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Sample records for by-2 tobacco cells

  1. Analyzing Cell Wall Elasticity After Hormone Treatment: An Example Using Tobacco BY-2 Cells and Auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy, and related nano-indentation techniques, is a valuable tool for analyzing the elastic properties of plant cell walls as they relate to changes in cell wall chemistry, changes in development, and response to hormones. Within this chapter I will describe a method for analyzing the effect of the phytohormone auxin on the cell wall elasticity of tobacco BY-2 cells. This general method may be easily altered for different experimental systems and hormones of interest.

  2. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  3. Isolation, characterization and functional analysis of a cdc48 homologue from tobacco BY-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhiling; YU Yi; LIU Lina; XIA Guixian

    2007-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was used to identify genes from tobacco BY-2 cells that may play roles in cell cycle regulation. A cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the yeast CDC48 was isolated and the gene was designated as NtCDC48.The cDNA contains an open reading frame coding for a predicted protein of 808 amino acids which comprises of two typical ATPase modules (aa 245-374 and aa 518-646). Overexpression of NtCDC48 in tobacco BY-2 cells led to an increase in the mitotic index as well as to the formation of diffused mitotic spindles. NtCDC48-GFP fusion proteins are distributed ubiquitously through G1 to M phases, yet their subcellular localization varied regularly along with the cell cycle progression. These results indicate that NtCDC48 may play an important role in the regulation of cell cycle in BY-2 cells.

  4. Femtosecond optoinjection of intact tobacco BY-2 cells using a reconfigurable photoporation platform.

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    Claire A Mitchell

    Full Text Available A tightly-focused ultrashort pulsed laser beam incident upon a cell membrane has previously been shown to transiently increase cell membrane permeability while maintaining the viability of the cell, a technique known as photoporation. This permeability can be used to aid the passage of membrane-impermeable biologically-relevant substances such as dyes, proteins and nucleic acids into the cell. Ultrashort-pulsed lasers have proven to be indispensable for photoporating mammalian cells but they have rarely been applied to plant cells due to their larger sizes and rigid and thick cell walls, which significantly hinders the intracellular delivery of exogenous substances. Here we demonstrate and quantify femtosecond optical injection of membrane impermeable dyes into intact BY-2 tobacco plant cells growing in culture, investigating both optical and biological parameters. Specifically, we show that the long axial extent of a propagation invariant ("diffraction-free" Bessel beam, which relaxes the requirements for tight focusing on the cell membrane, outperforms a standard Gaussian photoporation beam, achieving up to 70% optoinjection efficiency. Studies on the osmotic effects of culture media show that a hypertonic extracellular medium was found to be necessary to reduce turgor pressure and facilitate molecular entry into the cells.

  5. Effect of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Tobacco BY-2 Cell Suspension Culture

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    Rene Kizek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles, electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases or imaging (contrast agents. Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis — total protein content, thiols — reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension

  6. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tobacco BY-2 cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-12-20

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis - total protein content, thiols - reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  7. Metabolism of farnesyl diphosphate in tobacco BY-2 cells treated with squalestatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, M A; Wentzinger, L; Hemmerlin, A; Bach, T J

    2000-12-01

    Plant isoprenoids represent a large group of compounds with a wide range of physiological functions. In the cytosol, isoprenoids are synthesized via the classical acetate/mevalonate pathway. In this pathway, farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) occupies a central position, from which isoprene units are dispatched to the different classes of isoprenoids, with sterols as the major end products. The present work deals with effects of squalestatin (SQ) on the metabolism of FPP in proliferating and synchronized cultured tobacco cv. Bright Yellow-2 cells. SQ is a potent inhibitor of squalene synthase (SQS), the first committed enzyme in the sterol pathway. At nanomolar concentrations, SQ severely impaired cell growth and sterol biosynthesis, as attested by the rapid decrease in SQS activity. At the same time, it triggered a several-fold increase in both the enzymic activity and mRNA levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase. When SQ was added to cells synchronized by aphidicolin treatment, it was found to block the cell cycle at the end of G(1) phase, but no cell death was induced. Tobacco cells were also fed exogenous tritiated trans-trans farnesol, the allylic alcohol derived from FPP, in the presence and absence of SQ. Evidence is presented that this compound was incorporated into sterols and ubiquinone Q(10). In the presence of SQ, the sterol pathway was inhibited, but no increase in the radioactivity of ubiquinone was observed, suggesting that this metabolic channel was already saturated under normal conditions.

  8. Dynamics and roles of phragmoplast microfilaments in cell plate formation during cytokinesis of tobacco BY-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; ZHANG WenJie; BALUSKA Frantisek; MENZEL Diedrik; REN HaiYun

    2009-01-01

    The phragmoplast is a special apparatus that functions in establishing a cell plate in dividing plant cells.It is known that microfilaments (MFs) are involved in constituting phragmoplast structure, but the dynamic distribution and role of phragmoplast MFs are far from being understood. In this study, the precise structure and dynamics of MFs during the initiation and the late lateral expansion of the phragmoplast were observed by using a tobacco BY-2 cell line stably expressing the microfilament reporter construct GFP-f ABD2. Three-dimensional imaging showed that the phragmoplast MFs were initiated by two populations of MFs emerging between the reconstituting daughter nuclei at anaphase, which migrated to the mid-zone and gave rise to two layers of microfilament arrays. FM4-64 stained vesicles accumulated and fused with the cell plate between the two populations of MFs. The two layers of microfilament arrays of phragmoplast with ends overlapped always surrounded the centrifugally expanding cell plate. Partial disruption of MFs at metaphase by low concentration of latrunculin B resulted in the inhibition of the cell plate consolidation and the blockage of cell plate lateral expansion,whereas high concentration of latrunculin B restrained the progression of the cell cycle. Treating the cell after the initiation of phragmoplast led to the cease of the expansion of the cell plate. Our observations provide new insights into the precise structure and dynamics of phragmoplast MFs during cytokinesis and suggest that dynamic phragmoplast MFs are important in cell plate formation.

  9. [Effect of inhibitors serine/threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases on mitosis progression of synchronized tobacco by-2 cells].

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    Sheremet, Ia A; Emets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J-P; Blium, Ia B

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of various serine/ threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases in the regulation of mitosis progression in plant cells the influence of cyclin-dependent (olomoucine) and Ca2+ -calmodulin-dependent (W7) protein kinases inhibitors, as well as protein kinase C inhibitors (H7 and staurosporine) and protein phosphatases inhibitor (okadaic acid) on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells has been studied. It was found that BY-2 culture treatment with inhibitors of cyclin dependent protein kinases and protein kinase C causes prophase delay, reduces the mitotic index and displaces of mitotic peak as compare with control cells. Inhibition of Ca2+ -calmodulin dependent protein kinases enhances the cell entry into prophase and delays their exit from mitosis. Meanwhile inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases insignificantly enhances of synchronized BY-2 cells entering into all phases of mitosis.

  10. Involvement of DNA methylation in the control of cell growth during heat stress in tobacco BY-2 cells.

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    Centomani, Isabella; Sgobba, Alessandra; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Dipierro, Nunzio; Paradiso, Annalisa; De Gara, Laura; Dipierro, Silvio; Viggiano, Luigi; de Pinto, Maria Concetta

    2015-11-01

    The alteration of growth patterns, through the adjustment of cell division and expansion, is a characteristic response of plants to environmental stress. In order to study this response in more depth, the effect of heat stress on growth was investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells. The results indicate that heat stress inhibited cell division, by slowing cell cycle progression. Cells were stopped in the pre-mitotic phases, as shown by the increased expression of CycD3-1 and by the decrease in the NtCycA13, NtCyc29 and CDKB1-1 transcripts. The decrease in cell length and the reduced expression of Nt-EXPA5 indicated that cell expansion was also inhibited. Since DNA methylation plays a key role in controlling gene expression, the possibility that the altered expression of genes involved in the control of cell growth, observed during heat stress, could be due to changes in the methylation state of their promoters was investigated. The results show that the altered expression of CycD3-1 and Nt-EXPA5 was consistent with changes in the methylation state of the upstream region of these genes. These results suggest that DNA methylation, controlling the expression of genes involved in plant development, contributes to growth alteration occurring in response to environmental changes.

  11. Rhodococcus fascians infection accelerates progression of tobacco BY-2 cells into mitosis through rapid changes in plant gene expression.

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    Vandeputte, Olivier; Vereecke, Danny; Mol, Adeline; Lenjou, Marc; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2007-01-01

    * To characterize plant cell cycle activation following Rhodococcus fascians infection, bacterial impact on cell cycle progression of tobacco BY-2 cells was investigated. * S-phase-synchronized BY-2 cells were cocultivated with R. fascians and cell cycle progression was monitored by measuring mitotic index, cell cycle gene expression and flow cytometry parameters. Cell cycle alteration was further investigated by cDNA-AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism). * It was shown that cell cycle progression of BY-2 cells was accelerated only upon infection with bacteria whose virulence gene expression was induced by a leafy gall extract. Thirty-eight BY-2 genes showed a differential expression within 6 h post-infection. Among these, seven were previously associated with specific plant cell cycle phases (in particular S and G2/M phases). Several genes also showed a differential expression during leafy gall formation. * R. fascians-infected BY-2 cells provide a simple model to identify plant genes related to leafy gall development. R. fascians can also be regarded as a useful biotic agent to alter cell cycle progression and, thereby, gain a better understanding of cell cycle regulation in plants.

  12. Dihydrosphingosine-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Tobacco BY-2 Cells Is Independent of H2O2 Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christophe Lachaud; Patrice Thuleau; Daniel Da Silva; Nicolas Amelot; Chloé Béziat; Christian Brière; Valérie Cotelle; Annick Graziana; Sabine Grat; Christian Mazars

    2011-01-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0,DHS),one of the most abundant free sphingoid Long Chain Base (LCB) in plants,has been recently shown to induce both cytosolic and nuclear calcium transient increases and a correlated Programmed Cell Death (PCD) in tobacco BY-2 cells. In this study,in order to get deeper insight into the LCB signaling pathway leading to cell death,the putative role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) has been investigated. We show that DHS triggers a rapid dose-dependent production of H2O2 that is blocked by diphenyleniodonium (DPI),indicating the involvement of NADPH oxidase(s) in the process. In addition,while DPI does not block DHS-induced calcium increases,the ROS production is inhibited by the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker lanthanum (La3+). Therefore,ROS production occurs downstream of DHS-induced Ca2+ transients. Interestingly,DHS activates expression of defense-related genes that is inhibited by both La3+ and DPI. Since DPI does not prevent DHS-induced cell death,these results strongly indicate that DHS-induced H2O2 production is not implicated in PCD mechanisms but rather would be associated to basal cell defense mechanisms.

  13. Deciphering early events involved in hyperosmotic stress-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

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    Monetti, Emanuela; Kadono, Takashi; Tran, Daniel; Azzarello, Elisa; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Briand, Joël; Kawano, Tomonori; Mancuso, Stefano; Bouteau, François

    2014-03-01

    Hyperosmotic stresses represent one of the major constraints that adversely affect plants growth, development, and productivity. In this study, the focus was on early responses to hyperosmotic stress- (NaCl and sorbitol) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase, ion fluxes, and mitochondrial potential variations, and on their links in pathways leading to programmed cell death (PCD). By using BY-2 tobacco cells, it was shown that both NaCl- and sorbitol-induced PCD seemed to be dependent on superoxide anion (O2·(-)) generation by NADPH-oxidase. In the case of NaCl, an early influx of sodium through non-selective cation channels participates in the development of PCD through mitochondrial dysfunction and NADPH-oxidase-dependent O2·(-) generation. This supports the hypothesis of different pathways in NaCl- and sorbitol-induced cell death. Surprisingly, other shared early responses, such as [Ca(2+)]cyt increase and singlet oxygen production, do not seem to be involved in PCD.

  14. Effects of tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells.

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    Sheremet, Ya A; Yemets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J P; Blume, Ya B

    2012-01-01

    To test whether reversible tubulin phosphorylation plays any role in the process of plant mitosis the effects of inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, herbimycin A, genistein and tyrphostin AG 18, and of an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, sodium orthovanadate, on microtubule organization and mitosis progression in a synchronized BY-2 culture has been investigated. It was found that treatment with inhibitors of tyrosine kinases of BY-2 cells at the G2/M transition did not lead to visible disturbances of mitotic microtubule structures, while it did reduce the frequency of their appearance. We assume that a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation level could alter the microtubule dynamic instability parameters during interphase/prophase transition. All types of tyrosine kinase inhibitors used caused a prophase delay: herbimycin A and genistein for 2 h, and tyrphostin AG18 for 1 h. Thereafter the peak of mitosis was displaced for 1 h by herbimycin A or genistein exposure, but after tyrphostin AG18 treatment the timing of the mitosis-peak was comparable to that in control cells. Enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation induced by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor resulted in the opposite effect on BY-2 mitosis transition. Culture treatment with sodium orthovanadate during 1 h resulted in an accelerated start of the prophase and did not lead to the alteration in time of the mitotic index peak formation, as compared to control cells. We suppose that the reversible tyrosine phosphorylation can be involved in the regulation of interphase to M phase transition possibly through regulation of microtubule dynamics in plant cells.

  15. Involvement of NADPH oxidase NtrbohD in the rapid production of H2O2 induced by ABA in cultured tobacco cell line BY-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fushun Hao; Jinguang Zhang; Zhonglian Yu; Jia Chen

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms for the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced by abscisic acid (ABA) were investigated in suspension culture cells of tobacco BY-2 cells. The results showed that the immediate generation of H2O2, which was mainly derived from super-oxide dismutase-catalyzed dismutation of superoxide radical, was significantly induced by ABA. Furthermore, treatment of the cultured tobacco cells with ABA resulted in a time-dependent quick increase in plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase activity, which coincided on time and magnitude with the elevation in ABA-induced accumulation of H2O2. Moreover, these enhanced effects were pronouncedly inhibited by two NADPH oxidase inhibitors, diphenylene iodonium and imidazole, suggesting that PM NADPH oxidase is involved in the rapid accumulation of H2O2 in cultured tobacco cells. In addition, analysis of the expression level of NtrbohD, a PM NADPH oxidase gene in tobacco, by RT-PCR and protein gel blot revealed that the gene at both mRNA and protein levels was upregulated by ABA, indicating that NtrbohD participates in the ABA-stimulated rapid production of H2O2 in tobacco culture cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that ABA induces the rapid accumulation of reactive oxygen species via NADPH oxidase in suspension culture cells of tobacco, and that NADPH oxidase and H2O2 appear to be important components in ABA signal transduction pathway in plants.

  16. Proliferation of the Golgi apparatus in tobacco BY-2 cells during cell proliferation after release from the stationary phase of growth.

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    Abiodun, Moses; Matsuoka, Ken

    2013-08-01

    We have recently developed a new method aimed at mass photo-conversion of photo-convertible fluorescence protein (PFP) fluorescence in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells. Using this method we reported recently that the Golgi apparatus is generated by the de novo formation from ER and the division of pre-existing Golgi stacks with similar extents In this work we report that the proliferation of the Golgi apparatus in tobacco cells that enter the growing cycle from the non-dividing cycle is quite similar to that in rapidly growing cells and that de novo formation from the ER and division of pre-existing stacks seems to contribute almost equally to the proliferation.

  17. Appearance of actin microfilament 'twin peaks' in mitosis and their function in cell plate formation, as visualized in tobacco BY-2 cells expressing GFP-fimbrin.

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    Sano, Toshio; Higaki, Takumi; Oda, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Tomomi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2005-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton of higher plants plays an essential role in plant morphogenesis and in maintaining various cellular activities. In this study we established a tobacco BY-2 cell line, stably transformed with a GFP-fimbrin actin-binding domain (ABD) 2 construct, that allows visualization of actin microfilaments (MFs) in living cells. Using this cell line, designated BY-GF11, we performed time-sequential observations of MF dynamics during cell-cycle progression. Detailed analyses revealed the appearance of a broad MF band in the late G2 phase that separated to form a structure corresponding to the so-called actin-depleted zone (ADZ) in mitosis. In BY-GF11, the MF structure at the cell cortex in mitosis appeared to form two bands rather than the ADZ. Measurements of fluorescent intensities of the cell cortex indicated an MF distribution that resembled two peaks, and we therefore named the structure MF 'twin peaks' (MFTP). The cell plate formed exactly within the valley between the MFTP at cytokinesis, and this cell-plate guidance was distorted by disruption of the MFTP by an inhibitor of actin polymerization. These results suggest that the MFTP originates from the broad MF band in the G2 phase and functions as a marker of cytokinesis.

  18. Possible Involvement of NADPH Oxidase in Lanthanide Cation-Induced Superoxide Anion Generation in BY-2 Tobacco Cell Suspension Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Shengchang

    2006-01-01

    A rapid and concentration-dependent generation of superoxide anion (·O-2), measured with a superoxide-specific Cypridina luciferin-derived chemiluminescent reagent, was observed when two lanthanide salts (LaCl3 and GdCl3) were added to tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell suspension culture.Addition of superoxide dismutase (480 U·ml-1) and Tiron (5 μmol·L-1) to cell culture suspension decreases the level of lanthanide cation-induced ·O-2 generation, suggesting that ·O-2 generation is extra-cellular.Pretreatment of the cell culture suspension with diphenyleneiodonium (10 and 50 μmol·L-1), quinacrine (1 and 5 mmol·L-1) and imidazol (10 mmol·L-1), inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, notably inhibits the generation of superoxide induced by lanthanide cation, implying the possible involvement of activation of NADPH oxidase.In addition, addition of SHAM (1 and 5 mmol·L-1), azide (0.2 and 1 mmol·L-1), inhibitor of peroxidase, has no influence on ·O-2 generation.

  19. An S-type anion channel SLAC1 is involved in cryptogein-induced ion fluxes and modulates hypersensitive responses in tobacco BY-2 cells.

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    Takamitsu Kurusu

    Full Text Available Pharmacological evidence suggests that anion channel-mediated plasma membrane anion effluxes are crucial in early defense signaling to induce immune responses and hypersensitive cell death in plants. However, their molecular bases and regulation remain largely unknown. We overexpressed Arabidopsis SLAC1, an S-type anion channel involved in stomatal closure, in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells and analyzed the effect on cryptogein-induced defense responses including fluxes of Cl(- and other ions, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, gene expression and hypersensitive responses. The SLAC1-GFP fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in BY-2 cells. Overexpression of SLAC1 enhanced cryptogein-induced Cl(- efflux and extracellular alkalinization as well as rapid/transient and slow/prolonged phases of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production, which was suppressed by an anion channel inhibitor, DIDS. The overexpressor also showed enhanced sensitivity to cryptogein to induce downstream immune responses, including the induction of defense marker genes and the hypersensitive cell death. These results suggest that SLAC1 expressed in BY-2 cells mediates cryptogein-induced plasma membrane Cl(- efflux to positively modulate the elicitor-triggered activation of other ion fluxes, ROS as well as a wide range of defense signaling pathways. These findings shed light on the possible involvement of the SLAC/SLAH family anion channels in cryptogein signaling to trigger the plasma membrane ion channel cascade in the plant defense signal transduction network.

  20. Live-Cell Imaging of Dual-Labeled Golgi Stacks in Tobacco BY-2 Cells Reveals Similar Behaviors for Different Cisternae during Movement and Brefeldin A Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie L. Madison; Andreas Nebenführ

    2011-01-01

    In plant cells,the Golgi apparatus consists of numerous stacks that,in turn,are composed of several flattened cisternae with a clear cis-to-trans polarity.During normal functioning within living cells,this unusual organelle displays a wide range of dynamic behaviors such as whole stack motility,constant membrane flux through the cisternae,and Golgi enzyme recycling through the ER.In order to further investigate various aspects of Golgi stack dynamics and integrity,we co-expressed pairs of established Golgi markers in tobacco BY-2 cells to distinguish sub-compartments of the Golgi during monensin treatments,movement,and brefeldin A (BFA)-induced disassembly.A combination of cis and trans markers revealed that Golgi stacks remain intact as they move through the cytoplasm.The Golgi stack orientation during these movements showed a slight preference for the cis side moving ahead,but trans cisternae were also found at the leading edge.During BFA treatments,the different sub-compartments of about half of the observed stacks fused with the ER sequentially; however,no consistent order could be detected.In contrast,the ionophore monensin resulted in swelling of trans cisternae while medial and particularly cis cisternae were mostly unaffected.Our results thus demonstrate a remarkable equivalence of the different cisternae with respect to movement and BFA-induced fusion with the ER.In addition,we propose that a combination of dual-label fluorescence microscopy and drug treatments can provide a simple alternative approach to the determination of protein localization to specific Golgi sub-compartments.

  1. Development of an optimized tetracycline-inducible expression system to increase the accumulation of interleukin-10 in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells

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    Bortesi Luisa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cell suspension cultures can be used for the production of valuable pharmaceutical and industrial proteins. When the recombinant protein is secreted into the culture medium, restricting expression to a defined growth phase can improve both the quality and quantity of the recovered product by minimizing proteolytic activity. Temporal restriction is also useful for recombinant proteins whose constitutive expression affects cell growth and viability, such as viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10. Results We have developed a novel, tetracycline-inducible system suitable for tobacco BY-2 suspension cells which increases the yields of vIL-10. The new system is based on a binary vector that is easier to handle than conventional vectors, contains an enhanced inducible promoter and 5′-UTR to improve yields, and incorporates a constitutively-expressed visible marker gene to allow the rapid and straightforward selection of the most promising transformed clones. Stable transformation of BY-2 cells with this vector, without extensive optimization of the induction conditions, led to a 3.5 fold increase in vIL-10 levels compared to constitutive expression in the same host. Conclusions We have developed an effective and straightforward molecular farming platform technology that improves both the quality and the quantity of recombinant proteins produced in plant cells, particularly those whose constitutive expression has a negative impact on plant growth and development. Although we tested the platform using vIL-10 produced in BY-2 cells, it can be applied to other host/product combinations and is also useful for basic research requiring strictly controlled transgene expression.

  2. Growth phase-dependent expression of proteins with decreased plant-specific N-glycans and immunogenicity in tobacco BY2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Plants possess some desirable characteristics to synthesize recombinant glycoproteins for pharma-ceutical application.However,the mammalian glycoproteins produced in plants are somewhat different from their natural counterparts in terms of N-glycoforms.The immunogenicity of plant-specific glyco-epitopes is the major concern in human therapy.Here,the distribution of N-glycans in different growth phases of tobacco BY2 cells and their immunogenicity in mice were determined.It was ob-served that the percentage of β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose in proteins of growing cells increased and the corresponding protein extracts caused accelerated immune response in mice.Based on this observation,the recombinant erythropoietin in BY2 cells was expressed and characterized,and Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant erythropoietin contained a relatively small amount of plant-specific glyco-epitopes in the early phase of culture growth.This study may provide a simple but effective strategy for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins with human-like N-glycan structures in plant hosts to avoid a great allergenic risk.

  3. 双氯芬酸对烟草BY-2细胞呼吸代谢的影响%Effect of Diclofenac on Respiratory Metabolism of Tobacco BY-2 Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉亭; 程丹丹; 刘美君; 高辉远

    2014-01-01

    Diclofenac is a new kind of global environmental pollutant, inlfuencing the growth and development of plants seriously. However, it has not been elucidated the mechanism by which the diclofenac inhibits plant growth. In order to explore the inhibition mechanism, in this study, we explored the effect of diclofenac on re-spiratory metabolism and metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tobacco BY-2 cells. The results showed that after treated with diclofenac for 1 d, the growth of tobacco BY-2 cell was signiifcantly inhibited, a burst and overproduction of ROS in the BY-2 cell were induced, which promoted death of the BY-2 cells. Di-clofenac treatment instantly inhibited the respiration of the BY-2 cell, the EMP, TCA, PPP respiration pathway and the respiratory electron transport via COX and AOX were inhibited by the diclofenac treatment. Diclofenac might inhibit respiratory electron transport and the inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory electron transport chain caused electrons leaking from respiratory electron transport chain, which accelerated generation of ROS, and the inhibition of respiratory electron transport also caused feedback inhibition of respiratory carbon meta-bolic pathways, disordering substance metabolism and energy metabolism in the BY-2 cell, this is one of the important reasons of diclofenac to inhibit the growth and induce death of the BY-2 cells.%双氯芬酸是一种新的全球性环境污染物,严重影响植物的生长发育,但其作用机制至今尚不清楚。本研究从双氯芬酸对烟草BY-2细胞呼吸代谢和活性氧代谢的影响入手,探讨双氯芬酸抑制植物细胞生长的作用机理。结果表明,双氯芬酸处理1 d后,显著抑制了烟草BY-2细胞的生长,引起细胞内活性氧(ROS)的爆发和积累,并导致烟草BY-2细胞死亡。双氯芬酸对烟草BY-2细胞的糖酵解途径(EMP)、三羧酸循环(TCA)和戊糖磷酸途径(PPP)三个碳代谢途径以及细胞色素氧化

  4. Polarized localization and borate-dependent degradation of the Arabidopsis borate transporter BOR1 in tobacco BY-2 cells [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/kv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Yamauchi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis the borate transporter BOR1, which is located in the plasma membrane, is degraded in the presence of excess boron by an endocytosis-mediated mechanism. A similar mechanism was suggested in rice as excess boron decreased rice borate transporter levels, although in this case whether the decrease was dependent on an increase in degradation or a decrease in protein synthesis was not elucidated. To address whether the borate-dependent degradation mechanism is conserved among plant cells, we analyzed the fate of GFP-tagged BOR1 (BOR1-GFP in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells. Cells expressing BOR1-GFP displayed GFP fluorescence at the plasma membrane, especially at the membrane between two attached cells. The plasma membrane signal was abolished when cells were incubated in medium with a high concentration of borate (3 to 5 mM. This decrease in BOR1-GFP signal was mediated by a specific degradation of the protein after internalization by endocytosis from the plasma membrane. Pharmacological analysis indicated that the decrease in BOR1-GFP largely depends on the increase in degradation rate and that the degradation was mediated by a tyrosine-motif and the actin cytoskeleton. Tyr mutants of BOR1-GFP, which has been shown to inhibit borate-dependent degradation in Arabidopsis root cells, did not show borate-dependent endocytosis in tobacco BY-2 cells. These findings indicate that the borate-dependent degradation machinery of the borate transporter is conserved among plant species.

  5. Evidence that proliferation of golgi apparatus depends on both de novo generation from the endoplasmic reticulum and formation from pre-existing stacks during the growth of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiodun, Moses Olabiyi; Matsuoka, Ken

    2013-04-01

    In higher plants, the numbers of cytoplasmic-distributed Golgi stacks differ based on function, age and cell type. It has not been clarified how the numbers are controlled, whether all the Golgi apparatus in a cell function equally and whether the increase in Golgi number is a result of the de novo formation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or fission of pre-existing stacks. A tobacco prolyl 4-hydroxylase (NtP4H1.1), which is a cis-Golgi-localizing type II membrane protein, was tagged with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, mKikGR (monomeric Kikume green red), and expressed in tobacco bright yellow 2 (BY-2) cells. Transformed cells were exposed to purple light to convert the fluorescence from green to red. A time-course analysis after the conversion revealed a progressive increase in green puncta and a decrease in the red puncta. From 3 to 6 h, we observed red, yellow and green fluorescent puncta corresponding to pre-existing Golgi; Golgi containing both pre-existing and newly synthesized protein; and newly synthesized Golgi. Analysis of the number and fluorescence of Golgi at different phases of the cell cycle suggested that an increase in Golgi number with both division and de novo synthesis occurred concomitantly with DNA replication. Investigation with different inhibitors suggested that the formation of new Golgi and the generation of Golgi containing both pre-existing and newly synthesized protein are mediated by different machineries. These results and modeling based on quantified results indicate that the Golgi apparatuses in tobacco BY-2 cells are not uniform and suggest that both de novo synthesis from the ER and Golgi division contribute almost equally to the increase in proliferating cells.

  6. 烟草赤星病菌代谢产物诱导的烟草BY-2细胞ROS爆发和ATP损耗%ROS Burst and ATP Depletion in Tobacco BY-2 Cells Induced by Metabolic Products of Alternaria alternata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程丹丹; 孙学娟; 高辉远; 杨程; 张立涛; 孟庆伟

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探讨赤星病菌代谢产物(metabolic product s of AIternaria alternata,MP)对烟草BY-2细胞活性氧(reactive oxygen species,ROS)产生和ATP含量的影响以及产生这种影响的原因.[方法]用10%MP处理烟草BY-2细胞,用氧电极检测不同MP处理时间后,烟草BY-2细胞呼吸速率和呼吸途径的变化,同时分析BY-2细胞内BO产生和ATP含量等的变化.[结果]MP处理导致了烟草BY-2细胞HO爆发和ATP含量下降,此外,MP处理也导致了烟草BY-2细胞总呼吸速率、细胞色素途径(cytochrome pathway)和交替氧化酶途径(AOX)的下降,并且造成线粒体通透转换孔道(permeability transition pore,PTP)开放和细胞色素c释放.[结论]MP对BY-2细胞呼吸速率和细胞色素途径的抑制不可避免地导致胞内ATP含量下降,此外MP诱导的烟草BY-2细胞氧化磷酸化的解偶联作用是MP导致胞内ATP含量下降的另一重要原因.而MP对AOX途径的抑制则是诱导胞内ROS爆发的重要原因.%[Objective] The objective of this study is to explore the effect of the Alternaria alternata metabolic products (MP) on changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and ATP content in the tobacco BY-2 cells. [ Method] 10% MP was used to treat tobacco BY-2 cells, and Oxytherm oxygen electrode was used to study the effects of MP on the reparation rate and reparation pathway in the tobacco BY-2 cells. The changes of ROS production and ATP content in tobacco BY-2 cells was also studied. [ Result] Treatment with the MP led to remarkable overproduction of ROS, rapid depletion of ATP, significant declines in respiration, in cytochrome pathway and in alternative oxidase pathway (AOX). The treatment with MP also resulted in uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytoplasm in tobacco BY-2 cells. [Conclusion] The inhibition of respiration and cytochrome pathway inevitably result in ATP

  7. The Plastidial 2-C-Methyl-d-Erythritol 4-Phosphate Pathway Provides the Isoprenyl Moiety for Protein Geranylgeranylation in Tobacco BY-2 Cells[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Esther; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Hartmann, Michael; Heintz, Dimitri; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée; Mutterer, Jérôme; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Boronat, Albert; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rohmer, Michel; Crowell, Dring N.; Bach, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Protein farnesylation and geranylgeranylation are important posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. We visualized in transformed Nicotiana tabacum Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells the geranylgeranylation and plasma membrane localization of GFP-BD-CVIL, which consists of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the C-terminal polybasic domain (BD) and CVIL isoprenylation motif from the Oryza sativa calmodulin, CaM61. Treatment with fosmidomycin (Fos) or oxoclomazone (OC), inhibitors of the plastidial 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, caused mislocalization of the protein to the nucleus, whereas treatment with mevinolin, an inhibitor of the cytosolic mevalonate pathway, did not. The nuclear localization of GFP-BD-CVIL in the presence of MEP pathway inhibitors was completely reversed by all-trans-geranylgeraniol (GGol). Furthermore, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose (DX) reversed the effects of OC, but not Fos, consistent with the hypothesis that OC blocks 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthesis, whereas Fos inhibits its conversion to 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate. By contrast, GGol and DX did not rescue the nuclear mislocalization of GFP-BD-CVIL in the presence of a protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 inhibitor. Thus, the MEP pathway has an essential role in geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) biosynthesis and protein geranylgeranylation in BY-2 cells. GFP-BD-CVIL is a versatile tool for identifying pharmaceuticals and herbicides that interfere either with GGPP biosynthesis or with protein geranylgeranylation. PMID:19136647

  8. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/yx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hartmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL. By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1, shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL.

  9. Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... countries. Picture warnings work Hard-hitting anti-tobacco advertisements and graphic pack warnings – especially those that include ... in tobacco products poses major health, economic and security concerns around the world. It is estimated that ...

  10. Is Tobacco Smoke a Germ-Cell Mutagen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although no international organization exists to declare whether an agent is a germ-cell mutagen, tobacco smoke may be a human germ-cell mutagen. In the mouse, tobacco smoke induces a significant increase in the mutation frequency at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus....

  11. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2af

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hartmann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL. By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1, shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL.

  12. Modes of exocytotic and endocytotic events in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandmann, Vera; Kreft, Marko; Homann, Ulrike

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the kinetics and size of single exo- and endocytotic events in BY-2 protoplasts, we employed cell-attached membrane capacitance measurements. These measurements revealed different modes of fusion and fission of single vesicles. In about half of the observed exocytotic events, fusion occurred transiently, which facilitates rapid recycling of vesicles. In addition, transient sequential or multi-vesicular exocytosis observed in some recordings can contribute to an increase in efficiency of secretory product release. Microscopic analysis of the timescale of cellulose and pectin deposition in protoplasts demonstrates that rebuilding of the cell wall starts soon after isolation of protoplasts and that transient fusion events can fully account for secretion of the required soluble material. The capacitance measurements also allowed us to investigate formation of the fusion pore. We speculate that regulation of secretion may involve control of the length and/or size of fusion pore opening. Together, the different kinetic modes of exo- and endocytosis revealed by capacitance measurements underline the complexity of this process in plants and provide a basis for future research into the underlying mechanisms. The fact that similar fusion/fission kinetics are present in plant and animal cells suggests that many of these mechanisms are highly conserved among eukaryotes.

  13. Modes of Exocytotic and Endocytotic Events in Tobacco BY-2 Protoplasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vera Bandmann; Marko Kreft; Ulrike Homann

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the kinetics and size of single exo- and endocytotic events in BY-2 protoplasts,we employed cell-attached membrane capacitance measurements. These measurements revealed different modes of fusion and fission of single vesicles. In about half of the observed exocytotic events,fusion occurred transiently,which facilitates rapid recycling of vesicles. In addition,transient sequential or multi-vesicular exocytosis observed in some recordings can contribute to an increase in efficiency of secretory product release. Microscopic analysis of the timescale of cellulose and pectin deposition in protoplasts demonstrates that rebuilding of the cell wall starts soon after isolation of protoplasts and that transient fusion events can fully account for secretion of the required soluble material. The capacitance measurements also allowed us to investigate formation of the fusion pore. We speculate that regulation of secretion may involve control of the length and/or size of fusion pore opening. Together,the different kinetic modes of exo- and endocytosis revealed by capacitance measurements underline the complexity of this process in plants and provide a basis for future research into the underlying mechanisms. The fact that similar fusion/fission kinetics are present in plant and animal cells suggests that many of these mechanisms are highly conserved among eukaryotes.

  14. 嗜碱单胞菌的新型羧基转移酶α亚基基因Aa-accA及其抗盐碱性能%A novel gene (Aa-accA) encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyltransferase α-subunit of Alkalimonas amylolytica N10 enhances salt and alkali tolerance of Escherichia coli and tobacco BY-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    羡明杰; 翟磊; 仲乃琴; 马祎玮; 薛燕芬; 马延和

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) catalyzes the first step of fatty acid synthesis.In most bacteria,ACC is composed of four subunits encoded by accA,accB,accC,and accD.Of them,accA encodes acetyl-CoA carboxyltransferase α-subunit.Our prior work on proteomics of Alkalimonas amylolytica N10 showed that the expression of the Aa-accA has a remarkable response to salt and alkali stress.This research aimed to find out the Aa-accA gene contributing to salt and alkali tolerance.[Methods] The Aa-accA was amplified by PCR from A.amylolytica N10 and expressed in E.coli K12 host.The effects of Aa-accA expression on the growth of transgenic strains were examined under different NaC1 concentration and pH conditions.Transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells harboring Aa-accA were also generated via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.The viability of BY-2 cells was determined with FDA staining method after salt and alkali shock.[Results] The Aa-accA gene product has 318 amino acids and is homologous to the carboxyl transferase domain of acyl-CoA carboxylases.It showed 76% identity with AccA (acetyl-CoA carboxylase carboxyltransferase subunit alpha) from E.coli.Compared to the wild-type strains,transgenic E.coli K12 strain containing Aa-accA showed remarkable growth superiority when grown in increased NaCl concentrations and pH levels.The final cell density of the transgenic strains was 2.6 and 3.5 times higher than that of the control type when they were cultivated in LB medium containing 6% (W/V) NaCl and at pH 9,respectively.Complementary expression of Aa-accA in an accA-depletion E.coli can recover the tolerance of K12△accA to salt and alkali stresses to some extent.Similar to the transgenic E.coli,transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells showed higher percentages of viability compared to the wild BY-2 cells under the salt or alkali stress condition.[Conclusion] We found that Aa-accA from A.amylolytica N10 overexpression enhances the tolerance of both transgenic E.coli and tobacco BY-2

  15. Tobacco constituents are mitogenic for arterial smooth-muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Hefton, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP) purified from flue-cured tobacco leaves, tar-derived material (TAR), the water soluble, nondialyzable, delipidized extract of cigarette smoke condensate, rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, but not adventitial fibroblasts. The mitogenicity appears to depend on polyphenol epitopes on carrier molecules. Ellagic acid, another plant polyphenol, inhibited arterial smooth-muscle proliferation. These results suggest that a number of ubiquitous, plant-derived substances may influence smooth-muscle cell proliferation in the arterial wall.

  16. Lethal impacts of cigarette smoke in cultured tobacco cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawano Tomonori

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to understand and generalize the toxic mechanism of cigarette smoke in living cells, comparison of the data between animal systems and other biological system such as microbial and plant systems is highly beneficial. Objective By employing the tobacco cells as model materials for cigarette smoke toxicity assay, the impacts of the combustion by-products such as nitrogen oxides could be highlighted as the toxic impacts of the plant-derived endogenous chemicals could be excluded in the plant cells. Methods Cigarette smoke-induced cell death was assessed in tobacco cell suspension cultures in the presence and absence of pharmacological inhibitors. Results Cigarette smoke was effective in induction of cell death. The smoke-induced cell death could be partially prevented by addition of nitric oxide (NO scavenger, suggesting the role for NO as the cell death mediator. Addition of NO donor to tobacco cells also resulted in development of partial cell death further confirming the role of NO as cell death mediator. Members of reactive oxygen species and calcium ion were shown to be protecting the cells from the toxic action of smoke-derived NO.

  17. Conjugated polymer nanoparticles for effective siRNA delivery to tobacco BY-2 protoplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verchot Jeanmarie

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS is a mechanism harnessed by plant biologists to knock down gene expression. siRNAs contribute to PTGS that are synthesized from mRNAs or viral RNAs and function to guide cellular endoribonucleases to target mRNAs for degradation. Plant biologists have employed electroporation to deliver artificial siRNAs to plant protoplasts to study gene expression mechanisms at the single cell level. One drawback of electroporation is the extensive loss of viable protoplasts that occurs as a result of the transfection technology. Results We employed fluorescent conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CPNs to deliver siRNAs and knockdown a target gene in plant protoplasts. CPNs are non toxic to protoplasts, having little impact on viability over a 72 h period. Microscopy and flow cytometry reveal that CPNs can penetrate protoplasts within 2 h of delivery. Cellular uptake of CPNs/siRNA complexes were easily monitored using epifluorescence microscopy. We also demonstrate that CPNs can deliver siRNAs targeting specific genes in the cellulose biosynthesis pathway (NtCesA-1a and NtCesA-1b. Conclusions While prior work showed that NtCesA-1 is a factor involved in cell wall synthesis in whole plants, we demonstrate that the same gene plays an essential role in cell wall regeneration in isolated protoplasts. Cell wall biosynthesis is central to cell elongation, plant growth and development. The experiments presented here shows that NtCesA is also a factor in cell viability. We show that CPNs are valuable vehicles for delivering siRNAs to plant protoplasts to study vital cellular pathways at the single cell level.

  18. Comparative analysis of the plant mRNA-destabilizing element, DST, in mammalian and tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrügge, M; Arizti, P; Sullivan, M L; Zamore, P D; Belasco, J G; Green, P J

    2002-05-01

    The labile SAUR transcripts from higher plants contain a conserved DST sequence in their 3'-untranslated regions. Two copies of a DST sequence from soybean are sufficient to destabilize reporter transcripts in cultured tobacco cells whereas variants bearing mutations in the conserved ATAGAT or GTA regions are inactive. To investigate the potential for conserved recognition components in mammalian and plant cells, we examined the function of this instability determinant in mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts and tobacco BY2 cells. In fibroblasts, a tetrameric DST element from soybean accelerated deadenylation and decay of a reporter transcript. However, a version mutated in the ATAGAT region was equally effective in this regard, and a tetrameric DST element from Arabidopsis was inactive. In contrast, the soybean DST element was more active as an mRNA instability element than the mutant version and the Arabidopsis element, when tested as tetramers in tobacco cells. Hence, the plant DST element is not recognized in animal cells with the same sequence requirements as in plant cells. Therefore, its mode of recognition appears to be plant-specific.

  19. Inhibition of Sterol Biosynthesis by 2-Isopropyl-4-dimethylamino-5-methylphenyl-1-piperidine Carboxylate Methyl Chloride in Tobacco and Rat Liver Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T J; Paleg, L G

    1972-03-01

    2-Isopropyl-4-dimethylamino-5-methylphenyl-1-piperidine carboxylate methyl chloride, 90%, applied to rootless tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samson) seedlings inhibits the incorporation of (14)C-mevalonate into sterols. Concomitantly, the retardant causes the accumulation of squalene-2,3-epoxide, an intermediate in sterol biosynthesis. The results with tobacco are identical to those produced by the retardant in cell-free rat liver preparations.

  20. Stable expression of a thermostable xylanase of Clostridium thermocellum in cultured tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Mizutani, Tomomi; Sakka, Kazuo; Ohmiya, Kunio

    2003-01-01

    Two distinct domains of the xynA gene from Clostridium thermocellum encoding a xylanase catalytic domain (XynAl) and a xylanase catalytic domain with a cellulose binding domain (XynA2) under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were electroporated into cultured tobacco BY-2 cells. Transgenic BY -2 calli expressing xylan-hydrolyzing activity were obtained at high frequency for both genes. Western blot analysis using an anti-XynA antibody indicated that XynAl and XynA2 were produced in these calli.

  1. Sidestream tobacco smoke is a male germ cell mutagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; Williams, Andrew; Polyzos, Aris; Berndt-Weis, M Lynn; Yauk, Carole L

    2011-08-02

    Active cigarette smoking increases oxidative damage, DNA adducts, DNA strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and heritable mutations in sperm. However, little is known regarding the effects of second-hand smoke on the male germ line. We show here that short-term exposure to mainstream tobacco smoke or sidestream tobacco smoke (STS), the main component of second-hand smoke, induces mutations at an expanded simple tandem repeat locus (Ms6-hm) in mouse sperm. We further show that the response to STS is not linear and that, for both mainstream tobacco smoke and STS, doses that induced significant increases in expanded simple tandem repeat mutations in sperm did not increase the frequencies of micronucleated reticulocytes and erythrocytes in the bone marrow and blood of exposed mice. These data show that passive exposure to cigarette smoke can cause tandem repeat mutations in sperm under conditions that may not induce genetic damage in somatic cells. Although the relationship between noncoding tandem repeat instability and mutations in functional regions of the genome is unclear, our data suggest that paternal exposure to second-hand smoke may have reproductive consequences that go beyond the passive smoker.

  2. Cryopreservation of transformed and wild-type Arabidopsis and tobacco cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Margit; Murray, James A H

    2004-02-01

    We have recently described Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures that can be effectively synchronised. Here, we describe procedures that allow clonal-transformed cell suspension lines to be produced using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and an optimised and straightforward procedure for the cryopreservation and recovery of both parental and transformed lines. Frozen cultures show 90% viability and rapid re-growth after recovery. We show that the cryopreservation procedure is equally applicable to the frequently used tobacco bright yellow (BY)2 cell suspension culture, and that cell cycle synchronisation capacity of parental lines is maintained after both transformation and recovery from cryopreservation. The techniques require no specialised equipment, and are suitable for routine laboratory use, greatly facilitating the handling and maintenance of cell cultures and providing security against both contamination and cumulative somaclonal variation. Finally, the ability to store easily large numbers of transformed lines opens the possibility of using Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures for high-throughput analysis.

  3. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  4. ANALYSIS OF ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM OF TOBACCO CELLS USING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Radochová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Image analysis techniques for preprocessing, segmentation and estimation of geometrical characteristics of fiber-like structures from 2-D or 3-D images captured by a confocal microscope are presented. Methods are demonstrated on fiber-like biological structure: endoplasmic reticulum (ER of tobacco cells. In the presented analysis of 2-D images of ER before and after the treatment of latrunculin B, ER and ER tubules were segmented and the area density of ER as well as the length density of ER tubules in the cell cortical layer were estimated by automatic image analysis algorithms. Images of 3-D arrangement of ER were reconstructed and rendered by various visualization techniques.

  5. Synergism of herpes simplex virus and tobacco-specific N'-nitrosamines in cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, N.H.; Dokko, H.; Li, S.L.; Cherrick, H.M. (UCLA School of Dentistry (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Previous studies indicate that herpes simplex virus (HSV) enhances the carcinogenic activity of smokeless tobacco and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens in animals. Since tobacco-specific N'-nitrosamines (TSNAs) such as N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) and 4-(N-methyl-N'-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) are major chemical carcinogens of smokeless tobacco and are known to be responsible for the development of oral cancers in smokeless tobacco users, the combined effects of TSNAs and HSV in cell transformation were investigated. Exposure of cells to NNN or NNK followed by virus infection resulted in a significant enhancement of transformation frequency when compared with that observed with chemical carcinogens or virus alone. This study suggests that TSNAs and HSV can interact together and show synergism in cell transformation.

  6. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengke eLiu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  7. Operation of an efficient site-specific recombination system of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onouchi, H; Yokoi, K; Machida, C; Matsuzaki, H; Oshima, Y; Matsuoka, K; Nakamura, K; Machida, Y

    1991-12-11

    Recombinase encoded by the R gene of pSR1 of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii mediates reciprocal recombination between two specific recombination sites (RSs) to induce excision or inversion of the DNA segment that is flanked by the RSs. We report here that site-specific recombination mediated by this system takes place effeciently in tobacco cells. To monitor the recombination events in tobacco cells, we have constructed two types of cryptic beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in such a way that recombination such as inversion of the construct or excision of the intervening sequence results in their expression. When these cryptic reporter constructs were transiently introduced together with the R gene by electroporation into protoplasts of tobacco cells, beta-glucuronidase activity was detected. The cryptic reporter genes, when stably resident in the chromosome of tobacco cells, were also activated by the R gene. Structural analyses of the genomic DNA isolated from these tobacco cells showed that the R protein did in fact catalyze precise recombination between two copies of RSs in tobacco cells, with resultant activation of the cryptic reporter genes. This observation provides the basis for development of a DNA technology whereby large regions of DNA can be manipulated in plant chromosomes. Potential uses of this recombination system are discussed.

  8. Initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA Fragmentation patterns depend on linear energy transfer in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts irradiated with helium, carbon and neon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yuichiro; Yamada, Shinya; Hase, Yoshihiro; Shikazono, Naoya; Narumi, Issay; Tanaka, Atsushi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    The ability of ion beams to kill or mutate plant cells is known to depend on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions, although the mechanism of damage is poorly understood. In this study, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were quantified by a DNA fragment-size analysis in tobacco protoplasts irradiated with high-LET ions. Tobacco BY-2 protoplasts, as a model of single plant cells, were irradiated with helium, carbon and neon ions having different LETs and with gamma rays. After irradiation, DNA fragments were separated into sizes between 1600 and 6.6 kbp by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Information on DNA fragmentation was obtained by staining the gels with SYBR Green I. Initial DSB yields were found to depend on LET, and the highest relative biological effectiveness (about 1.6) was obtained at 124 and 241 keV/microm carbon ions. High-LET carbon and neon ions induced short DNA fragments more efficiently than gamma rays. These results partially explain the large biological effects caused by high-LET ions in plants.

  9. Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Tobacco Smoke Condensate Inhibits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway.

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    Nathaniel Holcomb

    Full Text Available Exposure to tobacco smoke is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Although the DNA damaging properties of tobacco smoke have been well documented, relatively few studies have examined its effect on DNA repair pathways. This is especially true for the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway which recognizes and removes many structurally diverse DNA lesions, including those introduced by chemical carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on NER in human lung cells. We studied the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, a surrogate for tobacco smoke, on the NER pathway in two different human lung cell lines; IMR-90 lung fibroblasts and BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. To measure NER, we employed a slot-blot assay to quantify the introduction and removal of UV light-induced 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. We find a dose-dependent inhibition of 6-4 photoproduct repair in both cell lines treated with CSC. Additionally, the impact of CSC on the abundance of various NER proteins and their respective RNAs was investigated. The abundance of XPC protein, which is required for functional NER, is significantly reduced by treatment with CSC while the abundance of XPA protein, also required for NER, is unaffected. Both XPC and XPA RNA levels are modestly reduced by CSC treatment. Finally, treatment of cells with MG-132 abrogates the reduction in the abundance of XPC protein produced by treatment with CSC, suggesting that CSC enhances proteasome-dependent turnover of the protein that is mediated by ubiquitination. Together, these findings indicate that tobacco smoke can inhibit the same DNA repair pathway that is also essential for the removal of some of the carcinogenic DNA damage introduced by smoke itself, increasing the DNA damage burden of cells exposed to tobacco smoke.

  10. Genotoxic Effects of Tobacco on Buccal Epithelium: Cell Nuclear Anomalies as Biomarker

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    Sohini Das Biswas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco use has toxic effects on different organs. This study was carried out to assess the effect of indigenous tobacco both in smoking (bidi and smokeless (gutkha, zarda and khaini forms on buccal cells at chromosomal level, through assessment of different nuclear anomalies as biomarker. Methods:This study was done on people living in Durgapur and its adjacent areas, West Bengal, India during January to July 2011. The samples were collected from 50 smokers (case group, 50 smokeless tobacco consumers or chewers (case group and 50 non-tobacco consumers (control group. Micronucleus assay was used to assess buccal cell nuclear changes. Buccal smears collected from study subjects were prepared on a grease free slide. Prepared slides were observed under light microscope and 2 to 5 fields were observed randomly for counting the different anomalies. In each field, the frequency of each anomaly was assessed in 100 cells and reported with percentage. Results:Chewers had significantly the highest frequency of all nuclear anomalies compared to smokers and healthy controls (HCs. Smokers also had significantly more anomalies compared to HCs. Condensed chromatin (CC, karyolysis (KL and bi-nucleation (BN in chewers and CC, pyknosis and BN in smokers were the most frequent anomalies. KL was significantly more frequent in chewers compared to smokers (59.8 ± 6.4 vs. 24.2 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001, however, the frequency of other nuclear anomalies were not significantly different in these two study groups. Presence of each nuclear anomaly was significantly greater in older ages in all study groups. Conclusion:Tobacco can cause and increase the rate of nuclear anomalies in both smoking and smokeless forms compared to HCs. The genotoxic effects of tobacco on buccal cells are partly age-related. Cell nuclear anomalies in buccal tissue can be used as biomarker indicating the detrimental effects of tobacco.

  11. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Calcium-stimulated Serine Transport into Tobacco Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ivan K.

    1978-01-01

    The transport of serine into tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cultured in liquid medium was examined. Transport was inhibited approximately 50% by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, indoleacetic acid, α-naphthalene acetic acid, and kinetin at a concentration of 10 micrograms per milliliter. Transport was not inhibited by 2,6-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and inhibited less than 25% by p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid at this concentration. Removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid from the transport medium resulted in an alleviation of inhibition. Gibberellic acid at concentrations from 2 to 20 micrograms per milliliter stimulated transport. It was previously shown that inhibition of transport by La3+ was due to removal of Ca2+ from surface sites and inhibition of Ca2+ uptake by cells. None of the growth regulators tested had any significant effect on Ca2+ binding and/or transport. A contributing factor to the low transport rates in the absence of Ca2+ is the increased rate of serine efflux. None of the growth regulators tested had any significant effect on the rate of serine efflux. PMID:16660646

  12. Transient expression of P-type ATPases in tobacco epidermal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression in tobacco cells is a convenient method for several purposes such as analysis of protein-protein interactions and the subcellular localization of plant proteins. A suspension of Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells carrying the plasmid of interest is injected into the intracellular...... for example protein-protein interaction studies. In this chapter, we describe the procedure to transiently express P-type ATPases in tobacco epidermal cells, with focus on subcellular localization of the protein complexes formed by P4-ATPases and their β-subunits....

  13. Hydrogen peroxide production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the fusaric acid-induced programmed cell death in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jiao; Sun, Ling; Zhou, Benguo; Gao, Zhengliang; Hao, Yu; Zhu, Xiaoping; Liang, Yuancun

    2014-08-15

    Fusaric acid (FA), a non-specific toxin produced mainly by Fusarium spp., can cause programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. The mechanism underlying the FA-induced PCD was not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and mitochondrial function in the FA-induced PCD. Tobacco suspension cells were treated with 100 μM FA and then analyzed for H2O2 accumulation and mitochondrial functions. Here we demonstrate that cells undergoing FA-induced PCD exhibited H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, and a decrease of the catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities. Pre-treatment of tobacco suspension cells with antioxidant ascorbic acid and NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyl iodonium significantly reduced the rate of FA-induced cell death as well as the caspase-3-like protease activity. Moreover, FA treatment of tobacco cells decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content. Oligomycin and cyclosporine A, inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP synthase and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, respectively, could also reduce the rate of FA-induced cell death significantly. Taken together, the results presented in this paper demonstrate that H2O2 accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are the crucial events during the FA-induced PCD in tobacco suspension cells.

