to the growing list of differences in the way rodent and human cells deal with DNA damage.

  12. Beyond repair foci: DNA double-strand break repair in euchromatic and heterochromatic compartments analyzed by transmission electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Lorat

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated by ionizing radiation pose a serious threat to the preservation of genetic and epigenetic information. The known importance of local chromatin configuration in DSB repair raises the question of whether breaks in different chromatin environments are recognized and repaired by the same repair machinery and with similar efficiency. An essential step in DSB processing by non-homologous end joining is the high-affinity binding of Ku70-Ku80 and DNA-PKcs to double-stranded DNA ends that holds the ends in physical proximity for subsequent repair.Using transmission electron microscopy to localize gold-labeled pKu70 and pDNA-PKcs within nuclear ultrastructure, we monitored the formation and repair of actual DSBs within euchromatin (electron-lucent and heterochromatin (electron-dense in cortical neurons of irradiated mouse brain.While DNA lesions in euchromatin (characterized by two pKu70-gold beads, reflecting the Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer are promptly sensed and rejoined, DNA packaging in heterochromatin appears to retard DSB processing, due to the time needed to unravel higher-order chromatin structures. Complex pKu70-clusters formed in heterochromatin (consisting of 4 or ≥ 6 gold beads may represent multiple breaks in close proximity caused by ionizing radiation of highly-compacted DNA. All pKu70-clusters disappeared within 72 hours post-irradiation, indicating efficient DSB rejoining. However, persistent 53BP1 clusters in heterochromatin (comprising ≥ 10 gold beads, occasionally co-localizing with γH2AX, but not pKu70 or pDNA-PKcs, may reflect incomplete or incorrect restoration of chromatin structure rather than persistently unrepaired DNA damage.Higher-order organization of chromatin determines the accessibility of DNA lesions to repair complexes, defining how readily DSBs are detected and processed. DNA lesions in heterochromatin appear to be more complex, with multiple breaks in spatial vicinity inducing

  13. Oral delivery of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs induces RNAi effects in the potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hada Wuriyanghan

    Full Text Available The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli (B. cockerelli, and the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (D. citri, are very important plant pests, but they are also vectors of phloem-limited bacteria that are associated with two devastating plant diseases. B. cockerelli is the vector of Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum, which is associated with zebra chip disease of potatoes, and D. citri is the vector of Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, which is associated with the Huanglongbing (citrus greening disease that currently threatens the entire Florida citrus industry. Here we used EST sequence information from D. citri to identify potential targets for RNA interference in B. cockerelli. We targeted ubiquitously expressed and gut-abundant mRNAs via injection and oral acquisition of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs and were able to induce mortality in recipient psyllids. We also showed knockdown of target mRNAs, and that oral acquisition resulted primarily in mRNA knockdown in the psyllid gut. Concurrent with gene knockdown was the accumulation of target specific ∼ 21 nucleotide siRNAs for an abundant mRNA for BC-Actin. These results showed that RNAi can be a powerful tool for gene function studies in psyllids, and give support for continued efforts for investigating RNAi approaches as possible tools for psyllid and plant disease control.

  14. Expressions of interferon-inducible genes IFIT1 and IFIT4 mRNA in PBMCs of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunyan; Chen Xingguo; Wang Zizheng

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the expression levels of interferon-inducible genes (IFIT1, IFIT4) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and the relations between these genes expression levels and disease activity, the expression levels of IFIT1 and IFIT4 mRNA in the 95 patients with SLE and 48 normal controls were detected by Sybr green dye based real-time quantitative PCR method, and these genes expression levels were compared with anti-double strand DNA antibody. The associations between the expression levels of IFIT1, IFIT4 mRNA, anti-double strand DNA antibody and SLEDAI scores in patients with SLE were analyzed. The results showed that the expression levels of IFIT1, IFIT4 mRNA in the SLE patients were significantly higher than those of the normal controls (P<0.01). The expression levels of IFIT1, IFIT4 mRNA in the active SLE patients were higher than those of the inactive SLE patients (P<0.05). The real time expression levels of IFIT1 and IFIT4 mRNA showed positive correlations with each other (P<0.05) in patients with SLE. There was positively correlation between the expression levels of IFIT1, IFIT4 mRNA and the anti-double strand DNA antibody (P<0.05). The expression levels of IFIT1, IFIT4 mRNA in patients with SLE were significantly higher than those of the normal controls, and positively associated with SLEDAI scores, so they were helpful in evaluating SLE disease activity and severity. To inhibit the expressions of IFIT1, IFIT4 mRNA may provide a novel target for SLE treatment. (authors)

  15. Synthetic double-stranded RNAs are adjuvants for the induction of T helper 1 and humoral immune responses to human papillomavirus in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Stahl-Hennig

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands are being considered as adjuvants for the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, as in the design of vaccines. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytoidylic acid (poly I:C, a synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, is recognized by TLR3 and other intracellular receptors. Poly ICLC is a poly I:C analogue, which has been stabilized against the serum nucleases that are present in the plasma of primates. Poly I:C(12U, another analogue, is less toxic but also less stable in vivo than poly I:C, and TLR3 is essential for its recognition. To study the effects of these compounds on the induction of protein-specific immune responses in an animal model relevant to humans, rhesus macaques were immunized subcutaneously (s.c. with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH or human papillomavirus (HPV16 capsomeres with or without dsRNA or a control adjuvant, the TLR9 ligand CpG-C. All dsRNA compounds served as adjuvants for KLH-specific cellular immune responses, with the highest proliferative responses being observed with 2 mg/animal poly ICLC (p = 0.002 or 6 mg/animal poly I:C(12U (p = 0.001 when compared with immunization with KLH alone. Notably, poly ICLC -- but not CpG-C given at the same dose -- also helped to induce HPV16-specific Th1 immune responses while both adjuvants supported the induction of strong anti-HPV16 L1 antibody responses as determined by ELISA and neutralization assay. In contrast, control animals injected with HPV16 capsomeres alone did not develop substantial HPV16-specific immune responses. Injection of dsRNA led to increased numbers of cells producing the T cell-activating chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 as detected by in situ hybridization in draining lymph nodes 18 hours after injections, and to increased serum levels of CXCL10 (p = 0.01. This was paralleled by the reduced production of the homeostatic T cell-attracting chemokine CCL21. Thus, synthetic dsRNAs induce an innate chemokine response and act as adjuvants

  16. Construction and expression of secreting type human TRAIL gene vector mediated by hypoxia/radiation double sensitive promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yanming; Jia Xiaojing; Qu Yaqin; Li Yanbo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To construct secreting type human TRAIL (shTRAIL) gene vector pcDNA3.1-HRE/Egr1-shTRAIL mediated by hypoxia/radiation double sensitive promoter, and observe the effect of hypoxia and radiation on shTRAIL. Methods: HRE upper and lower strands were gotten by chemical synthesis, double strands HRE was gotten by PCR; pMD19T-Egr1 was digested by Sac I and Hind III, then Egr1 was obtained, pshuttle-shTRAIL was digested by Kpn I and BamH I, then shTRAIL was obtained; HRE/Egr1 double sensitive promoter mediated shTRAIL expression vector pcDNA3.1-HRE/Egr1-shTRAIL was constructed by gene recombination technique, it was identified correctly by enzyme digestion, PCR and sequencing. A549 cells were divided into normal, hypoxia (0.1%), irradiation (6 Gy) and hypoxia + irradiation groups. Results: After enzyme digestion by BamH I and Sma I, the fragments which lengths were 1284 bp and 4 998 bp, 2 292 bp and 3 990 bp were obtained; the vector was amplified by PCR with Egr1 and shTRAIL primer, the products which lengthens were 469 bp and 820 bp were obtained; pcDNA3.1-HRE/Egr1-shTRAIL was sequenced, the result was same to designed, this demonstrated that the construction was right. The vectors were transfected into A549 cells of adenocarcinoma of lung, the expression levels of shTRAIL mRNA and protein were increased after treated with hypoxia and radiation, it had statistically significant differences compared with normal group (P<0.05), and when they were combinated, the effect was more obvious. Conclusion: Secreting type human TRAIL gene vector pcDNA3.1-HRE/Egr1-shTRAIL mediated by hypoxia/radiation double sensitive promoter is constructed successfully, and hypoxia and radiation could increase the expression of TRAIL, and they have synergetic effect. (authors)

