WorldWideScience

Sample records for bwr fuel elements

  1. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  2. Thermomechanical evaluation of BWR fuel elements for procedures of preconditioned with FEMAXI-V; Evaluacion termomecanica de elementos combustible BWR para procedimientos de preacondicionado con FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Lucatero, M.A.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hhl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The limitations in the burnt of the nuclear fuel usually are fixed by the one limit in the efforts to that undergo them the components of a nuclear fuel assembly. The limits defined its provide the direction to the fuel designer to reduce to the minimum the fuel failure during the operation, and they also prevent against some thermomechanical phenomena that could happen during the evolution of transitory events. Particularly, a limit value of LHGR is fixed to consider those physical phenomena that could lead to the interaction of the pellet-shirt (Pellet Cladding Interaction, PCI). This limit value it is related directly with an PCI limit that can be fixed based on experimental tests of power ramps. This way, to avoid to violate the PCI limit, the conditioning procedures of the fuel are still required for fuel elements with and without barrier. Those simulation procedures of the power ramp are carried out for the reactor operator during the starting maneuvers or of power increase like preventive measure of possible consequences in the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel. In this work, the thermomechanical behavior of two different types of fuel rods of the boiling water reactor is analyzed during the pursuit of the procedures of fuel preconditioning. Five diverse preconditioning calculations were carried out, each one with three diverse linear ramps of power increments. The starting point of the ramps was taken of the data of the cycle 8 of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. The superior limit superior of the ramps it was the threshold of the lineal power in which a fuel failure could be presented by PCI, in function of the fuel burnt. The analysis was carried out with the FEMAXI-V code. (Author)

  3. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  4. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  5. Undermoderated spectrum MOX core study. Advanced fuel recycle by BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuyama, Shinichiro; Sakashita, Yoshiaki [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    The concept of BARS (BWR with Advanced Recycle System) is described. This system is to recycle fuel for breeding type BWR using spent fuel by the dry reprocessing. At present, it is studying about the high spectrum core cooling with light water, the dry reprocessing, Vibration Compaction fuel and so on. In the dry reprocessing method used oxide, RE and DF are one of the technical issues. In the case that DF is about 10, RE doesn`t influence a core behavior. According to improve the present process, the possibility lies in making DF from 5 to equal or more than 10 sufficiently. Here, the outline, the development situation of these studies and the prospect of BARS from ability are explained. (author)

  6. Development of a scatter search optimization algorithm for BWR fuel lattice design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J.L.; Martin-del-Campo, C. [Mexico Univ. Nacional Autonoma, Facultad de Ingenieria (Mexico); Morales, L.B.; Palomera, M.A. [Mexico Univ. Nacional Autonoma, Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    A basic Scatter Search (SS) method, applied to the optimization of radial enrichment and gadolinia distributions for BWR fuel lattices, is presented in this paper. Scatter search is considered as an evolutionary algorithm that constructs solutions by combining others. The goal of this methodology is to enable the implementation of solution procedures that can derive new solutions from combined elements. The main mechanism for combining solutions is such that a new solution is created from the strategic combination of two other solutions to explore the solutions' space. Results show that the Scatter Search method is an efficient optimization algorithm applied to the BWR design and optimization problem. Its main features are based on the use of heuristic rules since the beginning of the process, which allows directing the optimization process to the solution, and to use the diversity mechanism in the combination operator, which allows covering the search space in an efficient way. (authors)

  7. Safety analysis of thorium-based fuels in the General Electric Standard BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, M.J.; Townsend, D.B.; Kunz, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    A denatured (U-233/Th)O/sub 2/ fuel assembly has been designed which is energy equivalent to and hardware interchangeable with a modern boiling water reactor (BWR) reference reload assembly. Relative to the reference UO/sub 2/ fuel, the thorium fuel design shows better performance during normal and transient reactor operation for the BWR/6 product line and will meet or exceed current safety and licensing criteria. Power distributions are flattened and thermal operating margins are increased by reduced steam void reactivity coefficients caused by U-233. However, a (U-233/Th)O/sub 2/-fueled BWR will likely have reduced operating flexibility. A (U-235/Th)O/sub 2/-fueled BWR should perform similar to a UO/sub 2/-fueled BWR under all operating conditions. A (Pu/Th)O/sub 2/-fueled BWR may have reduced thermal margins and similar accident response and be less stable than a UO/sub 2/-fueled BWR. The assessment is based on comparisions of point model and infinite lattice predictions of various nuclear reactivity parameters, including void reactivity coefficients, Doppler reactivity coefficients, and control blade worths.

  8. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  9. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Tobin, S.J.; Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hu, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (Sweden); Trellue, H.; Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-11

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 134}Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  10. Design study of Thorium-232 and Protactinium-231 based fuel for long life BWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trianti, N.; Su'ud, Z.; Riyana, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    A preliminary design study for the utilization of thorium added with 231Pa based fuel on BWR type reactor has been performed. In the previous research utilization of fuel based Thorium-232 and Uranium-233 show 10 years operation time with maximum excess-reactivity about 4.075% dk/k. To increase reactor operation time and reduce excess-reactivity below 1% dk/k, Protactinium (Pa-231) is used as Burnable Poison. Protactinium-231 has very interesting neutronic properties, which enable the core to reduce initial excess-reactivity and simultaneously increase production of 233U to 231Pa in burn-up process. Optimizations of the content of 231Pa in the core enables the BWR core to sustain long period of operation time with reasonable burn-up reactivity swing. Based on the optimization of fuel element composition (Th and Pa) in various moderation ratio we can get reactor core with longer operation time, 20 ˜ 30 years operation without fuel shuffling or refuelling, with average power densities maximum of about 35 watt/cc, and maximum excess-reactivity 0.56% dk/k.

  11. Enhancing BWR proliferation resistance fuel with minor actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gray S.

    2009-03-01

    To reduce spent fuel for storage and enhance the proliferation resistance for the intermediate-term, there are two major approaches (a) increase the discharged spent fuel burnup in the advanced light water reactor- LWR (Gen-III Plus), which not only can reduce the spent fuel for storage, but also increase the 238Pu isotopes ratio to enhance the proliferation resistance, and (b) use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and 241Am) in the high burnup fuel, which can drastically increase the proliferation resistance isotope ratio of 238Pu/Pu. For future advanced nuclear systems, minor actinides (MA) are viewed more as a resource to be recycled, and transmuted to less hazardous and possibly more useful forms, rather than simply disposed of as a waste stream in an expensive repository facility. As a result, MAs play a much larger part in the design of advanced systems and fuel cycles, not only as additional sources of useful energy, but also as direct contributors to the reactivity control of the systems into which they are incorporated. In the study, a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel unit lattice cell model with UO 2 fuel pins will be used to investigate the effectiveness of minor actinide reduction approach (MARA) for enhancing proliferation resistance and improving the fuel cycle performance in the intermediate-term goal for future nuclear energy systems. To account for the water coolant density variation from the bottom (0.76 g/cm 3) to the top (0.35 g/cm 3) of the core, the axial coolant channel and fuel pin were divided to 24 nodes. The MA transmutation characteristics at different elevations were compared and their impact on neutronics criticality discussed. The concept of MARA, which involves the use of transuranic nuclides ( 237Np and/or 241Am), significantly increases the 238Pu/Pu ratio for proliferation resistance, as well as serves as a burnable absorber to hold-down the initial excess reactivity. It is believed that MARA can play an important role in

  12. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of

  13. High fidelity analysis of BWR fuel assembly with COBRA-TF/PARCS and trace codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarca, A.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G., E-mail: aabarca@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, (ISIRYM/UPV), (Spain). Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety; Concejal, A.; Melara, J.; Albendea, M., E-mail: acbe@iberdrola.es, E-mail: jls@iberdrola.es, E-mail: manuel.albendea@iberdrola.es [Iberdrola, Madrid (Spain); Soler, A., E-mail: asoler@iberdrola.es [SEA Propulsion SL, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    The growing importance of detailed reactor core and fuel assembly description for light water reactors (LWRs) as well as the sub-channel safety analysis requires high fidelity models and coupled neutronic/thermalhydraulic codes. Hand in hand with advances in the computer technology, the nuclear safety analysis is beginning to use a more detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics. Previously, a PWR core and a 16 by 16 fuel assembly models were developed to test and validate our COBRA-TF/PARCS v2.7 (CTF/PARCS) coupled code. In this work, a comparison of the modeling and simulation advantages and disadvantages of modern 10 by 10 BWR fuel assembly with CTF/PARCS and TRACE codes has been done. The objective of the comparison is making known the main advantages of using the sub-channel codes to perform high resolution nuclear safety analysis. The sub-channel codes, like CTF, permits obtain accurate predictions, in two flow regime, of the thermalhydraulic parameters important to safety with high local resolution. The modeled BWR fuel assembly has 91 fuel rods (81 full length and 10 partial length fuel rods) and a big square central water rod. This assembly has been modeled with high level of detail with CTF code and using the BWR modeling parameters provided by TRACE. The same neutronic PARCS's model has been used for the simulation with both codes. To compare the codes a coupled steady state has be performed. (author)

  14. Design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel for BWR reactors; Diseno y optimizacion axial de combustible nuclear para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia V, M.A

    2006-07-01

    In the present thesis, the modifications made to the axial optimization system based on Tabu Search (BT) for the axial design of BWR fuel type are presented, developed previously in the Nuclear Engineering Group of the UNAM Engineering Faculty. With the modifications what is mainly looked is to consider the particular characteristics of the mechanical design of the GE12 fuel type, used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central (CNLV) and that it considers the fuel bars of partial longitude. The information obtained in this thesis will allow to plan nuclear fuel reloads with the best conditions to operate in a certain cycle guaranteeing a better yield and use in the fuel burnt, additionally people in charge in the reload planning will be favored with the changes carried out to the system for the design and axial optimization of nuclear fuel, which facilitate their handling and it reduces their execution time. This thesis this developed in five chapters that are understood in the following way in general: Chapter 1: It approaches the basic concepts of the nuclear energy, it describes the physical and chemical composition of the atoms as well as that of the uranium isotopes, the handling of the uranium isotope by means of the nuclear fission until arriving to the operation of the nuclear reactors. Chapter 2: The nuclear fuel cycle is described, the methods for its extraction, its conversion and its enrichment to arrive to the stages of the nuclear fuel management used in the reactors are described. Beginning by the radial design, the axial design and the core design of the nuclear reactor related with the fuel assemblies design. Chapter 3: the optimization methods of nuclear fuel previously used are exposed among those that are: the genetic algorithms method, the search methods based on heuristic rules and the application of the tabu search method, which was used for the development of this thesis. Chapter 4: In this part the used methodology to the

  15. Extended Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauld, Ian C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Martinez, J. S. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-01-01

    [Full Text] Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase investigates the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used for spent fuel pools to spent fuel storage and transportation casks and the validation of reactivity (keff) calculations and depleted fuel compositions. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents work performed to date, investigating some aspects of extended BUC, and it also describes the plan to complete the evaluations. The technical basis for application of peak reactivity methods to BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems is presented in a companion paper. Two reactor operating parameters are being evaluated to establish an adequate basis for extended BWR BUC, including investigation of the axial void profile effect and the effect of control blade utilization during operation. A detailed analysis of core simulator data for one cycle of an operating BWR plant was performed to determine the range of void profiles and the variability of the profile experienced during irradiation. While a single cycle does not provide complete data, the data obtained are sufficient to use to determine the primary effects and identify conservative modeling approaches. Using data resulting from a single cycle, the axial void profile is studied by first determining the temporal fidelity necessary in depletion modeling, and then using multiple void profiles to examine the effect of the void profile on cask reactivity. The results of these studies are being used to develop recommendations for conservatively modeling the void profile effects for BWR depletion calculations. The second operational parameter studied is control blade exposure. Control blades

  16. Fuel performance annual report for 1981. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.; Tokar, M.

    1982-12-01

    This annual report, the fourth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1981 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel problems, fuel design changes and fuel surveillance programs, and high-burnup fuel experience are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.

  17. Estimation of the coolant flow through a natural circulation BWR fuel channel applying and equivalent electrical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, DEPFI, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Campus Morelos en IMTA, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_ig@yahoo.com.m [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work presents the design and implementation of an advanced controller for a reduced order model of a BWR reactor core cooled by natural circulating water, which allows real time estimates of coolant flows through fuel assemblies about standard neutron flux strings. Nuclear power plants with boiling water reactors control individual fuel assembly coolant flows by forced circulation using external or internal water pumps and different core support plate orifices. These two elements reduce flow dependency on local channel pressure drops. In BWR reactors using only natural circulation coolant flows, these two elements are not available and therefore individual channel coolant flows are highly dependent in local conditions, such as power distributions and local pressure drops. Therefore it is expected that grater uncertainties in these variables be used during safety, fuel management and other analysis, which in turns may lead to increased operation penalties, such as tighter operating limits. The objective of this work is to asses by computer simulations means to reduce uncertainties in the measurement of fuel assembly coolant flows and eventually the associated penalties. During coolant phase transitions, pressure drops and local power may alter local natural circulation through fuel assemblies and flow estimates can be helped or not by control rod moves. This work presents the construction of an optimal controller for a core flow estimator based on a reduced order model of the coolant going though the reactor vessel components and nuclear core. This model is to be driven by plant signals from standard BWR instrumentation in order to estimate the coolant flows in selected fuel assemblies about a LPRM string. For this purpose an equivalent electrical model has been mathematically developed and numerically tested. The power-flow maps of typical BRW are used as steady state references for this equivalent model. Once these were fully reproduced for steady state

  18. Probabilistic analysis of PWR and BWR fuel rod performance using the code CASINO-SLEUTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, A.J.

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the Monte Carlo and response surface techniques used in the code, and a probabilistic analysis of fuel rod performance in PWR and BWR applications. The analysis shows that fission gas release predictions are very sensitive to changes in certain of the code's inputs, identifies the most dominant input parameters and compares their effects in the two cases.

  19. Analysis of Core Physics Experiments on Irradiated BWR MOX Fuel in REBUS Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Toru; Ando, Yoshihira [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Safety Standard Division, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Yamato [Toshiba Corporation, Power System Company, Yokohama (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    As part of analyses of experimental data of a critical core containing a irradiated BWR MOX test bundle in the REBUS program, depletion calculations was performed for the BWR MOX fuel assemblies from that the MOX test rods were selected by using a general purpose neutronics code system SRAC. The core analyses were carried out using SRAC and a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP. The calculated k{sub eff}s were compared with those of the core containing a fresh MOX fuel bundle in the program. The SRAC-diffusion calculation underestimates k{sub eff}s of the both cores by 1.0 to 1.3 %dk and the k{sub eff}s of MVP are 1.001. The difference in k{sub eff} between the irradiated BWR MOX test bundle core and the fresh MOX one is 0.4 %dk in the SRAC-diffusion calculation and 0.0 %dk in the MVP calculation. The calculated fission rate distributions are in good agreement with the measurement in the SRAC-diffusion and MVP calculations. The calculated neutron flux distributions are also in good agreement with the measurement. The calculated burnup reactivity in the both calculations well reproduce the measurements. (authors)

  20. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: The DF-4 BWR Damaged Fuel experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tautges, T.J.

    1993-10-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRs. As a part of an ongoing assessment, program, MELCOR has been used to model the ACRR in-pile DF-4 Damaged Fuel experiment. DF-4 provided data for early phase melt progression in BWR fuel assemblies, particularly for phenomena associated with eutectic interactions in the BWR control blade and zircaloy oxidation in the canister and cladding. MELCOR provided good agreement with experimental data in the key areas of eutectic material behavior and canister and cladding oxidation. Several shortcomings associated with the MELCOR modeling of BWR geometries were found and corrected. Twenty-five sensitivity studies were performed on COR, HS and CVH parameters. These studies showed that the new MELCOR eutectics model played an important role in predicting control blade behavior. These studies revealed slight time step dependence and no machine dependencies. Comparisons made with the results from four best-estimate codes showed that MELCOR did as well as these codes in matching DF-4 experimental data.

  1. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    utilized or referenced, justification has been provided as to why the data can be utilized for BWR fuel.

  2. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  3. Axial profiles of burned and fraction of holes for calculations of criticality with credit for BWR fuel burning; Perfiles axiales de quemado y fraccion de huecos para calculos de criticidad con credito al quemado para combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado Sanchez, C.; Rubio Oviedo, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a method to define surround profiles of burning and fraction of holes suited for use in applications of credit to burning of BWR fuel from results obtained with the module STARBUCS of SCALE. (Author)

  4. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  5. Transient and stability analysis of a BWR core with thorium-uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779 Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, DF (Mexico)], E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx; Francois, Juan-Luis [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec Mor. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    The kinetic response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium as a nuclear material, in an integrated blanket-seed assembly, is presented in this work. Additionally an in-house code was developed to evaluate this core under steady state and transient conditions including a stability analysis. The code has two modules: (a) the time domain module for transient analysis and (b) the frequency domain module for stability analysis. The thermal-hydraulic process is modeled by a set of five equations, considering no homogeneous flow with drift-flux approximation and non-equilibrium thermodynamic. The neutronic process is calculated with a point kinetics model. Typical BWR reactivity effects are considered: void fraction, fuel temperature, moderator temperature and control rod density. Collapsed parameters were included in the code to represent the core using an average fuel channel. For the stability analysis, in the frequency domain, the transfer function is determined by applying Laplace-transforming to the calculated pressure drop perturbations in each of the considered regions where a constant total pressure drop was considered. The transfer function was used to study the system response in the frequency domain when an inlet flow perturbation is applied. The results show that the neutronic behavior of the core with thorium uranium fuel is similar to a UO{sub 2} core, even during transient conditions. The stability and transient analysis show that the thorium-uranium fuel can be operated safely in current BWRs.

  6. Nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocher, Roy W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  7. Effect of nonuniform 3-D void distribution within BWR fuel assemblies on neutronic characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Hyoudou, Hideaki; Kitada, Takanori [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering]. E-mail: takeda@nucl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kosaka, Shinya; Ikeda, Hideaki [Tepco Systems Corp., Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: kisaka-shinya@tepsys.co.jp

    2003-07-01

    The effect of nonuniform distribution of void fractions within fuel assemblies of BWR cores on the neutronic characteristics has been evaluated by coupling the thermal hydraulic and neutronic calculations. It is found that the effect is large for assemblies with Gd rods because of the small void fraction for subchannels with Gd rods. The axially averaged K{sub {infinity}} is reduced by about 0.1 {approx} 0.3% {delta}k/k compared with the case with uniform void distribution. The power peaking is decreased by 0.6 {approx} 1.3%. The reason of these changes is discussed. (author)

  8. Optimization of fuel reloads for a BWR using the ant colony system; Optimizacion de recargas de combustible para un BWR usando el sistema de colonia de hormigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel E, J. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ingenieria, Cerro de Coatepec s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 50110 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ortiz S, J. J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: jaime.es.jaime@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    In this work some results obtained during the development of optimization systems are presented, which are employees for the fuel reload design in a BWR. The systems use the ant colony optimization technique. As first instance, a system is developed that was adapted at travel salesman problem applied for the 32 state capitals of Mexican Republic. The purpose of this implementation is that a similarity exists with the design of fuel reload, since the two problems are of combinatorial optimization with decision variables that have similarity between both. The system was coupled to simulator SIMULATE-3, obtaining good results when being applied to an operation cycle in equilibrium for reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  9. Fuel Element Technical Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burley, H.H. [ed.

    1956-08-01

    It is the purpose of the Fuel Element Technical Manual to Provide a single document describing the fabrication processes used in the manufacture of the fuel element as well as the technical bases for these processes. The manual will be instrumental in the indoctrination of personnel new to the field and will provide a single data reference for all personnel involved in the design or manufacture of the fuel element. The material contained in this manual was assembled by members of the Engineering Department and the Manufacturing Department at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation between the dates October, 1955 and June, 1956. Arrangement of the manual. The manual is divided into six parts: Part I--introduction; Part II--technical bases; Part III--process; Part IV--plant and equipment; Part V--process control and improvement; and VI--safety.

  10. Impact of modeling Choices on Inventory and In-Cask Criticality Calculations for Forsmark 3 BWR Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Ade, Brian J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marshall, William BJ J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Simulation of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel depletion poses a challenge for nuclide inventory validation and nuclear criticality safety analyses. This challenge is due to the complex operating conditions and assembly design heterogeneities that characterize these nuclear systems. Fuel depletion simulations and in-cask criticality calculations are affected by (1) completeness of design information, (2) variability of operating conditions needed for modeling purposes, and (3) possible modeling choices. These effects must be identified, quantified, and ranked according to their significance. This paper presents an investigation of BWR fuel depletion using a complete set of actual design specifications and detailed operational data available for five operating cycles of the Swedish BWR Forsmark 3 reactor. The data includes detailed axial profiles of power, burnup, and void fraction in a very fine temporal mesh for a GE14 (10×10) fuel assembly. The specifications of this case can be used to assess the impacts of different modeling choices on inventory prediction and in-cask criticality, specifically regarding the key parameters that drive inventory and reactivity throughout fuel burnup. This study focused on the effects of the fidelity with which power history and void fraction distributions are modeled. The corresponding sensitivity of the reactivity in storage configurations is assessed, and the impacts of modeling choices on decay heat and inventory are addressed.

  11. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  12. JACKETED REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1958-12-01

    A fuel element is described for fast reactors comprised of a core of uranium metal containing material and a jacket around the core, the jacket consisting of from 2.5 to 15 percent of titanium, from 1 to 5 percent of niobium, and from 80 to 96.5 percent of vanadium.

  13. Development of a fuzzy logic method to build objective functions in optimization problems: application to BWR fuel lattice design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-del-Campo, C.; Francois, J.L.; Barragan, A.M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Facultad de Ingenieria (Mexico); Palomera, M.A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistema, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we develop a methodology based on the use of the Fuzzy Logic technique to build multi-objective functions to be used in optimization processes applied to in-core nuclear fuel management. As an example, we selected the problem of determining optimal radial fuel enrichment and gadolinia distributions in a typical 'Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)' fuel lattice. The methodology is based on the use of the mathematical capability of Fuzzy Logic to model nonlinear functions of arbitrary complexity. The utility of Fuzzy Logic is to map an input space into an output space, and the primary mechanism for doing this is a list of if-then statements called rules. The rules refer to variables and adjectives that describe those variables and, the Fuzzy Logic technique interprets the values in the input vectors and, based on the set of rules assigns values to the output vector. The methodology was developed for the radial optimization of a BWR lattice where the optimization algorithm employed is Tabu Search. The global objective is to find the optimal distribution of enrichments and burnable poison concentrations in a 10*10 BWR lattice. In order to do that, a fuzzy control inference system was developed using the Fuzzy Logic Toolbox of Matlab and it has been linked to the Tabu Search optimization process. Results show that Tabu Search combined with Fuzzy Logic performs very well, obtaining lattices with optimal fuel utilization. (authors)

  14. Artificial intelligence applied to fuel management in BWR type reactors; Inteligencia artificial aplicada a la administracion de combustible en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J

    1998-10-01

    In this work two techniques of artificial intelligence, neural networks and genetic algorithms were applied to a practical problem of nuclear fuel management; the determination of the optimal fuel reload for a BWR type reactor. This is an important problem in the design of the operation cycle of the reactor. As a result of the application of these techniques, comparable or even better reloads proposals than those given by expert companies in the subject were obtained. Additionally, two other simpler problems in reactor physics were solved: the determination of the axial power profile and the prediction of the value of some variables of interest at the end of the operation cycle of the reactor. Neural networks and genetic algorithms have been applied to solve many problems of engineering because of their versatility but they have been rarely used in the area of fuel management. The results obtained in this thesis indicates the convenience of undertaking further work on this area and suggest the application of these techniques of artificial intelligence to the solution of other problems in nuclear reactor physics. (Author)

  15. AREVA NP burnup credit investigation on irradiated MOX fuel within the REBUS BWR programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alander, Alexandra; Misu, Stefan; Timm, Wolf [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany); Thareau, Sebastien [AREVA, AREVA NP, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The present paper summarizes a criticality and burnup credit investigation carried out using the 2D spectral codes CASMO-4 and APOLLO2-A. Fission rate distributions and multiplication factors, for UOX and MOX configurations, are calculated as well as the reactivity effect caused by burnup on a selection of irradiated MOX fuel assemblies. 3D core criticality calculations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code MOCA and the deterministic transport code VARIANT (a nodal code developed by ANL) using CASMO-4 generated cross section libraries. Calculations were compared to experimental data from the critical facility VENUS in the context of the REBUS BWR Programme. The results confirm that the spectral codes CASMO-4 and APOLLO2-A are well suited to calculate fission rates, multiplication factors and reactivity effects. It is also found that the calculated burnup reactivity effect, using CASMO-4 generated cross sections and the best 3D method (MOCA), is underestimated by merely 7% compared to the experimental value, which can mainly be attributed to the simplifications done in order to model the critical configurations with reasonable efforts. (authors)

  16. Optimization of fuel cells for BWR based in Tabu modified search; Optimizacion de celdas de combustible para BWR basada en busqueda Tabu modificada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J.L. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Palomera P, M.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Posgrado en Ingenieria en Computacion, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The advances in the development of a computational system for the design and optimization of cells for assemble of fuel of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are presented. The method of optimization is based on the technique of Tabu Search (Tabu Search, TS) implemented in progressive stages designed to accelerate the search and to reduce the time used in the process of optimization. It was programed an algorithm to create the first solution. Also for to diversify the generation of random numbers, required by the technical TS, it was used the Makoto Matsumoto function obtaining excellent results. The objective function has been coded in such a way that can adapt to optimize different parameters like they can be the enrichment average or the peak factor of radial power. The neutronic evaluation of the cells is carried out in a fine way by means of the HELIOS simulator. In the work the main characteristics of the system are described and an application example is presented to the design of a cell of 10x10 bars of fuel with 10 different enrichment compositions and gadolinium content. (Author)

  17. Radial optimization of a BWR fuel cell using genetic algorithms; Optimizacion radial de una celda de combustible BWR usando algoritmos geneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Carmona H, R.; Oropeza C, I.P. [UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx

    2006-07-01

    The development of the application of the Genetic Algorithms (GA) to the optimization of the radial distribution of enrichment in a cell of fuel of a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The optimization process it was ties to the HELIOS simulator, which is a transport code of neutron simulation of fuel cells that has been validated for the calculation of nuclear banks for BWRs. With heterogeneous radial designs can improve the radial distribution of the power, for what the radial design of fuel has a strong influence in the global design of fuel recharges. The optimum radial distribution of fuel bars is looked for with different enrichments of U{sup 235} and contents of consumable poison. For it is necessary to define the representation of the solution, the objective function and the implementation of the specific optimization process to the solution of the problem. The optimization process it was coded in 'C' language, it was automated the creation of the entrances to the simulator, the execution of the simulator and the extraction, in the exit of the simulator, of the parameters that intervene in the objective function. The objective function includes four parameters: average enrichment of the cell, average gadolinia concentration of the cell, peak factor of radial power and k-infinite multiplication factor. To be able to calculate the parameters that intervene in the objective function, the one evaluation process of GA was ties to the HELIOS code executed in a Compaq Alpha workstation. It was applied to the design of a fuel cell of 10 x 10 that it can be employee in the fuel assemble designs that are used at the moment in the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central. Its were considered 10 different fuel compositions which four contain gadolinia. Three heuristic rules that consist in prohibiting the placement of bars with gadolinia in the ends of the cell, to place the compositions with the smallest enrichment in the corners of the cell and to fix

  18. Optimization of axial enrichment distribution for BWR fuels using scoping libraries and block coordinate descent method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Wu-Hsiung, E-mail: wstong@iner.gov.tw; Lee, Tien-Tso; Kuo, Weng-Sheng; Yaur, Shung-Jung

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • An optimization method for axial enrichment distribution in a BWR fuel was developed. • Block coordinate descent method is employed to search for optimal solution. • Scoping libraries are used to reduce computational effort. • Optimization search space consists of enrichment difference parameters. • Capability of the method to find optimal solution is demonstrated. - Abstract: An optimization method has been developed to search for the optimal axial enrichment distribution in a fuel assembly for a boiling water reactor core. The optimization method features: (1) employing the block coordinate descent method to find the optimal solution in the space of enrichment difference parameters, (2) using scoping libraries to reduce the amount of CASMO-4 calculation, and (3) integrating a core critical constraint into the objective function that is used to quantify the quality of an axial enrichment design. The objective function consists of the weighted sum of core parameters such as shutdown margin and critical power ratio. The core parameters are evaluated by using SIMULATE-3, and the cross section data required for the SIMULATE-3 calculation are generated by using CASMO-4 and scoping libraries. The application of the method to a 4-segment fuel design (with the highest allowable segment enrichment relaxed to 5%) demonstrated that the method can obtain an axial enrichment design with improved thermal limit ratios and objective function value while satisfying the core design constraints and core critical requirement through the use of an objective function. The use of scoping libraries effectively reduced the number of CASMO-4 calculation, from 85 to 24, in the 4-segment optimization case. An exhausted search was performed to examine the capability of the method in finding the optimal solution for a 4-segment fuel design. The results show that the method found a solution very close to the optimum obtained by the exhausted search. The number of

  19. Analysis of the performance of fuel cells BWR with a single enrichment and radial distribution of enrichments; Analisis del desempeno de celdas combustibles BWR con un solo enriquecimiento y con distribucion radial de enriquecimientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Vargas, S.; Alonso, G.; Del Valle, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: govaj666@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The efficient use of the fuel is one of the objectives in the assemblies design of type BWR. The present tendency in the assemblies design of type BWR is through a radial distribution of enrichments. The present work has like object showing the because of this decision, for what a comparison of the neutronic performance of two fuel cells with the same enrichment average but one of them with radial distribution of enrichment and the other with a single enrichment equal to the average. The cells were analyzed with the CASMO-4 code and the obtained results of the behavior of the neutron flow and the power sustain the because of the radial distribution of enrichments. (Author)

  20. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  1. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, C.H.

    1961-11-21

    A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

  2. Information to be requested from the NSSS vendor for fuel management capability for BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.; Esteban, A.; Gomez, M.; Leira, G.; Martinez, R.; Serrano, J.

    1975-07-01

    A set of the nuclear, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical parameters necessary according to the design of BWRs, is listed. This parameters are necessary to perform the fuel elements management and design, and it must be supplied by the Reactor Manufacturer to the Utility. (Author) 18 refs.

  3. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  4. Analysis of the behavior of irradiated BWR fuel rod in storage dry conditions; Analisis del comportamiento de una barra combustible irradiada BWR en condiciones de almacenamiento en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A.; Montes, D.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Munoz-Reja, C.