  14. Assessment of Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticide Residues in Cigarette Tobacco with a Novel Cell Biosensor

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    Spiridon Kintzios

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The conventional analysis of pesticide residues in analytical commodities, such as tobacco and tobacco products is a labor intensive procedure, since it is necessary to cover a wide range of different chemicals, using a single procedure. Standard analysis methods include extensive sample pretreatment (with solvent extraction and partitioning phases and determination by GC and HPLC to achieve the necessary selectivity and sensitivity for the different classes of compounds under detection. As a consequence, current methods of analysis provide a limited sample capacity. In the present study, we report on the development of a novel cell biosensor for detecting organophosphate and carbamate pesticide residues in tobacco. The sensor is based on neuroblastoma N2a cells and the measurement of changes of the cell membrane potential, according to the working principle of the Bioelectric Recognition Assay (BERA. The presence of pesticide residues is detected by the degree of inhibition of acetylcholine esterase (AChE. The sensor instantly responded to both the organophoshate pesticide chlorpyriphos and the carbamate carbaryl in a concentration-dependent pattern, being able to detect one part per billion (1 ppb. Additionally, tobacco leaf samples (in blended dry form were analyzed with both the novel biosensor and conventional methods, according to a double-blind protocol. Pesticide residues in tobacco samples caused a considerable cell membrane hyperpolarization to neuroblastoma cells immobilized in the sensor, as indicated by the increase of the negative sensor potential, which was clearly distinguishable from the sensor’s response against pesticide-free control samples. The observed response was quite reproducible, with an average variation of +5,6%. Fluorescence microscopy observations showed that treatment of the cells with either chlorpyrifos or carbaryl was associated with increased [Ca2+]cyt . The novel biosensor offers fresh

  15. Conjugation of the mycotoxins alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in tobacco suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Andreas A; Kohn, Beate N; Pfeiffer, Erika; Wefers, Daniel; Metzler, Manfred; Bunzel, Mirko

    2015-05-20

    The mycotoxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol-9-O-methyl ether (AME) carry three and two phenolic hydroxyl groups, respectively, which makes them candidates for the formation of conjugated metabolites in plants. Such conjugates may escape routine methods of analysis and have therefore been termed masked or, more recently, modified mycotoxins. We report now that AOH and AME are extensively conjugated in suspension cultures of tobacco BY-2 cells. Five conjugates of AOH were identified by MS and NMR spectroscopy as β-D-glucopyranosides (attached in AOH 3- or 9-position) as well as their 6'-malonyl derivatives, and as a gentiobiose conjugate. For AME, conjugation resulted in the d-glucopyranoside (mostly attached in the AME 3-position) and its 6'- and 4'-malonyl derivatives. Pronounced differences were noted for the quantitative pattern of AOH and AME conjugates as well as for their phytotoxicity. Our in vitro study demonstrates for the first time that masked mycotoxins of AOH and AME can be formed in plant cells.

  16. A role for fibroblasts in mediating the effects of tobacco-induced epithelial cell growth and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Boysen, Megan; Sun, Chung Ho; Wong, Brian J F; Kang, Mo K; Park, No-Hee; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Krtolica, Ana

    2008-07-01

    Cigarette smoke and smokeless tobacco extracts contain multiple carcinogenic compounds, but little is known about the mechanisms by which tumors develop and progress upon chronic exposure to carcinogens such as those present in tobacco products. Here, we examine the effects of smokeless tobacco extracts on human oral fibroblasts. We show that smokeless tobacco extracts elevated the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen, oxidative DNA damage, and DNA double-strand breaks in a dose-dependent manner. Extended exposure to extracts induced fibroblasts to undergo a senescence-like growth arrest, with striking accompanying changes in the secretory phenotype. Using cocultures of smokeless tobacco extracts-exposed fibroblasts and immortalized but nontumorigenic keratinocytes, we further show that factors secreted by extracts-modified fibroblasts increase the proliferation and invasiveness of partially transformed epithelial cells, but not their normal counterparts. In addition, smokeless tobacco extracts-exposed fibroblasts caused partially transformed keratinocytes to lose the expression of E-cadherin and ZO-1, as well as involucrin, changes that are indicative of compromised epithelial function and commonly associated with malignant progression. Together, our results suggest that fibroblasts may contribute to tumorigenesis indirectly by increasing epithelial cell aggressiveness. Thus, tobacco may not only initiate mutagenic changes in epithelial cells but also promote the growth and invasion of mutant cells by creating a procarcinogenic stromal environment.

  17. Histone deacetylation is required for progression through mitosis in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Butenko, Yana; Grafi, Gideon

    2005-02-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histone proteins play a key role in chromatin structure and function. Here, we study histone post-translational modifications during reentry of protoplasts derived from tobacco mesophyll cells into the cell cycle and evaluate their significance for progression through mitosis. Methylation of histone H3 at lysine residues 4 and 9 persisted in chromosomes during all phases of the cell cycle. However, acetylation of H4 and H3 was dramatically reduced during mitosis in a stage-specific manner; while deacetylation of histone H4 commenced at prophase and persisted up to telophase, histone H3 remained acetylated up to metaphase but was deacetylated at anaphase and telophase. Phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 was initiated at prophase, concomitantly with deacetylation of histone H4, and persisted up to telophase. Preventing histone deacetylation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) led to accumulation of protoplasts at metaphase-anaphase, and reduced S10 phosphorylation during anaphase and telophase; in cultured tobacco cells, TSA significantly reduced the frequency of mitotic figures. Our results indicate that deacetylation of histone H4 and H3 in tobacco protoplasts occurs during mitosis in a phase-specific manner, and is important for progression through mitosis.

  18. Inhibition of cell proliferation, cell expansion and differentiation by the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereterbide, A; Hernould, M; Castera, S; Mouras, A

    2001-11-01

    Plant development depends upon the control of growth, organization and differentiation of cells derived from shoot and root meristems. Among the genes involved in flower organ determination, the cadastral gene SUPERMAN controls the boundary between whorls 3 and 4 and the growth of the adaxial outer ovule integument by down-regulating cell divisions. To determine the precise function of this gene we overexpressed ectopically the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. SUPERMAN gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). The transgenic plants exhibited a dwarf phenotype. Histologically and cytologically detailed analyses showed that dwarfism is correlated with a reduction in cell number, which is in agreement with the SUPERMAN function in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, a reduction in cell expansion and an impairment of cell differentiation were observed in tobacco organs. These traits were observed in differentiated vegetative and floral organs but not in meristem structures. A potential effect of the SUPERMAN transcription factor in the control of gibberellin biosynthesis is discussed.

  19. Resistance to acetohydroxamate acquired by slow adaptive increases in urease in cultured tobacco cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, T.; Filner, P.

    1981-06-01

    Urease activity of tobacco XD cells (1U cells) had undergone a 4-fold increase (4U cells) during a year of growth on urea. A clone of 4U cells gave rise to 12U cells during another year of growth on urea. The doubling time of 12U cells on urea is 2.2 days, compared to about 4 days for 1U cells, while 1U and 12U cells double in 2 days on nitrate. Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), a specific inhibitor/reversible inactivator of jack bean urease, affects tobacco cells urease similarly. Fifty per cent inhibition of growth by AHA occurred at 20 micromolar in 1U cells growing on urea and at 165 micromolar in 12U cells growing on urea, but at 600 micromolar for either 1U or 12U cells growing on nitrate. When 12U cells were grown on urea with 100 micromolar AHA, extractable urease activity decreased 80% within 2.5 hours and remained at this level for 2 weeks; the doubling time increased to 3.7 days, and intracellular urea rose 2-fold, compared to 12U cells grown on urea without AHA. Urease of 12U cells inactivated by AHA in vivo could be reactivated to its pre-AHA level by incubation at 30 C after extraction and separation from free AHA. AHA inhibited incorporation of /sup 15/N from (/sup 15/N) urea into Kjeldahl nitrogen in the cells, in spite of the increased intracellular urea. These results indicate that AHA acts primarily by inhibiting urease action, rather than by inhibition of formation of urease protein or of uptake of urea. Because 12U cells are 8 times more tolerant of AHA than 1U cells, it is likely that growth on urea in the presence of AHA should select strongly for cells with high urease.

  20. Hemicellulose biosynthesis and degradation in tobacco cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compier, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural fibres have a wide range of technological applications, such as in paper and textile industries. The basic properties and the quality of plant fibres are determined by the composition of the plant cell wall. Characteristic for fibres are thick secondary cell walls, which consist of cellulose

  1. Interleukin-16-producing NK cells and T-cells in the blood of tobacco smokers with and without COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anders Andersson,1,* Carina Malmhäll,2,* Birgitta Houltz,1 Sara Tengvall,1 Margareta Sjöstrand,2 Ingemar Qvarfordt,1 Anders Lindén,3 Apostolos Bossios2 1Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Krefting Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3Unit for Lung and Airway Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Long-term exposure to tobacco smoke causes local inflammation in the airways that involves not only innate immune cells, including NK cells, but also adaptive immune cells such as cytotoxic (CD8+ and helper (CD4+ T-cells. We have previously demonstrated that long-term tobacco smoking increases extracellular concentration of the CD4+-recruiting cytokine interleukin (IL-16 locally in the airways. Here, we hypothesized that tobacco smoking alters IL-16 biology at the systemic level and that this effect involves oxygen free radicals (OFR.Methods: We quantified extracellular IL-16 protein (ELISA and intracellular IL-16 in NK cells, T-cells, B-cells, and monocytes (flow cytometry in blood samples from long-term tobacco smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and in never-smokers. NK cells from healthy blood donors were stimulated with water-soluble tobacco smoke components (cigarette smoke extract with or without an OFR scavenger (glutathione in vitro and followed by quantification of IL-16 protein.Results: The extracellular concentrations of IL-16 protein in blood did not display any substantial differences between groups. Notably, intracellular IL-16 protein was detected in all types of blood leukocytes. All long-term smokers displayed

  2. Arabidopsis and Tobacco superman regulate hormone signalling and mediate cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibau, Candida; Di Stilio, Verónica S; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana superman (SUP) plays an important role during flower development by maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels in the inner two whorls. It was proposed that SUP maintains this boundary by regulating cell proliferation in both whorls, as loss-of-function superman mutants produce more stamens at the expense of carpels. However, the cellular mechanism that underlies SUP function remains unknown. Here Arabidopsis or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SUP was overexpressed in tobacco plants to substantiate SUP's role as a regulator of cell proliferation and boundary definition and provide evidence that its biological role may be mediated via hormonal changes. It was found that moderate levels of SUP stimulated cell growth and proliferation, whereas high levels were inhibitory. SUP stimulated auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes, and cells overexpressing SUP displayed reduced hormone dependency for proliferation and regeneration into plants. SUP also induced proliferation of female traits in the second and third flower whorls and promoted differentiation of petaloid properties in sepals, further supporting a role for SUP as a boundary regulator. Moreover, cytokinin suppressed stamen development and promoted differentiation of carpeloid tissues, suggesting that SUP may regulate male and female development via its effect on cytokinin signalling. Taken together, these observations suggest a model whereby the effect of SUP on cell growth and proliferation involves the modulation of auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes. Furthermore, differential SUP expression or different sensitivities of different cell types to SUP may determine whether SUP stimulates or suppresses their proliferation.

  3. Increased of Langerhans Cells in Smokeless Tobacco-Associated Oral Mucosal Lesions

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    and Eacute;rica Dorigatti de and Aacute;vila

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the changes in the number of Langerhans Cells (LC observed in the epithelium of smokeless tobacco (SLT-induced lesions. Methods: Microscopic sections from biopsies carried out in the buccal mucosa of twenty patients, who were chronic users of smokeless tobacco (SLT, were utilized. For the control group, twenty non-SLT users of SLT with normal mucosa were selected. The sections were studied with routine coloring and were immunostained for S-100, CD1a, Ki-67 and p63. These data were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test to investigate the differences in the expression of immune markers in normal mucosa and in SLT-induced leukoplakia lesions. Results: There was a significant difference in the immunolabeling of all markers between normal mucosa and SLT-induced lesions (p<0.001. The leukoplakia lesions in chronic SLT users demonstrated a significant increase in the number of Langerhans cells and in the absence of epithelial dysplasia. Conclusion: The increase in the number of these cells represents the initial stage of leukoplakia. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 85-93

  4. Expression of Chlamydomonas actin-gfp fusion gene in to-bacco suspension cell and polymerization of the actin-gfp protein in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fusion gene of actin (cDNA of Chlamydo- monas reinhardtii) and green fluorescence protein (gfp) had been constructed into two expression vectors which could be expressed in E. coli and tobacco suspension cells BY2. The correct expression was observed in E. coli and BY2 with a fluorescence microscopy. The fusion protein, which took part in the membrane skeleton, was mainly located peripherally along the membrane, specially the fusion protein was dis-tributed around nucleus and cell plate, while the fusion pro-tein also forms F-actin in the cell. The fusion protein was purified from Bl21plus by ammonium sulfate fractionation, ion exchange chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The purified production could polymerize into F-actin when the actin polymerizing buffer was added. It was demonstrated that the characteristics and function of actin in Chlamydomonas was similar with those of animals and higher plants.

  5. Evaluation of cytomorphometric changes in tobacco users and diagnosed oral squamous cell carcinoma individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urmila Udayashankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the cellular and nuclear area of keratinocytes in smears obtained from the oral mucosa of tobacco users, those with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, and from normal healthy persons and resolve if any significant difference exists in these three groups. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 100 subjects 20 controls, (40 OSCC patients-20 from lesional sites and 20 from nonlesional sites, 20 tobacco smokers and 20 tobacco chewers in the age group of 25-75 years. Oral mucosal smears obtained by using a cytobrush were stained with Papanicolaou (PAP stain and using 20X objective in trinocular Olympus model BX53 with Jenoptik scientific grade-dedicated microphotographic camera images were taken. With ProgRes version 8.0 image analysis software, 20 cells with defined borders were evaluated from each slide. Finally, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to compare the above parameters in the studied groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Minitab and Excel software were used to analyze the data. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the above parameters in the studied groups. Results: The mean value of the cell area for groups I, II, III, IV, and V were 2838 ± 275.2, 2762.1 ± 511.4, 2861.9 ± 512.9, 2643.8 ± 333.3, and 3064.3 ± 362.7, respectively, the nuclear area (NA was 83.88 ± 9.86, 106.19 ± 13.45, 95.11 ± 14.24, 85.55 ± 21.11, and 80.83 ± 13.45, respectively, and nuclear-to-cellular (N:C ratio was 0.0297, 0.03924, 0.0337, 0.03257, and 0.02678, respectively. Conclusions: Thus, our study elucidates that cytomorphology gauges the effect of tobacco on the oral mucosa and possibly establishes a link between premalignant and malignant transformations even before a lesion is visibly noted.

  6. Prevention of copper-induced calcium influx and cell death by prion-derived peptide in suspension-cultured tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Kuse, Masaki; Isobe, Minoru; Bouteau, François; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    Impact of copper on the oxidative and calcium signal transductions leading to cell death in plant cells and the effects of the copper-binding peptide derived from the human prion protein (PrP) as a novel plant-protecting agent were assessed using a cell suspension culture of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell line BY-2) expressing the aequorin gene. Copper induces a series of biological and chemical reactions in plant cells including the oxidative burst reflecting the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radicals, and stimulation of calcium channel opening, allowing a transient increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations. The former was proven by the action of specific ROS scavengers blocking the calcium responses and the latter was proven by an increase in aequorin luminescence and its inhibition by specific channel blockers. Following these early events completed within 10 min, the development of copper-induced cell death was observed during additional 1 h in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of a synthetic peptide (KTNMKHMA) corresponding to the neurotoxic sequence in human PrP, prior to the addition of copper, effectively blocked both calcium influx and cell death induced by copper. Lastly, a possible mechanism of peptide action and future applications of this peptide in the protection of plant roots from metal toxicity or in favour of phytoremediation processes are discussed.

  7. Induction of H2AX phosphorylation in pulmonary cells by tobacco smoke: a new assay for carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, A P; Huang, X; Jorgensen, E; Yang, J; Gietl, D; Traganos, F; Darzynkiewicz, Z

    2004-08-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially carcinogenic lesions. The induction of DSBs triggers phosphorylation of histone H2AX. Phosphorylated H2AX, denoted p-H2AX, may be detected immunocytochemically and the intensity of p-H2AX immunofluorescence (IF) reveals the frequency of DSBs. Using this assay we tested whether the exposure of A549 human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells to tobacco smoke, and normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) to tobacco smoke condensate, induces DSBs. Cellular p-H2AX IF and DAPI fluorescence of individual cells were measured by laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Exposure of A549 cells to tobacco smoke and NHBE cells to smoke condensate led to H2AX phosphorylation in both a time and dose dependent manner. The maximal rate of H2AX phosphorylation was seen during the initial 4h of cell treatment. At high doses (50 microg/ml of smoke condensate), H2AX phosphorylation continued to increase for up to 24h. No differences in the level of H2AX phosphorylation were apparent between cells in G(1) vs S vs G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle in response to treatment with smoke condensate. The data provide strong evidence that exposure of A549 cells to tobacco smoke or NHBE cells to smoke condensate rapidly induces DSBs in these cells. The present assay to detect and measure DSBs induced by tobacco products complements other mutagenicity assays and may be applied to test potential carcinogens in other products.

  8. Evaluation of Parameters in the Isolation of Viable Protoplasts from Cultured Tobacco Cells 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Murashige, Toshio

    1974-01-01

    A systematic evaluation disclosed the following conditions to be optimum for the isolation of viable protoplasts from cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum L. `Bright Yellow' grown in liquid suspensions: (a) the cell culture in the early phase of cell number increase, (b) an enzyme mixture of 1% cellulase “Onozuka” and 0.2% Macerozyme, (c) an enzyme solution pH of 4.7 or 5.7, (d) a 2- to 3-hr incubation period, (e) 5 ml of enzyme solution per 500 mg cells and contained in a 50-ml Delong flask, (f) agitation on a gyrotory shaker at 50 rpm, and (g) 0.3 to 0.8 m mannitol as osmoticum in the cell enzyme mixture. The incubation temperature may be varied from 22 to 37 C. The procedure enabled 30% of the tobacco cells to form protoplasts, 80% of which regenerated cell walls in 4 days and 40% resumed cell division activity when returned to cell culture medium. Images PMID:16659004

  9. Expression, intracellular targeting and purification of HIV Nef variants in tobacco cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baschieri Selene

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants may represent excellent alternatives to classical heterologous protein expression systems, especially for the production of biopharmaceuticals and vaccine components. Modern vaccines are becoming increasingly complex, with the incorporation of multiple antigens. Approaches towards developing an HIV vaccine appear to confirm this, with a combination of candidate antigens. Among these, HIV-Nef is considered a promising target for vaccine development because immune responses directed against this viral protein could help to control the initial steps of viral infection and to reduce viral loads and spreading. Two isoforms of Nef protein can be found in cells: a full-length N-terminal myristoylated form (p27, 27 kDa and a truncated form (p25, 25 kDa. Here we report the expression and purification of HIV Nef from transgenic tobacco. Results We designed constructs to direct the expression of p25 and p27 Nef to either the cytosol or the secretory pathway. We tested these constructs by transient expression in tobacco protoplasts. Cytosolic Nef polypeptides are correctly synthesised and are stable. The same is not true for Nef polypeptides targeted to the secretory pathway by virtue of a signal peptide. We therefore generated transgenic plants expressing cytosolic, full length or truncated Nef. Expression levels were variable, but in some lines they averaged 0.7% of total soluble proteins. Hexahistidine-tagged Nef was easily purified from transgenic tissue in a one-step procedure. Conclusion We have shown that transient expression can help to rapidly determine the best cellular compartment for accumulation of a recombinant protein. We have successfully expressed HIV Nef polypeptides in the cytosol of transgenic tobacco plants. The proteins can easily be purified from transgenic tissue.

  10. Effects of air pollutants on plant cell tissue cultures. [Tobacco, rose soybean, periwinkle, and morning glory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine morphological and physiological effects of air pollutants on plant tissue cultures. Several cultures will be exposed to polluted atmospheres for various periods and observed for effects. The cultures which have been developed for this purpose are: tobacco pith, rose stem, soybean stem, periwinkle, and morning glory. Exposures will follow two regimens: a relatively high concentration of pollutant for a short duration and a low concentration for a long duration. Effects of pollutants on cell morphology will be observed microscopically. Effects on cell physiology may include altered respiratory quotients which will be determined by Warburg respirometry techniques. The design of an apparatus that is being developed to mix a pollutant with air and deliver it to the cultures is described.

  11. Solubilization, partial purification, and immunodetection of squalene synthetase from tobacco cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, K; Chappell, J

    1992-01-01

    Squalene synthetase, an integral membrane protein and the first committed enzyme for sterol biosynthesis, was solubilized and partially purified from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell suspension cultures. Tobacco microsomes were prepared and the enzyme was solubilized from the lipid bilayer using a two-step procedure. Microsomes were initially treated with concentrations of octyl-beta-d-thioglucopyranoside and glycodeoxycholate below their critical micelle concentration, 4.5 and 1.1 millimolar, respectively, to remove loosely associated proteins. Complete solubilization of the squalene synthetase enzyme activity was achieved after a second treatment at detergent concentrations above or at their critical micelle concentration, 18 and 2.2 millimolar, respectively. The detergent-solubilized enzyme was further purified by a combination of ultrafiltration, gel permeation, and Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography anion exchange. A 60-fold purification and 20% recovery of the enzyme activity was achieved. The partially purified squalene synthetase protein was used to generate polyclonal antibodies from mice that efficiently inhibited synthetase activity in an in vitro assay. The apparent molecular mass of the squalene synthetase protein as determined by immunoblot analysis of the partially purified squalene synthetase protein separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was 47 kilodaltons. The partially purified squalene synthetase activity was optimal at pH 6.0, exhibited a K(m) for farnesyl diphosphate of 9.5 micromolar, and preferred NADPH as a reductant rather than NADH.

  12. Effects of Tobacco Smoke (TS) on Growth of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position , policy...males than in females1. Tobacco smoking (TS), obesity , hypertension, and age are established risk factors for ccRCC development1. Despite the well...several papers . NDRI is able to procure tissues from patients with known status of smoking and additional information such as BMI and history of

  13. MOLECULAR PHENOTYPING OF LIGNIN-MODIFIED TOBACCO REVEALS ASSOCIATED CHANGES IN CELL WALL METABOLISM, PRIMARY METABOLISM, STRESS METABOLISM AND PHOTORESPIRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin is an important component of secondary thickened cell walls. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) are two key enzymes catalyzing the penultimate and last step in the biosynthesis of the monolignols. Down-regulation of CCR in tobacco has been shown to reduce l...

  14. Evaluation of micronucleus frequency in oral exfoliated buccal mucosa cells of smokers and tobacco chewers: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Agrawal

    2016-08-01

    Results: The mean number of micronuclei was 18.5+/-9.5 in tobacco chewers, 19.1+/-9.2 in chewers with smoking habit and 8.2+/-5.6 in controls. Bonferroni multiple comparisons amongst these three groups showed the mean difference of micronuclei to be highly significant when chewers and chewers with smoking habit were compared to controls. Similarly based on the duration of addiction, a highly significant difference was noted in no. of micronucleated cells in subjects addicted to tobacco for more than 15 years. Conclusions: Tobacco can cause and increase the rate of nuclear anomalies in both smoking and smokeless forms. Thus oral mucosal micronuclei frequency can be used as a marker of epithelial carcinogenic progression. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3130-3133

  15. Apoptosis Induced by High Concentrations of Nicotinamide in Tobacco Suspension Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贵友; 朱瑞宇; 戴尧仁

    2004-01-01

    As an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), nicotinamide has a restraining effect on apoptosis at certain low concentrations. In our present study, apoptosis induced by high concentrations of nicotinamide was observed in tobacco suspension cells. When cells were preincubated with 250 mmol/L nicotinamide for 24 h, the hallmarks of apoptosis were detected, including DNA fragments increasing in size by multiples of 180-200 bp, the condensation and peripheral distribution of nuclear chromatin, and a positive reaction to the TUNEL assay. At the same time, the degradation of PARP and the reduction in the potential of the inner membrane of mitochondria appeared in apoptotic cells induced by high concentrations of nicotinamide. This result indicates that apoptosis induced by high concentrations of nicotinamide is associated with caspase-3-like activity and with the opening of mitochondrial permeability pores. These results partially support the hypothesis that high concentrations of PARP inhibitor could force cells to enter an apoptotic pathway by delay of DNA repair in replicating cells.

  16. NtSCP1 from tobacco is an extracellular serine carboxypeptidase III that has an impact on cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Manuela Désirée; Delannoy, Mélanie; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2012-03-01

    The leaf extracellular space contains several peptidases, most of which are of unknown function. We isolated cDNAs for two extracellular serine carboxypeptidase III genes from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), NtSCP1 and NtSCP2, belonging to a phylogenetic clade not yet functionally characterized in plants. NtSCP1 and NtSCP2 are orthologs derived from the two ancestors of tobacco. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that NtSCP1 and NtSCP2 are expressed in root, stem, leaf, and flower tissues. Expression analysis of the β-glucuronidase reporter gene fused to the NtSCP1 transcription promoter region confirmed this expression profile. Western blotting of NtSCP1 and expression of an NtSCP1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein showed that the protein is located in the extracellular space of tobacco leaves and culture cells. Purified His-tagged NtSCP1 had carboxypeptidase activity in vitro. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing NtSCP1 showed a reduced flower length due to a decrease in cell size. Etiolated seedlings of these transgenic plants had shorter hypocotyls. These data provide support for a role of an extracellular type III carboxypeptidase in the control of cell elongation.

  17. Assessment of cultivation factors that affect biomass and geraniol production in transgenic tobacco cell suspension cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Vasilev

    Full Text Available A large-scale statistical experimental design was used to determine essential cultivation parameters that affect biomass accumulation and geraniol production in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN cell suspension cultures. The carbohydrate source played a major role in determining the geraniol yield and factors such as filling volume, inoculum size and light were less important. Sucrose, filling volume and inoculum size had a positive effect on geraniol yield by boosting growth of plant cell cultures whereas illumination of the cultures stimulated the geraniol biosynthesis. We also found that the carbohydrates sucrose and mannitol showed polarizing effects on biomass and geraniol accumulation. Factors such as shaking frequency, the presence of conditioned medium and solubilizers had minor influence on both plant cell growth and geraniol content. When cells were cultivated under the screened conditions for all the investigated factors, the cultures produced ∼ 5.2 mg/l geraniol after 12 days of cultivation in shaking flasks which is comparable to the yield obtained in microbial expression systems. Our data suggest that industrial experimental designs based on orthogonal arrays are suitable for the selection of initial cultivation parameters prior to the essential medium optimization steps. Such designs are particularly beneficial in the early optimization steps when many factors must be screened, increasing the statistical power of the experiments without increasing the demand on time and resources.

  18. Power loss analysis of n-PASHA cells validated by 2D simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, G.J.M.; Gutjahr, A.; Burgers, A.R.; Saynova, D.S.; Cesar, I.; Romijn, I.G.

    2013-10-15

    To reach >21% efficiency for the n-Pasha (passivated all sides H-pattern) cell of ECN, reliable power-loss analyses are essential. A power-loss analysis is presented that is based on experimental data but validated and completed by 2D simulations. The analysis is used to identify the key factors that will contribute most to achieving >21% efficiency.

  19. Chloride regulates leaf cell size and water relations in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Navarro, Juan D; Brumós, Javier; Rosales, Miguel A; Cubero-Font, Paloma; Talón, Manuel; Colmenero-Flores, José M

    2016-02-01

    Chloride (Cl(-)) is a micronutrient that accumulates to macronutrient levels since it is normally available in nature and actively taken up by higher plants. Besides a role as an unspecific cell osmoticum, no clear biological roles have been explicitly associated with Cl(-) when accumulated to macronutrient concentrations. To address this question, the glycophyte tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Habana) has been treated with a basal nutrient solution supplemented with one of three salt combinations containing the same cationic balance: Cl(-)-based (CL), nitrate-based (N), and sulphate+phosphate-based (SP) treatments. Under non-saline conditions (up to 5 mM Cl(-)) and no water limitation, Cl(-) specifically stimulated higher leaf cell size and led to a moderate increase of plant fresh and dry biomass mainly due to higher shoot expansion. When applied in the 1-5 mM range, Cl(-) played specific roles in regulating leaf osmotic potential and turgor, allowing plants to improve leaf water balance parameters. In addition, Cl(-) also altered water relations at the whole-plant level through reduction of plant transpiration. This was a consequence of a lower stomatal conductance, which resulted in lower water loss and greater photosynthetic and integrated water-use efficiency. In contrast to Cl(-), these effects were not observed for essential anionic macronutrients such as nitrate, sulphate, and phosphate. We propose that the abundant uptake and accumulation of Cl(-) responds to adaptive functions improving water homeostasis in higher plants.

  20. Sterol and sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis during a growth cycle of tobacco cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, J; Von Lanken, C; Vögeli, U; Bhatt, P

    1989-05-01

    The accumulation and biosynthesis of sterols and fungal elicitor-inducible sesquiterpenoids by tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cell suspension cultures were examined as a function of a 10 day culture cycle. Sterols accumulated concomitantly with fresh weight gain. The rate of sterol biosynthesis, measured as the incorporation rate of [(14)C]acetate and [(3)H]mevalonate, was maximal when the cultures entered into their rapid phase of growth. Changes in squalene synthetase enzyme activity correlated more closely with thein vivo synthesis rate and accumulation of sterols than 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme activity. Cell cultures entering into the rapid phase of growth also responded maximally to fungal elicitor as measured by the production of capsidiol, an extracellular sesquiterpenoid. However, the rate of sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis, measured as the incorporation rate of [(14)C]acetate and [(3)H]mevalonate, could not be correlated with elicitor-inducible HMGR or sesquiterpene cyclase enzyme activities, nor elicitor-suppressible squalene synthetase enzyme activity.

  1. Silver(I Ions Ultrasensitive Detection at Carbon Electrodes―Analysis of Waters, Tobacco Cells and Fish Tissues

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    Sona Krizkova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We used carbon paste electrodes and a standard potentiostat to detect silver ions. The detection limit (3 Signal/Noise ratio was estimated as 0.5 μM. A standard electrochemical instrument microanalysis of silver(I ions was suggested. As a working electrode a carbon tip (1 mL or carbon pencil was used. Limits of detection estimated by dilution of a standard were 1 (carbon tip or 10 nM (carbon pencil. Further we employed flow injection analysis coupled with carbon tip to detect silver(I ions released in various beverages and mineral waters. During first, second and third week the amount of silver(I ions releasing into water samples was under the detection limit of the technique used for their quantification. At the end of a thirteen weeks long experiment the content of silver(I ions was several times higher compared to the beginning of release detected in the third week and was on the order of tens of nanomoles. In subsequent experiments the influence of silver(I ions (0, 5 and 10 μM on a plant model system (tobacco BY-2 cells during a fourday exposition was investigated. Silver(I ions were highly toxic to the cells, which was revealed by a double staining viability assay. Moreover we investigated the effect of silver(I ions (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 and 2.5 μM on guppies (Poecilia reticulata. Content of Ag(I increased with increasing time of the treatment and applied concentrations in fish tissues. It can be concluded that a carbon tip or carbon pencil coupled with a miniaturized potentiostat can be used for detection of silver(I ions in environmental samples and thus represents a small, portable, low cost and easy-to-use instrument for such purposes.

  2. Alteration in buccal mucosal cells due to the effect of tobacco and alcohol by assessing the silver-stained nucleolar organiser regions and micronuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Jindal

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Tobacco and alcohol consumption produce alteration in apparently normal buccal mucosal cells, which may cumulatively lead to carcinomatous changes. Result of these changes may be used as educational tool in cessation of habits.

  3. Further observations on cell-wall formation around isolated protoplasts of tobacco and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, J H; Grout, B W

    1978-01-01

    Freeze-etch observations of protoplasts isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) mesophyll tissue and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) fruit locule tissue are described which clarify earlier observations (Burgess, J., Fleming, E.N., Planta 131, 173-178, 1976; Planta 133, 267-273, 1977), obtained using scanning electron microscopy. of "fibres" associated with "projections" from these cell surfaces. It is demonstrated (1) that the "fibres" consist of bundles of small numbers of microfibrils which have become artifactually thickened by the deposition of coating materials, and (2) that the apparent association between "fibres" and "projections" results from microfibrils being lifted preferentially from protoplast surfaces in regions rich in "projections" (plasmalemmasomes). With the higher resolution available using freeze-etching it can be demonstrated that microfibril deposition does not occur in discontinuous zones on these protoplast surfaces. Globules associated with microfibril termini in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) roots are illustrated and it is proposed that turgor pressure differences between isolated protoplasts and intact tissue may account for the absence of similar globules from isolated protoplast surfaces.

  4. Over-expression of Arabidopsis CAP causes decreased cell expansion leading to organ size reduction in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Roberto A; Umeda, Masaaki; Yamamura, Saburo; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2003-04-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAP) are multifunctional proteins involved in Ras-cAMP signalling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. It has recently been demonstrated that over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic arabidopsis plants causes severe morphological defects owing to loss of actin filaments. To test the generality of the function of AtCAP1 in plants, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing an arabidopsis CAP (AtCAP1) under the regulation of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter were produced. Over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic tobacco plants led to growth abnormalities, in particular a reduction in the size of leaves. Morphological alterations in leaves were the result of reduced elongation of epidermal and mesophyll cells.

  5. The acropetal wave of developmental cell death of tobacco corolla is preceded by activation of transglutaminase in different cell compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Mea, Massimiliano; De Filippis, Francesca; Genovesi, Valeria; Serafini Fracassini, Donatella; Del Duca, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    The activity of transglutaminase (TGase), an enzyme responsible for polyamine conjugation to proteins, was analyzed in relationship to developmental cell death (DCD) during the flower life span stages of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) corolla. As the DCD exhibits an acropetal gradient, TGase was studied in corolla proximal, medial, and distal parts. TGase was immunorecognized by three TGase antibodies; the main 58-kD band decreased during corolla life, whereas a 38-kD band localized progressively from basal to distal parts. The former was present in the soluble, microsomal, plastidial (together with the 38-kD band), and cell wall fractions. The endogenous TGase activity increased during DCD reaching a maximum soon after the corolla opening. The activity maximum shifted from proximal to distal part, preceding the DCD acropetal pattern. A similar activity increase was observed by the exogenous TGase substrate (histidine(6)-Xpr-green fluorescent protein). Subcellular activities were detected in (1) the microsomes, where TGase activity is in general higher in the proximal part, peaking at the corolla opening; (2) the soluble fraction, where it is present only in the proximal part at senescence; (3) the plastids, where it shows an increasing trend; and (4) cell walls, prevailing in the distal part and progressively increasing. These data suggest a relationship between DCD and TGase; the latter, possibly released in the cell wall through the Golgi vesicles, could cooperate to cell wall strengthening, especially at the abscission zone and possibly during corolla shape change. The plastid TGase, stabilizing the photosystems, could sustain the energy requirements for the senescence progression.

  6. Enhancement of radionuclide induced cytotoxicity by 2-deoxy-D-glucose in human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of targeted radiotherapy can be enhanced by selective delivery of radionuclide to the tumors and/or by differentially enhancing the manifestation of radiation damage in tumors. Our earlier studies have shown that the 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG, an inhibitor of glucose transport and glycolytic ATP production, selectively enhances the cytotoxicity of external beam radiation in tumor cells. Therefore, it is suggested that 2-DG may also enhance the cytotoxic effects of radionuclides selectively in tumor cells, thereby improving the efficacy of radionuclide therapy. In vitro studies on breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-468 and glioma (U-87 cell lines, has been carried out to verify this proposition. Clonogenicity (macrocolony assay, cell proliferation, cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation and apoptosis were investigated as parameters of radiation response. Mean inactivation dose D (dose required to reduce the survival from 1 to 0.37, was 48 MBq/ml and 96 MBq/ml for 99 mTc, treated MDA-MB-468 and U-87, respectively. The dose response of growth inhibition, induction of micronuclei formation and apoptosis observed under these conditions, were correlated well with the changes in cell survival. Presence of 2-DG (5 mM during radionuclide exposure (24 hrs, reduced the survival by nearly 2 folds in MDA-MB-468 (from 48.5 MBq to18.5 MBq and by 1.6 folds in U-87 cells (from 96 MBq to 66 Mbq. These results clearly show that the presence of 2-DG during radionuclide exposure, significantly enhances the cytotoxicity, by increasing mitotic as well as interphase death. Further studies to understand the mechanisms of radio-sensitization by 2-DG and preclinical studies using tumor-bearing animals, are required for optimizing the treatment schedule.

  7. Suppression of cell expansion by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic petunia and tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, M M; Franken, J; van Aelst, A; Angenent, G C

    2000-08-01

    Molecular and genetic analyses have shown that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene SUPERMAN (SUP) has at least two functions in Arabidopsis flower development. SUP is necessary to control the correct distribution of cells with either a stamen or carpel fate, and is essential for proper outgrowth of the ovule outer integument. Both these functions indicate a role for SUP in cell proliferation. To study the function of the Arabidopsis SUP gene in more detail, we over-expressed the SUP gene in petunia and tobacco in a tissue-specific manner. The petunia FLORAL BINDING PROTEIN 1 (FBP1) gene promoter was used to restrict the expression of SUP to petals and stamens. The development of petals and stamens was severely affected in both petunia and tobacco plants over-expressing SUP. Petals remained small and did not unfold, resulting in closed flowers. Stamen filaments were thin and very short. Detailed analysis of these floral organs from the petunia transformants showed that cell expansion was dramatically reduced without affecting cell division. These results reveal a novel activity for SUP as a regulator of cell expansion.

  8. Evaluation of buffers toxicity in tobacco cells: Homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid) is a suitable buffer for plant cells studies at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgo, Lucélia

    2017-03-19

    Low pH is an important environmental stressor of plant root cells. Understanding the mechanisms of stress and tolerance to acidity is critical; however, there is no widely accepted pH buffer for studies of plant cells at low pH. Such a buffer might also benefit studies of Al toxicity, in which buffering at low pH is also important. The challenge is to find a buffer with minimal cellular effects. We examined the cytotoxicity and possible metabolic disturbances of four buffers that have adequate pKa values and potential use for studies in the pH range of 4.0-5.0. These were homopipes (homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid); pKa1 4.4), 3,3-dimethylglutaric acid (pKa1 3.73), β-alanine (pKa1 3.70) and potassium biphthalate (pKa1 2.95; pKa2 5.41). First, tobacco BY-2 cells were grown in a rich medium containing 10 mM of each buffer or MES (2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid) as a control, with the pH initially adjusted to 5.7. β-alanine was clearly toxic and dimethylgluturate and biphthalate were found to be cytostatic, in which no culture growth occurred but cell viability was either unaffected or decreased only after 5 days. Only homopipes allowed normal culture growth and cell viability. Homopipes (10 mM) was then tested in cell cultures with an initial pH of 4.3 ± 0.17 in minimal medium to examine whether its undissociated species (H2A) displayed any cellular effects and no cytotoxic effects were observed. It is possible to conclude that among tested buffers, homopipes is the most suitable for studies at low pH, and may be especially useful for aluminum toxicity experiments.

  9. TOBACCO TIGHTROPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China's monopoly tobacco industry is trying to maintain revenue levels while adjusting to stricter policies aimed at curbing smoking While China is increasingly opening the doors to its booming economy, reducing the number of state-owned enterprises and welcoming foreign businesses, when it comes to tobacco, the government is still screening out the smoke. A major source of government tax rev-

  10. Smoking, environmental tobacco smoke, and risk of renal cell cancer: a population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Tariq

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kidney and renal pelvis cancers account for 4% of all new cancer cases in the United States, among which 85% are renal cell carcinomas (RCC. While cigarette smoking is an established risk factor for RCC, little is known about the contribution of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS to RCC incidence. This study assesses the role of smoking and ETS on RCC incidence using a population-based case-control design in Florida and Georgia. Methods Incident cases (n = 335 were identified from hospital records and the Florida cancer registry, and population controls (n = 337 frequency-matched by age (+/- 5 years, gender, and race were identified through random-digit dialing. In-person interviews assessed smoking history and lifetime exposure to ETS at home, work, and public spaces. Home ETS was measured in both years and hours of exposure. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression, controlled for age, gender, race, and BMI. Results Cases were more likely to have smoked 20 or more pack-years, compared with never-smokers (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 0.93 – 1.95. A protective effect was found for smoking cessation, beginning with 11–20 years of cessation (OR: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.18–0.85 and ending with 51 or more years of cessation (OR: 0.11, 95% CI: 0.03–0.39 in comparison with those having quit for 1–10 years. Among never-smokers, cases were more likely to report home ETS exposure of greater than 20 years, compared with those never exposed to home ETS (OR: 2.18; 95% CI: 1.14–4.18. Home ETS associations were comparable when measured in lifetime hours of exposure, with cases more likely to report 30,000 or more hours of home ETS exposure (OR: 2.37; 95% CI: 1.20–4.69. Highest quartiles of combined home/work ETS exposure among never-smokers, especially with public ETS exposure, increased RCC risk by 2 to 4 times. Conclusion These findings confirm known associations between smoking and RCC and establish a

  11. Dissociation of a population of Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 in tobacco plants: formation of bacterial emboli and dormant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Daminova, Amina; Ageeva, Marina; Petrova, Olga; Gogoleva, Natalya; Tarasova, Nadezhda; Gogolev, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    The population dynamics of Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 (Pba) within tobacco plants was monitored from the time of inoculation until after long-term preservation of microorganisms in the remnants of dead plants. We found and characterised peculiar structures that totally occlude xylem vessels, which we have named bacterial emboli. Viable but non-culturable (VBN) Pba cells were identified in the remnants of dead plants, and the conditions for resuscitation of these VBN cells were established. Our investigation shows that dissociation of the integrated bacterial population during plant colonisation forms distinct subpopulations and cell morphotypes, which are likely to perform specific functions that ensure successful completion of the life cycle within the plant.

  12. The Mechanism of Herbicide Resistance in Tobacco Cells with a New Mutation in the QB Protein 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigematsu, Yoshio; Sato, Fumihiko; Yamada, Yasuyuki

    1989-01-01

    A new mutant of the psbA gene conferring resistance to 2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (atrazine) was obtained by selection of photomixotrophic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun NN) cells. The 264th codon AGT (serine) in the wild psbA gene was changed to ACT (threonine) in these mutant tobacco cells. All other higher plants resistant to atrazine exhibit a change to GGT (glycine) in this codon. Measurements of Hill reaction activity and chlorophyll fluorescence showed that the threonine 264-containing plastoquinone serving as secondary stable electron acceptor of PSII (QB protein) had not only strong resistance to triazine-type herbicides but also moderate resistance to substituted urea-type herbicides. Threonine-type QB protein showed especially strong resistance to methoxylamino derivatives of the substituted urea herbicides. The projected secondary structures of the mutant QB proteins indicate that the cross-resistance of threonine 264 QB protein to triazine and urea herbicides is mainly due to a conformational change of the binding site for the herbicides. However, the glycine 264 QB protein is resistant to only triazine herbicides because of the absence of an hydroxyl group and not because of a conformational change. Images Figure 1 PMID:16666653

  13. The Effects of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in a Rat Model of Tobacco-Associated Erectile Dysfunction.

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    Yun-Ching Huang

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is associated with erectile dysfunction (ED via a number of mechanisms including vascular injury and oxidative stress in corporal tissue. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSC have been shown to ameliorate vascular/corporal injury and oxidative stress by releasing cytokines, growth factors and antioxidants. We assessed the therapeutic effects of intracavernous injection of ADSC in a rat model of tobacco-associated ED. Thirty male rats were used in this study. Ten rats exposed to room air only served as negative controls. The remaining 20 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS for 12 weeks. At the 12-week time point, ADSC were isolated from paragonadal fat in all rats. Amongst the 20 CS exposed rats, 10 each were assigned to one of the two following conditions: (i injection of phosphate buffered saline (PBS into the corpora cavernosa (CS+PBS; or (ii injection of autologous ADSC in PBS into the corpora cavernosa (CS+ADSC. Negative control animals received PBS injection into the corpora cavernosa (normal rats [NR] + PBS. After injections all rats were returned to their previous air versus CS exposure state. Twenty-eight days after injection, all rats were placed in a metabolic cage for 24-hour urine collection to be testing for markers of oxidative stress. After 24-hour urine collection all 30 rats also underwent erectile function testing via intracavernous pressure (ICP testing and were then sacrificed. Corporal tissues were obtained for histological assessment and Western blotting. Mean body weight was significantly lower in CS-exposed rats than in control animals. Mean ICP, ICP /mean arterial pressure ratio, serum nitric oxide level were significantly lower in the CS+PBS group compared to the NR+PBS and CS+ADSC groups. Urine markers for oxidative stress were significantly higher in the CS+PBS group compared to the NR+PBS and CS+ADSC groups. Mean expression of corporal nNOS and histological markers for endothelial and smooth

  14. The Effects of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in a Rat Model of Tobacco-Associated Erectile Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Huang, Yan-Hua; Chen, Chih-Shou; Ho, Dong-Ru; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco use is associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) via a number of mechanisms including vascular injury and oxidative stress in corporal tissue. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) have been shown to ameliorate vascular/corporal injury and oxidative stress by releasing cytokines, growth factors and antioxidants. We assessed the therapeutic effects of intracavernous injection of ADSC in a rat model of tobacco-associated ED. Thirty male rats were used in this study. Ten rats exposed to room air only served as negative controls. The remaining 20 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 12 weeks. At the 12-week time point, ADSC were isolated from paragonadal fat in all rats. Amongst the 20 CS exposed rats, 10 each were assigned to one of the two following conditions: (i) injection of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) into the corpora cavernosa (CS+PBS); or (ii) injection of autologous ADSC in PBS into the corpora cavernosa (CS+ADSC). Negative control animals received PBS injection into the corpora cavernosa (normal rats [NR] + PBS). After injections all rats were returned to their previous air versus CS exposure state. Twenty-eight days after injection, all rats were placed in a metabolic cage for 24-hour urine collection to be testing for markers of oxidative stress. After 24-hour urine collection all 30 rats also underwent erectile function testing via intracavernous pressure (ICP) testing and were then sacrificed. Corporal tissues were obtained for histological assessment and Western blotting. Mean body weight was significantly lower in CS-exposed rats than in control animals. Mean ICP, ICP /mean arterial pressure ratio, serum nitric oxide level were significantly lower in the CS+PBS group compared to the NR+PBS and CS+ADSC groups. Urine markers for oxidative stress were significantly higher in the CS+PBS group compared to the NR+PBS and CS+ADSC groups. Mean expression of corporal nNOS and histological markers for endothelial and smooth muscle cells

  15. Increased sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and an apparent decrease in sterol biosynthesis in elicitor-treated tobacco cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voegeli, U.; Bhatt, P.N.; Chappell, J.

    1987-04-01

    Addition of fungel elicitor prepared from Phytophthora parasitica to tobacco cell suspension cultures leads to an increased production of the phytoalexin capsidiol. Capsidiol is a sesquiterpenoid which is most likely synthesized from farnesylpyrophosphat (FPP) by a bicyclic cyclase reaction. Because FPP is also a substrate for squalene synthetase and therefore a precursor of sterol biosynthesis, the question arises whether or not the accumulation of capsidiol in elicitor-treated cells occurs at the expense of sterol biosynthesis. (/sup 14/C)-acetate was given to elicitor-treated and control (no treatment) cell cultures and incorporation into sterols and capsidiol determined. No labeled capsidiol was detected in control cells. In elicitor-treated cells about 12-15% of the radioactivity taken up by the cells was incorporated into capsidiol. In contrast, control cells incorporated 4 times more radioactivity into sterols than elicitor-treated cells. Similar results were obtained using (/sup 3/H)-mevalonate as a precursor of capsidiol and sterol biosynthesis. Likely explanations for the apparently decline in sterol biosynthesis in elicitor-treated cells include: (1) inhibition of squalene synthetase; (2) induction of capsidiol synthesizing enzymes; and (3) metabolic channeling of FPP into capsidiol versus sterols. These possibilities will be discussed further together with other results.

  16. Comparative transcriptional profiling analysis of the two daughter cells from tobacco zygote reveals the transcriptome differences in the apical and basal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Tian-Xiang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In angiosperm, after the first asymmetric zygotic cell division, the apical and basal daughter cells follow distinct development pathways. Global transcriptome analysis of these two cells is essential in understanding their developmental differences. However, because of the difficulty to isolate the in vivo apical and basal cells of two-celled proembryo from ovule and ovary in higher plants, the transcriptome analysis of them hasn't been reported. Results In this study, we developed a procedure for isolating the in vivo apical and basal cells of the two-celled proembryo from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, and then performed a comparative transcriptome analysis of the two cells by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH combined with macroarray screening. After sequencing, we identified 797 differentially expressed ESTs corresponding to 299 unigenes. Library sequence analysis successfully identified tobacco homologies of genes involved in embryogenesis and seed development. By quantitative real-time PCR, we validated the differential expression of 40 genes, with 6 transcripts of them specifically expressed in the apical or basal cell. Expression analysis also revealed some transcripts displayed cell specific activation in one of the daughter cells after zygote division. These differential expressions were further validated by in situ hybridization (ISH. Tissue expression pattern analysis also revealed some potential roles of these candidate genes in development. Conclusions The results show that some differential or specific transcripts in the apical and basal cells of two-celled proembryo were successfully isolated, and the identification of these transcripts reveals that these two daughter cells possess distinct transcriptional profiles after zygote division. Further functional work on these differentially or specifically expressed genes will promote the elucidation of molecular mechanism controlling early embryogenesis.

  17. Smokeless Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toothpick-sized sticks. Some of these also contain sweeteners or flavoring and look a lot like candy. ... Still, tobacco companies often market these products as alternatives to smoking in places where smoking isn’t ...

  18. Induction of Apoptosis in Purified Nuclei from Tobacco-Suspension Cells by Cytochrome b6/f Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贵友; 李萍; 朱瑞宇; 田瑞华; 戴尧仁

    2004-01-01

    An apoptotic cell-free system containing cytosol and nuclei from normally cultured tobacco suspension cells was used to show that a spinach chloroplast preparation can induce apoptosis in nuclei,evidenced by DNA electrophoresis and fluorescence microscopy observations.Further study showed that the chloroplast preparation or its pellet (thylakoid membrane) after hypoosmotic or supersonic treatment still exhibited the apoptosis-inducing activity,but the supernatant had no effect,which indicates that the apoptosis-inducing effector in the chloroplast preparation is water-insoluble.The induction of apoptosis by chloroplast preparation could be attenuated by Ac-DEVD-CHO,the specific inhibitor of Caspase-3,implying involvement of a Caspase-3-like protease during the process.Furthermore,extensive apoptosis in nuclei was induced by cytochrome b6/f on the thylakoid membrane,indicating that this important cytochrome complex may have an important role in the chloroplast-related apoptotic pathway.

  19. Tobacco Dilemma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Although a major fiscal revenue source, the tobacco industry is always under a watchful eye while many industries continue to suffer negative growth, even with economic recovery efforts in full swing, profits from Chinese tobacco companies allowed the industry to pay 513.11 billion yuan ($75.13 billion) in taxes in 2009, a year-on-year increase of 12.2 percent.

  20. Expression of the major mugwort pollen allergen Art v 1 in tobacco plants and cell cultures: problems and perspectives for allergen production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Marc; Pertl-Obermeyer, Heidi; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Ferreira, Fatima; Obermeyer, Gerhard

    2012-03-01

    An economic and cheap production of large amounts of recombinant allergenic proteins might become a prerequisite for the common use of microarray-based diagnostic allergy assays which allow a component-specific diagnosis. A molecular pharming strategy was applied to express the major allergen of Artemisia vulgaris pollen, Art v 1, in tobacco plants and tobacco cell cultures. The original Art v 1 with its endogenous signal peptide which directs Art v 1 to the secretory pathway, was expressed in transiently transformed tobacco leaves but was lost in stable transformed tobacco plants during the alternation of generations. Using a light-regulated promoter and "hiding" the recombinant Art v 1 in the ER succeeded in expression of Art v 1 over three generations of tobacco plants and in cell cultures generated from stable transformed plants. However, the amounts of the recombinant allergen were sufficient for analysis but not high enough to allow an economic production. Although molecular pharming has been shown to work well for the production of non-plant therapeutic proteins, it might be less efficient for closely related plant proteins.

  1. Overexpression of poplar xylem sucrose synthase in tobacco leads to a thickened cell wall and increased height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhigang; Qu, Zanshuang; Zhang, Lijie; Zhao, Shuanjing; Bi, Zhihong; Ji, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is considered the first key enzyme for secondary growth because it is a highly regulated cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of sucrose and UDP into UDP-glucose and fructose. Although SuSy enzymes preferentially functions in the direction of sucrose cleavage at most cellular condition, they also catalyze the synthetic reaction. We isolated a gene that encodes a SuSy from Populus simonii×Populus nigra and named it PsnSuSy2 because it shares high similarity to SuSy2 in Populus trichocarpa. RT-PCR revealed that PsnSuSy2 was highly expressed in xylem, but lowly expressed in young leaves. To characterize its functions in secondary growth, multiple tobacco overexpression transgenic lines of PnsSuSy2 were generated via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The PsnSuSy2 expression levels and altered wood properties in stem segments from the different transgenic lines were carefully characterized. The results demonstrated that the levels of PsnSuSy2 enzyme activity, chlorophyll content, total soluble sugars, fructose and glucose increased significantly, while the sucrose level decreased significantly. Consequently, the cellulose content and fiber length increased, whereas the lignin content decreased, suggesting that PsnSuSy2 plays a significant role in cleaving sucrose into UDP-glucose and fructose to facilitate cellulose biosynthesis and that promotion of cellulose biosynthesis suppresses lignin biosynthesis. Additionally, the noticeable increase in the lodging resistance in transgenic tobacco stem suggested that the cell wall characteristics were altered by PsnSuSy2 overexpression. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to study the cell wall morphology of stem, and surprisingly, we found that the secondary cell wall was significantly thicker in transgenic tobacco. However, the thickened secondary cell wall did not negatively affect the height of the plants because the PsnSuSy2- overexpressing lines grew taller than the

  2. Overexpression of poplar xylem sucrose synthase in tobacco leads to a thickened cell wall and increased height.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Wei

    Full Text Available Sucrose synthase (SuSy is considered the first key enzyme for secondary growth because it is a highly regulated cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of sucrose and UDP into UDP-glucose and fructose. Although SuSy enzymes preferentially functions in the direction of sucrose cleavage at most cellular condition, they also catalyze the synthetic reaction. We isolated a gene that encodes a SuSy from Populus simonii×Populus nigra and named it PsnSuSy2 because it shares high similarity to SuSy2 in Populus trichocarpa. RT-PCR revealed that PsnSuSy2 was highly expressed in xylem, but lowly expressed in young leaves. To characterize its functions in secondary growth, multiple tobacco overexpression transgenic lines of PnsSuSy2 were generated via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The PsnSuSy2 expression levels and altered wood properties in stem segments from the different transgenic lines were carefully characterized. The results demonstrated that the levels of PsnSuSy2 enzyme activity, chlorophyll content, total soluble sugars, fructose and glucose increased significantly, while the sucrose level decreased significantly. Consequently, the cellulose content and fiber length increased, whereas the lignin content decreased, suggesting that PsnSuSy2 plays a significant role in cleaving sucrose into UDP-glucose and fructose to facilitate cellulose biosynthesis and that promotion of cellulose biosynthesis suppresses lignin biosynthesis. Additionally, the noticeable increase in the lodging resistance in transgenic tobacco stem suggested that the cell wall characteristics were altered by PsnSuSy2 overexpression. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to study the cell wall morphology of stem, and surprisingly, we found that the secondary cell wall was significantly thicker in transgenic tobacco. However, the thickened secondary cell wall did not negatively affect the height of the plants because the PsnSuSy2- overexpressing lines

  3. Cytomixis doesn’t induce obvious changes in chromatin modifications and programmed cell death in tobacco male meiocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey eMursalimov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytomixis is a poorly studied process of nuclear migration between plant cells. It is so far unknown what drives cytomixis and what is the functional state of the chromatin migrating between cells. Using immunostaining, we have analyzed the distribution of posttranslational histone modifications (methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation that reflect the functional state of chromatin in the tobacco microsporocytes involved in cytomixis. We demonstrate that the chromatin in the cytomictic cells does not differ from the chromatin in intact microsporocytes according to all 14 analyzed histone modification types. We have also for the first time demonstrated that the migrating chromatin contains normal structures of the synaptonemal complex and lacks any signs of apoptosis. As has been shown, the chromatin migrating between cells in cytomixis is neither selectively heterochromatized nor degraded both before its migration to another cell and after it enters a recipient cell as micronuclei. We also showed that cytomictic chromatin contains marks typical for transcriptionally active chromatin as well as heterochromatin. Moreover, marks typical for chromosome condensation, synaptonemal complex formation and key proteins required for the formation of bivalents were also detected at migrated chromatin.