  17. Numt-mediated double-strand break repair mitigates deletions during primate genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat Hazkani-Covo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is the major mechanism of double-strand break repair (DSBR in mammalian cells. NHEJ has traditionally been inferred from experimental systems involving induced double strand breaks (DSBs. Whether or not the spectrum of repair events observed in experimental NHEJ reflects the repair of natural breaks by NHEJ during chromosomal evolution is an unresolved issue. In primate phylogeny, nuclear DNA sequences of mitochondrial origin, numts, are inserted into naturally occurring chromosomal breaks via NHEJ. Thus, numt integration sites harbor evidence for the mechanisms that act on the genome over evolutionary timescales. We have identified 35 and 55 lineage-specific numts in the human and chimpanzee genomes, respectively, using the rhesus monkey genome as an outgroup. One hundred and fifty two numt-chromosome fusion points were classified based on their repair patterns. Repair involving microhomology and repair leading to nucleotide additions were detected. These repair patterns are within the experimentally determined spectrum of classical NHEJ, suggesting that information from experimental systems is representative of broader genetic loci and end configurations. However, in incompatible DSBR events, small deletions always occur, whereas in 54% of numt integration events examined, no deletions were detected. Numts show a statistically significant reduction in deletion frequency, even in comparison to DSBR involving filler DNA. Therefore, numts show a unique mechanism of integration via NHEJ. Since the deletion frequency during numt insertion is low, native overhangs of chromosome breaks are preserved, allowing us to determine that 24% of the analyzed breaks are cohesive with overhangs of up to 11 bases. These data represent, to the best of our knowledge, the most comprehensive description of the structure of naturally occurring DSBs. We suggest a model in which the sealing of DSBs by numts, and probably by other filler

  18. Convergence of Domain Architecture, Structure, and Ligand Affinity in Animal and Plant RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel; Manny, Austin; Kolaczkowski, Oralia; Kolaczkowski, Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences using phylogenetic methods is a powerful technique for directly examining the evolution of molecular function. Although ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is itself very efficient, downstream functional, and structural studies necessary to characterize when and how changes in molecular function occurred are often costly and time-consuming, currently limiting ASR studies to examining a relatively small number of discrete functional shifts. As a result, we have very little direct information about how molecular function evolves across large protein families. Here we develop an approach combining ASR with structure and function prediction to efficiently examine the evolution of ligand affinity across a large family of double-stranded RNA binding proteins (DRBs) spanning animals and plants. We find that the characteristic domain architecture of DRBs-consisting of 2-3 tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsrms)-arose independently in early animal and plant lineages. The affinity with which individual dsrms bind double-stranded RNA appears to have increased and decreased often across both animal and plant phylogenies, primarily through convergent structural mechanisms involving RNA-contact residues within the β1-β2 loop and a small region of α2. These studies provide some of the first direct information about how protein function evolves across large gene families and suggest that changes in molecular function may occur often and unassociated with major phylogenetic events, such as gene or domain duplications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Differential Delivery of Genomic Double-Stranded RNA Causes Reovirus Strain-Specific Differences in Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Johnasha D; Holm, Geoffrey H; Boehme, Karl W

    2018-05-01

    Serotype 3 (T3) reoviruses induce substantially more type 1 interferon (IFN-I) secretion than serotype 1 (T1) strains. However, the mechanisms underlying differences in IFN-I production between T1 and T3 reoviruses remain undefined. Here, we found that differences in IFN-I production between T1 and T3 reoviruses correlate with activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor for the production of IFN-I. T3 strain rsT3D activated IRF3 more rapidly and to a greater extent than the T1 strain rsT1L, in simian virus 40 (SV40) immortalized endothelial cells (SVECs). Differences in IRF3 activation between rsT1L and rsT3D were observed in the first hours of infection and were independent of de novo viral RNA and protein synthesis. NF-κB activation mirrored IRF3 activation, with rsT3D inducing more NF-κB activity than rsT1L. We also found that IRF3 and NF-κB are activated in a mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS)-dependent manner. rsT1L does not suppress IRF3 activation, as IRF3 phosphorylation could be induced in rsT1L-infected cells. Transfected rsT1L and rsT3D RNA induced IRF3 phosphorylation, indicating that genomic RNA from both strains has the capacity to activate IRF3. Finally, bypassing the normal route of reovirus entry by transfecting in vitro -generated viral cores revealed that rsT1L and rsT3D core particles induced equivalent IRF3 activation. Taken together, our findings indicate that entry-related events that occur after outer capsid disassembly, but prior to deposition of viral cores into the cytoplasm, influence the efficiency of IFN-I responses to reovirus. This work provides further insight into mechanisms by which nonenveloped viruses activate innate immune responses. IMPORTANCE Detection of viral nucleic acids by the host cell triggers type 1 interferon (IFN-I) responses, which are critical for containing and clearing viral infections. Viral RNA is sensed in the cytoplasm by cellular receptors that initiate

  20. Chromosomal Integrity after UV Irradiation Requires FANCD2-Mediated Repair of Double Strand Breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Federico

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to inter-strand crosslinks (ICLs. FANCD2, a central factor of the FA pathway, is essential for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs generated during fork collapse at ICLs. While lesions different from ICLs can also trigger fork collapse, the contribution of FANCD2 to the resolution of replication-coupled DSBs generated independently from ICLs is unknown. Intriguingly, FANCD2 is readily activated after UV irradiation, a DNA-damaging agent that generates predominantly intra-strand crosslinks but not ICLs. Hence, UV irradiation is an ideal tool to explore the contribution of FANCD2 to the DNA damage response triggered by DNA lesions other than ICL repair. Here we show that, in contrast to ICL-causing agents, UV radiation compromises cell survival independently from FANCD2. In agreement, FANCD2 depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs generated during the replication of UV-damaged DNA and is dispensable for UV-induced checkpoint activation. Remarkably however, FANCD2 protects UV-dependent, replication-coupled DSBs from aberrant processing by non-homologous end joining, preventing the accumulation of micronuclei and chromatid aberrations including non-homologous chromatid exchanges. Hence, while dispensable for cell survival, FANCD2 selectively safeguards chromosomal stability after UV-triggered replication stress.

  1. Detection of DNA damage in cells exposed to ionizing radiation by use of antisingle-stranded-DNA monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Loon, A.A.W.M. van; Groenendijk, R.H.; Baan, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    An immunochemical method has been developed for quantitative detection of DNA damage in mammalian cells. The method is based on the binding of a monoclonal antibody to single-stranded DNA. The clone producing this antibody, D1B, was obtained as a by-product from fusion of mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells isolated from a mouse immunized with chemically modified DNA. The technique is based upon the determination of the percentage single-strandedness resulting from the partial umwinding of cellular DNA under alkaline conditions, a time-dependent process. Single-strand and double-strand DNA breaks, or lesions converted into such breaks in alkaline medium, form initiation points for the unwinding. The extent of unwinding under controlled conditions is a measure, therefore, of the amount of such sites. The method is rapid, does not require radioactive labelling of DNA or physical separation of single- from double-stranded molecules, is sufficiently sensitive to detect damage induced by 1 Gu of ionizing radiation and needs only small amounts of cells. The usefulness of the technique was demonstrated in a study on the induction of damage and its repair in unlabelled cultured Chinese hamster cells and in DNA-containing cells of human blood, both after exposure to 60 Co-γ-rays, and in white blood cells and bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice. A dose-related degree of unwinding was observed and repair could be observed up to 60 min after irradiation. (author). 19 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Flap Endonuclease 1 Limits Telomere Fragility on the Leading Strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasley, Daniel C; Parajuli, Shankar; Nguyen, Mai; Moore, Hayley R; Alspach, Elise; Lock, Ying Jie; Honaker, Yuchi; Saharia, Abhishek; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Stewart, Sheila A

    2015-06-12

    The existence of redundant replication and repair systems that ensure genome stability underscores the importance of faithful DNA replication. Nowhere is this complexity more evident than in challenging DNA templates, including highly repetitive or transcribed sequences. Here, we demonstrate that flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), a canonical lagging strand DNA replication protein, is required for normal, complete leading strand replication at telomeres. We find that the loss of FEN1 nuclease activity, but not DNA repair activities, results in leading strand-specific telomere fragility. Furthermore, we show that FEN1 depletion-induced telomere fragility is increased by RNA polymerase II inhibition and is rescued by ectopic RNase H1 expression. These data suggest that FEN1 limits leading strand-specific telomere fragility by processing RNA:DNA hybrid/flap intermediates that arise from co-directional collisions occurring between the replisome and RNA polymerase. Our data reveal the first molecular mechanism for leading strand-specific telomere fragility and the first known role for FEN1 in leading strand DNA replication. Because FEN1 mutations have been identified in human cancers, our findings raise the possibility that unresolved RNA:DNA hybrid structures contribute to the genomic instability associated with cancer. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Product differentiation by analysis of DNA melting curves during the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ririe, K M; Rasmussen, R P; Wittwer, C T

    1997-02-15

    A microvolume fluorometer integrated with a thermal cycler was used to acquire DNA melting curves during polymerase chain reaction by fluorescence monitoring of the double-stranded DNA specific dye SYBR Green I. Plotting fluorescence as a function of temperature as the thermal cycler heats through the dissociation temperature of the product gives a DNA melting curve. The shape and position of this DNA melting curve are functions of the GC/AT ratio, length, and sequence and can be used to differentiate amplification products separated by less than 2 degrees C in melting temperature. Desired products can be distinguished from undesirable products, in many cases eliminating the need for gel electrophoresis. Analysis of melting curves can extend the dynamic range of initial template quantification when amplification is monitored with double-stranded DNA specific dyes. Complete amplification and analysis of products can be performed in less than 15 min.