    2014-07-01

    In order to complete previous studies of creep on PWR sheath material, developed a joint experimental program by CSN, ENRESA and ENUSA about BWR (Zircaloy-2) sheath material. This program consisted in creep tests and then on the material under creep, compression testing diametral obtaining the permissible displacement of the sheath to break. (Author)

  5. Validation of the Monte Carlo model developed to estimate doses around the irradiated fuel pool produced by activated control rods discharged from a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarca, Agustin; Gallardo, Sergio; Rodenas, Jose [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear], e-mail: ergalbe@iqn.upv.es

    2009-07-01

    BWR control rods are irradiated into the reactor by the neutron flux and consequently materials composing the rod become activated. When the control rods are withdrawn from the reactor, they must be stored into the spent fuel storage pool of the plant at a certain depth under water. Doses potentially received by plant workers in the area surrounding the pool edges as well as in a platform moving over the water surface should be calculated to assure the adequate protection. Irradiated fuel elements are stored at the bottom of the pool while controls rods are nearer the surface. Therefore, doses out of the pool are mainly produced by activated control rods. The MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to model the pool containing hanger devices with irradiated control rods and to estimate dose rates at points of interest. To obtain dose rates on the pool and around it an F4MESH tally has been used. Furthermore, the SSW/SSR technique has been applied in order to strongly reduce the computer time. Results have been compared with measurements in plant in order to validate the model. An interesting application of the validated model is the assessment of doses when some variation is introduced in the distribution of activated material. (author)

  6. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  7. BUTREN-RC an hybrid system for the recharges optimization of nuclear fuels in a BWR; BUTREN-RC un sistema hibrido para la optimizacion de recargas de combustible nuclear en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz S, J.J.; Castillo M, J.A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The obtained results with the hybrid system BUTREN-RC are presented that obtains recharges of nuclear fuel for a BWR type reactor. The system has implemented the methods of optimization heuristic taboo search and neural networks. The optimization it carried out with the technique of taboo search, and the neural networks, previously trained, were used to predict the behavior of the recharges of fuel, in substitution of commercial codes of reactor simulation. The obtained recharges of nuclear fuel correspond to 5 different operation cycles of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, Veracruz in Mexico. The obtained results were compared with the designs of this cycles. The energy gain with the recharges of fuel proposals is of approximately 4.5% with respect to those of design. The time of compute consumed it was considerably smaller that when a commercial code for reactor simulation is used. (Author)

  8. Nuclear fuel activity with minor actinides after their useful life in a BWR; Actividad del combustible nuclear con actinidos menores despues de su vida util en un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: eduardo.martinez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Nuclear fuel used in nuclear power reactors has a life cycle, in which it provides energy, at the end of this cycle is withdrawn from the reactor core. This used fuel is known as spent nuclear fuel, a strong problem with this fuel is that when the fuel was irradiated in a nuclear reactor it leaves with an activity of approximately 1.229 x 10{sup 15} Bq. The aim of the transmutation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel is to reduce the activity of high level waste that must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high level waste; these two achievements would reduce the number of necessary repositories, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is aimed at evaluating the activity of a nuclear fuel in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material, first establishing a reference of actinides production in the standard nuclear fuel of uranium at end of its burning in a BWR, and a fuel rod design containing 6% of actinides in an uranium matrix from the enrichment tails is proposed, then 4 standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by 4 actinide bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of the same, finally the reduction of actinide activity in the fuel is evaluated. (Author)

  9. Compact Fuel Element Environment Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. E.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (I(sub sp)) and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average I(sub sp). Nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) capable of high I(sub sp) thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen, which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3,000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements that employ high melting point metals, ceramics, or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high-temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via noncontact radio frequency heating and expose samples to hydrogen for typical mission durations has been developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This Technical Memorandum details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  10. Analysis of core stability measurement data of advanced 9 x 9 fuel assembly in a BWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Katsuhiro; Itami, Akira; Kubo, Yuichiro; Shakudo, Taketomi [Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kreuter, D.; Anegawa, Takafumi; Kitamura, Hideya; Ishikawa, Masumi

    1997-05-01

    The core stability measurements were taken during the cycle-9 startup of the 1,300 MWe BWR, Kernkraftwerk Kruemmel (KKK). The core contained advanced 9 x 9 type high burn-up design reload fuel with a higher enrichment than current 8 x 8 fuel. A design feature of the advanced 9 x 9 fuel assembly (FA) is a large square water channel for enhanced neutron moderation. The measurement data as a function of core flow and power showed almost the same stability characteristics as those of the past measurement during the cycle-3 startup of the KKK core with the 8 x 8 FA. The local power range monitors (LPRM) detected neutron flux oscillations in both core-wide in-phase and half-core out-of-phase modes. The frequency-domain stability analysis using the STAIF-PK code well reproduced the measurement result that the onset of unstable operation in KKK first occurs when about half of the reactor internal pumps are operating and the other half are stopped. The stability performance of the advanced 9 x 9 FA in the core was compared with the 8 x 8 FA by a design parameter analysis with respect to thermal-hydraulic and neutronic design. It has been demonstrated by the analysis that the stability performance of the advanced 9 x 9 FA is comparable with current 8 x 8 FA. (author)

  11. MCTP, a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of a fuel rod of BWR type reactors (Neutron part); MCTP, un codigo para el analisis termo-mecanico de una barra combustible de reactores tipo BWR (Parte Neutronica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez L, H.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: hhl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico a code for the thermo-mechanical analysis of the fuel rods of the BWR type reactors of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde is developed. The code solves the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates with several energy groups. The code, likewise, calculates the temperature distribution and power distribution in those fuel rods. The code is denominated Multi groups With Temperatures and Power (MCTP). In the code, the energy with which the fission neutrons are emitted it is divided in six groups. They are also considered the produced perturbations by the changes in the temperatures of the materials that constitute the fuel rods, the content of fission products, the uranium consumption and in its case the gadolinium, as well as the plutonium production. In this work there are present preliminary results obtained with the code, using data of operation of the Nucleo electric Central of Laguna Verde. (Author)

  12. BWR ASSEMBLY SOURCE TERMS FOR WASTE PACKAGE DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.L. Lotz

    1997-02-15

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to provide boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly radiation source term data for use during Waste Package (WP) design. The BWR assembly radiation source terms are to be used for evaluation of radiolysis effects at the WP surface, and for personnel shielding requirements during assembly or WP handling operations. The objectives of this evaluation are to generate BWR assembly radiation source terms that bound selected groupings of BWR assemblies, with regard to assembly average burnup and cooling time, which comprise the anticipated MGDS BWR commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste stream. The source term data is to be provided in a form which can easily be utilized in subsequent shielding/radiation dose calculations. Since these calculations may also be used for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), with appropriate justification provided by TSPA, or radionuclide release rate analysis, the grams of each element and additional cooling times out to 25 years will also be calculated and the data included in the output files.

  13. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  14. Evaluation of the radial design of fuel cells in an operation cycle of a BWR reactor; Evaluacion del diseno radial de celdas de combustible en un ciclo de operacion de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, J.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jgco@ver.megared.net.mx

    2003-07-01

    This work is continuation of one previous in the one that the application of the optimization technique called Tabu search to the radial design of fuel cells of boiling water reactors (BWR, Boiling Water Reactor) is presented. The objective function used in the optimization process only include neutron parameters (k-infinite and peak of radial power) considering the cell at infinite media. It was obtained to reduce the cell average enrichment completing the characteristics of reactivity of an original cell. The objective of the present work is to validate the objective function that was used for the radial design of the fuel cell (test cell), analyzing the operation of a one cycle of the reactor in which fuels have been fresh recharged that contain an axial area with the nuclear database of the cell designed instead of the original cell. For it is simulated it with Cm-Presto the cycle 10 of the reactor operation of the Unit 1 of the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde (U1-CNLV). For the cycle evaluation its were applied so much the simulation with the Haling strategy, as the simulation of the one cycle with control rod patterns and they were evaluated the energy generation and several power limits and reactivity that are used as design parameters in fuel reloads of BWR reactors. The results at level of an operation cycle of the reactor, show that the objective function used in the optimization and radial design of the cell is adequate and that it can induce to one good use of the fuel. (Author)

  15. BWR simulation in a stationary state for the evaluation of fuel cell design; Simulacion de un reactor BWR en estado estacionario para la evaluacion del diseno de celdas de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper the simulation of a BWR in order to evaluate the performance of a set of fuel assemblies under stationary state in three dimensions (3-D) is presented. 15 cases selected from a database containing a total of 18225 cases are evaluated. The main selection criteria were based on the results of the design phase of the power cells in two dimensions (2-D) and 3-D initial study. In 2-D studies the parameters that were used to qualify and select the designs were basically the local power peaking factor and neutron multiplication factor of each fuel cell. In the initial 3-D study variables that defined the quality of results, and from which the selection was realized, are the margins to thermal limits of reactor operation and the value of the effective multiplication factor at the end of cycle operation. From the 2-D and 3-D results of the studies described a second 3-D study was realized, where the optimizations of the fuel reload pattern was carried out. The results presented in this paper correspond to this second 3-D study. It was found that the designs of the fuel cell they had a similar behavior to those provided by the fuel supplier of reference BWR. Particularly it noted the impact of reload pattern on the cold shut down margin. An estimate of the operation costs of reference cycle analyzed with each one designed reload batch was also performed. As a result a positive difference (gain) up to 10,347 M/US D was found. (Author)

  16. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide; Analisis del impacto de modificar la composicion del combustible nuclear de un BWR con oxido de berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO{sub 2} mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  17. Actinides record, power calculations and activity for present isotopes in the spent fuel of a BWR; Historial de actinidos y calculos de potencia y actividad para isotopos presentes en el combustible gastado de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez C, P.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Lucatero, M. A., E-mail: pastor.enriquez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The administration of spent fuel is one of the more important stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, and this has become a problem of supreme importance in countries that possess nuclear reactors. Due to this in this work, the study on the actinides record and present fission products to the discharge of the irradiated fuel in a light water reactor type BWR is shown, to quantify the power and activity that emit to the discharge and during the cooling time. The analysis was realized on a fuel assembly type 10 x 10 with an enrichment average of 3.69 wt % in U-235 and the assembly simulation assumes four cycles of operation of 18 months each one and presents an exposition of 47 G Wd/Tm to the discharge. The module OrigenArp of the Scale 6 code is the computation tool used for the assembly simulation and to obtain the results on the actinides record presents to the fuel discharge. The study covers the following points: a) Obtaining of the plutonium vector used in the fuel production of mixed oxides, and b) Power calculation and activity for present actinides to the discharge. The results presented in this work, correspond at the same time immediate of discharge (0 years) and to a cooling stage in the irradiated fuel pool (5 years). (Author)

  18. Comparison study of the thermal mechanical performance of fuel rods during BWR fuel preconditioning operations using the computer codes FUELSIM and FEMAXI-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: rafael.pantoja10@yahoo.com.m [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The safety of nuclear power plants requires monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behaviour under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, pre-conditioning simulations are necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod during any power ramp, and mainly during reactor startup, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with array 8 x 8, and the other one from a 10 x 10 fuel assembly design, and a comparison of the thermal-mechanical performance between the two different rod designs is performed. The performance simulations were performed by the code FUELSIM, and compared against results previously obtained from similar simulation with the code FEMAXI-V. (Author)

  19. Thermomechanical analysis of a fuel rod in a BWR reactor using the FUELSIM code; Analisis termomecanico de una barra de combustible de un reactor BWR utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, IPN, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Ortiz V, J.; Araiza M, E. [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: rapaca78@yahoo.com.mx

    2009-10-15

    The thermomechanical behaviour of a fuel rod exposed to irradiation is a complex process in which are coupled great quantity of interrelated physical-chemical phenomena, for that analysis of rod performance in the core of a nuclear power reactor is realized generally with computation codes that integrate several phenomena expected during the time life of fuel rod in the core. An application of this type of thermomechanical codes is to predict, inside certain reliability margin, the design parameters that would be required to adjust, in order to get a better economy or rod performance, for a systematic approach to the fuel design optimization. FUELSIM is a thermomechanical code based on the models of FRAPCON code, which was developed under auspice of Nuclear Regulatory Commission of USA. FUELSIM allows iterative calculations like part of its programming structure, allowing search of extreme cases of behaviour, probabilistic analysis (or statistical), parametric analysis (or sensibility) and also can include as entrance data to the uncertainties associated with production data, code parameters and associated models. In this work is reported a first analysis of thermomechanical performance of a typical fuel rod used in a BWR 5/6. Results of maximum temperatures are presented in the fuel center and of axial deformation, for the 10 axial nodes in that the active longitude of fuel rod was divided. (Author)

  20. Fuel Performance Improvement Program. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1977. [BWR, PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, D.S. (comp.)

    1977-07-01

    The Fuel Performance Improvement Program has as its objective the identification and demonstration of fuel concepts with improved power ramp performance. Improved fuels are being sought to allow reduction or elimination of fuel related operating guidelines on nuclear power plants such that the fuel may be power maneuvered within the rates allowed by the system technical specifications. The program contains a combination of out-of-reactor studies, in-reactor experiments and in-reactor demonstrations. Fuel concepts initially being considered include annular-pellets, cladding internally coated with graphite and packed-particle fuels. The performance capability of each concept is being compared to a reference fuel of contemporary pellet design through test reactor experiments.

  1. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIA: Criticality calculations of BWR spent fuel assemblies in storage and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ando, Yoshihira [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The report describes the final results of Phase IIIA Benchmarks conducted by the Burnup Credit Criticality Calculation Working Group under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The benchmarks are intended to confirm the predictive capability of the current computer code and data library combinations for the neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of a layer of irradiated BWR fuel assembly array model. In total 22 benchmark problems are proposed for calculations of k{sub eff}. The effects of following parameters are investigated: cooling time, inclusion/exclusion of FP nuclides and axial burnup profile, and inclusion of axial profile of void fraction or constant void fractions during burnup. Axial profiles of fractional fission rates are further requested for five cases out of the 22 problems. Twenty-one sets of results are presented, contributed by 17 institutes from 9 countries. The relative dispersion of k{sub eff} values calculated by the participants from the mean value is almost within the band of {+-}1%{delta}k/k. The deviations from the averaged calculated fission rate profiles are found to be within {+-}5% for most cases. (author)

  2. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, April--September 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1977-11-01

    The Fuel Performance Improvement Program has as its objective the identification and demonstration of fuel concepts with improved power ramp performance. The program contains a combination of out-of-reactor studies, in-reactor experiments and in-reactor demonstrations. Fuel concepts initially being considered include annular pellets, cladding internally coated with graphite and packed-particle fuels. The performance capability of each concept will be compared to a reference fuel of contemporary pellet design by irradiations in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. Fuel design and process development is being completed and fuel rod fabrication will begin for the Halden test rods and for the first series of in-reactor demonstrations. The in-reactor demonstrations are being performed in the Big Rock Point reactor to show that the concepts pose no undue risk to commercial operation.

  3. Fuel performance improvement program. Quarterly/annual progress report, October 1977--September 1978. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouthamel, C.E. (comp.)

    1978-10-01

    This quarterly/annual report reviews and summarizes the activities performed in support of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP) during Fiscal Year 1978 with emphasis on those activities that transpired during the quarter ending September 30, 1978. Significant progress has been made in achieving the primary objectives of the program, i.e., to demonstrate commercially viable fuel concepts with improved fuel - cladding interaction (FCI) behavior. This includes out-of-reactor experiments to support the fuel concepts being evaluated, initiation of instrumented test rod experiments in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), and fabrication of the first series of demonstration rods for irradiation in the Big Rock Point Reactor (BRPR).

  4. Boiling water reactors with uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. Report 5: Analysis of the reactivity coefficients and the stability of a BWR loaded with MOx fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    2000-01-01

    This report is a part of the project titled 'Boiling Water Reactors With Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide (MOx) Fuel'. The aim of this study is to model the impact of a core loading pattern containing MOx bundles upon the main characteristics of a BWR (reactivity coefficients, stability, etc.). For this purpose, the Core Management System (CMS) codes of Studsvik Scandpower are used. This package is constituted by CASMO-4/TABLES-3/SIMULATE-3. It has been shown in previous reports that these codes are able to accurately represent and model MOx bundles. This report is thus devoted to the study of BWR cores loaded (partially or totally) with MOx bundles. The plutonium quality used is the Pu type 2016 (mostly Pu-239, 56 %, and Pu-240, 26 %), but a variation of the plutonium isotopic vector was also investigated, in case of a partial MOx loading. One notices that the reactivity coefficients do not present significant changes in comparison with a full UOx loading. Nevertheless, two main problems arise: the shutdown margin at BOC is lower than 1 % and the stability to in-phase oscillations is slightly decreased. (The SIMULATE-3 version used for this study does not contain the latest MOx enhancements described in literature, since these code developments have not been provided to the department. Nevertheless, as the nominal average enrichment of the MOx bundles is 5.41 % (total amount of plutonium), which can still be considered as a relatively low enrichment, the accuracy of the CMS codes is acceptable without the use of the MOx improvements for this level of Pu enrichment.

  5. Burnup calculations using the OREST computer code for uranium dioxide fuel elements of boiling water reactors. Abbrandberechnung mit OREST fuer Urandioxid-Siedewasserreaktor-Brennelemente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, U.

    1991-01-01

    There are plans to also use plutonium containing fuel elements (mixed oxide fuel) in the BWR type reactors, with a proportion of up to one third of the entire fuel core. The new concept uses complete MOX fuel elements, as are used in the PWR type reactors. The OREST computer code has been designed for burnup calculations in PWRs. The situation in BWRs is different, as in these reactor types, fuel elements are heterogenous in design, and burnup calculations have to take into account the axial variations of the void fraction, so that multi-dimensional effects have to be calculated. The report explains that the one-dimensional OREST code can be enhanced by supplementing calculations, performed with the Monte-Carlo type KENO code in this case, and is thus suitable without restrictions for performing burnup calculations for MOX fuel elements in BWRs. The calculation method and performance is illustrated by the example of a UO{sub 2} fuel element of the Wuergassen reactor. The model calculations predict a relatively high residual activity in the upper part of the fuel element, and a distinct curium buildup in the lower third of the BWR fuel element. (orig./HP).

  6. Design and optimization of a fuel reload of BWR with plutonium and minor actinides; Diseno y optimizacion de una recarga de combustible de BWR con plutonio y actinidos menores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman A, J. R.; Francois L, J. L.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Palomera P, M. A. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos 62550 (Mexico)]. e-mail: maestro_juan_rafael@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In this work is designed and optimized a pattern of fuel reload of a boiling water reactor (BWR), whose fuel is compound of uranium coming from the enrichment lines, plutonium and minor actinides (neptunium, americium, curium); obtained of the spent fuel recycling of reactors type BWR. This work is divided in two stages: in the first stage a reload pattern designs with and equilibrium cycle is reached, where the reload lot is invariant cycle to cycle. This reload pattern is gotten adjusting the plutonium content of the assembly for to reach the length of the wished cycle. Furthermore, it is necessary to increase the concentration of boron-10 in the control rods and to introduce gadolinium in some fuel rods of the assembly, in order to satisfy the margin approach of out. Some reactor parameters are presented: the axial profile of power average of the reactor core, and the axial and radial distribution of the fraction of holes, for the one reload pattern in balance. For the design of reload pattern codes HELIOS and CM-PRESTO are used. In the second stage an optimization technique based on genetic algorithms is used, along with certain obtained heuristic rules of the engineer experience, with the intention of optimizing the reload pattern obtained in the first stage. The objective function looks for to maximize the length of the reactor cycle, at the same time as that they are satisfied their limits related to the power and the reactor reactivity. Certain heuristic rules are applied in order to satisfy the recommendations of the fuel management: the strategy of the control cells core, the strategy of reload pattern of low leakage, and the symmetry of a quarter of nucleus. For the evaluation of the parameters that take part in the objective function it simulates the reactor using code CM-PRESTO. Using the technique of optimization of the genetic algorithms an energy of the cycle of 10834.5 MW d/tHM is obtained, which represents 5.5% of extra energy with respect to the

  7. Carbon 14 distribution in irradiated BWR fuel cladding and released carbon 14 after aqueous immersion of 6.5 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuragi, T. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tsukishima 1-15-7, Chuo City, Tokyo, 104-0052 (Japan); Yamashita, Y.; Akagi, M.; Takahashi, R. [TOSHIBA Corporation, Ukishima Cho 4-1, Kawasaki Ward, Kawasaki, 210-0862 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Spent fuel cladding which is highly activated and strongly contaminated is expected to be disposed of in an underground repository. A typical activation product in the activated metal waste is carbon 14 ({sup 14}C), which is mainly generated by the {sup 14}N(n,p){sup 14}C reaction and produces a significant exposure dose due to the large inventory, long half-life (5730 years), rapid release rate, and the speciation and consequent migration parameters. In the preliminary Japanese safety case, the release of radionuclides from the metal matrix is regarded as the corrosion-related congruent release, and the cladding oxide layer is regarded as a source of instant release fraction (IRF). In the present work, specific activity of {sup 14}C was measured using an irradiated BWR fuel cladding (Zircaloy-2, average rod burnup of 41.6 GWd/tU) which has an external oxide film having a thickness of 25.3 μm. The {sup 14}C specific activity of the base metal was 1.49*10{sup 4} Bq/g, which in the corresponding burnup is comparable to values in the existing literature, which were obtained from various irradiated claddings. Although the specific activity in oxide was 2.8 times the base metal activity due to the additive generation by the {sup 17}O(n,α){sup 14}C reaction, the {sup 14}C abundance in oxide was less than 10% of total inventory. A static leaching test using the cladding tube was carried out in an air-tight vessel filled with a deoxygenated dilute NaOH solution (pH of 12.5) at room temperature. After 6.5 years, {sup 14}C was found in each leachate fraction of gas phase and dissolved organics and inorganics, the total of which was less than 0.01% of the {sup 14}C inventory of the immersed cladding tube. A simple calculation based on the congruent release with Zircaloy corrosion has suggested that the 96.7% of released {sup 14}C was from the external oxide layer and 3.3% was from the base Zircaloy metal. However, both the {sup 14}C abundance and the low leaching rate

  8. A comparison of crud phases appearing on some Swedish BWR fuel rods using Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)]|[Lulea Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    Previous investigations showed that laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) can be used as a phase specific analytical tool for radioactive fuel crud samples and also for details in the underlying layer of zirconium dioxide. It is relatively easy to record Raman spectra that discriminate between chemical phases for all crud oxides of interest. The method has therefore been recommended for crud investigations within the Swedish program. At ideal conditions the resolution is about 1 {mu}m, permitting detailed position determination of crud phases in the sample. Therefore LRS is a very good complement to X-ray diffraction (XRD). The methods for sample preparation and handling of radioactive crud samples for LRS turn out to be relatively simple. A detailed LRS study on fuel crud samples from Barsebaeck 2, Forsmark 2, Forsmark 3 and Ringhals 1 was performed in this work. All of those Swedish BWRs were operated at different conditions at the time of sampling. The chemistry regimes covered NWC, HWC and other variable conditions. Also different types of fuel, exposure times and sampling positions were selected. (authors)

  9. Fuel design with low peak of local power for BWR reactors with increased nominal power; Diseno de un combustible con bajo pico de potencia local para reactores BWR con potencia nominal aumentada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia C, R.; Montes, J.L.; Hernandez, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Castillo, A. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The Federal Commission of Electricity recently announcement the beginning of the works related with the increase of the power to 120% of the original nominal one in the Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of the Laguna Verde Central (CLV): In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) are carried out studies of the impact on the design of the recharge of derived fuel of this increase. One of the main effects of the power increase type that it is promoting, is the increment of the flow of generated vapor, what takes, to a bigger fraction of vacuum in the core presenting increased values of the maximum fraction to the limit, so much of the ratio of lineal heat generation (XFLPD) as of the ratio of critic power (MFLCPR). In the made studies, it is found that these fractions rise lineally with the increase of the nominal power. Considering that the reactors of the CLV at the moment operate to 105% of the original nominal power, it would imply an increment of the order of 13.35% in the XFLPD and in the MFLCPR operating to a nominal power of 120% of the original one. This would propitiate bigger problems to design appropriately the fuel cycle and the necessity, almost unavoidable, of to resort to a fuel assembly type more advanced for the recharges of the cores. As option, in the ININ the feasibility of continuing using the same type of it fuel assembles that one has come using recently in the CLV, the type GE12 is analyzed. To achieve it was outlined to diminish the peak factor of local power (LPPF) of the power cells that compose the fuel recharge in 13.35%. It was started of a fuel design previously used in the recharge of the unit 1 cycle 12 and it was re-design to use it in the recharge design of the cycle 13 of the unit 1, considering an increase to 120% of the original power and the same requirements of cycle extension. For the re-design of the fuel assembly cell it was used the PreDiCeldas computer program developed in the ININ. It was able to diminish the LPPF

  10. Advanced and flexible genetic algorithms for BWR fuel loading pattern optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-del-Campo, Cecilia [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Mor., 62550 (Mexico)], E-mail: cmcm@fi-b.unam.mx; Palomera-Perez, Miguel-Angel [Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Escolar, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 DF (Mexico)], E-mail: mapp@uxmcc2.iimas.unam.mx; Francois, Juan-Luis [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Mor., 62550 (Mexico)], E-mail: jlfl@fi-b.unam.mx

    2009-10-15

    This work proposes advances in the implementation of a flexible genetic algorithm (GA) for fuel loading pattern optimization for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). In order to avoid specific implementations of genetic operators and to obtain a more flexible treatment, a binary representation of the solution was implemented; this representation had to take into account that a little change in the genotype must correspond to a little change in the phenotype. An identifier number is assigned to each assembly by means of a Gray Code of 7 bits and the solution (the loading pattern) is represented by a binary chain of 777 bits of length. Another important contribution is the use of a Fitness Function which includes a Heuristic Function and an Objective Function. The Heuristic Function which is defined to give flexibility on the application of a set of positioning rules based on knowledge, and the Objective Function that contains all the parameters which qualify the neutronic and thermal hydraulic performances of each loading pattern. Experimental results illustrating the effectiveness and flexibility of this optimization algorithm are presented and discussed.

  11. Serpent: an alternative for the nuclear fuel cells analysis of a BWR; SERPENT: una alternativa para el analisis de celdas de combustible nuclear de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva A, L.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: lidi.s.albarran@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In the last ten years the diverse research groups in nuclear engineering of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (UNAM, IPN), as of research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ) as well as the personnel of the Nuclear Plant Management of the Comision Federal de Electricidad have been using the codes Helios and /or CASMO-4 in the generation of cross sections (X S) of nuclear fuel cells of the cores corresponding to the Units 1 and 2 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Both codes belong to the Studsvik-Scandpower Company who receives the payment for the use and their respective maintenance. In recent years, the code Serpent appears among the nuclear community distributed by the OECD/Nea which does not has cost neither in its use neither in its maintenance. The code is based on the Monte Carlo method and makes use of the processing in parallel. In the Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of the IPN, the personnel has accumulated certain experience in the use of Serpent under the direction of personal of the ININ; of this experience have been obtained for diverse fuel burned, the infinite multiplication factor for three cells of nuclear fuel, without control bar and with control bar for a known thermodynamic state fixed by: a) the fuel temperature (T{sub f}), b) the moderator temperature (T{sub m}) and c) the vacuums fraction (α). Although was not realized any comparison with the X S that the codes Helios and CASMO-4 generate, the results obtained for the infinite multiplication factor show the prospective tendencies with regard to the fuel burned so much in the case in that is not present the control bar like when it is. The results are encouraging and motivate to the study group to continue with the X S generation of a core in order to build the respective library of nuclear data as a following step and this can be used for the codes PARCS, of USA NRC, DYN3D of HZDR, or others developed locally

  12. MRT fuel element inspection at Dounreay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    To ensure that their production and inspection processes are performed in an acceptable manner, ie. auditable and traceable, the MTR Fuel Element Fabrication Plant at Dounreay operates to a documented quality system. This quality system, together with the fuel element manufacturing and inspection operations, has been independently certified to ISO9002-1987, EN29002-1987 and BS5750:Pt2:1987 by Lloyd`s Register Quality Assurance Limited (LRQA). This certification also provides dual accreditation to the relevant German, Dutch and Australian certification bodies. This paper briefly describes the quality system, together with the various inspection stages involved in the manufacture of MTR fuel elements at Dounreay.

  13. Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The book presented is designed to function both as a text for first-year graduate courses in nuclear materials and as a reference for workers involved in the materials design and performance aspects of nuclear power plants. The contents are arranged under the following chapter headings: statistical thermodynamics, thermal properties of solids, crystal structures, cohesive energy of solids, chemical equilibrium, point defects in solids, diffusion in solids, dislocations and grain boundaries, equation of state of UO/sub 2/, fuel element thermal performance, fuel chemistry, behavior of solid fission products in oxide fuel elements, swelling due to fission gases, pore migration and fuel restructuring kinetics, fission gas release, mechanical properties of UO/sub 2/, radiation damage, radiation effects in metals, interaction of sodium and stainless steel, modeling of the structural behavior of fuel elements and assemblies. (DG)

  14. 1D and 3D analyses of the Zy2 SCIP BWR ramp tests with the fuel codes METEOR and ALCYONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sercombe, J.; Agard, M.; Stuzik, C.; Michel, B.; Thouvenin, G.; Poussard, C.; Kallstrom, K. R. [CEA, Saint-Paul-lez Durance (France)

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, three power ramp tests performed on high burn-up Recrystallized Zircaloy2 - UO{sub 2} BWR fuel rods (56 to 63 MWd/kgU) within the SCIP project have been simulated with METEOR and ALCYONE 3D. Two of the ramp tests are of staircase type up to Linear Heat Rates of 420 and 520 W/cm and with long holding periods. Failure of the 420 W/cm fuel rod was observed after 40 minutes. The third ramp test consists in a more standard ramp test with a constant power rate of 80 W/cm/min till 410 W/cm and a short holding time. The tests were first simulated with the METEOR 1D fuel rod code leading accurate results in terms of profilometry and fission gas releases. The behaviour of a fuel pellet fragment and of the cladding piece on top of it was then investigated with ALCYONE 3D. The size and the main characteristics of the ridges after base irradiation and power ramp testing were recovered. Finally, the failure criteria validated for PWR conditions and fuel rods with low to medium burn ups were used to analyze the failure probability of the KKL rodlets during ramp testing.

  15. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 2. Pre- and post-test decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, L.E.; Lombardo, N.J.; Heeb, C.M.; Jenquin, U.P.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Creer, J.M.; McCann, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses conducted in support of performance testing of a Ridhihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2033 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The cask testing program was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and by General Electric at the latters' Morris Operation (GE-MO) as reported in Volume I. The analyses effort consisted of performing pretest calculations to (1) select spent fuel for the test; (2) symmetrically load the spent fuel assemblies in the cask to ensure lateral symmetry of decay heat generation rates; (3) optimally locate temperature and dose rate instrumentation in the cask and spent fuel assemblies; and (4) evaluate the ORIGEN2 (decay heat), HYDRA and COBRA-SFS (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) computer codes. The emphasis of this second volume is on the comparison of code predictions to experimental test data in support of the code evaluation process. Code evaluations were accomplished by comparing pretest (actually pre-look, since some predictions were not completed until testing was in progress) predictions with experimental cask testing data reported in Volume I. No attempt was made in this study to compare the two heat transfer codes because results of other evaluations have not been completed, and a comparison based on one data set may lead to erroneous conclusions.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND CORE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W.T.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors and in particular to an improved fuel element and a novel reactor core system for facilitating removal of contaminating fission products, as they are fermed, from association with the flssionable fuel, so as to mitigate the interferent effects of such fission products during reactor operation. The fuel elements are comprised of tubular members impervious to fluid and contatning on their interior surfaces a thin layer of fissionable material providing a central void. The core structure is comprised of a plurality of the tubular fuel elements arranged in parallel and a closed manifold connected to their ends. In the reactor the core structure is dispersed in a water moderator and coolant within a pressure vessel, and a means connected to said manifuld is provided for withdrawing and disposing of mobile fission product contamination from the interior of the feel tubes and manifold.