  4. Stable production of thermotolerant xylanase B of Clostridium stercorarium in transgenic tobacco and rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Mizutani, Tomomi; Sun, Jia-Lin; Kawazu, Tetsu; Karita, Shuichi; Sakka, Makiko; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ohmiya, Kunio; Sakka, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The xylanase B gene encoding a thermostable family 10 xylanase of Clostridium stercorarium was expressed in plants under the control of a constitutive promoter. Two forms of the xylanase B gene, the xynB gene encoding the full length of the xylanase B gene including the bacterial signal sequence and the xynBM gene without the signal sequence region, were introduced into tobacco BY-2 cells and tobacco plants respectively under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Transgenic BY-2 cells and tobacco plants showed xylanase activity and normal growth. The recombinant enzyme produced in transgenic BY-2 cells harboring the xynB gene was secreted into the culture supernatant, and the recombinant enzyme produced in transgenic BY-2 cells harboring the xynBM gene was localized in the cells. In contrast to tobacco plants, expression of the xynB gene under the control of the rice actin promoter in rice plants was toxic to host cells. However, the recombinant XynBM accumulated in leaf cells, and no phenotypic effect of expression of the xynBM gene was observed. Enzyme activity was maintained in cell-free extracts of transgenic rice leaves at 60 degrees C for 72 h, and the recombinant XynBM degraded hemicellulosic polymers in cell-free extracts of transgenic rice leaves.

  5. The signal peptide-like segment of hpaXm is required for its association to the cell wall in transgenic tobacco plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Miao, Weiguo; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Shujian

    2017-01-01

    Harpins, encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes of Gram-negative plant pathogens, are elicitors of hypersensitive response (HR). HpaXm is a novel harpin-like protein described from cotton leaf blight bacteria, Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum—a synonym of X. campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith 1901–1978). A putative signal peptide (1-MNSLNTQIGANSSFL-15) of hpaXm was predicted in the nitroxyl-terminal (N-terminal)by SignalP (SignalP 3.0 server). Here, we explored the function of the N-terminal leader peptide like segment of hpaXm using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc.). Transgenic tobacco lines expressing the full-length hpaXm and the signal peptide-like segment-deleted mutant hpaXmΔLP were developed using transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The target genes were confirmed integrated into the tobacco genomes and expressed normally. Using immune colloidal-gold detection technique, hpaXm protein was found to be transferred to the cytoplasm, the cell membrane, and organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nucleus, as well as the cell wall. However, the deletion mutant hpaXmΔLP expressed in transgenic tobacco was found unable to cross the membrane to reach the cell wall. Additionally, soluble proteins extracted from plants transformed with hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were bio-active. Defensive micro-HR induced by the transgene expression of hpaXm and hpaXmΔLP were observed on transgenic tobacco leaves. Disease resistance bioassays to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) showed that tobacco plants transformed with hpaXm and with hpaXmΔLP exhibited enhanced resistance to TMV. In summary, the N-terminal signal peptide-like segment (1–45 bp) in hpaXm sequence is not necessary for transgene expression, bioactivity of hpaXm and resistance to TMV in transgenic tobacco, but is required for the protein to be translocated to the cell wall. PMID:28141855

  6. [Smokeless tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underner, M; Perriot, J

    2011-10-01

    Use of smokeless tobacco (ST) (chewing tobacco and snuff) can lead to a number of consequences detrimental to health. ST rapidly delivers high doses of nicotine, which can lead to dependence and is also a source of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Changes usually develop in the mouth area where the ST is most often placed. Non-malignant oral lesions include leuko-oedema, hyperkeratotic lesions of the oral mucosa and localised periodontal disease. Oral premalignant lesions are leukoplakia, erythroplakia, submucosal fibrosis and lichen planus. Betel chewing, with or without tobacco, may increase the incidence of oral cancer. There is conflicting evidence with regard to snuff users about the risk of oral and gastro-oesophageal cancer. ST use is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and may increase the risk of fatal myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. During pregnancy, ST is associated with an increase in pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery and stillbirth. Nicotine replacement therapy and bupropion reduce withdrawal symptoms and tobacco craving during ST cessation. However, they have not been shown to help long-term abstinence. Information concerning the potential hazards of ST products should be incorporated into educational programmes to discourage its use and to help users to quit. Smokeless tobacco is not recommended to help smoking cessation.

  7. Potent antiproliferative cembrenoids accumulate in tobacco upon infection with Rhodococcus fascians and trigger unusual microtubule dynamics in human glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminata P Nacoulma

    Full Text Available AIMS: Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. METHODS: We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability.

  8. The role of alternative oxidase in modulating carbon use efficiency and growth during macronutrient stress in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Stephen M; Kristensen, Brian K; Robson, Christine A; Amirsadeghi, Sasan; Eng, Edward W Y; Abdel-Mesih, Amal; Møller, Ian M; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2005-06-01

    When wild-type (wt) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Petit Havana SR1) cells are grown under macronutrient (P or N) limitation, they induce large amounts of alternative oxidase (AOX), which constitutes a non-energy-conserving branch of the respiratory electron transport chain. To investigate the significance of AOX induction, wt cells were compared with transgenic (AS8) cells lacking AOX. Under nutrient limitation, growth of wt cell cultures was dramatically reduced and carbon use efficiency (g cell dry weight gain g(-1) sugar consumed) decreased by 42-63%. However, the growth of AS8 was only moderately reduced by the nutrient deficiencies and carbon use efficiency values remained the same as under nutrient-sufficient conditions. As a result, the nutrient limitations more severely compromised the tissue nutrient status (P or N) of AS8 than wt cells. Northern analyses and a comparison of the mitochondrial protein profiles of wt and AS8 cells indicated that the lack of AOX in AS8 under P limitation was associated with increased levels of proteins commonly associated with oxidative stress and/or stress injury. Also, the level of electron transport chain components was consistently reduced in AS8 while tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes did not show a universal trend in abundance in comparison to the wt. Alternatively, the lack of AOX in AS8 cells under N limitation resulted in enhanced carbohydrate accumulation. It is concluded that AOX respiration provides an important general mechanism by which plant cells can modulate their growth in response to nutrient availability and that AOX also has nutrient-specific roles in maintaining cellular redox and carbon balance.

  9. NtSCP1 from Tobacco Is an Extracellular Serine Carboxypeptidase III That Has an Impact on Cell Elongation1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Manuela Désirée; Delannoy, Mélanie; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The leaf extracellular space contains several peptidases, most of which are of unknown function. We isolated cDNAs for two extracellular serine carboxypeptidase III genes from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), NtSCP1 and NtSCP2, belonging to a phylogenetic clade not yet functionally characterized in plants. NtSCP1 and NtSCP2 are orthologs derived from the two ancestors of tobacco. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that NtSCP1 and NtSCP2 are expressed in root, stem, leaf, and flower tissues. Expression analysis of the β-glucuronidase reporter gene fused to the NtSCP1 transcription promoter region confirmed this expression profile. Western blotting of NtSCP1 and expression of an NtSCP1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein showed that the protein is located in the extracellular space of tobacco leaves and culture cells. Purified His-tagged NtSCP1 had carboxypeptidase activity in vitro. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing NtSCP1 showed a reduced flower length due to a decrease in cell size. Etiolated seedlings of these transgenic plants had shorter hypocotyls. These data provide support for a role of an extracellular type III carboxypeptidase in the control of cell elongation. PMID:22214816

  10. DGP1, a drought-induced guard cell-specific promoter and its function analysis in tobacco plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Jun; GONG; Ximing; LIN; Huiqiong; SONG; Quanbo; CHEN; J

    2005-01-01

    The genetic regulation of stomatal movement mainly depends on an efficient control system of gene expression, and guard cell-specific promoter is becoming the best choice. Here we combined the dehydration responsive element (DRE) with guard cell specific element (GCSE) to construct a novel promoter, DGP1. Histochemical assays in transgenic tobacco carryingβ-glucuronidase (gus) gene fused to DGP1 demonstrated that GUS activity was found to be highly inducible by drought treatment and specifically restricted to guard cells. No GUS activity was detected in roots, stems or flowers after treatment. Further quantitative analysis showed that GUS activity in the epidermal strips was apparently induced by dehydration and dramatically increased with the elongation of treatment. The GUS activity after 8 h treatment was 179 times that of those without treatment. Although GUS activity in roots, stems or mesophyll increased after treatment, no great changes were observed. These results suggested that DGP1 could drive target gene expressed in guard cells when plant is subjected to drought stress. And this gets us prepared to control opening and closing of stomata through plant gene engineering.

  11. A multidirectional non-cell autonomous control and a genetic interaction restricting tobacco etch virus susceptibility in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Gopalan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Viruses constitute a major class of pathogens that infect a variety of hosts. Understanding the intricacies of signaling during host-virus interactions should aid in designing disease prevention strategies and in understanding mechanistic aspects of host and pathogen signaling machinery. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An Arabidopsis mutant, B149, impaired in susceptibility to Tobacco etch virus (TEV, a positive strand RNA virus of picoRNA family, was identified using a high-throughput genetic screen and a counterselection scheme. The defects include initiation of infection foci, rate of cell-to-cell movement and long distance movement. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The defect in infectivity is conferred by a recessive locus. Molecular genetic analysis and complementation analysis with three alleles of a previously published mutant lsp1 (loss of susceptibility to potyviruses indicate a genetic interaction conferring haploinsufficiency between the B149 locus and certain alleles of lsp1 resulting in impaired host susceptibility. The pattern of restriction of TEV foci on leaves at or near the boundaries of certain cell types and leaf boundaries suggest dysregulation of a multidirectional non-cell autonomous regulatory mechanism. Understanding the nature of this multidirectional signal and the molecular genetic mechanism conferring it should potentially reveal a novel arsenal in the cellular machinery.

  12. The invasion of tobacco mosaic virus RNA induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-related autophagy in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Li; Xiao, Ruijing; Zhu, Guoguo; Li, Yan; Liu, Changxuan; Yang, Ru; Tang, Zhiqing; Li, Jie; Huang, Wei; Chen, Lang; Zheng, Xiaoling; He, Yuling; Tan, Jinquan

    2012-04-01

    The ability of human cells to defend against viruses originating from distant species has long been ignored. Owing to the pressure of natural evolution and human exploration, some of these viruses may be able to invade human beings. If their 'fresh' host had no defences, the viruses could cause a serious pandemic, as seen with HIV, SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and avian influenza virus that originated from chimpanzees, the common palm civet and birds, respectively. It is unknown whether the human immune system could tolerate invasion with a plant virus. To model such an alien virus invasion, we chose TMV (tobacco mosaic virus) and used human epithelial carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) as its 'fresh' host. We established a reliable system for transfecting TMV-RNA into HeLa cells and found that TMV-RNA triggered autophagy in HeLa cells as shown by the appearance of autophagic vacuoles, the conversion of LC3-I (light chain protein 3-I) to LC3-II, the up-regulated expression of Beclin1 and the accumulation of TMV protein on autophagosomal membranes. We observed suspected TMV virions in HeLa cells by TEM (transmission electron microscopy). Furthermore, we found that TMV-RNA was translated into CP (coat protein) in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and that TMV-positive RNA translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleolus. Finally, we detected greatly increased expression of GRP78 (78 kDa glucose-regulated protein), a typical marker of ERS (ER stress) and found that the formation of autophagosomes was closely related to the expanded ER membrane. Taken together, our data indicate that HeLa cells used ERS and ERS-related autophagy to defend against TMV-RNA.

  13. Tobacco Dilemma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN XINZHEN

    2010-01-01

    @@ While many industries continue to suffer negative growth, even with economic recovery efforts in full swing, profits from Chinese tobacco companies allowed the industry to pay 513.11 billion yuan ($75.13 billion) in taxes in 2009, a year-on-year increase of 12.2 percent.

  14. Molecular phenotyping of lignin-modified tobacco reveals associated changes in cell-wall metabolism, primary metabolism, stress metabolism and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwe, Rebecca; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Gielen, Birgit; Rohde, Antje; Van Beeumen, Jos; Ralph, John; Boudet, Alain-Michel; Kopka, Joachim; Rochange, Soizic F; Halpin, Claire; Messens, Eric; Boerjan, Wout

    2007-10-01

    Lignin is an important component of secondarily thickened cell walls. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) are two key enzymes that catalyse the penultimate and last steps in the biosynthesis of the monolignols. Downregulation of CCR in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) has been shown to reduce lignin content, whereas lignin in tobacco downregulated for CAD incorporates more aldehydes. We show that altering the expression of either or both genes in tobacco has far-reaching consequences on the transcriptome and metabolome. cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism-based transcript profiling, combined with HPLC and GC-MS-based metabolite profiling, revealed differential transcripts and metabolites within monolignol biosynthesis, as well as a substantial network of interactions between monolignol and other metabolic pathways. In general, in all transgenic lines, the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway was downregulated, whereas starch mobilization was upregulated. CCR-downregulated lines were characterized by changes at the level of detoxification and carbohydrate metabolism, whereas the molecular phenotype of CAD-downregulated tobacco was enriched in transcript of light- and cell-wall-related genes. In addition, the transcript and metabolite data suggested photo-oxidative stress and increased photorespiration, mainly in the CCR-downregulated lines. These predicted effects on the photosynthetic apparatus were subsequently confirmed physiologically by fluorescence and gas-exchange measurements. Our data provide a molecular picture of a plant's response to altered monolignol biosynthesis.

  15. Aspirin inhibits the proliferation of tobacco-related esophageal squamous carcinomas cell lines through cyclooxygenase 2 pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiao-Zhi; LIU Hai-bo; DING Xin-chun; LI Peng; ZHANG Shu-tian; YU Zhong-lin

    2007-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking has been verified as the risk factor of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC).Overexpression of cyclooxygenase 2(COX-2)is shown in ESCC.The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of cigarette smoking ethanol extract(EE)on the proliferation of the human ESCC cell Iines,and to explore the correlation between the proliferation rate of human ESCC cell lines and the expression pattern of COX-2.Whether aspirin can inhibit the proliferation of the ESCC cell lines pretreated with EE.and regulate the mRNA expression levels of COX-2 are also examined.Methods Two human ESCC cell Iines were selected.EC109 was poorly differentiated and EC9706 was highly differentiated.EC109 and EC9706 were treated with EE and aspirin for different time course.The cell growth of ESCC was measured by MTT reduction assay and the expression of COX-2 was measured by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis.Results EE promoted the proliferation of EC109 and EC9706 in dose- and time-dependent manners.In the concentration range (10-100 μg/ml for EE)and in the time range(24-72 hours)after addition of EE,the cell proliferation was prominent in an up-scaled manner respectively.Aspirin could inhibit the proliferation of cell lines EC109 and EC9706.pretreated with EE for 5 hours,in a dose-dependent manner.In the concentration range (0.5-8.0 mmol/L for aspirin),the cell growth inhibition was prominent in an up-scaled manner accordingly (P<0.05).The effect of EE on cell proliferation was correlated with the up-regulation of COX-2 gene.However,the cell growth inhibition of aspirin was correlated with the down-regulation of COX-2 gene.Conclusions EE can stimulate the proliferation of human ESCC cell lines EC109 and EC9706,most likely through up-regulating the expression of COX-2.Aspirin can inhibit the proliferation of ESCC cell lines induced by EE,which suggests it may be advantageous in the chemoprevention and therapy of human tobacco-related ESCC.And its effect is

  16. Cross-talk between the cytosolic mevalonate and the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways in tobacco bright yellow-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Hoeffler, Jean-François; Meyer, Odile; Tritsch, Denis; Kagan, Isabelle A; Grosdemange-Billiard, Catherine; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2003-07-18

    In plants, two pathways are utilized for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate, the universal precursor for isoprenoid biosynthesis. The key enzyme of the cytoplasmic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway is 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR). Treatment of Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cells by the HMGR-specific inhibitor mevinolin led to growth reduction and induction of apparent HMGR activity, in parallel to an increase in protein representing two HMGR isozymes. Maximum induction was observed at 24 h. 1-Deoxy-d-xylulose (DX), the dephosphorylated first precursor of the plastidial 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, complemented growth inhibition by mevinolin in the low millimolar concentration range. Furthermore, DX partially re-established feedback repression of mevinolin-induced HMGR activity. Incorporation studies with [1,1,1,4-2H4]DX showed that sterols, normally derived from MVA, in the presence of mevinolin are synthesized via the MEP pathway. Fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase, the second enzyme of the MEP pathway, was utilized to study the reverse complementation. Growth inhibition by fosmidomycin of TBY-2 cells could be partially overcome by MVA. Chemical complementation was further substantiated by incorporation of [2-13C]MVA into plastoquinone, representative of plastidial isoprenoids. Best rates of incorporation of exogenous stably labeled precursors were observed in the presence of both inhibitors, thereby avoiding internal isotope dilution.

  17. Alamethicin permeabilizes the plasma membrane and mitochondria but not the tonoplast in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) suspension cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matic, S.; Geisler, D.A.; Møller, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    The ion channel-forming peptide AlaM (alamethicin) is known to permeabilize isolated mitochondria as well as animal cells. When intact tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) Bright Yellow-2 cells were treated with AlaM, the cells became permeable for low-molecular-mass molecules as shown by induced leakage...... the H2O2 necessary for NADH oxidation by apoplastic peroxidases, mitochondrial oxygen consumption could be measured in permeabilized cells. Inhibitor-sensitive oxidation of the respiratory substrates succinate, malate and NADH was observed after the addition of the appropriate coenzymes (ATP, NAD...

  18. Heat reduces nitric oxide production required for auxin-mediated gene expression and fate determination in tree tobacco guard cell protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Robert A; Anderson, David J; Bufford, Jennifer L; Tallman, Gary

    2012-08-01

    Tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) is an equatorial perennial with a high basal thermotolerance. Cultured tree tobacco guard cell protoplasts (GCPs) are useful for studying the effects of heat stress on fate-determining hormonal signaling. At lower temperatures (32°C or less), exogenous auxin (1-naphthalene acetic acid) and cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine) cause GCPs to expand 20- to 30-fold, regenerate cell walls, dedifferentiate, reenter the cell cycle, and divide. At higher temperatures (34°C or greater), GCPs expand only 5- to 6-fold; they do not regenerate walls, dedifferentiate, reenter the cell cycle, or divide. Heat (38°C) suppresses activation of the BA auxin-responsive transgene promoter in tree tobacco GCPs, suggesting that inhibition of cell expansion and cell cycle reentry at high temperatures is due to suppressed auxin signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in auxin signaling in other plant systems. Here, we show that heat inhibits NO accumulation by GCPs and that L-N(G)-monomethyl arginine, an inhibitor of NO production in animals and plants, mimics the effects of heat by limiting cell expansion and preventing cell wall regeneration; inhibiting cell cycle reentry, dedifferentiation, and cell division; and suppressing activation of the BA auxin-responsive promoter. We also show that heat and L-N(G)-monomethyl arginine reduce the mitotic indices of primary root meristems and inhibit lateral root elongation similarly. These data link reduced NO levels to suppressed auxin signaling in heat-stressed cells and seedlings of thermotolerant plants and suggest that even plants that have evolved to withstand sustained high temperatures may still be negatively impacted by heat stress.

  19. [Smokeless tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underner, Michel; Perriot, Jean; Peiffer, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    The use of snus (smokeless tobacco) can be detrimental to health. Containing carcinogenic nitrosamines (Swedish snus do not contain nitrosamine). Snus delivers rapidly high doses of nicotine which can lead to dependence. It do not induce bronchial carcinoma differently smoked tobacco. Lesions usually develop in the area of the mouth where the snus is placed. Non-malignant oral lesions include leukoedema, hyperkeratotic lesions of the oral mucosa and localised periodontal disease. The most frequently occurring premalignant lesion is leukoplakia. Studies reveal conflicting evidence about the risk of oral and gastroesophageal cancer with regard to snus users. However, the use of snus has proved to be a risk factor in developing pancreatic cancer and increases the risk of fatal myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. During pregnancy, snus is associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia and premature delivery. Nicotine substitution therapy and bupropion and varenicline reduce withdrawal symptoms and tobacco craving during snus cessation. However, they have not been shown to assist in long-term abstinence. Information concerning potential hazards of using snus products must be incorporated into health educational programmes in order to discourage its use. Snus is not a recommended product to help in stopping to smoke.

  20. Lipid Transfer Proteins Enhance Cell Wall Extension in TobaccoW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwland, Jeroen; Feron, Richard; Huisman, Bastiaan A.H.; Fasolino, Annalisa; Hilbers, Cornelis W.; Derksen, Jan; Mariani, Celestina

    2005-01-01

    Plant cells are enclosed by a rigid cell wall that counteracts the internal osmotic pressure of the vacuole and limits the rate and direction of cell enlargement. When developmental or physiological cues induce cell extension, plant cells increase wall plasticity by a process called loosening. It was demonstrated previously that a class of proteins known as expansins are mediators of wall loosening. Here, we report a type of cell wall–loosening protein that does not share any homology with expansins but is a member of the lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are known to bind a large range of lipid molecules to their hydrophobic cavity, and we show here that this cavity is essential for the cell wall–loosening activity of LTP. Furthermore, we show that LTP-enhanced wall extension can be described by a logarithmic time function. We hypothesize that LTP associates with hydrophobic wall compounds, causing nonhydrolytic disruption of the cell wall and subsequently facilitating wall extension. PMID:15937228

  1. A large population of small chloroplasts in tobacco leaf cells allows more effective chloroplast movement than a few enlarged chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Won Joong; Park, Youn-Il; Suh, KyeHong; Raven, John A; Yoo, Ook Joon; Liu, Jang Ryol

    2002-05-01

    We generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) plants that contained only one to three enlarged chloroplasts per leaf mesophyll cell by introducing NtFtsZ1-2, a cDNA for plastid division. These plants were used to investigate the advantages of having a large population of small chloroplasts rather than a few enlarged chloroplasts in a leaf mesophyll cell. Despite the similarities in photosynthetic components and ultrastructure of photosynthetic machinery between wild-type and transgenic plants, the overall growth of transgenic plants under low- and high-light conditions was retarded. In wild-type plants, the chloroplasts moved toward the face position under low light and toward the profile position under high-light conditions. However, chloroplast rearrangement in transgenic plants in response to light conditions was not evident. In addition, transgenic plant leaves showed greatly diminished changes in leaf transmittance values under both light conditions, indicating that chloroplast rearrangement was severely retarded. Therefore, under low-light conditions the incomplete face position of the enlarged chloroplasts results in decreased absorbance of light energy. This, in turn, reduces plant growth. Under high-light conditions, the amount of absorbed light exceeds the photosynthetic utilization capacity due to the incomplete profile position of the enlarged chloroplasts, resulting in photodamage to the photosynthetic machinery, and decreased growth. The presence of a large number of small and/or rapidly moving chloroplasts in the cells of higher land plants permits more effective chloroplast phototaxis and, hence, allows more efficient utilization of low-incident photon flux densities. The photosynthetic apparatus is, consequently, protected from damage under high-incident photon flux densities.

  2. Substrate profiling of tobacco etch virus protease using a novel fluorescence-assisted whole-cell assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kostallas

    Full Text Available Site-specific proteolysis of proteins plays an important role in many cellular functions and is often key to the virulence of infectious organisms. Efficient methods for characterization of proteases and their substrates will therefore help us understand these fundamental processes and thereby hopefully point towards new therapeutic strategies. Here, a novel whole-cell in vivo method was used to investigate the substrate preference of the sequence specific tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp. The assay, which utilizes protease-mediated intracellular rescue of genetically encoded short-lived fluorescent substrate reporters to enhance the fluorescence of the entire cell, allowed subtle differences in the processing efficiency of closely related substrate peptides to be detected. Quantitative screening of large combinatorial substrate libraries, through flow cytometry analysis and cell sorting, enabled identification of optimal substrates for TEVp. The peptide, ENLYFQG, identical to the protease's natural substrate peptide, emerged as a strong consensus cleavage sequence, and position P3 (tyrosine, Y and P1 (glutamine, Q within the substrate peptide were confirmed as being the most important specificity determinants. In position P1', glycine (G, serine (S, cysteine (C, alanine (A and arginine (R were among the most prevalent residues observed, all known to generate functional TEVp substrates and largely in line with other published studies stating that there is a strong preference for short aliphatic residues in this position. Interestingly, given the complex hydrogen-bonding network that the P6 glutamate (E is engaged in within the substrate-enzyme complex, an unexpectedly relaxed residue preference was revealed for this position, which has not been reported earlier. Thus, in the light of our results, we believe that our assay, besides enabling protease substrate profiling, also may serve as a highly competitive platform for directed evolution of

  3. Comparison of Tobacco Host Cell Protein Removal Methods by Blanching Intact Plants or by Heat Treatment of Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyel, Johannes F; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Plants not only provide food, feed and raw materials for humans, but have also been developed as an economical production system for biopharmaceutical proteins, such as antibodies, vaccine candidates and enzymes. These must be purified from the plant biomass but chromatography steps are hindered by the high concentrations of host cell proteins (HCPs) in plant extracts. However, most HCPs irreversibly aggregate at temperatures above 60 °C facilitating subsequent purification of the target protein. Here, three methods are presented to achieve the heat precipitation of tobacco HCPs in either intact leaves or extracts. The blanching of intact leaves can easily be incorporated into existing processes but may have a negative impact on subsequent filtration steps. The opposite is true for heat precipitation of leaf extracts in a stirred vessel, which can improve the performance of downstream operations albeit with major changes in process equipment design, such as homogenizer geometry. Finally, a heat exchanger setup is well characterized in terms of heat transfer conditions and easy to scale, but cleaning can be difficult and there may be a negative impact on filter capacity. The design-of-experiments approach can be used to identify the most relevant process parameters affecting HCP removal and product recovery. This facilitates the application of each method in other expression platforms and the identification of the most suitable method for a given purification strategy.

  4. Consumption of salted meat and its interactions with alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking on esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sihao; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Chengyu; Liu, Xudong; Zhao, Jin; Yu, Ignatius T S; Christiani, David C

    2015-08-01

    Etiology of esophageal cancer has not yet been clearly documented, especially in high-risk regions. To evaluate the association between salted meat intake and esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to explore its joint effects with alcohol drinking and smoking, a population-based case-control study was conducted in a high ESCC risk area in China, including 942 incident ESCC cases and 942 age- and sex-matching controls. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to collect information on dietary factors, alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking. Conditional logistic regressions were applied to estimate the association between salted meat intake and ESCC and its interactions with alcohol drinking and smoking, with adjustment for other confounders, including total energy intake. Salted meat intake was associated with an increased risk of ESCC, showing an exposure-response relationship (p for trend alcohol drinking or smoking had a greater risk than salted meat alone, which was more than additive. The strongest association was seen in the combination of all the three factors, particularly at the highest level of salted meat intake (odds ratio = 29.27, 95% confidence interval: 13.21-64.89). Salted meat intake is strongly associated with ESCC and its interactions with alcohol drinking and/or smoking highlights the significance of reducing salted meat intake among smokers and drinkers with respect to ESCC prevention.

  5. Influence of the Nutrient Medium on the Recovery of Dividing Cells from Tobacco Protoplasts 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Murashige, Toshio

    1976-01-01

    Systematic tests resulted in a nutrient solution containing the following, in milligrams per liter, for the culture of protoplasts isolated from Nicotiana tabacum L. callus cells: Murashige and Skoog salts (T. Murashige and F. Skoog, 1962. Physiol. Plant. 15: 473-497); sucrose, 15,000; mannitol, 110,000; α-naphthaleneacetic acid, 0.6; kinetin, 0-0.1; thiamine·HCl, 10; pyridoxine·HCl, 10; nicotinic acid, 5; myo-inositol, 100; and glycine, 2. In this medium, regeneration of cell wall has been observed in 85% and resumption of cell division among 35% of the protoplast isolates. PMID:16659496

  6. Relationship of phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) level to exposure to tobacco smoke in primary non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Bo Bin; Han, Joungho; Song, Sang Yong; Shim, Young Mog; Park, Joobae; Kim, Duk-Hwan

    2009-02-18

    This study was aimed at understanding the effect of smoking on pRb phosphorylation and the clinicopathological significance of phospho-pRb in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) expression was not detected in 149 (39%) of 382 patients, and the mean phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) level was 5.7%. Squamous cell carcinoma had higher phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) levels than adenocarcinoma (7.1%+/-10.4% versus 4.7%+/-7.9%; P=0.003). The association between phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) levels and exposure to tobacco smoke was different according to the statuses of cyclin D1 expression and p16 methylation, suggesting that their statuses might play a role as an effect modifier in the relationship between phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) levels and exposure to tobacco smoke. In stratified multivariate analysis, phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) levels were not associated with exposure to tobacco smoke in 38 patients with p16 hypermethylation and cyclin D1 expression >5%, after adjusting for confounding factors. However, in the remaining 344 patients, the mean phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) levels in patients who had smoked >40 pack years increased by 4.65% (PpRb (Ser-807/811) levels and overall survival. In conclusion, the present study suggests that exposure to tobacco smoke is associated with phosphorylation of pRb in NSCLC patients and its relationship depends on the p16 methylation status and cyclin D1 expression levels.

  7. Tobacco Smoke Activates Human Papillomavirus 16 p97 Promoter and Cooperates with High-Risk E6/E7 for Oxidative DNA Damage in Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Juan P.; Chnaiderman, Jonás; Urzúa, Ulises; León, Oscar; Tornesello, Maria L.; Corvalán, Alejandro H.; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Aguayo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown a functional interaction between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 and E7 oncoproteins and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in lung cells suggesting cooperation during carcinogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of such interaction, however, remain to be elucidated. Here we first present evidence showing that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) has the ability to activate the HPV-16 p97 promoter by acting on the long control region (LCR) in lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, we observed that CSC-induced p97 promoter activation occurs in a dose-dependent manner in both tumor A-549 (lung adenocarcinoma), H-2170 (bronchial carcinoma), SiHa or Hela (cervical carcinoma) cells but not in non-tumor BEAS-2B (bronchial) or NL-20 (alveolar) lung cells unless they ectopically expressed the HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes. In addition, we also observed a significant increase of primary DNA damage in tumor and non-tumor CSC-treated lung cells expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes suggesting a cooperative effect in this process, even though the contribution of E7 was significantly higher. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that tobacco smoke is able to induce the activation of the HPV-16 p97 promoter in cooperation with HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes that, in turn, sensitize lung cells to tobacco smoke-induced DNA damage. PMID:25830243

  8. Auxin influx inhibitors 1-NOA, 2-NOA, and CHPAA interfere with membrane dynamics in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanková, Martina; Smith, Richard S; Pesek, Bedrich; Kubes, Martin; Zazímalová, Eva; Petrásek, Jan; Hoyerová, Klára

    2010-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin is transported through the plant body either via vascular pathways or from cell to cell by specialized polar transport machinery. This machinery consists of a balanced system of passive diffusion combined with the activities of auxin influx and efflux carriers. Synthetic auxins that differ in the mechanisms of their transport across the plasma membrane together with polar auxin transport inhibitors have been used in many studies on particular auxin carriers and their role in plant development. However, the exact mechanism of action of auxin efflux and influx inhibitors has not been fully elucidated. In this report, the mechanism of action of the auxin influx inhibitors (1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA), 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (2-NOA), and 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (CHPAA)) is examined by direct measurements of auxin accumulation, cellular phenotypic analysis, as well as by localization studies of Arabidopsis thaliana L. auxin carriers heterologously expressed in Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Bright Yellow cell suspensions. The mode of action of 1-NOA, 2-NOA, and CHPAA has been shown to be linked with the dynamics of the plasma membrane. The most potent inhibitor, 1-NOA, blocked the activities of both auxin influx and efflux carriers, whereas 2-NOA and CHPAA at the same concentration preferentially inhibited auxin influx. The results suggest that these, previously unknown, activities of putative auxin influx inhibitors regulate overall auxin transport across the plasma membrane depending on the dynamics of particular membrane vesicles.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) suspension cultured cells and involvement of Ca(2+) and calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Gong, Ming; Xie, Hong; Yang, Lan; Li, Jing

    2012-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is considered as a new emerging cell signal in higher plants. Hydrogen sulfide donor, sodium hydrosulfide, pretreatment significantly increased survival percentage of tobacco suspension cultured cells under heat stress and regrowth ability after heat stress, and alleviated decrease in vitality of cells, increase in electrolyte leakage and accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance was markedly strengthened by application of exogenous Ca(2+) and its ionophore A23187, respectively, while this heat tolerance was weakened by addition of Ca(2+) chelator ethylene glycol-bis(b-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), plasma membrane channel blocker La(3+), as well as calmodulin (CaM) antagonists chlorpromazine (CPZ) and trifluoperazine (TFP), respectively, but intracellular channel blocker ruthenium red (RR) did not. These results suggested that sodium hydrosulfide pretreatment could improve heat tolerance in tobacco suspension cultured cells and the acquisition of this heat tolerance requires the entry of extracellular Ca(2+) into cells across the plasma membrane and the mediation of intracellular CaM.

  10. Changes of CD8+CD28- T regulatory cells in rat model of colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Bin Xiao; Yu-Lan Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the changes of CD8+ T subsets especially CD8+CD28- T regulatory cells in rat model of experimental colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrofiuorobenzene (DNFB).METHODS: The rat model of experimental colitis was induced by enema with DNFB. Ten days later, colonic intraepithelial and splenic lymphocytes were isolated from colitis animals (n=16) and controls (n=8). The proportion of CD8+ T cells, CD8+CD28+ T cells and CD8+CD28- T regulatory cells were determined by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The model of experimental colitis was successfully established by DNFB that was demonstrated by bloody diarrhea, weight loss and colonic histopathology. The proportion of CD8+ T cells in either splenic or colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes was not significantly different between colitis animals and controls (spleen: 34.6±7.24 % vs33.5±9.41%,colon: 14.0±8.93 % vs 18.0±4.06 %, P>0.05). But CD8+CD28-T regulatory cells from colitis animals were significantly more than those from controls (spleen: 11.3±2.26 % vs5.64±1.01%,colon: 6.50±5.37 % vs 1.07±0.65 %, P<0.05). In contrast,CD8+CD28+ T cells from colitis animals were less than those from controls (spleen: 23.3±6.14 % vs27.8±9.70 %, P=0.06;colon: 7.52±4.18 % vs 16.9±4.07 %, P<0.05). The proportion of CD8+CD28- T regulatory cells in splenic and colonintraepithelial CD8+ T cells from colitis animals was higher than that from controls (spleen: 33.3±5.49 % vs 18.4±7.26 %,colon: 46.0±14.3 % vs6.10±3.72 %, P<0.005).CONCLUSION: Experimental colitis of rats can be induced by DNFB with simplicity and good reproducibility. The proportion of CD8+CD28- T regulatory cells in rats with experimental colitis is increased, which may be associated with the pathogenesis of colitis.

  11. DIFFERENTIAL SENSITIVITY OF MALE GERM CELLS TO MAINSTREAM AND SIDESTREAM TOBACCO SMOKE IN THE MOUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzos, Aris; Schmid, Thomas Ernst; Pina-Guzman, Belem; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Marchetti, Francesco

    2009-03-13

    Cigarette smoking in men has been associated with increased chromosomal abnormalities in sperm and with increased risks for spontaneous abortions, birth defects and neonatal death. Little is known, however, about the reproductive consequences of paternal exposure to second-hand smoke. We used a mouse model to investigate the effects of paternal exposure to sidestream (SS) smoke, the main constituent of second-hand smoke, on the genetic integrity and function of sperm, and to determine whether male germ cells were equally sensitive to mainstream (MS) and SS smoke. A series of sperm DNA quality and reproductive endpoints were investigated after exposing male mice for two weeks to MS or SS smoke. Our results indicated that: (i) only SS smoke significantly affected sperm motility; (ii) only MS smoke induced DNA strand breaks in sperm; (iii) both MS and SS smoke increased sperm chromatin structure abnormalities; and (iv) MS smoke affected both fertilization and the rate of early embryonic development, while SS smoke affected fertilization only. These results show that MS and SS smoke have differential effects on the genetic integrity and function of sperm and provide further evidence that male exposure to second-hand smoke, as well as direct cigarette smoke, may diminish a couple's chance for a successful pregnancy and the birth of a healthy baby.

  12. Comparative Detection of Calcium Fluctuations in Single Female Sex Cells of Tobacco to Distinguish Calcium Signals Triggered by in vitro Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong-Bo Peng; Meng-Xiang Sun; Hong-Yuan Yang

    2009-01-01

    Double fertilization is a key process of sexual reproduction in higher plants. The role of calcium In the activation of female sex cells through fertilization has recently received a great deal of attention. The establishment of a Ca-imaging technique for living, single, female sex cells is a difficult but necessary prerequisite for evaluating the role of Ca in the transduction of external stimuli, including the fusion with the sperm cell, to internal cellular processes. The present study describes the use of Fluo-3 for reporting the Ca signal in isolated, single, female sex cells, egg cells and central cells, of tobacco plants. A suitable loading protocol was optimized by loading the cells at pH 5.6 with 2 μM Fluo-3 for 30 min at 30℃. Under theseconditions, several key factors related to in vitro fertilization were also investigated in order to test their possible effects onthe [Ca] of the female sex cells. The results indicated that the bovine serum albumin-fusion system was superior to the polyethlene glycol.fusion system for detecting calcium fluctuations in female sex cells during fertilization. The central cell was fertilized with the sperm cell in bovine serum albumin; however, no evident calcium dynamic was detected, implying that a transient calcium rise might be a specific signal for egg cell fertilization.

  13. Osmotically induced cell swelling versus cell shrinking elicits specific changes in phospholipid signals in tobacco pollen tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E. Zonia; T. Munnik

    2004-01-01

    Pollen tube cell volume changes rapidly in response to perturbation of the extracellular osmotic potential. This report shows that specific phospholipid signals are differentially stimulated or attenuated during osmotic perturbations. Hypo-osmotic stress induces rapid increases in phosphatidic acid

  14. Inhibition of fucosylation of cell wall components by 2-fluoro 2-deoxy-L-fucose induces defects in root cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Marie; Lehner, Arnaud; Bardor, Muriel; Burel, Carole; Vauzeilles, Boris; Lerouxel, Olivier; Anderson, Charles T; Mollet, Jean-Claude; Lerouge, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    Screening of commercially available fluoro monosaccharides as putative growth inhibitors in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that 2-fluoro 2-l-fucose (2F-Fuc) reduces root growth at micromolar concentrations. The inability of 2F-Fuc to affect an Atfkgp mutant that is defective in the fucose salvage pathway indicates that 2F-Fuc must be converted to its cognate GDP nucleotide sugar in order to inhibit root growth. Chemical analysis of cell wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins demonstrated that fucosylation of xyloglucans and of N-linked glycans is fully inhibited by 10 μm 2F-Fuc in Arabidopsis seedling roots, but genetic evidence indicates that these alterations are not responsible for the inhibition of root development by 2F-Fuc. Inhibition of fucosylation of cell wall polysaccharides also affected pectic rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II). At low concentrations, 2F-Fuc induced a decrease in RG-II dimerization. Both RG-II dimerization and root growth were partially restored in 2F-Fuc-treated seedlings by addition of boric acid, suggesting that the growth phenotype caused by 2F-Fuc was due to a deficiency of RG-II dimerization. Closer investigation of the 2F-Fuc-induced growth phenotype demonstrated that cell division is not affected by 2F-Fuc treatments. In contrast, the inhibitor suppressed elongation of root cells and promoted the emergence of adventitious roots. This study further emphasizes the importance of RG-II in cell elongation and the utility of glycosyltransferase inhibitors as new tools for studying the functions of cell wall polysaccharides in plant development. Moreover, supplementation experiments with borate suggest that the function of boron in plants might not be restricted to RG-II cross-linking, but that it might also be a signal molecule in the cell wall integrity-sensing mechanism.

  15. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  16. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Longoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  17. Skin cell isolation and expansion for cell transplantation is limited in patients using tobacco, alcohol, or are exhibiting diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnen, Christa; Hartmann, Bernd; Steffen, Ingo; Bräutigam, Kirsten; Witascheck, Tom; Toman, Nidal; Küntscher, Markus V; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the isolation and expansion of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from donors with certain medical histories. Biopsies were taken from donors (N=32) falling into one or more of the following categories: a history of heavy smoking and/or alcohol abuse, drug abuse, diabetes mellitus or steroid treatment. Cells from donors who did not fall into any of the above-mentioned categories were used as controls. Proliferation and growth behaviour of cells were analyzed by measurement of passage duration, absorbance (MTT-assay) and light microscopy. Donors with a specific medical history required larger biopsy areas than the control group for isolating a sufficient number of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Times to confluence were significantly prolonged and absorbances (MTT) were significantly reduced in several donor groups when compared to control cultures. Biopsies from donors with steroid treatment, drug abuse and combined nicotine and alcohol abuse could not be established beyond passage 0 degrees or 1 degree, respectively. We conclude that isolation and expansion of skin cells from donors with certain medical histories may require larger biopsies, prolonged expansion times or may even result in failure. These findings may therefore be of clinical importance in the field of autologous skin cell transplantation.

  18. Comparative cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells in normal, tobacco users, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadoon Nivia

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The cytomorphometric changes observed in samples from oral SCC and oral leukoplakia were consistent with the current diagnostic features. Hence, the semi-automated cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells can be used as an objective adjunct diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  19. Risks of tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip navigation U.S. National Library of Medicine The navigation menu has been collapsed. Menu ... tobacco URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002032.htm Risks of tobacco To use the sharing features ...

  20. Tobacco and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper will review the epidemiology of the impact of cigarette smoking and other forms of tobacco exposure on human development. Sources of exposure described include cigarettes and other forms of smoked tobacco, secondhand (environmental) tobacco smoke, several forms of smok...

  1. North Carolina Tobacco Farmers' Changing Perceptions of Tobacco Control and Tobacco Manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crankshaw, Erik C.; Beach, Robert H.; Austin, W. David; Altman, David G.; Jones, Alison Snow

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine tobacco farmers' attitudes toward tobacco control, public health, and tobacco manufacturers in order to determine the extent to which rapidly changing economic conditions have influenced North Carolina tobacco farmer attitudes in ways that may provide tobacco control advocates with new opportunities to promote tobacco control…

  2. Inhibition of squalene synthase and squalene epoxidase in tobacco cells triggers an up-regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme a reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzinger, Laurent F; Bach, Thomas J; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée

    2002-09-01

    To get some insight into the regulatory mechanisms controlling the sterol branch of the mevalonate pathway, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow-2) cell suspensions were treated with squalestatin-1 and terbinafine, two specific inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS) and squalene epoxidase, respectively. These two enzymes catalyze the first two steps involved in sterol biosynthesis. In highly dividing cells, SQS was actively expressed concomitantly with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and both sterol methyltransferases. At nanomolar concentrations, squalestatin was found to inhibit efficiently sterol biosynthesis as attested by the rapid decrease in SQS activity and [(14)C]radioactivity from acetate incorporated into sterols. A parallel dose-dependent accumulation of farnesol, the dephosphorylated form of the SQS substrate, was observed without affecting farnesyl diphosphate synthase steady-state mRNA levels. Treatment of tobacco cells with terbinafine is also shown to inhibit sterol synthesis. In addition, this inhibitor induced an impressive accumulation of squalene and a dose-dependent stimulation of the triacylglycerol content and synthesis, suggesting the occurrence of regulatory relationships between sterol and triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathways. We demonstrate that squalene was stored in cytosolic lipid particles, but could be redirected toward sterol synthesis if required. Inhibition of either SQS or squalene epoxidase was found to trigger a severalfold increase in enzyme activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, giving first evidence for a positive feedback regulation of this key enzyme in response to a selective depletion of endogenous sterols. At the same time, no compensatory responses mediated by SQS were observed, in sharp contrast to the situation in mammalian cells.

  3. Phytophthora elicitor PB90 induced apoptosis in suspension cultures of tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Rui; ZHANG Zhengguang; WANG Yuanchao; ZHENG Xiaobo

    2005-01-01

    The protein elicitor PB90 secreted by Phytophthora boehmeriae is an efficient elicitor inducing the hypersensitive response and systemic acquired resistance in tobacco plants. Here, we observed cell death in suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 with PB90 treatment using Trypan blue staining method. And this cell death could be suppressed by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of proteins synthesis, which implies that PB90-induced cell death was an active cell death process requiring new protein synthesis. DAPI staining revealed that PB90 induce rapid chromatin condensation, margination, apoptotic bodies' formation and DNA laddering, further TUNEL assay also observed the specific breakage of 3′-OH ends. All of the above common morphological characteristics indicated that PB90 induced apoptosis in suspension cultures of tobacco, suggesting that hypersensitive response induced by PB90 is an apoptotic process.

  4. Detection and isolation of rare cells by 2-step enrichment high-speed flow cytometry/cell sorting and single cell LEAP laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, M. D.; Leary, James F.

    2011-02-01

    The clonal isolation of rare cells, especially cancer and stem cells, in a population is important to the development of improved medical treatment. We have demonstrated that the Laser-Enabled Analysis and Processing (LEAP, Cyntellect Inc., San Diego, CA) instrument can be used to efficiently produce single cell clones by photoablative dilution. Additionally, we have also shown that cells present at low frequencies can be cloned by photoablative dilution after they are pre-enriched by flow cytometry based cell sorting. Circulating tumor cells were modeled by spiking isolated peripheral blood cells with cells from the lung carcinoma cell line A549. Flow cytometry based cell sorting was used to perform an enrichment sort of A549 cells directly into a 384 well plate. Photoablative dilution was performed with the LEAPTM instrument to remove any contaminating cells, and clonally isolate 1 side population cell per well. We were able to isolate and grow single clones of side population cells using this method at greater than 90% efficiency. We have developed a 2 step method that is able to perform the clonal isolation of rare cells based on a medically relevant functional phenotype.

  5. Tobacco guard cells fix CO2 by both Rubisco and PEPcase while sucrose acts as a substrate during light-induced stomatal opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloso, Danilo M; Antunes, Werner C; Pinheiro, Daniela P; Waquim, Jardel P; Araújo, Wagner L; Loureiro, Marcelo E; Fernie, Alisdair R; Williams, Thomas C R

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptomic and proteomic studies have improved our knowledge of guard cell function; however, metabolic changes in guard cells remain relatively poorly understood. Here we analysed metabolic changes in guard cell-enriched epidermal fragments from tobacco during light-induced stomatal opening. Increases in sucrose, glucose and fructose were observed during light-induced stomatal opening in the presence of sucrose in the medium while no changes in starch were observed, suggesting that the elevated fructose and glucose levels were a consequence of sucrose rather than starch breakdown. Conversely, reduction in sucrose was observed during light- plus potassium-induced stomatal opening. Concomitant with the decrease in sucrose, we observed an increase in the level as well as in the (13) C enrichment in metabolites of, or associated with, the tricarboxylic acid cycle following incubation of the guard cell-enriched preparations in (13) C-labelled bicarbonate. Collectively, the results obtained support the hypothesis that sucrose is catabolized within guard cells in order to provide carbon skeletons for organic acid production. Furthermore, they provide a qualitative demonstration that CO2 fixation occurs both via ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPcase). The combined data are discussed with respect to current models of guard cell metabolism and function.

  6. Cell wall biochemical alterations during Agrobacterium-mediated expression of haemagglutinin-based influenza virus-like vaccine particles in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mauff, François; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne; Bardor, Muriel; Berard, Caroline; Doucet, Alain; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Vezina, Louis-Philippe; Driouich, Azeddine; Couture, Manon M-J; Lerouge, Patrice

    2017-03-01

    Influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) have been shown to induce a safe and potent immune response through both humoral and cellular responses. They represent promising novel influenza vaccines. Plant-based biotechnology allows for the large-scale production of VLPs of biopharmaceutical interest using different model organisms, including Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Through this platform, influenza VLPs bud from the plasma membrane and accumulate between the membrane and the plant cell wall. To design and optimize efficient production processes, a better understanding of the plant cell wall composition of infiltrated tobacco leaves is a major interest for the plant biotechnology industry. In this study, we have investigated the alteration of the biochemical composition of the cell walls of N. benthamiana leaves subjected to abiotic and biotic stresses induced by the Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation and the resulting high expression levels of influenza VLPs. Results show that abiotic stress due to vacuum infiltration without Agrobacterium did not induce any detectable modification of the leaf cell wall when compared to non infiltrated leaves. In contrast, various chemical changes of the leaf cell wall were observed post-Agrobacterium infiltration. Indeed, Agrobacterium infection induced deposition of callose and lignin, modified the pectin methylesterification and increased both arabinosylation of RG-I side chains and the expression of arabinogalactan proteins. Moreover, these modifications were slightly greater in plants expressing haemagglutinin-based VLP than in plants infiltrated with the Agrobacterium strain containing only the p19 suppressor of silencing.

  7. Sincronización de Células de Tabaco (Nicotiana tabacum NT-1 Synchronization of tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum NT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    León F Ruiz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se ha evaluado la capacidad sincronizante de afidicolina e hidroxiurea en cultivos de células de tabaco (Nicotiana tabacum NT-1. Los cultivos sincronizados son poderosas herramientas en estudios moleculares y bioquímicos relacionados al ciclo celular y comúnmente se utilizan químicos para bloquear el ciclo celular. La línea celular de tabaco (Nicotiana tabacum NT-1 proviene de la línea celular TBY-2, caracterizándose NT-1 por su menor velocidad de crecimiento y tamaño celular heterogéneo. Los resultados mostraron una sincronía del 30 % de NT-1 con afidicolina 5 mg/ml, similar a la obtenida con TBY-2. Se probaron diferentes concentraciones de hidroxiurea, obteniéndose niveles óptimos de sincronización de hasta 31 % con 0.75 mM. Se muestra también que es posible sincronizar cultivos NT-1 en porcentajes similares a cultivos TBY-2 con afidicolina e hidroxiurea. Para este propósito, se recomienda la hidroxiurea por ser químicamente más estable y económica.The synchronizing capacity of aphidicolin and hydroxyurea on NT-1 cultures of tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum NT-1. Synchronized cell cultures are a powerful tool in biochemistry and molecular studies related to cell cycle and commonly chemicals are used to block the biochemical cycle. The tobacco cell line NT-1 comes from cell line TBY-2, the former being characterized with a slower growth rate and heterogeneous cell size. Results show 30 % synchrony with 5 mg/ml aphidicolin, similar to that obtained with TBY-2. Different concentrations of hydroxyurea were tested, obtaining an optimal synchrony of 31 % at 0.75 mM of concentration. It is also shown that it is possible to synchronize NT-1 cultures in similar percentages to those obtained with TBY-2, with either aphidicolin or hydroxyurea. For this purpose, hydroxyurea is recommended because of its lower cost and chemical stability.

  8. Nicotine Levels and Presence of Selected Tobacco-Derived Toxins in Tobacco Flavoured Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some electronic cigarette (EC liquids of tobacco flavour contain extracts of cured tobacco leaves produced by a process of solvent extraction and steeping. These are commonly called Natural Extract of Tobacco (NET liquids. The purpose of the study was to evaluate nicotine levels and the presence of tobacco-derived toxins in tobacco-flavoured conventional and NET liquids. Methods. Twenty-one samples (10 conventional and 11 NET liquids were obtained from the US and Greek market. Nicotine levels were measured and compared with labelled values. The levels of tobacco-derived chemicals were compared with literature data on tobacco products. Results. Twelve samples had nicotine levels within 10% of the labelled value. Inconsistency ranged from −21% to 22.1%, with no difference observed between conventional and NET liquids. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs were present in all samples at ng/mL levels. Nitrates were present almost exclusively in NET liquids. Acetaldehyde was present predominantly in conventional liquids while formaldehyde was detected in almost all EC liquids at trace levels. Phenols were present in trace amounts, mostly in NET liquids. Total TSNAs and nitrate, which are derived from the tobacco plant, were present at levels 200–300 times lower in 1 mL of NET liquids compared to 1 gram of tobacco products. Conclusions. NET liquids contained higher levels of phenols and nitrates, but lower levels of acetaldehyde compared to conventional EC liquids. The lower levels of tobacco-derived toxins found in NET liquids compared to tobacco products indicate that the extraction process used to make these products did not transfer a significant amount of toxins to the NET. Overall, all EC liquids contained far lower (by 2–3 orders of magnitude levels of the tobacco-derived toxins compared to tobacco products.