  4. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals widespread occurrence of novel cis-natural antisense transcripts in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs are RNAs transcribed from the antisense strand of a gene locus, and are complementary to the RNA transcribed from the sense strand. Common techniques including microarray approach and analysis of transcriptome databases are the major ways to globally identify cis-NATs in various eukaryotic organisms. Genome-wide in silico analysis has identified a large number of cis-NATs that may generate endogenous short interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs, which participate in important biogenesis mechanisms for transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in rice. However, the transcriptomes are yet to be deeply sequenced to comprehensively investigate cis-NATs. Results We applied high-throughput strand-specific complementary DNA sequencing technology (ssRNA-seq to deeply sequence mRNA for assessing sense and antisense transcripts that were derived under salt, drought and cold stresses, and normal conditions, in the model plant rice (Oryza sativa. Combined with RAP-DB genome annotation (the Rice Annotation Project Database build-5 data set, 76,013 transcripts corresponding to 45,844 unique gene loci were assembled, in which 4873 gene loci were newly identified. Of 3819 putative rice cis-NATs, 2292 were detected as expressed and giving rise to small RNAs from their overlapping regions through integrated analysis of ssRNA-seq data and small RNA data. Among them, 503 cis-NATs seemed to be associated with specific conditions. The deep sequence data from isolated epidermal cells of rice seedlings further showed that 54.0% of cis-NATs were expressed simultaneously in a population of homogenous cells. Nearly 9.7% of rice transcripts were involved in one-to-one or many-to-many cis-NATs formation. Furthermore, only 17.4-34.7% of 223 many-to-many cis-NAT groups were all expressed and generated nat-siRNAs, indicating that only some cis-NAT groups may be involved in complex regulatory networks. Conclusions

  5. Prediction of guide strand of microRNAs from its sequence and secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Firoz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are produced by the sequential processing of a long hairpin RNA transcript by Drosha and Dicer, an RNase III enzymes, and form transitory small RNA duplexes. One strand of the duplex, which incorporates into RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC and silences the gene expression is called guide strand, or miRNA; while the other strand of duplex is degraded and called the passenger strand, or miRNA*. Predicting the guide strand of miRNA is important for better understanding the RNA interference pathways. Results This paper describes support vector machine (SVM models developed for predicting the guide strands of miRNAs. All models were trained and tested on a dataset consisting of 329 miRNA and 329 miRNA* pairs using five fold cross validation technique. Firstly, models were developed using mono-, di-, and tri-nucleotide composition of miRNA strands and achieved the highest accuracies of 0.588, 0.638 and 0.596 respectively. Secondly, models were developed using split nucleotide composition and achieved maximum accuracies of 0.553, 0.641 and 0.602 for mono-, di-, and tri-nucleotide respectively. Thirdly, models were developed using binary pattern and achieved the highest accuracy of 0.708. Furthermore, when integrating the secondary structure features with binary pattern, an accuracy of 0.719 was seen. Finally, hybrid models were developed by combining various features and achieved maximum accuracy of 0.799 with sensitivity 0.781 and specificity 0.818. Moreover, the performance of this model was tested on an independent dataset that achieved an accuracy of 0.80. In addition, we also compared the performance of our method with various siRNA-designing methods on miRNA and siRNA datasets. Conclusion In this study, first time a method has been developed to predict guide miRNA strands, of miRNA duplex. This study demonstrates that guide and passenger strand of miRNA precursors can be distinguished using their

  6. Ionizing radiation damage to the folded chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12: repair of double-strand breaks in deoxyribonucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, M.K.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskevy, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    The extremely gentle lysis and unfolding procedures that have been developed for the isolation of nucleoid deoxyribonucleic acid yield undamaged, replicating genomes, thus permitting direct measurement of the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks at biologically significant doses of ionizing radiation. Repair of ionizing radiation damage to folded chromosomes of Escherichia coli K-12 strain AB2497 was observed within 2 to 3 h of post-irradiation incubation in growth medium. Such behavior was not observed after post-irradiation incubation in growth medium of a recA13 strain (strain AB2487). A model based on recombinational repair is proposed to explain the formation of 2,200 to 2,300S material during early stages of incubation and to explain subsequent changes in the gradient profiles. Association of unrepaired DNA with the plasma membrane is proposed to explain the formation of a peak of rapidly sedimenting material (greater than 3,100S) during the later stage of repair. Direct evidence of repair of double-strand breaks during post-irradiation incubation in growth medium was obtained from gradient profiles of DNA from ribonuclease-digested chromosomes. The sedimentation coefficient of broken molecules was restored to the value of unirradiated DNA after 2 to 3 h of incubation, and the fraction of the DNA repaired in this fashion was equal to the fraction of cells that survived at the same dose. An average of 2.7 double-strand breaks per genome per lethal event was observed, suggesting that one to two double-strand breaks per genome are repairable in E. coli K-12 strain AB2497

  7. Dissecting the interactions of SERRATE with RNA and DICER-LIKE 1 in Arabidopsis microRNA precursor processing

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2013-08-05

    Efficient and precise microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in Arabidopsis is mediated by the RNaseIII-family enzyme DICER-LIKE 1 (DCL1), double-stranded RNA-binding protein HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 and the zinc-finger (ZnF) domain-containing protein SERRATE (SE). In the present study, we examined primary miRNA precursor (pri-miRNA) processing by highly purified recombinant DCL1 and SE proteins and found that SE is integral to pri-miRNA processing by DCL1. SE stimulates DCL1 cleavage of the pri-miRNA in an ionic strength-dependent manner. SE uses its N-terminal domain to bind to RNA and requires both N-terminal and ZnF domains to bind to DCL1. However, when DCL1 is bound to RNA, the interaction with the ZnF domain of SE becomes indispensible and stimulates the activity of DCL1 without requiring SE binding to RNA. Our results suggest that the interactions among SE, DCL1 and RNA are a potential point for regulating pri-miRNA processing. 2013 The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Correlation between slowly repairable double-strand breaks and thermal radiosensitization in the human HeLa S3 cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, HH; Hiemstra, YS; Konings, AWT; Dikomey, E

    The effect of heat on double-strand breaks (dsb) repair was compared with thermal radiosensitization using HeLa S3 cells. Cells were exposed to a combined treatment of X-irradiation followed by heat (44 degrees C, 0.5 h) separated by time intervals up to 8h. DNA dsb were measured by PFGE and

  9. Primary structure of the. cap alpha. -subunit of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. II. Isolation, reverse transcription, and cloning of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, K.E.; Broude, N.E.; Arsenyan, S.G.; Grishin, A.V.; Dzhandzhugazyan, K.N.; Modyanov, N.N.

    1986-10-01

    The messenger RNA coding the ..cap alpha..-subunit of Na/sup +/,K/sup +/-ATPase has been isolated from the outer medullary layer of porcine kidneys. The mRNA gives a specific hybridization band in the 25S-26S region with three oligonucleotide probes synthesized on the basis of information on the structure of three peptides isolated from a tryptic hydrolyzate of the ..cap alpha..-subunit of Na/sup +/,K/sup +/-ATPase. The translation of the mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes followed by immunochemical identification of the products of synthesis confirmed the presence of the mRNA of the ..cap alpha..-subunit of Na/sup +/,K/sup +/-ATPase in an enriched fraction of poly(A/sup +/)-RNA. This preparation has been used for the synthesis of cloning of double-stranded cDNA.