  17. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  18. Calculation of the linear heat generation rates which violate the thermomechanical limit of plastic deformation of the fuel cladding in function of the burn up of a BWR fuel rod type; Calculo de las razones de generacion de calor lineal que violen el limite termomecanico de deformacion plastica de la camisa en funcion del quemado de una barra combustible tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Hernandez L, H. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The linear heat generation rates (LHGR) for a BWR type generic fuel rod, as function of the burnup that violate the thermomechanical limit of circumferential plastic deformation of the can (canning) in nominal operation in stationary state of the fuel rod are calculated. The evaluation of the LHGR in function of the burnt of the fuel, is carried out under the condition that the deformation values of the circumferential plastic deformation of the can exceeds in 0.1 the thermomechanical value operation limit of 1%. The results of the calculations are compared with the generation rates of linear operation heat in function of the burnt for this fuel rod type. The calculations are carried out with the FEMAXI-V and RODBURN codes. The results show that for exhibitions or burnt between 0 and 16,000 M Wd/tU a minimum margin of 160.8 W/cm exists among LHGR (439.6 W/cm) operation peak for the given fuel and maximum LHGR of the fuel (calculated) to reach 1.1% of circumferential plastic deformation of the can, for the peak factor of power of 1.40. For burnt of 20,000 MWd/tU and 60,000 MWd/tU exist a margin of 150.3 and 298.6 W/cm, respectively. (Author)

  19. Study of intermediate configurations during the fuel reload in BWRs; Estudio de configuraciones intermedias durante la recarga de combustible en BWR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes M, L.; Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del C, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Jacinto C, S., E-mail: luis.fuentes@inin.gob.mx [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Yucatan, Calle 60 No. 491-A por 57, 97000 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The criticality state of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) was evaluated, during the reload process for the intermediate states between the load pattern of cycle end and the beginning of the next, using the information of the load pattern of the operation cycles 13 and 14 of Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. For this evaluation the codes CASMO-4 and Simulate-3 for conditions of the core in cold were used. The strategy consisted on moving assemblies with 4 burned cycles of the reactor core. Later on were re situated the remaining assemblies, placing them in the positions to occupy in the next operation cycle. Finally, was carried out the assemblies load of fresh fuel. In each realized change, it was observing the behavior of the k-effective value that is the parameter used to evaluate the criticality state of each state of the core change. In a second stage, was designed a program that builds in automatic way each one of the intermediate cores and also analyzes the criticality state of the reactor core after each withdrawal, re situated and load of fuel assemblies. (Author)

  20. Post-processor for simulations of the ORIGEN program and calculation of the composition of the activity of a burnt fuel core by a BWR type reactor; Post-procesador para simulaciones del programa ORIGEN y calculo de la composicion de la actividad de un nucleo de combustible quemado por un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval V, S. [IIE, Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: sandoval@iie.org.mx

    2006-07-01

    The composition calculation and the activity of nuclear materials subject to processes of burnt, irradiation and decay periods are of utility for diverse activities inside the nuclear industry, as they are it: the processes design and operations that manage radioactive material, the calculation of the inventory and activity of a core of burnt nuclear fuel, for studies of type Probabilistic Safety Analysis (APS), as well as for regulation processes and licensing of nuclear facilities. ORIGEN is a program for computer that calculates the composition and the activity of nuclear materials subject to periods of burnt, irradiation and decay. ORIGEN generates a great quantity of information whose processing and analysis are laborious, and it requires thoroughness to avoid errors. The automation of the extraction, conditioning and classification of that information is of great utility for the analyst. By means of the use of the post-processor presented in this work it is facilitated, it speeds up and wide the capacity of analysis of results, since diverse consultations with several classification options and filtrate of results can be made. As illustration of the utility of the post-processor, and as an analysis of interest for itself, it is also presented in this work the composition of the activity of a burned core in a BWR type reactor according to the following classification criteria: by type of radioisotope (fission products, activation products and actinides), by specie type (gassy, volatile, semi-volatile and not volatile), by element and by chemical group. The results show that the total activity of the studied core is dominated by the fission products and for the actinides, in proportion four to one, and that the gassy and volatile species conform a fifth part of the total activity of the core. (Author)

  1. Evaluation of the thermal-mechanical performance of fuel rods of a BWR during a power ramp using the FUELSIM code; Evaluacion del desempeno termomecanico de barras de combustible de un reactor BWR durante una rampa de potencia utilizando el codigo FUELSIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja C, R.

    2010-07-01

    To avoid the risk to environment due to release of radioactive material, because of occurrence of an accident, it is the priority of the design and performance of the diverse systems of safety of a commercial nuclear power plant. The safety of nuclear power plants requires, therefore, monitoring those parameters having some direct or indirect effect on safety. The thermal limits are values set for those parameters considered having most impact on the safe operation of a nuclear power reactor. Some thermal limits monitoring requires the thermal-mechanical analysis of the rods containing the nuclear fuel. The fuel rod thermal-mechanical behavior under irradiation is a complex process in which there exists a great deal of interrelated physical and chemical phenomena, so that the fuel rod performance analysis in the core of a nuclear power reactor is generally accomplished by using computer codes, which integrate several of the phenomena that are expected to occur during the lifetime of the fuel rod in the core. The main application of the thermal-mechanical analysis codes is the prediction of occurrence of conditions and/or phenomena that could lead to the deterioration or even mechanical failure of the fuel rod cladding, as, for example, the pellet-cladding interaction. In the operation of a nuclear power reactor, fuel preconditioning operations refer to the operational procedures employed to reduce the fuel rod failure probability due to fuel-cladding interaction, specially during reactor startup. Preconditioning simulations are therefore necessary to determine in advance limit values for the power that can be generated in a fuel rod, and thus avoiding any rod damage. In this work, a first analysis of the thermal-mechanical performance of typical fuel rods used in nuclear reactors of the type BWR 5/6, as those two nuclear reactors in Laguna Verde, Veracruz, is performed. This study includes two types of fuel rods: one from a fuel assembly design with an array 8 x 8

  2. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  3. Nuclear fuel element with axially aligned fuel pellets and fuel microspheres therein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sease, J.D.; Harrington, F.E.

    1973-12-11

    Elongated single- and multi-region fuel elements are prepared by replacing within a cladding container a coarse fraction of fuel material which includes plutonium and uranium in the appropriate regions of the fuel element and then infiltrating with vibration a fine-sized fraction of uranium-containing microspheres throughout all interstices in the coarse material in a single loading. The fine, rigid material defines a thin annular layer between the coarse fraction and the cladding to reduce adverse mechanical and chemical interactions. (Official Gazette)

  4. UNIFRAME interim design report. [Fuel element size reduction plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.B.; Baer, J.W.; Cook, E.J.

    1977-12-01

    A fuel element size reduction system has been designed for the ''cold'' pilot-scale plant for an HTGR Fuel Reference Recycle Facility. This report describes in detail the present design.

  5. 44-BWR WASTE PACKAGE LOADING CURVE EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2004-08-25

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of spent nuclear fuel into the 44 BWR waste package configuration as provided in Attachment IV. This calculation is an application of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). The scope of this calculation covers a range of enrichments from 0 through 5.0 weight percent (wt%) U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 40 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel applications. The intended use of these results will be in establishing BWR waste package configuration loading specifications. Limitations of this evaluation are as follows: (1) The results are based on burnup credit for actinides and selected fission products as proposed in YMP (2003, Table 3-1) and referred to as the ''Principal Isotopes''. Any change to the isotope listing will have a direct impact on the results of this report. (2) The results of 100 percent of the current BWR projected waste stream being able to be disposed of in the 44-BWR waste package with Ni-Gd Alloy absorber plates is contingent upon the referenced waste stream being sufficiently similar to the waste stream received for disposal. (3) The results are based on 1.5 wt% Gd in the Ni-Gd Alloy material and having no tuff inside the waste package. If the Gd loading is reduced or a process to introduce tuff inside the waste package is defined, then this report would need to be reevaluated based on the alternative materials.

  6. BWR MOX core monitoring at Kernkraftwerk Gundremmingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Alejandro [Studsvik Scandpower (Suisse) GmbH, Nussbaumen AG (Switzerland); Holzer, Robert [NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Anton, Gerd [Studsvik Scandpower GmbH, Norderstedt (Germany); Smith, Kord [Studsvik Scandpower Inc., Idaho Falls (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The replacement of the core monitoring system for twin KWU Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) is presented. The reactors, Kernkraftwerk Gundremmingen B and C (KGG), are located in Germany. Core monitoring for KGG is more challenging than for most BWR reactors due to its core composition with about 30% MOX fuel assemblies. The objectives of this paper are to discuss the specific MOX modelling aspects in CASMO-4/Simulate-3, the impact of the MOX fuel on several core monitoring aspects like the LPRM detector modelling and to present some core monitoring results since the beginning of GARDEL's operation. The available core monitoring results confirm the accuracy of the underlying physical methods. The core monitoring system replacement att KGG was a common project of Studsvik Scandpower and NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft GmbH, where Studsvik Scandpower supplied its standard core monitoring system GARDEL and NIS was responsible for the computer hardware, system integration and plant specific add-ons. (authors)

  7. Heat and Mass Transfer during Hydrogen Generation in an Array of Fuel Bars of a BWR Using a Periodic Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Romero-Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents, the numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer during hydrogen generation in an array of fuel cylinder bars, each coated with a cladding and a steam current flowing outside the cylinders. The analysis considers the fuel element without mitigation effects. The system consists of a representative periodic unit cell where the initial and boundary-value problems for heat and mass transfer were solved. In this unit cell, we considered that a fuel element is coated by a cladding with steam surrounding it as a coolant. The numerical simulations allow describing the evolution of the temperature and concentration profiles inside the nuclear reactor and could be used as a basis for hybrid upscaling simulations.

  8. Fuel cell elements with improved water handling capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Lee, Albany (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    New fuel cell components for use in liquid feed fuel cell systems are provided. The components include biplates and endplates, having a hydrophilic surface and allow high efficiency operation. Conductive elements and a wicking device also form a part of the fuel cell components of the invention.

  9. Separation of metallic residues from the dissolution of a high-burnup BWR fuel using nitrogen trifluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Frances N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mausolf, Edward J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scheele, Randall D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-03-23

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) was used to fluorinate the metallic residue from the dissolution of a high burnup, boiling water reactor fuel (~70 MWd/kgU). The metallic residue included the noble metal phase (containing ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, technetium, and molybdenum), and smaller amounts of zirconium, selenium, tellurium, and silver. Exposing the noble metal phase to 10% NF3 in argon between 400 and 550°C, removed molybdenum and technetium near 400°C as their volatile fluorides, and ruthenium near 500C as its volatile fluoride. The events were thermally and temporally distinct and the conditions specified are a recipe to separate these transition metals from each other and from the noble metal phase nonvolatile residue. Depletion of the volatile fluorides resulted in substantial exothermicity. Thermal excursion behavior was recorded under non-adiabatic, isothermal conditions that typically minimize heat release. Physical characterization of the metallic noble phase and its thermal behavior are consistent with high kinetic velocity reactions encouraged by the nanoparticulate phase or perhaps catalytic influences of the mixed platinum metals with nearly pure phase structure. Post-fluorination, only two phases were present in the residual nonvolatile fraction. These were identified as a nano-crystalline, metallic palladium cubic phase and a hexagonal rhodium trifluoride (RhF3) phase. The two phases were distinct as the sub-µm crystallites of metallic palladium were in contrast to the RhF3 phase, which grew from the parent nano-crystalline noble-metal phase during fluorination, to acicular crystals exceeding 20-µm in length.

  10. Nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.; Williford, R.E.; Christensen, J.A.

    1982-03-03

    A nuclear reactor fuel element having improved heat transfer between fuel material and cladding is described. The element consists of an outer cladding tube divided into an upper fuel section containing a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material, slightly smaller in diameter than the inner surface of the cladding tube and a small lower accumulator section, the cladding tube being which is filled with a low molecular weight gas to transfer heat from fuel material to cladding during irradiation. A plurality of essentially vertical grooves in the fuel section extend downward and communicate with the accumulator section. The radial depth of the grooves is sufficient to provide a thermal gradient between the hot fuel surface and the relatively cooler cladding surface to allow thermal segregation to take place between the low molecular weight heat transfer gas and high molecular weight fission product gases produced by the fuel material during irradiation.

  11. A comparison between genetic algorithms and neural networks for optimizing fuel recharges in BWR; Una comparacion entre algoritmos geneticos y redes neuronales para optimizar recargas de combustible en BWR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz J, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Depto. Sistemas Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Requena, I. [Universidad de Granada (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    In this work the results of a genetic algorithm (AG) and a neural recurrent multi state network (RNRME) for optimizing the fuel reload of 5 cycles of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (CNLV) are presented. The fuel reload obtained by both methods are compared and it was observed that the RNRME creates better fuel distributions that the AG. Moreover a comparison of the utility for using one or another one techniques is make. (Author)

  12. VENTED FUEL ELEMENT FOR GAS-COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgerson, W.T.

    1963-12-17

    A hollow, porous-walled fuel element filled with fissionable fuel and provided with an outlet port through its wall is described. In operation in a gas-cooled reactor, the element is connected, through its outlet port, to the vacuum side of a pump that causes a portion of the coolant gas flowing over the exterior surface of the element to be drawn through the porous walls thereof and out through the outlet port. This continuous purging gas flow sweeps away gaseous fission products as they are released by the fissioning fuel. (AEC) A fuel element for a nuclear reactor incorporating a body of metal of melting point lower than the temperature of operation of the reactor and a nuclear fuel in finely divided form dispersed in the body of metal as a settled slurry is presented. (AEC)

  13. Thermal-mechanical behavior of fuel element in SCWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, R.; Yetisir, M.; Hamilton, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a study on thermal-mechanical behavior of a fuel element proposed for the Canadian Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR). In the Canadian SCWR, the coolant pressure is 25 MPa, and the temperature is 350{sup o}C at the inlet and 625{sup o}C at the outlet of the reactor core. Critical design decisions for fuel design will be the selection of the fuel sheath material and details of the fuel element design options (sheath thickness, pellet-clad gap, internal pressure, etc.). The analysis presented in this paper predicted temperature, stress and strain in the fuel element of the Canadian SCWR with a collapsible sheath using ANSYS. Typical conditions for the evaluation of the fuel behavior, such as linear heat generation rate, coolant temperature and sheath surface heat transfer coefficient, were extracted from core and fuel channel designs. The temperature distribution in the fuel element is predicted by a thermal model and then the thermal model is coupled sequentially with a structural model to predict fuel sheath deformation under the predicted temperature distribution and external (coolant) pressure. Nonlinear thermo-mechanical simulations include nonlinear buckling with elastic-plastic deformation. Three sheath collapse phenomena are considered: (1) elastic collapse by buckling, (2) longitudinal ridging and (3) plastic collapse by yielding. The numerical models are validated against analytical and experimental data. The presented results show the temperature distribution, deformed shape, stress and strain of the fuel element, allowing the designers to select appropriate sheath material and element design options for the SCWR fuel element design. (author)

  14. Key instrumentation in BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laendner, Alexander; Stellwag, Bernhard; Fandrich, Joerg [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes water chemistry surveillance practices at boiling water reactor (BWR) power plants. The key instrumentation in BWR plants consists of on-line as well as off-line instrumentation. The chemistry monitoring and control parameters are predominantly based on two guidelines, namely the VGB Water Chemistry Guidelines and the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines. Control parameters and action levels specified in the VGB guideline are described. Typical sampling locations in BWR plants, chemistry analysis methods and water chemistry data of European BWR plants are summarized. Measurement data confirm the high quality of reactor water of the BWRs in Europe. (orig.)

  15. Updating of the costs of the nuclear fuels of the equilibrium reloading of the A BWR and EPR reactors; Actualizacion de los costos de combustible nuclear de la recarga de equilibrio de los reactores ABWR y EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega C, R.F. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: rortega@fi-b.unam.mx

    2008-07-01

    In the last two and a half years, the price of the uranium in the market spot has ascended of US$20.00 dollars by lb U{sub 3O}8 in January, 2005 to a maximum of US$137.00 dollars by Ib U{sub 3}O{sub 8} by the middle of 2007. At the moment this price has been stabilized in US$90.00 dollars by Ib U{sub 3}O{sub 8} such for the market spot, like for the long term contracts. In this work the reasons of this increment are analyzed, as well as their impact in the fuel prices of the balance recharge of the advanced reactors of boiling water (A BWR) and of the advanced water at pressure reactors (EPR). (Author)

  16. Design of an equilibrium nucleus of a BWR type reactor based in a Thorium-Uranium fuel; Diseno de un nucleo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR basado en un combustible de Torio-Uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J.L.; Nunez C, A. [Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Facultad de Ingenieria-UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the design of the reactor nucleus of boiling water using fuel of thorium-uranium is presented. Starting from an integral concept based in a type cover-seed assemble is carried out the design of an equilibrium reload for the nucleus of a reactor like that of the Laguna Verde Central and its are analyzed some of the main design variables like the cycle length, the reload fraction, the burnt fuel, the vacuum distribution, the generation of lineal heat, the margin of shutdown, as well as a first estimation of the fuel cost. The results show that it is feasible to obtain an equilibrium reload, comparable to those that are carried out in the Laguna Verde reactors, with a good behavior of those analyzed variables. The cost of the equilibrium reload designed with the thorium-uranium fuel is approximately 2% high that the uranium reload producing the same energy. It is concluded that it is convenient to include burnable poisons, type gadolinium, in the fuel with the end of improving the reload design, the fuel costs and the margin of shutdown. (Author)

  17. Water chemistry practice at German BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, B. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Staudt, U. [VGB PowerTech e.V., Essen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    As visual examinations carried out in 1994 detected cracks in a German boiling water reactor (BWR) plant due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in core shroud components manufactured from Nb-stabilized CrNi steel 1.4550, safety-related assessments and in-service inspections were subsequently performed for the other six German BWRs. No cracks were found in the core shrouds of these plants. The second major event in the early 1990s was the detection of cracks at various German BWRs in piping systems made of Ti-stabilized CrNi steel 1.4541 caused by thermal sensitization in the heat-affected zone of welds. Comprehensive investigations resulted in a number of remedial measures (repair, replacement) implemented at piping in contact with reactor coolant of temperatures above 200 C. Thanks to the remedial measures and according to the analyses performed, cracking in the components in question due to the considered damage mechanisms need not be expected. German operators have therefore continued operating their BWR plants on normal water chemistry with an oxidizing environment. As a precaution, more stringent reactor coolant quality requirements have been specified and the limiting values of VGB Guideline R 401 J revised. This paper gives an overview of the trends in chemistry parameters at German BWR plants in the past 10 years. In addition, other relevant experience gained from the German BWR plants operating under normal water chemistry conditions is outlined: dose rates and collective doses, fuel performance, and results of periodic in-service inspections of major components of the reactor system. In the nearly 10 years of plant operation since implementation of the remedial measures, no cracks or other indications have been detected in any of the systems and components concerned. (orig.)

  18. Zirconium alloys for fuel element structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bart, G.; Bertsch, J

    2005-07-01

    Today more than 400 light water power reactors (LWRs) operate worldwide providing approximately 17% of the world's electricity demand. One important component for their successful operation is the fuel tube, made out of a zirconium alloy. A huge number of out-of-pile and in-pile experiments have been performed to improve step by step the fuel for higher burn-up and to reduce the failure rates of fuel pins close to zero. The influencing parameters for excellent or poor cladding behaviour are numerous and sometimes counteract each other. The process of cladding corrosion is slow, difficult to follow, the mechanistic understanding at best incomplete. A vast amount of literature documents the abundant tests and comes up with hypotheses and models for the materials behaviour. PSI has supported for the past 20 years the development of high burn-up fuel cladding by microstructural research studies and service work in post-irradiation examination of test pins. This article reviews the development of the cladding tubes, focussing on the chemical and materials science aspects. (author)

  19. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz; Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 (233U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  20. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING FUEL ELEMENTS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, E.M.V.; Bauer, D.T.; Hahn, H.T.

    1963-09-01

    A process is described for dissolving stainless-steelor zirconium-clad uranium dioxide fuel elements by immersing the elements in molten lead chloride, adding copper, cuprous chloride, or cupric chloride as a catalyst and passing chlorine through the salt mixture. (AEC)

  1. Uranium density reduction on fuel element side plates assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Ilka A. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, Delvonei A.; Domingos, Douglas B.; Umbehaun, Pedro E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During operation of IEA-R1 research reactor, located at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP, an abnormal oxidation on some fuel elements was noted. It was also verified, among the possible causes of the problem, that the most likely one was insufficient cooling of the elements in the core. One of the propositions to solve or minimize the problem is to reduce uranium density on fuel elements side plates. In this paper, the influence of this change on neutronic and thermal hydraulic parameters for IEA-R1 reactor is verified by simulations with the codes HAMMER and CITATION. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  2. Rover fuel element development activities: July-September 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, J.M.; Marrow, G.B.

    1971-11-30

    Experimental studies designed to fabricate NERVA graphite fuel elements capable of cyclic operations at exit gas temperatures of approximately 4400/degree/R were continued during this report period. Carbon precursor materials, manufacturing parameters, and deposition of carbide films are included in these studies. Accomplishments include the following: three commercial powders were extruded into elements having a desirable coefficient of thermal expansion; molded graphites using low-fired filler carbons and uncured short organic fibers produced graphites having an improved strain-to-failure value; thick-walled tubes of vapor-deposited zirconium carbide were produced, and the chemical composition was determined; vapor-deposited zirconium carbide coatings were applied to fuel-element bores; experimental graphite fuel elements were hot-gas tested; uranium-loaded ion exchange beads survived a heat treatment cycle of 2800/degree/C for three hours. Organic precursor carbon studies were oriented toward modification of the CAI polymers. 2 refs., 66 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. Radial distribution of UO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} in fuel cells of a BWR Reactor; Distribucion radial de UO{sub 2} y Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} en celdas de combustible de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia del C, R. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Francois, J.L.; Martin del Campo M, C. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos 62500 (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlmt@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    The fuel system that is used at the moment in a power plant based on power reactors BWR, includes as much like the one of its substantial parts to the distribution of the fissile materials like a distribution of burnt poisons within each one of the cells which they constitute the fuel assemblies, used for the energy generation. Reason why at the beginning of a new operation cycle in a reactor of this type, the reactivity of the nucleus should be compensated by the exhaustion of the assemblies that it moves away of the nucleus for their final disposition. This compensation is given by means of the introduction of the recharge fuel, starting from the UO{sub 2} enriched in U{sup 2}35, and of the Gadolinium (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The distribution of these materials not only defines the requirements of energy generation, but in certain measures also the form in that the margins will behave to the limit them thermal during the operation of the reactor. These margins must be taken into account for the safe and efficient extraction of the energy of the fuel. In this work typical fuel cells appear that are obtained by means of the use of a emulation model of an ants colony. This model allows generating from a possible inventory of values of enrichment of U{sup 2}35, as well as of concentration of Gadolinium a typical fuel cell, which consists of an arrangement of lOxlO rods, of which 92 contain U{sup 2}35, some of these rods contain a concentration of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 8 of the total contain only water. The search of each cell finishes when the value of the Local Peak Power Factor (LPPF) in the cell reaches a minimal value, or when a pre established value of iterations is reached. The cell parameters are obtained from the results of the execution of the code HELIOS, which incorporates like a part integral of the search algorithm. (Author)

  4. Advanced methods for BWR transient and stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Wehle, F.; Opel, S.; Velten, R. [AREVA, AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The design of advanced Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies and cores is governed by the basic requirement of safe, reliable and flexible reactor operation with optimal fuel utilization. AREVA NP's comprehensive steady state and transient BWR methodology allows the designer to respond quickly and effectively to customer needs. AREVA NP uses S-RELAP5/RAMONA as the appropriate methodology for the representation of the entire plant. The 3D neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulics code has been developed for the prediction of system, fuel and core behavior and provides additional margins for normal operation and transients. Of major importance is the extensive validation of the methodology. The validation is based on measurements at AREVA NP's test facilities, and comparison of the predictions with a great wealth of measured data gathered from BWR plants during many years of operation. Three of the main fields of interest are stability analysis, operational transients and reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs). The introduced 3D methodology for operational transients shows significant margin regarding the operational limit of critical power ratio, which has been approved by the German licensing authority. Regarding BWR stability a large number of measurements at different plants under various conditions have been performed and successfully post-calculated with RAMONA. This is the basis of reliable pre-calculations of the locations of regional and core-wide stability boundaries. (authors)

  5. The manufacture of LEU fuel elements at Dounreay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    Two LEU test elements are being manufactured at Dounreay for test irradiation in the HFR at Petten, The Netherlands. This paper describes the installation of equipment and the development of the fabrication and inspection techniques necessary for the manufacture of LEU fuel plates. The author`s experience in overcoming the technical problems of stray fuel particles, dog-boning, uranium homogeneity and the measurement of uranium distribution is also described.

  6. Analysis of the ATR fuel element swaging process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richins, W.D.; Miller, G.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a detailed evaluation of the swaging process used to connect fuel plates to side plates in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel elements. The swaging is a mechanical process that begins with fitting a fuel plate into grooves in the side plates. Once a fuel plate is positioned, a lip on each of two side plate grooves is pressed into the fuel plate using swaging wheels to form the joints. Each connection must have a specified strength (measured in terms, of a pullout force capacity) to assure that these joints do not fail during reactor operation. The purpose of this study is to analyze the swaging process and associated procedural controls, and to provide recommendations to assure that the manufacturing process produces swaged connections that meet the minimum strength requirement. The current fuel element manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) of Lynchburg, Virginia, follows established procedures that include quality inspections and process controls in swaging these connections. The procedures have been approved by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies and are designed to assure repeatability of the process and structural integrity of each joint. Prior to July 1994, ATR fuel elements were placed in the Hydraulic Test Facility (HTF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (AGNAIL), Test Reactor Area (TRA) for application of Boehmite (an aluminum oxide) film and for checking structural integrity before placement of the elements into the ATR. The results presented in this report demonstrate that the pullout strength of the swaged connections is assured by the current manufacturing process (with several recommended enhancements) without the need for- testing each element in the HTF.

  7. Thermo-Elastic Finite Element Analyses of Annular Nuclear Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Y. D.; Kwon, S. B.; Rho, K. T.; Kim, M. S.; Song, H. J.

    In this study, we tried to examine the pros and cons of the annular type of fuel concerning mainly with the temperatures and stresses of pellet and cladding. The inner and outer gaps between pellet and cladding may play an important role on the temperature distribution and stress distribution of fuel system. Thus, we tested several inner and outer gap cases, and we evaluated the effect of gaps on fuel systems. We conducted thermo-elastic-plastic-creep analyses using an in-house thermo-elastic-plastic-creep finite element program that adopted the 'effective-stress-function' algorithm. Most analyses were conducted until the gaps disappeared; however, certain analyses lasted for 1582 days, after which the fuels were replaced. Further study on the optimal gaps sizes for annular nuclear fuel systems is still required.

  8. Low Cost Nuclear Thermal Rocket Cermet Fuel Element Environment Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, David E.; Mireles, Omar R.; Hickman, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (Isp) and relatively high thrust in order to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average Isp. Nuclear thermal rockets (NTR) capable of high Isp thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements is limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements which employ high-melting-point metals, ceramics or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via non-contact RF heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This paper details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  9. Reactor fuel element heat conduction via numerical Laplace transform inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Furfaro, Roberto [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering], e-mail: ganapol@cowboy.ame.arizona.edu

    2001-07-01

    A newly developed numerical Laplace transform inversion (NLTI) will be presented to determine the transient temperature distribution within a nuclear reactor fuel element. The NLTI considered in this presentation has evolved to its present state over the past 10 years of application. The methodology adopted is one that relies on acceleration of the convergence of an infinite series towards its limit. The inversion will be applied to the prediction of the transient temperature distribution within an MTR type nuclear fuel element through a novel formulation of the solution to the transformed heat conduction equation. (author)

  10. Core analysis during transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in CANDU 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An 1200-day time-dependent fuel-management for the transition from 37-element fuel to CANFLEX-NU fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor has been simulated to show the compatibility of the CANFLEX-NU fuel with the reactor operation. The simulation calculations were carried out with the RFSP code, provided by cell averaged fuel properties obtained from the POWDERPUFS-V code. The refueling scheme for both fuels was an eight bundle shift at a time. The simulation results show that the maximum channel and bundle powers were maintained below the license limit of the CANDU 6. This indicates that the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle is compatible with the CANDU 6 reactor operation during the transition period. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  11. Model for the analysis of transitories and stability of a BWR reactor with fuel of thorium; Modelo para el analisis de transitorios y de estabilidad de un reactor BWR con combustible de torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez C, A. [CNSNS, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: anunezc@cnsns.gob.mx; Espinosa P, G. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois L, J.L. [Fac. de Ingenieria, UNAM 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    In this work it is described the thermo hydraulic and neutronic pattern used to simulate the behavior of a nucleus of thorium-uranium under different conditions of operation. The analysed nucleus was designed with base to assemblies that operate under the cover-seed concept. The pattern was proven to conditions of stationary state and transitory state. Here it is only presented the simulation of the one SCRAM manual and it is compared in the behavior of a nucleus with UO{sub 2}. Additionally one carries out an analysis of stability taking into account the four corners that define the area of stability of the map flow-power and to conditions of 100% of flow and 100% of power. The module of stability is based on the pattern of Lahey and Podowsky to estimate the drops of pressure during a perturbation. It is concludes that the behavior of this nucleus is not very different to the one shown by the nuclei loaded with the fuel of UO{sub 2}. (Author)

  12. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  13. LAPUR5. BWR Core Stability Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March-Leuba, J.; Otaduy, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1990-01-01

    LAPUR5 is a mathematical description of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR). The program uses a point kinetics description of the neutron dynamics together with a distributed-parameter model of the core thermal hydrodynamics to produce a space-dependent representation of the dynamics of a BWR in the frequency domain for small perturbations about a steady-state condition. LAPUR5 consists of two autonomous modules, LAPUR5X, the steady-state module, and LAPUR5W the dynamics module, which are linked by use of an intermediate storage device. LAPUR5X solves the coolant and the fuel steady-state governing equations while LAPUR5W solves the dynamic equations for the coolant, fuel, and neutron field in the frequency domain. Considerable detail exists in the modeling of the thermohydrodynamics and the reactivity feedbacks. LAPUR5 can be run interactively (LAPUR) or in batch mode (BLAPUR); these are equivalent except that LAPUR allows the user to edit input parameters at run time. Both spawn the two autonomous modules consecutively and delete the intermediate storage files.

  14. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: jasouza@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    IPEN developed and made available for routine production the technology for manufacturing dispersion type fuel elements for use in research reactors. However, the fuel produced at IPEN is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 g U/c m3 by using the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion. Increasing the uranium concentration of the fuel is interesting by the possibility of increasing the reactor core reactivity and lifetime of the fuel. It is possible to increase the concentration of uranium in the fuel up to the technological limit of 4.8 g U/c m3 for the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion, which is well placed around the world. This new fuel will be applicable in the new Brazilian- Multipurpose Reactor RMB. This study aimed to develop the manufacturing process of high uranium concentration fuel, redefining the procedures currently used in the manufacture of IPEN. This paper describes the main procedures adjustments that will be necessary. (author)

  15. Fuel cell design using a new heuristic method; Diseno de celdas de combustible mediante un nuevo metodo heuristico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes T, J. L.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Castillo M, A., E-mail: joseluis.montes@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a new method for the pre-design of a typical fuel cell with a structural array of 10 x 10 fuel elements for a BWR is presented. The method is based on principles of maximum dispersion and minimum peaks of local power within the array of fuel elements. The pre-design of the fuel cells is made by simulation in two dimensions (2-D) through the cells physics code CASMO-4. For this purpose of pre-design the search process is guided by an objective function which is a combination of the main neutronic parameters of the fuel cell. The results show that the method is a promising tool that could be used for the design of fuel cells for use in a nuclear plant BWR. (Author)

  16. FISSILE MATERIAL AND FUEL ELEMENTS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, B.E.

    1961-08-15

    The fissile material consists of about 64 to 70% (weight) zirconium dioxide, 15 to 19% uranium dioxide, and 8 to 17% calcium oxide. The fissile material is formed into sintered composites which are disposed in a compartmented fuel element, comprising essentially a flat filler plate having a plurality of compartments therein, enclosed in cladding plates of the same material as the filler plate. The resultant fuel has good resistance to corrosion in high temperature pressurized water, good dimensional stability to elevated temperatures, and good resistance to thermal shock. (AEC)

  17. Radionuclide inventories in the discharged fuels of PHWR-220, BWR-160, VVER-1000 and the conceptual ATBR-600 reactors - A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Usha [Light Water Reactors Physics Section, Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: ushapal@barc.gov.in; Jagannathan, V. [Light Water Reactors Physics Section, Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)], E-mail: vjagan@barc.gov.in

    2008-10-15

    Radionuclides content in the discharged fuel of the conceptual thorium breeder reactor ATBR-600 has been assessed and compared against other thermal power reactors considered in Indian nuclear power programme. The contribution of actinides and the fission products inventories in the discharged fuels are separately estimated and assessed. The ATBR-600 reactor is suggested for closed fuel cycle option. The relatively large presence of the unspent plutonium would in fact be recycled. Nonetheless, the data has been presented in the event of operating ATBR-600 like other present day power reactors in a once through fuel cycle mode.