  9. Smokeless Tobacco and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... range of risks, including nicotine addiction, from smokeless tobacco products may vary extensively because of differing levels of nicotine, carcinogens, and other toxins in different products” ( 6 ). Should ...

  10. Phenotypic modification of human airway epithelial cells in air-liquid interface culture induced by exposure to the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Johnny L; Brighton, Luisa E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-04-01

    The nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a potent tobacco-specific carcinogen. We used an air-liquid interface epithelial cell culture system to model changes associated with NNK exposure relative to pathologies documented in human tobacco-related illnesses. Although in vitro systems exhibit certain limitations, they often offer accentuation of subtle pathologies. While the distribution of cell types in control cultures typically favors the ciliated cell phenotype, NNK-exposed cultures transitioned to non-ciliated cell phenotypes as well as reflecting features consistent with squamous metaplasia. We conclude that NNK impacts normal growth and differentiation of human airway epithelium in a short interval of time in vitro.

  11. Activation of pyrophosphate:fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase by fructose 2,6-bisphosphate stimulates conversion of hexose phosphates to triose phosphates but does not influence accumulation of carbohydrates in phosphate-deficient tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, Alisdair R; Roscher, Albrecht; Ratcliffe, R. George; Kruger, Nicholas J

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the contribution of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate to the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism under phosphate stress. The study exploited heterotrophic tobacco callus lines expressing a modified mammalian 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose 2,6-bisphosphatase that increased the fructose 2,6-bisphosphate content of the tissue. The phosphate status of two transgenic and one untransformed cell line was perturbed by incubation with 2-deoxyglucose, a phosphate-sequestering agent, and by growth of callus on phosphate-depleted media. 31P-NMR spectroscopy confirmed that both treatments decreased cellular levels of inorganic phosphate and phosphorylated metabolites. Despite large decreases in the amounts of phosphate esters, UDPglucose and adenylates in response to phosphate deficiency, the fructose 2,6-bisphosphate content of each line was unaffected by 2-deoxyglucose and increased during growth on phosphate-limited media. Short-term treatment of callus with 2-deoxyglucose had only minor effects on the carbohydrate status of each line, whereas long-term phosphate deficiency caused an increase in starch and a decrease in soluble sugar content in both transgenic and control lines. There were no consistent differences between the three callus lines in metabolism of [U-14C]glucose in response to incubation with 2-deoxyglucose. In contrast, there was a decrease in partitioning of label into glycolytic products (particularly organic acids) in untransformed callus during growth on phosphate-depleted medium. This decrease was greatly attenuated in the transgenic lines with increased fructose 2,6-bisphosphate content. This suggests that the conversion of hexose phosphates to triose phosphates is constrained under phosphate-deficient conditions, and that this restriction can be relieved by activation of pyrophosphate:fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase. However, since the transgenic and control lines did not differ in the extent to which the

  12. Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Smoke-Free Laws Do Not Harm Business at Restaurants and Bars Stay Connected Twitter @TobaccoFreeKids Facebook Read ... Not Your Grandfather's Cigar Deadly Alliance: Big Tobacco & Convenience Stores Tobacco Ad Gallery U.S. Racketeering Verdict The ...

  13. Promising link of HLA-G polymorphism, tobacco consumption and risk of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) in North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Vertica; Gupta, Abhishek; Kumar, Rahul; Upadhyay, Ashish Datt; Dwivedi, Sadanand; Kumar, Lalit; Dey, Sharmistha

    2017-02-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-G) is a potent immune-tolerant molecule and has a critical role in various pathological conditions of cancer. The aim of the study was to analyze the association of HLA-G polymorphism as a risk factor in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC). The HLA-G polymorphism at 3'UTR 14bp INDEL (rs371194629) and +3142G/C (rs1063320) were studied in 383 HNSCC patients and 383 ethnically similar-aged healthy controls in North Indian population. The genotyping study of two polymorphisms of HLA-G was documented using DNA-PAGE and RFLP-PCR method. 14bp INDEL Del/Ins, Ins/Ins genotype and Ins allele were more pronounced in HNSCC patients in compared to controls. Whereas, +3142 C/C genotype and C allele were associated with risk factors in HNSCC. Furthermore, the dual effect of polymorphisms; both variants (Del/Ins-Ins/Ins & G/C-C/C) carrying loci was significantly (OR=2.78) associated with the disease compared to one variant (Del/Del-G/C or Del/Del-C/C or Ins/Ins-G/G). Moreover, both polymorphisms showed promising link in terms of tobacco influence on HNSCC risk. It can be concluded that this study first time reports that C/C, Del/Ins and Ins/Ins genotype as well as C and Ins allele could be major risk factors with strong impact of tobacco for HNSCC in North Indian population.

  14. Concentration dependent effects of tobacco particulates from different types of cigarettes on expression of drug metabolizing proteins, and benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in primary normal human oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Peter G; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Fleisher, Kenneth E; Gordon, Terry; Guttenplan, Joseph B

    2011-09-01

    The ability of tobacco smoke (TS) to modulate phase I and II enzymes and affect metabolism of tobacco carcinogens is likely an important factor in its carcinogenicity. For the first time several types of TS particulates (TSP) were compared in different primary cultured human oral epithelial cells (NOE) for their abilities to affect metabolism of the tobacco carcinogen, (BaP) to genotoxic products, and expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. TSP from, reference filtered (2RF4), mentholated (MS), reference unfiltered, (IR3), ultra low tar (UL), and cigarettes that primarily heat tobacco (ECL) were tested. Cells pretreated with TSP concentrations of 0.2-10 μg/ml generally showed increased rates of BaP metabolism; those treated with TSP concentrations above 10 μg/ml showed decreased rates. Effects of TSPs were similar when expressed on a weight basis. Weights of TSP/cigarette varied in the order: MS≈IR3>2RF4>ECL>UL. All TSPs induced the phase I proteins, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and 1B1 (CYP1B1), phase II proteins, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO1), and microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1), and additionally, hydroxysteroid (17-beta) dehydrogenase 2 (HSD17B2), as assessed by qRT-PCR. The pattern of gene induction at probable physiological levels favored activation over detoxification.

  15. Biological impact of cigarette smoke compared to an aerosol produced from a prototypic modified risk tobacco product on normal human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogel, U; Gonzalez Suarez, I; Xiang, Y; Dossin, E; Guy, P A; Mathis, C; Marescotti, D; Goedertier, D; Martin, F; Peitsch, M C; Hoeng, J

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking causes serious and fatal diseases. The best way for smokers to avoid health risks is to quit smoking. Using modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) may be an alternative to reduce the harm caused for those who are unwilling to quit smoking, but little is known about the toxic effects of MRTPs, nor were the molecular mechanisms of toxicity investigated in detail. The toxicity of an MRTP and the potential molecular mechanisms involved were investigated in high-content screening tests and whole genome transcriptomics analyses using human bronchial epithelial cells. The prototypic (p)MRTP that was tested had less impact than reference cigarette 3R4F on the cellular oxidative stress response and cell death pathways. Higher pMRTP aerosol extract concentrations had impact on pathways associated with the detoxification of xenobiotics and the reduction of oxidative damage. A pMRTP aerosol concentration up to 18 times higher than the 3R4F caused similar perturbation effects in biological networks and led to the perturbation of networks related to cell stress, and proliferation biology. These results may further facilitate the development of a systems toxicology-based impact assessment for use in future risk assessments in line with the 21st century toxicology paradigm, as shown here for an MRTP.

  16. Interaction of the tobacco lectin with histone proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schouppe, Dieter; Ghesquière, Bart; Menschaert, Gerben; De Vos, Winnok; Bourque, Stéphane; Trooskens, Geert; Proost, Paul; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Els

    2011-01-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) agglutinin or Nictaba is a member of a novel class of plant lectins residing in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of tobacco cells. Since tobacco lectin expression is only observed after the plant has been subjected to stress situations such as jasmonate treatment or insect attack, Nictaba is believed to act as a signaling protein involved in the stress physiology of the plant. In this paper, a nuclear proteomics approach was followed to identify the binding partne...

  17. Tobacco-specific Carcinogen 4-(Methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridyl )-1-butanone(NNK) Activating ERK1/2 MAP Kinases and Stimulating Proliferation of Hmnan Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is correlated with the development of various cancers. 4 - (Methylnitrosoamino) -1 - ( 3 -pyridyl) -1-butanone (NNK) is one of the major tobacco-specific carcinogens in the cigarette smoke, which increases the risk of breast cancer. In the present study, it was demonstrated that NNK rapidly activated ERK1 and ERK2 MAP kinases in human normal mammary epithelial cells. It was found that there are two different routes for the activation of ERK1/2with NNK. One is from nicotinic receptor nAchR to MEK1/2, and the other is from tyrosine kinase containing receptor to MEK1/2. The tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK shows a strong proliferative effect on normal human mammary epithelial cells and cancer mammary epithelial cells.

  18. Tobacco documents research methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stacey J; McCandless, Phyra M; Klausner, Kim; Taketa, Rachel; Yerger, Valerie B

    2011-05-01

    Tobacco documents research has developed into a thriving academic enterprise since its inception in 1995. The technology supporting tobacco documents archiving, searching and retrieval has improved greatly since that time, and consequently tobacco documents researchers have considerably more access to resources than was the case when researchers had to travel to physical archives and/or electronically search poorly and incompletely indexed documents. The authors of the papers presented in this supplement all followed the same basic research methodology. Rather than leave the reader of the supplement to read the same discussion of methods in each individual paper, presented here is an overview of the methods all authors followed. In the individual articles that follow in this supplement, the authors present the additional methodological information specific to their topics. This brief discussion also highlights technological capabilities in the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library and updates methods for organising internal tobacco documents data and findings.

  19. Laser-induced tobacco protoplast fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李银妹; 关力劼; 楼立人; 崔国强; 姚湲; 王浩威; 操传顺; 鲁润龙; 陈曦

    1999-01-01

    Laser tweezers can manipulate small particles, such as cells and organdies. When coupling them with laser microbeam selective fusion of two tobacco protoplasts containing some chloroplast was achieved. Physical and biological variables that affect laser trapping and laser-induced fusion were also discussed. The results show that the effect of chloroplast content and distribution on the yield of cell fusion is remarkable.

  20. 1.5-NM PROJECTION STRUCTURE OF HELA-CELL PROSOME-MCP (PROTEASOME) PROVIDED BY 2-DIMENSIONAL CRYSTALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PERKINS, GA; BERGSMASCHUTTER, W; KEEGSTRA, W; ARNBERG, AC; COUX, O; SCHERRER, K

    1994-01-01

    We grew two-dimensional crystals of HeLa cell prosomes, also called multicatalytic proteinases (MCP) and proteasomes, for a structure determination by electron microscopy. The molecules were arranged in side views in these crystals. The crystals have p21 plane group symmetry with one particle per un

  1. [Cancer prevention and tobacco control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gonghuan

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarized briefly the evidences for tobacco use as a cause of cancer based on hundreds of epidemiologic and biomedical studies carried out over the past 50-60 years, as well as overviewed the carcinogens in tobacco products and mechanisms of neoplasm induction by tobacco products. So, tobacco control is the important measure for cancer prevention.

  2. Noncigarette forms of tobacco use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carlos Alberto de Assis

    2008-12-01

    There are many preparations for tobacco use, which can be classified as smoking or smokeless tobacco. Among the noncigarette preparations that produce smoke, we cite cigars, pipes and narghiles. Smokeless tobacco can be found in preparations for chewing or for being absorbed by nasal and oral mucosae (snuff). However, all tobacco products deliver nicotine to the central nervous system and there is a confirmed risk of dependence. In addition, there is no safe form of tobacco use, and tobacco users have a significantly increased risk of morbidity and premature mortality due to tobacco-related diseases.

  3. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  4. Tobacco and cancer (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacco and its various components increase the risk of several types of cancer especially cancer of the lung, mouth, larynx, esophagus, bladder, kidney, pancreas, and cervix. Smoking also increases ...

  5. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  6. NAAG Tobacco Settlement Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999-2016. National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG). Policy—Tobacco Settlement Payments. The National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) provides...

  7. [Evaluating tobacco dependance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François

    2006-11-29

    Good science needs good measurement instruments, and this is also true for the study of tobacco dependence. In this paper, we present and criticize the most frequently used instrument, the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence. This test, published 28 years ago, does not reflect current definitions of dependence. Several alternative approaches to the measurement of tobacco dependence are discussed, and more recent instruments are presented.

  8. Analysis of differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins in chromophobe renal cell carcinomas and renal oncocytomas by 2-D gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Yusenko, Thomas Ruppert, Gyula Kovacs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal oncocytomas (RO and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (RCC display morphological and functional alterations of the mitochondria. Previous studies showed that accumulation of mitochondria in ROs is associated with somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA resulting in decreased activity of the respiratory chain complex I, whereas in chromophobe RCC only heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations were found. To identify proteins associated with these changes, for the first time we have compared the mitochondrial proteomes of mitochondria isolated from ROs and chromophobe RCCs as well as from normal kidney tissues by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The proteome profiles were reproducible within the same group of tissues in subsequent experiments. The expression patterns within each group of samples were compared and 81 in-gel digested spots were subjected to nanoLC-MS/MS-based identification of proteins. Although the list of mitochondrial proteins identified in this study is incomplete, we identified the downregulation of NDUFS3 from complex I of the respiratory chain and upregulation of COX5A, COX5B, and ATP5H from complex IV and V in ROs. In chromophobe RCCs downregulation of ATP5A1, the alpha subunit of complex V, has been observed, but no changes in expression of other complexes of the respiratory chain were detected. To confirm the role of respiratory chain complex alterations in the morphological and/or functional changes in chromophobe RCCs and ROs, further studies will be necessary.

  9. Unity in diversity, a systems approach to regulating plant cell physiology by 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Could a disjoint group of enzymes synchronize their activities and execute a complex multi-step, measurable, and reproducible response? Here, I surmise that the alpha-ketoglutarate dependent superfamily of non-haem iron (II) dioxygenases could influence cell physiology as a cohesive unit, and that the broad spectra of substrates transformed is an absolute necessity to this portrayal. This eclectic group comprises members from all major taxa, and participates in pesticide breakdown, hypoxia signaling, and osmotic stress neutralization. The oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinate is coupled with a concomitant substrate hydroxylation and, in most cases, is followed by an additional specialized conversion. The domain profile of a protein sequence was used as an index of miscellaneous reaction chemistry and interpreted alongside existent kinetic data in a linear model of integrated function. Statistical parameters were inferred by the creation of a novel, empirically motivated flat-file database of over 3800 sequences (DB2OG) with putative 2-oxoglutarate dependent activity. The collated information was categorized on the basis of existing annotation schema. The data suggests that 2OG-dependent enzymes incorporate several desirable features of a systems level player. DB2OG, is free, accessible without a login to all users, and available at the following URL (http://comp-biol.theacms.in/DB2OG.html).

  10. Lost in traffic? The K+ channel of lily pollen, LilKT1, is detected at the endomembranes inside yeast cells, tobacco leaves and lily pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minou Jasmin Safiarian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization in plants relies on fast growth of pollen tubes through the style tissue towards the ovules. This polarized growth depends on influx of ions and water to increase the tube’s volume. K+ inward rectifying channels were detected in many pollen species, with one identified in Arabidopsis. Here, an Arabidopsis AKT1-like channel (LilKT1 was identified from Lilium longiflorum pollen. Complementation of K+ uptake deficient yeast mutants was only successful when the entire LilKT1 C-terminus was replaced by the AKT1 C-terminus. No signals were observed in the plasma membrane (PM of pollen tubes after expression of fluorescence-tagged LilKT1 nor were any LilKT1-derived peptides detectable in the pollen PM by mass spectrometry analysis. In contrast, fluorescent LilKT1 partly co-localized with the lily PM H+ ATPase LilHA2 in the PM of tobacco leaf cells, but exhibited a punctual fluorescence pattern and also sub-plasma membrane localization. Thus, incorporation of LilKT1 into the pollen PM seems tighter controlled than in other cells with still unknown trafficking signals in LilKT1’s C-terminus, resulting in channel densities below detection limits. This highly controlled incorporation might have physiological reasons: an uncontrolled number of K+ inward channels in the pollen PM will give an increased water influx due to the raising cytosolic K+ concentration, and finally, causing the tube to burst.

  11. Recycling of tobacco wastes after tobacco products manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Don

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing tobacco wastes is one of the important problems for tobacco industry. They can be divided into easy recycled which can be returned into technological process without special treatment, and irretrievable which can be recycled only after special treatment. Easy recycled wastes consist of leaf parts and large tobacco scraps, which are cleaned from the dust and then returned into manufacturing process. Irretrievable wastes consist of small tobacco scraps which use for reconstituted tobacco production and midrib parts which used for expanded stem manufacturing and added into cigarette for nicotine decreasing. Little tobacco scraps is not used for recycling and thus utilized. In the laboratory of technologies for tobacco products manufacturing possibility for utilizing little tobacco scraps for manufacturing new tobacco products: hookah blends and non-smoking products has been studied. Fractional composition of little tobacco scraps from cigarette industry has been defined. Samples of hookah blends and non-smoking products have been manufactured. New tobacco products manufactured from burley leaves were used as comparison. Tasting of these products has been done, utilizing methods developed in the laboratory. As the result, it has been found that samples made of wastes have better tasting score because of rich taste and tobacco aroma. Utilizing wastes instead of expensive leaf tobacco greatly decreases final cost of the product. As the result possibility and expediency of utilizing cigarette’s manufacturing wastes for hookah blends and non-smoking products manufacturing has been proved.

  12. Suppression of cell expansion by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis SUPERMAN gene in transgenic petunia an tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, M.M.; Franken, J.; Aelst, van A.; Angenent, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic analyses have shown that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene SUPERMAN (SUP) has at least two functions in Arabidopsis flower development. SUP is necessary to control the correct distribution of cells with either a stamen or carpel fate, and is essential for proper outgrowth of the ov

  13. Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) - Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2008-2012. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) – Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) - Global Adult Tobacco...

  14. Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) - Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2008-2012. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) – Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) - Global Adult Tobacco...

  15. Recycling of tobacco wastes after tobacco products manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    T. A. Don; A. G. Mirgorodskaya; O. K. Bedritskaya

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing tobacco wastes is one of the important problems for tobacco industry. They can be divided into easy recycled which can be returned into technological process without special treatment, and irretrievable which can be recycled only after special treatment. Easy recycled wastes consist of leaf parts and large tobacco scraps, which are cleaned from the dust and then returned into manufacturing process. Irretrievable wastes consist of small tobacco scraps which use for reconstituted toba...

  16. 75 FR 76921 - Tobacco Transition Payment Program; Tobacco Transition Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Corporation 7 CFR Part 1463 RIN 0560-AH30 Tobacco Transition Payment Program; Tobacco Transition Assessments... Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) is modifying the regulations for the Tobacco Transition Payment Program (TTPP) to clarify, consistent with current practice and as required by the Fair and Equitable...

  17. HIF-1α inhibition by 2-methoxyestradiol induces cell death via activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe, Nana; Chen, Shuya; Zhou, Zhen; Liu, Ping; Lin, Xiaojing; Yu, Meisheng; Cheng, Bingqing; Zhang, Yaming; Wang, Jishi

    2016-06-02

    The bone marrow microenvironment plays an important role in the development and progression of AML. Leukemia stem cells are in a hypoxic condition, which induces the expression of HIF-1α. Aberrant activation of HIF-1α is implicated in the poor prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Herein, we investigated the expression of HIF-1α in AML and tested 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) as a candidate HIF-1α inhibitor for the treatment of AML. We found that HIF-1α was overexpressed in AML. HIF-1α suppression by 2ME2 significantly induced apoptosis of AML cells, and it outperformed traditional chemotherapy drugs such as cytarabine. At the same time, 2ME2 downregulated the transcriptional levels of VEGF, GLUT1 and HO-1 in cellular assays. Additionally, 2ME2 displayed antileukemia activity in bone marrow blasts from AML patients, but showed little effect on normal cells. 2ME2-induced activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which decreased the slight effect of drug on normal cells. Our data show that supression of HIF-1α expression significantly reduced the survival of AML cell lines, suggesting that 2ME2 may represent a powerful therapeutic approach for patients with AML.

  18. HGF is released from buccal fibroblasts after smokeless tobacco stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, S; Christensen, S; Gron, B;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of smokeless tobacco (ST) on (1) HGF, KGF and GM-CSF expression by buccal fibroblasts and (2) on keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation. Buccal fibroblasts were stimulated with different concentrations of ST extracts in a double dilution from 0.50% w/v to 0.03% w...... on exposure time and on concentration of the tobacco extract. High concentration increased production of HGF 4-fold. KGF production was doubled when high concentration of tobacco was used, low concentration did not stimulate cells. GM-CSF production was low in both stimulated and non-stimulated cells...

  19. 27 CFR 40.257 - Processed tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Processed tobacco. 40.257 Section 40.257 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES,...

  20. Human Papillomavirus and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study regarding Tobacco and Alcohol Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Farshadpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the role of HPV in the pathogenesis and outcome of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC in lifelong nonsmoking and nondrinking patients. A case-case analysis was performed to compare the presence of HPV-DNA in tumor cells of 16 nonsmoking and nondrinking with 16 matched smoking and drinking patients (matching criteria: age at incidence, gender, tumor sublocation, tumor stage. HPV was detected using 2 PCR tests, FISH analysis, and p16INK4A immunostaining. Nonsmoking and nondrinking patients had more HPV-positive tumors than smoking and drinking patients (n=12; 75% versus n=2; 13%; P<0.001. All HPV-positive tumors showed p16INK4A overexpression, and 1 HPV-negative tumor had p16INK4A overexpression, (P<0.001. Overall survival and disease-specific survival were higher for HPV-positive compared to HPV-negative cases (P=0.027, P=0.039, resp.. In conclusion, HPV is strongly associated with OSCC of nonsmoking and nondrinking patients. Specific diagnostic and therapeutic actions should be considered for these patients to achieve a better prognosis.

  1. Tobacco Workers in 1916

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    I looked at the women in the photo carefully,judging theirage from the style of their hair and clothes,and guessingtheir mood at the time when the photo was taken. On this photo there are about 50 workers from theNanyang Brothers Tobacco Company,who are sitting in thefactory working.It seems they are married women, for allwear their hair in buns.Behind them stand two men in white;they may be the foremen. Women tobacco workers were one branch of Chinesewomen workrs in modern industry.At the end of the 1900’s,the reeling.cotton spinning,match and cigarette trades usedwomen workers extensively.They were mainly employed inenterprises with more than 500 workers,chiefly in cotton,silkand weaving mills.They also amassed in the tobacco trade,

  2. Price and consumption of tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Virendra Singh; Bharat Bhushan Sharma; Puneet Saxena; Hardayal Meena; Daya Krishan Mangal

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is thought that price increase in tobacco products leads to reduced consumption. Though many studies have substantiated this concept, it has not been well studied in India. Recently, price of tobacco products was increased due to ban on plastic sachets of chewing tobacco and increased tax in Rajasthan. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of price rise on overall consumption of tobacco in Jaipur city, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in Jai...

  3. FUELS IN TOBACCO PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Čavlek, M.; Boić, M.; Kristina Gršić; V. Kozumplik

    2008-01-01

    Energy production from biomass can reduce „greenhouse effect” and contribute to solving energy security especially in the agricultural households which rely on energy from fossil fuels. In Croatia fuel-cured tobacco is produced on about 5000 ha. Gross income for the whole production is about 180 000 000 kn/year. Flue-cured tobacco is a high energy consuming crop. There are two parts of energy consumption, for mechanization used for the field production (11%) and, energy for bulk-curing (89%)....

  4. Tobacco Use among Sexual Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Lawrence O.; Bowman, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    This chapter addresses tobacco use among sexual minorities. It examines research on the prevalence of tobacco use in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community and discusses why tobacco use within this group continues to significantly exceed that of the general population.

  5. Vacuolar transport in tobacco leaf epidermis cells involves a single route for soluble cargo and multiple routes for membrane cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottanelli, Francesca; Foresti, Ombretta; Hanton, Sally; Denecke, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    We tested if different classes of vacuolar cargo reach the vacuole via distinct mechanisms by interference at multiple steps along the transport route. We show that nucleotide-free mutants of low molecular weight GTPases, including Rab11, the Rab5 members Rha1 and Ara6, and the tonoplast-resident Rab7, caused induced secretion of both lytic and storage vacuolar cargo. In situ analysis in leaf epidermis cells indicates a sequential action of Rab11, Rab5, and Rab7 GTPases. Compared with Rab5 members, mutant Rab11 mediates an early transport defect interfering with the arrival of cargo at prevacuoles, while mutant Rab7 inhibits the final delivery to the vacuole and increases cargo levels in prevacuoles. In contrast with soluble cargo, membrane cargo may follow different routes. Tonoplast targeting of an α-TIP chimera was impaired by nucleotide-free Rha1, Ara6, and Rab7 similar to soluble cargo. By contrast, the tail-anchored tonoplast SNARE Vam3 shares only the Rab7-mediated vacuolar deposition step. The most marked difference was observed for the calcineurin binding protein CBL6, which was insensitive to all Rab mutants tested. Unlike soluble cargo, α-TIP and Vam3, CBL6 transport to the vacuole was COPII independent. The results indicate that soluble vacuolar proteins follow a single route to vacuoles, while membrane spanning proteins may use at least three different transport mechanisms.

  6. Tobacco point-of-purchase promotion: examining tobacco industry documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavack, Anne M; Toth, Graham

    2006-10-01

    In the face of increasing media restrictions around the world, point-of-purchase promotion (also called point-of-sale merchandising, and frequently abbreviated as POP or POS) is now one of the most important tools that tobacco companies have for promoting tobacco products. Using tobacco industry documents, this paper demonstrates that tobacco companies have used point-of-purchase promotion in response to real or anticipated advertising restrictions. Their goal was to secure dominance in the retail setting, and this was achieved through well-trained sales representatives who offered contracts for promotional incentive programmes to retailers, which included the use of point-of-sale displays and merchandising fixtures. Audit programmes played an important role in ensuring contract enforcement and compliance with a variety of tobacco company incentive programmes. Tobacco companies celebrated their merchandising successes, in recognition of the stiff competition that existed among tobacco companies for valuable retail display space.

  7. Price and consumption of tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is thought that price increase in tobacco products leads to reduced consumption. Though many studies have substantiated this concept, it has not been well studied in India. Recently, price of tobacco products was increased due to ban on plastic sachets of chewing tobacco and increased tax in Rajasthan. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of price rise on overall consumption of tobacco in Jaipur city, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in Jaipur city. Two-staged stratified sampling was used. In the first phase of study, cost and consumption of various tobacco products in the months of February and April were enquired from 25 retail tobacco shops. In the second phase, tobacco consumption was enquired from 20 consecutive consumers purchasing any tobacco product from all the above retail tobacco shops. The data were statistically analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired "t" test. Results: The comparison of prices of tobacco products between February and April revealed that the price of cigarette, bidi, and chewing tobacco has increased by 19%, 21%, and 68%, respectively. Average decrease in sales of cigarettes, bidi, and chewing tobacco at shops included in the study were 14%, 23%, and 38%, respectively. The consumers purchasing tobacco also reported decreased consumption. Chewing tobacco showed the maximum reduction (21%. Consumption of cigarette and bidi has also reduced by 15% and 13%, respectively. Conclusion: It may be concluded that reduction in consumption is associated with increased price of tobacco products. Reduced consumption is comparative to the magnitude of price increase.

  8. Floral gradient in flowering tobacco in relation to free amino acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYONGNING; WENANLI

    1993-01-01

    By employing TCLs (thin cell layers) culture, the floral gradient in flowering tobacco of different developmental stages was confirmed. The TCLs from early flowering tobacco regenerated more floral buds than those from the tobacco plants in full blooming or fruiting stages. Analysis of free amino acid levels revealed the acropetal gradient of Pro in flowering tobacco stem. L-Pro. L-Trp. D,L-Met and L-Arg were respectively added into the culture medium for testing their influence on floral bud formation from tobacco pedicel segments. Only L-Trp evidently enhanced the floral bud neoformation.

  9. Isolation of Two Populations of Sperm Cells from the Pollen Tube of Tobacco%烟草精细胞两个群体的分离

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱义兰; 杨延红; 张塞群; 田惠桥

    2004-01-01

    Pollen of Nicotiana tabacum L. is bicellular type, a generative cell and a vegetative cell in a mature pollen grain. To isolate sperm cells pollen tube should be induced in advance. Using an in vivo-in vitro technique, the style was pollinated and kept in vivo growing for 37 h and then cut about 3.5-4.0 cm long to be cultured in a medium containing 15%(W/V) sucrose, 0.01% (W/V) boric acid, 0.01% (W/V) CaCl2,0.01% (W/V) KH2PO4, at pH 5.0. A numerous pollen tubes grew out of the cut end of the style after being cultured for 3-5 h. When the pollen tubes were transferred to a broken solution just containing 9% mannitol some tubes broke and released the tube content into the broken solution including two sperm cells. Two sperm cells just released from the tube are connected with vegetative nucleus (VN) of pollen tube consisting of a male germ unit (MGU). Two sperm cells of tobacco are dimorphism: one is big and the other small. The small one (Svn) connects with vegetative nucleus and the big one only associates with the small one. Two isomorphic sperm cells might be selective fusion with egg cell and central cell during in vivo fertilization (preferential fertilization). When two associated sperm cells were transferred into a solution containing 0.01% cellulase, 0.008% pectinase and 9% mannitol, the association between two brother sperm cells disappeared, and both cells could be easily separated using a micromanipulator. To probe the mechanism of preferential fertilization two sperm cells from one pollen tube have to be separated each other to find the differences at the molecular level. Two sperm cells were respectively collected into two individual populations, each containing over thousand big sperm cells or small one, using a micromanipulator.The two sperm populations will offer a possibility to find the differences between two sperm cells in genes and proteins by using molecular methods, which will help us to understand the mechanism of preferential fertilization

  10. Smoked Tobacco Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States from India and other Southeast Asian countries. They are tobacco wrapped in a tendu or temburni leaf—plants native to Asia—that may be tied with colorful string at one or both ends. Bidis can be flavored—such as chocolate, cherry, or mango—or unflavored. Flavored bidis, however, ...

  11. NO TOBACCO DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service is joining in with the world no tobacco day, which takes place on 31 May 2002. We encourage you to take this opportunity to stop smoking for good. Nurses and Doctors will be present on that day to give out information on methods to stop smoking and to assist you in your efforts.

  12. [Tobacco--a source of biofuels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzianowska, Anna; Budzianowski, Jaromir

    2012-01-01

    One of the concepts of global protection of environment is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, mainly carbon dioxide, into the atmosphere by replacing fossil fuels by the so-called biofuels, which can be obtained from cultivated plants or any plant waste biomass. Currently applied industrial technologies allow the production of biofuels to receive ethanol, mostly from the reserve carbohydrates of sugar cane and corn as well as biodiesel from oil, mainly from rapeseed or oil palm. Tobacco, which provides a high biomass, can be used to produce biogas, bioethanol and biodiesel. The latter derived from oil from seeds and leaves of tobacco has proved useful for driving cars. Modest oil content in tobacco leaves can be increased by the expression of foreign genes encoding its biosynthesis. Promising future source of biofuels is a waste plant biomass consisting mainly of cell walls, which can be subjected to the degradation to produce sugars suitable for fermentation and the production of bioethanol. A number of enzymes needed for efficient degradation of plant cell walls can be produced using recombinant DNA technology in a variety of plants, particularly in chloroplasts of tobacco.

  13. Environmental health organisations against tobacco.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulcahy, Maurice

    2009-04-01

    Implementing the World Health Organisation (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) relies heavily on enforcement. Little is known of the way different enforcement agencies operate, prioritise or network. A questionnaire was sent to representatives of the International Federation of Environmental Health (IFEH) in 36 countries. Tobacco control was given low priority. Almost two thirds did not have any tobacco control policy. A third reported their organisation had worked with other agencies on tobacco control. Obstacles to addressing tobacco control included a lack of resources (61%) and absence of a coherent strategy (39%).

  14. FUELS IN TOBACCO PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Čavlek

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy production from biomass can reduce „greenhouse effect” and contribute to solving energy security especially in the agricultural households which rely on energy from fossil fuels. In Croatia fuel-cured tobacco is produced on about 5000 ha. Gross income for the whole production is about 180 000 000 kn/year. Flue-cured tobacco is a high energy consuming crop. There are two parts of energy consumption, for mechanization used for the field production (11% and, energy for bulk-curing (89%. In each case, presently used fuels of fossil origin need to be substituted by an alternative energy source of organic origin. Hereafter attention is paid to finding a more economic and ecologically acceptable fuel for curing tobacco. Curing flue-cured tobacco is done by heated air in curing burns. Various sources of heat have been used; wood, coal, oil and gas. In each case different burning facilities of different efficiency have been used. This has had an impact on curing costs and ecology. Recently, mostly used fuel has been natural gas. However, gas is getting expensive. Consequently, an alternative fuel for curing tobacco is sought for. According to literature, agricultural crops suitable for the latter purpose could be wheat, barley, maize, sorghum, sugar beet and some other annual and perennial plant species. Wooden pellets (by-products are suitable for combustion too. Ligno-cellulose fuels have been used for heating since long time. However, not sufficient research has been done from an applied point of view (Venturi and Venturi, 2003. Fuel combustion is getting more efficient with developing technological innovations. The curing barn manufacturers are offering technology for combusting wooden pellets (by-products for curing tobacco. The pellets are available on domestic market. The same technology can be used for combustion of maize grain. Within “Hrvatski duhani” research on suitability of using wooden pellets and maize grain and whole

  15. Tobacco or health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piha, T; Besselink, E; Lopez, A D

    1993-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the major cause of premature death among men in the CCEE/NIS. Reliable information on smoking prevalence and tobacco use is scarce, but the overall evidence points to two different patterns: a traditional and a high prevalence pattern. The traditional pattern dominates in the NIS and some of the CCEE, and is characterized by a high smoking rate in men (about 50%) and a low rate in women (10%). Smoking by women, however, is increasing, starting with the younger age groups. The high prevalence pattern found in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland, for example, shows a high smoking prevalence in women (about 25%) in addition to a high prevalence in men. Predictions made in 1990 indicated further increases or stable tobacco consumption in the CCEE/NIS by the year 2000, in contrast with the steady decrease in western European countries. When smoking is combined with other types of harmful health behaviour and environmental influences, the result is some of the highest mortality rates from lung cancer and other diseases in the world. This situation has caused severe concern in public health professionals in many of the affected countries, but not in the public and policy-makers. The fundamental changes in social and economic structures have both improved and decreased opportunities to promote nonsmoking. In the short term, the negative influences seem to dominate, although some countries, such as Lithuania and Poland, are now introducing their first realistic policies on tobacco. In most countries, however, tobacco control has to compete with other issues for priority on a crowded public health agenda.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Tobacco use by Indian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadda RK

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adolescents are the most vulnerable population to initiate tobacco use. It is now well established that most of the adult users of tobacco start tobacco use in childhood or adolescence. There has been a perceptible fall in smoking in the developed countries after realization of harmful effects of tobacco. The tobacco companies are now aggressively targeting their advertising strategies in the developing countries like India. Adolescents often get attracted to tobacco products because of such propaganda. There has been a rapid increase in trade and use of smokeless tobacco products in recent years in the country, which is a matter of serious concern to the health planners. It is important to understand various factors that influence and encourage young teenagers to start smoking or to use other tobacco products. The age at first use of tobacco has been reduced considerably. However, law enforcing agencies have also taken some punitive measures in recent years to curtail the use of tobacco products. This paper focuses on various tobacco products available in India, the extent of their use in adolescents, factors leading to initiation of their use, and the preventive strategies, which could be used to deal with this menace.

  17. Scaled-up manufacturing of recombinant antibodies produced by plant cells in a 200-L orbitally-shaken disposable bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raven, N.; Rasche, F.; Kuehn, C.; Anderlei, T.; Klöckner, W.; Schuster, F.; Henquet, M.G.L.; Bosch, H.J.; Büchs, J.; Fischer, R.; Schillberg, S.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells have emerged as a promising platform for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins, offering efficient protein secretion, favourable growth characteristics and cultivation in containment under a controlled environment. The cultivation of BY-2 cells in disposable bioreactors is

  18. Changing smokeless tobacco products new tobacco-delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Ebbert, Jon O; Feuer, Rachel M; Stepanov, Irina; Hecht, Stephen S

    2007-12-01

    Smokeless or noncombusted oral tobacco use as a substitute for cigarette smoking has been gaining greater interest and attention by the public health community and the tobacco industry. In order for the product to appeal to smokers, tobacco companies have been manufacturing new noncombusted oral tobacco (i.e., moist snuff) that is lower in moisture content and nitrosamine levels, packaged in small sachets and "spitless." While the primary motives of the major tobacco companies are to maintain or increase tobacco use, some members of the public health community perceive the use of noncombusted oral tobacco products as a harm reduction tool. Because cigarette smoking is associated with greater toxicant exposure compared to noncombusted oral tobacco, reduced mortality and morbidity are hypothesized to ensue, if cigarette smokers switched completely to these products. However, variability exists in levels of nicotine and toxicants and potential health consequences from use within and across countries. Therefore, promulgating noncombusted oral tobacco products as a safer alternative to smoking or as a substitute for smoking may engender more rather than less harm. To date, limited research is available on the effects of marketing noncombusted oral tobacco products to smokers, to support the use of these products as a harm reduction tool, and to determine the effects of varying levels of tobacco toxicants including nicotine on health. The need exists for manufacturing standards to lower toxicant levels of all noncombusted oral tobacco products, for the formulation of appropriate tobacco-product regulations and for the development of a strategic plan by the public health community to address this controversial topic.

  19. Analytical studies on tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines in tobacco and tobacco smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnemann, K D; Hoffmann, D

    1991-01-01

    Chemical-analytical studies have led to the identification of approximately 3000 compounds in tobacco and 4000 in tobacco smoke. These include carcinogens in processed tobacco as well as tumor initiators, tumor promoters, cocarcinogens, and organ-specific carcinogens in tobacco smoke. The latter group includes N-nitrosamines, in particular those that derive from nicotine and other tobacco alkaloids, the TSNA. In vitro nitrosation of nicotine yields NNN, NNA, and NNK. Nitrosation of other tobacco alkaloids leads to the formation of NAT, and NAB. Our analytical studies using GC-TEA have led to the identification of seven TSNA in tobacco and tobacco smoke. In addition to NNN, NAT, NAB, and NNK, we also identified NNAL, iso-NNAL, and, most recently, iso-NNAC. Their levels range from 0.01 to 92 ppm in tobacco and from 6 to 530 ng/cigarette in tobacco smoke. The high levels observed in snuff are primarily due to fermentation and aging. Technological methods exist today to reduce the levels of TSNA in both tobacco and cigarette smoke.

  20. Transient expression in tobacco Bright Yellow 2 cells and pollen grains: A fast, efficient and reliable system for functional promoter analysis of plant genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratić Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression is mediated by DNA sequences directly upstream from the coding sequences, recruited transcription factors and RNA polymerase in a spatially-defined manner. Understanding promoter strength and regulation would enhance our understanding of gene expression. The goal of this study was to develop a fast, efficient and reliable method for testing basal promoter activity and identifying core sequences within its pollen specific elements. In this paper we examined the functionality of buckwheat metallothionein promoter by a histochemical GUS assay in two transient expression systems: BY2 cells and pollen grains. Strong promoter activity was observed in both systems.

  1. Secondhand Smoke/“Light” Tobacco/ Smokeless Tobacco | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health. Here's why: Smokeless tobacco is still tobacco. Tobacco contains cancer-causing chemicals, including nitrosamines, a family of chemicals ... cigarettes. Nicotine addiction can make quitting difficult. Smokeless tobacco causes mouth cancer, pancreatic cancer, and other health problems, such as ...

  2. 76 FR 50226 - Harmful and Potentially Harmful Constituents in Tobacco Products and Tobacco Smoke; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... Tobacco Products and Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen (CA), respiratory toxicant (RT), cardiovascular toxicant (CT... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Harmful and Potentially Harmful Constituents in Tobacco Products and Tobacco Smoke; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  3. 7 CFR 29.2560 - Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tobacco. 29.2560 Section 29.2560 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2560 Tobacco. Tobacco as it appears...

  4. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines in new tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Irina; Jensen, Joni; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Hecht, Stephen S

    2006-04-01

    New tobacco products, designed to attract consumers who are concerned about the health effects of tobacco, have been appearing on the market. Objective evaluation of these products requires, as a first step, data on their potentially toxic constituents. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) are an important class of carcinogens in tobacco products, but virtually no data were available on their levels in these products. In the present study, we analyzed several new products-Ariva, Stonewall, Exalt, Revel, Smokey Mountain, and Quest-for TSNAs and compared their TSNA levels with those in nicotine replacement products and conventional smokeless tobacco and cigarette brands. TSNAs were not detected in Smokey Mountain, which is a tobacco-free snuff product. The lowest levels among the new products containing tobacco were in Ariva and Stonewall (0.26-0.28 microg/g wet weight of product). The highest levels in the new products were found in Exalt (3.3 microg/g tobacco), whereas Revel and Quest had intermediate amounts. Only trace amounts were found in nicotine replacement products, and conventional brands had levels consistent with those reported in the literature. These results demonstrate that TSNA levels in new tobacco products range from relatively low to comparable with those found in some conventional brands.

  5. Health effects of smokeless tobacco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-28

    Pharmacologic and physiologic effects of snuff and chewing tobacco include the gamut of cardiovascular, endocrinologic, neurologic, and psychological effects that are associated with nicotine. A review of studies appearing in the scientific literature involving various populations and approaches indicates that the use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with a variety of serious adverse effects and especially with oral cancer. The studies suggest that snuff and chewing tobacco also may affect reproduction, longevity, the cardiovascular system, and oral health. The Council on Scientific Affairs concludes there is evidence demonstrating that use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with adverse health effects such as oral cancer, urges the implementation of well-planned and long-term studies that will further define the risks of using snuff and chewing tobacco, and recommends that the restrictions applying to the advertising of cigarettes also be applied to the advertising of snuff and chewing tobacco.

  6. Tobacco advertising in retail stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, K M; Sciandra, R; Lawrence, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have described tobacco advertising in the print media, on billboards, and through sponsorship of cultural and sporting events. However, little attention has been given to another common and unavoidable source of tobacco advertising, that which is encountered in retail stores. In July 1987, we conducted a survey of 61 packaged goods retail stores in Buffalo, NY, to assess the prevalence and type of point-of-sale tobacco advertising. In addition, store owners or managers were surveyed to determine their store's policy regarding tobacco advertising, receipt of monetary incentives from distributors for displaying tobacco ads, and willingness to display antitobacco ads. Six types of stores were involved in the study: 10 supermarkets, 10 privately owned grocery stores, 9 chain convenience food stores that do not sell gasoline, 11 chain convenience food stores that sell gasoline, 11 chain pharmacies, and 10 private pharmacies. Two-thirds of the stores displayed tobacco posters, and 87 percent had promotional items advertising tobacco products, primarily cigarettes. Larger stores, and those that were privately owned, tended to display more posters and promotional items. Eighty percent of tobacco product displays were for cigarettes, 16 percent for smokeless tobacco products, and 4 percent for cigars and pipe tobacco. Convenience stores selling gasoline had the most separate tobacco product displays. Of tobacco product displays, 24 percent were located adjacent to candy and snack displays. Twenty-nine of the 61 store owners or managers indicated that their store had a policy regulating the display of tobacco ads and tobacco product displays. Policies dealt primarily with the location of tobacco posters (for example, no ads in the window) and number of product displays. Only 14 shop owners or managers indicated that they had previously displayed antitobacco information; more than half (31 of 61) said that they would be willing to display antitobaccoads.In many

  7. Overexpression of two cambium-abundant Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) α-expansin genes ClEXPA1 and ClEXPA2 affect growth and development in transgenic tobacco and increase the amount of cellulose in stem cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifeng; Gao, Yan; Wang, Jinjun; Yang, Liwei; Song, Rentao; Li, Xiaorong; Shi, Jisen

    2011-05-01

    Expansins are unique plant cell wall proteins that possess the ability to induce immediately cell wall extension in vitro and cell expansion in vivo. To investigate the biological functions of expansins that are abundant in wood-forming tissues, we cloned two expansin genes from the differentiating xylem of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook). Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that they belong to α-expansin (EXPA), named ClEXPA1 and ClEXPA2. Expression pattern analysis demonstrated that they are preferentially expressed in the cambium region. Overexpression of ClEXPA1 and ClEXPA2 in tobacco plants yielded pleiotropic phenotypes of plant height, stem diameter, leaf number and seed pod. The height and diameter growth of the 35S(pro) :ClEXPA1 and 35S(pro) :ClEXPA2 transgenic plants were increased drastically, exhibiting an enlargement of pith parenchyma cell size. Isolated cell walls of ClEXPA1 and ClEXPA2 overexpressors contained 30%-50% higher cellulose contents than the wild type, accompanied by a thickening of the cell walls in the xylem region. Both ClEXPA1 and ClEXPA2 are involved in plant growth and development, with a partially functional overlap. Expansins are not only able to induce cell expansion in different tissues/organs in vivo, but they also can act as a potential activator during secondary wall formation by directly or indirectly affecting cellulose metabolism, probably in a cell type-dependent manner.

  8. Associations between Schools' Tobacco Restrictions and Adolescents' Use of Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslash-Verland, Simon; Aaro, Leif Edvard; Lindbak, Rita Lill

    2010-01-01

    Schools are an important arena for smoking prevention. In many countries, smoking rates have been reduced among adolescents, but the use of smokeless tobacco is on the rise in some of these countries. We aimed to study the associations between schools' restrictions on smoking and snus and on the use of these tobacco products among students in…

  9. Book Review: The Chemical Components of Tobacco and Tobacco Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green CR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This book is highly recommended as an indispensable reference source for tobacco and smoke chemists as well as other scientists involved in the study of tobacco and its products. The compilation of proper chemical names, common names, Chemical Abstract Service numbers (CAS No., and structures is alone worth the purchase price.

  10. WHO Technical Manual on Tobacco Tax Administration

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This technical manual aims to help governments maximize the benefits that they can receive from higher tobacco taxes by identifying a set of best practices for tobacco taxation. This is one of several available or forthcoming products that focus on tobacco taxation, including: the forthcoming monograph on the economics of tobacco and tobacco control being jointly produced by WHO and the US National Cancer Institute (NCI); the handbook on the effectiveness of tobacco tax and price policies for...

  11. Tobacco alkaloids and tobacco-specific nitrosamines in dust from homes of smokeless tobacco users, active smokers, and nontobacco users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Todd P; Havel, Christopher; Metayer, Catherine; Benowitz, Neal L; Jacob, Peyton

    2015-05-18

    Smokeless tobacco products, such as moist snuff or chewing tobacco, contain many of the same carcinogens as tobacco smoke; however, the impact on children of indirect exposure to tobacco constituents via parental smokeless tobacco use is unknown. As part of the California Childhood Leukemia Study, dust samples were collected from 6 homes occupied by smokeless tobacco users, 6 homes occupied by active smokers, and 20 tobacco-free homes. To assess children's potential for exposure to tobacco constituents, vacuum-dust concentrations of five tobacco-specific nitrosamines, including N'-nitrosonornicotine [NNN] and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone [NNK], as well as six tobacco alkaloids, including nicotine and myosmine, were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We used generalized estimating equations derived from a multivariable marginal model to compare levels of tobacco constituents between groups, after adjusting for a history of parental smoking, income, home construction date, and mother's age and race/ethnicity. The ratio of myosmine/nicotine was used as a novel indicator of the source of tobacco contamination, distinguishing between smokeless tobacco products and tobacco smoke. Median dust concentrations of NNN and NNK were significantly greater in homes with smokeless tobacco users compared to tobacco-free homes. In multivariable models, concentrations of NNN and NNK were 4.8- and 6.9-fold higher, respectively, in homes with smokeless tobacco users compared to tobacco-free homes. Median myosmine/nicotine ratios were lower in homes with smokeless tobacco users (1.8%) compared to homes of active smokers (7.7%), confirming that cigarette smoke was not the predominant source of tobacco constituents in homes with smokeless tobacco users. Children living with smokeless tobacco users may be exposed to carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines via contact with contaminated dust and household surfaces.

  12. The hazardous effects of tobacco smoking on male fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Bo Dai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The substantial harmful effects of tobacco smoking on fertility and reproduction have become apparent but are not generally appreciated. Tobacco smoke contains more than 4000 kinds of constituents, including nicotine, tar, carbonic monoxide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and heavy metals. Because of the complexity of tobacco smoke components, the toxicological mechanism is notably complicated. Most studies have reported reduced semen quality, reproductive hormone system dysfunction and impaired spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, and spermatozoa function in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Underlying these effects, elevated oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell apoptosis may play important roles collaboratively in the overall effect of tobacco smoking on male fertility. In this review, we strive to focus on both the phenotype of and the molecular mechanism underlying these harmful effects, although current studies regarding the mechanism remain insufficient.

  13. Tobacco Products Production and Operations Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury — Monthly statistical reports on tobacco products production and operations. Data for Tobacco Statistical Release is derived directly from the Report – Manufacturer of...

  14. [DIP (desquamative interstitial pneumonia): as a tobacco-associated disease -- case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Vitor; Carvalho, Lina

    2004-01-01

    DIP (desquamative interstitial pneumonia) is an interstitial lung disease with diffuse and uniform accumulation of alveolar macrophages. There is a strong association with tobacco since 90% of the patients are smokers. The interstitial lung diseases related to tobacco are diverse and include tumours, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, RBILD (Respiratory Bronchilites associated Interstitial Lung Disease), DIP and Langerhans Cell Histiocitosis. The authors present a case of DIP. A brief theorycal revision and discussion of a case is made facing the association with tobacco.

  15. Tobacco Use and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffrin, John R.; Randall, B. Grove

    1982-01-01

    Oral disease risks regarding the use of tobacco arise not only from smoking but also from the oral use of tobacco in the form of snuff. Such diseases range from simple tooth decay to various forms of cancer. A fact list is suggested for presenting the risks to school-age youth. (JN)

  16. Tobacco socialization and anti-tobacco ad effectiveness among children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalbous, Slim; Bouslama, Heifa

    2012-01-01

    In order to prevent smoking onset among children, it is essential to know the process of smoking socialization and its various dimensions before being able to design any effective anti-tobacco advertisements. This research aims to conceptualize this process and to test the effectiveness of certain styles of anti-tobacco advertising addressed to children. The results show that both attitudinal and behavioral smoking socialization influence anti-tobacco advertisements effectiveness and that the least offensive and humoristic are most effective in Tunisia.

  17. Tobacco carcinogens, their biomarkers and tobacco-induced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S

    2003-10-01

    The devastating link between tobacco products and human cancers results from a powerful alliance of two factors - nicotine and carcinogens. Without either one of these, tobacco would be just another commodity, instead of being the single greatest cause of death due to preventable cancer. Nicotine is addictive and toxic, but it is not carcinogenic. This addiction, however, causes people to use tobacco products continually, and these products contain many carcinogens. What are the mechanisms by which this deadly combination leads to 30% of cancer-related deaths in developed countries, and how can carcinogen biomarkers help to reveal these mechanisms?

  18. Monitoring Epidemic of Tobacco Use, Promote Tobacco Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong-Huan YANG

    2010-01-01

    @@ Tobacco use is a major cause of preventable disease and premature death. The tobacco epidemic is responsible for 5.4 million deaths annually and killed 100 million people worldwide in the last century. It is estimated that by 2030 there will be more than 8 million deaths every year attributable to tobacco use and that more than 80% of these will occur in developing countries. By the end of the 21st century,1 billion people will have died from cigarette smoke[1].

  19. Activation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Defense Responses in Tobacco Cells Treated with Riboflavin%核黄素对烟草悬浮细胞活性氧和防卫反应的激活作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘菲; 魏芳芳; 王蕾; 刘辉; 梁元存; 刘爱新

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] To study the triggering defense responses in tobacco suspension cells after treated with riboflavin,reactive oxygen species (ROS) and defense-related responses were investigated together with their related effects involving in calcium signals and protein kinases.[method]tobacco suspension cells were treated 1 mmol·L~(-1) riboflavin or pretreated with inhibitors including calcium surrogate La~(3+),calcium chelator EGTA and staurosporine which is an inhibitor of serine/threonine protein kinase.A series of dynamic defense responses were then studied with several methods,including semiquantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) techniques.[Result] It was identified that a series of defense-related responses were induced in tobacco suspension cells after treated with riboflavin,such as an oxidative burst,resulting in alkalization of the extracellular medium,activated the expression of four defense-related genes,and the scopoletin accumulation.And all the tested three inhibitors were shown in suppressing the riboflavin triggered defense responses at difference levels.[Conclusion]These results suggest that riboflavin triggers plant basal defense signal pathway which are also concerned with calcium signal pathway and protein phosphorylation in tobacco cell suspensions as an elicitor.%[目的]研究核黄素处理烟草悬浮细胞后,激活的氧进发和防卫反应,以及钙信号和蛋白激酶对这些事件的影响.[方法]1mmol·L~(-1)核黄素处理烟草悬浮细胞,用半定量RT-PCR(reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction)和高效液相色谱(high performance liquid chromatography,HPLC)等方法测定一系列防卫反应,并用钙离子通道抑制剂LaCl3、钙离子螯合剂EGTA和一种丝氨酸/苏氨酸蛋白激酶抑制剂staurosporine处理细胞,测定防卫反应的变化.[结果]1mmol·L~(-1)核黄素处理悬浮细胞后,产生了氧进发、导致培

  20. Mechanisms of Cancer Induction by Tobacco-Specific NNK and NNN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jiaping [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Yang, Suping; Seng, Seyha, E-mail: sseng@bidmc.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    Tobacco use is a major public health problem worldwide. Tobacco-related cancers cause millions of deaths annually. Although several tobacco agents play a role in the development of tumors, the potent effects of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) are unique. Metabolically activated NNK and NNN induce deleterious mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppression genes by forming DNA adducts, which could be considered as tumor initiation. Meanwhile, the binding of NNK and NNN to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor promotes tumor growth by enhancing and deregulating cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion, thereby creating a microenvironment for tumor growth. These two unique aspects of NNK and NNN synergistically induce cancers in tobacco-exposed individuals. This review will discuss various types of tobacco products and tobacco-related cancers, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which nitrosamines, such as NNK and NNN, induce cancer.