  10. Analysis of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Cytotoxicity after 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Isolated Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttek, Karina; Hartig, Roland; Godenschweger, Frank; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Ricke, Jens; Reinhold, Dirk; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The global use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is constantly growing and the field strengths increasing. Yet, only little data about harmful biological effects caused by MRI exposure are available and published research analyzing the impact of MRI on DNA integrity reported controversial results. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of 7 T ultra-high-field MRI on isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Hence, unstimulated mononuclear blood cells were exposed to 7 T static magnetic field alone or in combination with maximum permissible imaging gradients and radiofrequency pulses as well as to ionizing radiation during computed tomography and γ-ray exposure. DNA double-strand breaks were quantified by flow cytometry and automated microscopy analysis of immunofluorescence stained γH2AX. Cytotoxicity was studied by CellTiter-Blue viability assay and [3H]-thymidine proliferation assay. Exposure of unstimulated mononuclear blood cells to 7 T static magnetic field alone or combined with varying gradient magnetic fields and pulsed radiofrequency fields did not induce DNA double-strand breaks, whereas irradiation with X- and γ-rays led to a dose-dependent induction of γH2AX foci. The viability assay revealed a time- and dose-dependent decrease in metabolic activity only among samples exposed to γ-radiation. Further, there was no evidence for altered proliferation response after cells were exposed to 7 T MRI or low doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 0.2 Gy). These findings confirm the acceptance of MRI as a safe non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool, but whether MRI can induce other types of DNA lesions or DNA double-strand breaks during altered conditions still needs to be investigated. PMID:26176601

  11. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  12. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to 32 P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs was examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K a for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 x 10 9 M -1 . The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3' end of the genome with a K a similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3' noncoding region

  13. Carbon ion induced DNA double-strand breaks in melanophore B16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zengquan; Zhou Guangming; Wang Jufang; He Jing; Li Qiang; Li Wenjian; Xie Hongmei; Cai Xichen; Tao Huang; Dang Bingrong; Han Guangwu

    1997-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in melanophore B 16 induced by plateau and extended Bragg peak of 75 MeV/u 12 C 6+ ions were studied by using a technique of inverse pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PIGE). DNA fragment lengths were distributed in two ranges: the larger in 1.4 Mbp-3.2 Mbp and the smaller in less than 1.2 Mbp. It indicates that distribution of DNA fragments induced by heavy ion irradiation is not stochastic and there probably are sensitive sites to heavy ions in DNA molecules of B 16 . Percentage of DNA released from plug (PR) increased and trended towards a quasi-plateau ∝85% as dose increased. Content of the larger fragments decreased and flattened with increasing dose while content of the smaller ones increased and trended towards saturation. (orig.)

  14. Distinct roles for RDE-1 and RDE-4 during RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, S; Fire, A

    2001-10-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular defense mechanism that uses double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as a sequence-specific trigger to guide the degradation of homologous single-stranded RNAs. RNAi is a multistep process involving several proteins and at least one type of RNA intermediate, a population of small 21-25 nt RNAs (called siRNAs) that are initially derived from cleavage of the dsRNA trigger. Genetic screens in Caenorhabditis elegans have identified numerous mutations that cause partial or complete loss of RNAi. In this work, we analyzed cleavage of injected dsRNA to produce the initial siRNA population in animals mutant for rde-1 and rde-4, two genes that are essential for RNAi but that are not required for organismal viability or fertility. Our results suggest distinct roles for RDE-1 and RDE-4 in the interference process. Although null mutants lacking rde-1 show no phenotypic response to dsRNA, the amount of siRNAs generated from an injected dsRNA trigger was comparable to that of wild-type. By contrast, mutations in rde-4 substantially reduced the population of siRNAs derived from an injected dsRNA trigger. Injection of chemically synthesized 24- or 25-nt siRNAs could circumvent RNAi resistance in rde-4 mutants, whereas no bypass was observed in rde-1 mutants. These results support a model in which RDE-4 is involved before or during production of siRNAs, whereas RDE-1 acts after the siRNAs have been formed.

  15. Radiation-induced DNA Double Strand Breaks and Their Modulations by Treatments with Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaf Extracts: A Cancer Cell Culture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boonsirichai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gamma radiation brings deleterious effects upon human cells by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damages. Antioxidants have been shown to confer protective effects on irradiated normal cells. Moringa oleifera Lam. is a widely used nutritional supplement with antioxidant activities. This report showed that antioxidant-containing supplements, in addition to protecting normal cells, could protect cancer cells against genotoxic effects of gamma radiation. -H2AX immunofluorescent foci were utilized as an indicator of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells were irradiated with 2-8 Gy gamma radiation. A linear relationship between the formation of -H2AX foci and radiation dose was observed with an average of 10 foci per cell per Gy. A 30-minute pretreatment of the cells with either the aqueous or the ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves could partially protect the cells from radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. A pretreatment with 500 µg/mL aqueous extract reduced the number of foci formed by 15% when assayed at 30 minutes post-irradiation. The ethanolic extract was more effective; 500 µg/mL of its concentration reduced the number of foci among irradiated cells by 30%. The results indicated that irradiated cancer cells responded similarly to nutritional supplements containing antioxidants as irradiated normal cells. These natural antioxidants could confer protective effects upon cancer cells against gamma radiation

  16. Effects of DNA double-strand and single-strand breaks on intrachromosomal recombination events in cell-cycle-arrested yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, A.; Schiestl, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Intrachromosomal recombination between repeated elements can result in deletion (DEL recombination) events. We investigated the inducibility of such intrachromosomal recombination events at different stages of the cell cycle and the nature of the primary DNA lesions capable of initiating these events. Two genetic systems were constructed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that select for DEL recombination events between duplicated alleles of CDC28 and TUB2. We determined effects of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-strand breaks (SSBs) between the duplicated alleles on DEL recombination when induced in dividing cells or cells arrested in G1 or G2. Site-specific DSBs and SSBs were produced by overexpression of the I-Sce I endonuclease and the gene II protein (gIIp), respectively. I-Sce I-induced DSBs caused an increase in DEL recombination frequencies in both dividing and cell-cycle-arrested cells, indicating that G1- and G2-arrested cells are capable of completing DSB repair. In contrast, gIIp-induced SSBs caused an increase in DEL recombination frequency only in dividing cells. To further examine these phenomena we used both γ-irradiation, inducing DSBs as its most relevant lesion, and UV, inducing other forms of DNA damage. UV irradiation did not increase DEL recombination frequencies in G1 or G2, whereas γ-rays increased DEL recombination frequencies in both phases. Both forms of radiation, however, induced DEL recombination in dividing cells. The results suggest that DSBsbut not SSBs induce DEL recombination, probably via the single-strand annealing pathway. Further, DSBs in dividing cells may result from the replication of a UV or SSB-damaged template. Alternatively, UV induced events may occur by replication slippage after DNA polymerase pausing in front of the damage. (author)

  17. RNA-processing proteins regulate Mec1/ATR activation by promoting generation of RPA-coated ssDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfrini, Nicola; Trovesi, Camilla; Wery, Maxime; Martina, Marina; Cesena, Daniele; Descrimes, Marc; Morillon, Antonin; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2015-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by activating a checkpoint that depends on the protein kinases Tel1/ATM and Mec1/ATR. Mec1/ATR is activated by RPA-coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which arises upon nucleolytic degradation (resection) of the DSB. Emerging evidences indicate that RNA-processing factors play critical, yet poorly understood, roles in genomic stability. Here, we provide evidence that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA decay factors Xrn1, Rrp6 and Trf4 regulate Mec1/ATR activation by promoting generation of RPA-coated ssDNA. The lack of Xrn1 inhibits ssDNA generation at the DSB by preventing the loading of the MRX complex. By contrast, DSB resection is not affected in the absence of Rrp6 or Trf4, but their lack impairs the recruitment of RPA, and therefore of Mec1, to the DSB. Rrp6 and Trf4 inactivation affects neither Rad51/Rad52 association nor DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR), suggesting that full Mec1 activation requires higher amount of RPA-coated ssDNA than HR-mediated repair. Noteworthy, deep transcriptome analyses do not identify common misregulated gene expression that could explain the observed phenotypes. Our results provide a novel link between RNA processing and genome stability. © 2014 The Authors.