  18. RAMONA analysis of BWR stability at nuclear power plant Brunsbuettel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, C.; Velten, R.; Wehle, F. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Huettmann, A.; Schuster, R. [Vattenfall Europe GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    For high power/low flow operating conditions associated with unfavorable core power distributions, BWR operation requires attention with respect to potential power and flow oscillations. Beside stability analyses based on highly validated methodology as RAMONA, also stability measurements are performed in BWR plants. Such measurements usually cover the evaluation of Average Power Range Monitor (APRM) and Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) signals of the BWR core at several operating conditions. This paper presents the numerical simulation of stability phenomena which were recorded in the frame of a stability measurement at the nuclear power plant Brunsbuettel (KKB) on December 12{sup th} 2004 (Cycle 18). The measurement showed a local instability at most investigated operating points and a temporal global instability when the reactor was operated at conditions where four of the eight recirculation pumps were running. The numerical investigation with RAMONA-3 focuses on the operating point with four recirculation pumps when a temporal global instability has been measured. It will be shown that a local destabilization of a single Fuel Assembly (FA) can yield a global instability mode when the reactor is operating under high power and low flow conditions. Such phenomena have already been observed and analyzed for other BWR plants as e.g. Forsmark-1. (orig.)

  19. Time-domain analysis of BWR core stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokomizo, Osamu

    1983-01-01

    A time-domain stability analysis program for boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRs) has been developed and applied to analysis of a commercial size BWR. The program takes into account parallel channel effects. The model incorporates (a) one point neutron kinetics with weighted average reactivity feedback, (b) radial heat conduction and transfer in fuel rods, (c) fuel channel thermal hydraulics with quasi-equilibrium subcooled boiling approximation, and (d) recirculation hydrodynamics. Nonlinearity and parallel channel effects are examined through analyses of a commercial size BWR. Core behavior has been found virtually linear for small but finite amplitude oscillations, which proved the validity of frequency-domain stability analyses for finite disturbances. It has also been found that single channel analyses with core averaged thermal hydraulic properties give more stable results than parallel channel analyses.

  20. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-12-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated.

  1. Power oscillations in BWR reactors; Oscilaciones de potencia en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa P, G. [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx

    2002-07-01

    One of the main problems in the operation of BWR type reactors is the instability in power that these could present. One type of oscillations and that is the objective of this work is the named density wave, which is attributed to the thermohydraulic processes that take place in the reactor core. From the beginnings of the development of BWR reactors, the stability of these has been an important aspect in their design, due to its possible consequences on the fuel integrity. The reactor core operates in two phase flow conditions and it is observed that under certain power and flow conditions, power instabilities appear. Studying this type of phenomena is complex, due to that a reactor core is constituted approximately by 27,000 fuel bars with different distributions of power and flow. The phenomena that cause the instability in BWR reactors continue being matter of scientific study. In the literature mainly in nuclear subject, it can be observed that exist different methods and approximations for studying this type of phenomena, nevertheless, their results are focused to establish safety limits in the reactor operation, instead of studying in depth of the knowledge about. Also in this line sense of the reactor data analysis, the oscillations characteristic frequencies are obtained for trying to establish if the power is growing or decreasing. In addition to that before mentioned in this paper it is presented a rigorous study applying the volumetric average method, for obtaining the vacuum waves propagation velocities and its possible connection with the power oscillations. (Author)

  2. Estimation of dose rate around the spent control rods of a BWR; Estimacion de la rapidez de dosis alrededor de las barras de control gastadas de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino P, G.

    2016-10-01

    The energy can come from fossil renewable sources (solar (natural gas, oil), wind, hydro, tidal, geothermal, biomass, bio energy and nuclear. Nuclear power can be obtained by fission reactions and fusion (still under investigation) atomic nuclei. Fission, is a partition of a very heavy nucleus (Uranium 235, for example) into two lighter nuclei. Much of the world's electric power is generated from the energy released by fission processes. In a nuclear power reactor, light water as the BWR, there are many important elements that allow safe driving operation, one of them are the elements or control systems, the burnable poison or neutron absorber inherently allow control power reactor. The control rods, which consist mostly of stainless steel and absorbing elements (such as boron carbide, hafnium, cadmium, among others) of thermal neutrons is able to initiate, regulate or stop the reactor power. These, due to the use of depleted burned or absorbing material and therefore reach their lifespan, which can be 15 years or have other values depending on the manufacturer. Control rods worn should be removed, stored or confined in expressly places. Precisely at this stage arises the importance of knowing their radiological condition to manipulate safely and without incident to the people health responsible for conducting these proceedings state arises. This thesis consists in the estimation of the dose rate in spent control rod made of boron carbide, from a typical BWR reactor. It will be estimated by direct radiation measurements with measurement equipment for radiotherapy ionization chamber, in six spent control rods, which were taken at different reactor operating cycles and are in a spent fuel pool. Using bracket electromechanical and electronic equipment for positioning and lifting equipment for radiation measurement around the control rod in the axial and radial arrangement for proper scanning. Finally will be presented a graphic corresponding to the dose

  3. Licos, a fuel performance code for innovative fuel elements or experimental devices design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.helfer@cea.fr; Bejaoui, Syriac, E-mail: syriac.bejaoui@cea.fr; Michel, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.michel@cea.fr

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The Licos fuel performance code is introduced. • Advanced features, such as dependency algorithm and kriging are described. • First results on three dimensional modelling of the SFR fuel pin are given. • Application to the DIAMINO design computations is discussed. - Abstract: This paper provides an overview of the Licos fuel performance code which has been developed for several years within the platform pleiades, co-developed by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and its industrial partners Électricité de France (EDF) and AREVA. CEA engineers have been using Licos to back multidimensional thermo-mechanical studies on innovative fuel elements design and experimental device pre-and post-irradiation computations. Studies made with Licos thus encompass a wide range of situations, including most nuclear systems used or studied in France in recent years (PWR, SFR or GFR), normal and off-normal operating conditions, and a large selection of materials (either for fuel, absorber, coolant and cladding). The aim of this paper is to give some insights about some innovative features in the design of Licos (dependency management, kriging, mfront, etc.). We also present two studies that demonstrate the flexibility of this code. The first one shows how Licos can be combined with the Germinal monodimensional fuel performance code to demonstrate the interest of a three dimensional modelling of the fuel relocation phenomenon in the Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin. The second one describes how Licos was used to model the DIAMINO experiment.

  4. The element technology of clean fuel alcohol plant construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.S; Lee, D.S. [Sam-Sung Engineering Technical Institute (Korea, Republic of); Choi, C.Y [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The fuel alcohol has been highlighted as a clean energy among new renewable energy sources. However, the production of the fuel alcohol has following problems; (i)bulk distillate remains is generated and (ii) benzene to be used as a entertainer in the azeotropic distillation causes the environmental problem. Thus, we started this research on the ground of preserving the cleanness in the production of fuel alcohol, a clean energy. We examined the schemes of replacing the azotropic distillation column which causes the problems with MSDP(Molecular Sieve Dehydration Process) system using adsorption technology and of treating the bulk distillate remains to be generated as by-products. In addition, we need to develop the continuous yea station technology for the continuous operation of fuel alcohol plant as a side goal. Thus, we try to develop a continuous ethanol fermentation process by high-density cell culture from tapioca, a industrial substrate, using cohesive yeast. For this purpose, we intend to examine the problem of tapioca, a industrial substrate, where a solid is existed and develop a new process which can solve the problem. Ultimately, the object of this project is to develop each element technology for the construction of fuel alcohol plant and obtain the ability to design the whole plant. (author) 54 refs., 143 figs., 34 tabs.

  5. A novel microbial fuel cell sensor with biocathode sensing element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Liang, Peng; Liu, Panpan; Wang, Donglin; Miao, Bo; Huang, Xia

    2017-08-15

    The traditional microbial fuel cell (MFC) sensor with bioanode as sensing element delivers limited sensitivity to toxicity monitoring, restricted application to only anaerobic and organic rich water body, and increased potential fault warning to the combined shock of organic matter/toxicity. In this study, the biocathode for oxygen reduction reaction was employed for the first time as the sensing element in MFC sensor for toxicity monitoring. The results shown that the sensitivity of MFC sensor with biocathode sensing element (7.4±2.0 to 67.5±4.0mA%-1cm-2) was much greater than that showed by bioanode sensing element (3.4±1.5 to 5.5±0.7mA%-1cm-2). The biocathode sensing element achieved the lowest detection limit reported to date using MFC sensor for formaldehyde detection (0.0005%), while the bioanode was more applicable for higher concentration (>0.0025%). There was a quicker response of biocathode sensing element with the increase of conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO). The biocathode sensing element made the MFC sensor directly applied to clean water body monitoring, e.g., drinking water and reclaimed water, without the amending of background organic matter, and it also decreased the warning failure when challenged by a combined shock of organic matter/toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, R. L.; Lords, L. V.; Kiser, D. M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage.

  7. Recent trends in the mitigation of the IGSCC through modifications in the water chemistry of BWR reactors; Tendencias recientes en la mitigacion del IGSCC mediante modificaciones en la quimica del agua de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz S, A.; Robles, E.F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    During the last years, the Nuclear Power stations had been that to adequate or to modify the parameters and operational conditions, attempting to maintain and to safeguard the integrity and functionality of its components and systems, as well as the personnel safety involved in its operation. In a Boiling water reactor (BWR), the chemical control of the water, constitutes one of the fundamental aspects to get a sure and reliable operation, having as main objectives: (a) The protection of the reactor vessel, of the structural materials of the same one and of the pipes and components of those recirculation systems against the Intergranular stress corrosion phenomena (IGSCC); (b) To guarantee the integrity of the nuclear fuel minimizing the corrosion phenomena in the fuel elements; and (c) The reduction of the operational dose of the personnel involved directly in the operation and maintenance by means of the control of the activated corrosion products. (Author)

  8. THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE USE OF BWR MOX SNF IN THE WASTE PACKAGE DESIGN (SCPB: N/A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Wang

    1997-01-23

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24, 5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: (1) Characterize the conceptual 40 BWR and 24 BWR Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. (2) Characterize the conceptual 44 BWR and 24 BWR Uncanistered Fuel (UCF) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. The purpose of this analysis is to respond to a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the WP Design, if used with SNF designed for a MOX fuel cycle, do not preclude WP compatibility with the MGDS. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual WP design with disposal container which is loaded with BWR MOX SNF under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation, and to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts, and to show that the BWR MOX SNF loaded WP performance is similar to an WP loaded with commercial BWR SNF.

  9. Spent BWR fuel characterisation combining a fork detector with gamma spectrometry. Report on Task JNT A 1071 FIN of the Finnish Support Programme to IAEA Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiitta, A.; Hautamaeki, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Turunen, A. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Arlt, R.; Arenas, Carrasco J.; Esmailpour-Kazerouni, K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Schwalbach, P. [Euratom Safeguards Office (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    The LWR spent fuel assemblies have to be verified at the partial defect level before they become difficult to access. According to the IAEA's criteria the partial defect test for spent fuel should be able to detect if half or more of the fuel pins have been removed from an assembly and possibly replaced by dummies. Euratom applies similar criteria. Therefore a standard verification procedure needs to be developed using an appropriate combination of measurements and theoretical calculations. Two experiments with an 'upgraded' fork detector were performed at the TVO KPA Store in September and in December 1999. On the whole, 26 assemblies were measured. In the 'upgraded' fork detector the total neutron count and the gross gamma measurements are complemented with gamma spectroscopic measurement using an integrated measurement head. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector is placed on the same vertical level as the fission and ionisation chambers. This enables simultaneous gamma and neutron measurements at one location. In the upgraded fork model the fork prongs can also be removed and gamma spectrometric measurements can be done using only the CZT detector. This allows more versatile placement of the target fuel assembly allowing various kind of gamma spectroscopic scanning measurements. In this report a gamma spectroscopy based correction to the gross gamma data is introduced. This corrected gross gamma signal seems to describe more consistently the burnup of the assembly than the {sup 137}Cs intensity obtained by direct gamma spectrometry. Concerning the measured neutron data of assemblies with different enrichments, an enrichment correction method based on calculations made with the ORIGEN-S program is introduced in this report. In addition, the share of {sup 244}Cm neutrons of the total neutron source is derived from the results calculated with the PYVO program. These corrections to the neutron signal seem to improve the correlation of the

  10. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Fuel Element Testing in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) testing milestone, a graphite composite fuel element using a uranium simulant was received from the Oakridge National Lab and tested in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) at various operating conditions. The nominal operating conditions required to satisfy the milestone consisted of running the fuel element for a few minutes at a temperature of at least 2000 K with flowing hydrogen. This milestone test was successfully accomplished without incident.

  11. Post irradiation examination of HANARO nucler mini-element fuel (metallographic and density test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Ok; Hong, K. P.; Park, D. G.; Choo, Y. S.; Baik, S. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, H. C.; Jung, Y. H

    2001-05-01

    The post irradiation examination of a HANARO mini-element nuclear fuel, KH96C-004, was done in June 6, 2000. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the in-core performance and reliability of mini-element nuclear fuel for HANARO developed by the project ''The Nuclear Fuel Material Development of Research Reactor''. And, in order to examine the performance of mini-element nuclear fuel in normal output condition, the post irradiation examination of a nuclear fuel bundle composed by 6 mini nuclear fuel rods and 12 dummy fuel rods was performed. Based on these examination results, the safety and reliability of HANARO fuel and the basic data on the design of HANARO nuclear fuel can be ensured and obtained,.

  12. Design and in-core fuel management of reload fuel elements for reactors made by other manufacturers. Auslegung und Einsatzplanung von Nachlade-Brennelementen fuer Reaktoren anderer Hersteller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufert, A.; Urban, P.

    1990-12-01

    By the end of 1990 Siemens had performed fuel element designs and in-core fuel management for 94 operating cycles in 27 pressurized and boiling water reactors of other manufacturers. Together with the client different fuel element designs are developed and proof is furnished of the reactor physics compatibility of different fuel elements from various producers, and of plant safety. (DG).

  13. Formation of actinides in irradiated HTGR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    dos Santos, A. M.

    1976-03-15

    Actinide nuclide concentrations of 11 spent AVR fuel elements were determined experimentally. The burnup of the spheres varied in the range between 10% and 100% fifa, the Th : U ratio was 5 : 1. The separation procedures for an actinide isolation were tested with highly irradiated ThO/sub 2/. Separation and decontamination factors are presented. Build-up of /sup 232/U was discussed. The AVR breeding rate was ascertained to be 0.5. The hazard potential of high activity waste was calculated. Actinide recovery factors were proposed in order to reduce the hazard potential of the waste by an actinide removal under consideration of the reprocessing technology which is available presently.

  14. BWR Steam Dryer Alternating Stress Assessment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morante, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hambric, S. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ziada, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents an overview of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) steam dryer design; the fatigue cracking failures that occurred at the Quad Cities (QC) plants and their root causes; a history of BWR Extended Power Uprates (EPUs) in the USA; and a discussion of steam dryer modifications/replacements, alternating stress mechanisms on steam dryers, and structural integrity evaluations (static and alternating stress).

  15. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  16. Impact of Reactor Operating Parameters on Cask Reactivity in BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Betzler, Benjamin R [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of reactor operating parameters used in fuel depletion calculations on spent fuel cask reactivity, with relevance for boiling-water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) applications. Assessments that used generic BWR fuel assembly and spent fuel cask configurations are presented. The considered operating parameters, which were independently varied in the depletion simulations for the assembly, included fuel temperature, bypass water density, specific power, and operating history. Different operating history scenarios were considered for the assembly depletion to determine the effect of relative power distribution during the irradiation cycles, as well as the downtime between cycles. Depletion, decay, and criticality simulations were performed using computer codes and associated nuclear data within the SCALE code system. Results quantifying the dependence of cask reactivity on the assembly depletion parameters are presented herein.

  17. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  18. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors; Desarrollo de un program de computo de calculo rapido para el prediseno de celdas de combustible nuclear avanzado 10 x 10 para reactores de agua en ebullicion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mrpc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  19. Coretran/Vipre assembly critical power assessment against Nupec BWR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aounallah, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    This study has been performed, in the framework of the STARS project, to assess CORETRAN-01/VIPRE-02 code capability to predict critical heat flux conditions for BWR fuel assemblies. The assessment is based on comparisons of the code results with the NUPEC steady-state critical power measurements on full-scale assemblies tested under a range of flow conditions. Two assembly types were considered, the standard BWR 8 x 8 and the so-called ''high-burnup'' assembly, similar to GE-10. Code modelling options that have a significant impact on the results have been identified, along with code limitations. (author)

  20. BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. Ryman

    2003-07-31

    This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-00006 REV 01. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the

  1. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  2. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A technical basis for peak reactivity boiling water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) methods was recently generated, and the technical basis for extended BWR BUC is now being developed. In this paper, a number of effects related to extended BWR BUC are analyzed, including three major operational effects in BWRs: the coolant density axial distribution, the use of control blades during operation, and the axial burnup profile. Specifically, uniform axial moderator density profiles are analyzed and compared to previous results and an additional temporal fidelity study combing moderator density profiles for three different fuel assemblies is presented. Realistic control blade histories and cask criticality results are compared to previously generated constructed control blade histories. Finally, a preliminary study of the axial burnup profile is provided.

  3. Subcritical Noise Analysis Measurements with Fresh and Spent Research Reactor Fuels Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Kryter, R.C.; Miller, V.C.

    1999-02-01

    The verification of the subcriticality is of utmost importance for the safe transportation and storage of nuclear reactor fuels. Transportation containers and storage facilities are designed such that nuclear fuels remain in a subcritical state. Such designs often involve excess conservatism because of the lack of relevant experimental data to verify the accuracy of Monte Carlo codes used in nuclear criticality safety analyses. A joint experimental research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., and the University of Missouri was initiated to obtain measured quantities that could be directly related to the subcriticality of simple arrays of Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) fuel elements. A series of measurement were performed to assess the reactivity of materials such as BORAL, stainless steel, aluminum, and lead that are typically used in the construction of shipping casks. These materials were positioned between the fuel elements. In addition, a limited number of measurements were performed with configurations of fresh and spent (irradiated) fuel elements to ascertain the reactivity of the spent fuel elements. In these experiments, fresh fuel elements were replaced by spent fuel elements such that the subcritical reactivity change could be measured. The results of these measurements were used by Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions to determine the subcriticality of MURR fuel elements isolated by absorbing materials. The measurements were interpreted using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code to obtain the subcritical neutron multiplication factor k(sub eff), and the bias in K(sub eff) that are used in criticality safety analyses.

  4. Radioisotope concentrations in the PRTR primary coolant and helium system during operation with a failed fuel element(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R.W.; Thomas, C.W.

    1961-09-07

    Fission product measurements in the PRTR primary D{sub 2}O and helium systems during the startup tests in May 1961, showed the presence of a defective fuel elements(s). Reactor operation was discontinued during the latter part of May and during June for reactor maintenance and fuel element inspection. On resumption of operation on July 1, a sampling and analytical program was initiated to study the radioisotope concentrations resulting from this defective element(s) which were present in the primary D{sub 2}O and helium systems during the various phases of reactor operation. The data accumulated during this study are to serve as background information in future fuel element rupture identification and location studies as well as serving as a guide in setting up the rupture monitor for the individual tubes of the PRTR reactor. A summary of the analytical results from this study and their theoretical interpretation is presented in this paper.

  5. Multidisciplinary Simulation of Graphite-Composite and Cermet Fuel Elements for NTP Point of Departure Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the expected performance of two Nuclear Thermal Propulsion fuel types. High fidelity, fluid/thermal/structural + neutronic simulations help predict the performance of graphite-composite and cermet fuel types from point of departure engine designs from the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion project. Materials and nuclear reactivity issues are reviewed for each fuel type. Thermal/structural simulations predict thermal stresses in the fuel and thermal expansion mis-match stresses in the coatings. Fluid/thermal/structural/neutronic simulations provide predictions for full fuel elements. Although NTP engines will utilize many existing chemical engine components and technologies, nuclear fuel elements are a less developed engine component and introduce design uncertainty. Consequently, these fuel element simulations provide important insights into NTP engine performance.

  6. Advancements in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements and related structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.C.; Montgomery, R.O.; Rashid, Y.R.; Head, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (USA); Royal Naval Coll., Greenwich (UK))

    1989-01-01

    An important aspect of the design and analysis of nuclear reactors is the ability to predict the behavior of fuel elements in the adverse environment of a reactor system. By understanding the thermomechanical behavior of the different materials which constitute a nuclear fuel element, analysis and predictions can be made regarding the integrity and reliability of fuel element designs. The SMiRT conference series, through the division on fuel elements and the post-conference seminars on fuel element modeling, provided technical forums for the international participation in the exchange of knowledge concerning the thermomechanical modeling of fuel elements. This paper discusses the technical advances in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements presented at the SMiRT conference series since its inception in 1971. Progress in the areas of material properties and constitutive relationships, modeling methodologies, and integral modeling approaches was reviewed and is summarized in light of their impact on the thermomechanical modeling of nuclear fuel elements. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Comparison of depletion results for a boiling water reactor fuel element with CASMO and SCALE 6.1 (TRITON/NEWT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesado, C.; Morera, D.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G., E-mail: cmesado@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: dmorera@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: rmiro@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@isirym.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@isirym.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (UPV), Valencia (Spain). Institute for the Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety; Concejal, Alberto, E-mail: acbe@iberdrola.es [Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construcion, S.A.U, Madrid (Spain); Soler, Amparo, E-mail: asoler@iberdrola.es [SEA Propulsion S. L., Madrid (Spain); Melara, Jose, E-mail: j.melara@iberdrola.es [Iberdrola Generacion Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the results of depletion calculations with CASMO and SCALE 6.1 (TRITON) are compared. To achieve it, a region of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel element is modeled, using both codes. To take into account different operating conditions, the simulations are repeated with different void fraction, ranging from null void fraction to a void fraction closed to one. Special care was used to keep in mind that the homogenization of the materials and the two group approach was the same in both codes. Additionally, KENO-VI and MCDANCOFF modules are used. The k-effective calculated by KENO-VI is used to ensure that the starting point was correct and MCDANCOFF module is used to calculate the Dancoff factors in order to improve the model accuracy. To validate the whole process, a comparison of k{sub eff}, and cross-sections collapsed and homogenized is shown. The results show a very good agreement, with an average error around the 1.75%. Furthermore, an automatic process for translating CASMO data to SCALE input decks was developed. The reason for the translation is the fact that SCALE's TRITON module is a new code very powerful and continuously being developed. Thus, great advantage can be taken from the current and future SCALE features. This is hoped to produce more realistic models, and hence, increase the accuracy of neutronic libraries. (author)

  8. Preliminary Studies of New Water Removal Element in Purification Applications of Diesel Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To effectively and efficiently remove water contamination dispersed in petrodiesel fuels, a new water removal element with both coalescence and separation features is studied in this paper. The unique droplet coalescence and separation mechanism occurring in the new water removal element is proposed. The conceptual design of this filter element is presented and the basic features of FCP filtration systems are briefly introduced. A laboratory test stand and fuel analysis procedure are described. The results from preliminary water removal tests with number 2 petrodiesel fuel demonstrate the filtration performance of the new water removal element. For example, within one single fuel flow pass through FCP filtration system equipped with the new water removal element and running at 2 GPM flow rate, the water content in 80°F, number 2 petrodiesel fuel stream can be reduced from up to 40,000 ppm upstream to 64.8 ppm or less downstream.

  9. Status update of the BWR cask simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Durbin, Samuel G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are typically evaluated through detailed numerical analysis of the system's thermal performance. These modeling efforts are performed by the vendor to demonstrate the performance and regulatory compliance and are independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Numerous studies have been previously conducted. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have moved the storage location from above ground to below ground and significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the canister helium pressure. Previous cask performance validation testing did not capture these parameters. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern dry casks. These modern cask designs utilize elevated helium pressure in the sealed canister or are intended for subsurface storage. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above ground and below ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the canister. The symmetric single assembly geometry with well-controlled boundary conditions simplifies interpretation of results. Various configurations of outer concentric ducting will be used to mimic conditions for above and below ground storage configurations

  10. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karjunen, T. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR`s as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs.

  11. Effect of anisotropic scattering in neutronics analysis of BWR assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Toshikazu [Division of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0571 (Japan)]. E-mail: takeda@nucl.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Okamoto, Toshiki [Division of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0571 (Japan); Inoue, Akira [Division of Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0571 (Japan); Kosaka, Shinya [TEPCO Systems Corporation, 2-37-28 Eitai, Koutou-ku, Tokyo 135-0034 (Japan); Ikeda, Hideaki [TEPCO Systems Corporation, 2-37-28 Eitai, Koutou-ku, Tokyo 135-0034 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    The anisotropic scattering effect to keff is studied for UO{sub 2} and MOX fueled BWR assemblies. The anisotropic scattering effect increases the assembly k {sub {infinity}} by 0.44% {delta}k for the UO{sub 2} assembly with 0% void fraction, and by 0.21% {delta}k for the MOX assembly with 0% void fraction. This is because the anisotropic scattering effect flattens the intra-assembly thermal flux, and the absorption rate in the surrounding water gap is decreased, but the absorption rates in the MOX fuel rods are increased compared to the UO{sub 2} rods. Therefore, the total decrease in absorption rates in the UO{sub 2} assembly is relatively large, and the k {sub {infinity}} is increased in the UO{sub 2} assembly. The dependence of the anisotropic scattering effect on the void fraction is investigated, and the significant difference of 0.62% {delta}k/k is found for the 0% and the 80% void fractions. The BWR assemblies with Gd rods are also considered. Furthermore, the usefulness of the transport cross section is investigated, and it is found that the transport cross section gives reasonable anisotropic scattering effect, though not satisfactory.

  12. Performance and fuel-cycle cost analysis of one JANUS 30 conceptual design for several fuel-element-design options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurdin, M.; Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    The performance and fuel cycle costs for a 25 MW, JANUS 30 reactor conceptual design by INTERATOM, Federal Republic of Germany, for BATAN, Republic of Indonesia have been studied using 19.75% enriched uranium in four fuel element design options. All of these fuel element designs have either been proposed by INTERATOM for various reactors or are currently in use with 93% enriched uranium in reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. Aluminide, oxide, and silicide fuels were studied for selected designs using the range of uranium densities that are either currently qualified or are being developed and demonstrated internationally. To assess the long-term fuel adaptation strategy as well as the present fuel acceptance, reactor performance and annual fuel cycle costs were computed for seventeen cases based on a representative end-of-cycle excess reactivity and duty factor. In addition, a study was made to provide data for evaluating the trade-off between the increased safety associated with thicker cladding and the economic penalty due to increased fuel consumption.

  13. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under

  14. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation systems (often referred to as casks) and spent fuel pools (SFPs). This work is divided into two main phases. The first phase investigated the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in SFPs to transportation and storage casks and the validation of reactivity calculations and spent fuel compositions within these methods. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the analysis of the effects of control blade insertion history, and moderator density and burnup axial profiles for extended BWR BUC.

  15. 77 FR 16868 - Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... COMMISSION Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test Reactors,'' is temporarily identified... verifying the quality of plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research and test reactors (RTRs...

  16. 78 FR 33132 - Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... COMMISSION Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test... Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test Reactors.'' This guide... plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research and test reactors (RTRs). ADDRESSES: Please...

  17. Cross-section adjustment techniques for BWR adaptive simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    Computational capability has been developed to adjust multi-group neutron cross-sections to improve the fidelity of boiling water reactor (BWR) modeling and simulation. The method involves propagating multi-group neutron cross-section uncertainties through BWR computational models to evaluate uncertainties in key core attributes such as core k-effective, nodal power distributions, thermal margins, and in-core detector readings. Uncertainty-based inverse theory methods are then employed to adjust multi-group cross-sections to minimize the disagreement between BWR modeling predictions and measured plant data. For this work, measured plant data were virtually simulated in the form of perturbed 3-D nodal power distributions with discrepancies with predictions of the same order of magnitude as expected from plant data. Using the simulated plant data, multi-group cross-section adjustment reduces the error in core k-effective to less than 0.2% and the RMS error in nodal power to 4% (i.e. the noise level of the in-core instrumentation). To ensure that the adapted BWR model predictions are robust, Tikhonov regularization is utilized to control the magnitude of the cross-section adjustment. In contrast to few-group cross-section adjustment, which was the focus of previous research on BWR adaptive simulation, multigroup cross-section adjustment allows for future fuel cycle design optimization to include the determination of optimal fresh fuel assembly designs using the adjusted multi-group cross-sections. The major focus of this work is to efficiently propagate multi-group neutron cross-section uncertainty through BWR lattice physics calculations. Basic neutron cross-section uncertainties are provided in the form of multi-group cross-section covariance matrices. For energy groups in the resolved resonance energy range, the cross-section uncertainties are computed using an infinitely-dilute approximation of the neutron flux. In order to accurately account for spatial and

  18. Mathematical simulation of hydrocarbon fuel conversion in heat-protection elements of hypersonic aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Korabel'nikov, A. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a mathematical model of hydrocarbon fuel conversion in a thermochemical reactor as an element of heat protection of a hypersonic aircraft. The application of this model has made it possible to enrich information obtained in experimental studies.

  19. Structural analysis of the SNAP-8 developmental reactor fuel element cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalcher, A.W.

    1969-04-15

    Primary, secondary, and thermal stresses were calculated and evaluated for the SNAP-8 developmental reactor fuel element cladding. The effects of fabrication and assembly stresses, as well as test and operational stresses were included in the analysis. With the assumption that fuel-swelling-induced stresses are nil, the analytical results indicate that the cladding assembly is structurally adequate for the proposed operation.

  20. Coolant Density and Control Blade History Effects in Extended BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase investigates the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used for spent fuel pools to spent fuel storage and transportation casks and the validation of reactivity (keff) calculations and predicted spent fuel compositions. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents work performed to date investigating some aspects of extended BUC. (The technical basis for application of peak reactivity methods to BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems is presented in a companion paper.) Two reactor operating parameters are being evaluated to establish an adequate basis for extended BWR BUC: (1) the effect of axial void profile and (2) the effect of control blade utilization during operation. A detailed analysis of core simulator data for one cycle of a modern operating BWR plant was performed to determine the range of void profiles and the variability of the profile experienced during irradiation. Although a single cycle does not provide complete data, the data obtained are sufficient to determine the primary effects and to identify conservative modeling approaches. These data were used in a study of the effect of axial void profile. The first stage of the study was determination of the necessary moderator density temporal fidelity in depletion modeling. After the required temporal fidelity was established, multiple void profiles were used to examine the effect on cask reactivity. The results of these studies are being used to develop recommendations for conservatively modeling the void profile effects for BWR depletion calculations. The second operational parameter studied was control blade history. Control blades are inserted in

  1. Multiphysics Modeling of a Single Channel in a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Grooved Ring Fuel Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J., Jr.; Barkett, Laura A.; Mathias, Adam D.; Cassibry, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    In the past, fuel rods have been used in nuclear propulsion applications. A new fuel element concept that reduces weight and increases efficiency uses a stack of grooved discs. Each fuel element is a flat disc with a hole on the interior and grooves across the top. Many grooved ring fuel elements for use in nuclear thermal propulsion systems have been modeled, and a single flow channel for each design has been analyzed. For increased efficiency, a fuel element with a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio is ideal. When grooves are shallower, i.e., they have a lower surface area, the results show that the exit temperature is higher. By coupling the physics of turbulence with those of heat transfer, the effects on the cooler gas flowing through the grooves of the thermally excited solid can be predicted. Parametric studies were done to show how a pressure drop across the axial length of the channels will affect the exit temperatures of the gas. Geometric optimization was done to show the behaviors that result from the manipulation of various parameters. Temperature profiles of the solid and gas showed that more structural optimization is needed to produce the desired results. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Fuel Element, Heat Transfer, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Coupled Physics Computations, Finite Element Analysis

  2. Distribution of fission products in Peach Bottom HTGR fuel element E11-07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichner, R.P.; Dyer, F.F.; Martin, W.J.; Bate, L.C.