  1. Tobacco and health in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Rao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is a well-acknowledged social and health evil. The history of tobacco use traces back to the dawn of human civilization and has been deeply entrenched into the human society since time immemorial. The social, economic, and health impact of tobacco has been a subject of intense debate over the recent decades. For India, this problem has been a unique one, with the consumption patterns either largely influenced by the socioeconomic backgrounds or dictated by the cultural diversity. With more than 200 million tobacco consumers in the country at present, it becomes imperative to address this health hazard and stir up strong measures toward damage control. This article addresses the tobacco problem, its evolution, and the factors that have affected the growth of Indian tobacco industry. It also highlights the current legislative measures against tobacco, fiscal gains to the government, and the serious health and economic impact to the consumer, compounded by the increasing cost of private health care in the present era of consumerism.

  2. 27 CFR 40.1 - Manufacture of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacture of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 40.1 Section 40.1 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED)...

  3. 27 CFR 41.1 - Importation of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Importation of tobacco products, cigarette papers and tubes, and processed tobacco. 41.1 Section 41.1 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED)...

  4. 7 CFR 29.6043 - Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tobacco. 29.6043 Section 29.6043 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6043 Tobacco. Tobacco in its unmanufactured forms as it appears...

  5. 7 CFR 29.9207 - Nonquota tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonquota tobacco. 29.9207 Section 29.9207 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO... Tobacco Produced and Marketed in a Quota Area Definitions § 29.9207 Nonquota tobacco. Any kind or type...

  6. Tobacco control in Nigeria- policy recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agaku Israel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Major strides towards national tobacco control have been made since Nigeria became signatory to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC in June 2004. The Nigerian senate passed a bill on March 15, 2011 which is expected to be signed into law shortly, to regulate and control production, manufacture, sale, advertising, promotion and sponsorship of tobacco or tobacco products. This paper highlights how the proposed tobacco control law provides a unique opportunity to domesticate the WHO FCTC, expand on smokeless tobacco regulation and develop a science base to improve tobacco control measures in Nigeria.

  7. Phospholipase D activation correlates with microtubule reorganization in living plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. Dhonukshe; A.M. Laxalt; J. Goedhart; Th.W.J. Gadella; T. Munnik

    2003-01-01

    A phospholipase D (PLD) was shown recently to decorate microtubules in plant cells. Therefore, we used tobacco BY-2 cells expressing the microtubule reporter GFP-MAP4 to test whether PLD activation affects the organization of plant microtubules. Within 30 min of adding n-butanol, a potent activator

  8. Green Tobacco Sickness among Thai Traditional Tobacco Farmers, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Saleeon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional Thai tobacco (Nicotiana abacus L. is known as a non-Virginia type whose mature leaf contains three to four times more nicotine than that of a Virginia type. As such, the process of Thai traditional tobacco production may lead to adverse health effects such as green tobacco sickness (GTS.Objective: To investigate the prevalence of GTS and risk factors related to GTS among Thai traditional tobacco farmers in Nan province, northern Thailand.Methods: 473 Thai traditional tobacco farmers from rural areas in Nan province were randomly selected and interviewed in person by means of questionnaires and environmental survey. Statistical analyses were used to identify potential risk factors for GTS.Results: The prevalence of GTS was 22.6% (95% CI 19.1% to 26.6%. Multivariate analysis showed various risk factors associated with GTS including gender of the farmer (ORadj 0.44, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.73, smoking (ORadj 4.36, 95% CI 1.41 to 13.47, skin rash (ORadj 0.36, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.68, wearing a wet suit (ORadj 1.91, 95% CI 1.12 to 3.23, process of curing tobacco leaves (ORadj 0.06, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.16, and watering tobacco plants (ORadj 0.42, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.72.Conclusion: The process of traditional Thai tobacco production can result in increased dermal exposure and can be considered a major risk factor for GTS. Body soaking during watering may further increase adverse health effects related to GTS.

  9. Question Inventory on Tobacco (QIT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1965, 1966, 1970, 1974-2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Office on Smoking and Health (OSH). Tobacco-Related Survey Questions. The QIT is a...

  10. Youth Tobacco Survey (YTS) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999-2015. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. YTS Data. The YTS was developed to...

  11. Tobacco, Alcohol, Drugs, and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these products. Smokeless tobacco, electronic cigarettes, and nicotine gel strips are not safe substitutes for cigarettes. Why ... during pregnancy? Medicines sold over the counter, including herbal supplements and vitamins, can cause problems during pregnancy. ...

  12. Youth Tobacco Survey (YTS) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999-2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. YTS Data. The YTS was developed to...

  13. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten

    2012-01-01

    General Population Study, respectively. According to the magnitude of the hazard ratios, tobacco consumption was the most important risk factor for hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm, followed by male sex and hypertension in both cohorts. The population attributable risk of aortic aneurysm...... outcomes due to tobacco consumption was 64% and 47% in the Copenhagen City Heart Study and Copenhagen General Population Study, respectively, and ranked highest among population attributable risks of aortic aneurysm in both cohorts. The absolute 10-year risk for hospitalization or death from aortic......BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...

  14. Question Inventory on Tobacco (QIT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1965, 1966, 1970, 1974-2015, 2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Office on Smoking and Health (OSH). Survey Questions (Tobacco Use). The QIT is...

  15. Sport Sponsorship and Tobacco: Implications and Impact of Federal Trade Commission v. Pinkerton Tobacco Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotlar, David

    1992-01-01

    The union of sports and tobacco represents a multimillion dollar enterprise. Recent litigation, the Federal Trade Commission v. Pinkerton Tobacco Company, jeopardizes sport sponsorship agreements. Tobacco advertising may no longer be displayed anywhere during televised sporting events. (SM)

  16. Electrofusion of tobacco protoplasts in space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Huiqiong; WANG Liufa; CHENG Aidi; LIU Chengxian

    2003-01-01

    Electrofusion of evacuolated (N. Tabacum L. cvs. Gexin no1) and vacuolated (N. Rustic) tobacco mesophyll protoplasts was performed on the Chinese spacecraft (Shenzhou No. 4, from 30th Dec. 2002 to 6th Jan. 2003). The results showed that the frequency of bi-nucleated and multinucleated protoplasts was significantly increased under microgravity. Compared with the control samples incubated on the ground, the viability of protoplasts incubated in space was much higher. In addition, the influence of altered gravity on carbohydrates was also observed. These results confirmed the effect of microgravitation on electrofusion of plant cell protoplasts.

  17. Human mesenchymal stem cell expression program upon extended ex-vivo cultivation, as revealed by 2-DE-based quantitative proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Madeira

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been on the focus of intense clinical-oriented research due to their multilineage differentiation potential and immunomodulatory properties. However, to reach the clinically meaningful cell numbers for cellular therapy and tissue engineering applications, MSC ex-vivo expansion is mandatory but sequential cell passaging results in loss of proliferative, clonogenic and differentiation potential. To get clues into the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular senescence resulting from extended ex-vivo cultivation of bone marrow (BM MSC, we explored a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE based quantitative proteomics to compare the expression programs of Passage 3 cells (P3, commonly used in clinical studies with expanded MSC, and Passage 7 (P7 cells, which already demonstrated significant signs of culture-induced senescence. Proteins of the functional categories "Structural components and cellular cytoskeleton" and "Folding and stress response proteins" are less abundant in P7 cells, compared to P3, while proteins involved in "Energy metabolism", "Cell cycle regulation and aging" and "Apoptosis" are more abundant. The large number of multiple size and charge isoforms with an altered content that were identified in this study in P7 versus P3, namely the cytoskeleton components β-actin (7 forms and vimentin (24 forms, also emphasizes the importance of post-transcriptional modification upon long-term cultivation. The differential protein expression registered suggests that cellular senescence occurring during ex-vivo expansion of BM MSC is associated with the impairment of cytoskeleton remodeling and/or organization and the repair of damaged proteins resulting from cell exposure to culture stress. The genome-wide expression approach used in this study has proven useful for getting mechanistic insights into the observed decrease on the proliferative and clonogenic potential of P7 versus P3 cells and paves the

  18. Human mesenchymal stem cell expression program upon extended ex-vivo cultivation, as revealed by 2-DE-based quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Andreia; da Silva, Cláudia L; dos Santos, Francisco; Camafeita, Emilio; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been on the focus of intense clinical-oriented research due to their multilineage differentiation potential and immunomodulatory properties. However, to reach the clinically meaningful cell numbers for cellular therapy and tissue engineering applications, MSC ex-vivo expansion is mandatory but sequential cell passaging results in loss of proliferative, clonogenic and differentiation potential. To get clues into the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular senescence resulting from extended ex-vivo cultivation of bone marrow (BM) MSC, we explored a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) based quantitative proteomics to compare the expression programs of Passage 3 cells (P3), commonly used in clinical studies with expanded MSC, and Passage 7 (P7) cells, which already demonstrated significant signs of culture-induced senescence. Proteins of the functional categories "Structural components and cellular cytoskeleton" and "Folding and stress response proteins" are less abundant in P7 cells, compared to P3, while proteins involved in "Energy metabolism", "Cell cycle regulation and aging" and "Apoptosis" are more abundant. The large number of multiple size and charge isoforms with an altered content that were identified in this study in P7 versus P3, namely the cytoskeleton components β-actin (7 forms) and vimentin (24 forms), also emphasizes the importance of post-transcriptional modification upon long-term cultivation. The differential protein expression registered suggests that cellular senescence occurring during ex-vivo expansion of BM MSC is associated with the impairment of cytoskeleton remodeling and/or organization and the repair of damaged proteins resulting from cell exposure to culture stress. The genome-wide expression approach used in this study has proven useful for getting mechanistic insights into the observed decrease on the proliferative and clonogenic potential of P7 versus P3 cells and paves the way to set

  19. Toll of Tobacco in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tobacco-report/ftc_smokeless_tobacco_report_2014.pdf [Data for top 5 manufacturers only]. See, also Campaign factsheet, Trends in Tobacco Industry Marketing . Tobacco marketing studies. Pollay, R, et al., “The ...

  20. NK cell cytotoxicity mediated by 2B4 and NTB-A is dependent on SAP acting downstream of receptor phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eMeinke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 2B4 (CD244 and NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A, CD352 are activating receptors on human NK cells and belong to the family of SLAM-related receptors. Engagement of these receptors leads to phosphorylation of their cytoplasmic tails and recruitment of the adapter proteins SAP and EAT-2. X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP is a severe immunodeficiency that results from mutations in the SAP gene. 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity are abrogated in XLP NK cells. To elucidate the molecular basis for this defect we analyzed early signaling events in SAP knockdown cells. Similar to XLP NK cells, knockdown of SAP in primary human NK cells leads to a reduction of 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that early signaling events such as raft recruitment and receptor phosphorylation are not affected by the absence of SAP, indicating the defect in the absence of SAP is downstream of these events. In addition, knockdown of EAT-2 does not impair 2B4 or NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. Surprisingly, EAT-2 recruitment to both receptors is abrogated in the absence of SAP, revealing a novel cooperativity between these adapters.

  1. NK cell cytotoxicity mediated by 2B4 and NTB-A is dependent on SAP acting downstream of receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Stephan; Watzl, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    2B4 (CD244) and NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A, CD352) are activating receptors on human natural killer (NK) cells and belong to the family of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-related receptors (SRR). Engagement of these receptors leads to phosphorylation of their cytoplasmic tails and recruitment of the adapter proteins SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and Ewing's sarcoma-activated transcript-2 (EAT-2). X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) is a severe immunodeficiency that results from mutations in the SAP gene. 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity are abrogated in XLP NK cells. To elucidate the molecular basis for this defect we analyzed early signaling events in SAP knockdown cells. Similar to XLP NK cells, knockdown of SAP in primary human NK cells leads to a reduction of 2B4 and NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that early signaling events such as raft recruitment and receptor phosphorylation are not affected by the absence of SAP, indicating the defect in the absence of SAP is downstream of these events. In addition, knockdown of EAT-2 does not impair 2B4 or NTB-A-mediated cytotoxicity. Surprisingly, EAT-2 recruitment to both receptors is abrogated in the absence of SAP, revealing a novel cooperativity between these adapters.

  2. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Qadir, M Imran; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), polonium, formaldehyde, cadmium, lead, and benzo[a]pyrene, which are carcinogenic agents. Although there is presence of some compounds, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, that have cancer inhibiting properties, they are in low concentrations. Dry snuff use is linked with higher relative risks, while the use of other smokeless tobacco is of intermediate risk. Moist snuff and chewing tobacco have a very low risk for oral cancer. Therefore, from this review article, it was concluded that smokeless tobacco has risk for oral cancer - either low, medium or high depending on the balance between cancer causing agents and cancer inhibiting agents.

  3. Protection of HepG2 cells against acrolein toxicity by 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-imidazolide via glutathione-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Halley; Speen, Adam M; Saunders, Christina; Brooke, Elizabeth A S; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Zhu, Hong; Li, Y Robert; Jia, Zhenquan

    2015-10-01

    Acrolein is an environmental toxicant, mainly found in smoke released from incomplete combustion of organic matter. Several studies showed that exposure to acrolein can lead to liver damage. The mechanisms involved in acrolein-induced hepatocellular toxicity, however, are not completely understood. This study examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of acrolein on HepG2 cells. Acrolein at pathophysiological concentrations was shown to cause apoptotic cell death and an increase in levels of protein carbonyl and thiobarbituric acid reactive acid substances. Acrolein also rapidly depleted intracellular glutathione (GSH), GSH-linked glutathione-S-transferases, and aldose reductase, three critical cellular defenses that detoxify reactive aldehydes. Results further showed that depletion of cellular GSH by acrolein preceded the loss of cell viability. To further determine the role of cellular GSH in acrolein-mediated cytotoxicity, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) was used to inhibit cellular GSH biosynthesis. It was observed that depletion of cellular GSH by BSO led to a marked potentiation of acrolein-mediated cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. To further assess the contribution of these events to acrolein-induced cytotoxicity, triterpenoid compound 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-imidazolide (CDDO-Im) was used for induction of GSH. Induction of GSH by CDDO-Im afforded cytoprotection against acrolein toxicity in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, BSO significantly inhibited CDDO-Im-mediated induction in cellular GSH levels and also reversed cytoprotective effects of CDDO-Im in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that GSH is a predominant mechanism underlying acrolein-induced cytotoxicity as well as CDDO-Im-mediated cytoprotection. This study may provide understanding on the molecular action of acrolein which may be important to develop novel strategies for the prevention of acrolein-mediated toxicity.

  4. A fluorescent reporter protein containing AtRMR1 domains is targeted to the storage and central vacuoles in Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scabone, Camila María; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2011-10-01

    To develop a new strategy to target recombinant proteins to the vacuolar storage system in transgenic plants, the ability of the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of Arabidopsis receptor homology-transmembrane-RING H2-1 (AtRMR1) was evaluated. A secreted version of RFP (secRFP) and a fusion of it to the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of AtRMR1 (RFP-TMCT) were produced and studied both in transient and stable expression assays. Transient expression in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum showed that secRFP is secreted to the apoplast while its fusion to TMCT of AtRMR1 is sufficient to prevent secretion of the reporter. In tobacco leaves, RFP-TMCT reporter showed an endoplasmic reticulum pattern in early expression stages while in late expression stages, it was found in the vacuolar lumen. For the first time, the role of TM and CT domains of AtRMR1 in stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is presented; the fusion of TMCT to secRFP is sufficient to sort RFP to the lumen of the central vacuoles in leaves and roots and to the lumen of PSV in cotyledons of mature embryos. In addition, biochemical studies performed in extract from transgenic plants showed that RFP-TMCT is an integral membrane protein. Full-length RFP-TMCT was also found in the vacuolar lumen, suggesting internalization into destination vacuole. Not colocalization of RFP-TMCT with tonoplast and plasma membrane markers were observed. This membrane vacuolar determinant sorting signal could be used for future application in molecular pharming as an alternative means to sort proteins of interest to vacuoles.

  5. The Museum as a platform for tobacco promotion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Sun, Shaojing; Yao, Xinyi; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The China Tobacco Museum in Shanghai is the largest in China, consisting of seven pavilions of tobacco-related exhibits. A focus group and previous survey data revealed that the museum conveys messages that make tobacco use appealing. Of the pavilions, three were found to contain blatant misinformation about tobacco and tobacco consumption. We argue that the China Tobacco Museum is a platform for tobacco promotion, a form of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, and thus contravenes the FCTC.

  6. Immunohistochemical locali- zation of Ca2+/calmodulin- dependent kinase in tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The existence of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaM kinase, CaMK) in tobacco is verified immuno- logically and its distribution in different tissues of tobacco is studied. It has been demonstrated that CaMK is mainly distributed in early developing anthers, developing ovules and embryos, lateral root primordium, apical meristem and leaf primordium of buds and mesophyll cells and developing vascular bundles of leaves. There is enormous CaM kinase distributed in leaf epidermis fair cells and guard cells of stomas too. Little kinase is found in mature stem or root cells. The distribution properties of CaM kinase in tobacco are consistent with those of CaM, suggesting that there exists the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway mediated by CaM kinase in tobacco and it plays an important role in the plant growth and development.

  7. Implications of Smokeless Tobacco Use Among Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Elbert D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This literature review delineates the current status of smokeless tobacco, including prevalence, terminology, periodontal effects, and addiction potential. Also discussed is the possible influence on youth of smokeless tobacco use by popular sports figures. (Author/CB)

  8. SAMHSA Synar Reports: Youth Tobacco Sales

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1997-2014. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Synar Reports: Youth Tobacco Sales. Policy – Youth Tobacco Sales. SAMHSA’s Synar...

  9. SAMHSA Synar Reports: Youth Tobacco Sales

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1997-2013. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Synar Reports: Youth Tobacco Sales. Policy – Youth Tobacco Sales. SAMHSA’s Synar...

  10. Public Health and Increased Tobacco Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI’s Dr. Robert Croyle discusses the Food and Drug Administration’s release of a rule that extends its regulatory authority over tobacco products to include cigars, e-cigarettes, hookah tobacco, and others.

  11. Tobacco Use in Racial and Ethnic Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Smoking Facts Tobacco Use in Racial and Ethnic Populations Tobacco use is much higher in some communities ... disparities. Adult Smoking Rates among Racial and Ethnic Populations 1 Race/Ethnicity Total Men Women Whites 19. ...

  12. Management of broomrape (Orobanche cernua) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhanapal, G.N.

    1996-01-01

    Tobacco is an important commercial crop in India. India is the third largest tobacco producing country in the world. Tobacco is cultivated in an area of 0.428 million ha. Non- Virginia tobaccos such as bidi tobacco constitute about 65% of the total tobacco area in the country.Broomrape (Orobanche ce

  13. 27 CFR 40.216a - Notice for pipe tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice for pipe tobacco. 40.216a Section 40.216a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE...

  14. 27 CFR 40.182 - Record of processed tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Record of processed tobacco. 40.182 Section 40.182 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE...

  15. 27 CFR 41.72a - Notice for pipe tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice for pipe tobacco. 41.72a Section 41.72a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  16. 27 CFR 40.521 - Record of processed tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Record of processed tobacco. 40.521 Section 40.521 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE...

  17. 27 CFR 45.45a - Notice for pipe tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice for pipe tobacco. 45.45a Section 45.45a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  18. 27 CFR 40.527 - Authorization to package processed tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authorization to package processed tobacco. 40.527 Section 40.527 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS,...

  19. Study on Poverty Alleviation and Tobacco Control in Myanmar

    OpenAIRE

    Kyaing, Nyo Nyo; Perucic, Anne-Marie; Rahman, Khalilur

    2005-01-01

    This paper looks at tobacco consumption among low-income groups and assesses the level of tobacco-related expenditure among households using tobacco and the opportunity cost of their tobacco expenditure. A survey among tobacco users from low-income groups was conducted to collect data for the analysis. The survey found that households consuming tobacco were spending many times more on toba...

  20. Development of a model of the tobacco industry's interference with tobacco control programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Trochim, W; Stillman, F; Clark, P; Schmitt, C.(Institut für Physik, Universität Mainz, Mainz, Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To construct a conceptual model of tobacco industry tactics to undermine tobacco control programmes for the purposes of: (1) developing measures to evaluate industry tactics, (2) improving tobacco control planning, and (3) supplementing current or future frameworks used to classify and analyse tobacco industry documents.

  1. 75 FR 33814 - Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Product Constituents Subcommittee of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee:...

  2. Identification and characterization of cDNA clones encoding hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, M J; Czernic, P; Michael, A; Negrel, J

    1999-08-01

    The sequences of three cDNA clones that include the complete coding region of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (THT) from tobacco are reported. The three cDNAs were isolated by antibody screening of a cDNA expression library produced from poly(A)+RNA purified from tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Bottom Special), previously infiltrated with an incompatible strain of Ralstonia solanacearum. The identity of these clones was confirmed by the detection of THT activity in extracts of transformed Escherichia coli and by matching the translated polypeptides with tryptic enzyme sequences. cDNA clones tht4 and tht11 differ only by their 5' leader and 3' UTRs and therefore encode the same protein, whereas tht10 and tht11 exhibit 95 and 99% sequence identity at the DNA and deduced amino acid levels, respectively. The three clones encode proteins of 226 amino acids with calculated molecular masses of 26 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequences show no similarity with the sequence of anthranilate hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase from Dianthus caryophyllus, the only enzyme exhibiting hydroxycinnamoyltransferase activity to be cloned so far in plants. In contrast, comparison of the THT amino acid sequence with protein sequence databases revealed substantial homology with mammalian diamine acetyltransferases. The THT clones hybridized to a 0.95-kb mRNA from elicited tobacco cell-suspension cultures and also to a mRNA of similar size from wound-healing potato tubers. The messengers for THT were also found to be expressed at relatively high levels in tobacco root tissues. Southern hybridization of tobacco genomic DNA with THT cDNA suggests that several copies of the THT gene occur in the tobacco genome. Inhibition experiments using amino-acid-specific reagents demonstrated that both histidyl and cysteyl residues are required for THT activity. In the course of these experiments THT was also found to be inhibited by (2-hydroxyphenyl) amino sulfinyl

  3. The tobacco gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Rovetto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 it was closed and dismantled the spectacular Duke Gar­dens near Princeton University. They were created by the famous heiress Doris Duke, in honor of her father, James Buchanan Duke. This last gentleman caused 100-million deaths during the 20th century. The gardens mentioned demonstrated, perhaps trivially, what was stated by philosopher Walter Benjamin: There has never been a document of culture, which is not simultaneously one of barbarism”. “Buck” Duke was the inventor of the modern cigarette. By the end of the 20th century, this astute manufacturer entered the instantly ready-to-smoke tobacco market (without having to roll in small pieces of paper or cut off the cigarette tips with the automated production of cigarettes. Without a cigarette maker like Carmen from opera by Bizet who rolled a maximum of 200 cigarettes per day, the machine he perfected with a mechanic named Bonsack produced 120,000 “cigarettes” during the same time. Thereby, rea­ching a oversupply that had to be sold – creating a demand for it. The solution was cigarette marketing and advertising. These were placed in restaurants, bars, and cigar stores; thus, making them an important part of the worker’s period of rest and dining. Although, in principle, they were associated to women of free morals (“Smo­king is a great sensual pleasure. While smoking, I a wait for the man I love …” sang Sarita Montiel in the 1950s in a stroke of clever advertising these were transformed into symbols of women’s libe­ration. Toward the late 1920s, young women were seen marching and brandishing their freedom torches, the cigarettes. During the two world wars, cigarettes were distributed to hundreds of thou­sands of soldiers as part of their daily nutritional ration. During the immediate post-war, packs of Camel and Lucky Strike were the most used Exchange currency in Europe. With all these publi­city maneuvers, Mr. Duke and his partners have caused, as we al

  4. 7 CFR 29.23 - Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tobacco. 29.23 Section 29.23 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.23 Tobacco. Tobacco in its unmanufactured forms as it appears...

  5. Smokeless Tobacco Education for College Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Lydia J.

    2001-01-01

    Chewing tobacco and taking snuff are common practices among college athletes. This article describes one college's smokeless tobacco education program for students athletes in the health, physical education, and recreation department. Research on the multiple-strategy intervention indicated decreases in student athletes' smokeless tobacco use and…

  6. Electronic Medical Record Tobacco Use Vital Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris John W

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Determination of the prevalence of tobacco use and impact of tobacco prevention/treatment efforts in an electronic medical record enabled practice utilizing a defined tobacco vital sign variable. Design and Measurements Retrospective cohort study utilizing patient data recorded in an electronic medical record database between July 15, 2001, and May 31, 2003. Patient-reported tobacco use status was obtained for each of 6,771 patients during the pre-provider period of their 24,824 visits during the study period with the recorder blinded to past tobacco use status entries. Results An overall current tobacco use prevalence of 27.1% was found during the study period. Tobacco use status was recorded in 96% of visits. Comparison of initial to final visit tobacco use status demonstrates a consistency rate of 75.0% declaring no change in tobacco status in the 4,522 patients with two or more visits. An 8.6% net tobacco use decline was seen for the practice (p value Conclusion Self reported tobacco use status as a vital sign embedded within the workflow of an electronic medical record enabled practice was a quantitative tool for determination of tobacco use prevalence and a measuring stick of risk prevention/intervention impact.

  7. 7 CFR 29.3069 - Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tobacco. 29.3069 Section 29.3069 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Burley Tobacco (u.s. Type 31 and Foreign Type 93) §...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3555 - Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tobacco. 29.3555 Section 29.3555 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and...

  9. 19 CFR 11.2 - Manufactured tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufactured tobacco. 11.2 Section 11.2 Customs... PACKING AND STAMPING; MARKING Packing and Stamping § 11.2 Manufactured tobacco. (a) If the invoice and entry presented for manufactured tobacco specify all the information necessary for prompt...

  10. Should Tobacco Sponsorship Of Education Be Banned?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    After the massive earthquake in Sichuan Province in May 2008, a primary school funded by a tobacco company was set up in the quake-stricken area. On the roof of the school building stands the signboard "Sichuan Tobacco Hope Primary School." A slogan engraved on another board reads, "Tobacco helps your success."

  11. 7 CFR 29.1067 - Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tobacco. 29.1067 Section 29.1067 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Flue-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 11, 12, 13, 14 and...

  12. 7 CFR 29.2308 - Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tobacco. 29.2308 Section 29.2308 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) §...

  13. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf tobacco. 30.2 Section 30.2 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.2...

  14. Tobacco control policies of oncology nursing organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Linda; Bialous, Stella Aguinaga

    2004-05-01

    Nurses, the largest group of health care professionals, and the policies of nursing organizations, have tremendous potential to promote health and tobacco control. Policies addressing tobacco use have been implemented by a variety of national and international nursing organizations. This article reviews existing tobacco control policies in oncology nursing organizations.

  15. Public health aspects of tobacco control revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E.; Alajbeg, Ivan; Buechler, Silvia; Carrassi, Antonio; Hovius, Marjolijn; Jacobs, Annelies; Jenner, Maryan; Kinnunen, Taru; Ulbricht, Sabina; Zoitopoulos, Liana

    2010-01-01

    The tobacco epidemic presents a major public health challenge, globally, and within Europe. The aim of the Public Health Work Stream at the 2nd European Workshop on Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation for Oral Health Professionals was to review the public health aspects of tobacco control and make

  16. ICT Transformation in Chinese Tobacco Industry: Case Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper is based on four in-depth case studies on the information and communication technology (ICT) evolution of Chinese tobacco companies. The ICT transformation processes of these companies are introduced briefly. A strategic grid model was used, which shows that depending on a company's strategic grid cell, different behavior patterns can be observed, in terms of Nolan's stage model. The analysis shows that companies allocated in the "turnaround" and "strategic" cell do not behave accordingly to Nolan's stage model. A few years after China first application for a World Trade Organization (WTO) membership renewal in 1986, observed companies skipped some of Nolan's stages to achieve an accelerated ICT transformation. Therefore, a fast transformation of ICT plays a major role for Chinese tobacco companies to face the challenges entailed by an open door policy and the WTO entry. This conclusion is limited to companies that are allocated either in the "transformation" cell or the "strategic" cell.

  17. Tobacco Industry Dominating National Tobacco Policy Making in Argentina, 1966-2005

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto M Sebrie; Barnoya, Joaquin; Perez-Stable, Eliseo; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2005-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Argentina accounts for 15% of total tobacco consumption in Latin America and has made the epidemiological transition to an advanced stage in the tobacco epidemic. The Southern Cone region of the Americas leads the hemisphere in tobacco attributable mortality. Argentina is a developing country with economic interests in tobacco growing and rapidly increasing tobacco use in urban areas. In 2000, smoking prevalence was 40.4% among adults- 46.8% of men and 34% of wom...

  18. Magazine hyped: Trends in tobacco advertising and readership characteristics, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toukhy, Sherine M; Choi, Kelvin

    2016-10-01

    We tracked magazine advertisements for seven tobacco products in U.S. magazines from 2010 to 2014 and examined magazine readership characteristics that are associated with advertising placement in 2014. Advertising data came from Kantar Media's Intelligence and readership data came from a 2014 Experian's nationally representative survey of 4667 adult tobacco users. At magazine level, we aggregated total and product-specific number of advertisements and expenditures by year and calculated readership demographics. We used linear and poisson regression models to examine trends in number of tobacco advertisements and expenditures and readership characteristics associated with number of tobacco advertisements in 2014. Analyses were conducted in 2015. There were 5317 tobacco advertisements with expenditures of $796 million that appeared in 322 magazines during 2010-2014. Cigarette advertisements accounted for 2928 (55%), followed by e-cigarettes (n=862, 16%), and snus (n=534, 10%). Advertisements increased by 2.79ad/year for cigarettes, 1.94ad/year for e-cigarettes, and 0.78ad/year for chewing tobacco (padvertisements was associated with select readership characteristics (padvertisement rate increased by 1.48 times for cigarettes, 3.44 times for e-cigarettes, and 2.15 times for chewing tobacco. For every 10% increase in readers who earn ≤$24,999, advertisement rate increased by 1.37 times for cigarettes and 1.70 times for e-cigarettes. Magazine tobacco advertising has increased especially for cigarettes and is targeted toward certain demographic subgroups. Regulating tobacco magazine advertising should be integral to tobacco control policies.

  19. A phase 1 study of obinutuzumab induction followed by 2 years of maintenance in patients with relapsed CD20-positive B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehn, Laurie H; Assouline, Sarit E; Stewart, Douglas A; Mangel, Joy; Gascoyne, Randy D; Fine, Gregg; Frances-Lasserre, Susan; Carlile, David J; Crump, Michael

    2012-05-31

    This phase 1 study evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of obinutuzumab (GA101), a glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody administered as induction followed by 2 years of maintenance. Cohorts of 3 to 6 patients received obinutuzumab (200-2000 mg) intravenously weekly for 4 weeks. Patients with a complete or partial response (or stable disease and clinical benefit) continued to receive obinutuzumab every 3 months, for a maximum of 8 doses. Twenty-two patients with relapsed CD20-positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia with an indication for treatment and no therapy of higher priority were enrolled. Patients received a median of 4 prior regimens; 86% had received at least 1 rituximab-containing regimen. No dose-limiting or unexpected AEs were observed. Infusion-related reactions were most common (all grades, 73%; grade 3/4, 18%), followed by infection (32%), pyrexia (23%), neutropenia (23%), headache (18%), and nausea (18%). At end of induction, 5 (23%) patients achieved partial responses and 12 (54%) had stable disease. Eight patients received maintenance; best overall response was 32% (6 partial responses/1 complete response). Obinutuzumab induction and maintenance therapy was well tolerated with promising efficacy in this heterogeneous, highly pretreated population and warrants further investigation. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT00576758).

  20. The Ultra-structure Observation of Glandular Hairs Secretory Cell of Flue-cured Tobacco%烤烟腺毛分泌细胞的超微结构观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛晓明; 张晶; 于丽杰

    2011-01-01

    为了解和掌握烤烟腺毛分泌细胞中分泌物产生、转运及分泌的过程和规律,通过透射电子显微镜观察了烤烟的长柄腺毛和短柄腺毛分泌细胞的超微结构.结果表明:2种类型腺毛的分泌细胞在超微结构上特性比较相似,但优势细胞器的分布不同,结构完整的发达的叶绿体在长柄腺毛分泌细胞的细胞质内大量存在,可以初步认定叶绿体参与了腺毛分泌产物的生物合成;在2类腺毛中均有大量的内质网、线粒体、液泡和少数的高尔基体,这些细胞器与腺毛的分泌活动有密切的关系.2种腺毛中都观察到细胞间隙和胞质外空间的产生和扩大,以及其中存在的嗜锇物质,2处是分泌产物的临时储藏所,分泌产物在细胞中的分布可得到分泌物的储存和释放途径.%Ultra-structure of the flue-cured tobacco was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) to understand and master the process and regulation of generation, transportation and secretion of the secretion from glandular hairs secretory cell of flue-cured tobacco. The results showed that the ultra-structure of the long-stem glandular hairs was very similar to the short-stem glandular hairs, but the distribution of advantageous cell was different and there were plenty of well structured and developed chloroplasts in the long-stem glandular cell. It can be affirmed that chloroplast has been involved in the biosynthesis of glandular secreta. A large amount of endoplasmic, reticulum, mitochondria, vacuole and a few of golgiosome existed in the two kinds of glandular hairs. These organelles were greatly related with the secretory of glandular hairs cell. With the space appearance and expansion of intercellular and cytoplasm external and osmiophilic materials, it was proved that the two places were both temporary storage sites of secreta and the pathway of secreta storage and release can be investigated by observing the secreta's distribution

  1. Recommendations for Sustainable Development of Ankang Tobacco Growing Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hatao; YANG; Ke; SUN; Feng; ZHU

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable development of high quality characteristic tobacco is the only path for future development of China’s tobacco industry.In combination with realities of tobacco development in Ankang tobacco growing area,this paper made analysis on factors restricting sustainable development of Ankang tobacco growing area.On the basis of actual situations,it came up with recommendations including establishing scientific basic tobacco field protection system,gradually cultivating professional tobacco farmers and strengthening tobacco technician team construction,improving scientific and technological innovation,implementing standardized technologies,improving tobacco production organization mode,and improving tobacco production security mechanism.

  2. Job strain and tobacco smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T; Fransson, Eleonor I

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a major contributor to the public health burden and healthcare costs worldwide, but the determinants of smoking behaviours are poorly understood. We conducted a large individual-participant meta-analysis to examine the extent to which work-related stress, operationalised as job...

  3. Arab Americans' acculturation and tobacco smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omari, Hasan; Scheibmeir, Monica

    2009-04-01

    Limited information is available about Arab Americans' smoking behaviors. The aim of this study was to describe Arab Americans' smoking behaviors and any relationship between tobacco dependence and acculturation. This was a cross-sectional study. Arab American smokers and ex-smokers (N = 96) participated in the study. Nicotine dependence, acculturation, and tobacco use questionnaires were used to measure the major variables. Analyses revealed a significant positive correlation between acculturation and tobacco dependence and between tobacco exposure and tobacco dependence. Arab Americans who behaved most like their ethnic peers and spent more time with Arab Americans were more dependent on nicotine.

  4. How effective has tobacco tax increase been in the Gambia? A case study of tobacco control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargis, Nigar; Manneh, Yahya; Krubally, Bakary; Jobe, Baboucarr; Ouma, Ahmed E Ogwell; Tcha-Kondor, Noureiny; Blecher, Evan H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to evaluate how effective tobacco tax increase has been in increasing price of tobacco products and reducing tobacco consumption in the Gambia. In addition, it tests the hypothesis that tobacco tax revenue grows while tobacco consumption decreases as a result of tax and price increase. Setting The study is designed at the macroeconomic level to examine the import of tobacco products and revenue collected from tobacco taxation in a low-income setting. Participants The participants of this study are the government officials employed in the Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs (MoFEA), the Gambia and the Gambia Revenue Authority, who are in charge of planning and implementing the tobacco tax policy in the Gambia. Interventions The study includes 2 consecutive interventions in tobacco tax policy in the Gambia. The first intervention was moving the tax base for the uniform specific excise tax on cigarettes from weight to pack of cigarettes in 2013. The second intervention involved increasing the excise and the environmental tax on tobacco products in 2014. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were the cost, insurance and freight value and the price of tobacco products. The secondary outcome measures included the import of tobacco products and tobacco tax revenue. Results In 2013–2014, the Gambia MoFEA raised the specific excise rate, which increased price, reduced consumption and generated significantly more government revenue from tobacco products. This is a clear evidence of the win-win outcome of raising tobacco tax. In addition, the Gambia has set the example of harmonising tax rates between tobacco products that reduces the substitution between tobacco products. Conclusions The Gambia presents the best practice in tobacco taxation. There is need for documenting more country-specific evidence on the win-win outcome of raising tobacco tax. PMID:27566626

  5. A Fluorimetric Sensor for Detection of One Living Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, studies of metabolic pathways and processes in living organisms cannot be easily done at the cellular level. That is why the development of a new analytical methods and approaches is needed, to allow detection of different biologically important species at very low concentrations levels and sample volumes, especially in individual cells. In the present work, we suggested a sensor to detect units of living cells by means determination of plant esterases (PE based on fluorimetric detection of the products of the enzymatic hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate in plant cell cultures (BY-2 tobacco cells and early somatic embryos of Norway spruce, clone 2/32. We standardized the sensor using a readily available esterase from pig liver. The detection limits were approximately 17 to 50 amol in 2 ml (8.5 to 25 femtomolar concentrations of esterases of the enzyme contained in BY-2 tobacco cells and spruce early somatic embryos, respectively, after re-computation on the amounts of pig liver esterases. We assumed that the optimised sensor for the determination of PE in cell extracts accomplishes all requirements for a sensitive analysis which could be usable for single cell analysis. The detection limit was 1.5 in case of analysing BY-2 tobacco cells and 0.5 in early somatic embryos. Moreover, we were able to detect single protoplasts.

  6. Electrical disturbance in heart by smokeless tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Aniket; Chaudhary, Gaurav; Srivastava, Rohit; Tiwari, Sunita

    2013-05-01

    Smokeless tobacco use in the form of chewed tobacco or snuff is common in various parts of the world, including India. It is well known that smokeless tobacco consumption is responsible for cancer but less is known about its role as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Nicotine, the main constituent of tobacco smoke is responsible for the elevated risk of the cardiovascular disease and sudden coronary death associated with smoking, presumably by provoking cardiac arrhythmias. This review discusses some of the acute and chronic cardiac effects of smokeless tobacco on cardiovascular disease with special reference to the electrical disturbance as well as comparing nicotine kinetics between smoking and smokeless tobacco. It would further enhance the clamor to urge people to quit all forms of tobacco consumption.

  7. The Tobacco Industry's Abuse of Scientific Evidence and Activities to Recruit Scientists During Tobacco Litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungkyu

    2016-01-01

    South Korea's state health insurer, the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS), is in the process of a compensation suit against tobacco industry. The tobacco companies have habitually endeavored to ensure favorable outcomes in litigation by misusing scientific evidence or recruiting scientists to support its interests. This study analyzed strategies that tobacco companies have used during the NHIS litigation, which has been receiving world-wide attention. To understand the litigation strategies of tobacco companies, the present study reviewed the existing literature and carried out content analysis of petitions, preparatory documents, and supporting evidence submitted to the court by the NHIS and the tobacco companies during the suit. Tobacco companies misrepresented the World Health Organization (WHO) report's argument and misused scientific evidence, and removed the word "deadly" from the title of the citation. Tobacco companies submitted the research results of scientists who had worked as a consultant for the tobacco industry as evidence. Such litigation strategies employed by the tobacco companies internationally were applied similarly in Korean lawsuits. Results of tobacco litigation have a huge influence on tobacco control policies. For desirable outcomes of the suits, healthcare professionals need to pay a great deal of attention to the enormous volume of written opinions and supporting evidence that tobacco companies submit. They also need to face the fact that the companies engage in recruitment of scientists. Healthcare professionals should refuse to partner with tobacco industry, as recommended by Article 5.3 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

  8. Revealing anti-cariogenic efficacy of smokeless tobacco: A pilot study

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    Ankita Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum, has been responsible for more deaths than any other herb. However, the literature has also been endowed with its use as "holy herb" since the pre-Columbian era. Used for treating pain, poisonous bites, ulcers, nasal polyps, and basal cell carcinoma; it also acts as an important ingredient of commercially available toothpastes; and even used as tobacco vaccines against Streptococcus species as highlighted in the literature. Aims and Objectives: (1 To elicit the anti-microbial property of tobacco against Streptococcus mutans, if any, in raw smokeless tobacco. (2 To study the relationship of duration and growth inhibition efficacy of smokeless tobacco. Materials and Methods: Extracts were prepared by centrifugation of mixed raw smokeless tobacco with Ringer′s lactate solution and with saliva. The extracts were placed in wells prepared on Mitis salivarius culture plate and incubated at 37΀C for 24 h after 0 h, 1 h, and 2 h of extract preparation. The inhibition zones were measured on the underside of plate using the vernier calipers. Results: Smokeless tobacco has a statistically significant zone of inhibition, which proves its anti-microbial activity against S. mutans. However, the mean zones of inhibition were greater for Ringer′s lactate and tobacco group as compared to test samples (saliva and tobacco with subsequent reduction of inhibition zones with an increase in duration. Conclusion: The anti-microbial property of extensive tobacco resources can be utilized from their extracts in order to balance the deterioration it had caused to mankind.

  9. Tobacco Product Waste: An Environmental Approach to Reduce Tobacco Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Thomas E; Slaughter, Elli

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette butts and other tobacco product wastes (TPW) are the most common items picked up in urban and beach cleanups worldwide. TPW contains all the toxins, nicotine, and carcinogens found in tobacco products, along with the plastic nonbiodegradable filter attached to almost all cigarettes sold in the United States and in most countries worldwide. Toxicity studies suggest that compounds leached from cigarette butts in salt and fresh water are toxic to aquatic micro-organisms and test fish. Toxic chemicals have also been identified in roadside TPW. With as much as two-thirds of all smoked cigarettes (numbering in the trillions globally) being discarded into the environment each year, it is critical to consider the potential toxicity and remediation of these waste products. This article reviews reports on the toxicity of TPW and recommends several policy approaches to mitigation of this ubiquitous environmental blight.

  10. Ending tobacco-caused mortality and morbidity: the case for performance standards for tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K

    2013-05-01

    The US Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act and WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provide us with powerful tools to reduce the death and disease caused by the use of tobacco products. One tool that can contribute substantially toward this goal is the authority to establish performance standards for tobacco products. Conjointly with reducing levels of nicotine in cigarettes, performance and quality control standards need to be established for non-combusted tobacco products. Performance standards and incentives should be provided so that tobacco companies are compelled to manufacture and market products with very low or almost non-existent toxicity (eg, nicotine-only products).

  11. Ending tobacco-caused mortality and morbidity: the case for performance standards for tobacco products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K

    2013-01-01

    The US Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act and WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provide us with powerful tools to reduce the death and disease caused by the use of tobacco products. One tool that can contribute substantially toward this goal is the authority to establish performance standards for tobacco products. Conjointly with reducing levels of nicotine in cigarettes, performance and quality control standards need to be established for non-combusted tobacco products. Performance standards and incentives should be provided so that tobacco companies are compelled to manufacture and market products with very low or almost non-existent toxicity (eg, nicotine-only products). PMID:23591505

  12. The Tobacco Farmers’ Mutual Assistance and Cooperation Pattern in Modern Tobacco Agriculture in Mountainous Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Guo-sheng; GUO Xiang; LIU Chang-hua; YUAN Jian-hua

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the basic situation of Yanziqian Tobacco Farmers’ Mutual Assistance and Cooperation Association in Jiamachi Town of Xianfeng County.It analyzes the operating mode of tobacco farmers’ mutual assistance and cooperation association,and conducts a comparative analysis of tobacco farmers’ costs and benefits before and after participating in mutual assistance and cooperation.Studies show that the mode of tobacco farmers’ mutual assistance and cooperation,is conducive to reducing labor in curing link,promoting the quality of tobacco,increasing tobacco farmers’ income,which is worthy of promotion.

  13. Smokeless tobacco use in Sri Lanka

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    L C Somatunga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To comprehensively review the issues of smokeless tobacco use in Sri Lanka . This review paper is based on a variety of sources including Medline, WHO documents, Ministry of Health and Nutrition, Colombo and from other sources. Results: The prevalence of smokeless tobacco (SLT use in Sri Lanka has been reported high, especially among rural and disadvantaged groups. Different smokeless tobacco products were not only widely available but also very affordable. An increasing popularity of SLT use among the youth and adolescents is a cause for concern in Sri Lanka. There were evidences of diverse benign, premalignant, and malignant oral diseases due to smokeless tobacco use in the country. The level of awareness about health risks related to the consumption of smokeless tobacco products was low, particularly among the people with low socio-economic status. In Sri Lanka various forms of smokeless tobacco products, some of them imported, are used. At the national level, 15.8% used smokeless tobacco products and its use is three-fold higher among men compared to women. Betel quid is by far the traditional form in which tobacco is a general component. Other manufactured tobacco products include pan parag/pan masala, Mawa, Red tooth powder, Khaini, tobacco powder, and Zarda. Some 8.6% of the youth are current users of smokeless tobacco. There are studies demonstrating the harmful effects of smokeless tobacco use, especially on the oral mucosa, however, the level of awareness of this aspect is low. The highest mean expenditure on betel quid alone in rural areas for those earning Rs. 5,000/month was Rs. 952. The core issue is the easy availability of these products. To combat the smokeless tobacco problem, public health programs need to be intensified and targeted to vulnerable younger age groups. Another vital approach should be to levy higher taxation.

  14. Transient expression assays in tobacco protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Bossche, Robin; Demedts, Brecht; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Goossens, Alain

    2013-01-01

    The sequence information generated through genome and transcriptome analysis from plant tissues has reached unprecedented sizes. Sequence homology-based annotations may provide hints for the possible function and roles of particular plant genes, but the functional annotation remains nonexistent or incomplete for many of them. To discover gene functions, transient expression assays are a valuable tool because they can be done more rapidly and at a higher scale than generating stably transformed tissues. Here, we describe a transient expression assay in protoplasts derived from suspension cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) for the study of the transactivation capacities of transcription factors. To enhance throughput and reproducibility, this method can be automated, allowing medium-throughput screening of interactions between large compendia of potential transcription factors and gene promoters.

  15. A LIM Domain Protein from Tobacco Involved in Actin-Bundling and Histone Gene Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danièle Moes; Sabrina Gatti; Céline Hoffmann; Monika Dieterle; Flora Moreau; Katrin Neumann; Marc Schumacher

    2013-01-01

    The two LIM domain-containing proteins from plants (LIMs) typically exhibit a dual cytoplasmic-nuclear distribution,suggesting that,in addition to their previously described roles in actin cytoskeleton organization,they participate in nuclear processes.Using a south-western blot-based screen aimed at identifying factors that bind to plant histone gene promoters,we isolated a positive clone containing the tobacco LIM protein WLIM2 (NtWLIM2) cDNA.Using both green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion-and immunology-based strategies,we provide clear evidence that NtWLIM2 localizes to the actin cytoskeleton,the nucleus,and the nucleolus.Interestingly,the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by latrunculin B significantly increases NtWLIM2 nuclear fraction,pinpointing a possible novel cytoskeletal-nuclear crosstalk.Biochemical and electron microscopy experiments reveal the ability of NtWLIM2 to directly bind to actin filaments and to crosslink the latter into thick actin bundles.Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that NtWLIM2 specifically binds to the conserved octameric cis-elements (Oct) of the Arabidopsis histone H4A748 gene promoter and that this binding largely relies on both LIM domains.Importantly,reporter-based experiments conducted in Arabidopsis and tobacco protoplasts confirm the ability of NtWLIM2 to bind to and activate the H4A748 gene promoter in live cells.Expression studies indicate the constitutive presence of NtWLIM2 mRNA and NtWLIM2 protein during tobacco BY-2 cell proliferation and cell cycle progression,suggesting a role of NtWLIM2 in the activation of basal histone gene expression.Interestingly,both live cell and in vitro data support NtWLIM2 di/oligomerization.We propose that NtWLIM2 functions as an actin-stabilizing protein,which,upon cytoskeleton remodeling,shuttles to the nucleus in order to modify gene expression.

  16. Regular black tea habit could reduce tobacco associated ROS generation and DNA damage in oral mucosa of normal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Debolina; Sur, Subhayan; Mandal, Shyamsundar; Das, Sukta; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco and tea habit are very common in world wide. In the present study, an attempt was made to evaluate the effect of regular drinking of black tea on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage in buccal cells of normal subjects with or without tobacco habit. Expression of ROS associated proteins IκB, NF-κB as well as DNA repair associated proteins p53, MLH1 were also analyzed. Exfoliated buccal cells were collected from 308 healthy individuals and classified according to age, tobacco and tea habits. In all age groups, comparatively high ROS level and significantly high DNA damage frequency were seen in individuals with tobacco habit than the subjects without tea and tobacco habits. Tea habit effectively lowered ROS level and restrict DNA damage in tobacco users irrespective of ages. The DNA damage seen in the subjects was not associated with apoptosis. Moreover, tea habit effectively lowered the expression of IκB, NF-κB, p53 and MLH1 in tobacco users in all age groups. It seems that regular black tea habit could have anti-genotoxic effect as revealed by reduced tobacco associated ROS generation and DNA damage in buccal cells.

  17. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  18. 7 CFR 29.65 - Accessibility of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessibility of tobacco. 29.65 Section 29.65... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Permissive Inspection § 29.65 Accessibility of tobacco. All tobacco... characteristics or for drawing of samples. In the case of tobacco in packages, the coverings shall be removed...

  19. New Insights Into Tobacco-Induced Vascular Disease: Clinical Ramifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, John P

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains more than 4,000 compounds. These include phenols, carbonyls, and nitrosamines that may be irritants and carcinogens; particulate matter such as tars; volatiles and gases such as carbon monoxide; and nicotine. Many of these compounds may contribute to the adverse health effects of tobacco. For example, recent findings have shown that the angiogenic and proliferative effects of nicotine are mediated by activation of nicotinic receptors on the vascular cells. Nicotine-induced activation of vascular cells may contribute to pathological neovascularization in cancer, age-related macular degeneration, and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on how nicotine adversely affects cardiovascular health and highlights intriguing new data about nicotine's potent angiogenic and proliferative properties.

  20. Production of H5N1 influenza virus matrix protein 2 ectodomain protein bodies in tobacco plants and in insect cells as a candidate universal influenza vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandiswa Mbewana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The spread of influenza A viruses is partially controlled and prevented by vaccination. The matrix protein 2 ectodomain (M2e is the most conserved sequence in influenza A viruses, and is therefore a good potential target for a vaccine to protect against multiple virus subtypes. We explored the feasibility of a M2e-based universal influenza A vaccine candidate based on the highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus, H5N1. A synthetic M2e gene was human and plant codon optimised and fused in-frame with a sequence encoding the N-terminal proline-rich domain (Zera® of the γ-zein protein of maize. Zera®M2e was expressed transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana and Sf21 baculovirus / insect cell expression systems, and Zera®M2e protein bodies (PBs were successfully produced in both expression systems. The plant-produced Zera®M2e PBs were purified and injected into Balb/c mice. Western blot analysis using insect cell-produced Zera®M2e PBs and multiple tandem M2e sequences (5xM2e fused with the avian influenza H5N1 transmembrane and cytosolic tail (5xM2e_tHA confirmed the presence of M2e-specific antibodies in immunised mice sera. The immunogenicity of the Zera®M2e indicates that our plant-produced protein has potential as an inexpensive universal influenza A vaccine.

  1. It is time to regulate carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines in cigarette tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act gives the Food and Drug Administration power to regulate tobacco products. This commentary calls for immediate regulation of the carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N’-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) in cigarette tobacco as a logical path to cancer prevention. NNK and NNN, powerful carcinogens in laboratory animals, have been evaluated as “carcinogenic to humans” by the International...

  2. Tobacco and the European common agricultural policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joossens, L; Raw, M

    1991-10-01

    The common agricultural policy of the European Community subsidizes tobacco production to the tune of 1,300 million ecu a year (US$ 1,500 million, UK pounds 900 million). This amounts to 2,500 ecu ($3,100, pounds 1,700) per minute, and is more in one year than the total amount spent on tobacco subsidies by the US in the last 50 years. The purpose of this policy was to maintain farmers' incomes and adapt community production to demand. Demand for the dark tobaccos which dominate EC production has fallen, while demand for light flue cured tobacco like Virginia has risen. A complex system of production subsidies and quotas was intended to discourage production of the dark tobaccos, for which there is virtually no market, and lead to more Virginia production. The policy has failed. Expenditure has spiralled out of control, production of unmarketable tobacco varieties has risen enormously, and the EC is the world's largest importer of raw tobacco. As a result tobacco is being bought by the community for intervention storage and surpluses of the dark high tar varieties are being 'exported' to eastern Europe and north Africa at giveaway prices. There has been no effective monitoring or control of this policy. This paper explains how this has happened and argues that, in view of the health risks attached to tobacco, these subsidies should be abolished.

  3. Teenagers' Use of Tobacco and Their Perceptions of Tobacco Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Hannah J.; Kulik, Keri S.; Klingaman, Linda; Deutschlander, Sharon; Black, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tobacco use leads to more deaths each year than any other single factor. This research examined teenagers' perceptions of anti-tobacco messages to determine which campaigns and educational approaches were most effective in preventing tobacco use among youth. Methods: Students from five rural high schools in western Pennsylvania were…

  4. Linking Global Youth Tobacco Survey 2003 and 2006 Data to Tobacco Control Policy in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dhirendra Narain; Gupta, Prakash C.; Reddy, K. Srinath; Prasad, Vinayak M.; Rahman, Khalilur; Warren, Charles W.; Jones, Nathan R.; Asma, Samira

    2008-01-01

    Background: India made 2 important policy statements regarding tobacco control in the past decade. First, the India Tobacco Control Act (ITCA) was signed into law in 2003 with the goal to reduce tobacco consumption and protect citizens from exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS). Second, in 2005, India ratified the World Health Organization Framework…

  5. Tobacco industry influence on the definition of tobacco related disorders by the American Psychiatric Association

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, M; Bitton, A.; Glantz, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, third edition (DSM-III), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 1980, included the first official definitions by the APA of tobacco dependence and tobacco withdrawal. Tobacco industry efforts to influence the DSM-III were investigated.