  18. Thioflavin T binds dimeric parallel-stranded GA-containing non-G-quadruplex DNAs: a general approach to lighting up double-stranded scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuangna; Peng, Pai; Wang, Huihui; Shi, Lili; Li, Tao

    2017-12-01

    A molecular rotor thioflavin T (ThT) is usually used as a fluorescent ligand specific for G-quadruplexes. Here, we demonstrate that ThT can tightly bind non-G-quadruplex DNAs with several GA motifs and dimerize them in a parallel double-stranded mode, accompanied by over 100-fold enhancement in the fluorescence emission of ThT. The introduction of reverse Watson-Crick T-A base pairs into these dimeric parallel-stranded DNA systems remarkably favors the binding of ThT into the pocket between G•G and A•A base pairs, where ThT is encapsulated thereby restricting its two rotary aromatic rings in the excited state. A similar mechanism is also demonstrated in antiparallel DNA duplexes where several motifs of two consecutive G•G wobble base pairs are incorporated and serve as the active pockets for ThT binding. The insight into the interactions of ThT with non-G-quadruplex DNAs allows us to introduce a new concept for constructing DNA-based sensors and devices. As proof-of-concept experiments, we design a DNA triplex containing GA motifs in its Hoogsteen hydrogen-bonded two parallel strands as a pH-driven nanoswitch and two GA-containing parallel duplexes as novel metal sensing platforms where C-C and T-T mismatches are included. This work may find further applications in biological systems (e.g. disease gene detection) where parallel duplex or triplex stretches are involved. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. DNA hybrids suggesting a recombination process repairing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in Ehrlich Ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The results presented suggest the possibility of repair of DNA double-strand breaks by recombination, at least in the S and G 2 -phases of the cell cycle, in mammalian cells. Further experiments with synchronized cell cultures will have to show whether this process may also occur in the G 1 -phase of the cell cycle. (orig./AJ) [de

  20. Non-nematode-derived double-stranded RNAs induce profound phenotypic changes in Meloidogyne incognita and Globodera pallida infective juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, Johnathan J; McMaster, Steven; Johnston, Michael J; Kerr, Rachel; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G

    2009-11-01

    Nine non-nematode-derived double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs), designed for use as controls in RNA interference (RNAi) screens of neuropeptide targets, were found to induce aberrant phenotypes and an unexpected inhibitory effect on motility of root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita J2s following 24h soaks in 0.1 mg/ml dsRNA; a simple soaking procedure which we have found to elicit profound knockdown of neuronal targets in Globodera pallida J2s. We have established that this inhibitory phenomenon is both time- and concentration-dependent, as shorter 4h soaks in 0.1 mg/ml dsRNA had no negative impact on M. incognita J2 stage worms, yet a 10-fold increase in concentration to 1 mg/ml for the same 4h time period had an even greater qualitative and quantitative impact on worm phenotype and motility. Further, a 10-fold increase of J2s soaked in 0.1 mg/ml dsRNA did not significantly alter the observed phenotypic aberration, which suggests that dsRNA uptake of the soaked J2s is not saturated under these conditions. This phenomenon was not initially observed in potato cyst nematode G. pallida J2s, which displayed no aberrant phenotype, or diminution of migratory activity in response to the same 0.1 mg/ml dsRNA 24h soaks. However, a 10-fold increase in dsRNA to 1mg/ml was found to elicit comparable irregularity of phenotype and inhibition of motility in G. pallida, to that initially observed in M. incognita following a 24h soak in 0.1 mg/ml dsRNA. Again, a 10-fold increase in the number of G. pallida J2s soaked in the same volume of 1 mg/ml dsRNA preparation did not significantly affect the observed phenotypic deviation. We do not observe any global impact on transcript abundance in either M. incognita or G. pallida J2s following 0.1 mg/ml dsRNA soaks, as revealed by reverse transcriptase-PCR and quantitative PCR data. This study aims to raise awareness of a phenomenon which we observe consistently and which we believe signifies a more expansive deficiency in our knowledge and

  1. Role of electrostatics in the assembly pathway of a single-stranded RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmann, Rees F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Koay, Melissa S T; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M

    2014-09-01

    We have recently discovered (R. D. Cadena-Nava et al., J. Virol. 86:3318-3326, 2012, doi:10.1128/JVI.06566-11) that the in vitro packaging of RNA by the capsid protein (CP) of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus is optimal when there is a significant excess of CP, specifically that complete packaging of all of the RNA in solution requires sufficient CP to provide charge matching of the N-terminal positively charged arginine-rich motifs (ARMS) of the CPs with the negatively charged phosphate backbone of the RNA. We show here that packaging results from the initial formation of a charge-matched protocapsid consisting of RNA decorated by a disordered arrangement of CPs. This protocapsid reorganizes into the final, icosahedrally symmetric nucleocapsid by displacing the excess CPs from the RNA to the exterior surface of the emerging capsid through electrostatic attraction between the ARMs of the excess CP and the negative charge density of the capsid exterior. As a test of this scenario, we prepare CP mutants with extra and missing (relative to the wild type) cationic residues and show that a correspondingly smaller and larger excess, respectively, of CP is needed for complete packaging of RNA. Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) has long been studied as a model system for the assembly of single-stranded RNA viruses. While much is known about the electrostatic interactions within the CCMV virion, relatively little is known about these interactions during assembly, i.e., within intermediate states preceding the final nucleocapsid structure. Theoretical models and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest that viruses like CCMV assemble by the bulk adsorption of CPs onto the RNA driven by electrostatic attraction, followed by structural reorganization into the final capsid. Such a mechanism facilitates assembly by condensing the RNA for packaging while simultaneously concentrating the local density of CP for capsid nucleation. We provide experimental evidence of

  2. Evidence for an RNA polymerization activity in axolotl and Xenopus egg extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Pelczar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported a post-transcriptional RNA amplification observed in vivo following injection of in vitro synthesized transcripts into axolotl oocytes, unfertilized (UFE or fertilized eggs. To further characterize this phenomenon, low speed extracts (LSE from axolotl and Xenopus UFE were prepared and tested in an RNA polymerization assay. The major conclusions are: i the amphibian extracts catalyze the incorporation of radioactive ribonucleotide in RNase but not DNase sensitive products showing that these products correspond to RNA; ii the phenomenon is resistant to α-amanitin, an inhibitor of RNA polymerases II and III and to cordycepin (3'dAMP, but sensitive to cordycepin 5'-triphosphate, an RNA elongation inhibitor, which supports the existence of an RNA polymerase activity different from polymerases II and III; the detection of radiolabelled RNA comigrating at the same length as the exogenous transcript added to the extracts allowed us to show that iii the RNA polymerization is not a 3' end labelling and that iv the radiolabelled RNA is single rather than double stranded. In vitro cell-free systems derived from amphibian UFE therefore validate our previous in vivo results hypothesizing the existence of an evolutionary conserved enzymatic activity with the properties of an RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp.

  3. Crystal Structure of a CRISPR RNA-guided Surveillance Complex Bound to a ssDNA Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulepati, Sabin [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Heroux, Annie; Bailey, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-09-19

    In prokaryotes, RNA derived from type I and type III CRISPR loci direct large ribonucleoprotein complexes to destroy invading bacteriophage and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, this 405-kilodalton complex is called Cascade. We report the crystal structure of Cascade bound to a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) target at a resolution of 3.03 angstroms. The structure reveals that the CRISPR RNA and target strands do not form a double helix but instead adopt an underwound ribbon-like structure. This noncanonical structure is facilitated by rotation of every sixth nucleotide out of the RNA-DNA hybrid and is stabilized by the highly interlocked organization of protein subunits. These studies provide insight into both the assembly and the activity of this complex and suggest a mechanism to enforce fidelity of target binding.

  4. DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes induced by two-day 99mTc-MIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rief, Matthias; Hartmann, Lisa; Geisel, Dominik; Richter, Felicitas; Brenner, Winfried; Dewey, Marc

    2018-07-01

    To investigate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in blood lymphocytes induced by two-day 99m Tc-MIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) using y-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy and to correlate the results with 99m Tc activity in blood samples. Eleven patients who underwent two-day MPS were included. DSB blood sampling was performed before and 5min, 1h and 24h after the first and second radiotracer injections. 99m Tc activity was measured in each blood sample. For immunofluorescence microscopy, distinct foci representing DSBs were quantified in lymphocytes after staining for the phosphorylated histone variant y-H2AX. The 99m Tc-MIBI activity measured on days one and two was similar (254±25 and 258±27 MBq; p=0.594). Compared with baseline DSB foci (0.09±0.05/cell), a significant increase was found at 5min (0.19±0.04/cell) and 1h (0.18±0.04/cell) after the first injection and at 5min and 1h after the second injection (0.21±0.03 and 0.19±0.04/cell, respectively; p=0.003 for both). At 24h after the first and second injections, the number of DSB foci had returned to baseline (0.06±0.02 and 0.12±0.05/cell, respectively). 99m Tc activity levels in peripheral blood samples correlated well with DSB counts (r=0.451). DSB counts reflect 99m Tc-MIBI activity after injection for two-day MPS, and might allow individual monitoring of biological effects of cardiac nuclear imaging. • Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using 99m Tc induces time-dependent double-strand breaks (DSBs) • γ-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy shows DSB as an early response to radiotracer injection • Activity measurements of 99m Tc correlate well with detected DSB • DSB foci induced by 99m Tc return to baseline 24h after radiotracer injection.