    1977-04-01

    This is the second in a projected series of six post-irradiation examinations of Peach Bottom High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor driver fuel elements. Element E11-07, the subject of this report, received an equivalent of 701 full-power days of irradiation prior to scheduled withdrawal. The examination procedures emphasized the determination of fission product distributions in the graphite portions of the fuel element. Continuous axial scans indicated a /sup 137/Cs inventory of 17 Ci in the graphite sleeve and 8.3 Ci in the spine at the time of element withdrawal from the core. In addition, the nuclides /sup 134/Cs, /sup 110m/Ag, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 154/Eu were found in the graphite portions of the fuel element in significant amounts. Radial distributions of these nuclides plus the distribution of the beta emitters /sup 3/H, /sup 14/C, and /sup 90/Sr were obtained at six axial locations, four within the fueled region and one each above and below. The radial dissection was accomplished by use of a manipulator-operated lathe in a hot cell. These profiles reveal an increased degree of penetration of /sup 134/Cs, relative to /sup 137/Cs, evidently due to a longer time spent as xenon precursor. In addition to fission product distribution, the appearance of the element components was recorded photographically, fuel compact and graphite dimensions were recorded at numerous locations, and metallographic examinations of the fuel were performed.

  3. A simple gamma spectrometry method for evaluating the burnup of MTR-type HEU fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makmal, T. [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of The Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Nuclear Physics and Engineering Division, Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Aviv, O. [Radiation Safety Division, Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Gilad, E., E-mail: gilade@bgu.ac.il [The Unit of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of The Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-10-21

    A simple method for the evaluation of the burnup of a materials testing reactor (MTR) fuel element by gamma spectrometry is presented. The method was applied to a highly enriched uranium MTR nuclear fuel element that was irradiated in a 5 MW pool-type research reactor for a total period of 34 years. The experimental approach is based on in-situ measurements of the MTR fuel element in the reactor pool by a portable high-purity germanium detector located in a gamma cell. To corroborate the method, analytical calculations (based on the irradiation history of the fuel element) and computer simulations using a dedicated fuel cycle burnup code ORIGEN2 were performed. The burnup of the MTR fuel element was found to be 52.4±8.8%, which is in good agreement with the analytical calculations and the computer simulations. The method presented here is suitable for research reactors with either a regular or an irregular irradiation regime and for reactors with limited infrastructure and/or resources. In addition, its simplicity and the enhanced safety it confers may render this method suitable for IAEA inspectors in fuel element burnup assessments during on-site inspections. - Highlights: • Simple, inexpensive, safe and flexible experimental setup that can be quickly deployed. • Experimental results are thoroughly corroborated against ORIGEN2 burnup code. • Experimental uncertainty of 9% and 5% deviation between measurements and simulations. • Very high burnup MTR fuel element is examined, with 60% depletion of {sup 235}U. • Impact of highly irregular irradiation regime on burnup evaluation is studied.

  4. Enhanced Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Element for the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, M. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, M. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morrell, S. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jamison, R. K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nef, E. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Under the current US Department of Energy (DOE) policy and planning scenario, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its associated critical facility (ATRC) will be reconfigured to operate on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort has produced a conceptual design for an Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) element. This fuel features monolithic U-10Mo fuel foils and aluminum cladding separated by a thin zirconium barrier. As with previous iterations of the ELF design, radial power peaking is managed using different U-10Mo foil thicknesses in different plates of the element. The lead fuel element design, ELF Mk1A, features only three fuel meat thicknesses, a reduction from the previous iterations meant to simplify manufacturing. Evaluation of the ELF Mk1A fuel design against reactor performance requirements is ongoing, as are investigations of the impact of manufacturing uncertainty on safety margins. The element design has been evaluated in what are expected to be the most demanding design basis accident scenarios and has met all initial thermal-hydraulic criteria.

  5. Gamma spectroscopy for analysis of high temperature reactor fuel element KueFA tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O.; Laurie, M.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU); Allelein, H.J. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik

    2013-07-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is characterized by an advanced design with passive safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with TRISO (TRi-ISOtropic) coating designed to provide high fission product retention. During a loss of coolant accident scenario in a HTR the maximum temperature is foreseen to be in the range of 1600-1650 C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. An experimental assessment of the fuel behaviour under accident conditions is necessary to investigate the quality of fission product retention of TRISO coated particles in a given fuel element and to validate relevant computer codes. The device used to perform these studies is the cold finger apparatus KueFA (KuehlFinger-Apparatur). (orig.)

  6. Radiation field control at the latest BWR plants -- design principle, operational experience and future subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke [Energy Research Lab., Ibaraki (Japan); Ohsumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie [Hitachi Works, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Improvements of operational procedures to control water chemistry, e.g., nickel/iron control, as well as application of hardware improvements for reducing radioactive corrosion products resulted in an extremely low occupational exposure of less than 0.5 man.Sv/yr without any serious impact on the radwaste system, for BWR plants involved in the Japanese Improvement and Standardization Program. Recently, {sup 60}C radioactively in the reactor water has been increasing due to less crud fixation on the two smooth surfaces of new type high performance fuels and to the pH drop caused by chromium oxide anions released from stainless steel structures and pipings. This increase must be limited by changes in water chemistry, e.g., applications of modified nickel/iron ratio control and weak alkali control. Controlled water chemistry to optimize three points, the plant radiation level and integrities of fuel and structural materials, is the primary future subject for BWR water chemistry.

  7. Full MOX core in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Motoo [Power and Industrial Systems R and D Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    Studies on the core design, the fuel rod thermal-mechanical design and the safety evaluation have been summarized for the Full MOX-ABWR, loaded with MOX fuels up to 100% of the core. Fuel bundle configuration for MOX fuels is identical to the STEP II fuel design and the discharge burnup is about 33 GWd/t. Core performance evaluations and fuel rod thermal-mechanical design analyses have been performed, and it has been confirmed that the design criteria are satisfied with enough margin like the UO{sub 2} fuel loaded core. Safety analyses on transients and accidents have also been performed by considering the MOX fuel and core characteristics adequately through selecting appropriate input data for each safety analysis. All safety criteria are satisfied like the UO{sub 2} core. (author)

  8. Sipping test update device for fuel elements cladding inspections in IPR-r1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.R.; Mesquita, A.Z.; Andrade, E.P.D.; Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: rrr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br, E-mail: edson@cdtn.br, E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    It is in progress at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN (Nuclear Technology Development Center), a research project that aims to investigate possible leaks in the fuel elements of the TRIGA reactor, located in this research center. This paper presents the final form of sipping test device for TRIGA reactor, and results of the first experiments setup. Mechanical support strength tests were made by knotting device on the crane, charged with water from the conventional water supply, and tests outside the reactor pool with the use of new non-irradiated fuel elements encapsulated in stainless steel, and available safe stored in this unit. It is expected that tests with graphite elements from reactor pool are done soon after and also the test experiment with the first fuel elements in service positioned in the B ring (central ring) of the reactor core in the coming months. (author)

  9. Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ; Matlin, Ramail [Berkeley Heights, NJ; Heinz, Robert [Ludwigshafen, DE

    2012-06-26

    A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

  10. Oxide fuel element and blanket element development programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    Approval-in-principle has been granted for run beyond breach experiment XY-2, which will incorporate an F11A series rod. Fuel microstructures and operating parameters have been tabulated for 118 specimens from the F20 power to melt experiment. Retained gas measurements have been compiled indicating 36-50 ..mu..l/gm in this high power fuel. Topical report GEFR-00367 was prepared describing F20 results. Preparation of the Test Design Description for axial blanket experiment AB-1 is proceeding on schedule (for Cycle 2 irradiation). The safety analysis calculations, showing no fuel melting nor sodium boiling in design-basis upsets, have been completed.

  11. Development and Testing of CTF to Support Modeling of BWR Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wysocki, Aaron [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-01-29

    This milestone supports developing and assessing COBRA-TF (CTF) for the modeling of boiling water reactors (BWRs). This is achieved in three stages. First, a new preprocessor utility that is capable of handling BWR-specic design elements (e.g., channel boxes and large water rods) is developed. A previous milestone (L3:PHI.CTF.P12.01) led to the development of this preprocessor capability for single assembly models. This current milestone expands this utility so that it is applicable to multi-assembly BWR models that can be modeled in either serial or parallel. The second stage involves making necessary modications to CTF so that it can execute these new models. Specically, this means implementing an outer-iteration loop, specic to BWR models, that equalizes the pressure loss over all assemblies in the core (which are not connected due to the channel boxes) by adjusting inlet mass ow rate. A third stage involves assessing the standard convergence metrics that are used by CTF to determine when a simulation is steady-state. The nal stage has resulted in the implementation of new metrics in the code that give a better indication of how steady the solution is at convergence. This report summarizes these eorts and provides a demonstration of CTF's BWR-modeling capabilities. CASL-U-2016-1030-000

  12. Natural convection heat transfer analysis of ATR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langerman, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    Natural convection air cooling of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel assemblies is analyzed to determine the level of decay heat that can be removed without exceeding the melting temperature of the fuel. The study was conducted to assist in the level 2 PRA analysis of a hypothetical ATR water canal draining accident. The heat transfer process is characterized by a very low Rayleigh number (Ra {approx} 10{sup {minus}5}) and a high temperature ratio. Since neither data nor analytical models were available for Ra < 0.1, an analytical approach is presented based upon the integral boundary layer equations. All assumptions and simplifications are presented and assessed and two models are developed from similar foundations. In one model, the well-known Boussinesq approximations are employed, the results from which are used to assess the modeling philosophy through comparison to existing data and published analytical results. In the other model, the Boussinesq approximations are not used, thus making the model more general and applicable to the ATR analysis.

  13. Hazards summary memorandum: Savannah River reactors the production of tritium using tubular fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, D.F.; Menegus, R.L.

    1956-09-01

    The Savannah River reactors were operated initially for the production of plutonium, and used slug-type natural uranium fuel elements. Recently one reactor was converted to the production of tritium, and other reactors will be converted soon. slug-type elements (of enriched uranium-aluminum) were charged into this reactor in order to reduce to a minimum the development effort required before the shift to tritium was made. It was recognized, however, that the slug elements would be deficient in that they would give a low yield of tritium per atom of uranium-235 destroyed because of the large parasitic capture of neutrons by aluminum. Also the production rate of tritium would be low because of the small amount of surface available for the transfer of the fission heat. Both of these shortcomings will be reduced materially by the substitution of tubular elements for the slugs now employed. The development of this type of element has progressed so that a full reactor loading of tubular fuel elements is contemplated for early 1957. The special hazards related to the production of tritium using tubular fuel elements are described in this memorandum which has been written as a supplement to a report entitled ``Reactor Safety Determination -- Savannah River Plant`` (DPW-56-106), one section of which described the hazards associated with the production of tritium from slug elements.

  14. Characterizing high-temperature deformation of internally heated nuclear fuel element simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, A.I.; Fong, R.W.L.; Leitch, B.W.; Nitheanandan, T.; Williams, A., E-mail: alexander.belov@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The sag behaviour of a simulated nuclear fuel element during high-temperature transients has been investigated in an experiment utilizing an internal indirect heating method. The major motivation of the experiment was to improve understanding of the dominant mechanisms underlying the element thermo-mechanical response under loss-of-coolant accident conditions and to obtain accurate experimental data to support development of 3-D computational fuel element models. The experiment was conducted using an electrically heated CANDU fuel element simulator. Three consecutive thermal cycles with peak temperatures up to ≈1000 {sup o}C were applied to the element. The element sag deflections and sheath temperatures were measured. On heating up to 600 {sup o}C, only minor lateral deflections of the element were observed. Further heating to above 700 {sup o}C resulted in an element multi-rate creep and significant permanent bow. Post-test visual and X-ray examinations revealed a pronounced necking of the sheath at the pellet-to-pellet interface locations. A wall thickness reduction was detected in the necked region that is interpreted as a sheath longitudinal strain localization effect. The sheath cross-sectioning showed signs of a 'hard' pellet-cladding interaction due to the applied cycles. A 3-D model of the experiment was generated using the ANSYS finite element code. As a fully coupled thermal mechanical simulation is computationally expensive, it was deemed sufficient to use the measured sheath temperatures as a boundary condition, and thus an uncoupled mechanical simulation only was conducted. The ANSYS simulation results match the experiment sag observations well up to the point at which the fuel element started cooling down. (author)

  15. Clad thickness variation N-Reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.A.

    1966-05-12

    The current specifications for the cladding on {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} fuels were established early in the course of process development and were predicted on several basic considerations. Among these were: (a) a desire to provide an adequate safety factor in cladding thickness to insure against corrosion penetration and rupture from uranium swelling stresses; (b) an apprehension that the striations in the zircaloy cladding of the U/zircaloy interface and on the exterior surface might serve as stress-raisers, leading to untimely failures of the jacket; and (c) then existing process capability - the need to maintain a specified ratio between zircaloy and uranium in the billet assembly to effect satisfactory coextrusion. It now appears appropriate to review these specifications in an effort to determine whether some of them may be revised, with attendant gains in economy and/or operating smoothness.

  16. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  17. Postirradiation examination and evaluation of Peach Bottom fuel test element FTE-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallroth, C.F.; Holzgraf, J.F.; Jensen, D.D.

    1977-09-01

    Fuel test element FTE-6 was irradiated in the Peach Bottom high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) for 645 equivalent full power days. Four fuel varieties, contained in H-327 graphite bodies, were tested. A primary result of this test has been to demonstrate acceptable performance even with calculated high stresses in the graphite bodies. Heterogeneous fuel loadings in the element caused local power peaking and azimuthal power variations, deforming the graphite fuel bodies and thereby causing bowing nearly five times as large as the diametral clearance within the sleeve. The axial stresses resulting from interference between the fuel bodies and sleeve were estimated to have reached 45% of the ultimate material strength at the end of the irradiation. Residual stresses from differential contraction within the fuel body resulted in probable in-plane stress levels of 130% of the material strength at the end-of-life shutdown and of up to 150% of the strength at shutdown during the irradiation cycle. The high in-plane stresses are local peaks at the corners of a sharp notch in the element, which may account for the stresses failing to cause damage. The lack of observable damage, however, indicates that the methods and data used for stress analysis give results that are either fairly accurate or conservative.

  18. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  19. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  20. Feasibility study of modeling a CANDU fuel element using a multiphysics object-oriented simulation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, K., E-mail: Kyle.Gamble@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Williams, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Chan, P.K. [Royal Military College of Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The first phase of the feasibility study of using a Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) for modeling a CANDU fuel element is presented. A two-dimensional model of a fuel pellet sheath was created to examine the contact algorithm within MOOSE. The results obtained show the expected behaviour of contact pressure and penetration in 2D. Preliminary results for a 3D model of a quarter fuel pellet and sheath are provided but at present contain anomalies currently being investigated. The next steps in the feasibility study are outlined. (author)

  1. The possibility and the effects of a steam explosion in the BWR lower head on recriticality of a BWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N. [Sehgal Consult (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    The report describes an analysis considering a BWR postulated severe accident scenario during which the late vessel automatic depressurization brings the water below the level of the bottom core plate. The subsequent lack of ECCS leads to core heat up during which the control rods melt and the melt deposits on the core plate. At that point of time in the scenario, the core fuel bundles are still intact and the Zircaloy clad oxidation is about to start. The objective of the study is to provide the conditions of reflood into the hot core due to the level swell or a slug delivered from the lower head as the control rod melt drops into the water. These conditions are employed in the neutronic analysis with the RECRIT code to determine if the core recriticality may be achieved. (au)

  2. Statistical analysis in the design of nuclear fuel cells and training of a neural network to predict safety parameters for reactors BWR; Analisis estadistico en el diseno de celdas de combustible nuclear y entrenamiento de una red neuronal para predecir parametros de seguridad para reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauregui Ch, V.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the obtained results for a statistical analysis are shown, with the purpose of studying the performance of the fuel lattice, taking into account the frequency of the pins that were used. For this objective, different statistical distributions were used; one approximately to normal, another type X{sup 2} but in an inverse form and a random distribution. Also, the prediction of some parameters of the nuclear reactor in a fuel reload was made through a neuronal network, which was trained. The statistical analysis was made using the parameters of the fuel lattice, which was generated through three heuristic techniques: Ant Colony Optimization System, Neuronal Networks and a hybrid among Scatter Search and Path Re linking. The behavior of the local power peak factor was revised in the fuel lattice with the use of different frequencies of enrichment uranium pines, using the three techniques mentioned before, in the same way the infinite multiplication factor of neutrons was analyzed (k..), to determine within what range this factor in the reactor is. Taking into account all the information, which was obtained through the statistical analysis, a neuronal network was trained; that will help to predict the behavior of some parameters of the nuclear reactor, considering a fixed fuel reload with their respective control rods pattern. In the same way, the quality of the training was evaluated using different fuel lattices. The neuronal network learned to predict the next parameters: Shutdown Margin (SDM), the pin burn peaks for two different fuel batches, Thermal Limits and the Effective Neutron Multiplication Factor (k{sup eff}). The results show that the fuel lattices in which the frequency, which the inverted form of the X{sup 2} distribution, was used revealed the best values of local power peak factor. Additionally it is shown that the performance of a fuel lattice could be enhanced controlling the frequency of the uranium enrichment rods and the variety of

  3. Nerva Fuel Element Development Program Summary Report - July 1966 through June 1972 Extrusion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, J. M.

    1973-09-21

    This part of the completion report pertaining to the NERVA graphite fuel element program covers data collected during the extrusion studies. The physical properties of the fuel element reached the following values: coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) - 7.0 x 10-6/o C (25 - l,OOOo C); modulus of elasticity - 1.5 x lo6 psi; flexural strength - - 8,000 psi; ultimate strain to failure - 5,500 pidin; good thermal stress resistance. Matrices were produced which could be vapor coated with crack-free films of zirconium carbide. The CTE of the matrix was almost equal to the CTE of the zirconium carbide coating.

  4. Burnup measurements on spent fuel elements of the RP-10 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Mora, Mariano; Gallardo Padilla, Alberto; Palomino, Jose Luis Castro, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.p [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN/Peru), Lima (Peru). Grupo de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the measurement, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, of the average burnup attained by Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the RP-10 research reactor. Measurements were performed at the reactor storage pool area using {sup 137}Cs as the only burnup monitor, even for spent fuel elements with cooling times much shorter than two years. The experimental apparatus was previously calibrated in efficiency to obtain absolute average burnup values, which were compared against corresponding ones furnished by reactor physics calculations. The mean deviation between both values amounts to 6%. (author)

  5. THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE USE OF BWR MOX SNF IN THE MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER (MPC) WITH ACD DISPOSAL CONTAINER (SCPB: N/A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.L. Lotz

    1995-11-13

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24,5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: (1) Characterize the conceptual 40 BWR Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. (2) Characterize the conceptual 24 BWR Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Waste Package (WP) design to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment when loaded with BWR MOX SNF. The purpose of this analysis is to respond a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) Subsystem Design, if used with SNF designed for a MOX fuel cycle, do not preclude MPC compatibility with the MGDS. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual MPC design with disposal container which is loaded with BWR MOX SNF under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation, to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts, and to show that the BWR MOX SNF loaded MPC performance is similar to an MPC loaded with commercial BWR SNF. Future design efforts will focus on specific MPC vendor designs and BWR MOX SNF designs when they become available.

  6. Proposal for charging the third rupture fuel element experiment, GEH 12--16, 17, 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Call, R.L.; Kaulitz, D.C.

    1960-01-11

    The objective of this irradiation is to verify the corrosion rate of a cluster-type fuel element under conditions of high specific power and central core temperatures. The test will also be used in the development of rupture detection instrumentation and decontamination procedures as a necessary part in the development of the NPR. In this test a fuel element irradiated to 3200 MWD/T will be ruptured, the rate of rupture product released will be determined and the gamma spectrum from fission products released into the coolant will be observed. Permission is requested for charging three 7-rod cluster fuel elements (one previously irradiated to 3200 MWD/T at the Hanford projects, the other two unirradiated) into the GEH-R33P7 loop of the ETR. The irradiated element will have attached to it a hydraulic mechanism for opening a defect in one of its fuel rods. The other two elements are to serve as heaters to enable the loop to operate at desired temperatures.

  7. Which Elements Should be Recycled for a Comprehensive Fuel Cycle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Piet; Trond Bjornard; Brent Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Robert Hill; Chris Laws; Gretchen Matthern; David Shropshire; Roald Wigeland

    2007-09-01

    Uranium recovery can reduce the mass of waste and possibly the number of waste packages that require geologic disposal. Separated uranium can be managed with the same method (near-surface burial) as used for the larger quantities of depleted uranium or recycled into new fuel. Recycle of all transuranics reduces long-term environmental burden, reduces heat load to repositories, extracts more energy from the original uranium ore, and may have significant proliferation resistance and physical security advantages. Recovery of short-lived fission products cesium and strontium can allow them to decay to low-level waste in facilities tailored to that need, rather than geologic disposal. This could also reduce the number and cost of waste packages requiring geologic disposal. These savings are offset by costs for separation, recycle, and storage systems. Recovery of technetium-99 and iodine-129 can allow them to be sent to geologic disposal in improved waste forms. Such separation avoids contamination of the other products (uranium) and waste (cesium-strontium) streams with long-lived radioisotopes so the material might be disposed as low-level waste. Transmutation of technetium and iodine is a possible future alternative.

  8. Molybdenum-99-producing 37-element fuel bundle neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to a standard CANDU fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichita, E., E-mail: Eleodor.Nichita@uoit.ca; Haroon, J., E-mail: Jawad.Haroon@uoit.ca

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A 37-element fuel bundle modified for {sup 99}Mo production in CANDU reactors is presented. • The modified bundle is neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard bundle. • The modified bundle satisfies all safety criteria satisfied by the standard bundle. - Abstract: {sup 99m}Tc, the most commonly used radioisotope in diagnostic nuclear medicine, results from the radioactive decay of {sup 99}Mo which is currently being produced at various research reactors around the globe. In this study, the potential use of CANDU power reactors for the production of {sup 99}Mo is investigated. A modified 37-element fuel bundle, suitable for the production of {sup 99}Mo in existing CANDU-type reactors is proposed. The new bundle is specifically designed to be neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard 37-element CANDU fuel bundle in normal, steady-state operation and, at the same time, be able to produce significant quantities of {sup 99}Mo when irradiated in a CANDU reactor. The proposed bundle design uses fuel pins consisting of a depleted-uranium centre surrounded by a thin layer of low-enriched uranium. The new molybdenum-producing bundle is analyzed using the lattice transport code DRAGON and the diffusion code DONJON. The proposed design is shown to produce 4081 six-day Curies of {sup 99}Mo activity per bundle when irradiated in the peak-power channel of a CANDU core, while maintaining the necessary reactivity and power rating limits. The calculated {sup 99}Mo yield corresponds to approximately one third of the world weekly demand. A production rate of ∼3 bundles per week can meet the global demand of {sup 99}Mo.

  9. Study on the high-precision laser welding technology of nuclear fuel elements processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y

    2001-01-01

    The proper welding method for appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of welding defects of the appendage parts is mostly apt to occur and it is connected directly with the safty and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. Recently there has been studied all over the world to develope welding technology by laser in nuclear fuel processing, and the appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the laser welded specimens and make some samples for the appendage of bearing pads of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. This study will be also provide the basic data for the fabrications of the appendage of bearing pads and spacers. Especially the laser welding is supposed to be used in the practical application such as precise materials manufacturing fields. In this respect this technology is not only a basic advanced technology with wide applications but also likely to be used for the development of directly applicable technologies for industries, with high potential benefits derived in the view point of economy and industry.

  10. Postirradiation examination and evaluation of Peach Bottom fuel test elements FTE-14 and FTE-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzgraf, J.F.; McCord, F.; Miller, C.M.; Norman, B.L.; Saurwein, J.J.; Wallroth, C.F.

    1979-02-01

    Peach Bottom fuel test elements FTE-14 and FTE-15 were companion nonaccelerated tests of fuel rods and fuel particles representative of the Large High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (LHTGR). The purpose of the tests was to broaden the data base of H-327 graphite and various fuel types; specifically, UO/sub 2/, UC/sub 2/, weak acid resin UC/sub x//O/sub y/, and several fertile fuel types were tested. The irradiation reached peak fuel temperatures of 1600/sup 0/C volume- and time-averaged temperatures of 1300/sup 0/C, and fast fluence exposures up to 2 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Experimental results were compared with predictions based on accelerated irradiation tests, postirradiation heating, and other Peach Bottom test elements to validate HTGR design codes. The nuclear design predictions were modified by measurements which allowed the verification of thermal design calculations and thermocouple readings.

  11. Fuel-element failures in Hanford single-pass reactors 1944--1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. To estimate the doses, the staff of the Source Terms Task use operating information from historical documents to approximate the radioactive emissions. One source of radioactive emissions to the Columbia River came from leaks in the aluminum cladding of the uranium metal fuel elements in single-pass reactors. The purpose of this letter report is to provide photocopies of the documents that recorded these failures. The data from these documents will be used by the Source Terms Task to determine the contribution of single-pass reactor fuel-element failures to the radioactivity of the reactor effluent from 1944 through 1971. Each referenced fuel-element failure occurring in the Hanford single-pass reactors is addressed. The first recorded failure was in 1948, the last in 1970. No records of fuel-element failures were found in documents prior to 1948. Data on the approximately 2000 failures which occurred during the 28 years (1944--1971) of Hanford single-pass reactor operations are provided in this report.

  12. Comparative analysis of preliminary design core of TRIGA Bandung using fuel element plate MTR in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Anwar Ilmar; Umar, Efrizon; Tandian, Nathanael Panagung; Suwono, Aryadi

    2017-01-01

    TRIGA Bandung is a research nuclear reactor owned by Indonesia, located in Bandung with a power of 2 MWth. Nuclear research reactor TRIGA Bandung is used as a center for applied research and development in the field of application of the nuclear technologies. TRIGA Bandung is currently still using a cylindrical fuel element, this raises a new problem - the limited number of existing fuel element. The purpose of this research is the development of the preliminary core design of a nuclear research reactor TRIGA Bandung using fuel element plate MTR. The research method is modeling and simulation the preliminary design core of nuclear research reactor TRIGA Bandung using comparative method of porous media and non-porous media with CFD code. This research shows the velocity flow and temperature distribution and the influence of pressure from the comparison method of k-ɛ standard model and porous media model at the preliminary design in the core area of TRIGA Bandung research reactor with fuel element plate MTR.

  13. Conceptual design report for the mechanical disassembly of Fort St. Vrain fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, D.L. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wadsworth, D.C.; Sekot, J.P.; Skinner, K.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-04-01

    A conceptual design study was prepared that: (1) reviewed the operations necessary to perform the mechanical disassembly of Fort St. Vrain fuel elements; (2) contained a description and survey of equipment capable of performing the necessary functions; and (3) performed a tradeoff study for determining the preferred concepts and equipment specifications. A preferred system was recommended and engineering specifications for this system were developed.

  14. TRISO-Fuel Element Performance Modeling for the Hybrid LIFE Engine with Pu Fuel Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, M; Caro, A

    2010-02-18

    A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the hybrid LIFE engine to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burnup of a weapons-grade Pu blanket. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties for all TRISO layers, and a procedure to remap the elastic solutions in order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2} (E > 0.18 MeV). In order to model fast fluences in the range of {approx} 7 {approx} 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2}, for which no data exist, careful scalings and extrapolations of the known TRISO material properties are carried out under a number of potential scenarios. A number of findings can be extracted from our study. First, failure of the internal pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer occurs within the first two months of operation. Then, the particles behave as BISO-coated particles, with the internal pressure being withstood directly by the SiC layer. Later, after 1.6 years, the remaining PyC crumbles due to void swelling and the fuel particle becomes a single-SiC-layer particle. Unrestrained by the PyC layers, and at the temperatures and fluences in the LIFE engine, the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. Second, the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Obtaining more reliable measurements, especially at higher fluences, is an imperative for the fidelity of our models. Finally, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in the scope of fuel performance. The mechanical integrity of 2-cm graphite pebbles that act as fuel matrix has also been studied and it is concluded that they can reliable serve the entire LIFE burnup cycle without failure.

  15. Verification of the Advanced Nodal Method on BWR Core Analyses by Whole-Core Heterogeneous Transport Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinya Kosaka

    2000-11-12

    Recent boiling water reactor (BWR) core and fuel designs have become more sophisticated and heterogeneous to improve fuel cycle cost, thermal margin, etc. These improvements, however, tend to lead to a strong interference effect among fuel assemblies, and it my cause some inaccuracies in the BWR core analyses by advanced nodal codes. Furthermore, the introduction of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel will lead to a much stronger interference effect between MOX and UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies. However, the CHAPLET multiassembly characteristics transport code was developed recently to solve two-dimensional cell-heterogeneous whole-core problems efficiently, and its results can be used as reference whole-core solutions to verify the accuracy of nodal core calculations. In this paper, the results of nodal core calculations were compared with their reference whole-core transport solutions to verify their accuracy (in k{sub eff}, assembly power and pin power via pin power reconstruction) of the advanced nodal method on both UO{sub 2} and MOX BWR whole-core analyses. Especially, it was investigated if there were any significant differences in the accuracy between MOX and UO{sub 2} results.

  16. Behavior of a VVER fuel element tested under severe accident conditions in the CORA facility. Test results of experiment CORA-W1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-01-01

    Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material. As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the test were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zirconium/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundle to a maximum temperature of approximately 1900 C. With the movement of the melt also heat is transported to the lower region. Below 300 mm elevation the test bundle remained intact due to the axial temeprature distribution. W2 ist characterized by a strong oxidation above 300 mm elevation. Besides the severe oxidation the test bundle resulted in considerable fuel dissolution by ZrNb1/UO{sub 2} interaction in the upper part, complete spacer destruction at 600 mm due to chemical interactions between steel and the ZSrNb1 cladding. Despite some specific features the material behavior of the VVER-1000 bundle is comparable to that observed in the PWR and BWR test using fuel elements typical for Western countries. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Versuchsbuendel CORA-W1 hatte kein Absorberelement. Wie in den CORA-Versuchen zuvor wurden die Testbuendel in Dampfatmosphaere Temperaturtransienten mit langsamer Aufheizrate ausgesetzt. Damit wurde ein Unfallablauf fuer einen LWR simuliert, der sich aus einem Kuehlmittelverluststoerfall durch Auftreten eines sogenannten kleinen Lecks entwickeln kann. Die Temperatureskalation - aufgrund der exothermen Zirkon/Niob-Wasserdampfreaktion - setzte ab ca. 1100 C ein. Die Hoechsttemperaturen im Buendel betrugen 2000 C. Die Versuchsdaten des Experiments CORA-W1 werden zusammen mit ersten Ergebnissen der Nachuntersuchung dargelegt. Das Versuchsbuendel weist eine starke Oxidation im oberen Bereich auf. Der untere Buendelabschnitt (bis 400 mm) blieb aufgrund der niedrigen Temperaturen in diesem

  17. Test design description Volume 2, Part 1. IFR-1 metal fuel irradiation test (AK-181) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1986-06-01

    The IFR-1 Test, designated as the AK-181 Test Assembly, will be the first irradiation test of wire wrapped, sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The test is part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuels program conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the Innovative Reactor Concepts Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). One subassembly, containing 169 fuel elements, will be irradiated for 600 full power days to achieve 10 at.% burnup. Three metal fuel alloys (U-10Zr, U-8Pu-10Zr) will be irradiated in D9 cladding tubes. The metal fuel elements have a fuel-smeared density of 75% and each contains five slugs. The enriched zone contains three slugs and is 36-in. long. One 6.5-in. long depleted uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) was loaded at each end of the enriched zone. the fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for wirewrapping and assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains relevant data on compositions, densities, dimensions and weights for the cast fuel slugs and completed fuel elements. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "Users` Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  18. Improving the neutronic characteristics of a boiling water reactor by using uranium zirconium hydride fuel instead of uranium dioxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, Ahmed Abdelghafar [Higher Technological Institute, Ramadan (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The present work discusses two different models of boiling water reactor (BWR) bundle to compare the neutronic characteristics of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH{sub 1.6}) fuel. Each bundle consists of four assemblies. The BWR assembly fueled with UO{sub 2} contains 8 × 8 fuel rods while that fueled with UZrH{sub 1.6} contains 9 × 9 fuel rods. The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport code, based on the Mont Carlo method, is used to design three dimensional models for BWR fuel bundles at typical operating temperatures and pressure conditions. These models are used to determine the multiplication factor, pin-by-pin power distribution, axial power distribution, thermal neutron flux distribution, and axial thermal neutron flux. The moderator and coolant (water) are permitted to boil within the BWR core forming steam bubbles, so it is important to calculate the reactivity effect of voiding at different values. It is found that the hydride fuel bundle design can be simplified by eliminating water rods and replacing the control blade with control rods. UZrH{sub 1.6} fuel improves the performance of the BWR in different ways such as increasing the energy extracted per fuel assembly, reducing the uranium ore, and reducing the plutonium accumulated in the BWR through burnup.