  6. Tobacco and Pregnancy: Overview of exposures and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    This opening paper will review the epidemiology of the impact of cigarette smoking and other forms of tobacco exposure on human development. Sources of exposure described include cigarettes and other forms of smoked tobacco, secondhand (environmental) tobacco smoke, several forms...

  7. The role of tobacco advertising and promotion: themes employed in litigation by tobacco industry witnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Marvin E; Davis, Ronald M; O'Keefe, Anne Marie

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To identify key themes related to tobacco advertising and promotion in testimony provided by tobacco industry‐affiliated witnesses in tobacco litigation, and to present countervailing evidence and arguments. Methods Themes in industry testimony were identified by review of transcripts of testimony in the Tobacco Deposition and Trial Testimony Archive (http://tobaccodocuments.org/datta) from a sample of defence witnesses, including three academic expert witnesses, six senior executives of tobacco companies, and one industry advertising consultant. Counterarguments to the themes embodied in defence testimony were based on information from peer‐reviewed literature, advertising trade publications, government reports, tobacco industry documents, and testimony provided by expert witnesses testifying for plaintiffs. Results Five major themes employed by defence witnesses were identified: (1) tobacco advertising has a relatively weak “share of voice” in the marketing environment and is a weak force in affecting smoking behaviour; (2) tobacco advertising and promotion do not create new smokers, expand markets, or increase total tobacco consumption; (3) the tobacco industry does not target, study, or track youth smoking; (4) tobacco advertising and promotion do not cause smoking initiation by youth; and (5) tobacco companies and the industry adhere closely to relevant laws, regulations, and industry voluntary codes. Substantial evidence exists in rebuttal to these arguments. Conclusions Tobacco industry‐affiliated witnesses have marshalled many arguments to deny the adverse effects of tobacco marketing activities and to portray tobacco companies as responsible corporate citizens. Effective rebuttals to these arguments exist, and plaintiffs' attorneys have, with varying degrees of success, presented them to judges and juries. PMID:17130625

  8. Sulfated fucan oligosaccharides elicit defense responses in tobacco and local and systemic resistance against tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarzynski, Olivier; Descamps, Valérie; Plesse, Bertrand; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Kloareg, Bernard; Fritig, Bernard

    2003-02-01

    Sulfated fucans are common structural components of the cell walls of marine brown algae. Using a fucan-degrading hydrolase isolated from a marine bacterium, we prepared sulfated fucan oligosaccharides made of mono- and disulfated fucose units alternatively bound by alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,3 glycosidic linkages, respectively. Here, we report on the elicitor activity of such fucan oligosaccharide preparations in tobacco. In suspension cell cultures, oligofucans at the dose of 200 microg ml(-1) rapidly induced a marked alkalinization of the extracellular medium and the release of hydrogen peroxide. This was followed within a few hours by a strong stimulation of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and lipoxygenase activities. Tobacco leaves treated with oligofucans locally accumulated salicylic acid (SA) and the phytoalexin scopoletin and expressed several pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, but they displayed no symptoms of cell death. Fucan oligosaccharides also induced the systemic accumulation of SA and the acidic PR protein PR-1, two markers of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Consistently, fucan oligosaccharides strongly stimulated both local and systemic resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The use of transgenic plants unable to accumulate SA indicated that, as in the SAR primed by TMV, SA is required for the establishment of oligofucan-induced resistance.

  9. DL-alpha-difluoromethyl[3,4-3H]arginine metabolism in tobacco and mammalian cells. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity after arginase-mediated hydrolysis of DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine to DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R D; Bitonti, A J; McCann, P P; Feirer, R P

    1988-10-01

    DL-alpha-Difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) is an enzyme-activated irreversible inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) in vitro. DFMA has also been shown to inhibit ADC activities in a variety of plants and bacteria in vivo. However, we questioned the specificity of this inhibitor for ADC in tobacco ovary tissues, since ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity was strongly inhibited as well. We now show that [3,4-3H]DFMA is metabolized to DL-alpha-difluoromethyl[3,4-3H]ornithine [( 3,4-3H]DFMO), the analogous mechanism-based inhibitor of ODC, by tobacco tissues in vivo. Both tobacco and mammalian (mouse, bovine) arginases (EC 3.5.3.1) hydrolyse DFMA to DFMO in vitro, suggesting a role for this enzyme in mediating the indirect inhibition of ODC by DFMA in tobacco. These results suggest that DFMA may have other effects, in addition to the inhibition of ADC, in tissues containing high arginase activities. The recent development of potent agmatine-based ADC inhibitors should permit selective inhibition of ADC, rather than ODC, in such tissues, since agmatine is not a substrate for arginase.

  10. Evaluation of micronuclei in tobacco users: A study in Punjabi population

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    Himanta Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of micronuclei in exfoliated cells is a promising tool for the study of epithelial carcinogens and can be used to detect chromosome breakage or mitotic interference, thought to be relevant to carcinogenesis. Aim: The present study aimed to detect micronuclei in exfoliated oral mucosal cells in individuals using various tobacco forms from the last 5 years. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 healthy male subjects (25 smokeless tobacco users, 25 smokers, and 25 non-tobacco users were selected for the study. Smears were obtained with moistened wooden spatula from buccal mucosa and fixed with 95% alcohol. All the cytologic smears were stained by Papanicolaou technique. From each slide, ~1000 cells were examined under the 400× magnification and where micronucleated (MN cells were located, they were examined under the 1000× magnification. Result: MN cells were found to be significantly higher in smokeless tobacco users than in smokers and controls. Conclusion: A positive correlation is found between increased micronucleus frequency and tobacco-using habits. So micronucleus assay can be used as a biomarker of genotoxicity.

  11. Inactivation of the β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase and the α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase genes in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 Cells by a Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 Strategy Results in Glycoproteins without Plant-Specific Glycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercx, Sébastien; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Chaumont, François; De Pauw, Edwin; Boutry, Marc; Navarre, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Plants or plant cells can be used to produce pharmacological glycoproteins such as antibodies or vaccines. However these proteins carry N-glycans with plant-typical residues [β(1,2)-xylose and core α(1,3)-fucose], which can greatly impact the immunogenicity, allergenicity, or activity of the protein. Two enzymes are responsible for the addition of plant-specific glycans: β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) and α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT). Our aim consisted of knocking-out two XylT genes and four FucT genes (12 alleles altogether) in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Three XylT and six FucT sgRNAs were designed to target conserved regions. After transformation of N. tabacum BY-2 cells with genes coding for sgRNAs, Cas9, and a selectable marker (bar), transgenic lines were obtained and their extracellular as well as intracellular protein complements were analyzed by Western blotting using antibodies recognizing β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3)-fucose. Three lines showed a strong reduction of β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3)-fucose, while two lines were completely devoid of them, indicating complete gene inactivation. The absence of these carbohydrates was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular proteins. PCR amplification and sequencing of the targeted region indicated small INDEL and/or deletions between the target sites. The KO lines did not show any particular morphology and grew as the wild-type. One KO line was transformed with genes encoding a human IgG2 antibody. The IgG2 expression level was as high as in a control transformant which had not been glycoengineered. The IgG glycosylation profile determined by mass spectrometry confirmed that no β(1,2)-xylose or α(1,3)-fucose were present on the glycosylation moiety and that the dominant glycoform was the GnGn structure. These data represent an important step toward humanizing the glycosylation of pharmacological proteins expressed in N. tabacum BY-2 cells.

  12. Tobacco Dependence: Nursing Care Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Miguel García

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco dependence is a major risk factor for health that requires a correct approach by all health workers. Nursing plays a key role both in identifying smokers, as in the systematic advice to quit smoking, or assist in smoking quit. This work presents three standardized care plans that enable the nursing work in accordance with a methodology and using a standardized language that allows both continuity of care such as research and development of knowledge nurse: Care plan to smoker in precontemplation stage; Care plan to smoker in contemplation stage; Care plan to smoker in preparation/action stage.

  13. Japan Tobacco International: To 'be the most successful and respected tobacco company in the world'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Ross; Eckhardt, Jappe; Widyati Prastyani, Ade

    2017-03-01

    Japan Tobacco International (JTI) is the international division of Japan Tobacco Incorporated, and the world's third largest transnational tobacco company. Founded in 1999, JTI's rapid growth has been the result of a global business strategy that potentially serves as a model for other Asian tobacco companies. This paper analyses Japan Tobacco Incorporated's global expansion since the 1980s in response to market opening, foreign competition, and declining share of a contracting domestic market. Key features of its global strategy include the on-going central role and investment by the Japanese government, and an expansion agenda based on mergers and acquisitions. The paper also discusses the challenges this global business strategy poses for global tobacco control and public health. This paper is part of the special issue 'The Emergence of Asian Tobacco Companies: Implications for Global Health Governance'.

  14. "Light" Tobacco Products Pose Heavy Health Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates "Light" Tobacco Products Pose Heavy Health Risks Share Tweet ... Feed A federal law is restricting the words “light,” “low,” and “mild” from tobacco products now on ...

  15. Initiating Tobacco Curricula in Dental Hygiene Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda D.; Fun, Kay; Madden, Theresa E.

    2006-01-01

    Two hours of tobacco instructions were incorporated into the baccalaureate dental hygiene curricula in a university in the Northwestern United States. Prior to graduation, all senior students were invited to complete anonymously a questionnaire surveying attitudes and clinical skills in providing tobacco services to their clinic patients. Twenty…

  16. Agrochemical Management in Production of Tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Miceski, Trajko; Taskoski, Petre

    2006-01-01

    Environment protection requires from tobacco growers to secure a good quality and economically justified tobacco production. With respect to this, application of agrochemicals plays a particularly important role. The agrochemicals should be applied in the lowest possible rate, in compliance with the Integral Protection Management(IPM), paying great attention to the use of adequate working clothes and equipment during their use.

  17. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  18. Tobacco Etch Virus protease: A shortcut across biotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaratto, Francesca; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2016-08-10

    About thirty years ago, studies on the RNA genome of Tobacco Etch Virus revealed the presence of an efficient and specific protease, called Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEVp), that was part of the Nuclear Inclusion a (NIa) enzyme. TEVp is an efficient and specific protease of 27kDa that has become a valuable biotechnological tool. Nowadays TEVp is a unique endopeptidase largely exploited in biotechnology from industrial applications to in vitro and in vivo cellular studies. A number of TEVp mutants with different rate of cleavage, stability and specificity have been reported. Similarly, a panel of different target cleavage sites, derived from the canonical ENLYFQ-G/S site, has been established. In this review we describe these aspects of TEVp and some of its multiple applications. A particular focus is on the use and molecular biology of TEVp in living cells and organisms.

  19. Lithium treatment induces a hypersensitive-like response in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Miguel A; Romero, Carlos; Bellés, José M; Montesinos, Consuelo; Vicente, Oscar; Serrano, Ramón

    2003-07-01

    Treatment of tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants with lithium induces the formation of necrotic lesions and leaf curling as in the case of incompatible pathogen interactions. Further similarities at the molecular level include accumulation of ethylene and of salicylic and gentisic acids, and induced expression of pathogenesis-related PR-P, PR5 and PR1 genes. With the exception of PR1 induction, lithium produced the same effects in transgenic tobacco plants that do not accumulate salicylate because of overexpression of the bacterial hydroxylase gene nahG. On the other hand, inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis with aminoethoxyvinylglycine prevented lithium-induced cell death and PR5 expression. These results suggest that lithium triggers a hypersensitive-like response where ethylene signalling is essential.

  20. High tobacco consumption lowers body weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winsløw, Ulrik C; Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting evidence has been found regarding the association between high tobacco consumption and body weight among smokers. We tested the hypothesis that high tobacco consumption is causally associated with low body weight. METHODS: We conducted a Mendelian randomization study...... with a genetic variant in CHRNA3 (rs1051730) as proxy for high tobacco consumption. The cohort consisted of 80,342 participants from the Copenhagen General Population Study, with details on body weight, smoking habits and CHRNA3 genotype, including 15,220 current smokers. RESULTS: In observational analyses, high...... tobacco consumption was associated with high body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference and waist-hip ratio. In multivariable adjusted models a 1-cigarette/day higher tobacco consumption was associated with 0.05 kg (95% confidence interval 0.02; 0.08) higher body weight, 0.02 kg...

  1. Dual use of tobacco among Bangladeshi men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Zaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dual use of tobacco (using smoking and smokeless forms in Bangladesh is uncommon in women but common in men. Dual users are at additional risk of cancers and heart diseases compared with a single form of tobacco use. Knowledge about their socioeconomic background is necessary for planning appropriate interventions. We report here socioeconomic background of the dual users of tobacco from a nationally representative survey. Methods: The study adopted a probability proportionate to size sampling technic of divisional population stratified into urban and rural areas to recruit men aged 25 years or older from their households. A total of 4312 men were recruited. Variables included questions on 20 household assets, tobacco use and other behavioral risk factors, and measurement of body weight and height. Results: The average age of dual users was 46.7 years old compared to 43.4 and 52.3 years for smokers and smokeless tobacco users. Prevalence of "smoking only," "smokeless only" and "dual use" of tobacco was 40.6%, 15.2%, and 14.2%, respectively. Among all tobacco users, dual users constituted 20%. These dual users had lower educational achievement, rural residence, lower intake of fruit, and higher intake of alcohol. They were more undernourished as indicated by a thin body mass index compared to nonusers and smokers. Dual users were of socioeconomically deprived as measured by wealth quartiles constructed out of household assets. Conclusion: Dual use of tobacco is common in Bangladesh, and it is intimately linked with socioeconomic deprivation. Poverty reduction strategy and campaigns should address tobacco control not only tobacco in general, but its dual use in particular.

  2. Tobacco industry targeting youth in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S; Mejia, R; Ling, P M; Pérez-Stable, E J

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Argentina has one of the highest cigarette smoking rates among both men and women in the Americas and no legislated restrictions on tobacco industry advertising. The tobacco industry has traditionally expanded markets by targeting adolescents and young adults. The objective of this study was to determine whether and how the tobacco industry promotes cigarettes to adolescents in Argentina. Methods We conducted a systematic search of tobacco industry documents available through the internet dated between 1995 and 2004 using standard search terms to identify marketing strategies in Argentina. A selected review of the four leading newspapers and nine magazines with reported high readership among adolescents was completed. The selected print media were searched for tobacco images and these were classified as advertisements if associated with a commercial product or as a story if not. Results The tobacco industry used market segmentation as a strategy to target Argentinean consumers. British American Tobacco (BAT) undertook a young adult psychographic study and classified them as “progressives”, “Jurassics” or “conservatives” and “crudos” or “spoiled brats”. BAT marketed Lucky Strike to the “progressives” using Hollywood movies as a vehicle. The tobacco industry also targeted their national brands to the conservatives and linked these brands with “nationalistic values” in advertising campaigns. Philip Morris promoted Marlboro by sponsoring activities directed at young people and they launched the 10 cigarettes packet as a starter vehicle. Conclusions The tobacco industry used psychographic segmentation of the population and developed advertising strategies focused on youth. Tobacco control researchers and advocates must be able to address these strategies in counter-marketing interventions. PMID:18299308

  3. British American Tobacco ghost-wrote reports on tobacco advertising bans by the International Advertising Association and J J Boddewyn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R M

    2008-06-01

    In 1983 and 1986, the International Advertising Association (IAA) published an original version and then a revision of a report entitled "Tobacco Advertising Bans and Consumption in 16 Countries," which were edited by J J Boddewyn, a marketing professor. The reports concluded that tobacco advertising bans have not been accompanied by any significant reduction in tobacco consumption. Opponents of tobacco advertising restrictions trumpeted the IAA reports in print materials, media communications and legislative hearings during the 1980s and beyond. A new analysis of tobacco industry documents and transcripts of tobacco litigation testimony reveals that British American Tobacco ghost-wrote the IAA reports and that the Tobacco Institute (the trade association then representing the major US cigarette manufacturers) helped to arrange for Boddewyn to present the findings to the US Congress and the media. Further research on tobacco industry documents and tobacco litigation transcripts should assess whether tobacco industry sources were responsible for ghost-writing other studies favourable to the industry.

  4. Tobacco industry marketing, population-based tobacco control, and smoking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, John P

    2007-12-01

    Two of the major influences of cigarette smoking behavior are tobacco industry marketing and public health tobacco-control activities. These vie with each other to influence the proportion of each generation who initiate smoking, the intensity level reached by smokers, and the time before smokers are able to quit successfully. This article provides a brief summary of the evidence associating tobacco marketing practices (organized under the four "Ps" of marketing), with smoking behavior. The evidence for causality in this association is considered convincing. Publicly funded, comprehensive, statewide tobacco-control programs were introduced into the United States in the late 1980s, with money either from tobacco taxes or from legal settlements of states with the tobacco industry. These programs use organized statewide approaches to implement current recommendations on "best practices" to discourage tobacco use, recommendations that have changed over time. During the 1990s, "best practices" evolved to include protection against secondhand smoke, sale of cigarettes to minors, and restrictions on tobacco advertising. Evaluations have been published on four statewide tobacco-control programs (Sydney/Melbourne, California, Massachusetts, and Florida) and a national program aimed at youth (American Legacy Program). For each program, there was a positive association with reduced smoking. The evidence supporting the conclusion that tobacco-control programs reduce smoking behavior is evaluated as strong.

  5. Role of Oxides of Nitrogen in Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamine Formation in Flue-Cured Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor TB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is known to contain a class of nitrosamines known as tobacco-specific nitrosamines or TSNA. Nitrosation of naturally occurring tobacco alkaloids is commonly accepted as the mechanism of TSNA formation in tobacco. Because green and freshly harvested tobaccos are virtually free of TSNA, formation and accumulation of TSNA are generally considered to occur during the curing process. Most recent hypotheses have focused on microbial reduction of nitrate to nitrite and other oxides of nitrogen (NOcompounds that react with tobacco alkaloids to form TSNA during curing. This natural microbial process remains the prevalent hypothesis for TSNA formation in burley and other air-cured tobaccos. However, a different mechanism for the formation of TSNA in flue-cured tobacco, independent of microbial activity, is documented in this paper. It is common practice to flue-cure Virginia or blonde tobacco in bulk barns that incorporate forced air ventilation and temperature control. For the last thirty-five years, many modern bulk barns in North America generally have used liquid propane gas (LPG with direct-fired burners that exhaust combustion gases directly into the barn where the tobacco is exposed to those gases. Our studies indicate that LPG combustion by-products in the exhaust stream, namely NO, react with naturally occurring tobacco alkaloids to form TSNA. Heat exchange curing methods preclude exposure of the tobacco to combustion gases and by-products, thereby eliminating this significant source of TSNA formation, without degrading leaf quality or smoking character. Research findings from 1998 and 1999 are presented to demonstrate the role of NOgases in TSNA formation and the significance of direct-fired curing as a primary source of TSNA formation in flue-cured tobacco. Also, data from an extensive barn conversion program in 2000, which resulted in a 94% average reduction in TSNA levels in cured flue-cured leaf, are presented.

  6. Smokeless tobacco product prices and taxation in Bangladesh: Findings from the International Tobacco Control Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Nargis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Smokeless tobacco use occupies a significant portion of overall tobacco consumption in Bangladesh. Yet very little is known about the effectiveness of tax and price policy in controlling the use of smokeless tobacco use in the country. Methods: The paper examines the price distribution of various smoked (cigarette, bidi and smokeless tobacco products (zarda, gul using the univariate Epanechnikov kernel density function. It estimates the own and cross price elasticity of demand for the most widely used smokeless tobacco product zarda using two-step regression analysis. The analysis is based on data from the ITC Bangladesh Wave 3 Survey which is a nationally representative cohort survey of tobacco users and nonusers conducted in in Bangladesh during 2011-12. Results: The price elasticity of lower price brands of zarda is estimated at −0.64 and of higher priced brands at −0.39, and the cross price elasticity of zarda with respect to cigarette price at 0.35. The tax increase on smokeless tobacco needs to be greater than the tax increase on smoked tobacco to bridge the wide price differential between the two types of products that currently encourages downward substitution from smoked to smokeless tobacco and discourages quitting behavior. Conclusions: This paper argues that increasing tax on smokeless tobacco simultaneously with the tax increase on smoked tobacco can have significant negative impact on the prevalence of smokeless tobacco use in Bangladesh. Finally, a specific excise system replacing the existing ad valorem excise tax can substantially contribute to the revenue collection performance from smokeless tobacco products.

  7. EXPRESSION OF BACTERIAL PROTEIN-A IN TOBACCO LEADS TO ENHANCED RESISTANCE TO STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitali Roy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is the most commonly used plant for expression of transgenes from a variety of organisms because it can be easily grown and transformed, it provides abundant amounts of fresh tissue and has a well-established cell culture system. As bacterial enzymes can be synthesized in tobacco, here we explore the possibility of in planta expression of staphylococcal protein-A(PA which is an antibody, an important group among biopharmaceuticals. In our study we have shown that the tobacco plants harboring PA gene could combat the crown gall infection and also effective in resisting abiotic stress conditions. Transgenic plants when subjected to interact with wild variety of Agrobacterium shows its enhanced capability to resist the gall formation. And when transgenic tobacco plants were grown in presence of 200mM NaCl and/or MG(Methylglyoxal solution, shows their increased tolerance towards salinity stress and high MG stress. So far transgenic tobacco plants are concerned, improvements in the expression of recombinant proteins and their recovery from tobacco may also enhance production and commercial use of this protein.

  8. Non-cigarette tobacco and the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schivo, Michael; Avdalovic, Mark V; Murin, Susan

    2014-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is known to cause a wide range of damaging health outcomes; however, the effects of non-cigarette tobacco products are either unknown or perceived as less harmful than cigarettes. Smokeless tobacco, cigar smoking, and waterpipe smoking have increased in usage over the past few decades. Some experts believe that their use is reaching epidemic proportions. Factors such as a perception of harm reduction, targeted advertising, and unrecognized addiction may drive the increased consumption of non-cigarette tobacco products. In particular, the need for social acceptance, enjoyment of communal smoking activities, and exotic nature of waterpipe smoking fuels, in part, its popularity. The public is looking for "safer" alternatives to smoking cigarettes, and some groups advertise products such as smokeless tobacco and electronic cigarettes as the alternatives they seek. Though it is clear that cigar and waterpipe tobacco smoking are probably as dangerous to health as cigarette smoking, there is an opinion among users that the health risks are less compared to cigarette smoking. This is particularly true in younger age groups. In the cases of smokeless tobacco and electronic cigarettes, the risks to health are less clear and there may be evidence of a harm reduction compared to cigarettes. In this article, we discuss commonly used forms of non-cigarette tobacco products, their impacts on lung health, and relevant controversies surrounding their use.

  9. Dental students' attitudes toward tobacco cessation counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Patrick L; Davis, Elaine L; McCall, W D

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine if level of education, gender, and tobacco history affected attitudes of dental students toward tobacco cessation counseling. A secondary objective was to examine the psychometric properties of the survey instrument. First- and fourth-year dental students at one school of dental medicine completed a survey examining attitudes toward tobacco cessation and perceived barriers to performing tobacco cessation counseling in a dental setting. Analyses were conducted to determine whether there were differences in attitudes by gender, level of education, or personal and family tobacco use. A main effect for education level was discovered. Fourth-year students were more likely than first-year students to consider the prescription of nicotine gum and transdermal patches to be within the scope and responsibility of the dental profession. No significant differences were seen with regard to gender or students' personal and family tobacco histories. Dental students were in general agreement that tobacco cessation counseling is within the responsibility of the dental profession, is within the scope of dental practice, and can be effective. Psychometric analysis revealed reliability of the survey instrument.

  10. Influence of tobacco type on smoke composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    Cigarette smoke quantity and composition is affected by both the physical properties and chemical nature of the tobacco. Flue-cured tobacco exhibits a greater density than does Burley which results in a larger number of standard puffs per cigarette for the former and, thus, increased per cigarette deliveries of most smoke constituents. The greater carbohydrate and polyphenolic content of flue-cured tobaccos contributes to an increased yield of acidic constituents in the smoke. The increased nitrogenous component of Burley tobacco leads to a more alkaline smoke and one enriched in oxides of nitrogen. A quantitative elucidation of the relationship between tobacco type and smoke composition from literature results is complicated by the large number of variables influencing smoke composition which are generally unspecified in the reports. Smokes from cigaretts containing straight Burley and straight Bright tobaccos are compared based on analytical results from this laboratory. With few exceptions, smoke composition is often influenced more by processing variables and agronomic practices than by general tobacco ''type.'' 6 tables.

  11. Tobacco and the Escalating Global Cancer Burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F. Oppeltz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of cancer is escalating as a result of dramatic increases in the use of tobacco in the developing world. The use of tobacco is linked to the development of a broad variety of cancers, mainly lung cancer, the single most common cancer in the world. Tobacco smoking-attributable deaths extends beyond cancer and include stroke, heart attack and COPD. Widening disparities in cancer-related mortality have shifted towards a more dramatic burden in the developing world. Appropriate interventions must be implemented to reduce tobacco use and prevent global mortality that has escalated to epidemic levels. Tobacco control policies, including public health advertisement campaigns, warning labels, adoption of smoke-free laws, comprehensive bans and tax policies are highly effective measures to control tobacco use. Clinicians and academic institutions have to be actively committed to support tobacco control initiatives. The reduction in cancer related morbidity and mortality should be viewed as a global crisis and definitive results will depend on a multilevel effort to effectively reduce the burden of cancer, particularly in underprivileged regions of the world.

  12. Awareness of pro-tobacco advertising and promotion and beliefs about tobacco use: findings from the Tobacco Control Policy (TCP) India Pilot Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Fong, Geoffrey T; Quah, Anne C K; Sansone, Genevieve; Pednekar, Mangesh S; Gupta, Prakash C; Sinha, Dhirendra N

    2014-12-01

    Tobacco companies are utilizing similar strategies to advertise and promote their products in developing countries as they have used successfully for over 50 years in developed countries. The present study describes how adult smokers, smokeless tobacco users, and non-users of tobacco from the Tobacco Control Project (TCP) India Pilot Survey, conducted in 2006, responded to questions regarding their perceptions and observations of pro-tobacco advertising and promotion and beliefs about tobacco use. Analyses found that 74% (n=562) of respondents reported seeing some form of pro-tobacco advertising in the last six months, with no differences observed between smokers (74%), smokeless tobacco users (74%), and nonsmokers (73%). More than half of respondents reported seeing pro-tobacco advertising on store windows or inside shops. Overall, this study found that a significant percentage of tobacco users and non-users in India report seeing some form of pro-tobacco advertising and promotion messages. Additional analyses found that smokers were more likely to perceive tobacco use as harmful to their health compared with smokeless tobacco users and non-users (padvertising and promotion of tobacco products in India.

  13. The implementation of health care aimed at the cessation of tobacco use, treatment of tobacco dependence and consequences of tobacco consumption in the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Boytsov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The summarizing of the experience of medical care at the cessation of tobacco use and the treatment of tobacco addiction and consequences of tobacco consumption in the Russian Federation (RF as well as suggestions for their improvement are presented.For the effective implementation of health care, aimed at the cessation of tobacco use, treatment of tobacco addiction and consequences of tobacco consumption in the RF it is necessary to solve the following problems:to include doctors of all specialties in the process of medical care and treatment oftobacco addiction and consequences oftobacco consumption in the RF; to ensure effective implementation of the existing legal documents determining the procedure for providing medical aid, aimed at ending the use of tobacco, treatment of tobacco dependence and consequences of tobacco consumption, greater control over their performance and quality of their implementation; to expand of the network of medical offices for cessation of tobacco consumption on the basis of existing structures in primary health care settings (including women's and children’s outpatient clinics, as well as hospitals and health resorts, their provision of personnel and equipment, introduction of group forms of work; to ensure a permanent system of training on assistance at the cessation of tobacco consumption, the treatment of tobacco dependence and consequences of tobacco consumption, including the introduction of medical assistance cycle on cessation of tobacco consumption for student training in medical schools and programs for postgraduate education of health professionals

  14. Health Implications of Smokeless Tobacco Use. Volume 6, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD. Office of Medical Applications of Research.

    Concerned with the increase in use of chewing tobacco and snuff, this brochure looks at the health risks of using smokeless tobacco. It presents five questions about smokeless tobacco use and provides answers to the questions developed by a consensus development conference on health implications of smokeless tobacco use convened by the National…

  15. Tobacco Industry Interference in the WHO European Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Céline E J L Brassart

    2012-01-01

    WHO selected tobacco industry interference as the theme of the 2012 World No Tobacco Day, recognizing the serious danger the tobacco industry poses to public health and the need to expose and counter the industry’s increasing attempts to undermine the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control...

  16. CLINOPATHOLOGICAL AND CYTOLOGICAL CHANGES IN ORAL MUCOSA OF PATIENTS HAVING TOBACCO SMOKING HABBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanindra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tobacco was introduced into Europe in the late 15th century. Portuguese traders introduced it to India in late 16th or early 17th century. Since then, tobacco use has spread with remarkable rapidity, into all sections of people. Now tobacco is used in different forms out of which some are in form of smoking like cigarette, bidi whereas some are smokeless e.g., chewing, application over the teeth & the gingiva. Among tobacco habituated Indian population, about 70% are in the smoking form.1 Passive smoking is also a significant health hazard. There is a vital role of dental practitioners in identifying individuals at risk of mucosal disease, the importance of public education about the risk factors, and the necessity for counseling patients with precancerous lesions on avoiding further risk.2 AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To study clinico-pathological & cytological changes in oral mucosal cells of people with the habit of smoking tobacco by using exfoliative cytology and PAP stain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The oral exfoliative cytology smears are taken from 60 person (30 smoking habit & 30 control from the oral pathology department of K M Shah Dental College & Hospital. The smears are spread on the glass slide and are fixed with 95% ethyl alcohol. The slides are stained with papanicolaou stain and observed under microscope. RESULTS: The result showed that the anucleated cells (Precancerous feature are increased in patient with smoking habit as compared to control group. Anucleated cells are highest in oral sub mucous fibrosis group of patients

  17. Smokeless tobacco, sport and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagué, Frédéric; Guenancia, Charles; Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Moreau, Daniel; Cottin, Yves; Zeller, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco (snuff) is a finely ground or shredded tobacco that is sniffed through the nose or placed between the cheek and gum. Chewing tobacco is used by putting a wad of tobacco inside the cheek. Smokeless tobacco is widely used by young athletes to enhance performance because nicotine improves some aspects of physiology. However, smokeless tobacco has harmful health effects, including cardiovascular disorders, linked to nicotine physiological effects, mainly through catecholamine release. Nicotine decreases heart rate variability and the ventricular fibrillation threshold, and promotes the occurrence of various arrhythmias; it also impairs endothelial-dependent vasodilation and could therefore promote premature atherogenesis. At rest, heart rate, blood pressure, inotropism, cardiac output and myocardial oxygen consumption are increased by nicotine, leading to an imbalance between myocardial oxygen demand and supply. The same occurs at submaximal levels of exercise. These increases are accompanied by a rise in systemic resistances. At maximal exercise, heart rate, cardiac output and maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) are unaffected by nicotine. Because endothelial dysfunction is promoted by nicotine, paradoxical coronary vasoconstriction may occur during exercise and recovery. Nicotine induces a decrease in muscular strength and impairs anaerobic performance. However, nicotine is used in sports as it diminishes anxiety, enhances concentration and agility, improves aerobic performance and favours weight control. Importantly, smokeless tobacco, similar to cigarette smoking, leads to nicotine dependence through dopaminergic pathways. Smokeless tobacco has harmful cardiovascular effects and is addictive: it fulfils all the criteria for inclusion in the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list as a doping product. Smokeless tobacco use in sporting activities must be discouraged.

  18. Tooth decay in alcohol and tobacco abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavarajah Rooban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Alcohol and tobacco abuse are detrimental to general and oral health. Though the effects of these harmful habits on oral mucosa had been demonstrated, their independent and combined effect on the dental caries experience is unknown and worthy of investigation. Materials and Methods : We compared 268 alcohol-only abusers with 2426 alcohol and tobacco abusers in chewing and smoking forms to test the hypothesis that various components of their dental caries experience are significantly different due to plausible sociobiological explanations. Clinical examination, Decay, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT Index and Oral Hygiene Index - Simplified were measured in a predetermined format. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square test and one-way ANOVA analysis were done using SPSS Version 16.0. Result : The mean DMFT were 3.31, 3.24, 4.09, 2.89 for alcohol-only abusers, alcohol and chewing tobacco abusers, smoking tobacco and alcohol abusers, and those who abused tobacco in smoke and smokeless forms respectively. There was no significant difference between the oral hygiene care measures between the study groups. Presence of attrition among chewers and those with extrinsic stains experienced less caries than others. Discussion and conclusion : The entire study population exhibited a higher incidence of caries experience. Use of tobacco in any form appears to substantially increase the risk for dental caries. Attrition with use of chewing tobacco and presence of extrinsic stains with tobacco use appear to provide a protective effect from caries. The changes in oral micro-flora owing to tobacco use and alcohol may play a critical role in the initiation and progression of dental caries.

  19. Countermeasures for Tobacco Branding and Industrial Development in Enshi Prefecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangzhong; DAI

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural branding is an important mark of agricultural modernization. Enshi Prefecture of Hubei Province is reputed as " Tobacco Kingdom" and " World Capital of Selenium". It is also the key production area of flue-cured tobacco,burley tobacco and selenium-enriched tobacco. The tobacco industry has become a pillar industry of Enshi Prefecture. This paper firstly introduces tobacco resource and industry of Enshi Prefecture. Then,it analyzes countermeasures for tobacco branding and industrial development. Finally,it comes up with several constructive recommendations.

  20. Chewing tobacco use: perceptions and knowledge in rural adolescent youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Grossman, Christie; Hudson, Diane Brage; Fleck, Margaret Ofe

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this pilot study were to describe the incidence of chewing tobacco use among rural midwestern adolescents and to describe rural midwestern adolescents' perceptions and knowledge about chewing tobacco use. A Smokeless Tobacco Use Survey was administered to 34 adolescent subjects who attended 5th-8th grades in two rural towns. None of the subjects reported trying chewing tobacco products. However, a group of male subjects who stated they may chew tobacco sometime in the future, performed less well on the test about chewing tobacco facts and perceptions of use, indicating some education needs are warranted. Risk factors and deterrent factors to using chewing tobacco are reported.

  1. Engineering triterpene metabolism in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuiqin; Jiang, Zuodong; Kempinski, Chase; Eric Nybo, S; Husodo, Satrio; Williams, Robert; Chappell, Joe

    2012-09-01

    Terpenes comprise a distinct class of natural products that serve a diverse range of physiological functions, provide for interactions between plants and their environment and represent a resource for many kinds of practical applications. To better appreciate the importance of terpenes to overall growth and development, and to create a production capacity for specific terpenes of industrial interest, we have pioneered the development of strategies for diverting carbon flow from the native terpene biosynthetic pathways operating in the cytosol and plastid compartments of tobacco for the generation of specific classes of terpenes. In the current work, we demonstrate how difficult it is to divert the 5-carbon intermediates DMAPP and IPP from the mevalonate pathway operating in the cytoplasm for triterpene biosynthesis, yet diversion of the same intermediates from the methylerythritol phosphate pathway operating in the plastid compartment leads to the accumulation of very high levels of the triterpene squalene. This was assessed by the co-expression of an avian farnesyl diphosphate synthase and yeast squalene synthase genes targeting metabolism in the cytoplasm or chloroplast. We also evaluated the possibility of directing this metabolism to the secretory trichomes of tobacco by comparing the effects of trichome-specific gene promoters to strong, constitutive viral promoters. Surprisingly, when transgene expression was directed to trichomes, high-level squalene accumulation was observed, but overall plant growth and physiology were reduced up to 80 % of the non-transgenic controls. Our results support the notion that the biosynthesis of a desired terpene can be dramatically improved by directing that metabolism to a non-native cellular compartment, thus avoiding regulatory mechanisms that might attenuate carbon flux within an engineered pathway.

  2. [Can tobacco companies be good corporate citizens?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, G; Mena, S

    2009-07-01

    Tobacco companies have jumped on the Corporate social responsibility (CSR) bandwagon as a tentative to be societally accepted as responsible actors and good corporate citizens. This is however not possible for two reasons. First, the product they sell is lethal and thus not compatible with the precondition of doing no harm to be a good corporate citizen. Second, the behavior of tobacco firms is not responsible, being illustrated by four examples: junk science versus sound science strategy, seducing young smokers, political lobbying and getting customers on new markets. To conclude, three implications for regulating the activities of the tobacco industry are given.

  3. Epidemiology of tobacco use and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovino, G A; Henningfield, J E; Tomar, S L; Escobedo, L G; Slade, J

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the epidemiology of tobacco use and dependence can be used to guide research initiatives, intervention programs, and policy decisions. Both the reduction in the prevalence of smoking among US adults and black adolescents and the decline in per capita consumption are encouraging. These changes have probably been influenced by factors operating at the individual (e.g., school-based prevention programs and cessation programs) and environmental (e.g., mass media educational strategies, the presence of smoke-free laws and policies, and the price of tobacco products) levels (for a discussion of these factors, see, e.g., refs. 2, 48, 52, 183, and 184). The lack of progress among adolescents, especially whites and males, and the high risk for experimenters of developing tobacco dependence present cause for great concern (48, 183-186). In addition to those discussed above, several areas of research can be recommended. 1. Better understanding of the clustering of tobacco use with the use of other drugs, other risk behaviors, and other psychiatric disorders could better illuminate the causal processes involved, as well as the special features of the interventions needed to prevent and treat tobacco dependence. 2. To better understand population needs, trend analyses of prevalence, initiation, and cessation should, whenever possible, incorporate standardized measures of these other risk factors. Future research should compare the effect of socioeconomic status variables on measures of smoking behavior among racial/ethnic groups in the United States. 3. For reasons that may be genetic, environmental, or both, some persons do not progress beyond initial experimentation with tobacco use (2, 48, 183, 187-192), but about one-third to one-half of those who experiment with cigarettes become regular users (48, 193, 194). Factors, both individual and environmental, that can influence the susceptibility of individuals to tobacco dependence need further attention. 4. To

  4. Altria means tobacco: Philip Morris's identity crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth A; Malone, Ruth E

    2003-04-01

    Philip Morris Companies, the world's largest and most profitable tobacco seller, has changed its corporate name to The Altria Group. The company has also embarked on a plan to improve its corporate image. Examination of internal company documents reveals that these changes have been planned for over a decade and that the company expects to reap specific and substantial rewards from them. Tobacco control advocates should be alert to the threat Philip Morris's plans pose to industry focused tobacco control campaigns. Company documents also suggest what the vulnerabilities of those plans are and how advocates might best exploit them.

  5. Project Cerberus: tobacco industry strategy to create an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamudu, Hadii M; Hammond, Ross; Glantz, Stanton A

    2008-09-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, British American Tobacco, Philip Morris, and Japan Tobacco International executed Project Cerberus to develop a global voluntary regulatory regime as an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). They aimed to develop a global voluntary regulatory code to be overseen by an independent audit body and to focus attention on youth smoking prevention. The International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards announced in September 2001, however, did not have the independent audit body. Although the companies did not stop the FCTC, they continue to promote the International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards youth smoking prevention as an alternative to the FCTC. Public health civil society groups should help policymakers and governments understand the importance of not working with the tobacco industry.

  6. On the way of tobacco quitting: A VAR approach

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Gérard Vaillant; Christian Ben lakhdar; Thérèse Lebrun

    2011-01-01

    In order to describe the process of tobacco quitting, we perform a VAR model and causality tests both on the monthly sales of tobacco products and nicotine dependence drugs in France, for the period going from February 2004 to April 2009. According to the path of tobacco quitting found out, it results that an upward harmonization of tax policy on the different tobacco products could accelerate the tobacco quitting process.

  7. Effect of smokeless tobacco and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens on survival of ultraviolet light-inactivated herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dokko, H.; Min, P.S.; Cherrick, H.M.; Park, N.H. (Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UCLA School of Dentistry (USA))

    1991-04-01

    Low doses of ultraviolet (UV) light, x-rays, photodynamic treatment, or aflatoxins increase the survival of UV-irradiated virus in cells. This effect is postulated to occur by enhancement of the error-prone cellular repair function, which could also be associated with oncogenic cell transformation. The present study was designed to investigate whether treatment of green monkey kidney cells with water extract of snuff (snuff extract), benzo(a)pyrene, nicotine, or tobacco-specific N'-nitrosamines would result in enhanced survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus (HSV). Exposure of the cells with snuff extract, benzo(a)pyrene, N'-nitrosonornicotine, or 4-(N-methyl-N'-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone resulted in an enhancement of survival of UV-irradiated HSV type 1 compared with the control whereas exposure of the cells with nicotine did not. These data indicate that the water-extractable component of snuff and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens increase the cellular repair mechanism and provides for increased survival of UV-irradiated HSV.

  8. Knowledge and attitude towards the health effects of tobacco and measures of tobacco control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrestha Mohan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco is a major public health threat the world has ever faced. It is a risk factor for six of the eight leading causes of death in the world. Without the effective implementation of tobacco regulation policy, the risk itself cannot be minimized. The aim of this study is to provide the adolescents knowledge of the health effects of active and passive smoking, and knowledge and attitudes towards tobacco control measures. Materials and Methods: A descriptive type of study was conducted in December 2013 in one of the government school of Palpa district, one of the rural areas of the Western region. Data entry and analysis was done using SPSS 17 version. Microsoft Excel 2007 is also used for the data processing. Results: There is substantial support for the government taking measure towards tobacco control (96%. Furthermore, strong supports are there regarding ban of smoking in public places and public transport (95% followed by increasing price of tobacco products (87%, banning sales of tobacco to and by minors (82% and ban of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (73%. Conclusion: The study focuses the effective implementation of the Tobacco Control and Regulation Act 2011, Nepal and health education should be provided to the adolescents with the facts and skills that will enable them to protect themselves from the harmful effects of tobacco related exposure.

  9. [Legal framework and strategy of the tobacco industry in relation to tobacco advertising in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, J; Cortés Blanco, M; Sarriá Santamera, A

    2000-01-01

    Publicity is legally regulated in Spain, in order to avoid its misuse. Tobacco publicity is also under those regulation, having had the companies operating in this sector to adapt themselves through new strategies. In this work, the legal restrictions existing in Spain regarding publicity are analyzed, together with some of the strategies developed by tobacco companies in order to elude them. In this sense, and despite of the existing legal framework, it should be noticed that tobacco companies are cleverly taking advantage of the existence of legal loopholes in tobacco publicity to promote their products.

  10. Can tobacco control be transformative? Reducing gender inequity and tobacco use among vulnerable populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Lorraine

    2014-01-07

    Tobacco use and exposure is unequally distributed across populations and countries and among women and men. These trends and patterns reflect and cause gender and economic inequities along with negative health impacts. Despite a commitment to gender analysis in the preamble to Framework Convention on Tobacco Control there is much yet to be done to fully understand how gender operates in tobacco control. Policies, program and research in tobacco control need to not only integrate gender, but rather operationalize gender with the goal of transforming gender and social inequities in the course of tobacco control initiatives. Gender transformative tobacco control goes beyond gender sensitive efforts and challenges policy and program developers to apply gender theory in designing their initiatives, with the goal of changing negative gender and social norms and improving social, economic, health and social indicators along with tobacco reduction. This paper outlines what is needed to progress tobacco control in enhancing the status of gendered and vulnerable groups, with a view to reducing gender and social inequities due to tobacco use and exposure.

  11. It is time to regulate carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines in cigarette tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-07-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act gives the U.S. Food and Drug Administration power to regulate tobacco products. This commentary calls for immediate regulation of the carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) in cigarette tobacco as a logical path to cancer prevention. NNK and NNN, powerful carcinogens in laboratory animals, have been evaluated as "carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. NNK and NNN are present in the tobacco of virtually all marketed cigarettes; levels in cigarette smoke are directly proportional to the amounts in tobacco. The NNK metabolite NNAL, itself a strong carcinogen, is present in the urine of smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke. Some of the highest levels of NNK and NNN are found in U.S. products. It is well established that factors such as choice of tobacco blend, agricultural conditions, and processing methods influence levels of NNK and NNN in cigarette tobacco and cigarette smoke. Therefore, it is time to control these factors and produce cigarettes with 100 ppb or less each of NNK and NNN in tobacco, which would result in an approximate 15- to 20-fold reduction of these carcinogens in the mainstream smoke of popular cigarettes sold in the United States.

  12. Similar exposure to a tobacco-specific carcinogen in smokeless tobacco users and cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S; Carmella, Steven G; Murphy, Sharon E; Riley, William T; Le, Chap; Luo, Xianghua; Mooney, Marc; Hatsukami, Dorothy K

    2007-08-01

    Smokeless tobacco has been proposed as a reduced risk substitute for smoking, but no large studies have investigated exposure to the powerful carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) in smokeless tobacco users versus smokers. The purpose of this study was to carry out such a comparison. Levels of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL), a biomarker of NNK exposure, and cotinine, a biomarker of nicotine exposure, were quantified in the urine of 420 smokers and 182 smokeless tobacco users who were participants in studies designed to reduce their use of these products. The measurements were taken at baseline, before intervention. Levels of total NNAL per milliliter of urine were significantly higher in smokeless tobacco users than in smokers (P tobacco users than in smokers (P tobacco users than in smokers (P tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK in smokeless tobacco users and smokers. These findings do not support the use of smokeless tobacco as a safe substitute for smoking.

  13. Conveying misinformation: Top-ranked Japanese books on tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone Ruth E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco control efforts in Japan have lagged other high income countries, possibly because the Japanese government partially owns Japan Tobacco, Inc. In Japan, tobacco use is still often regarded as an issue of manners rather than an issue of health. Information about tobacco is available, but may not always be accurate. We explored what information Japanese consumers might access by reading popular Japanese books about tobacco. Methods We searched Amazon.com Japan using the term "Tobacco", identifying the top 12 books by "relevance" and "bestselling." We eliminated duplicates and books not concerned with tobacco use and classified the remaining books as pro-smoking, anti-smoking, or neutral. We reviewed the pro-smoking books, published 2004-2009, and analyzed examples of misinformation by theme. Results Pro-smoking popular books conveyed five types of misinformation: doubt about science; suggestions that smoking increased health, longevity, virility, etc.; trivializing tobacco's effects; attacking public health advocates/authorities; and linking tobacco use with authenticity, history, or civil rights. At least one book was authored by a former Japan Tobacco employee; another used a popular Japan Tobacco advertising phrase. Conclusions Creating doubt and confusion about tobacco serves tobacco industry interests and re-creates a strategy developed by US tobacco interests more than 40 years ago. Japanese readers may be misled by texts such as those reviewed. Tobacco control and public health advocates in Japan and globally should expose and counter such misinformation. "Naming and shaming" may be effective.

  14. Researcher eyeing tobacco for factory of biopharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Karen

    2004-01-01

    The economics of producing biopharmaceuticals from transgenic plants such as tobacco is still a roadblock to producing large quantities of urgently needed medicines, especially for people in underdeveloped nations.

  15. Should Tobacco Researchers Be Selected as Academicians?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    On Deccmber 8,2011,the Chinese cademy of Engineering (CAE)lected 54 academicians.Xic Jianping,whose research focuses on adding Chinese herbal medicine to cigarettes to reduce tar content,was on the list.Xie,52,is widely known for his research on low-tar cigarettes and serves as the deputy head of a tobacco research institute under China National Tobacco Corp.,China's tobacco monopoly and the world's largest cigarette company.Xie's election has ignited great controversy.Supporters say people shouldn't discriminate against researchers in controversial fields.Xie does not encourage smoking but has done his best to reduce its harm.The tobacco industry is a big one and China cannot eliminate it now.

  16. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Fire Safety

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Fire-Safety. The STATE...

  17. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Licensure

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation—Licensure. The STATE...

  18. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Tax

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation-Tax. The STATE System...

  19. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Advertising

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2015. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Advertising. The STATE...

  20. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Preemption

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation—Preemption. The STATE...

  1. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses....

  2. Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160769.html Smokeless Tobacco May Contain Potentially Harmful Bacteria Infections, diarrhea and vomiting are possible consequences, FDA ... products can harbor several species of potentially harmful bacteria, researchers warn. Two types in particular -- Bacillus licheniformis ...

  3. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses. The...

  4. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Preemption Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation—Preemption. The STATE...

  5. Smokeless tobacco: challenges, products and, cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, K Vendrell; Jones, Daniel L; Benton, Elain

    2010-06-01

    Tobacco companies continue to develop and aggressively market new products for oral use. Most new products are intended to dissolve in the mouth and swallow rather than spit out the juices. These products effectively circumvent smoke-free policies, decrease tobacco cessation efforts, and create individuals who use both smokeless tobacco (ST) and cigarettes. All ST products contain nicotine, carcinogens, and pose multiple health risks. The cancer and health risks associated with ST use extend well beyond the changes in the oral cavity and the risk of oral cancer. Unlike cigarettes, the contents of ST vary widely by brand and product posing difficulty in the use of the available pharmacotherapy for cessation. Although no uniform guidelines exist for the use of pharmacotherapy for smokeless tobacco cessation, research suggests that use of these drugs is effective. The most important motivator for quitting ST cessation remains in the hands of the dentist.

  6. Chemistry and toxicology of smokeless tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhisey, R A

    2012-01-01

    In most parts of the world, tobacco is used for smoking, whereas, in India, tobacco is used for smoking as well as in diverse smokeless forms. Absorption of toxic and carcinogenic chemicals in tobacco and other ingredients added to various products are causally associated with several non-communicable diseases including cancer, especially oral cancer, which is the leading cancer among men and the third most common cancer among women in India. This article highlights the toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenic effects of hazardous chemicals present in smokeless tobacco products. This endeavor was based on the extensive review of literature from various sources. The SLT products have influence on cellular metabolism, ability to cause DNA damage, and cancer in experimental animals. It is, therefore, essential to consider the collective role of chemical constituents of SLT products in the causation of adverse effect on human health.

  7. Does High Tobacco Consumption Cause Psychological Distress?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Ettrup, Lise S; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Petersen, Christina B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests that smoking influences mental health negatively. This study investigated whether high tobacco consumption is causally related to psychological distress in a Mendelian randomization design, using a variant in the nicotine acetylcholine receptor gene CHRNA3......-known to influence individual tobacco consumption-as instrumental variable for tobacco consumption. METHODS: Data from 90 108 participants in the Copenhagen General Population Study was used. Exposures included self-reported cigarettes/day and pack years and the CHRNA3 rs1051730 genotype as instrumental...... variable for tobacco consumption. Three dimensions of psychological distress were studied: Stress, fatigue, and hopelessness. Analyses with the CHRNA3 genotype were stratified by smoking status. RESULTS: Self-reported amount of smoking was associated with all three dimensions of psychological distress...

  8. Economic Study of Global Tobacco Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an interview on Cancer Currents, Dr. Mark Parascandola discusses findings from an economics study showing that, globally, tobacco use burdens economies with more than US $1 trillion annually in health care costs and lost productivity.

  9. Healthy People 2020 Tobacco Use Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Healthy People 2020 Tobacco Use Objectives. Healthy People...

  10. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Youth Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation—Youth Access. The STATE...

  11. Quantifying the influence of tobacco industry on EU governance: automated content analysis of the EU Tobacco Products Directive.

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, H.(Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, IRFU, Saclay, France); Gilmore, AB; Peeters, S; McKee, M; Stuckler, D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The tobacco industry spends large sums lobbying the European Union (EU) institutions, yet whether such lobbying significantly affects tobacco policy is not well understood. We used novel quantitative text mining techniques to evaluate the impact of industry pressure on the contested EU Tobacco Products Directive revision. DESIGN: Policy positions of 18 stakeholders including the tobacco industry, health NGOs and tobacco retailers were evaluated using their text submissions to EU co...

  12. Clinico-epidemiological profile of tobacco users attending a tobacco cessation clinic in a teaching hospital in Bangalore city

    OpenAIRE

    George D′Souza; Dorothy P Rekha; Priya Sreedaran; Srinivasan, K.; Mony, Prem K

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tobacco-attributable mortality in India is estimated to be at least 10%. Tobacco cessation is more likely to avert millions of deaths before 2050 than prevention of tobacco use initiation. Objective: To describe the clinico-epidemiological profile of attendees of a tobacco cessation clinic in a teaching hospital in Bangalore city. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study of 189 attendees seen over 2 years in the Tobacco Cessation Clinic of a tertiary-care teaching hospital in Ba...

  13. 27 CFR 71.46 - Suspension and revocation of tobacco permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... felony violation of any other provision of Federal criminal law relating to tobacco products, processed... criminal law relating to tobacco products, processed tobacco, cigarette paper, or cigarette tubes,...

  14. Challenges of smokeless tobacco use in Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myanmar Tobacco Control Law of 2006 covers the control of all forms of tobacco use. After 7-year, tobacco use among adults did not see a decrease. The paper aimed to study the prevalence, details of the products, trade, legislation, tax, marketing, advertising and evidence on morbidity and mortality, and to make recommendations for policy options. Personal communications by authors and colleagues, and searches by keywords in PubMed and on Google, literature review and research from published reports, and various studies and surveys conducted in Myanmar and other countries. Smokeless tobacco use in Myanmar is the highest among ASEAN countries. A variety of SLT products used together with betel chewing poses a challenge; betel quid chewing has been accepted as a cultural norm in both rural and urban areas. Betel quid chewing usually starts at younger ages. Sale, marketing, and advertising of SLT are not under control and thus, road-side kiosks selling betel quid with SLT are mushrooming. Considerable trade of SLT products by illegal and legal means created an increase in access and availability. Low cost of SLT product enables high volume of use, even for the poor families. Taxation for raw tobacco and tobacco products is half the values of the tax for cigarettes. Effective enforcement, amendment of the law, and action for social change are needed.