  5. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation of different quality and their relevance for cell inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampf, G.

    1988-01-01

    By investigation of the production of DNA strand breaks and of DNA release from the nuclear membrane complex in Chinese hamster cells using different radiation qualities from 1 to 360 keV/μm, partly also under hypoxic conditions, and by relating the results to the induction of chromosome aberrations and to cell inactivation it has become possible to find connections between the induction of molecular lesions and the expression of this damage on the cellular level. From the studies follows that DNA pieces are cut off from the nuclear membrane complex by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). The share and size of the released pieces depends on radiation dose and quality as well as on the oxygen conditions. The lesions can partly be repaired. In connection with the DSB rates the results of the DNA release studies led to the conclusion that the DNA in the cells must be organized in superstructure units (MASSUs) with a DNA mass of about 2 x 10 9 g/mol, which are associated to the nuclear membrane in attachment points. The numerical relations show that for a 37% survival probability about 90 DSB per genome are required with sparsely ionizing radiation; this number declines to about 40 by use of more densely ionizing radiation up to 150 keV/μm, and increases again with further rise of the ionization density. Hence, for cell inactivation not simply a certain number of DSB per cell is required but rather seems their cooperation within a small structure section of the DNA to be relevant. These critical structures are with high probability the MASSUs. An irrepairable release of DNA from such a structure unit can bring about a chromosome break detectable in the metaphase and finally lead to cell inactivation. DSB turned out to be the essential lethal events in bacteria as well. The relatively small differences to the eukaryotic cells in the position of the maximum of radiation sensitivity on the LET scale and in the lesion sensitivity towards DSB let suggest that a common critical

  6. DNA Strand Breaks in Mitotic Germ Cells of Caenorhabditis elegans Evaluated by Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sojin; Choi, Seoyun; Ahn, Byungchan

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage responses are important for the maintenance of genome stability and the survival of organisms. Such responses are activated in the presence of DNA damage and lead to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. In Caenorhabditis elegans, double-strand breaks induced by DNA damaging agents have been detected indirectly by antibodies against DSB recognizing proteins. In this study we used a comet assay to detect DNA strand breaks and to measure the elimination of DNA strand breaks in mitotic germline nuclei of C. elegans. We found that C. elegans brc-1 mutants were more sensitive to ionizing radiation and camptothecin than the N2 wild-type strain and repaired DNA strand breaks less efficiently than N2. This study is the first demonstration of direct measurement of DNA strand breaks in mitotic germline nuclei of C. elegans. This newly developed assay can be applied to detect DNA strand breaks in different C. elegans mutants that are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. PMID:26903030

  7. Sequence analysis of L RNA of Lassa virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieth, Simon; Torda, Andrew E.; Asper, Marcel; Schmitz, Herbert; Guenther, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    The L RNA of three Lassa virus strains originating from Nigeria, Ghana/Ivory Coast, and Sierra Leone was sequenced and the data subjected to structure predictions and phylogenetic analyses. The L gene products had 2218-2221 residues, diverged by 18% at the amino acid level, and contained several conserved regions. Only one region of 504 residues (positions 1043-1546) could be assigned a function, namely that of an RNA polymerase. Secondary structure predictions suggest that this domain is very similar to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of known structure encoded by plus-strand RNA viruses, permitting a model to be built. Outside the polymerase region, there is little structural data, except for regions of strong alpha-helical content and probably a coiled-coil domain at the N terminus. No evidence for reassortment or recombination during Lassa virus evolution was found. The secondary structure-assisted alignment of the RNA polymerase region permitted a reliable reconstruction of the phylogeny of all negative-strand RNA viruses, indicating that Arenaviridae are most closely related to Nairoviruses. In conclusion, the data provide a basis for structural and functional characterization of the Lassa virus L protein and reveal new insights into the phylogeny of negative-strand RNA viruses

  8. Ratiometric FRET-based detection of DNA and micro-RNA in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveeva, Evgenia G.; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Stewart, Donald R.; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2009-01-01

    A ratiometric method for detecting DNA oligomers in bulk solution based on Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is described. The two fluorescence signals (green and red), originating from Cy3 (donor, green) and Cy5 (acceptor, red) labels, are simultaneously detected from the pre-hybridized Cy3oligomerY:Cy5oligomerX system. The ratio of red to green intensities is sensitive to the presence of the single-stranded complimentary oligomer, which replaces single-stranded Cy3oligomerY in the donor:acceptor complex and perturbs the FRET. The detection scheme is generally applicable to the detection of DNA and RNA, and particularly micro-RNA. The proposed method is applicable to various double-stranded various lengths targets (manipulation of the sample preparation conditions, such as temperature, incubation time, denaturizing agent, may be needed).

  9. DNA double strand break repair is enhanced by P53 following induction by DNA damage and is dependent on the C-terminal domain of P53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Tang; Powell, Simon N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor gene p53 can mediate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that it may also directly or indirectly influence the DNA repair machinery. In the present study, we investigated whether p53, induced by DNA damage, could enhance the rejoining of double-strand DNA breaks. Materials and Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) were made by restriction enzyme digestion of a plasmid, between a promoter and a 'reporter' gene: luciferase (LUC) or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). Linear or circular plasmid DNA (LUC or CAT) was co-transfected with circular β-Gal plasmid (to normalize for uptake) into mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) for p53. Their ability to rejoin linearized plasmid was measured by the luciferase or CAT activity detected in rescued plasmids. The activity detected in cells transfected with linear plasmid was scored relative to the activity detected in cells transfected with circular plasmid. Results: Ionizing radiation (IR, 2 Gy) enhanced the dsb repair activity in wild type p53 cells; however, p53 null cells lose this effect, indicating that the enhancement of dsb repair was p53-dependent. REF cells with dominant-negative mutant p53 showed a similar induction compared with the parental REF cells with wild-type p53. This ala-143 mutant p53 prevents cell cycle arrest and transactivation of p21 WAF1/cip1) following IR, indicating that the p53-dependent enhancement of DNA repair is distinct from transactivation. Immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts, 10(1)VasK1 cells, which express p53 cDNA encoding a temperature-sensitive mutant in the DNA sequence specific binding domain (ala135 to val135) with an alternatively spliced C-terminal domain (ASp53: amino-acids 360-381) and, 10(1)Val5 cells, which express the normal spliced p53 (NSp53) with the same temperature-sensitive mutant were compared. It was found that 10(1)VasK1 cells showed no DNA

  10. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md.; Wibowo, Anjar Tri; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions

  11. Production of DNA Double Strand Breaks in Human Cells due to Acute Exposure to Tritiated Water (HTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, R.; German, U.; Alfassi, Z. B.; Priel, E.