  19. Fuel composition optimization in a 78-element fuel bundle for use in a pressure tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, D.W.; Novog, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    A 78-element fuel bundle containing a plutonium-thorium fuel mixture has been proposed for a Generation IV pressure tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor. In this work, using a lattice cell model created with the code DRAGON,the lattice pitch, fuel composition (fraction of PuO{sub 2} in ThO{sub 2}) and radial enrichment profile of the 78-element bundle is optimized using a merit function and a metaheuristic search algorithm.The merit function is designed such that the optimal fuel maximizes fuel utilization while minimizing peak element ratings and coolant void reactivity. A radial enrichment profile of 10 wt%, 11 wt% and 20 wt% PuO{sub 2} (inner to outer ring) with a lattice pitch of 25.0 cm was found to provide the optimal merit score based on the aforementioned criteria. (author)

  20. Review: Circulation of Inorganic Elements in Combustion of Alternative Fuels in Cement Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar; Nørskov, Linda Kaare; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Cement production is an energy-intensive process, which traditionally has been dependent on fossil fuels. However, the use of alternative fuels, i.e., selected waste, biomass, and byproducts with recoverable calorific value, is constantly increasing. Combustion of these fuels is more challenging...... the internal circulation of S, Cl, Na, and K. Compounds containing these elements, such as alkali salts, evaporate when exposed to high temperatures and subsequently condense in colder parts of the plant. The transformation of the volatile inorganic species at different locations in the cement plant...... is important, because a high internal circulation affects the process stability and operation through formation of buildups and blockages, ring formation, and shell corrosion, resulting in reduced clinker production, higher heat consumption, and kiln or plant stops. The present review describes the internal...

  1. Optimization of thorium-uranium content in a 54-element fuel bundle for use in a CANDU-SCWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, D.W.; Novog, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Engineering Physics, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    A new 54-element fuel bundle design has been proposed for use in a pressure-tube supercritical water-cooled reactor, a pre-conceptual evolution of existing CANDU reactors. Pursuant to the goals of the Generation IV International Forum regarding advancement in nuclear fuel cycles, optimization of the thorium and uranium content in each ring of fuel elements has been studied with the objectives of maximizing the achievable fuel utilization (burnup) and total thorium content within the bundle, while simultaneously minimizing the linear element ratings and coolant void reactivity. The bundle was modeled within a reactor lattice cell using WIMS-AECL, and the uranium and thorium content in each ring of fuel elements was optimized using a weighted merit function of the aforementioned criteria and a metaheuristic search algorithm. (author)

  2. GOTHIC MODEL OF BWR SECONDARY CONTAINMENT DRAWDOWN ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, P.N.

    2004-10-06

    This article introduces a GOTHIC version 7.1 model of the Secondary Containment Reactor Building Post LOCA drawdown analysis for a BWR. GOTHIC is an EPRI sponsored thermal hydraulic code. This analysis is required by the Utility to demonstrate an ability to restore and maintain the Secondary Containment Reactor Building negative pressure condition. The technical and regulatory issues associated with this modeling are presented. The analysis includes the affect of wind, elevation and thermal impacts on pressure conditions. The model includes a multiple volume representation which includes the spent fuel pool. In addition, heat sources and sinks are modeled as one dimensional heat conductors. The leakage into the building is modeled to include both laminar as well as turbulent behavior as established by actual plant test data. The GOTHIC code provides components to model heat exchangers used to provide fuel pool cooling as well as area cooling via air coolers. The results of the evaluation are used to demonstrate the time that the Reactor Building is at a pressure that exceeds external conditions. This time period is established with the GOTHIC model based on the worst case pressure conditions on the building. For this time period the Utility must assume the primary containment leakage goes directly to the environment. Once the building pressure is restored below outside conditions the release to the environment can be credited as a filtered release.

  3. HEDL contribution to SRL fuel recycle program. Quarterly report, January--March 1977. [Sensitivity analysis of LMFBR fuel fabrication cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.F.

    1977-08-01

    Research on LWR fuel cycle is being done in the following categories: economic studies (sensitivity analysis of LMFBR fuel fabrication costs), spent fuel receipt and storage (failure of PWR and BWR fuel assemblies), fuel materials preparation or finishing processes, reduction of TRU waste generation, and environmental impacts. 12 tables. (DLC)

  4. Simulated accident testing of a fuel element from the HFR-EU1bis irradiation campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O., E-mail: Oliver.Seeger@ec.europa.eu; Knebel, K.; Weerd, W. de; Carbol, P.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V.; Allelein, H.-J.

    2014-05-01

    The Cold Finger Apparatus (KühlFinger-Apparatur – KüFA) in operation at JRC-ITU is designed to experimentally examine the effects of Depressurization and LOss of Forced Circulation (DLOFC) accident scenarios on irradiated High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles. While remaining under an inert helium atmosphere, a HTR fuel pebble is subjected to heating schedules up to 1800 °C for several hundred hours. Fission gas release is monitored online during the experiment and volatile fission products are collected on condensation plates made of stainless steel positioned above the fuel sample on a “cold finger”, which is water-cooled to approximately 100 °C. Analysis of the substances deposited on the plates by means of gamma spectroscopy provides information on the fission product release as a function of time and temperature. The most recent KüFA test was performed on a fuel element irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten in the HFR-EU1bis campaign. The condensation plates feature dose rates up to 80 mSv/h and the lab background levels to some hundred μSv/h. Thus, effective collimation and background shielding is mandatory in order to perform a quantitatively accurate analysis of the samples by means of gamma spectroscopy. We present a detailed description of the experimental setup and the calibration procedure. The time-dependent fractional release of the volatile fission products {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs is shown. The results for the most recently tested fuel pebble HFR-EU1bis/5 are compared to data obtained for other fuel elements.

  5. Comparative analysis of results between CASMO, MCNP and Serpent for a suite of Benchmark problems on BWR reactors; Analisis comparativo de resultados entre CASMO, MCNP y SERPENT para una suite de problemas Benchmark en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xolocostli M, J. V.; Vargas E, S.; Gomez T, A. M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Reyes F, M. del C.; Del Valle G, E., E-mail: vicente.xolocostli@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, UP - Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a comparison is made in analyzing the suite of Benchmark problems for reactors type BWR between CASMO-4, MCNP6 and Serpent code. The Benchmark problem consists of two different geometries: a fuel cell of a pin and assembly type BWR. To facilitate the study of reactors physics in the fuel pin their nuclear characteristics are provided to detail, such as burnt dependence, the reactivity of selected nuclide, etc. With respect to the fuel assembly, the presented results are regarding to infinite multiplication factor for burning different steps and different vacuum conditions. Making the analysis of this set of Benchmark problems provides comprehensive test problems for the next fuels generation of BWR reactors with high extended burned. It is important to note that when making this comparison the purpose is to validate the methodologies used in modeling for different operating conditions, if the case is of other BWR assembly. The results will be within a range with some uncertainty, considering that does not depend on code that is used. Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN (Mexico) has accumulated some experience in using Serpent, due to the potential of this code over other commercial codes such as CASMO and MCNP. The obtained results for the infinite multiplication factor are encouraging and motivate the studies to continue with the generation of the X S of a core to a next step a respective nuclear data library is constructed and this can be used by codes developed as part of the development project of the Mexican Analysis Platform of Nuclear Reactors AZTLAN. (Author)

  6. Interpretation of the VENUS VIP-BWR program with APOLLO2.8 reference and optimized MOC schemes for 8 x 8 UO{sub 2} and MOX BWR assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, P., E-mail: patrick.blaise@cea.f [CEA - Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de CADARACHE - DEN/CAD/DER/SPRC, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Vidal, J.-F.; Santamarina, A.; Bernard, D. [CEA - Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de CADARACHE - DEN/CAD/DER/SPRC, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2010-11-15

    The interpretation of the VIP-BWR program conducted in the CEN.SCK Mol VENUS critical facility (Belgium), has been performed with the new APOLLO2.8 product and its CEA2005V4.1 library based on the JEFF3.1.1 file. Both reference SHEM-MOC (281groups without equivalence) and Optimized BWR 26G (26 groups with equivalence) schemes are used for UO{sub 2} and MOX BWR assembly calculations. The VIP-BWR program was aimed to provide an experimental database for BWR neutronics tools in mixed Gd poisoned configurations with 8 x 8 UO{sub 2} and MOX assemblies. The experimental conditions are relatively representative of actual industrial BWR core characteristics, at least in terms of void fraction. Measured pin-by-pin power distributions enable to exact valuable information at various interfaces. For fresh (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-Gd) and recycled UO{sub 2} (UO{sub 2} only) cores loadings, the information is given through the 'UO{sub 2}' core. In the case of partial MOX loadings (UO{sub 2}/MOX interface), the power distributions are available through the 'T-MOX' core. All critical sizes are predicted within 1 with SHEM-MOC reference calculation scheme. For UO{sub 2} core, the (C-E) on k{sub eff} are (95 {+-} 266) pcm and (203 {+-} 266) pcm for SHEM-MOC and Optimized scheme respectively. For MOX core, the results are (87 {+-} 214) pcm and (283 {+-} 214) pcm. The uncertainties take into account both measurement uncertainties and technological uncertainties such as enrichment, clad thicknesses, grid pitch or fuel densities. Average (C-E)/E on radial fission rate distributions are in excellent agreement in the UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}-Gd assemblies. In mixed loading cores, the calculation shows an over prediction in the MOX fuel pin. This points out a systematic swing between UO{sub 2} and MOX. For average fission rates in UO{sub 2}, the C/E results are within {+-} 0.2% with SHEM-MOC and OptimizedBWR26G. For average power in MOX, the C/E results are within {+-}0

  7. Finite element analysis of the contact between fuel rod and spacer grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Young Koon; Kang, Heung Seok; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Song, Kee Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    For the research on the fretting failure problem of nuclear fuel, the contact length and normal stress field are evaluated for the contact between fuel rod and spacer grid by using the Finite Element Method (FEM). An assumption of semi-infiniteness is necessary for applying the Contact Mechanics which is based on the classical theory of elasticity to the present problem. For the contact problem of fuel fretting, the contact mechanical solutions could be utilized well with sufficient accuracy if the contact bodies (i.e., the cladding tube and the spacer grid) can be assumed as semi-infinite bodies. To this end, the contact length evaluated by FEM is discussed together with the relevant research which concerned the effect of dimension for the validity of the assumption of semi-infiniteness. Normal stress profile on the contact is also studied through comparing the theoretical and the FE results. For the analysis of contact problem by FEM, ANSYS code (Version 5.3) is utilized and the geometry is chosen to be the Hertzian (cylinder-to-cylinder), the strip-to-cylinder and the fuel rod/spacer grid contact (strip-to-tube). Present research will be utilized for accessing the fuel fretting problem by FEM together with the theoretical (i.e., contact mechanical) analysis which has been published as KAERI/TR-1113/98. (author). 15 refs., 44 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. CFD analysis of the 37-element fuel channel for CANDU6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.T.; Rhee, B.W.; Park, J.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    We analyzed the thermal-hydraulic behavior of coolant flow along fuel bundles with appendages of end support plate, spacer pad, and bearing pad, which are the CANDU6 characteristic design. The computer code used is a commercial CFD code, CFX-12. The present CFD analysis model calculates the conjugate heat transfer between the fuel and coolant. Using the same volumetric heat source as the O6 channel, the CFD predictions of the axial temperature distributions of the fuel element are compared with those by the CATHENA (one-dimensional safety analysis code for CANDU6 reactor). It is shown that CFX-12 predictions are in good agreement with those by the CATHENA code for the single liquid convection region (especially before the axial position of the first half of the channel length). However, the CFD analysis at the second half of the fuel channel, where the two-phase flow is expected to occur, over-predicts the fuel temperature, since the wall boiling model is not considered in the present CFD model. (author)

  9. Design of a mixed recharge with MOX assemblies of greater relation of moderation for a BWR reactor; Diseno de una recarga mixta con ensambles MOX de mayor relacion de moderacion para un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The study of the fuel of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium (MOX) it has been topic of investigation in many countries of the world and those are even discussed in many places the benefits of reprocessing the spent fuel to extract the plutonium created during the irradiation of the fuel in the nuclear power reactors. At the moment those reactors that have been loaded partially with MOX fuel, are mainly of the type PWR where a mature technology has been achieved in some countries like they are France, Belgium and England, however the experience with reactors of the type BWR is more limited and it is continued studying the best way to introduce this type of fuel in BWRs, one of the main problems to introduce MOX in reactors BWR is the neutronic design of the same one, existing different concepts to introduce the plutonium in the assemblies of fuel and one of them is the one of increasing the relationship of moderation of the assemble. In this work a MOX fuel assemble design is presented and the obtained results so far in the ININ. These results indicate that the investigated concept has some exploitable advantages in the use of the MOX fuel. (Author)

  10. Cerenkov Characteristics of BWR Assemblies using a Prototype DCVD with a Back-Illuminated CCD. Prepared for the Canadian Safeguards Support Program and the Swedish Support Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.D.; Gerwing, A.F. [Channel Systems Inc., Pinawa MA (Canada); Maxwell, R. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Larsson, M.; Axell, K.; Hildingsson, L. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindberg, B. [LENS-TECH AB, Skellefteaa (Sweden); Sundkvist, E. [Teleca Design and Development, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    The Canadian and Swedish Safeguards Support Programs have developed a prototype Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) to verify spent fuel. Field measurements in Swedish nuclear power reactor fuel bays on BWR fuel and non-fuel assemblies resulted in new Cerenkov information that offers the possibility of computer-assisted verification of spent-fuel assemblies. A number of fuel assemblies with missing fuel rods were examined. The missing fuel rods are easily detected when not hidden under the lifting handle of the fuel assembly. Initial studies of off-angle viewing of these assemblies show promise for the detection of the missing fuel rods under the lifting handle. The quantitative nature of the charge-coupled device was examined. A number of procedures were developed to quantify parameters such as image intensity and alignment (collimation) of fuel and no fuel assemblies. The quantitative studies on fuel assembly intensity as a function of cooling time showed excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  11. Genusa Bepu methodologies for the safety analysis of BWRs; Metodologias Bepu de Genusa para el analisis de seguridad de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, M.; Garcia, J.; Goodson, C.; Ibarra, L.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the BEPU methodologies developed by General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) for the evaluation of the BWR reactor safety analysis based on the TRACG best-estimate code. These methodologies are applicable to a wide range of events, operational transients (AOO), anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and instability events; to different BWR types operating commercially. General Electric (GE( designs and other vendors, including Generation III+ESBWR; to the new operation strategies, and to all types of BWR fuel. Their application achieves, among other benefits, a better understanding of the overall plant response and an improvement in margins to the operating limits; thus, the increase of flexibility in reactor operation and reduction in generation costs. (Author)

  12. Development of the manufacture and process for DUPIC fuel elements; development of the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Choi, Myong Seon; Yang, Hyun Tae; Kim, Dong Gyun; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Jin Ho [Yeungnam University, Kyongsan (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this research is to set up the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel element. High temperature corrosion test and the SCC test for Zircaloy-4 were performed, and also the possibility of the ultrasonic test technique was verified for the quality evaluation and control of the laser welds in the DUPIC fuel rod end cap. From the evaluation of corrosion properties with measuring the weight gain and observing oxide film of the specimen that had been in the circumstance of steam(400 .deg. C, 1,500 psi) by max. 70 days later, the weight gain of the welded specimens was larger than original tube and the weight increasing rate increased with the exposed days. For the Development of techniques for ultrasonic test, semi-auto ultrasonic test system has been made based on immersion pulse-echo technique using spherically concentrated ultrasonic beam. Subsequently, developed ultrasonic test technique is quite sensible to shape of welds in the inside and outside of tube as well as crack, undercut and expulsion, and also this ultrasonic test, together with metallurgical fracture test, has good reliance as enough to be used for control method of welding process. 43 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  13. The effects of fuel characteristics and engine operating conditions on the elemental composition of emissions from heavy duty diesel buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.C.H. Lim; G.A. Ayoko; L. Morawska; Z.D. Ristovski; E.R. Jayaratne [Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences

    2007-08-15

    The effects of fuel characteristics and engine operating conditions on elemental composition of emissions from twelve heavy duty diesel buses have been investigated. Two types of diesel fuels - low sulfur diesel (LSD) and ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels with 500 ppm and 50 ppm sulfur contents respectively and 3 driving modes corresponding to 25%, 50% and 100% power were used. Elements present in the tailpipe emissions were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and those found in measurable quantities included Mg, Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ti, Ni, Pb, Be, P, Se, Ti and Ge. Multivariate analyses using multi-criteria decision making methods (MCDM), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) facilitated the extraction of information about the structure of the data. MCDM showed that the emissions of the elements were strongly influenced by the engine driving conditions while the PCA loadings plots showed that the emission factors of the elements were correlated with those of other pollutants such as particle number, total suspended particles, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx. Partial least square analysis revealed that the emission factors of the elements were strongly dependent on the fuel parameters such as the fuel sulfur content, fuel density, distillation point and cetane index. Strong correlations were also observed between these pollutants and the engine power or exhaust temperature. The study provides insights into the possible role of fuel sulfur content in the emission of inorganic elements from heavy duty diesel vehicles. 39 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Trace elements in co-combustion of solid recovered fuel and coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Glarborg, Peter; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    linearly with their content in fuel ash. This linear tendency was affected when the fuels were mixed with additives. The volatility of trace elements during combustion was assessed by applying a relative enrichment (RE) factor, and TEM–EDS analysis was conducted to provide qualitative interpretations...... was collected in a chamber, large fly ash particles were collected by a cyclone with a cut-off diameter of ~2.5 μm, and the remaining fly ash particles were gathered in a filter. It was found that when coal was co-fired with SRF, the As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn content in filter ash/cyclone ash increased almost...... that trace element emission would be significantly increased when coal is co-fired with SRF, which may greatly enhance the toxicity of the dusts from coal-fired power plant. In order to minimize trace element emission in co-combustion, in addition to lowering the trace element content in SRF, utilizing SRF...

  15. Development of a prototype pin-by-pin fine mesh calculation code for BWR core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Akio; Yamane, Yoshihiro [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kosaka, Shinya; Hirano, Gou [TEPCO SYSTEMS CORPORATION, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    A prototype core analysis code for BWR, SUBARU, which is based on the three-dimensional pin-by-pin fine-mesh calculation, is being developed. The SUBARU code has several features, e.g., incorporation of the SP3 transport theory, capability to treat the staggered meshes, and so on. In this paper, to estimate the prediction accuracy of this core analysis code, a hypothetical 2D ABWR core which is consisted by 8x8 low-enrichment UO{sub 2} fuel assembly, 9x9 high-enrichment UO{sub 2} fuel assembly, and 10x10 MOX fuel assembly is analyzed. To investigate the prediction accuracy, we compared the pin-wise fission rate distribution which was obtained by the cell-heterogeneous transport calculation by MOC. To evaluate the computational costs, a hypothetical 3D ABWR core is also used. These results suggest that SUBARU would have enough accuracy and reasonable calculation costs for the reference BWR core analysis when further investigation is taken into account. (authors)

  16. Investigation of a Tricarbide Grooved Ring Fuel Element for a Nuclear Thermal Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Brian D.; Emrich, Bill; Tucker, Dennis; Barnes, Marvin; Donders, Nicolas; Benensky, Kelsa

    2017-01-01

    Deep space exploration, especially that of Mars, is on the horizon as the next big challenge for space exploration. Nuclear propulsion, through which high thrust and efficiency can be achieved, is a promising option for decreasing the cost and logistics of such a mission. Work on nuclear thermal engines goes back to the days of the NERVA program. Currently, nuclear thermal propulsion is under development again in various forms to provide a superior propulsion system for deep space exploration. The authors have been working to develop a concept nuclear thermal engine that uses a grooved ring fuel element as an alternative to the traditional hexagonal rod design. The authors are also studying the use of carbide fuels. The concept was developed in order to increase surface area and heat transfer to the propellant. The use of carbides would also raise the temperature limitations of the reactor. It is hoped that this could lead to a higher thrust to weight nuclear thermal engine. This paper describes the modeling of neutronics, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics of this alternative nuclear fuel element geometry. Fabrication experiments of grooved rings from carbide refractory metals are also presented along with material characterization and interactions with a hot hydrogen environment.

  17. Calibration of the Failed-Fuel-Element Detection Systems in the Aagesta Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O.

    1966-06-15

    Results from a calibration of the systems for detection of fuel element ruptures in the Aagesta reactor are presented. The calibration was carried out by means of foils of zirconium-uranium alloy which were placed in a special fuel assembly. The release of fission products from these foils is due mainly to recoil and can be accurately calculated. Before the foils were used in the reactor their corrosion behaviour in high temperature water was investigated. The results obtained with the precipitator systems for bulk detection and localization are in good agreement with the expected performance. The sensitivity of these systems was found to be high enough for detection and localization of small defects of pin-hole type ({nu} = 10{sup -8}/s ). The general performance of the systems was satisfactory during the calibration tests, although a few adjustments are desirable. A bulk detecting system for monitoring of activities in the moderator, in which the {gamma}-radiation from coolant samples is measured directly after an ion exchanger, showed lower sensitivity than expected from calculations. It seems that the sensitivity of the latter system has to be improved to admit the detection of small defects. In the ion exchanger system, and to some extent in the precipitator systems, the background from A{sup 41} in the coolant limits the sensitivity. The calibration technique utilized seems to be of great advantage when investigating the performance of failed-fuel-element detection systems.

  18. Study on nuclear physics of high burn-up full MOX-BWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Okubo, Tsutomu; Ochiai, Masa-aki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-08-01

    In this report, neutronics study of full Mixed-oxide (MOX) high burn-up BWR core is presented. Our design goals are about 3-year cycle length, four-batch refueling scheme and more than 100GWd/t fuel discharge burn-up. Base core configuration is 1,350MWe US version of ABWR with 9 x 9 type fuel assembly. Investigation of the reactor core has been carried out by arranging Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents in fuel rods and changing water to fuel volume ratio (V{sub m}/V{sub f}) through the number of water rods or adjustment of fuel clad diameter. JAERI`s general purpose neutronics code system SRAC95 was used for two dimensional XY fuel assembly cell neutronics calculations. Calculated cases are for a comparatively high moderated fuel assembly with 9 water rods, a fuel assembly without water rods and a comparatively low moderated fuel assembly without water rods and with larger fuel clad diameter. All these 3 cases seem to achieve our design goals mentioned above. For the last case, three dimensional core burn-up calculation was performed by this code system. This case seems to attain a low linear power density and the operation with all control rod out. (author)

  19. Analysis of assemblies exchange in the core of a reactor BWR; Analisis del intercambio de ensambles en el nucleo de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauil U, J. S. [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Facultad de Ingenieria, Av. Industrias no contaminantes por Anillo Periferico Norte s/n, Apdo. Postal 150 Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Fuentes M, L.; Castillo M, J. A.; Ortiz S, J. J.; Perusquia del Cueto, R., E-mail: san_dino@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The performance of the core of a boiling water reactor (BWR) was evaluated when two assemblies are exchanged during the fuel reload in erroneous way. All with the purpose of analyzing the value of the neutrons effective multiplication factor and the thermal limits for an exchange of assemblies. In their realization the mentioned study was based in a transition cycle of the Unit 1 of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. The obtained results demonstrate that when carrying out an exchange between two fuel assemblies in erroneous way, with regard to the original reload, the changes in the neutrons effective multiplication factor do not present a serious problem, unless the exchange has been carried out among a very burnt assembly with one fresh, where this last is taken to the periphery. (Author)

  20. Obtention control bars patterns for a BWR using Tabo search; Obtencion de patrones de barras de control para un BWR usando busqueda Tabu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, A.; Ortiz, J.J.; Alonso, G. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico 52045 (Mexico); Morales, L.B. [UNAM, IIMAS, Ciudad Universitaria, D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Valle, E. del [IPN, ESFM, Unidad Profesional ' Adolfo Lopez Mateos' , Col. Lindavista 07738, D. F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: jacm@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The obtained results when implementing the technique of tabu search, for to optimize patterns of control bars in a BWR type reactor, using the CM-PRESTO code are presented. The patterns of control bars were obtained for the designs of fuel reloads obtained in a previous work, using the same technique. The obtained results correspond to a cycle of 18 months using 112 fresh fuels enriched at the 3.53 of U-235. The used technique of tabu search, prohibits recently visited movements, in the position that correspond to the axial positions of the control bars, additionally the tiempo{sub t}abu matrix is used for to manage a size of variable tabu list and the objective function is punished with the frequency of the forbidden movements. The obtained patterns of control bars improve the longitude of the cycle with regard to the reference values and they complete the restrictions of safety. (Author)

  1. Studies on production planning of IPEN fuel-element plant in order to meet RMB demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negro, Miguel L.M.; Saliba-Silva, Adonis M.; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: mlnegro@ipen.br, E-mail: saliba@ipen.br, E-mail: mdurazzo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The plant of the Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) will have to change its current laboratorial production level to an industrial level in order to meet the fuel demand of RMB and of IEA-R1. CCN's production process is based on the hydrolysis of UF6, which is not a frequent production route for nuclear fuel. The optimization of the production capacity of such a production route is a new field of studies. Two different approaches from the area of Operations Research (OR) were used in this paper. The first one was the PERT/CPM technique and the second one was the creation of a mathematical linear model for minimization of the production time. PERT/CPM's results reflect the current situation and disclose which production activities may not be critical. The results of the second approach show a new average time of 3.57 days to produce one Fuel Element and set the need of inventory. The mathematical model is dynamic, so that it issues better results if performed monthly. CCN's management team will therefore have a clearer view of the process times and production and inventory levels. That may help to shape the decisions that need to be taken for the enlargement of the plant's production capacity. (author)

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of plate type nuclear fuel elements during manufacturing stage using ultrasonic test method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Mucio Jose Drumond de; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Alencar, Donizete Anderson de; Silva Junior, Silverio Ferreira da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Nucleo de Tecnologia do Combustivel], e-mail: mjdb@cdtn.br, e-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, e-mail: daa@cdtn.br, e-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Structural discontinuities, such as cracks and bonding lacks at the core/cladding interface can be introduced in plate type nuclear fuel elements during the manufacturing stages, due to the mechanical and thermal processing conditions. They can reduce the performance of the nuclear fuel during its operational life or contribute to its premature failure. Plate type nuclear fuels (PTNF) consist of a core formed by a dispersion of UO{sub 2} into a metallic matrix, involved by a metallic cladding. Nondestructive testing methods such as eddy current, radiography and ultrasonic have been used to detect and monitoring discontinuities generated in the fuel's manufacturing stage, each one presenting advantages and limitations. The use of ultrasonic testing for this purpose presents two main difficulties: the small thickness of the plates as well as the presence of materials with different characteristics. The study described in this paper presents the methodology used in the evaluation of a prototype of PTNF by ultrasonic testing method, using different test techniques and transducers. The main results obtained and the next steps to be developed in this activity are discussed. (author)

  3. Residual stress analysis in BWR pressure vessel attachments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, R.J.; Leung, C.P. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)); Pont, D. (FRAMASOFT+CSI, 69 - Lyon (France). Div. of Framatome)

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses from welding processes can be the primary driving force for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR components. Thus, a better understanding of the causes and nature of these residual stresses can help assess and remedy SCC. Numerical welding simulation software, such as SYSWELD, and material property data have been used to quantify residual stresses for application to SCC assessments in BWR components. Furthermore, parametric studies using SYSWELD have revealed which variables significantly affect predicted residual stress. Overall, numerical modeling techniques can be used to evaluate residual stress for SCC assessments of BWR components and to identify and plan future SCC research.

  4. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  5. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  6. Fuel element failure detection experiments, evaluation of the experiments at KNK II/1 (Intermediate Report)

    CERN Document Server

    Bruetsch, D

    1983-01-01

    In the frame of the fuel element failure detection experiments at KNK II with its first core the measurement devices of INTERATOM were taken into operation in August 1981 and were in operation almost continuously. Since the start-up until the end of the first KNK II core operation plugs with different fuel test areas were inserted in order to test the efficiency of the different measuring devices. The experimental results determined during this test phase and the gained experiences are described in this report and valuated. All three measuring techniques (Xenon adsorption line XAS, gas-chromatograph GC and precipitator PIT) could fulfil the expectations concerning their susceptibility. For XAS and GC the nuclide specific sensitivities as determined during the preliminary tests could be confirmed. For PIT the influences of different parameters on the signal yield could be determined. The sensitivity of the device could not be measured due to a missing reference measuring point.

  7. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can

  8. BWR Anticipated Transients Without Scram Leading to Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng L. Y.; Baek J.; Cuadra, A.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

    2013-11-10

    Anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in aboiling water reactor (BWR) were simulated in order to understand reactor response and determine the effectiveness of automatic and operator actions to mitigate this beyond-design-basis accident. The events of interest herein are initiated by a turbine trip when the reactor is operating in the expanded operating domainMELLLA+ [maximum extended load line limit plus]. In these events the reactor may initially be at up to 120% of the original licensed thermal power (OLTP) and at flow rates as low as 80% of rated.For these (and similar) ATWS events the concern isthat when the reactor power decreases in response to a dual recirculation pump trip, the core will become unstable and large amplitude oscillations will begin. The occurrence of these power oscillations, if left unmitigated, may result in fuel damage, and the amplitude of the poweroscillations may hamper the effectiveness of the injection of dissolved neutron absorber through the standby liquid control system (SLCS).

  9. BWR/5 Pressure-Suppression Pool Response during an SBO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ortiz-Villafuerte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP/SCDAPSIM Mod 3.4 has been used to simulate a station blackout occurring at a BWR/5 power station. Further, a simplified model of a wet well and dry well has been added to the NSSS model to study the response of the primary containment during the evolution of this accident. The initial event leading to severe accident was considered to be a LOOP with simultaneous scram. The results show that RCIC alone can keep the core fully covered, but even in this case about 30% of the original liquid water inventory in the PSP is vaporized. During the SBO, without RCIC, this inventory is reduced about 5% more within six hours. Further, a significant pressure rise occurs in containment at about the time when a sharp increase of heat generation occurs in RPV due to cladding oxidation. Failure temperature of fuel clad is also reached at this point. As the accident progresses, conditions for containment venting can be reached in about nine hours, although there still exists considerable margin before reaching containment design pressure. Detailed information of accident progress in reactor vessel and containment is presented and discussed.