  15. Challenges of smokeless tobacco use in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein, T; Swe, T; Toe, M M; Zaw, K K; Sein, T O

    2014-12-01

    Myanmar Tobacco Control Law of 2006 covers the control of all forms of tobacco use. After 7-year, tobacco use among adults did not see a decrease. The paper aimed to study the prevalence, details of the products, trade, legislation, tax, marketing, advertising and evidence on morbidity and mortality, and to make recommendations for policy options. Personal communications by authors and colleagues, and searches by keywords in PubMed and on Google, literature review and research from published reports, and various studies and surveys conducted in Myanmar and other countries. Smokeless tobacco use in Myanmar is the highest among ASEAN countries. A variety of SLT products used together with betel chewing poses a challenge; betel quid chewing has been accepted as a cultural norm in both rural and urban areas. Betel quid chewing usually starts at younger ages. Sale, marketing, and advertising of SLT are not under control and thus, road-side kiosks selling betel quid with SLT are mushrooming. Considerable trade of SLT products by illegal and legal means created an increase in access and availability. Low cost of SLT product enables high volume of use, even for the poor families. Taxation for raw tobacco and tobacco products is half the values of the tax for cigarettes. Effective enforcement, amendment of the law, and action for social change are needed.

  16. Assessment of the carcinogenic N-nitrosodiethanolamine in tobacco products and tobacco smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunnemann, K.D.; Hoffmann, D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple, reproducible gas chromatography-thermal energy analyzer (g.c.-TEA) method has been developed for the analysis of N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA) in tobacco and tobacco smoke. The extract of tobacco or the trapped particulates of tobacco smoke are chromatographed on silica gel. The NDELA containing fractions are concentrated, silylated and analyzed with a modified g.c.-TEA system. (/sup 14/C)NDELA serves as internal standard for the quantitative analysis. Experimental cigarettes made from tobaccos which were treated with the sucker growth inhibitor maleic hydrazidediethanolamine (MH-DELA) contained 115--420 p.p.b. of NDELA and their smoke contained 20--290 ng/cigarette, whereas hand-suckered tobacco and its smoke were free of NDELA. The tobacco of US smoking products contained 115--420 p.p.b. of NDELA and the mainstream smoke from such products yielded 10--68 ng/cigar or cigarette. NDELA levels in chewing tobacco ranged from 220--280 p.p.b. and in two commercial snuff products were 3,200 and 6,800 p.p.b. Although the five analyzed MH-DELA preparations contained between 0.6--1.9 p.p.m. NDELA it is evident that the major portion of NDELA in tobacco is formed from the DELA residue during the tobacco processing. Based on bioassay data from various laboratories which have shown that NDELA is a relatively strong carcinogen and based on the results of this study the use of MH-DELA for the cultivation of tobacco is questioned.

  17. Effects of mutated replicase and movement protein genes on attenuation of tobacco mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Gong; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Banerjee, N., Wang, J. Y., Zaitlin, M., A single nucleotide change in the coat protein gene of tobacco mosaic virus is involved in the induction of severe chlorosis, Virology, 1995, 207: 234-239.[2]Dawson, W. O., Bubrick, P., Grantham, G. L., Modifications of the tobacco mosaic virus coat protein gene affecting replication, movement, and symptomatology, Mol. Plant Pathol., 1988, 78: 783-789.[3]Lu, B., Stubbs, G., Culver, J. N., Coat protein interactions involved in tobacco mosaic tobamovirus cross-protection, Virology, 1998, 248: 188-198.[4]Bao, Y. M., Carter, S. A., Nelson,R. S., The 126- and 183-kilodalton proteins of tobacco mosaic virus, and not their common nucleotide sequence, control mosaic symptom formation in tobacco, J. Virol., 1996, 70: 6378-6383.[5]Holt, C. A., Hodgson, A. J., Coker, F. A. et al., Characterization of the masked strain of tobacco mosaic virus: identification of the region responsible for symptom attenuation by analysis of an infectious cDNA clone, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact., 1990, 3: 417-423.[6]Nishiguchi, M., Kikuchi, S., Kiho, Y. et al., Molecular basis of plant viral virulence, the complete nucleotide sequence of an attenuated strain of tobacco mosaic virus, Nucleic Acids Res., 1985, 13: 5585-5590.[7]Watanabe, Y., Morita, N., Nishiguchi, M.et al., Attenuated strains of tobacco mosaic virus reduced synthesis of a viral protein with a cell to cell movement function, J. Mol. Biol., 1987, 194: 699-704.[8]Lewandowski, D. J., Dawson, W. O., A single amino acid change in tobacco mosaic virus replicase prevents symptom production, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact., 1993, 6: 157-160.[9]Yang, G., Qiu, B. S., Cloning and infectivity analysis of the cDNAs of tobacco mosaic virus (tomato strain) and its attenuated virus (N14) genomes, Chinese Journal of Biotechnology (in Chinese), 2000, 16: 207-210.[10]Yang, G., Liu, X. G., Qiu, B. S., Complete nucleotid sequences and genome structures of two Chinese tobacco

  18. Branding the rodeo: a case study of tobacco sports sponsorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Pamela M; Haber, Lawrence A; Wedl, Stefani

    2010-01-01

    Rodeo is one of the few sports still sponsored by the tobacco industry, particularly the US Smokeless Tobacco Company. Rodeo is popular in rural communities, where smokeless tobacco use is more prevalent. We used previously secret tobacco industry documents to examine the history and internal motivations for tobacco company rodeo sponsorship. Rodeos allow tobacco companies to reach rural audiences and young people, enhance brand image, conduct market research, and generate positive press. Relationships with athletes and fans were used to fight proposed restrictions on tobacco sports sponsorship. Rodeo sponsorship was intended to enhance tobacco sales, not the sport. Rural communities should question the tradition of tobacco sponsorship of rodeo sports and reject these predatory marketing practices.

  19. Tobacco control law enforcement and compliance in odisha, India - implications for tobacco control policy and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panda, B.; Rout, A.; Pati, S.; Chauhan, A.S.; Tripathy, A.; Shrivastava, R.; Bassi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco use is a leading cause of deaths and disabilities in India, killing about 1.2 lakh people in 2010. About 29% of adults use tobacco on a daily basis and an additional 5% use it occasionally. In Odisha, non-smoking forms are more prevalent than smoking forms. The habit has very h

  20. [The plain packaging of tobacco products: a new strategy for tobacco control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Pino, Juan Miguel; Nerín, Isabel; Lacave-García, Ma Blanca

    There is evidence that global tobacco smoking control policies contribute to decrease the prevalence of smoking among populations, so there is a need to effectively implement different measures in a coordinated way. The plain packaging and labelling of tobacco products is one of the measures proposed by the World Health Organisation Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. At the moment, leading countries are implementing this tobacco control measure, which involves a plain packaging for all tobacco products, i.e., the absence of any promotional or communication tool in the packaging, except the name of the brand, appearing with a standardised font, size, colour and placing in the pack. Australia was the first country to implement this measure in 2012 and recently other countries are legislating and approving it. In Spain, tobacco legislation (2005 and 2010), was an important advance in tobacco control policies. The introduction of plain packaging in Spain would mean the next step in the development of a global strategy for fighting this significant health problem. The aim of this article is to synthesise in a structured manner the role that the packaging of tobacco products has within marketing and communication strategies, as well as to describe the potential effects that the plain packaging has on some aspects of smoking behaviour, according to current literature.

  1. Introducing oral tobacco for tobacco harm reduction: what are the main obstacles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohadana Abraham

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the number of smokers worldwide currently on the rise, the regular failure of smokers to give up their tobacco addiction, the direct role of smoke (and, to a much lesser extent, nicotine in most tobacco-related diseases, and the availability of less toxic (but still addictive oral tobacco products, the use of oral tobacco in lieu of smoking for tobacco harm reduction (HR merits assessment. Instead of focusing on the activity itself, HR focuses on the risks related to the activity. Currently, tobacco HR is controversial, generally not discussed, and consequently, poorly evaluated. In this paper, we try to pinpoint some of the main reasons for this lack of interest or reluctance to carry out or fund this type of research. In this paper we deal with the following issues: the status of nicotine in society, the reluctance of the mainstream anti-tobacco lobby toward the HR approach, the absence of smokers from the debate, the lack of information disseminated to the general population and politicians, the need to protect young people, the role of physicians, the future of HR research, and the role of tobacco companies.

  2. 75 FR 41498 - Draft Guidance for Tobacco Retailers on Tobacco Retailer Training Programs; Availability; Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... does provide for lower civil money penalties for violations of access, advertising, and promotion... distribution of a tobacco product, including restrictions on the access to, and the advertising and promotion... to cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products, as well as restrictions on advertising and promotion...

  3. Tobacco consumption among adolescents in rural Wardha: Where and how tobacco control should focus its attention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongre A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to study the pattern of tobacco use among rural adolescents (15-19 years and to find out reasons for use and non use of tobacco products. Materials and Methods : In the present community-based research, triangulation of qualitative (free list, focus group discussions and quantitative methods (survey was undertaken. The study was carried out in surrounding 11 villages of the Kasturba Rural Health Training Centre, Anji during January 2008 where 385 adolescents were selected by simple random sampling and interviewed by house to house visits. After survey, six focus group discussions were undertaken with adolescent boys. Results: About 68.3% boys and 12.4% girls had consumed any tobacco products in last 30 days. Out of boys who had consumed tobacco, 79.2% consumed kharra, and 46.4% consumed gutka. Among boys, 51.2% consumed it due to peer pressure, 35.2% consumed tobacco as they felt better, and five percent consumed tobacco to ease abdominal complaints and dental problem. Among girls, 72% used dry snuff for teeth cleaning, 32% and 20% consumed tobacco in the form of gutka and tobacco & lime respectively. The reasons for non use of tobacco among girls were fear of cancer (59%, poor oral health (37.9%. Among non consuming boys it was fear of cancer (58.6%, poor oral health (44.8% and fear of getting addiction (29.3%. According to FGD respondents, few adolescent boys taste tobacco by 8-10 years of age, while girls do it by 12-13 years. Peer pressure acts as a pro tobacco influence among boys who are outgoing and spend more time with their friends. They prefer to consume freshly prepared kharra which was supposed to be less strong (tej than gutka. Tobacco is being used in treatment of some health problems. Tobacco is chewed after meals for better digestion, given to ease toothache, pain in abdomen and to induce vomiting in suicidal insecticide poisoning. Conclusion: The current consumption of any

  4. Smokeless tobacco reduction: preliminary study of tobacco-free snuff versus no snuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Ebbert, Jon O; Edmonds, Amanda; Li, Casey; Lin, Haiying; Le, Chap; Hecht, Stephen S

    2008-01-01

    This preliminary study examined the effects of tobacco-free snuff (intervention, n = 52) compared with no snuff (control, n = 54) for reducing tobacco use among smokeless tobacco (ST) users not interested in quitting. Both groups received behavioral instructions, and intervention subjects received tobacco-free snuff for 8 weeks. Participants were required to reduce their intake by 50% during the first 4 weeks and by 75% during the subsequent 4 weeks. Follow-up occurred at 12 weeks. Significant reductions were observed from baseline to week 8 (end of treatment) for both treatment groups in the amount of ST use (tins/week and dips/day, psnuff could potentially reduce risk for ST-related disease beyond that achieved with no snuff by increasing the number of patients who achieve significant reductions in carcinogen exposure and, more important, by facilitating tobacco abstinence by increasing quit attempts and abstinence duration.

  5. The economics of tobacco control: evidence from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauras, John A; Chaloupka, Frank J; Quah, Anne Chiew Kin; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2014-03-01

    Over the past few decades, the importance of economic research in advancing tobacco control policies has become increasingly clear. Extensive research has demonstrated that increasing tobacco taxes and prices is the single most cost-effective tobacco control measure. The research contained in this supplement adds to this evidence and provides new insights into how smokers respond to tax and price changes using the rich data on purchase behaviours, brand choices, tax avoidance and evasion, and tobacco use collected systematically and consistently across countries and over time by the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Project. The findings from this research will help inform policymakers, public health professionals, advocates, and others seeking to maximise the public health and economic benefits from higher taxes.

  6. DNA methylation polymorphism in flue-cured tobacco and candidate markers for tobacco mosaic virus resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-hong ZHAO; Ji-shun ZHANG; Yi WANG; Ren-gang WANG; Chun WU; Long-jiang FAN; Xue-liang REN

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression during plant growth,development,and polyploidization.However,there is still no distinct evidence in tobacco regarding the distribution of the methylation pattern and whether it contributes to qualitative characteristics.We studied the levels and patterns of methylation polymorphism at CCGG sites in 48 accessions of allotetraploid flue-cured tobacco,Nicotiana tabacum,using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique.The results showed that methylation existed at a high level among tobacco accessions,among which 49.3% sites were methylated and 69.9% allelic sites were polymorphic.A cluster analysis revealed distinct patterns of geography-specific groups.In addition,three polymorphic sites significantly related to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) resistance were explored.This suggests that tobacco breeders should pay more attention to epigenetic traits.

  7. Oil from Tobacco Leaves: FOLIUM - Installation of Hydrocarbon Accumulating Pathways in Tobacco Leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: LBNL is modifying tobacco to enable it to directly produce fuel molecules in its leaves for use as a biofuel. Tobacco is a good crop for biofuels production because it is an outstanding biomass crop, has a long history of cultivation, does not compete with the national food supply, and is highly responsive to genetic manipulation. LBNL will incorporate traits for hydrocarbon biosynthesis from cyanobacteria and algae, and enhance light utilization and carbon uptake in tobacco, improving the efficiency of photosynthesis so more fuel can be produced in the leaves. The tobacco-generated biofuels can be processed for gasoline, jet fuel or diesel alternatives. LBNL is also working to optimize methods for planting, cultivating and harvesting tobacco to increase biomass production several-fold over the level of traditional growing techniques.

  8. Analysis of the Appearance Quality of Tobacco Leaves in the Tobacco-growing Areas of Qujing City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijuan; BAO; Folin; LI; Jun; WANG; Jiahe; JIANG; Binjie; DAI

    2014-01-01

    In order to set up the digitization indices system of appearance quality of flue-cured tobacco leaves in Qujing. According to the relevant standards,the quantitative analysis on appearance quality of 39 cutter and upper tobacco leaf samples which were collected from eight fluecured tobacco production regions of Qujing City,Yunnan Province were carried out in 2011,respectively. The results showed that the difference in evaluation score of appearance quality of flue-cured tobacco in eight regions was not significant. The tobacco leaves had high maturity,high oil content,loose structure and good appearance quality. The scores of appearance quality of flue-cured tobacco in Shizong County and Malong County are higher than other regions. The two regions are suitable for tobacco plantation. The preliminary digitization indices provide reference and guidance to tobacco production and standards system of tobacco leaves base.

  9. Public policy to maximize tobacco cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Daniel E; Boonn, Ann V

    2010-03-01

    Tobacco use kills more than 400,000 Americans every year. For smokers, quitting is the biggest step they can take to improve their health, but it is a difficult step. Fortunately, policy-based interventions can both encourage smokers to quit and help them succeed. Evidence shows that tobacco tax increases encourage smokers to quit-recent state and federal increases have created dramatic surges in calls to quitlines. Similarly, smokefree workplace laws not only protect workers and patrons from secondhand smoke but also encourage smokers to quit, help them succeed, and create a social environment less conducive to smoking. The impact of policy changes can be amplified by promoting quitting around the date they are implemented. Outreach to health practitioners can alert them to encourage their patients to quit. Earned and paid media can also be used to motivate smokers to quit when policy changes are put into effect. Although these policies and efforts regarding them can generate great demand for evidence-based cessation services such as counseling and medication, it is important to make these resources available for those wanting to quit. Public and private health insurance plans should provide coverage for cessation services, and states should invest tobacco tax and/or tobacco settlement dollars in smoking-cessation programs as recommended by the CDC. Finally, the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act has given the U.S. Food and Drug Administration new authority to regulate tobacco products and marketing, and to prevent tobacco companies from deceptively marketing new products that discourage smokers from quitting and keep them addicted.

  10. [Etiology, epidemiology, biology. Tobacco use and smoking in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, G

    2008-10-01

    Since 1976, France improved its anti tobacco legislation and regulation with the help of the Non-governmental organizations under the umbrella of the Alliance Against Tobacco. Since then were implemented a total ban of tobacco advertising (1991), a total ban of smoking in enclosed public and work places (2006), a high taxation of tobacco products, strong media campaigns to de normalize smoking and tobacco products, improved availability, accessibility and affordability of treatments of tobacco dependence. Since 1991, the number of cigarettes smoked per adult was halved.

  11. Differences by sex in tobacco use and awareness of tobacco marketing -Bangladesh, Thailand, and Uruguay, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    The majority of the world's 1.3 billion tobacco users are men, but female use is increasing. To examine differences in tobacco use and awareness of tobacco marketing by sex, CDC and health officials in Bangladesh, Thailand, and Uruguay (among the first countries to report results) analyzed 2009 data from a newly instituted survey, the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated wide variation among the three countries in tobacco use, product types used, and marketing awareness among males and females. In Bangladesh and Thailand, use of smoked tobacco products was far greater among males (44.7% and 45.6%, respectively) than females (1.5% and 3.1%, respectively). In Uruguay, the difference was smaller (30.7% versus 19.8%). Use of smokeless tobacco products in Bangladesh was approximately the same among males (26.4%) and females (27.9%), but females were significantly more likely to use smokeless tobacco in Thailand (6.3% versus 1.3%), and use in Uruguay by either sex was nearly nonexistent. Males in Bangladesh were twice as likely as females to notice cigarette advertising (68.0% versus 29.3%), but the difference between males and females was smaller in Thailand (17.4% versus 14.5%) and Uruguay (49.0% versus 40.0%). In all three countries, awareness of tobacco marketing was more prevalent among females aged 15--24 years than older women. Comprehensive bans on advertising, sponsorship, and promotion of tobacco products, recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), can reduce per capita cigarette consumption if enforced.

  12. Metabolic engineering of monoterpende biosysnthesis: two step production of (+)-trans-Isopiperitenol by tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lücker, J.; Schwab, W.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Plas, van der L.H.W.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Verhoeven, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    Monoterpenoid biosynthesis in tobacco was modified by introducing two subsequent enzymatic activities targeted to different cell compartments. A limonene-3-hydroxylase (lim3h) cDNA was isolated from Mentha spicata L. 'Crispa'. This cDNA was used to re-transform a transgenic Nicotiana tabacum'Petit H

  13. Isolation and characterization of Rhodococcus sp. Y22 and its potential application to tobacco processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Duan, Yan-Qin; Dong, Jin-Yan; Zhe, Wei; Wang, Le; Li, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2009-04-01

    A novel nicotine-degrading bacterium, strain Y22, was isolated and identified as Rhodococcus sp. Y22 based on its 16S rDNA sequence and morphological and biochemical features. The isolate could utilize nicotine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Nicotine (1.0g/L) was degraded by Rhodococcus sp. Y22 within 52h at 28 degrees C and pH 7.0. Preparation of resting cells from nicotine-induced cultures was found to rapidly and efficiently degrade nicotine from solutions as well as from tobacco leaves. Therefore, Rhodococcus sp. Y22 has the potential to degrade nicotine during tobacco leave processing.

  14. Tobacco control for clinicians who treat adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James D; DiFranza, Joseph R

    2003-01-01

    Smoking remains the most common preventable cause of death in the developed world, and is rapidly becoming an important cause of death in the developing world. Nicotine is a powerfully addictive substance, and the tobacco industry spends billions annually promoting it in the United States. It is therefore important for clinicians to understand why people smoke, to address smoking in patients of all ages, and to lobby for health-preserving tobacco control policies at the community level. Children take up smoking in response to social influences: smoking by friends, parents, and family, and through exposure to smoking in media. Parents who smoke not only model the behavior, but also often make the product available by leaving cigarettes around the house. Media influences include the dollar 10 billion spent per year on tobacco marketing, but more importantly, the modeling of the behavior on screen by movie and television stars. Once children start smoking, many rapidly lose autonomy over the behavior. Youth can get hooked after smoking just a few cigarettes. The most effective community efforts for reducing tobacco use are: raising the price of tobacco; halting the sale of tobacco to minors; enforcing strict school tobacco policies; and making public places smoke free through local ordinances. Working with individuals, clinicians should support cessation in all smokers, including parents of children and adolescents. They should screen children for smoking risk factors beginning at age 10. They should teach parents to maintain smoke-free households, to set nonsmoking expectations early on, and to monitor adolescents for signs of smoking. Parents should limit exposure to adult media (e.g., R-rated movies) and use family television time to discuss the effect of seeing screen depictions of smoking on adolescent behavior. Adolescents who smoke should be assessed for signs of nicotine dependence and counseled about quitting. Clinicians are effective community voices; they

  15. [Harm reduction strategy in tobacco control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Potentially reduced exposure products (PREPs), already sold in USA and in some European Countries, are low-nitrosamine cigarettes, low-nitrosamine smokeless tobacco (e.g., the Swedish Snus), cigarette-like products, and medicinal nicotine products. Even e-cigarette delivers nicotine. With the exception of snus and medicinal nicotine, studies on the health effects of PREPs have not been carried out, although some PREPs are already sold and promoted as products that effectively reduce health risks. Thus, a second disaster similar to that occurred for light cigarettes could happen in the next years. Only medicinal nicotine and snus could be valid candidates to become PREPs, even if they pose some significant health risks. The World Health Organization, following a precautionary approach, has recently published a list of 9 carcinogens or toxicants recommended for mandated lowering (the tobacco-specific nitrosamines NNN and NNK, acetaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, benzo[a]pyrene, 1-3 butadiene, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde), and 9 carcinogens or toxicants for monitoring in usual cigarettes (not PREPs), underlining that tobacco companies cannot use this reduction strategy as a promotional message, as it occurred for light cigarettes in the 70s and 80s. The present status quo, in which cigarettes are freely available, medicinal nicotine, being a drug, is available under a regulated market, and Snus is prohibited, actually denies smokers the right to choose safer nicotine products. The solution suggested by the UK Royal College of Physicians is to balance the nicotine market, framing tobacco products and medicinal nicotine in the same regulation system; establishing a nicotine and tobacco regulatory authority;making medicinal nicotine more available; evaluating the feasibility of the introduction in the English market of Swedish Snus. California Government remarks that the nicotine maintenance is not a valid strategy, because it could induce smokers not to try to quit

  16. Predictors of Canadian legislators' support for tobacco control policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joanna E; de Guia, Nicole A; Ashley, Mary Jane; Ferrence, Roberta; Northrup, David A; Studlar, Donley T

    2002-09-01

    It is clear that regulatory strategies can be effective in reducing tobacco use. Because legislators ultimately determine whether many of these policies are enacted, they are a key focus for tobacco policy research. This study identifies political and personal predictors of Canadian legislators' support for tobacco control policies. Data are from a 1996-97 survey of federal, provincial and territorial legislators. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess relationships between five groups of variables (political factors including political ideology, personal characteristics, tobacco experiences, tobacco knowledge, interest group saliency) and support for tobacco control based on an 11-item scale. Support for tobacco control varied by political party. Support was higher among legislators who thought government had a duty to promote healthy lifestyles, knew second-hand smoke could cause lung cancer, knew tobacco caused more deaths than alcohol, and said they wanted more contact with medical associations about tobacco issues. Support was lower among current smokers and those with tobacco industry jobs in their ridings. The findings indicate that political party membership cannot be ignored in enlisting legislator support for tobacco control. It also appears that legislators who oppose tobacco control measures may not be opposed to tobacco control per se, but are more generally opposed to a government role in health promotion. Thus, public health professionals and tobacco control advocates need to be more attentive to the way tobacco control issues are framed for particular legislators. Further, meetings with health groups about tobacco issues would be welcomed by many legislators; non-governmental organizations and other health advocates could work to increase tobacco knowledge among legislators.

  17. Changes in retail tobacco promotions in a cohort of stores before, during, and after a tobacco product display ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joanna E; Planinac, Lynn; Lavack, Anne; Robinson, Daniel; O'Connor, Shawn; DiNardo, Joanne

    2011-10-01

    We used a longitudinal design to investigate the impact of a government policy banning the display of tobacco products at the point of sale. The extent of tobacco promotions in 481 randomly selected stores was documented at 4 points in time (2005-2009). Tobacco promotions were greatly reduced after implementation of the display ban. A ban on the display of tobacco products and other signage and promotions at retail is a critical tobacco-control policy to reduce people's exposure to tobacco marketing.

  18. Environmental tobacco smoke and children's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Hwang, Jong Hee; Moon, Jin Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Passive exposure to tobacco smoke significantly contributes to morbidity and mortality in children. Children, in particular, seem to be the most susceptible population to the harmful effects of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Paternal smoking inside the home leads to significant maternal and fetal exposure to ETS and may subsequently affect fetal health. ETS has been associated with adverse effects on pediatric health, including preterm birth, intrauterine growth retardation, perinatal mortality, respiratory illness, neurobehavioral problems, and decreased performance in school. A valid estimation of the risks associated with tobacco exposure depends on accurate measurement. Nicotine and its major metabolite, cotinine, are commonly used as smoking biomarkers, and their levels can be determined in various biological specimens such as blood, saliva, and urine. Recently, hair analysis was found to be a convenient, noninvasive technique for detecting the presence of nicotine exposure. Because nicotine/cotinine accumulates in hair during hair growth, it is a unique measure of long-term, cumulative exposure to tobacco smoke. Although smoking ban policies result in considerable reductions in ETS exposure, children are still exposed significantly to tobacco smoke not only in their homes but also in schools, restaurants, child-care settings, cars, buses, and other public places. Therefore, more effective strategies and public policies to protect preschool children from ETS should be consolidated.

  19. Overexpression of rice OsLOL2 gene confers disease resistance in tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tabaci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khizar Hayat Bhatti; Chunxiao Xu; Jiahe Wu; Chaozu He

    2008-01-01

    LSD1-related proteins of Arabidopsis with LSD1-like zinc finger domains regulate disease resistance and programmed cell death(PCD). We cloned a rice OsLOL2 gene, orthologous to LSDI of Arabidopsis and expressed it in a tobacco plant. Transgenic tobacco lines displayed enhanced disease resistance to a virulent bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pst). RT-PCR analysis showed that overexpression of OsLOL2 in transgenic tobacco lines resulted in upregulation of two pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes, PR2 and PR5. Our results suggest that overexpression of OsLOL2 in transgenic tobacco enhances the resistance through the induction of PR pro-teins and hypersensitive response-like reaction.

  20. In situ localization and tissue distribution of the replication-associated proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus in tobacco and cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillo, Fabrizio; Roberts, Ian M; Palukaitis, Peter

    2002-11-01

    The replication-associated proteins encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), the 1a and 2a proteins, were detected by immunogold labeling in two host species of this virus, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). In both hosts, the 1a and 2a proteins colocalized predominantly to the vacuolar membranes, the tonoplast. While plus-strand CMV RNAs were found distributed throughout the cytoplasm by in situ hybridization, minus-strand CMV RNAs were barely detectable but were found associated with the tonoplast. In both cucumber and tobacco, 2a protein was detected at higher densities than 1a protein. The 1a and 2a proteins also showed quantitative differences with regard to tissue distributions in tobacco and cucumber. About three times as much 2a protein was detected in CMV-infected cucumber tissues as in CMV-infected tobacco tissues. In tobacco, high densities of these proteins were observed only in vascular bundle cells of minor veins. In contrast, in cucumber, high densities of 1a and 2a proteins were observed in mesophyll cells, followed by epidermis cells, with only low levels being observed in vascular bundle cells. Differences were also observed in the distributions of 2a protein and capsid protein in vascular bundle cells of the two host species. These observations may represent differences in the relative rates of tissue infection in different hosts or differences in the extent of virus replication in vascular tissues of different hosts.

  1. Comparative effectiveness of the nicotine lozenge and tobacco-free snuff for smokeless tobacco reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbert, Jon O; Severson, Herbert H; Croghan, Ivana T; Danaher, Brian G; Schroeder, Darrell R

    2013-05-01

    Long-term smokeless tobacco (ST) use is associated with cardiovascular disease and cancer, but not all ST users want to quit. Previous studies have evaluated the effectiveness of nicotine lozenges and tobacco-free snuff for reducing ST use among ST users not ready to quit, but no comparative effectiveness trials of these two products have been conducted. We conducted a multicenter, randomized clinical pilot study evaluating the comparative effectiveness of the 4-mg nicotine lozenge and tobacco-free snuff for reducing ST use and increasing tobacco abstinence among ST users with no intention of quitting in the next 30 days. Participants received 8 weeks of treatment and behavioral counseling on tobacco reduction strategies with follow-up to 26 weeks. We randomized 81 participants (40 nicotine lozenges, 41 tobacco-free snuff). No significant differences in reduction were observed between the two groups at weeks 8, 12, and 26. No significant differences were observed between groups in nicotine withdrawal or tobacco craving. However, both groups significantly reduced (psnuff both appear to be effective and comparable for reducing ST use among ST users not ready to quit in the next 30 days.

  2. Patterns and socioeconomic influences of tobacco exposure in tobacco cultivating rural areas of Yunnan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Le

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes the patterns and socioeconomic influences of tobacco use among adults in tobacco-cultivating regions of rural southwest China. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 8681 adults aged ≥18 years in rural areas of Yunnan Province, China from 2010 to 2011. A standardized questionnaire was administered to obtain data about participants’ demographic characteristics, individual socioeconomic status, ethnicity, self-reported smoking habits, and exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS. The socioeconomic predictors of current smoking, nicotine addiction, and SHS exposure were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Results The prevalence rates of tobacco use were much higher in men compared with women (current smoking 68.5% vs. 1.3%; and nicotine dependence 85.2% vs. 72.7%. However, the rate of SHS exposure was higher in women compared with men (76.6% vs. 70.5%. Tobacco farmers had higher prevalence rates of current smoking, nicotine dependence, and SHS exposure compared with participants not engaged in tobacco farming (P Conclusions This study suggests that tobacco control efforts in rural southwest China must be tailored to address tobacco-cultivating status and socioeconomic factors.

  3. The Tax Burden on Tobacco Volume 49, 1970-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1970-2014. Orzechowski and Walker. Tax Burden on Tobacco. Tax burden data was obtained from the annual compendium on tobacco revenue and industry statistics, The Tax...

  4. CDC Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs - 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. Funding. CDC's Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco...

  5. Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) - Global School Personnel Survey (GSPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001-2011. The GSPS was initiated in 2000 to collect information on tobacco use, knowledge and attitudes of school personnel toward tobacco, existence and...

  6. CDC Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. Funding. CDC's Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco...

  7. The Tax Burden on Tobacco Volume 49, 1970-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1970-2014. Orzechowski and Walker. Tax Burden on Tobacco. Tax burden data was obtained from the annual compendium on tobacco revenue and industry statistics, The...

  8. 27 CFR 41.72b - Notice for roll-your-own tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice for roll-your-own tobacco. 41.72b Section 41.72b Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE...

  9. 27 CFR 40.216b - Notice for roll-your-own tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice for roll-your-own tobacco. 40.216b Section 40.216b Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE...

  10. 27 CFR 45.45b - Notice for roll-your-own tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice for roll-your-own tobacco. 45.45b Section 45.45b Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE...

  11. TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brannock Jennifer F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription is a major control point in many biological processes. Transcription factors (TFs can activate and/or repress the transcriptional rate of target genes and vascular plant genomes devote approximately 7% of their coding capacity to TFs. Global analysis of TFs has only been performed for three complete higher plant genomes – Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana, poplar (Populus trichocarpa and rice (Oryza sativa. Presently, no large-scale analysis of TFs has been made from a member of the Solanaceae, one of the most important families of vascular plants. To fill this void, we have analysed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum TFs using a dataset of 1,159,022 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs obtained by methylation filtering of the tobacco genome. An analytical pipeline was developed to isolate TF sequences from the GSR data set. This involved multiple (typically 10–15 independent searches with different versions of the TF family-defining domain(s (normally the DNA-binding domain followed by assembly into contigs and verification. Our analysis revealed that tobacco contains a minimum of 2,513 TFs representing all of the 64 well-characterised plant TF families. The number of TFs in tobacco is higher than previously reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Results TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors, is an integrative database that provides a portal to sequence and phylogeny data for the identified TFs, together with a large quantity of other data concerning TFs in tobacco. The database contains an individual page dedicated to each of the 64 TF families. These contain background information, domain architecture via Pfam links, a list of all sequences and an assessment of the minimum number of TFs in this family in tobacco. Downloadable phylogenetic trees of the major families are provided along with detailed information on the bioinformatic pipeline that was used to find

  12. Adverse selection model regarding tobacco consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru MARIN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of introducing a tax on tobacco consumption can be studied trough an adverse selection model. The objective of the model presented in the following is to characterize the optimal contractual relationship between the governmental authorities and the two type employees: smokers and non-smokers, taking into account that the consumers’ decision to smoke or not represents an element of risk and uncertainty. Two scenarios are run using the General Algebraic Modeling Systems software: one without taxes set on tobacco consumption and another one with taxes set on tobacco consumption, based on an adverse selection model described previously. The results of the two scenarios are compared in the end of the paper: the wage earnings levels and the social welfare in case of a smoking agent and in case of a non-smoking agent.

  13. EGCG Suppresses ERK5 Activation to Reverse Tobacco Smoke-Triggered Gastric Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Lu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke is an important risk factor of gastric cancer. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is a crucial pathophysiological process in cancer development. ERK5 regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition may be sensitive to cell types and/or the cellular microenvironment and its role in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process remain elusive. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG is a promising chemopreventive agent for several types of cancers. In the present study we investigated the regulatory role of ERK5 in tobacco smoke-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the stomach of mice and the preventive effect of EGCG. Exposure of mice to tobacco smoke for 12 weeks reduced expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, ZO-1, and CK5, while the expression of mesenchymal markers Snail-1, Vimentin, and N-cadherin were increased. Importantly, we demonstrated that ERK5 modulated tobacco smoke-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mice stomach, as evidenced by the findings that tobacco smoke elevated ERK5 activation, and that tobacco smoke-triggered epithelial-mesenchymal transition was reversed by ERK5 inhibition. Treatment of EGCG (100 mg/kg BW effectively attenuated tobacco smoke-triggered activation of ERK5 and epithelial-mesenchymal transition alterations in mice stomach. Collectively, these data suggested that ERK5 was required for tobacco smoke-triggered gastric epithelial-mesenchymal transition and that EGCG suppressed ERK5 activation to reverse tobacco smoke-triggered gastric epithelial-mesenchymal transition in BALB/c mice. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of tobacco smoke-associated gastric tumorigenesis and the chemoprevention of tobacco smoke-associated gastric cancer.

  14. Tobacco and tobacco branding in films most popular in the UK from 1989 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ailsa; McNeill, Ann; Chen, Yilu; Britton, John

    2010-05-01

    BACKGROUND Tobacco promotion is now tightly restricted in the UK and many other countries, but tobacco imagery including brand appearances in the media remain potentially powerful drivers of smoking uptake among children and young people. The extent to which tobacco imagery and specific products have appeared in the most popular films viewed in the UK over 20 years has been measured, in relation to year of release, the age certification allocated to the film by the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), country of origin and other characteristics. METHODS Occurrence of tobacco intervals (tobacco use, implied use or appearance of smoking paraphernalia) and brand appearances were measured by 5 min interval coding in the 15 most commercially successful films in the UK each year from 1989 to 2008. RESULTS Tobacco intervals occurred in 70% of all films. Over half (56%) of those that contained tobacco intervals were rated by the BBFC as suitable for viewing by children aged Brand appearances were nearly twice as likely to occur in films originating wholly or in part from the UK (UK films). Specific brands, particularly Marlboro and Silk Cut, appeared in 9% of all films, and most brand appearances (39%) were in films with BBFC 15 classification. CONCLUSIONS Tobacco imagery in the most popular films shown in the UK has declined substantially over the past 20 years but continues to occur, particularly in UK films, and predominantly in films categorised as suitable for viewing by children and young people. Specific brand appearances are now rare but occur repeatedly in some films. The BBFC is not currently protecting children and young people from exposure to tobacco imagery in film.

  15. China Says No to New Tobacco Joint Ventures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    China will not launch any more tobacco joint ventures with foreign investors,according to Zhang Benfu,general manager of the China Tobacco lmport and Export(Group)Corp.Zhang states that China will not build any more joint venture cigarette manufacturing,tobacco processing or filter making facilities because the Chinese tobacco market is saturated and its cigarette production capacity is far in excess of demand.

  16. Levels of toxins in oral tobacco products in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    McNeill, A; Bedi, R; Islam, S.; Alkhatib, M N; West, R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the constituents of smokeless tobacco products available in the UK and compared them with products available in India, Sweden, and the USA Methods: Seven UK brands of smokeless tobacco, including a tooth cleaning powder, and four international brands of smokeless tobacco were tested for a range of toxins and known carcinogens, such as tobacco specific N-nitrosamines (TSNA), as well as nicotine availability. Results: Ten of the 11 brands tested had detectable lev...

  17. Population Health Trial for Smokeless Tobacco Cessation with Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Critchley JA, Unal B. Is smokeless tobacco a risk factor for coronary heart disease ? A systematic review of epidemiological studies . Eur J...LF, Lopez-Guzman A, Hodges JS. The association of periodontal disease parameters with systemic medical conditions and tobacco use. J Clin...smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco and snuff) has not been a focus of medical services or research. Epidemiological data suggest that while smoking

  18. Capillary gas chromatographic determination of dimethachlon residues in fresh tobacco leaves and cut-tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-cheng; LI Qi-wan; TANG Li-bin

    2007-01-01

    Simple procedures for extraction and chromatographic determination of dimethachlon residues in fresh tobacco leaves and cut-tobacco are described. The determination was carried out by capillary gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection (ECD) and confirmed by GC-MS. The mean recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 93.2%~112.9% and 3.5%~6.7%, respectively at levels ranging from 0.01 to 0.1 mg/kg. The limit of determination was 0.001 mg/kg. Tobacco samples in routine check were successfully analyzed using the proposed method.

  19. Youth tobacco use cessation: 2008 update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sussman Steve

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, an empirical review of 64 teen tobacco use cessation studies is provided. Examined include program contents, delivery modalities, number of contacts, and expected quit rates. In addition, means of recruitment and retention of smokers in programming are discussed. Also, promising contemporary methods of teen smoking cessation are examined, including use of pharmacologic adjuncts, electronic technology, and cigarette price increases (and no smoking policy. Conclusions are made regarding implications for developing and implementing teen tobacco use cessation programs.

  20. PYROLYSIS OF TOBACCO RESIDUE: PART 1. THERMAL

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The pyrolysis of two types of tobacco residue was carried out at different pyrolysis temperatures between 300 and 600 °C and a residence time of 1 h in a nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on the product distributions was investigated and the composition of the bio-oils identified. The variation in product distribution depended on both the temperature and the type of tobacco residues. The maximum liquid yields were obtained at 400°C for one sample and at 500°C for the ot...

  1. Pharmacological treatments for tobacco dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Fagerström

    2008-12-01

    development for the treatment of tobacco dependence are cannabinoid antagonists, immunotherapy against nicotine, monoaminooxidase inhibitors, dopamine receptor D3 receptor antagonists and partial agonists, glutamatergic and GABA-ergic compounds and novel selective nicotine cholinergic receptor agonists and antagonists.

  2. Electronic cigarette aerosol induces significantly less cytotoxicity than tobacco smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi, David; Patel, Kharishma; Jaunky, Tomasz; Santopietro, Simone; Camacho, Oscar M.; McAughey, John; Gaça, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electronic cigarettes (E-cigarettes) are a potential means of addressing the harm to public health caused by tobacco smoking by offering smokers a less harmful means of receiving nicotine. As e-cigarettes are a relatively new phenomenon, there are limited scientific data on the longer-term health effects of their use. This study describes a robust in vitro method for assessing the cytotoxic response of e-cigarette aerosols that can be effectively compared with conventional cigarette smoke. This was measured using the regulatory accepted Neutral Red Uptake assay modified for air–liquid interface (ALI) exposures. An exposure system, comprising a smoking machine, traditionally used for in vitro tobacco smoke exposure assessments, was adapted for use with e-cigarettes to expose human lung epithelial cells at the ALI. Dosimetric analysis methods using real-time quartz crystal microbalances for mass, and post-exposure chemical analysis for nicotine, were employed to detect/distinguish aerosol dilutions from a reference Kentucky 3R4F cigarette and two commercially available e-cigarettes (Vype eStick and ePen). ePen aerosol induced 97%, 94% and 70% less cytotoxicity than 3R4F cigarette smoke based on matched EC50 values at different dilutions (1:5 vs. 1:153 vol:vol), mass (52.1 vs. 3.1 μg/cm2) and nicotine (0.89 vs. 0.27 μg/cm2), respectively. Test doses where cigarette smoke and e-cigarette aerosol cytotoxicity were observed are comparable with calculated daily doses in consumers. Such experiments could form the basis of a larger package of work including chemical analyses, in vitro toxicology tests and clinical studies, to help assess the safety of current and next generation nicotine and tobacco products. PMID:27690199

  3. 27 CFR 41.72 - Notice for smokeless tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... designation. Every package of chewing tobacco or snuff shall, before removal subject to internal revenue tax... tobacco” or “snuff.” As an alternative, packages of chewing tobacco may be designated “Tax Class C,” and packages of snuff may be designated “Tax Class M.” (b) Product weight. Every package of chewing tobacco...

  4. Adolescent Tobacco Use in Nebraska. Technical Report 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ian M.

    This report on adolescent tobacco use in Nebraska focuses on grades 8 and 10. The results presented are based on over time; (2) the changing nature of tobacco use from smoking to use as a chew or snuff; (3) the viewing of smoking and chewing as one health issue of tobacco exposure; (4) definition of a smoker for purposes of this study; (5) data…

  5. 27 CFR 45.43 - Notice for smokeless tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for smokeless tobacco. (a) Product designation. Every package of chewing tobacco or snuff shall..., the designation “chewing tobacco” or “snuff.” As an alternative, packages of chewing tobacco may be designated “Tax Class C,” and packages of snuff may be designated “Tax Class M.” (b) Product weight....

  6. 27 CFR 40.216 - Notice for smokeless tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Notice for smokeless tobacco. (a) Product designation. Every package of chewing tobacco or snuff shall..., the designation “chewing tobacco” or “snuff.” As an alternative, packages of chewing tobacco may be designated “Tax Class C”, and packages of snuff may be designated “Tax Class M”. (b) Product weight....

  7. Increasing tobacco taxes : A cheap tool to increase public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baal, Pieter H. M.; Brouwer, Werner B. F.; Hoogenveen, Rudolf T.; Feenstra, Talitha L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have estimated health effects resulting from tobacco tax increases. However, studies on the cost effectiveness of tobacco taxes are scarce. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost effectiveness of tobacco tax increases from a health care perspective, explicitly c

  8. 7 CFR 29.403 - Accessibility of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessibility of tobacco. 29.403 Section 29.403 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Regulations Miscellaneous § 29.403 Accessibility of tobacco. All...

  9. 7 CFR 29.9241 - Accessibility of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessibility of tobacco. 29.9241 Section 29.9241... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Policy Statement and Regulations Governing the Identification and Certification of Nonquota Tobacco Produced and Marketed in a Quota Area Administration § 29.9241 Accessibility...

  10. Should College Campuses become Tobacco Free without an Enforcement Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco-free campuses are a great public health initiative. "Healthy People 2020" and "Healthy Campus 2020" address tobacco use and young adults including college students. Sources indicate that of the more than 6,000 colleges and universities in the United States, less than 800 are either smoke free or tobacco free. An increasing number of…

  11. Student and Principal Perceptions of School Tobacco Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Melody; Rayens, Mary Kay; Riggs, Richard S.; Staten, Ruth; Hahn, Ellen; Riker, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Background: Enforcement of no-tobacco policies is critical to providing a safe, healthy environment for students. Purpose: The purposes of the study were to: (1) describe and compare student and principal perceptions of enforcement of school tobacco policy in a school district with a tobacco-free policy, and (2) explore perceived barriers to…

  12. Evidence supporting product standards for carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Stepanov, Irina; Severson, Herb; Jensen, Joni A; Lindgren, Bruce R; Horn, Kimberly; Khariwala, Samir S; Martin, Julia; Carmella, Steven G; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco products sold in the United States vary significantly in yields of nicotine and tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA). With the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, the Food and Drug Administration now has the authority to establish product standards. However, limited data exist determining the relative roles of pattern of smokeless tobacco use versus constituent levels in the smokeless tobacco product in exposure of users to carcinogens. In this study, smokeless tobacco users of brands varying in nicotine and TSNA content were recruited from three different regions in the U.S. Participants underwent two assessment sessions. During these sessions, demographic and smokeless tobacco use history information along with urine samples to assess biomarkers of exposure and effect were collected. During the time between data collection, smokeless tobacco users recorded the amount and duration of smokeless tobacco use on a daily basis using their diary cards. Results showed that independent of pattern of smokeless tobacco use and nicotine yields, levels of TSNA in smokeless tobacco products played a significant role in carcinogen exposure levels. Product standards for reducing levels of TSNA in smokeless tobacco products are necessary to decrease exposure to these toxicants and potentially to reduce risk for cancer.

  13. Tobacco, the Common Enemy and a Gateway Drug: Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Mohammad R.; Jun, Mi Kyung; Nowicke, Carole; de Martinez, Barbara Seitz; Gassman, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    For the four leading causes of death in the United States (heart disease, cancer, stroke and chronic respiratory disease), tobacco use is a common risk factor. Tobacco use is responsible for almost 450,000 deaths per year and impacts the health of every member of our society. Tobacco is a gateway drug for substance abuse. That role is critical to…

  14. First Nations Communities and Tobacco Taxation: A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samji, Hasina; Wardman, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Taxation of tobacco is a widely used strategy that promotes smoking cessation among adults and reduces cigarette consumption among continuing smokers. First Nations (FN) populations' tobacco use is estimated to be 2-3 times that of other Canadians and, in part, a reflection that tobacco products purchased on reserve by FN people are tax exempt.…

  15. Effect of Anti-Tobacco Audiovisual Messages on Knowledge and Attitude towards Tobacco Use in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tobacco use is one of the leading preventable causes of death globally. Mass media plays a significant role in initiation as well as in control of tobacco use. Aims: To assess the effect of viewing anti-tobacco audiovisual messages on knowledge and attitudinal change towards tobacco use. Settings and Design: Interventional community-based study. Materials and Methods: A total of 1999 cinema attendees (age 10 years and above, irrespective of their smoking or tobacco using status, were selected from four cinema halls (two urban, one semi-urban, and one rural site. In pre-exposure phase 1000 subjects and in post-exposure phase 999 subjects were interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire. After collecting baseline information, the other days were chosen for screening the audiovisual spots that were shown twice per show. After the show, subjects were interviewed to assess its effect. Statistical Analysis Used: Proportions of two independent groups were compared and statistically significance using chi-square test was accepted if error was less than 0.05%. Results: Overall 784 (39.2% subjects were tobacco users, 52.6% were non-tobacco users and 8.2% were former tobacco users. Important factors for initiation of tobacco use were peer pressure (62%, imitating elders (53.4% and imitating celebrity (63.5%. Tobacco users were significantly less likely than non-tobacco users to recall watching the spots during movie (72.1% vs. 79.1%. Anti-tobacco advertisement gave inspiration to 37% of subjects not to use tobacco. The celebrity in advertisement influenced the people′s attention. There was significant improvement in knowledge and attitudes towards anti-tobacco legal and public health measures in post exposure group. Conclusions: The anti-tobacco advertisements have been found to be effective in enhancing knowledge as well as in transforming to positive attitude of the people about tobacco use.

  16. Effect of Anti-Tobacco Audiovisual Messages on Knowledge and Attitude towards Tobacco Use in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Kishore, Jugal; Kumar, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Context: Tobacco use is one of the leading preventable causes of death globally. Mass media plays a significant role in initiation as well as in control of tobacco use. Aims: To assess the effect of viewing anti-tobacco audiovisual messages on knowledge and attitudinal change towards tobacco use. Settings and Design: Interventional community-based study. Materials and Methods: A total of 1999 cinema attendees (age 10 years and above), irrespective of their smoking or tobacco using status, were selected from four cinema halls (two urban, one semi-urban, and one rural site). In pre-exposure phase 1000 subjects and in post-exposure phase 999 subjects were interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire. After collecting baseline information, the other days were chosen for screening the audiovisual spots that were shown twice per show. After the show, subjects were interviewed to assess its effect. Statistical Analysis Used: Proportions of two independent groups were compared and statistically significance using chi-square test was accepted if error was less than 0.05%. Results: Overall 784 (39.2%) subjects were tobacco users, 52.6% were non-tobacco users and 8.2% were former tobacco users. Important factors for initiation of tobacco use were peer pressure (62%), imitating elders (53.4%) and imitating celebrity (63.5%). Tobacco users were significantly less likely than non-tobacco users to recall watching the spots during movie (72.1% vs. 79.1%). Anti-tobacco advertisement gave inspiration to 37% of subjects not to use tobacco. The celebrity in advertisement influenced the people's attention. There was significant improvement in knowledge and attitudes towards anti-tobacco legal and public health measures in post exposure group. Conclusions: The anti-tobacco advertisements have been found to be effective in enhancing knowledge as well as in transforming to positive attitude of the people about tobacco use. PMID:23293436

  17. A multilevel analysis of tobacco use and tobacco consumption levels in France: are there any combination risk groups?

    OpenAIRE

    Chaix, Basile; Guilbert, Philippe; Chauvin, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Both the predictors for tobacco use and the determinants of the amounts of tobacco consumed by smokers should be taken into account when designing prevention programmes. METHODS: Using a sample of 12,948 individuals representative of the French population in 1999, multilevel models were used to carry out a comparative investigation for the predictors of tobacco use and the determinants of the amount of tobacco consumed by smokers. RESULTS: At the individual...

  18. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  19. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  20. Effect of tobacco smoke exposure on rat tracheal submucosal glands: an ultrastructural study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.J.; Jakins, P.R.

    1981-08-01

    The ultrastructural appearance of rat tracheal submucosal glands after exposure to tobacco smoke for up to two years is described. Within the mucous cells many of the rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae were grossly dilated with an accumulation of amorphous, electron-lucent material. The Golgi zones were prominent, and the secretion granules often contained dense cores, and appeared to have coalesced. Histochemically, increased amounts of sulphated mucus were present in exposed rats. Serous, ciliated, and myoepithelial cells were unaffected by smoke exposure.

  1. Understanding the Authoritative Parenting-Early Adolescent Tobacco Use Link; The Mediating Role of Peer Tobacco Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk-Robinette, Stacey L.; Fletcher, Anne C.; Wright, Kristie

    2002-01-01

    Studied the link between authoritative parenting style and early adolescent tobacco use through the self-reports of 156 eighth graders and independent reports on tobacco use from their friends. Results show that high levels of authoritative parenting are associated with lower levels of tobacco use among target adolescents. (SLD)

  2. Teen Tobacco Court: A Determination of the Short-Term Outcomes of Judicial Processes with Teens Engaging in Tobacco Possession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Lilly M.; Warheit, George J.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the impact of a tobacco citation and subsequent court appearance on teens who possessed tobacco, examining offenders' attitudes and behaviors following citation and court appearance. Surveys and interviews indicated that being ticketed and appearing in teen tobacco court had significant, positive, short-term impacts on large numbers…

  3. Establishing a model workplace tobacco cessation program in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Gauravi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco use is highly prevalent and culturally accepted in rural Maharashtra, India. Aims: To study the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP regarding tobacco consumption, identify reasons for initiation and continuation of tobacco use, identify prevalence of tobacco consumption and its relation with different precancerous lesions, provide professional help for quitting tobacco, and develop local manpower for tobacco cessation activities. Settings, Design, Methods and Material: The present study was conducted for one year in a chemical industrial unit in Ratnagiri district. All employees (104 were interviewed and screened for oral neoplasia. Their socio-demographic features, habits, awareness levels etc. were recorded. Active intervention in the form of awareness lectures, focus group discussions, one-to-one counseling and, if needed, pharmacotherapy was offered to the tobacco users. Results: All employees actively participated in the program. Overall, 48.08% of the employees were found to use tobacco, among which the smokeless forms were predominant. Peer pressure and pleasure were the main reasons for initiation of tobacco consumption, and the belief that, though injurious, it would not harm them, avoiding physical discomfort on quitting and relieving stress were important factors for continuation of the habit. Employees had poor knowledge regarding the ill-effects of tobacco. 40% of tobacco users had oral precancerous lesions, which were predominant in employees consuming smokeless forms of tobacco. Conclusions: Identifying reasons for initiation and continuation of tobacco consumption along with baseline assessment of knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding tobacco use, are important in formulating strategies for a comprehensive workplace tobacco cessation program.

  4. Price elasticity estimates for tobacco products in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Rijo M

    2008-05-01

    The tax base of tobacco in India is heavily dependent on about 14% of tobacco users, who smoke cigarettes. Non-cigarette tobacco products accounting for 85% of the tobacco consumption contributes only 15% of the total tobacco taxes. Though taxation is an important tool to regulate consumption of tobacco, there have been no estimates of price elasticities for different tobacco products in India to date, which can guide tax policy on tobacco. This paper, for the first time in India, examines the price elasticity of demand for bidis, cigarettes and leaf tobacco at the national level using a representative cross-section of households. This study found that own-price elasticity estimates of different tobacco products in India ranged between -0.4 to -0.9, with bidis (an indigenous hand-rolled smoked tobacco preparation in India) and leaf tobacco having elasticities close to unity. Cigarettes were the least price elastic of all. With some assumptions, it is shown that the tax on bidis can be increased to Rs. 100 per 1000 sticks compared with the current Rs. 14 and the tax on an average cigarette can be increased to Rs. 3.5 per stick without any fear of losing revenue. The paper argues that the current system of taxing cigarettes in India based on the presence of filters and the length of cigarettes has no justification on health grounds, and should be abolished, if reducing tobacco consumption and the consequent disease burden is one of the objectives of tobacco taxation policy. It also argues that attempts to regulate tobacco use without effecting significant tax increases on bidis may not produce desired results.