    2014-01-01

    The average and maximum energies of the beta emission from 3H are 5.69 keV and 18.6 keV respectively. The average range in water (or soft tissues), around 0.5 1/4m (500 nm), is considerably less than the typical diameter of a cell (10-30 1/4m), and even of a cell nucleus (5-10 1/4m), thus the micro-location of the tritium atom may well be crucial in determining its biochemical consequences. Due to the high ionization density of the beta particles emitted by tritium (about 400 ion pairs/1/4m) possible interaction of tritium beta radiation with DNA may play a significant role. Tritiated water (HTO) is the main chemical form in which tritium is found in the environment. In the body it may be retained as organically bound tritium (OBT), binding to biological molecules or remaining as OBT with various degrees of solubility. OBT can be retained in the human body much longer than HTO and therefore the dose arising from OBT can reach 50% of the total tritium dose . Histones are major protein components of chromatin. They function as spools around which DNA winds and play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. In the absence of histones, the DNA in chromosomes would be unmanageably long, as human cells each have about 1.8 m of DNA. During mitosis, DNA is duplicated and condensed, resulting in about 120 1/4m of chromosomes. It was recently reported that the phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine residue 139 (D 3 -H2AX) is associated with Double Strand Breaks (DSB) sites in DNA), which indicates the possibility of research based on the detection of DSBs in DNA. The phosphorylated megabase chromatin domain surrounding the DSB can be immunostained and visualized as discrete foci by fluorescence microscopy, as each DNA DSB formed produces a visible D 3 -H2AX focus. Since 1 Gy of radiation produces approximately 60 DSBs/cell, doses of a few mGy should be distinguishable from the background, and it was recently shown that the exposure to 1 mGy of X-rays induces

  12. Recognition, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells: the molecular choreography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Larry H

    2012-01-01

    The faithful maintenance of chromosome continuity in human cells during DNA replication and repair is critical for preventing the conversion of normal diploid cells to an oncogenic state. The evolution of higher eukaryotic cells endowed them with a large genetic investment in the molecular machinery that ensures chromosome stability. In mammalian and other vertebrate cells, the elimination of double-strand breaks with minimal nucleotide sequence change involves the spatiotemporal orchestration of a seemingly endless number of proteins ranging in their action from the nucleotide level to nucleosome organization and chromosome architecture. DNA DSBs trigger a myriad of post-translational modifications that alter catalytic activities and the specificity of protein interactions: phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation, followed by the reversal of these changes as repair is completed. "Superfluous" protein recruitment to damage sites, functional redundancy, and alternative pathways ensure that DSB repair is extremely efficient, both quantitatively and qualitatively. This review strives to integrate the information about the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair that has emerged over the last two decades with a focus on DSBs produced by the prototype agent ionizing radiation (IR). The exponential growth of molecular studies, heavily driven by RNA knockdown technology, now reveals an outline of how many key protein players in genome stability and cancer biology perform their interwoven tasks, e.g. ATM, ATR, DNA-PK, Chk1, Chk2, PARP1/2/3, 53BP1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BLM, RAD51, and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex. Thus, the nature of the intricate coordination of repair processes with cell cycle progression is becoming apparent. This review also links molecular abnormalities to cellular pathology as much a possible and provides a framework of temporal relationships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Conjugation and Evaluation of Triazole?Linked Single Guide RNA for CRISPR?Cas9 Gene Editing

    OpenAIRE

    He, Kaizhang; Chou, Eldon T.; Begay, Shawn; Anderson, Emily M.; van?Brabant?Smith, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The CRISPR?Cas9 gene editing system requires Cas9 endonuclease and guide RNAs (either the natural dual RNA consisting of crRNA and tracrRNA or a chimeric single guide RNA) that direct site?specific double?stranded DNA cleavage. This communication describes a click ligation approach that uses alkyne?azide cycloaddition to generate a triazole?linked single guide RNA (sgRNA). The conjugated sgRNA shows efficient and comparable genome editing activity to natural dual RNA and unmodified s...

  14. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Wiechec, Anna; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Bartnik, Andrzej; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, Ladislav; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Application of a compact laser plasma source of soft X-rays in radiobiology studies is demonstrated. The source is based on a laser produced plasma as a result of irradiation of a double-stream gas puff target with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercially available Nd:YAG laser. The source allows irradiation of samples with soft X-ray pulses in the "water window" spectral range (wavelength: 2.3-4.4 nm; photon energy: 280-560 eV) in vacuum or a helium atmosphere at very high-dose rates and doses exceeding the kGy level. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DBS) induced in DNA plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 have been measured. The different conformations of the plasmid DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. An exponential decrease in the supercoiled form with an increase in linear and relaxed forms of the plasmids has been observed as a function of increasing photon fluence. Significant difference between SSB and DSB in case of wet and dry samples was observed that is connected with the production of free radicals in the wet sample by soft X-ray photons and subsequent affecting the plasmid DNA. Therefore, the new source was validated to be useful for radiobiology experiments.

  15. Isolation and characterization of Solenopsis invicta virus 3, a new positive-strand RNA virus infecting the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, Steven M.; Hashimoto, Yoshifumi

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new virus from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) represents the third virus discovered from this ant species using the metagenomics approach. The single (positive)-strand RNA, monopartite, bicistronic genome of SINV-3 was sequenced in entirety (GenBank accession number (FJ528584)), comprised of 10,386 nucleotides, and polyadenylated at the 3' terminus. This genome size was confirmed by Northern analysis. The genome revealed 2 large open reading frames (ORFs) in the sense orientation with an untranslated region (UTR) at each end and between the two ORFs. The 5' proximal ORF (ORF 1) encoded a predicted protein of 299.1 kDa (2580 amino acids). The 3' proximal ORF (ORF 2) encoded a predicted protein of 73.2 kDa (651 amino acids). RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), helicase, and protease domains were recognized in ORF 1. SDS-PAGE separation of purified SINV-3 particles yielded 2 bands (ostensibly capsid proteins) with a combined molecular mass of 77.3 kDa which was similar to the mass predicted by ORF 2 (73.2 kDa). Phylogenetic analysis of the conserved amino acid sequences containing domains I to VIII of the RdRp from dicistroviruses, iflaviruses, plant small RNA viruses, picornaviruses, and 4 unassigned positive-strand RNA viruses revealed a trichotomous phenogram with SINV-3 and Kelp fly virus comprising a unique cluster. Electron microscopic examination of negatively stained samples of SINV-3 revealed isometric particles with apparent projections and a diameter of 27.3 ± 1.3 nm. SINV-3 was successfully transmitted to uninfected workers by feeding. The minus (replicative) strand of SINV-3 was detected in worker ants indicating replication of the virus. The possibility of using SINV-3 as a microbial control agent for fire ants is discussed.

  16. Repair of the double-strand breaks produced by /sup 125/I disintegrations in the DNA of micrococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D K [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario. Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1978-01-01

    Wild-type M. radiodurans and two radiosensitive mutants were used to study the lethal effects of /sup 125/I disintegrations in their DNA. The relative sensitivities of these three strains to inactivation by ..gamma..-radiation were reflected in their relative sensitivities to inactivation by /sup 125/I decay. The number of double-strand (ds) breaks in the DNA appeared to be similar at levels of ..gamma..-radiation and of /sup 125/I decay that reduced survival to 10%. All three strains of M. radiodurans rapidly repaired ds breaks produced in their DNA by either ..gamma..-radiation or /sup 125/I disintegrations. If one ds break per cell is a lethal event (Krisch. et al., 1975), cells of the three strains tested would die when they had left unrepaired one ds break out of an initial 45, 600 or 1800 ds breaks per single cell.

  17. Mycobacterium smegmatis HelY Is an RNA-Activated ATPase/dATPase and 3'-to-5' Helicase That Unwinds 3'-Tailed RNA Duplexes and RNA:DNA Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uson, Maria Loressa; Ordonez, Heather; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria have a large and distinctive ensemble of DNA helicases that function in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Little is known about the roster of RNA helicases in mycobacteria or their roles in RNA transactions. The 912-amino-acid Mycobacterium smegmatis HelY (MSMEG_3885) protein is a bacterial homolog of the Mtr4 and Ski2 helicases that regulate RNA 3' processing and turnover by the eukaryal exosome. Here we characterize HelY as an RNA-stimulated ATPase/dATPase and an ATP/dATP-dependent 3'-to-5' helicase. HelY requires a 3' single-strand RNA tail (a loading RNA strand) to displace the complementary strand of a tailed RNA:RNA or RNA:DNA duplex. The findings that HelY ATPase is unresponsive to a DNA polynucleotide cofactor and that HelY is unable to unwind a 3'-tailed duplex in which the loading strand is DNA distinguish HelY from other mycobacterial nucleoside triphosphatases/helicases characterized previously. The biochemical properties of HelY, which resemble those of Mtr4/Ski2, hint at a role for HelY in mycobacterial RNA catabolism. RNA helicases play crucial roles in transcription, RNA processing, and translation by virtue of their ability to alter RNA secondary structure or remodel RNA-protein interactions. In eukarya, the RNA helicases Mtr4 and Ski2 regulate RNA 3' resection by the exosome. Mycobacterium smegmatis HelY, a bacterial homolog of Mtr4/Ski2, is characterized here as a unidirectional helicase, powered by RNA-dependent ATP/dATP hydrolysis, that tracks 3' to 5' along a loading RNA strand to displace the complementary strand of a tailed RNA:RNA or RNA:DNA duplex. The biochemical properties of HelY suggest a role in bacterial RNA transactions. HelY homologs are present in pathogenic mycobacteria (e.g., M. tuberculosis and M. leprae) and are widely prevalent in Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria but occur sporadically elsewhere in the bacterial domain. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Equilibrious Strand Exchange Promoted by DNA Conformational Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations.