  10. Instrument for determining the transuranic element content of chopped leached fuel hulls and other materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodzinski, R. L.; Wogman, N. A.; Nielson, H. L.; Brown, D. P.

    1979-07-01

    An instrument has been designed, constructed, and evaluated for the identification and quantitative determination of transuranic elements by detection of neutrons emitted from their (..cap alpha.., n) and spontaneous fission reactions. Although optimized for batch evaluation of chopped leached nuclear fuel cladding hulls, the principle can be adapted to continuous feed operations. Unique electronic circuitry permits the sorting of neutron emissions depending on their origin which can be directly related to the isotopic composition of very small amounts of transuranic activities present in extreme gamma radiation fields. Efficiencies, sensitivities, and detection limits are discussed.

  11. STAT, GAPS, STRAIN, DRWDIM: a system of computer codes for analyzing HTGR fuel test element metrology data. User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurwein, J.J.

    1977-08-01

    A system of computer codes has been developed to statistically reduce Peach Bottom fuel test element metrology data and to compare the material strains and fuel rod-fuel hole gaps computed from these data with HTGR design code predictions. The codes included in this system are STAT, STRAIN, GAPS, and DRWDIM. STAT statistically evaluates test element metrology data yielding fuel rod, fuel body, and sleeve irradiation-induced strains; fuel rod anisotropy; and additional data characterizing each analyzed fuel element. STRAIN compares test element fuel rod and fuel body irradiation-induced strains computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. GAPS compares test element fuel rod, fuel hole heat transfer gaps computed from metrology data with the corresponding design code predictions. DRWDIM plots the measured and predicted gaps and strains. Although specifically developed to expedite the analysis of Peach Bottom fuel test elements, this system can be applied, without extensive modification, to the analysis of Fort St. Vrain or other HTGR-type fuel test elements.

  12. BWR water chemistry guidelines and PWR primary water chemistry guidelines in Japan – Purpose and technical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka, E-mail: kawamuh@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Katsumura, Yousuke [University of Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shunsuke [Tohoku University (Japan); Mizuno, Takayuki [Mie University (Japan); Kitajima, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (Japan); Terachi, Takumi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (Japan); Nagase, Makoto; Usui, Naoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Shoda, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Takao [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Framework of BWR/PWR water chemistry Guidelines in Japan are presented. • Guideline necessity, definitions, philosophy and technical background are mentioned. • Some guideline settings for control parameters and recommendations are explaines. • Chemistry strategy is also mentioned. - Abstract: After 40 years of light water reactor (LWR) operations in Japan, the sustainable development of water chemistry technologies has aimed to ensure the highest coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability performance for maintaining LWRs in the world; additionally, it aimed to achieve an excellent dose rate reduction. Although reasonable control and diagnostic parameters are utilized by each boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) owner, it is recognized that specific values are not shared among everyone involved. To ensure the reliability of BWR and PWR operation and maintenance, relevant members of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish guidelines for water chemistry. The Japanese BWR and PWR water chemistry guidelines provide strategies to improve material and fuel reliability performance as well as to reduce dosing rates. The guidelines also provide reasonable “control values”, “diagnostic values” and “action levels” for multiple parameters, and they stipulate responses when these levels are exceeded. Specifically, “conditioning parameters” are adopted in the Japanese PWR primary water chemistry guidelines. Good practices for operational conditions are also discussed with reference to long-term experience. This paper presents the purpose, technical background and framework of the preliminary water chemistry guidelines for Japanese BWRs and PWRs. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful as an introduction to achieve safety and reliability during operations.

  13. Study on the effect of the CANFLEX-NU fuel element bowing on the critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Cho, Moon Sung; Jeon, Ji Su

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the CANFLEX-NU fuel element bowing on the critical heat flux is reviewed and analyzed, which is requested by KINS as the Government design licensing condition for the use of the fuel bundles in CANDU power reactors. The effect of the gap between two adjacent fuel elements on the critical heat flux and onset-of-dryout power is studied. The reduction of the width of a single inter-rod gap from its nominal size to the minimum manufacture allowance of 1 mm has a negligible effects on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the bundle for the given set of boundary conditions applied to the CANFLEX-43 element bundle in an uncrept channel. As expected, the in-reactor irradiation test results show that there are no evidence of the element bow problems on the bundle performance.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  15. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  16. Determining the elemental composition of fuels by bomb calorimetry and the inverse correlation of HHV with elemental composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Niels; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    heating value. By analysing pure organic substances, literature data, and fuels it is demonstrated that the method can provide hydrogen estimates within +/- 0.7% daf. and carbon and sum of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulphur estimates within +/- 2% daf. for fuels containing less than 90% ash db., 2% nitrogen...

  17. NUCLEAR DATA UNCERTAINTY AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS WITH XSUSA FOR FUEL ASSEMBLY DEPLETION CALCULATIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zwermann, W; Aures, A; Gallner, L; Hannstein, V; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B; Velkov, K; Martinez, J.S

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to nuclear data are performed with depletion calculations for BWR and PWR fuel assemblies specified in the framework of the UAM-LWR Benchmark Phase II...

  18. Fuel injection and mixing systems having piezoelectric elements and methods of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chien-Pei [Clive, IA; Short, John [Norwalk, IA; Klemm, Jim [Des Moines, IA; Abbott, Royce [Des Moines, IA; Overman, Nick [West Des Moines, IA; Pack, Spencer [Urbandale, IA; Winebrenner, Audra [Des Moines, IA

    2011-12-13

    A fuel injection and mixing system is provided that is suitable for use with various types of fuel reformers. Preferably, the system includes a piezoelectric injector for delivering atomized fuel, a gas swirler, such as a steam swirler and/or an air swirler, a mixing chamber and a flow mixing device. The system utilizes ultrasonic vibrations to achieve fuel atomization. The fuel injection and mixing system can be used with a variety of fuel reformers and fuel cells, such as SOFC fuel cells.

  19. Release to the Gas Phase of Inorganic Elements during Wood Combustion. Part 2: Influence of Fuel Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    Combustion of wood for heat and power production may cause problems such as ash deposition, corrosion, and harmful emissions of gases and particulate matter. These problems are all directly related to the release of inorganic elements (in particular Cl, S, K, Na, Zn, and Pb) from the fuel...... to the gas phase. The aims of this study are to obtain quantitative data on the release of inorganic elements during wood combustion and to investigate the influence of fuel composition. Quantitative release data were obtained by pyrolyzing and subsequently combusting small samples of wood (~30 g) at various...

  20. Development of a model to predict fission product behaviour in spherical fuel elements during water ingress events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merwe, J.J. van der [PBMR, PO Box 9396, Centurion 0046 (South Africa)]. E-mail: hanno.vdmerwe@pbmr.co.za; Coetzee, P.P. [Randse Afrikaans University, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2007-01-15

    At PBMR gaseous fission product releases from spherical fuel elements under normal conditions are calculated by the code NOBLEG. The ability of NOBLEG to calculate noble gas and halogen release under oxidizing conditions during water ingress was developed. Observations made during the water vapour injection tests performed during the irradiation experiment HFR-K6, were used to determine simple relations that can be used to predict gaseous fission product release from spherical fuel elements under oxidizing conditions caused by small water ingress events, for PBMR operational temperatures. A new model was proposed to explain peculiarities observed during the water injection tests.

  1. Recovery of enriched Uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for argonaut type reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uriarte, A.; Ramos, L.; Estrada, J.; Val, J. L. del

    1962-07-01

    Results obtained with the two following installations for recovering enriched uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for Argonaut type reactors are presented. Ion exchange unit to recover uranium form mother liquors resulting from the precipitation ammonium diuranate (ADU) from UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} solutions. Uranium recovery unit from solid wastes from the process of manufacture of fuel elements, consisting of a) waste dissolution, and b) extraction with 10% (v/v) TBP. (Author) 9 refs.

  2. 3D simulation of a core operation cycle of a BWR using Serpent; Simulacion 3D de un ciclo de operacion del nucleo de un BWR usando SERPENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera Ch, M. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: rionchez@icloud.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This work had the main goal to develop a methodology to obtain the length of an operating cycle of the core of a BWR under different operating states using the Serpent code. The reactor core modeled in Serpent is composed of 444 fuel assemblies (120 with fresh fuels and 324 fuels from previous cycles), 109 cruciform control rods and light water as moderator and coolant. Once the core of the reactor was modeled in Serpent (Three-dimensional) without considering the cruciform control rods, a simulation was carried out with different steps of burning in the operational state with the average values of the fuel temperature (900 K), moderator temperature (600 K) and voids fraction equal to 0.4. In addition, the thermal power considered was 2017 MWt. This operational state was chosen because a previous analysis (not shown in this work) was carried out in 4 types of control cells. The first and second control cell has all of its natural uranium fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod respectively. The third and fourth control cell types have various types of enrichment, both natural uranium and gadolinium in their fuel pellets, with control rod and without control rod. The conclusion of this previous analysis was that the behavior of the effective multiplication factor along the fuel burnout within the four control cell types was almost unaffected by the fuel temperature but was affected by the voids fraction. Thus, for this operating cycle in the operating state defined above, its length was 14,63052 GW t/Tm. In addition, at the end of this cycle, the decay heat obtained was equal to 116.71 MWt and the inventory of the most important isotopes to be considered was obtained, such as some isotopes of uranium, neptune, plutonium, americium and curio. (Author)

  3. Parametric study of the potential for BWR ECCS strainer blockage due to LOCA generated debris. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zigler, G.; Brideau, J.; Rao, D.V.; Shaffer, C.; Souto, F.; Thomas, W. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report documents a plant-specific study for a BWR/4 with a Mark I containment that evaluated the potential for LOCA generated debris and the probability of losing long term recirculation capability due ECCS pump suction strainer blockage. The major elements of this study were: (1) acquisition of detailed piping layouts and installed insulation details for a reference BWR; (2) analysis of plant specific piping weld failure probabilities to estimate the LOCA frequency; (3) development of an insulation and other debris generation and drywell transport models for the reference BWR; (4) modeling of debris transport in the suppression pool; (5) development of strainer blockage head loss models for estimating loss of NPSH margin; (6) estimation of core damage frequency attributable to loss of ECCS recirculation capability following a LOCA. Elements 2 through 5 were combined into a computer code, BLOCKAGE 2.3. A point estimate of overall DEGB pipe break frequency (per Rx-year) of 1.59E-04 was calculated for the reference plant, with a corresponding overall ECCS loss of NPSH frequency (per Rx-year) of 1.58E-04. The calculated point estimate of core damage frequency (per Rx-year) due to blockage related accident sequences for the reference BWR ranged from 4.2E-06 to 2.5E-05. The results of this study show that unacceptable strainer blockage and loss of NPSH margin can occur within the first few minutes after ECCS pumps achieve maximum flows when the ECCS strainers are exposed to LOCA generated fibrous debris in the presence of particulates (sludge, paint chips, concrete dust). Generic or unconditional extrapolation of these reference plant calculated results should not be undertaken.

  4. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the activities led by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF relative to the future nuclear systems, the improvement of recycling of fuel elements and their components is a major issue. One of the studied systems by the GIF is the graphite-moderated high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR. The fuel elements are composed of fuel roads half-inch in diameter named compacts. The compacts contain spherical particles made of actinide kernels about 500 m in diameter coated with three layers of carbon and silicon carbide, each about 50 m thick, dispersed in a graphite matrix. Recycling of compacts requires first a separation of triso-particles from the graphite matrix and secondly, the separation of the triso-coating from the kernels. This aim may be achieved by using pulsed currents: the compacts are placed within a cell filled by water and exposed to high voltage between 200 – 500 kV and discharge currents from 10 to 20 kA during short laps of time (about 2 µs [1-2]. This repeated treatment leads to a progressive fragmentation of the graphite matrix and a disassembly of the compacts. In order to improve understanding of the fragmentation properties of compacts a series of quasi-static and dynamic experiments have been conducted with similar cylindrical samples containing 10% (volume fraction of SiC particles coated in a graphite matrix. First, quasi-static compression tests have been performed to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material at low strain-rates (Fig.1. The experiments reveal a complex elasto-visco-plastic behaviour before a brittle failure. The mechanical response is characterised by a low yield stress (about 1 MPa, a strong strain-hardening in the loading phase and marked hysteresis-loops during unloading-reloading stages. Brittle failure is observed for axial stress about 13 MPa. In parallel, a series of flexural tests have been performed with the aim to characterise the quasi-static tensile strength of the

  5. Mobile crud and transportation of radioactivity in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H-P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoping (Sweden); LTU, Div. of Chemical Engineering, Lulea (Sweden); Hagg, J. [Ringhals AB, Varobacka (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Mobile crud is here referred to as a generic term for all types of particles that occur in the reactor water in BWRs and that are able to carry radioactivity. Previous results in this on-going series of studies in Swedish BWRs suggest that there are particles of different origins and function. A share may come from fuel crud and others may come from detachment, precipitation and dissolution processes in different parts of the BWR primary system, as well as from other system parts, such as the turbine/condenser. In addition, crud particles in this sense may come from purely mechanical processes such as degradation of graphite containing parts of the control rod drives. Therefore, the overall aim was to evaluate which particles are responsible for the transportation and distribution of radioactivity and also to clarify the chemical conditions under which they are formed. Furthermore the aim was to draw conclusions about how the chemistry would be like in order to avoid or at least minimize the formation of radioactivity distributing particles. A specific objective has also been to look into the importance of particle size for spreading of radioactivity in the primary system. Different types of crud particles are likely to have different characteristics in terms of function associated with transportation of radioactivity. The fuel crud is radioactive from the source and other types of crud can via surface processes, co-precipitation and other chemical and mechanical processes potentially affect the distribution of radioactivity in the primary system. In order to predict how operating parameters (e.g. stable, full power operation and scram) and chemical parameters (NWC/HWC/Zn, etc.) will affect the activity build-up on the system surfaces, it is important to know how the different types of crud are affected by these and related parameters. Fuel crud fixed on cladding ring samples, as well as mobile crud from the reactor water captured on filters, were examined by

  6. Fuel element development committee: Annual report from the General Electric Company, Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.; Minor, J.E.; Stringer, J.T.

    1964-08-14

    A summary of HAPO activities is given to include separate sections on the N-Reactor and other current production reactors. Specific programs and fuel performance for current production reactor fuels is discussed. Also, the production status, fuel performance, development program and process technology for N-Reactor fuels is presented.

  7. An overview of the BWR ECCS strainer blockage issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkiz, A.W.; Marshall, M.L. Jr.; Elliott, R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This Paper provides a brief overview of actions taken in the mid 1980s to resolve Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-43, {open_quotes}Containment Emergency Sump Performance,{close_quotes} and their relationship to the BWR strainer blockage issue; the importance of insights gained from the Barseback-2 (a Swedish BWR) incident in 1992 and from ECCS strainer testing and inspections at the Perry nuclear power plant in 1992 and 1993; an analysis of an US BWR/4 with a Mark I containment; an international community sharing of knowledge relevant to ECCS strainer blockage, additional experimental programs; and identification of actions needed to resolve the strainer blockage issue and the status of such efforts.

  8. 10 CFR Appendix O to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... controls, the production flow of nuclear material; (2) Seals the nuclear material within the cladding; (3... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority O Appendix O to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR...

  9. Accumulation of Elements in Salix and Other Species Used in Vegetation Filters with Focus on Wood Fuel Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Anneli

    2007-07-01

    Woody or herbaceous perennials used as vegetation filters for treatment of different types of wastes can be suitable for production of solid biofuels when their above ground harvestable biomass yield is sufficiently high and when biomass contains appropriate concentrations of minerals with regard to fuel combustion processes. The concentrations of nitrogen (N), potassium (K) and heavy metals (especially Zn and Cd) in fuel should be low and calcium (Ca) concentrations high to avoid technical problems and environmentally harmful emissions during combustion. Since soil supplementation with essential elements improves biomass yield, a conflict might arise between yield and quality aims. There are various possibilities to influence fuel quality during the growing phase of the life cycle of perennial biomass crops. This study assessed the suitability of two deciduous woody perennials (Salix and Populus) and two summer green herbaceous perennials (Phragmites and Urtica) for phytoremediation in terms of growth and nutrient allocation patterns. Salix and Populus proved suitable as vegetation filters when nutrients were available to plants in near-optimal proportions, but when unbalanced nutrient solutions (wastewater) were applied, stem biomass fraction was strongly reduced. Phragmites was more tolerant to wastewater treatment in terms of plant biomass production and nutrient allocation patterns, so if the N:P ratio of the wastewater is suboptimal, a vegetation filter using Phragmites could be considered. In further studies, a method was developed to determine the proportions of nutrient-rich bark in coppiced Salix, while heavy metal phytoextraction capacity was assessed in two Salix vegetation filters. The relevance of proportion of bark on wood fuel quality and element removal from vegetation filters was also investigated. The concentrations of the elements studied in harvestable Salix shoot biomass were higher, meaning lower wood fuel quality, in plantations where

  10. Effect of the fuel element bundle statistical characteristics on the evaluation of temperature in the sodium-cooled fast-neutron reactor core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Tikhomirov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Different fuel element bundle models used to calculate the coolant and fuel cladding temperatures inside fuel assemblies have been analyzed as applied to sodium-cooled fast-neutron reactors. The drawbacks of the existing models have been identified. A bundle model based on an experimental study into the actual arrangement of the fuel elements within the AF shroud has been proposed. The model's capabilities and advantages, as compared to conservative models, have been shown with regard for the need to raise the reliability of the fuel cladding working temperature estimation.

  11. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S., E-mail: tiina.tuovinen@uef.fi [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Tervahauta, Arja [Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box FI-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low. - Highlights: • We studied transfer of elements in boreal food chain using meso- and microcosms. • Elements related to nuclear fuel cycle and mining were examined. • Higher uptake at lower soil concentrations was observed for primary producers. • Snails took up elements mainly from food but for U also soil was an element source. • Non-linear transfer of essential elements was observed for herbivore and decomposer.

  12. Applying Thermodynamics to Fossil Fuels: Heats of Combustion from Elemental Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, William G.; Davenport, Derek A.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are the calculations of heats of combustions of some selected fossil fuel compounds such as some foreign shale oils and United States coals. Heating values for coal- and petroleum-derived fuel oils are also presented. (HM)

  13. COMBINING NEUTRAL AND ACIDIC EXTRACTANTS FOR RECOVERING TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Neiner, Doinita; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Latesky, Stanley; Gelis, Artem V.; Tkac, Peter; Vandegrift, George F.

    2011-10-03

    We have been investigating a solvent extraction system that combines a neutral extractant--octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO)--with an acidic extractant--bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP)--to form a single process solvent for separating Am and Cm from the other components of irradiated nuclear fuel. It was originally hypothesized that the extraction chemistry of CMPO would dominate under conditions of high acidity (> 1 M HNO3), resulting in co-extraction of the transuranic and lanthanide elements into the organic phase. Contacting the loaded solvent with a solution of diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) buffered with lactic or citric acid at pH {approx}3 to 4 would result in a condition in which the HDEHP chemistry dominates. Although the data somewhat support this hypothesis, it is clear that there are interactions between the two extractants such that they do not act independently in the extraction and stripping regimes. We report here studies directed at determining the nature and extent of interaction between CMPO and HDEHP, the synergistic behavior of CMPO and HDEHP in the extraction of americium and neodymium, and progress towards determining the thermodynamics of this extraction system. Neodymium and americium behave similarly in the combined solvent system, with a significant synergy between CMPO and HDEHP in the extraction of both of these trivalent elements from lactate-buffered DTPA solutions. In contrast, a much weaker synergistic behaviour is observed for europium. Thus, investigations into the fundamental chemistry involved in this system have focused on the neodymium extraction. The extraction of neodymium has been systematically investigated, individually varying the HDEHP concentration, the CMPO concentration, or the aqueous phase composition. Thermodynamic modeling of the neodymium extraction system has been initiated. Interactions between CMPO and HDEHP in the organic phase must be taken into account in

  14. On-line elemental analysis of fossil fuel process streams by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    METC is continuing development of a real-time, multi-element plasma based spectrometer system for application to high temperature and high pressure fossil fuel process streams. Two versions are under consideration for development. One is an Inductively Coupled Plasma system that has been described previously, and the other is a high power microwave system. The ICP torch operates on a mixture of argon and helium with a conventional annular swirl flow plasma gas, no auxiliary gas, and a conventional sample stream injection through the base of the plasma plume. A new, demountable torch design comprising three ceramic sections allows bolts passing the length of the torch to compress a double O-ring seal. This improves the reliability of the torch. The microwave system will use the same data acquisition and reduction components as the ICP system; only the plasma source itself is different. It will operate with a 750-Watt, 2.45 gigahertz microwave generator. The plasma discharge will be contained within a narrow quartz tube one quarter wavelength from a shorted waveguide termination. The plasma source will be observed via fiber optics and a battery of computer controlled monochromators. To extract more information from the raw spectral data, a neural net computer program is being developed. This program will calculate analyte concentrations from data that includes analyte and interferant spectral emission intensity. Matrix effects and spectral overlaps can be treated more effectively by this method than by conventional spectral analysis.

  15. BWR stability using a reducing dynamical model; Estabilidad de un BWR con un modelo dinamico reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrin Bolea, J. M.; Blazquez Martinez, J. B.

    1990-07-01

    BWR stability can be treated with reduced order dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from dynamical models. When the parameters of the model came from experimental data, the predictions are accurate. In this work an alternative derivation for the void fraction equation is made, but remarking the physical structure of the parameters. As the poles of power/reactivity transfer function are related with the parameters, the measurement of the poles by other techniques such as noise analysis will lead to the parameters, but the system of equations is non-linear. Simple parametric calculation of decay ratio are performed, showing why BWRs become unstable when they are operated at low flow and high power. (Author)

  16. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed.

  17. Test Design Description: Volume 2, Part 1, MFF-1 and MFF-1A metal fuel irradiations (HF168 and HF169) element as-built data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, N. E.

    1987-06-01

    The metal fuel in FFTF (MFF) tests represented by the Test Design Description (TDD), Volume II, Part I will be the second irradiation test of full length Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel elements in FFTF. The MFF-1 Test, designated as the HF168 Test Assembly, will contain six sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements clad in HT9 interspersed in a basically oxide fuel assembly. The wire-wrapped elements will be irradiated to breach or 900 EFPD with peak nominal cladding temperatures of 1127{sup 0}F. The MFF-1A test, designated as the HF169 Test assembly, will also contain six sodium-bonded metallic fuel elements clad in HT9 interspersed in an oxide fuel assembly. The MFF-1A elements will be irradiated at a peak nominal cladding temperature of 1127{sup 0}F to 450 EFPD or until a cladding breach occurs. The metal fuel elements contain U-10Zr cast slugs and have a fuel-smeared density of 75%. The enriched zone is 36-in. long, composed of three slugs and has one 6.5-in. long depleted-uranium axial blanket slug (DU-10Zr) at each end. The metal fuel elements were fabricated at ANL-W and delivered to Westinghouse-Hanford for assembly into the test article. This Test Design Description contains only the relevant fabrication data for the metal fuel elements built at Argonne. The elements conform to the requirements in MG-22, "User`s Guide for the Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR."

  18. Modeling of γ field around irradiated TRIGA fuel elements by R2S method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Ambrožič

    2017-01-01

    An example of its capabilities is presented in terms of evaluation of utilization of JSI TRIGA nuclear fuel as a viable γ-ray source. In the model, fresh nuclear fuel is considered and a silicon pipe sample is modeled in. Fuel activities, dose and kerma rates on the sample, as well as emitted γ-ray spectra and isotopic contribution to the contact dose are calculated and presented.

  19. Costs of head-end incineration with respect to Kr separation in the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnert-Wiemer, H.; Boehnert, R.

    1976-07-15

    The C-incinerations and the Kr-separations during head-end incineration in the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements are described. The costs for constructing an operating a head-end incineration of reprocessing capacities with 5,000 to 50,000 MW(e)-HTR power have been determined. The cost estimates are divided into investment and operating costs, further after the fraction of the N/sub 2/-content in the incineration exhaust gas, which strongly affects costs. It appears that, in the case of Kr-separation from the incineration exhaust gas, the investment costs as well as the operating costs of the head-end for N/sub 2/-containing exhaust gas are considerably greater than those for gas without N/sub 2/. The C-incineration of the graphite of the HTR fuel elements should therefore only be performed with influx gas that is free of N/sub 2/.

  20. 3D modeling of heat transfer and gas flow in a grooved ring fuel element for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkett, Laura Ashley

    In the past, fuel elements with multiple axial coolant channels have been used in nuclear propulsion applications. A novel fuel element concept that reduces weight and increases efficiency uses a stack of grooved rings. Each fuel ring consists of a hole on the interior and grooves across the top face. Many grooved ring configurations have been modeled, and a single flow channel for each design has been analyzed. For increased efficiency, a fuel ring with a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio is ideal. When grooves are shallower and they have a lower surface area, the results show that the exit temperature is higher. By coupling the physics of fluid flow with those of heat transfer, the effects on the cooler gas flowing through the grooves of the hot, fissioning ring can be predicted. Models also show differences in velocities and temperatures after dense boundary nodes are applied. Parametric studies were done to show how a pressure drop across the length of the channels will affect the exit temperatures of the gas. Geometric optimization was done to show the temperature distributions and pressure drops that result from the manipulation of various parameters, and the effects of model scaling was also investigated. The inverse Graetz numbers are plotted against Nusselt numbers, and the results of these values suggest that the gas quickly becomes fully developed, laminar flow, rather than constant turbulent conditions.

  1. Portland clinker production with carbonatite waste and tire-derived fuel: crystallochemistry of minor and trace elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. D. Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results on the composition of Portland clinkers produced with non-conventional raw-materials and fuels, focusing on the distribution of selected trace elements. Clinkers produced with three different fuel compositions were sampled in an industrial plant, where all other parameters were kept unchanged. The fuels have chemical fingerprints, which are sulfur for petroleum coke and zinc for TDF (tire-derived fuel. Presence of carbonatite in the raw materials is indicated by high amounts of strontium and phosphorous. Electron microprobe data was used to determine occupation of structural site of both C3S and C2S, and the distribution of trace elements among clinker phases. Phosphorous occurs in similar proportions in C3S and C2S; while considering its modal abundance, C3S is its main reservoir in the clinker. Sulfur is preferentially partitioned toward C2S compared to C3S. Strontium substitutes for Ca2+ mainly in C2S and in non-silicatic phases, compared to C3S.

  2. A Multi-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model of a Tie-Tube and Hexagonal Fuel Element for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, C. F.; Mireles, O. R.; Stewart, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Capable Cryogenic Thermal Engine (SCCTE) effort considers a nuclear thermal rocket design based around a Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) design fission reactor. The reactor core is comprised of bundled hexagonal fuel elements that directly heat hydrogen for expansion in a thrust chamber and hexagonal tie-tubes that house zirconium hydride moderator mass for the purpose of thermalizing fast neutrons resulting from fission events. Created 3D steady state Hex fuel rod model with 1D flow channels. Hand Calculation were used to set up initial conditions for fluid flow. The Hex Fuel rod uses 1D flow paths to model the channels using empirical correlations for heat transfer in a pipe. Created a 2-D axisymmetric transient to steady state model using the CFD turbulent flow and Heat Transfer module in COMSOL. This model was developed to find and understand the hydrogen flow that might effect the thermal gradients axially and at the end of the tie tube where the flow turns and enters an annulus. The Hex fuel rod and Tie tube models were made based on requirements given to us by CSNR and the SCCTE team. The models helped simplify and understand the physics and assumptions. Using pipe correlations reduced the complexity of the 3-D fuel rod model and is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The 2-D axisymmetric tie tube model can be used as a reference "Virtual test model" for comparing and improving 3-D Models.

  3. The fuelbed: a key element of the Fuel Characteristic Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia L. Riccardi; Roger D. Ottmar; David V. Sandberg; Anne Andreu; Ella Elman; Karen Kopper; Jennifer Long

    2007-01-01

    Wildland fuelbed characteristics are temporally and spatially complex and can vary widely across regions. To capture this variability, we designed the Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS), a national system to create fuelbeds and classify those fuelbeds for their capacity to support fire and consume fuels. This paper describes the structure of the fuelbeds...

  4. Thermal performance of nuclear fuel rod with a Jacobian elliptic cross sectional form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Joao B. de; Tu, Carlos C.C.; Abe, Luciano [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Sistemas Mecanicos], e-mail: jbaguiar@usp.br, e-mail: carlcctu@usp.br, e-mail: Luciano.abe@poli.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    Boiling water reactors, BWR, commercially use fuel rods with a circular cross section. Set the operational conditions as well as the distribution of these rods, a specific power is established. Changing this form while conserving the cross sectional area may deliver a better performance. This fact is investigated here for a family of elliptic forms, in a thermal sense, using the finite element method. Two limiting values are considered: the melting temperature of the fuel and the critical flux rate. For 2 d models, gains of the order of twenty percent in performance are estimated. It is also perceived the advantage of this alteration in other form of reactor, and discussed means of addressing other aspects of the problem. (author)

  5. Acceptance testing of the eddy current probes for measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thickness on K West Basin fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1998-08-21

    During a recent visual inspection campaign of fuel elements stored in the K West Basin, it was noted that fuel elements contained in sealed aluminum canisters had a heavy translucent type coating on their surfaces (Pitner 1997a). Subsequent sampling of this coating in a hot cell (Pitner 1997b) and analysis of the material identified it as aluminum hydroxide. Because of the relatively high water content of this material, safety related concerns are raised with respect to long term storage of this fuel in Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). A campaign in the basin is planned to demonstrate whether this coating can be removed by mechanical brushing (Bridges 1998). Part of this campaign involves before-and-after measurements of the coating thickness to determine the effectiveness of coating removal by the brushing machine. Measurements of the as-deposited coating thickness on multiple fuel elements are also expected to provide total coating inventory information needed for MCO safety evaluations. The measurement technique must be capable of measuring coating thicknesses on the order of several mils, with a measurement accuracy of 0.5 mil. Several different methods for quantitatively measuring these thin coatings were considered in selecting the most promising approach. Ultrasonic measurement was investigated, but it was determined that due to the thin coating depth and the high water content of the material, the signal would likely pass directly through to the cladding without ever sensing the coating surface. X-ray fluorescence was also identified as a candidate technique, but would not work because the high gamma background from the irradiated fuel would swamp out the low energy aluminum signal. Laser interferometry could possibly be applied, but considerable development would be required and it was considered to be high risk on a short term basis. The consensus reached was that standard eddy current techniques for coating thickness measurement had the best chance for

  6. Application of the integral method to modelling the oxidation of defected fuel elements; Utilisation de la methode integrale pour la modelisation de l`oxydation d`elements combustibles defecteux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolar, M.

    1995-06-01

    Because interim dry storage is an alternative to storage in water pools, it is very important to be able to predict the long-term behaviour of used nuclear fuel in air, especially of fuel elements possibly defected in reactor or during subsequent handling. Extensive oxidation may lead to fuel disintegration and thus to substantially increased costs of interim handling and preparation for final disposal. The ability to predict the extent and rate of oxidation of defected fuel elements under conditions of limited or unlimited oxygen supply would be instrumental in determining the optimum operating conditions of a dry-storage facility. The starting point for the discrepancy reported in previous work between the reaction-diffusion calculations and the CEX-1 experiment, which involves storage of defected fuel elements in air at 150 deg. C.

  7. Fabrication of Tungsten-UO 2 Hexagonal-Celled Fuel-Element Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, R.R.; Cover, P.W.; Gripshover, P.J.; Wilson, W.J.

    1964-12-04

    The gas-pressure-bonding process is being evaluated as a means of fabricating tungsten-UO 2 hexagonal-celled fuel geometries. A two-part study was initiated to optimize the fuel materials and to develp the required fixturing and loading techniques. Production of fueled tungsten-coated UO 2 particles in in progress so that geometries embodying coated particles or coated particles plus fine tungsten powder can be evaluated. Tests to data have shown the rquirement for a pretreatment in which a gaseous oxide phase is removed. Initial loading and fixturing procedures were proven satisfactory by the fabrication of a 19-cylindrical-hole hexagonal-type composite.