  5. Infection of Plants by Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Larry; Maratos, Marina; Farabaugh, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Provides three exercises that introduce high school and college students to a common strain of the tobacco mosaic virus and the study of some basic biological processes. Activities involve inoculation of plants and observing and recording symptom development in infected plants. (DDR)

  6. Predictors of Arab American Adolescent Tobacco Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Virginia Hill; Weglicki, Linda S.; Templin, Thomas; Hammad, Adnan; Jamil, Hikmet; Kulwicki, Anahid

    2006-01-01

    This study examined personal, psychosocial, sociocultural, and environmental predictors in tobacco use for 1,671 Arab American adolescents. Cigarette smoking in the past 30 days was 6.9%. This increased from 1% at age 14 to 14% at age 18. Twenty-nine percent of the youths reported having ever smoked cigarettes. Experimentation with narghile was…

  7. Environmental tobacco smoke exposure and children's health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Polanska; W. Hanke; R. Ronchetti; P. van den Hazel; M. Zuurbier; J.G. Koppe; A. Bartonova

    2006-01-01

    Almost half of the child population is involuntarily exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The ETS exposure gives rise to an excessive risk of several diseases in infancy and childhood, including sudden infant death syndrome, upper and lower respiratory infections, asthma and middle ear dise

  8. How traceability is restructuring Malawi's tobacco industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyer-Lee, Jason; Prowse, Martin

    This article applies a global value chain framework to tobacco in Malawi. It illuminates how cigarette manufacturers govern the chain and control first-tier suppliers: the leaf merchants. Due to credence and litigation concerns, manufacturers have become obsessed with leaf integrity. Contract...

  9. Rural Indiana Profile: Alcohol, Tobacco & Other Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug Strategies, Washington, DC.

    This report examines alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use in rural parts of Indiana, as well as public and private initiatives to reduce these problems. The report is based on epidemiological, health, and criminal justice indicators; focus groups; and in-depth interviews with local officials, researchers, service providers, and civic leaders.…

  10. Taxing Tobacco in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Cnossen (Sijbren)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTobacco taxes in the European Union are the highest in the world. These taxes are mainly rationalized as a quid pro quo for the social costs of smoking. This paper argues that the arguments are not as persuasive as is often believed. A more likely reason is that governments are addicted

  11. Tobacco Interventions and Anaesthesia - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Saha

    2009-01-01

    This is a review of tobacco& its products, their health consequences, diseases caused, anaesthetic consider-ations& their role in helping these patients quit smoking Preventing nicotine addiction and improving smoking cessa-tion strategies should be the priority and despite these being only partially successful, strong measures at all levels should he continued& enforced.

  12. Chloroplast replication and growth in tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-Boasson, Rosalinda

    1969-01-01

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 1. The greening and the growth of chloroplasts as induced by light has been investigated in leaf discs from etiolated tobacco leaves in sterile culture. 2.On a medium containing salts after Murashige and Skoog plus sucrose, chlorophyll synthesis proceeds very slowly during th

  13. Tobacco smoking and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Kuźmicka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the problem of tobacco smoking in the context of quality of life. The aim of the study was to make a synthetic review of scientific research conducted all over the world, which assessed the potential influence of tobacco smoking on health related quality of life. Additionally, the paper reviews the Polish literature concerning comprehending and defining “quality of life”, especially in medical sciences. Meta-analysis was a research method. Descriptions of research findings were divided into two parts: using SF-36 questionnaire (the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire and using other questionnaires. From the review of scientific research results that tobacco smoking doesn’t influence health related quality of life in an unequivocal manner. Most of the studies showed better assessment of quality of life in non-smokers than in smokers. Improved quality of life was observed among those, who gave up smoking compared to those who continued smoking, but not all researchers demonstrated such a relationship. Research concerning influence of passive smoking on quality of life in individuals inhaling tobacco smoke for example at home, work or in places to eat wasn’t carried out so far. There is a need to do more longitudinal research on quality of life in smokers, passive smokers and among those, who successfully broke the habit to better understand the role of smoking in subjective perceived quality of life.

  14. Mutagenicity tobacco snuff: possible health implications for coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whong, W.Z.; Ames, R.G.; Ong, T.

    1984-01-01

    Mutagenicity of tobacco snuff extracts was studied using the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay system. No mutagenic activity was found for tobacco snuff extracts without S9 activation. However, mutagenic substances were formed from tobacco snuff extracts in an acidic environment. The mutagenic substances induced predominantly frameshift mutations and were direct-acting mutagens. Mutagenic activity of tobacco snuff extracts was enhanced in the presence of coal-dust extracts at low pH. Since tobacco snuff has been used by some coal miners to substitute for cigarettes, a possible risk for gastric cancer induction among coal miners is proposed.

  15. Methodology of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey in China, 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason HSIA; Gong-Huan YANG; Qiang LI; Lin XIAO; Yan YANG; Yan-Wei WU; Samira ASMA

    2010-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) is a component of Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS) under auspices of the Bloomberg philanthropy and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. GATS is a household survey with a standard protocol and its goals are to measure tobacco use, to assess changes due to policy and to facilitate cross country comparison. China is the largest consumer and producer of tobacco in the world. China was selected as one of 14 countries of high burden of tobacco use, large population, and mostly low income, to conduct the GATS.

  16. Demarketing of Tobacco Products and Consumers Behavior Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Jacennik

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Demarketing of tobacco products includes methods aimed at changing the consumer behavior and the marketing environment. The main strategies consist of price manipulation, anti-smoking advertising, regulations restricting or banning tobacco advertising, limitations of distribution or consumption of tobacco products, and warning messages on packages and advertisements. These measures influence either directly or indirectly the following psychosocial and environmental variables: health beliefs, social attractiveness of smoking, accessibility of tobacco products and associated behaviors. The article presents a review of international research on the demarketing of tobacco and its effects for the formation and change of health behavior.

  17. Do state expenditures on tobacco control programs decrease use of tobacco products among college students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciecierski, Christina Czart; Chatterji, Pinka; Chaloupka, Frank J; Wechsler, Henry

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of state tobacco control program expenditures on individual-level tobacco use behaviors among young adults. Data come from the 1997, 1999 and 2001 waves of the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study (CAS). Our findings indicate that a higher level of state spending on tobacco control programs in the prior year is associated with a statistically significant increase in the probability that current daily smokers report at least one attempt to quit smoking in the past year. We also find evidence that higher state expenditures on tobacco control programs in the prior year are associated with reductions in the prevalence of daily smoking and 30-day cigar use among college students. We do not find any statistically significant association between state tobacco control program expenditures and the number of attempts to quit smoking among those with at least one attempt, or on the prevalence of smokeless tobacco use in the past month.

  18. Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking in Turkey: Policy Implications and Trends from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdöl, Cevdet; Ergüder, Toker; Morton, Jeremy; Palipudi, Krishna; Gupta, Prakash; Asma, Samira

    2015-12-08

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS) is an emerging tobacco product globally, especially among adolescents and young adults who may perceive WTS as a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes. Monitoring the use of WTS in Turkey in relation to the tobacco control policy context is important to ensure that WTS does not become a major public health issue in Turkey. The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) was conducted in Turkey in 2008 and was repeated in 2012. GATS provided prevalence estimates on current WTS and change over time. Other indicators of WTS were also obtained, such as age of initiation and location of use. Among persons aged 15 and older in Turkey, the current prevalence of WTS decreased from 2.3% in 2008 to 0.8% in 2012, representing a 65% relative decline. Among males, WTS decreased from 4.0% to 1.1% (72% relative decline). While the overall smoking prevalence decreased among females, there was no change in the rate of WTS (0.7% in 2008 vs. 0.5% in 2012), though the WTS prevalence rate was already low in 2008. Comprehensive tobacco control efforts have been successful in reducing the overall smoking prevalence in Turkey, which includes the reduction of cigarette smoking and WTS. However, it is important to continue monitoring the use of waterpipes in Turkey and targeting tobacco control efforts to certain groups that may be vulnerable to future WTS marketing (e.g., youth, women).

  19. Paenibacillus lentimorbus Inoculation Enhances Tobacco Growth and Extenuates the Virulence of Cucumber mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheel Kumar

    Full Text Available Previous studies with Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488" (hereafter referred as B-30488, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR isolated from cow's milk, revealed its capabilities to improve plant quality under normal and stress conditions. Present study investigates its potential as a biocontrol agent against an economically important virus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, in Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Burley plants and delineates the physical, biophysical, biochemical and molecular perturbations due to the trilateral interactions of PGPR-host-CMV. Soil inoculation of B-30488 enhanced the plant vigor while significantly decreased the virulence and virus RNA accumulation by ~12 fold (91% in systemic leaves of CMV infected tobacco plants as compared to the control ones. Histology of these leaves revealed the improved tissue's health and least aging signs in B-30488 inoculated tobacco plants, with or without CMV infection, and showed lesser intercellular spaces between collenchyma cells, reduced amount of xyloglucans and pectins in connecting primary cells, and higher polyphenol accumulation in hypodermis layer extending to collenchyma cells. B-30488 inoculation has favorably maneuvered the essential biophysical (ion leakage and photosynthetic efficiency and biochemical (sugar, proline, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase attributes of tobacco plants to positively regulate and release the virus stress. Moreover, activities of defense related enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase induced due to CMV-infection were ameliorated with inoculation of B-30488, suggesting systemic induced resistance mediated protection against CMV in tobacco. The quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the genes related to normal plant development, stress and pathogenesis also corroborate well with the biochemical data and revealed the regulation (either up or down of these genes in favor of

  20. Worldwide expansion of transnational tobacco industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, G N

    1992-01-01

    As smoking rates fall in North America and western Europe, transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) from the United States and Great Britain turn to cigarette markets of the developing world to replace those smokers who have quit or died from smoking. The majority of these markets are dominated by state tobacco monopolies that advertise and promote smoking minimally. Few women or adolescents smoke in those nations. The majority of men do, but they smoke far fewer cigarettes per year than their counterparts in developed nations. Trade barriers in the developing world prevent foreign cigarette companies from entering. TTCs employ various techniques to force open those markets, including trade pressure from the US government. Once the market is open, Western cigarette advertising and promotions target nonsmoking women and children. Retail tobacco outlets increase, smoking rates rise, and more death and disease result. Latin America was the TTC target in the 1960s, the newly developed nations of Asia during the 1980s, and, today, the tobacco giants are pushing into eastern Europe, China, and Africa. If nothing is done, emerging national smoking-control programs will be overwhelmed, and state-owned cigarette monopolies will be taken over by the TTCs. Policies and programs to curb smoking exist, but for various reasons many lesser developed countries have not adopted them. The threat of TTC entry into a closed market offers an opportunity to form national coalitions against smoking, educate the public about the dangers of tobacco use, and implement public health policies and programs to restrict marketing and use of cigarettes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Poly-Tobacco Use among High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah D; Patel, Tanha; Ranney, Leah M; Huang, Li-Ling; Sutfin, Erin L; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-11-13

    Although cigarette use by adolescents is declining, emerging tobacco products are becoming increasingly popular and youth may use more than one type of tobacco product. The purposes of this study were: (1) to assess patterns of poly-tobacco use among a representative sample of high school students and (2) to determine how beliefs correlate with poly-tobacco use. Data came from the 2013 North Carolina Youth Tobacco Survey (n = 4092). SAS logistic regression survey procedures were used to account for the complex survey design and sampling weights. Among all high school students in NC in 2013, 29.7% reported current any tobacco use, with 19.1% reporting current poly-tobacco use, and 10.6% reporting current use of only one product. Among poly-tobacco users, 59.3% reported that one of the products they currently used was cigarettes. Positive tobacco product beliefs were found to be significantly associated with poly-tobacco use. Communication campaigns, policy efforts, and future research are needed for prevention, regulation, and control of poly-tobacco use among adolescents, which represents a significant public health problem.

  2. Tobacco Retail Outlets and Vulnerable Populations in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O. Chaiton

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest has been increasing in regulating the location and number of tobacco vendors as part of a comprehensive tobacco control program. The objective of this paper is to examine the distribution of tobacco outlets in a large jurisdiction, to assess: (1 whether tobacco outlets are more likely to be located in vulnerable areas; and (2 what proportion of tobacco outlets are located close to schools. Retail locations across the Province of Ontario from Ministry of Health Promotion data were linked to 2006 Census data at the neighbourhood level. There was one tobacco retail outlet for every 1,000 people over age 15 in Ontario. Density of outlets varied by public health unit, and was associated with the number of smokers. Tobacco outlets were more likely to be located in areas that had high neighbourhood deprivation, in both rural and urban areas. Outlets were less likely to be located in areas with high immigrant populations in urban areas, with the reverse being true for rural areas. Overall, 65% of tobacco retailers were located within 500 m of a school. The sale of tobacco products is ubiquitous, however, neighbourhoods with lower socio-economic status are more likely to have easier availability of tobacco products and most retailers are located within walking distance of a school. The results suggest the importance of policies to regulate the location of tobacco retail outlets.

  3. Tobacco branding, plain packaging, pictorial warnings, and symbolic consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Janet; Gendall, Philip; Gifford, Heather; Pirikahu, Gill; McCool, Judith; Pene, Gina; Edwards, Richard; Thomson, George

    2012-05-01

    We use brand association and symbolic consumption theory to explore how plain cigarette packaging would influence the identities young adults cocreate with tobacco products. Group discussions and in-depth interviews with 86 young adult smokers and nonsmokers investigated how participants perceive tobacco branding and plain cigarette packaging with larger health warnings. We examined the transcript data using thematic analysis and explored how removing tobacco branding and replacing this with larger warnings would affect the symbolic status of tobacco brands and their social connotations. Smokers used tobacco brand imagery to define their social attributes and standing, and their connection with specific groups. Plain cigarette packaging usurped this process by undermining aspirational connotations and exposing tobacco products as toxic. Replacing tobacco branding with larger health warnings diminishes the cachet brand insignia creates, weakens the social benefits brands confer on users, and represents a potentially powerful policy measure.

  4. Women and tobacco: moving from policy to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernster, V; Kaufman, N; Nichter, M; Samet, J; Yoon, S Y

    2000-01-01

    A gender perspective contributes to a better understanding of the epidemiological trends, social marketing strategies, economic policies, and international actions relating to women and the tobacco epidemic. Evidence is provided in this article for the negative impact of tobacco use by women and of passive smoking on the health of women and children. Use of tobacco by women is increasing and this is related to the tobacco industry's aggressive advertising, sponsorship and promotion strategies. Policy directions are proposed in this article. At all levels, a multi-pronged strategy--including changes in legislation and fiscal policies, improvements in gender-sensitive health services, and cessation programmes--should be considered. Much more gender-specific research on tobacco use is needed, particularly in developing countries. Women's empowerment and leadership should be at the centre of all tobacco control efforts and are essential for the success of national programmes and the recently introduced Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

  5. Away with tobacco? On the early understandings of tobacco as a problem and the associated attempts at political regulation of tobacco in Norway 1900–1930

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    Sæbø Gunnar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND - In the early 1900s, the industrialization of cigarette production rapidly created the first major expansion in tobacco consumption in modern times. AIMS - This article focuses on the “tobacco problem” as it was understood, debated and sought governed in Norway around the time of the First World War. I identify various attempts to define tobacco as a problem, including arguments put forward by the anti-tobacco movement, the medical profession and politicians. How were health, moral-aesthetic and economic conditions articulated and integrated in these arguments? What (if any addictive elements of smoking were in focus? I also discuss the association between perceptions of the tobacco problem and political attempts to regulate it. There were repeated calls for a state tobacco monopoly to be introduced and municipal licensing system for the sale of cigarettes. DATA - The data are sourced from the journals Tobakskampen (The Tobacco Fight, the journal of the norwegian medical association and parliamentary documents. FINDINGS - The findings suggest that a to the extent tobacco was perceived as a social problem, it was a moral one (vice, not a behavioural and dependency problem, which alcohol was perceived to be at the time; b proposals to establish a tobacco monopoly were based on economic arguments only, and lacked any firm connection to social issues, health and morality; and c the anti-tobacco movement was socially marginal and their commitment to the municipal licensing idea resulted in large regional variations in public support, too large in fact for the idea to be effective. Although the government did not introduce regulations in the 1920s, the industrialization of cigarettes and subsequent developments in advertising caused a “moral panic” among tobacco opponents and created the modern climate of opinion regarding tobacco.

  6. Cellular approaches to agricultural genetics. Progress report, December 1, 1975--November 30, 1976. [Potatoes, barley, tobacco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The intent of this project is to define conditions for the in vitro culture and subsequent regeneration into whole plants of somatic cells of important crop species. Work during this year has focused upon defining the role of several variables in regeneration of cultures derived primarily from potatoes, barley and long term tobacco cultures. Specific variables which were examined included source of the initial explant for in vitro culture, effects of various hormones (primarily 2,4-D and ABA), effects of alterations of the basic mineral salts medium, effects of various physical shocks and effects of selection and subculture of callus approximating a desired morphological type. Further research is focused on defining the response of plant cells to a range of mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic agents. Initial work in this area has developed and characterized a haploid cell line of tobacco capable of responding quantitatively to these agents.

  7. Community-based tobacco cessation program among women in Mumbai, India

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Globally tobacco epidemic kills nearly six million people annually. Consumption of tobacco products is on the rise in low- and middle-income countries. Tobacco is addictive; hence, tobacco users need support in quitting. Aims: Providing tobacco cessation services to women in community enabling them to quit tobacco, identifying factors associated with quitting and documenting the processes involved to establish a replicable "model tobacco cessation program." Settings and Design: Th...

  8. TcCYS4, a cystatin from cocoa, reduces necrosis triggered by MpNEP2 in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, L S; Costa, M G C; Pirovani, N M; Almeida, A F; Alvim, F C; Pirovani, C P

    2014-09-26

    In Brazil, most cocoa bean production occurs in Southern Bahia. Witches' broom disease arrived in this area in 1989 and has since caused heavy losses in production. The disease is caused by the basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, a hemibiotrophic fungus that produces the necrosis and ethylene-inducting protein (MpNEP2) during infection; this protein can activate cysteine proteases and induce programmed cell death. Cysteine proteases can be modulated by cystatin. In this study, we overexpressed TcCYS4, a cocoa cystatin, in tobacco plants and evaluated the effect on MpNEP2 in model plants. Tccys4 cDNA was cloned into the pCAMBIA 1390 vector and inserted into the tobacco plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transgene expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. Transcript and protein levels in Tcccys4:tobacco lines were 8.9- and 1.5-fold higher than in wild-type plants (wt). Tcccys4:tobacco lines showed no change in growth compared to wt plants. CO2 net assimilation (A) increased in Tcccys4:tobacco lines compared to wt plants. Only one line showed statistically significant stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration rate (E) changes. MpNEP2 was infiltered into the foliar mesophyll of Tcccys4:tobacco lines and wt plants, and necrotic lesions were attenuated in lines highly expressing Tccys4. Our results suggest that cocoa cystatin TcCYS4 affects MpNEP2 activity related to the progression of programmed cell death in tobacco plants. This may occur through the action of cystatin to inhibit cysteine proteases activated by MpNEP2 in plant tissues. Further studies are necessary to examine cystatin in the Theobroma cacao-M. perniciosa pathosystem.

  9. Activity of spinosad on stored-tobacco insects and persistence on cured tobacco stripst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Michel P; Panighini, Cécile; Gadani, Ferruccio; Rossi, Luca

    2004-11-01

    Every year raw tobacco and manufactured tobacco products are lost to two major storage pests, the cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne (F) and the tobacco moth, Ephestia elutella (Hiibner). Post-harvest management of both insects is achieved through sanitation, insect monitoring and fumigation with phosphine. However, insect resistance to phosphine and control failures have been reported, and fumigants are under constant regulatory pressure. Here we report the evaluation of spinosad, a bioinsecticide derived from the fermentation of the soil micro-organism Saccharopolyspora spinosa Mertz & Yao. Spinosad was first registered in 1997 and is now widely used as a field pest control agent on many crops, including tobacco. The insecticidal activity of the fermentation product (technical spinosad, TS) was measured by diet incorporation assays against L serricorne and E elutella larvae. Mortality levels were determined on newly hatched larvae and over the whole insect life cycle. For both species, no emergence of adult insects was observed in cured tobacco sprayed with 50mg TS kg(-1) and inoculated with eggs or newly hatched larvae. These results indicated that spinosad has potential for the control of both species in stored tobacco, since 100% control of both pests could be achieved at 50 mg TS kg(-1), and with almost full control (90-95%) at 10 mg kg(-1). We also monitored the stability of the product on cured tobacco. The original concentration of the main active component of TS, spinosyn A, did not change significantly over 18 months, indicating no loss of spinosad during a typical leaf storage period of time. Bioassays against larvae confirmed that the bioinsecticidal activity of spinosad was retained.

  10. Bacterial and fungal markers in tobacco smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szponar, B., E-mail: szponar@iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Lund University, Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Soelvegatan 23, 223 62 Lund (Sweden); Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Rudolfa Weigla 12, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Pehrson, C.; Larsson, L. [Lund University, Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Soelvegatan 23, 223 62 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-11-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that cigarette smoke contains bacterial and fungal components including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ergosterol. In the present study we used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze tobacco as well as mainstream and second hand smoke for 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) of 10 to 18 carbon chain lengths, used as LPS markers, and ergosterol, used as a marker of fungal biomass. The air concentrations of LPS were 0.0017 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) and 0.0007/m{sup 3} (N = 6) in the smoking vs. non-smoking rooms (p = 0.0559) of the studied private houses, and 0.0231 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) vs. 0.0006 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) (p = 0.0173), respectively, at the worksite. The air concentrations of ergosterol were also significantly higher in rooms with ongoing smoking than in rooms without smoking. A positive correlation was found between LPS and ergosterol in rooms with smoking but not in rooms without smoking. 3-OH C14:0 was the main 3-OH FA, followed by 3-OH C12:0, both in mainstream and second hand smoke and in phenol:water smoke extracts prepared in order to purify the LPS. The Limulus activity of the phenolic phase of tobacco was 3900 endotoxin units (EU)/cigarette; the corresponding amount of the smoke, collected on filters from 8 puffs, was 4 EU/cigarette. Tobacco smoking has been associated with a range of inflammatory airway conditions including COPD, asthma, bronchitis, alveolar hypersensitivity etc. Significant levels of LPS and ergosterol were identified in tobacco smoke and these observations support the hypothesis that microbial components of tobacco smoke contribute to inflammation and airway disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Air concentration of bacterial and fungal markers is significantly higher in rooms with ongoing smoking than without smoking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bacterial LPS correlates with fungal marker in rooms with ongoing smoking but not without smoking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS

  11. A STUDY ON TOBACCO USE AMONG RURAL ADULTS

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    Rajesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tobacco is one of the leading causes of morbidity and premature death though ironically it is preventable. Recently tobacco use has increased in India where about 3/4ths of population lives in rural areas in whom , level of knowledge and awareness about the deleterious effects of tobacco is very low. A clear understanding of reasons leading to increased tobacco use is very important. In view of this, the present study was undertaken to find out the prevalence, atti tudes towards tobacco use, prevalence of certain tobacco related oral health problems and their association with tobacco use. MATERIALS & METHODS: This study was as a cross sectional study conducted in 14 villages in Tamilnadu among adults (>=19, both mal es and females and sample size was 654. Simple Random Sampling Technique was employed. A structured questionnaire was developed and house - to - house survey was conducted. Informed consent from the participants and approval of Institutional Ethics Committee o f Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai were obtained. RESULTS: In this study, 69.6% of the respondents were in the age group of 31 - 60 years and 57.0% belonged to middle socio - economic status. The overall prevalence of tobacco use (both smoking and smokeless form of tobacco was 46% (95% CI 42.2% - 49.8% and the highest prevalence of tobacco use was found in the age group of 31 - 60 years accounting to 48.6% (95% CI 44.0 - 53.2. 18.6% of current users of tobacco and 2.5% of non users of tobacco had oral ulcers w ith odds ratio of 8.7(p<0.001.It was found that only 58.4% of the total study subjects and 56.5% of current users of tobacco were aware of tobacco control Act and 53.5% of the total study subjects and 48.2% of current users of tobacco felt the need to mak e the Act more strict and stringent. CONCLUSION: To reduce the tobacco use in the society, the approach includes increasing the awareness about ill effects, tobacco control policies and treating the

  12. Tobacco cessation: what role can dental professionals play?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Mehta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tobacco dependence is classified as a disease by the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10, but, medical and dental professionals have neither seriously taken this fact nor made any serious attempt to tackle this disease. Apart from supporting wider tobacco control measures, oral health professionals can help patients to stop using tobacco. This may be the single most important service dentists can provide for their patients’ overall health. Objective: This review is prepared with the object to help both clinicians and oral health professionals to scale up their involvement in tobacco control activities, including advocacy and smoking cessation programs. Literature review: Studies have shown that Studies have shown that 70% smokers indicate smokers indicatethat they want to quit, but a meagre 2% succeed. The dental practice The dental practice setting provides a unique opportunity to assist tobacco users in achieving tobacco abstinence. Still, More than 40% of dentists do not routinely ask about tobacco use and 60% do not routinely advise tobacco users to quit, while 61.5% of dentists believe their patients do not expect tobacco cessation services. Conclusion: Interventions by dentist has been found to be effective in helping people to quit tobacco consumption. A step-wise approach and patience must be adopted while dealing with such patients.

  13. Current Situations and Countermeasures of Organic Tobacco Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Current situations of organic tobacco development at both home and abroad,indicating that organic tobacco is one of the innovation directions for sustainable,healthy,environmental protection and low carbon development of modern tobacco industry.On the basis of foreign cultivation technical system for organic agriculture,the cultivation technical system for organic tobacco is summed up as follows:first,keep the diversity and continuity of space and time;second,ensure closeness of nutrient cycle;third,improve self-regulatory system and protection ability of crops.Then,the development trend of organic tobacco is analyzed and corresponding measures are put forward:establish production base and assessment system for organic tobacco;establish technical system for production of organic tobacco;establish and perfect evaluation system for management,production and supervision of organic tobacco;strengthen popularization of production and concept of organic tobacco;improve management of organic tobacco purchase,industry commerce handover,and redrying.

  14. African media coverage of tobacco industry corporate social responsibility initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Cadman, Brie; Malone, Ruth E

    2016-03-07

    Guidelines for implementing the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) recommend prohibiting tobacco industry corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives, but few African countries have done so. We examined African media coverage of tobacco industry CSR initiatives to understand whether and how such initiatives were presented to the public and policymakers. We searched two online media databases (Lexis Nexis and Access World News) for all news items published from 1998 to 2013, coding retrieved items through a collaborative, iterative process. We analysed the volume, type, provenance, slant and content of coverage, including the presence of tobacco control or tobacco interest themes. We found 288 news items; most were news stories published in print newspapers. The majority of news stories relied solely on tobacco industry representatives as news sources, and portrayed tobacco industry CSR positively. When public health voices and tobacco control themes were included, news items were less likely to have a positive slant. This suggests that there is a foundation on which to build media advocacy efforts. Drawing links between implementing the FCTC and prohibiting or curtailing tobacco industry CSR programmes may result in more public dialogue in the media about the negative impacts of tobacco company CSR initiatives.

  15. Chinese tobacco industry promotional activity on the microblog Weibo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although China ratified the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control [FCTC] in 2005, the partial ban on tobacco advertising does not cover the internet. Weibo is one of the most important social media channels in China, using a format similar to its global counterpart, Twitter. The Weibo homepage is a platform to present products, brands and corporate culture. There is great potential for the tobacco industry to exploit Weibo to promote products. METHODS: Seven tobacco industry Weibo accounts that each had more than 5000 fans were selected to examine the content of Weibos established by tobacco companies or their advertising agents. RESULTS: Of the 12073 posts found on the seven accounts, 92.3% (11143 could be classified into six main themes: traditional culture, popular culture, social and business affairs, advertisement, public relations and tobacco culture. Posts under the theme of popular culture accounted for about half of total posts (49%, followed by 'advertisement' and 'tobacco culture' (both at 12%, 'traditional culture' and 'public relations' (both at 11%, and finally 'social and business affairs' (5%. 33% of posts included the words 'cigarette' or 'smoking' and 53% of posts included the tobacco brand name, indicating that tobacco companies carefully construct the topic and content of posts. CONCLUSIONS: Weibo is an important new online marketing tool for the Chinese tobacco industry. Tobacco industry use of Weibo to promote brands and normalize smoking subverts China's ratification of the WHO FCTC. Policy to control tobacco promotion needs reforming to address this widespread circumvention of China's tobacco advertising ban.

  16. European Code against Cancer, 4th Edition: Tobacco and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Maria E; Peruga, Armando; McNeill, Ann; Kralikova, Eva; Guha, Neela; Minozzi, Silvia; Espina, Carolina; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Tobacco use, and in particular cigarette smoking, is the single largest preventable cause of cancer in the European Union (EU). All tobacco products contain a wide range of carcinogens. The main cancer-causing agents in tobacco smoke are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines, aromatic amines, aldehydes, and certain volatile organic compounds. Tobacco consumers are also exposed to nicotine, leading to tobacco addiction in many users. Cigarette smoking causes cancer in multiple organs and is the main cause of lung cancer, responsible for approximately 82% of cases. In 2012, about 313,000 new cases of lung cancer and 268,000 lung cancer deaths were reported in the EU; 28% of adults in the EU smoked tobacco, and the overall prevalence of current use of smokeless tobacco products was almost 2%. Smokeless tobacco products, a heterogeneous category, are also carcinogenic but cause a lower burden of cancer deaths than tobacco smoking. One low-nitrosamine product, snus, is associated with much lower cancer risk than other smokeless tobacco products. Smoking generates second-hand smoke (SHS), an established cause of lung cancer, and inhalation of SHS by non-smokers is still common in indoor workplaces as well as indoor public places, and more so in the homes of smokers. Several interventions have proved effective for stopping smoking; the most effective intervention is the use of a combination of pharmacotherapy and behavioural support. Scientific evidence leads to the following two recommendations for individual action on tobacco in the 4th edition of the European Code Against Cancer: (1) "Do not smoke. Do not use any form of tobacco"; (2) "Make your home smoke-free. Support smoke-free policies in your workplace".

  17. Call centre employees and tobacco dependence: Making a difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G A Mishra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : India is known as the Business Process Outsourcing (BPO capital of the world. Safeguarding health of millions of youngsters employed in this new growing economy is an occupational health challenge. Aims : This study was initiated in June 2007 in India with the objectives to assess the prevalence of tobacco use and study the factors responsible for initiating and continuing its use. The main aim, however, was to assess the effect of different tobacco cessation intervention strategies, thus identifying effective methods to assist these employees to quit tobacco. Materials and Methods : This is a 4-arm cluster randomized trial of 18 months duration among 646 BPO employees, working in 4 different BPO units. The employees were invited to participate in interviews following which tobacco users of each BPO were offered specific tobacco cessation interventions to assist them to quit tobacco use. Results : The prevalence of tobacco dependence is 41%, mainly cigarette smoking. The tobacco quit rate is similar (nearly 20% in the 3 intervention arms. Significantly higher reduction in tobacco consumption of 45% is seen in Arm 4 with the use of pharmacotherapy. BPO employees change jobs frequently, hence follow-up remains a major challenge. Conclusion : Inaccessibility of pharmacotherapy in the developing countries should not deter tobacco cessation efforts as good tobacco quit rates can be achieved with health education and behavioral therapy. Tobacco cessation should be an integral activity in all BPOs, so that the employees receive this service continuously and millions of our youths are protected from the hazards of tobacco.

  18. Toxicological effects of the different substances in tobacco smoke on human embryonic development by a systems chemo-biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno César Feltes

    Full Text Available The physiological and molecular effects of tobacco smoke in adult humans and the development of cancer have been well described. In contrast, how tobacco smoke affects embryonic development remains poorly understood. Morphological studies of the fetuses of smoking pregnant women have shown various physical deformities induced by constant fetal exposure to tobacco components, especially nicotine. In addition, nicotine exposure decreases fetal body weight and bone/cartilage growth in addition to decreasing cranial diameter and tibia length. Unfortunately, the molecular pathways leading to these morphological anomalies are not completely understood. In this study, we applied interactome data mining tools and small compound interaction networks to elucidate possible molecular pathways associated with the effects of tobacco smoke components during embryonic development in pregnant female smokers. Our analysis showed a relationship between nicotine and 50 additional harmful substances involved in a variety of biological process that can cause abnormal proliferation, impaired cell differentiation, and increased oxidative stress. We also describe how nicotine can negatively affect retinoic acid signaling and cell differentiation through inhibition of retinoic acid receptors. In addition, nicotine causes a stress reaction and/or a pro-inflammatory response that inhibits the agonistic action of retinoic acid. Moreover, we show that the effect of cigarette smoke on the developing fetus could represent systemic and aggressive impacts in the short term, causing malformations during certain stages of development. Our work provides the first approach describing how different tobacco constituents affect a broad range of biological process in human embryonic development.

  19. Predictors of tobacco smoking and smokeless tobacco use among adults in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Palipudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To examine predictors of current tobacco smoking and smokeless tobacco use among the adult population in Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: We used data from the 2009 Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS in Bangladesh consisting of 9,629 adults aged ΃15 years. Differences in and predictors of prevalence for both smoking and smokeless tobacco use were analyzed using selected socioeconomic and demographic characteristics that included gender, age, place of residence, education, occupation, and an index of wealth. Results: The prevalence of smoking is high among males (44.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 42.5-47.0 as compared to females (1.5%, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1, whereas the prevalence of smokeless tobacco is almost similar among both males (26.4%, 95% CI: 24.2-28.6 and females (27.9%, 95% CI: 25.9-30.0. Correlates of current smoking are male gender (odds ratio [OR] = 41.46, CI = 23.8-73.4, and adults in older age (ORs range from 1.99 in 24-35 years age to 5.49 in 55-64 years age, less education (ORs range from 1.47 in less than secondary to 3.25 in no formal education, and lower socioeconomic status (ORs range from 1.56 in high wealth index to 2.48 in lowest wealth index. Predictors of smokeless tobacco use are older age (ORs range from 2.54in 24-35 years age to 12.31 in 55-64 years age, less education (ORs range from 1.44 in less than secondary to 2.70 in no formal education, and the low (OR = 1.34, CI = 1.0-1.7 or lowest (OR = 1.43, CI = 1.1-1.9 socioeconomic status. Conclusion: Implementation of tobacco control strategies needs to bring special attention on disadvantaged group and cover all types of tobacco product as outlined in the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC and WHO MPOWER to protect people′s health and prevent premature death.

  20. Effects of Tobacco Smoking on the Degeneration of the Intervertebral Disc: A Finite Element Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmasry, Shady; Asfour, Shihab; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Travascio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is associated with numerous pathological conditions. Compelling experimental evidence associates smoking to the degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In particular, it has been shown that nicotine down-regulates both the proliferation rate and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis of disc cells. Moreover, tobacco smoking causes the constriction of the vascular network surrounding the IVD, thus reducing the exchange of nutrients and anabolic agents from the blood vessels to the disc. It has been hypothesized that both nicotine presence in the IVD and the reduced solute exchange are responsible for the degeneration of the disc due to tobacco smoking, but their effects on tissue homeostasis have never been quantified. In this study, a previously presented computational model describing the homeostasis of the IVD was deployed to investigate the effects of impaired solute supply and nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell proliferation and biosynthetic activity on the health of the disc. We found that the nicotine-mediated down-regulation of cell anabolism mostly affected the GAG concentration at the cartilage endplate, reducing it up to 65% of the value attained in normal physiological conditions. In contrast, the reduction of solutes exchange between blood vessels and disc tissue mostly affected the nucleus pulposus, whose cell density and GAG levels were reduced up to 50% of their normal physiological levels. The effectiveness of quitting smoking on the regeneration of a degenerated IVD was also investigated, and showed to have limited benefit on the health of the disc. A cell-based therapy in conjunction with smoke cessation provided significant improvements in disc health, suggesting that, besides quitting smoking, additional treatments should be implemented in the attempt to recover the health of an IVD degenerated by tobacco smoking.

  1. Fast detection of tobacco mosaic virus infected tobacco using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiyu; Song, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongyan; Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; Shen, Tingting; He, Yong

    2017-03-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is one of the most devastating viruses to crops, which can cause severe production loss and affect the quality of products. In this study, we have proposed a novel approach to discriminate TMV-infected tobacco based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Two different kinds of tobacco samples (fresh leaves and dried leaf pellets) were collected for spectral acquisition, and partial least squared discrimination analysis (PLS-DA) was used to establish classification models based on full spectrum and observed emission lines. The influences of moisture content on spectral profile, signal stability and plasma parameters (temperature and electron density) were also analysed. The results revealed that moisture content in fresh tobacco leaves would worsen the stability of analysis, and have a detrimental effect on the classification results. Good classification results were achieved based on the data from both full spectrum and observed emission lines of dried leaves, approaching 97.2% and 88.9% in the prediction set, respectively. In addition, support vector machine (SVM) could improve the classification results and eliminate influences of moisture content. The preliminary results indicate that LIBS coupled with chemometrics could provide a fast, efficient and low-cost approach for TMV-infected disease detection in tobacco leaves.

  2. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TOBACCO DEPENDENCE AND SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayan Widhidewi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco dependence in schizophrenia patients is a problem that got more concern, withfew treatment options. Peoples with schizophrenia have a prevalence rate of cigarettesmoking two until four times higher than the general population. Consequently, patientsalso have a lower smoking quit rate than the general population. Tobacco dependence inthis population may complicate symptoms and also has adverse physiological effects onpatients. Besides that, patients with schizophrenia tend to smoke more heavily thansmokers in general population. This can increased smoking-related morbidity andmortality and impose a significant financial burden on patients. Recent studiesdemonstrated that patients with schizophrenia smoke before the onset of the illness andalso start smoking earlier than the average population. Patients become psychotic earlierthan patients who do not smoke, and require higher dose of anti-psychotic medications.

  3. Parental tobacco consumption and child development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine F. Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between parental tobacco consumption and the prevalence of psychomotor development disorders in children between 6 and 22 months of age.METHOD: One hundred and nine mothers, fathers, and their babies participated in the study. The sociodemographic and clinical conditions were assessed using questionnaires. Tobacco consumption was assessed using the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND. Child development was evaluated using the Scale of Psychomotor Development in Early Childhood.RESULTS: There was a significant negative correlation between the father's morning smoking (FTND and the child's language development quotient; r = -0.41, p = 0.005, r2 =0.15. The children of mothers without nicotine dependence had a higher mean language development quotient than children of mothers with nicotine dependence; F(1, 107 = 5.51, p = 0.021, ?p2 = 0.05.CONCLUSION: Parental smoking appears to have a detrimental effect on child development.

  4. Litigation and the value of tobacco companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Frank A; Trogdon, Justin G; Mathews, Carrie A

    2005-05-01

    This study determines how the recent wave of litigation affected returns and systematic risk in the tobacco industry. We test for changes in stock prices coinciding with litigation announcements using a difference-in-difference event study methodology. Unfavorable information concerning litigation reduced tobacco returns. We find a decline in systematic risk as traditionally measured by the covariance between industry returns and returns to a diversified (efficient) portfolio. This decline may imply a substantial decline in the cost of equity capital of at least 2.2% after the period of litigation, which we attribute to common cost shocks experienced by the companies participating in the Master Settlement Agreement combined with the oligopolistic structure of the industry.

  5. PYROLYSIS OF TOBACCO RESIDUE: PART 1. THERMAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet K. Akalin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis of two types of tobacco residue was carried out at different pyrolysis temperatures between 300 and 600 °C and a residence time of 1 h in a nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on the product distributions was investigated and the composition of the bio-oils identified. The variation in product distribution depended on both the temperature and the type of tobacco residues. The maximum liquid yields were obtained at 400°C for one sample and at 500°C for the other. The compositions of bio-oils from the pyrolysis of the two samples were found to be very similar. N-containing compounds were found to be the major compounds identified in ether extracts for both samples.

  6. Tobacco use, alcohol consumption and infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J; Rachootin, P; Schiødt, A V

    1983-01-01

    An epidemiological study of the association between alcohol consumption, tobacco use and subfecundity is presented. Study subjects were recruited for a case-control study whose primary objective was to examine the association between occupational exposures and subfecundity. All 1069 women treated...... occupational exposures and smoking and drinking habits were collected by mailed questionnaires. A response rate of 87% was obtained for both case and control groups. Use of tobacco and alcohol was significantly higher in cases compared to controls. A within-group comparison of alcohol consumption among...... of this finding, along with further analyses, the authors suggest that the statistical association between smoking and subfecundity may be real and ought to be studied further. Moderate alcohol consumption does not seem to play a role in the development of subfecundity. The paper provides a systematic review...

  7. GENE TRANSFER IN TOBACCO MITOCHONDRIA IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katyshev A.I.

    2012-08-01

    -cob* genetic construct with integrative properties. It contains the selective gene and the gene of interest under control of the 5'-regulatory regions of Arabidopsis orf262 gene and the tobacco cob gene. We used modified variant of the tobacco apocytochrome b gene as a gene for selection with the nucleotide substitution G128T (G43V which results in antimycin A resistance. The maize sod3.1 gene was used as a gene of interest. The construct was delivered into tobacco callus cells and leaf disks by biolistic method. The callus lines demonstrating the high growth rates in the presence of antimycin A in comparison with the non-transformed control lines were selected. PCR analysis of transformed callus lines revealed the presence of heterologous maize sod3.1 sequence and the integration of the construct elements in tobacco mitochondrial genome.

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: tobacco [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tobacco Nicotiana tabacum Nicotiana_tabacum_L.png Nicotiana_tabacum_NL.png Nicotiana_tabacum_S.png Nico...tiana_tabacum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&...t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nico...tiana+tabacum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&t=NS ...

  9. Cancer and Tobacco Use PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-10

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the November 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. There is a long list of cancers linked to tobacco use, the leading preventable cause of cancer and cancer deaths. Learn more here.  Created: 11/10/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/10/2016.

  10. Post-Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement: Policy and Practice Implications for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Trenette T.; Sparks, Michele Jones; McDonald, Theresa M.; Dickerson, Janet D.

    2011-01-01

    The 1998 Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) was developed between states and tobacco manufacturers to settle the states' lawsuits against tobacco manufacturers and recover tobacco health-related costs. States won billions of dollars and concessions regarding how tobacco products could be advertised. The purpose of the MSA was to prevent…

  11. Exposure and Metabolic Activation Biomarkers of Carcinogenic Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S; Stepanov, Irina; Carmella, Steven G

    2016-01-19

    , blood, and toenails. Urinary and serum NNAL have been related to lung cancer risk, and urinary NNN has been related to esophageal cancer risk in prospective epidemiology studies. These results are consistent with carcinogenicity studies of NNK, NNAL, and NNN in rats, which show that NNK and NNAL induce mainly lung tumors, while NNN causes tumors of the esophagus and oral cavity. Biomarkers of metabolic activation of NNK and NNN applied in human studies include the metabolism of deuterium labeled substrates to distinguish NNK and NNN metabolism from that of nicotine and the determination of DNA and hemoglobin adducts in tissues, blood, and oral cells from people exposed to tobacco products. As these methods are continually improved in parallel with the ever increasing sensitivity and selectivity of mass spectrometers, development of a comprehensive biomarker panel for identifying tobacco users at high risk for cancer appears to be a realistic goal. Targeting high risk individuals for smoking cessation and cancer surveillance can potentially decrease the risk of developing fatal cancers.

  12. Transgenic Tobacco Plants With Efficient Insect Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李太元; 田颖川; 秦晓峰; 莽克强; 李文谷; 何永刚; 沈蕾

    1994-01-01

    Insecticidal protein gene CryIA(c)from Bacillus thuringiensis HD-1(B.t.toxin gene)with 5’-end modified and 3’-end deleted to 4 different lengths were inserted downstream of 35S promoterwith double enhancer and"Ω’"fragment of TMV-RNA cDNA in the binary vector pBin438 to constructthe chimeric expression vector of B.t.toxin gene.Leave stripes of tobacco plant var.NC89 widelygrown in China were transformed with A.tumefaciens LBA4404 harbouring the above expression vectorsrespectively,and kanamycin resistant tobacco plants were regenerated.Insect test with tobacco budwormH.assulta showed that insect-resistant transform.ants could be obtained from the regenerated plantstransformed with B.t.genes of different lengths though highest percentage(~50%)of plants with ahigh morality(90%-100%)to the testing insects is among those transformed with 1.8-kb toxin gene.Genetic,molecular and biological analyses of T1 and T2 progenies of plants with high efficient insect re-sistance showed that B.t.toxin gene and the character of insect resistance have been inherited in the pro-genies.Insect-resistant homozygotes D8-14 and D19-8 have been selected for small-scale field tests.

  13. Tobacco two-component gene NTHK2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By using a previously isolated tobacco two- component gene NTHK1 as a probe, we screened a cDNA library and obtained a homologous gene designated NTHK2. Sequencing analysis revealed that NTHK2 encoded a putative ethylene receptor homolog and contained a histidine kinase domain and a receiver domain. In the histidine kinase domain, the histidine at the phosphorylation site was replaced by an asparagine. Southern analysis indicated that NTHK2 was present at low copies in tobacco genome. The expression of NTHK2 was studied using a competitive RT-PCR method. It was found that, in young flower buds, NTHK2 was expressed abundantly, while in other organs or tissues, it was expressed in a low level. When leaf was subjected to wounding (cutting) treatment, NTHK2 expression was increased. When tobacco seedlings were stressed with PEG and heat shock, NTHK2 transcription was also enhanced. Other treatments showed little effects. These results indicated that NTHK2 might be involved in the developmental processes and in plant responses to some environmental stresses.

  14. Transgenerational Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Joya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, nicotine from second hand smoke (SHS, active or passive, has been considered the most prevalent substance of abuse used during pregnancy in industrialized countries. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS is associated with a variety of health effects, including lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Tobacco is also a major burden to people who do not smoke. As developing individuals, newborns and children are particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of SHS. In particular, prenatal ETS has adverse consequences during the entire childhood causing an increased risk of abortion, low birth weight, prematurity and/or nicotine withdrawal syndrome. Over the last years, a decreasing trend in smoking habits during pregnancy has occurred, along with the implementation of laws requiring smoke free public and working places. The decrease in the incidence of prenatal tobacco exposure has usually been assessed using maternal questionnaires. In order to diminish bias in self-reporting, objective biomarkers have been developed to evaluate this exposure. The measurement of nicotine and its main metabolite, cotinine, in non-conventional matrices such as cord blood, breast milk, hair or meconium can be used as a non-invasive measurement of prenatal SMS in newborns. The aim of this review is to highlight the prevalence of ETS (prenatal and postnatal using biomarkers in non-conventional matrices before and after the implementation of smoke free policies and health effects related to this exposure during foetal and/or postnatal life.

  15. Aspects of tobacco diterpene biosynthesis and accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    Lamina, midveins, stalks and flowers of most Nicotiana species are covered with trichomes. The exudate which accumulates around glandular trichome heads has been suggested to be responsible for the characteristics flavor and aroma associated with different tobaccos. Many classes of compounds have been identified in cuticular surface washes and exudates of tobacco, in particular diterpenes such as the labdanes and duvanes. It has been assumed that most of the components present in the cuticular surface washes and trichome exudates are synthesized by the trichomes. However, there is little definitive evidence to support this assumption. Utilizing radiolabeled precursors, studies were undertaken to determine the site or sites of 1S- and 1R-4.8, 13-duvatriene-1,3-diol (1S- and 1R-diol) biosynthesis. Experiments using midvein sections of Tobacco Introduction 1068 treated with (2-/sup 14/C)acetate or mevalonic acid indicated that radioactivity was incorporated into surface components, including 1S- and 1R-diol. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that all of the labeled duvatrienediols found were associated with the exudate and surface extracts. Experiments using incubated detached glandular trichome heads unequivocally demonstrated that the glandular heads have the biosynthetic capacity to incorporate (2-/sup 14/C)acetate or mevalonic acid into 1S- and 1R-diol. The influence of nitrogen fertilization, water stress, time of topping and curing conditions on the accumulated levels of 1S- and 1R-diol in field grown Ky 14 was also examined.

  16. Reducing the gap between the economic costs of tobacco and funds for tobacco training in schools of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovniak, Liza S; Johnson-Kozlow, Marilyn F; Hovell, Melbourne F

    2006-01-01

    Tobacco use costs approximately dollar 167 billion annually in the U.S., but few tobacco education opportunities are available in schools of public health. Reasons for the discrepancy between the costs of tobacco use and the creation of tobacco training opportunities have not been well explored. Based on the Behavioral Ecological Model, we present 10 recommendations for increasing tobacco training in schools of public health. Six recommendations focus on policy changes within the educational, legislative, and health care systems that influence funds for tobacco training, and four recommendations focus on strategies to mobilize key social groups that can advocate for change in tobacco control education and related policies. In addition, we present a model tobacco control curriculum to equip public health students with the skills needed to advocate for these recommended policy changes. Through concurrent changes in the ecological systems affecting tobacco control training, and through the collaborative action of legislators, the public, the media, and health professionals, tobacco control training can be moved to a higher priority in educational settings.

  17. Proteomic analysis of human bladder epithelial cells by 2D blue native SDS-PAGE reveals TCDD-induced alterations of calcium and iron homeostasis possibly mediated by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nisha; Pink, Mario; Petrat, Frank; Rettenmeier, Albert W; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2015-01-02

    A proteomic analysis of the interaction among multiprotein complexes involved in 2,3,7,8-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-mediated toxicity in urinary bladder epithelial RT4 cells was performed using two-dimensional blue native SDS-PAGE (2D BN/SDS-PAGE). To enrich the protein complexes, unexposed and TCDD-exposed cells were fractionated. BN/SDS-PAGE of the resulting fractions led to an effective separation of proteins and protein complexes of various origins, including cell membrane, mitochondria, and other intracellular compartments. Major differences between the proteome of control and exposed cells involved the alteration of many calcium-regulated proteins (calmodulin, protein S100-A2, annexin A5, annexin A10, gelsolin isoform b) and iron-regulated proteins (ferritin, heme-binding protein 2, transferrin). On the basis of these findings, the intracellular calcium concentration was determined, revealing a significant increase after 24 h of exposure to TCDD. Moreover, the concentration of the labile iron pool (LIP) was also significantly elevated in TCDD-exposed cells. This increase was strongly inhibited by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonist W-7, which pointed toward a possible interaction between iron and calcium signaling. Because nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly enhanced in TCDD-exposed cells and was also inhibited by W-7, we hypothesize that alterations in calcium and iron homeostasis upon exposure to TCDD may be linked through NO generated by CaM-activated nitric oxide synthase. In our model, we propose that NO produced upon TCDD exposure interacts with the iron centers of iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs) that modulate the alteration of ferritin and transferrin, resulting in an augmented cellular LIP and, hence, increased toxicity.

  18. A tobacco-free world: a call to action to phase out the sale of tobacco products by 2040.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaglehole, Robert; Bonita, Ruth; Yach, Derek; Mackay, Judith; Reddy, K Srinath

    2015-03-14

    The time has come for the world to acknowledge the unacceptability of the damage being done by the tobacco industry and work towards a world essentially free from the sale (legal and illegal) of tobacco products. A tobacco-free world by 2040, where less than 5% of the world's adult population use tobacco, is socially desirable, technically feasible, and could become politically practical. Three possible ways forward exist: so-called business-as-usual, with most countries steadily implementing the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) provisions; accelerated implementation of the FCTC by all countries; and a so-called turbo-charged approach that complements FCTC actions with strengthened UN leadership, full engagement of all sectors, and increased investment in tobacco control. Only the turbo-charged approach will achieve a tobacco-free world by 2040 where tobacco is out of sight, out of mind, and out of fashion--yet not prohibited. The first and most urgent priority is the inclusion of an ambitious tobacco target in the post-2015 sustainable development health goal. The second priority is accelerated implementation of the FCTC policies in all countries, with full engagement from all sectors including the private sector--from workplaces to pharmacies--and with increased national and global investment. The third priority is an amendment of the FCTC to include an ambitious global tobacco reduction goal. The fourth priority is a UN high-level meeting on tobacco use to galvanise global action towards the 2040 tobacco-free world goal on the basis of new strategies, new resources, and new players. Decisive and strategic action on this bold vision will prevent hundreds of millions of unnecessary deaths during the remainder of this century and safeguard future generations from the ravages of tobacco use.

  19. Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Tea cDNA Encoding Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase and Anthocyanidin Reductase Induces Early Flowering and Provides Biotic Stress Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar

    Full Text Available Flavan-3-ols contribute significantly to flavonoid content of tea (Camellia sinensis L.. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR are known to be key regulatory enzymes of flavan-3-ols biosynthesis. In this study, we have generated the transgenic tobacco overexpressing individually tea cDNA CsDFR and CsANR encoding for DFR and ANR to evaluate their influence on developmental and protective abilities of plant against biotic stress. The transgenic lines of CsDFR and CsANR produced early flowering and better seed yield. Both types of transgenic tobacco showed higher content of flavonoids than control. Flavan-3-ols such as catechin, epicatechin and epicatechingallate were found to be increased in transgenic lines. The free radical scavenging activity of CsDFR and CsANR transgenic lines was improved. Oxidative stress was observed to induce lesser cell death in transgenic lines compared to control tobacco plants. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing CsDFR and CsANR also showed resistance against infestation by a tobacco leaf cutworm Spodoptera litura. Results suggested that the overexpression of CsDFR and CsANR cDNA in tobacco has improved flavonoids content and antioxidant potential. These attributes in transgenic tobacco have ultimately improved their growth and development, and biotic stress tolerance.

  20. Expressive freedom and tobacco advertising: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Christopher P

    2002-03-01

    In 1989, Canada enacted the Tobacco Products Control Act (TPCA), which prohibited tobacco advertising, required health warnings on tobacco packaging, and restricted promotional activities. Canada's tobacco companies challenged the TPCA's constitutionality, arguing that it infringed on freedom of expression. Although it seemed likely that the Canadian Supreme Court would uphold the legislation, in 1995 the court declared the impugned provisions to be unconstitutional. The decision is testimony to the constraining force of liberalism on tobacco regulation, but it is also evidence of the power of political will. While the Canadian government could have used the decision to justify withdrawing from further confrontations with powerful commercial interests, it chose instead to enact new tobacco control legislation in 1997.