  19. Cystoviral polymerase complex protein P7 uses its acidic C-terminal tail to regulate the RNA-directed RNA polymerase P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonse, Sébastien; Arnold, Jamie J; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Wang, Hsin; Kloss, Brian; Cameron, Craig E; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2014-07-15

    In bacteriophages of the cystovirus family, the polymerase complex (PX) encodes a 75-kDa RNA-directed RNA polymerase (P2) that transcribes the double-stranded RNA genome. Also a constituent of the PX is the essential protein P7 that, in addition to accelerating PX assembly and facilitating genome packaging, plays a regulatory role in transcription. Deletion of P7 from the PX leads to aberrant plus-strand synthesis suggesting its influence on the transcriptase activity of P2. Here, using solution NMR techniques and the P2 and P7 proteins from cystovirus ϕ12, we demonstrate their largely electrostatic interaction in vitro. Chemical shift perturbations on P7 in the presence of P2 suggest that this interaction involves the dynamic C-terminal tail of P7, more specifically an acidic cluster therein. Patterns of chemical shift changes induced on P2 by the P7 C-terminus resemble those seen in the presence of single-stranded RNA suggesting similarities in binding. This association between P2 and P7 reduces the affinity of the former toward template RNA and results in its decreased activity both in de novo RNA synthesis and in extending a short primer. Given the presence of C-terminal acidic tracts on all cystoviral P7 proteins, the electrostatic nature of the P2/P7 interaction is likely conserved within the family and could constitute a mechanism through which P7 regulates transcription in cystoviruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of an effective scoring function for RNA-RNA interactions with a physics-based double-iterative method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yumeng; Wen, Zeyu; Zhang, Di; Huang, Sheng-You

    2018-05-18

    RNA-RNA interactions play fundamental roles in gene and cell regulation. Therefore, accurate prediction of RNA-RNA interactions is critical to determine their complex structures and understand the molecular mechanism of the interactions. Here, we have developed a physics-based double-iterative strategy to determine the effective potentials for RNA-RNA interactions based on a training set of 97 diverse RNA-RNA complexes. The double-iterative strategy circumvented the reference state problem in knowledge-based scoring functions by updating the potentials through iteration and also overcame the decoy-dependent limitation in previous iterative methods by constructing the decoys iteratively. The derived scoring function, which is referred to as DITScoreRR, was evaluated on an RNA-RNA docking benchmark of 60 test cases and compared with three other scoring functions. It was shown that for bound docking, our scoring function DITScoreRR obtained the excellent success rates of 90% and 98.3% in binding mode predictions when the top 1 and 10 predictions were considered, compared to 63.3% and 71.7% for van der Waals interactions, 45.0% and 65.0% for ITScorePP, and 11.7% and 26.7% for ZDOCK 2.1, respectively. For unbound docking, DITScoreRR achieved the good success rates of 53.3% and 71.7% in binding mode predictions when the top 1 and 10 predictions were considered, compared to 13.3% and 28.3% for van der Waals interactions, 11.7% and 26.7% for our ITScorePP, and 3.3% and 6.7% for ZDOCK 2.1, respectively. DITScoreRR also performed significantly better in ranking decoys and obtained significantly higher score-RMSD correlations than the other three scoring functions. DITScoreRR will be of great value for the prediction and design of RNA structures and RNA-RNA complexes.

  1. Viral Small-RNA Analysis of Bombyx mori Larval Midgut during Persistent and Pathogenic Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zografidis, Aris; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Kolliopoulou, Anna; Apostolou-Karampelis, Konstantinos; Head, Steven R; Deforce, Dieter; Smagghe, Guy; Swevers, Luc

    2015-11-01

    The lepidopteran innate immune response against RNA viruses remains poorly understood, while in other insects several studies have highlighted an essential role for the exo-RNAi pathway in combating viral infection. Here, by using deep-sequencing technology for viral small-RNA (vsRNA) assessment, we provide evidence that exo-RNAi is operative in the silkworm Bombyx mori against both persistent and pathogenic infection of B. mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) which is characterized by a segmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome. Further, we show that Dicer-2 predominantly targets viral dsRNA and produces 20-nucleotide (nt) vsRNAs, whereas an additional pathway is responsive to viral mRNA derived from segment 10. Importantly, vsRNA distributions, which define specific hot and cold spot profiles for each viral segment, to a considerable degree overlap between Dicer-2-related (19 to 21 nt) and Dicer-2-unrelated vsRNAs, suggesting a common origin for these profiles. We found a degenerate motif significantly enriched at the cut sites of vsRNAs of various lengths which link an unknown RNase to the origins of vsRNAs biogenesis and distribution. Accordingly, the indicated RNase activity may be an important early factor for the host's antiviral defense in Lepidoptera. This work contributes to the elucidation of the lepidopteran antiviral response against infection of segmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus (CPV; Reoviridae) and highlights the importance of viral small-RNA (vsRNA) analysis for getting insights into host-pathogen interactions. Three vsRNA pathways are implicated in antiviral defense. For dsRNA, two pathways are proposed, either based on Dicer-2 cleavage to generate 20-nucleotide vsRNAs or based on the activity of an uncharacterized endo-RNase that cleaves the viral RNA substrate at a degenerate motif. The analysis also indicates the existence of a degradation pathway that targets the positive strand of segment 10. Copyright © 2015, American

  2. Crystal-Structure-Guided Design of Self-Assembling RNA Nanotriangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerneke, Mark A; Dibrov, Sergey M; Hermann, Thomas

    2016-03-14

    RNA nanotechnology uses RNA structural motifs to build nanosized architectures that assemble through selective base-pair interactions. Herein, we report the crystal-structure-guided design of highly stable RNA nanotriangles that self-assemble cooperatively from short oligonucleotides. The crystal structure of an 81 nucleotide nanotriangle determined at 2.6 Å resolution reveals the so-far smallest circularly closed nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The assembly of the nanotriangle architecture involved RNA corner motifs that were derived from ligand-responsive RNA switches, which offer the opportunity to control self-assembly and dissociation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Expression microarray reproducibility is improved by optimising purification steps in RNA amplification and labelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenton James D

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression microarrays have evolved into a powerful tool with great potential for clinical application and therefore reliability of data is essential. RNA amplification is used when the amount of starting material is scarce, as is frequently the case with clinical samples. Purification steps are critical in RNA amplification and labelling protocols, and there is a lack of sufficient data to validate and optimise the process. Results Here the purification steps involved in the protocol for indirect labelling of amplified RNA are evaluated and the experimentally determined best method for each step with respect to yield, purity, size distribution of the transcripts, and dye coupling is used to generate targets tested in replicate hybridisations. DNase treatment of diluted total RNA samples followed by phenol extraction is the optimal way to remove genomic DNA contamination. Purification of double-stranded cDNA is best achieved by phenol extraction followed by isopropanol precipitation at room temperature. Extraction with guanidinium-phenol and Lithium Chloride precipitation are the optimal methods for purification of amplified RNA and labelled aRNA respectively. Conclusion This protocol provides targets that generate highly reproducible microarray data with good representation of transcripts across the size spectrum and a coefficient of repeatability significantly better than that reported previously.

  4. Repair of DNA double-strand breaks and cell killing by charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Murakami, M.; Itsukaichi, H.; Fukutsu, K.; Yatagai, F.; Kanai, T.; Ohara, H.; Sato, K.

    It has been suggested that it is not simple double-strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks which correlate well with the high biological effectiveness of high LET radiations for cell killing. We have compared the effects of charged particles on cell death in 3 pairs of cell lines which are normal or defective in the repair of DNA dsbs. For the cell lines SL3-147, M10, and SX10 which are deficient in DNA dsb repair, RBE values were close to unity for cell killing induced by charged particles with linear energy transfer (LET) up to 200 keV/mum and were even smaller than unity for the LET region greater than 300 keV/mum. The inactivation cross section (ICS) increased with LET for all 3 pairs. The ICS of dsb repair deficient mutants was always larger than that of their parents for all the LET ranges, but with increasing LET the difference in ICS between the mutant and its parent became smaller. Since a small difference in ICS remained at LET of about 300 keV/mum, dsb repair may still take place at this high LET, even if its role is apparently small. These results suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role in protection against the attack of high LET radiations and that a main cause of cell death is non-reparable dsb which are produced at a higher yield compared with low LET radiations. No correlation was observed between DNA content or nuclear area and ICS.