  8. The effect of element bow on dryout power and post-dryout heat transfer in CANDU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutradhar, S.C.; Schenk, J.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    Dryout and post-dryout tests were performed in a modified 37-element simulated CANDU fuel bundle, with one outer element of the last bundle bowed at gradual but controlled steps toward the pressure-tube wall. The dryout power decreased moderately as the gap size was reduced from nominal to about 40%. For smaller-than-40%-gap sizes, however, the dryout power increased in most cases; this resulted in almost equal dryout powers at the nominal and zero gap sizes. The maximum surface temperature of the bowed element at up to 20% overpower increased with decreasing gap sizes; however, for gap sizes smaller than 35% of the nominal gap, the surface temperature fluctuated moderately. (author)

  9. The Performance of Hydrocarbon Fuels with H2O2 in a Uni-element Combustor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muss, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    .... The combustor used decomposed 90% hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer. The water-cooled combustion chamber included significant fuel film cooling, with the overall mixture ratio (MR) ranging from 3.75 to 7.4...

  10. Porous Carbon Materials for Elements in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlodarczyk R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The porosity, distribution of pores, shape of pores and specific surface area of carbon materials were investigated. The study of sintered graphite and commercial carbon materials used in low-temperature fuel cells (Graphite Grade FU, Toray Teflon Treated was compared. The study covered measurements of density, microstructural examinations and wettability (contact angle of carbon materials. The main criterion adopted for choosing a particular material for components of fuel cells is their corrosion resistance under operating conditions of hydrogen fuel cells. In order to determine resistance to corrosion in the environment of operation of fuel cells, potentiokinetic curves were registered for synthetic solution 0.1M H2SO4+ 2 ppmF-at 80°C.

  11. Radiometallurgical examination of 1.47 enriched I&E fuel elements for PT-IP-247-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teats, R.

    1960-07-19

    Under the conditions of PT-IP-247-A, four columns of self-supported and four columns of rib-supported I&E 1.47% enriched fuel elements were irradiated to determine their relative performance under severe operating conditions. Four of the self-supported and two of the rib-supported control elements were received for nation. The two rib-supported control pieces, which were classified as ``near failures`` had received average exposures of 353 and 359 MWD/T at average specific power levels of 91 and 108 KW/ft before they were discharged because of other ruptured pieces in the tubes. The nominal specified canned fuel dimensions of the rib supported elements was 1.445 in. OD, .310 in bore, and 7.640 in. long. The first two self-supported elements were selected for examination on the basis of high weight losses sustained during irradiation, and the second two were selected to determine the effect of specific power levels on the AlSi bonding. The average specific power levels of the four self-supported elements varied from 79 to 110 KW/ft and the exposure varied from 845 MWD/T to 949 MWD/T. The nominal canned dimensions of the self-supported elements, which were made oversize to attain high annular coolant temperatures with respect to the interior coolant channel, were 1.460 in. OD, .375 in. bore, and 7.640 in. long. The eight bridge rail supports were spot welded on and gave an effective rib outside diameter of 1.600 in. All of the components were X-8001 aluminum alloy.

  12. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, D.C.; Porter, D.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-03-23

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr--Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu--Zr--Hf or a combination of both. 7 figs.

  13. Fuel element design for the enhanced destruction of plutonium in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Douglas C.; Porter, Douglas L.; Hayes, Steven L.; Hill, Robert N.

    1997-12-01

    A uranium-free fuel for a fast nuclear reactor comprising an alloy of Pu, Zr and Hf, wherein Hf is present in an amount less than about 10% by weight of the alloy. The fuel may be in the form of a Pu alloy surrounded by a Zr-Hf alloy or an alloy of Pu-Zr-Hf or a combination of both.

  14. Emission estimates of organic and elemental carbon from household biomass fuel used over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saud, T.; Gautam, R.; Mandal, T. K.; Gadi, Ranu; Singh, D. P.; Sharma, S. K.; Dahiya, Manisha; Saxena, M.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass burning emits large amount of aerosols and trace gases into the atmosphere, which have significant impact on atmospheric chemistry and climate. In the present study, we have selected seven Indian states (Delhi, Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar and West Bengal) over the IGP, India. Samples of biomass fuel (Fuel Wood, Crop Residue and Dung Cake) from rural household have been collected (Saud et al., 2011a). The burning process has been simulated using a dilution sampler following the methodology developed by Venkatraman et al. (2005). In the present study, emission factor represents the total period of burning including pyrolysis, flaming and smoldering. We have determined the emission factors of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) from different types of biomass fuels collected over the study area. Average emission factors of OC from dung cake, fuel wood and crop residue over IGP, India are estimated as 3.87 ± 1.09 g kg-1, 0.95 ± 0.27 g kg-1, 1.46 ± 0.73 g kg-1, respectively. Similarly, average emission factors of EC from dung cake, fuel wood and crop residue over IGP, India are found to be 0.49 ± 0.25 g kg-1, 0.35 ± 0.07 g kg-1 and 0.37 ± 0.14 g kg-1, respectively. Dung cake and crop residue are normally not used in Uttarakhand. Annual budget of OC and EC from biomass fuels used as energy in rural households of IGP, India is estimated as 361.96 ± 170.18 Gg and 56.44 ± 29.06 Gg respectively. This study shows the regional emission inventory from Indian scenario with spatial variability.

  15. Condensate polishing guidelines for PWR and BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, P.; Crinigan, P.; Graham, B.; Kohlmann, R.; Crosby, C.; Seager, J.; Bosold, R.; Gillen, J.; Kristensen, J.; McKeen, A.; Jones, V.; Sawochka, S.; Siegwarth, D.; Keeling, D.; Polidoroff, T.; Morgan, D.; Rickertsen, D.; Dyson, A.; Mills, W.; Coleman, L.

    1993-03-01

    Under EPRI sponsorship, an industry committee, similar in form and operation to other guideline committees, was created to develop Condensate Polishing Guidelines for both PWR and BWR systems. The committee reviewed the available utility and water treatment industry experience on system design and performance and incorporated operational and state-of-the-art information into document. These guidelines help utilities to optimize present condensate polisher designs as well as be a resource for retrofits or new construction. These guidelines present information that has not previously been presented in any consensus industry document. The committee generated guidelines that cover both deep bed and powdered resin systems as an integral part of the chemistry of PWR and BWR plants. The guidelines are separated into sections that deal with the basis for condensate polishing, system design, resin design and application, data management and performance and management responsibilities.

  16. Capacity of the equipment family SICOM to inspect fuel elements; Capacidad de los equipos familia SICOM para inspeccionar elementos de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Siguero, A.; Sola, A.

    2013-07-01

    To check the status where the fuel assemblies are after has been operating in the core of nuclear plants, inspections have been conducted to carry out an improvement in the behavior of alloys used in pods of fuel, the control of corrosion of these pods because of heat, reducing the transfer of heat due to the oxide and with the support of visual inspections monitor the physical integrity of the fuel elements.

  17. Characterization of a Neutron Beam Following Reconfiguration of the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) Core and Addition of New Fuel Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron E. Craft; Bruce A. Hilton; Glen C. Papaioannou

    2016-01-01

    The neutron radiography reactor (NRAD) is a 250 kW Mark-II Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics (TRIGA) reactor at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, USA. The East Radiography Station (ERS) is one of two neutron beams at the NRAD used for neutron radiography, which sits beneath a large hot cell and is primarily used for neutron radiography of highly radioactive objects. Additional fuel elements were added to the NRAD core in 2013 to increase the excess reactivity of the reac...

  18. CSAU methodology and results for an ATWS event in a BWR using information theory methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L., E-mail: jlcobos@iqn.upv.es [Universitat Politècnica de València, Thermal-Hydraulics and Nuclear Engineering Group (TIN), Institute for Energy Engineering (IEE), Valencia (Spain); Escrivá, A., E-mail: aescriva@iqn.upv.es [Universitat Politècnica de València, Thermal-Hydraulics and Nuclear Engineering Group (TIN), Institute for Energy Engineering (IEE), Valencia (Spain); Mendizabal, R., E-mail: rmsanz@csn.es [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pelayo, F., E-mail: fpl@csn.es [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Melara, J., E-mail: jls@iberdrola.es [IBERINCO, IBERDROLA Ingeniería y Construcción, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We apply the CSAU methodology to an ATWS in a BWR using information theory methods. • We show how to perform the selection of the most influential inputs on the critical safety parameter. • We apply the maximum entropy principle to get the input parameter distribution. • We examine the maximum relative entropy principle to update the input parameter PDF. • We quantify the uncertainty of the critical safety parameter using order statistics and information theory. - Abstract: This paper shows an application of the CSAU methodology to an ATWS in a BWR reactor, when the temperature of the suppression pool is taken as the critical safety parameter. The method combines CSAU methodology with recent techniques of information theory. In this paper we use auxiliary tools to help in the evaluation and improvement of the parameters distribution that enter in the elements II and III of CSAU based methodologies. These tools have been implemented in two FORTRAN programs: GEDIPA (Generation of the Parameter Distribution) and UNTHERCO (Uncertainty in Thermal Hydraulic Codes). The first one analyzes the information data available on a given parameter or parameters with the goal to know all the information about the probability distribution function of these parameters. The second apply information theory methods, as the maximum entropy principle (MEP) and the maximum relative entropy Principle (MREP), in order to build conservative distribution functions for the parameters from the available data. Also, the distribution function of a given parameter can be updated using the MREP principle when new information is provided. UNTHERCO performs the MONTECARLO sampling for a given set of parameters when the distribution function of these parameters is previously known. If the distribution of a parameter is unknown, then, the MEP is applied to deduce the distribution function for this parameter.

  19. FEM (finite element method) thermal modeling and thermal hydraulic performance of an enhanced thermal conductivity UO2/BeO composite fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenzhong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2011-03-24

    An enhanced thermal conductivity UO2-BeO composite nuclear fuel was studied. A methodology to generate ANSYS (an engineering simulation software) FEM (Finite Element Method) thermal models of enhanced thermal conductivity oxide nuclear fuels was developed. The results showed significant increase in the fuel thermal conductivities and have good agreement with the measured ones. The reactor performance analysis showed that the decrease in centerline temperature was 250-350K for the UO2-BeO composite fuel, and thus we can improve nuclear reactors' performance and safety, and high-level radioactive waste generation.

  20. FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION FOR STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF U7MO DISPERSION FUEL PLATES VIA FLUID-THERMAL-STRUCTURAL INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakan Ozaltun; Herman Shen; Pavel Madvedev

    2010-11-01

    This article presents numerical simulation of dispersion fuel mini plates via fluid–thermal–structural interaction performed by commercial finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics to identify initial mechanical response under actual operating conditions. Since fuel particles are dispersed in Aluminum matrix, and temperatures during the fabrication process reach to the melting temperature of the Aluminum matrix, stress/strain characteristics of the domain cannot be reproduced by using simplified models and assumptions. Therefore, fabrication induced stresses were considered and simulated via image based modeling techniques with the consideration of the high temperature material data. In order to identify the residuals over the U7Mo particles and the Aluminum matrix, a representative SEM image was employed to construct a microstructure based thermo-elasto-plastic FE model. Once residuals and plastic strains were identified in micro-scale, solution was used as initial condition for subsequent multiphysics simulations at the continuum level. Furthermore, since solid, thermal and fluid properties are temperature dependent and temperature field is a function of the velocity field of the coolant, coupled multiphysics simulations were considered. First, velocity and pressure fields of the coolant were computed via fluidstructural interaction. Computed solution for velocity fields were used to identify the temperature distribution on the coolant and on the fuel plate via fluid-thermal interaction. Finally, temperature fields and residual stresses were used to obtain the stress field of the plates via fluid-thermal-structural interaction.

  1. Brookhaven experience with handling and shipping of, and cask design for, reactor spent-fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Francis A.

    1965-12-01

    The general problems in the area are presented. Solutions to the specific problems at Brookhaven are discussed in relation to the general problem. Presentation covers (a) fuel removal tools and equipment, and canal storage facilities; (b) methods of shipment; (c) brief review of the AEC and ICC regulatory requirements; and (d) optimized design of the shipping container. Specific solutions used by BNL over a six -year period are described. The need for complete and early analysis of the specific problem is indicated.

  2. Recriticality calculation with GENFLO code for the BWR core after steam explosion in the lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miettinen, J. [VTT Processes (Finland)

    2002-12-01

    Recriticality of the partially degraded BWR core has been studied by assuming a severe accident phase during which the fuel rods are still intact but the control rods have experienced extensive damage. Previous NKS and EU projects have studied the same case assuming reflooding by the ECCS system In the present study it was assumed that coolant enters the core due to melt-coolant interaction in the lower plenum. In the first case specified the relocation and fragmentation of the molten control rod metal causes the level swell in the core but no steam explosion. In the second case a steam explosion in the lower head was assumed. I n the first case a prompt recriticality peak can occur, but after the peak no semistable power generation remains. In the second case the consequence of the slug entrance into the core is so violent that the fuel disintegration and melting during the first power peak may occur. After the large power peak water is rapidly pushed back from the core and no semistable power generation maintains. The fuel disintegration studies have been based on a coarse assumption that the acceptable local energy addition into the fresh fuel may be 170 cal/g, but with increasing burn-up it can be as low as 60-70 cal/g. In the level swell variations the maximum energy addition was between these limits, but in most of the steam explosion variations much above these limits. Additional variation of the assumptions related to the neutronics demonstrated that for the converged analysis result some interactions would be useful with respect to the boundary conditions and neutronic options.

  3. Modeling of γ field around irradiated TRIGA fuel elements by R2S method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemen, Ambrožič; Luka, Snoj

    2017-09-01

    The JSI TRIGA reactor has several irradiation facilities with well characterized neutron fields. The characterization was performed by measurements and by utilizing Monte Carlo particle transport computational methods. Because of this, JSI TRIGA has become a reference center for neutron irradiation of detectors for ATLAS experiment (CERN). Thorough γ characterization of the reactor is however yet to be performed. Current Monte Carlo particle transport code only account for the prompt generation of neutron induced γ rays, which have been characterized, but are neglecting the time dependent delayed part, which may in some cases amount to more then 30% of total γ flux in an operation reactor, and is the only source of γ-rays after reactor shutdown. Several common approaches of modeling delayed -rays , namely D1S and R2S exist. In this paper an in-house developed R2S method code is described, coupling a Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP6 and neutron activation code FISPACT-II, with intermediate steps performed by custom Python scripts. An example of its capabilities is presented in terms of evaluation of utilization of JSI TRIGA nuclear fuel as a viable γ-ray source. In the model, fresh nuclear fuel is considered and a silicon pipe sample is modeled in. Fuel activities, dose and kerma rates on the sample, as well as emitted γ-ray spectra and isotopic contribution to the contact dose are calculated and presented.

  4. Prony's method application for BWR instabilities characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Ramírez, J. Ramón, E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Alonso, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Prony's method application for BWR instability events. • Several BWR instability benchmark are assessed using this method. • DR and frequency are obtained and a new parameter is proposed to eliminate false signals. • Adequate characterization of in-phase and out-of-phase events is obtained. • The Prony's method application is validated. - Abstract: Several methods have been developed for the analysis of reactor power signals during BWR power oscillations. Among them is the Prony's method, its application provides the DR and the frequency of oscillations. In this paper another characteristic of the method is proposed to determine the type of oscillations that can occur, in-phase or out-of-phase. Prony's method decomposes a given signal in all the frequencies that it contains, therefore the DR of the fundamental mode and the first harmonic are obtained. To determine the more dominant pole of the system a normalized amplitude W of the system is calculated, which depends on the amplitude and the damping coefficient. With this term, it can be analyzed which type of oscillations is present, if W of the fundamental mode frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is in-phase, if W of the first harmonic frequency is the greater, the type of oscillations is out-of-phase. The method is applied to several stability benchmarks to assess its validity. Results show the applicability of the method as an alternative analysis method to determine the type of oscillations occurred.

  5. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements with aluminum 1100-F cladding of IPR-R1 research reactor: An initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Roger F. da; Silva Júnior, Silvério F. da; Frade, Rangel T. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, Juliano S., E-mail: rfs@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, E-mail: rtf@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Tubes of aluminum 1100-F as well as tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements whose cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. On the other hand, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In previous works, the application of eddy current testing to evaluate the AISI 304 cladding fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 was studied. In this paper, it is proposed an initial study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the aluminum 1100-F fuel elements cladding. The study includes the development of probes and the design and manufacture of reference standards. (author)

  6. A New Innovative Spherical Cermet Nuclear Fuel Element to Achieve an Ultra-Long Core Life for use in Grid-Appropriate LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senor, David J.; Painter, Chad L.; Geelhood, Ken J.; Wootan, David W.; Meriwether, George H.; Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.; Matson, Dean W.; Abrego, Celestino P.

    2007-12-01

    Spherical cermet fuel elements are proposed for use in the Atoms For Peace Reactor (AFPR-100) concept. AFPR-100 is a small-scale, inherently safe, proliferation-resistant reactor that would be ideal for deployment to nations with emerging economies that decide to select nuclear power for the generation of carbon-free electricity. The basic concept of the AFPR core is a water-cooled fixed particle bed, randomly packed with spherical fuel elements. The flow of coolant within the particle bed is at such a low rate that the bed does not fluidize. This report summarizes an approach to fuel fabrication, results associated with fuel performance modeling, core neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses demonstrating a ~20 year core life, and a conclusion that the proliferation resistance of the AFPR reactor concept is high.

  7. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  8. Trace Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Arantxa Cuadra, Gilad Raitses, Arnold Aronson

    2010-04-22

    A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depres-surization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

  9. Modeling of fuel elements for the thermal design of CASTOR casks; Modellierung der Brennelemente bei der thermischen Auslegung von CASTOR-Behaeltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greza, H.; Leber, A.; Kueck, T. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Funke, T. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    For the thermal design of transport and storage casks for radioactive wastes numerical calculation procedures are used to demonstrate the safe after-heat removal. In spite of the advanced software the modeling size and the level detail are still restricted. Therefore parts of the calculation models that exhibit a high level of detail are replaced by homogenized zones with effective material characteristics. The material data have to be determined by appropriate methods in order to provide calculated results of sufficient safety margins. The authors demonstrate the procedure using homogenized zones for the modeling of fuel elements in the CASTOR cask V/19. Comparative calculations using detailed modeling of the fuel elements show agreement of the maximum temperatures for the fuel elements within the calculation accuracy.

  10. Neutron dosimetry. Environmental monitoring in a BWR type reactor; Dosimetria de neutrones. Monitoreo ambiental en un reactor del tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavera D, L.; Camacho L, M.E

    1991-01-15

    The measurements carried out on reactor dosimetry are applied mainly to the study on the effects of the radiation in 108 materials of the reactor; little is on the environmental dosimetry outside of the primary container of BWR reactors. In this work the application of a neutron spectrometer formed by plastic detectors of nuclear traces manufactured in the ININ, for the environmental monitoring in penetrations around the primary container of the unit I of the Laguna Verde central is presented. The neutron monitoring carries out with purposes of radiological protection, during the operational tests of the reactor. (Author)

  11. BWR Refill-Reflood Program, Task 4. 7 - model development: basic models for the BWR version of TRAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, J G.M.; Chu, K H; Shaug, J C

    1983-09-01

    TRAC (Transient Reactor Analysis Code) is a computer code for best estimate analysis of the thermal hydraulic conditions in a reactor system. The constitutive correlations for shear and heat transfer developed for the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) version of TRAC are described. A universal flow regime map has been developed to tie the regimes for shear and heat transfer into a consistent package. New models in the areas of interfacial shear, interfacial heat transfer and thermal radiation have been introduced. Improvements have also been made to the constitutive correlations and the numerical methods. All the models have been implemented into the GE version TRACB02 and extensively tested against data.

  12. High-Voltage Thermionic Reactor Using Double-Sheath Fuel Elements, 3rd Interational Electrical Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1972-06-01

    A novel design concept for a "flashlight-type" in-core thermionic reactor is described. This concept, called the "double-sheath" design in contrast to the previously considered "wet-sheath" and "dry-sheath" concepts, permits the build-up of high reactor output voltages, without the danger of cesium breakdown and shorts-to-ground. In addition to a description of the design and its functional components, a brief discussion of suggested fuel element fabrication and reactor assembly techniques is presented. The proposed design offers the potential of high reliability because only insulators at very low potentials (e.g.<3 volts) are in contact with cesium vapor; because there are no ceramic or cermet seals within the reactor (all are outside, beyond the reflectors); and because all vacuum-tight joints in the reactor are between ductile niobium components.

  13. Hydrogen injection in BWR and related radiation chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigure, Kenkichi; Takagi, Junichi; Shiraishi, Hirotsugu

    Hydrogen injection to feed water systems in boiling water reactors (BWR) has drawn wide attention as one of the possible countermeasures to the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304 type stainless steel piping. To confirm the effectiveness of the hydrogen injection, a computer simulation of the complicated radiolysis reactions was carried out. The result of the simulation showed that the reactor water data monitored at the usual sampling points in actual plants reflect mainly the reactions in the downcomer portion but not in the reactor core in BWR. The calculation claimed approximately 300 ppb hydrogen in feed water to reduce the oxygen concentration in the recirculation lines to a negligible level, while one order of magnitude higher level of hydrogen is necessary to suppress oxygen in the reactor core. The computer simulation requires many radiation chemical data as in-put, among which are G values of initial products for water radiolysis at high temperature. An experimental approach was made to confirm the G values for high temperature radiolysis of water. The result does not seem to be consistent with the high temperature G values reported by Burns.

  14. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development.

  15. Low content uranium alloys for nuclear fuels; Alliages d'uranium a faible teneur pour elements combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, H.; Laniesse, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A description is given of the structure and the properties of low content alloys containing from 0.1 to 0.5 per cent by weight of Al, Fe, Cr, Si, Mo or a combination of these elements. A study of the kinetics and of the mode of transformation has made it possible to choose the most satisfactory thermal treatment. An attempt has been made to prepare alloys suitable for an economical industrial development having a small {alpha} grain structure without marked preferential orientation, with very fine and stable precipitates as well as a high creep-resistance. The physical properties and the mechanical strength of these alloys are given for temperatures of 20 to 600 deg C. These alloys proved very satisfactory when irradiated in the form of normal size fuel elements. (authors) [French] Sont decrits la structure et les proprietes d'alliages a faible teneur, contenant de 0,1 a 0,5 pour cent en poids de Al, Fe, Cr, Si, Mo ou une combinaison de ces elements. L'etude des cinetiques et du mode de transformation permet de choisir le traitement thermique le plus favorable. On a cherche a mettre, au point des alliages se pretant a une mise en oeuvre industrielle economique et presentant une structure a petits grains {alpha}, sans orientation preferentielle marquee, avec des precipites tres fins et stables ainsi qu'une bonne resistance au fluage. Les proprietes physiques et la resistance mecanique de ces alliages sont decrites entre la temperature ambiante et 600 deg C. Irradies sous forme d'elements combustibles de dimensions normales, ces alliages ont montre un bon comportement. (auteurs)

  16. ELM - A SIMPLE TOOL FOR THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET FUEL ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    ELM is a simple computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Written for the nuclear propulsion project of the Space Exploration Initiative, ELM evaluates the various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition. In the past, these correlations were found in different reactor analysis codes, but now comparisons are possible within one program. The logic of ELM is based on the one-dimensional conservation of energy in combination with Newton's Law of Cooling to determine the bulk flow temperature and the wall temperature across a control volume. Since the control volume is an incremental length of tube, the corresponding pressure drop is determined by application of the Law of Conservation of Momentum. The size, speed, and accuracy of ELM make it a simple tool for use in fuel element parametric studies. ELM is a machine independent program written in FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled on an IBM PC compatible running MS-DOS using Lahey FORTRAN 77, a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, and a Sun4 series computer running SunOS UNIX. ELM requires 565K of RAM under SunOS 4.1, 360K of RAM under VMS 5.4, and 406K of RAM under MS-DOS. Because this program is machine independent, no executable is provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ELM is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. ELM was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  17. Neutron measurement method for the detection of transuranic elements in the nuclear fuel cycle; Neutronenmessverfahren fuer den Nachweis von Transuranen im Kernbrennstoff-Kreislauf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokcic-Kostic, Marina; Schultheis, Roland [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    By handling and storing burned-down fuel elements operators are obliged to measure the existing nuclear fuel content. Due to high penetration of matter and its origin from decay or spontaneous fission of transuranic elements neutron verification methods are suited best for the proof of fission material as long as it has been burned-down beforehand. A highly improved measuring quality can be achieved by comparing measurement results with the results of computer-aided simulations such as e.g. burn-up programs or MCNP- calculations. (orig.)

  18. A preliminary evaluation of the ability of from-reactor casks to geometrically accommodate commercial LWR spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andress, D. (Andress (David) and Associates, Inc., Kensington, MD (USA)); Joy, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); McLeod, N.B. (Johnson (E.R.) Associates, Inc., Oakton, VA (USA)); Peterson, R.W. (Bentz (E.J.) and Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA (USA)); Rahimi, M. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of cask design efforts to define several transportation casks to accommodate the various assemblies expected to be accepted by the Federal Waste Management System. At this time, three preliminary cask designs have been selected for the final design--the GA-4 and GA-9 truck casks and the BR-100 rail cask. In total, this assessment indicates that the current Initiative I cask designs can be expected to dimensionally accommodate 100% of the PWR fuel assemblies (other than the extra-long South Texas Fuel) with control elements removed, and >90% of the assemblies having the control elements as an integral part of the fuel assembly. For BWR assemblies, >99% of the assemblies can be accommodated with fuel channels removed. This paper summarizes preliminary results of one part of that evaluation related to the ability of the From-Reactor Initiative I casks to accommodate the physical and radiological characteristics of the Spent Nuclear Fuel projected to be accepted into the Federal Waste Management System. 3 refs., 5 tabs.

  19. THERMAL EVALUATION OF THE CONCEPTUAL 24 BWR UCF TUBE BASKET DESIGN DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.L. Lotz

    1995-12-18

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) as specified in the Waste Package Implementation Plan (pp. 4-8,4-11,4-24,5-1, and 5-13; Ref. 5.10) and Waste Package Plan (pp. 3-15,3-17, and 3-24; Ref. 5.9). The design data request addressed herein is: (1) Characterize the conceptual 24 boiling water reactor (BWR) uncanistered fuel (UCF) waste package (WP) to show that the design is feasible for use in the MGDS environment. The purpose of this analysis is to respond to a concern that the long-term disposal thermal issues for the UCF waste package do not preclude UCF waste package compatibility with the MGDS. The objective of this analysis is to provide thermal parameter information for the conceptual UCF WP design under nominal MGDS repository conditions. The results are intended to show that the design has a reasonable chance to meet the MGDS design requirements for normal MGDS operation and to provide the required guidance to determining the major design issues for future design efforts. Future design efforts will focus on UCF design changes as further design and operations information becomes available.

  20. Analysis of fission product transport under terminated LOCA conditions. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieseke, J.A.; Baybutt, P.; Jordan, H.; Denning, R.S.; Wooton, R.O.

    1977-12-30

    An analytical model was developed to allow preditions of the source term to the containment as dependent on release from the fuel pins and deposition within the primary system. The model was developed into a flexible computer code adaptable to various geometrical arrangements and flow paths. The calculational framework was established in such a way to permit, in principle, the determination of particle and vapor transport and deposition in a general system of control volumes connected by fluid flow in an arbitrary way. This framework requires as input the rate of fission product release to the primary flow, as a function of time for each vapor and particulate species to be considered, and a complete, time dependent, thermal-hydraulic description of the system. TRAP-PWR, TRAP-BWR and TRACK computer codes are specializations, described in detail in the text of this report, of the general framework. The nature of these specializations depends strongly on the degree of detail with which the transporting fluid medium is modeled.

  1. HORIZONTAL LIFTING OF 5 DHLW/DOE LONG, 12-PWR LONG AND 24-BWR WASTE PACKAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. de la Brosse

    2001-05-17

    The objective of this calculation was to determine the structural response of a 12-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Long, a 24-Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and a 5-Defense High Level Waste/Department of Energy (DHLW/DOE)--Long spent nuclear fuel waste packages lifted in a horizontal position. The scope of this calculation was limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of maximum stress intensities in the trunnion collar sleeves. In addition, the maximum stress intensities in the inner and outer shells of the waste packages were presented for illustrative purposes. The information provided by the sketches (Attachments I, II and III) is that of the potential design of the types of waste packages considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for these designs only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with the ''Technical work plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 7). AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref. 13), was used to perform the calculation and develop the document.

  2. The Physical Mechanism of Core-Wide and Local Instabilities at the Forsmark-1 BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Analytis, G. Th. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland). Lab. for Thermohydraulics; Hennig, D. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland). Lab. for Reactor Physics and Systems Engineering; Karlsson, J. K.-H. [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    1998-10-01

    During the last 15 years, the problem of BWR instabilities has attracted the attention of a number of researchers. From the theoretical point of view, one would be interested in physically understanding the mechanisms responsible for the in- and out-of-phase core wide power oscillations observed at certain operating points of the power-flow map in different BWRs. From the practical point of view, one must try to avoid these `incidents` since either locally, or globally, the power may substantially exceed the prescribed levels. In this work, we shall use RAMONA3-12 and analyse a rather unusual instability incident at Forsmark-1 in which in addition to the core-wide fundamental spatial mode oscillation, there were local large amplitude power oscillations at different radial positions in the core. We were able to reproduce these unusual experimental findings by assuming that there are large amplitude Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) in different bundles, induced by the fact that these bundles were not seated properly into the lower fuel support plate. (author) 17 refs., 12 figs.

  3. The post irradiation examinations of twenty-years stored spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahara, A.; Matsumura, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The post irradiation examinations (PIE) on the twenty years stored spent fuels were carried out to evaluate fuel integrity during storage. The spent BWR-MOX fuel rods and PWR-UO{sub 2} fuel rod irradiated in commercial LWR were used. The burnup of the BWR-MOX fuels (five fuel rods) are about 20 GWd/t and that of the PWR-UO{sub 2} fuel is 58 GWd/t. PIE items in this study are, a) visual inspection of the cladding surface, b) puncture test or gas analysis in capsule, c) ceramographic examination to observe oxide layer thickness on outside/inside cladding and pellet microstructure such as grain size, d) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) on pellet, e) hydrogen content in cladding. The preliminary result shows that twenty years stored fuel rods were not different from that before storage. (authors)

  4. Metal-Element Compounds of Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium as Pyrotechnic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-04

    Atlantic Equipment Engineers ( AEE ), Alfa Aesar, and American Elements. These were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF... AEE phase pure - mostly 1-7 minimally processed TiC Alfa Aesar phase pure (TiC0 93) Fe, Cr, V fines < 1 intermediate 2-8 minimally processed...TiN AEE phase pure Fe fines < 1 intermediate 2-8 milled TiSi2 AEE trace TiSi, trace SiO2 Fe, Cr, Al fines < 2 int. 5-20, coarse 50-100 milled

  5. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors; Estudios de fragilizacion en aceros de vasija de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A{sup 2}. (Author)

  6. Spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel bearing components: characterization, disposal cost estimates, and proposed repository acceptance requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksic, A.T.; McKee, R.W.; Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Purcell, W.L.

    1986-10-01

    There are two categories of waste considered in this report. The first is the spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware. This consists of the hardware remaining after the fuel pins have been removed from the fuel assembly. This includes end fittings, spacer grids, water rods (BWR) or guide tubes (PWR) as appropriate, and assorted springs, fasteners, etc. The second category is other non-fuel-bearing (NFB) components the DOE has agreed to accept for disposal, such as control rods, fuel channels, etc., under Appendix E of the standard utiltiy contract (10 CFR 961). It is estimated that there will be approximately 150 kg of SFD and NFB waste per average metric ton of uranium (MTU) of spent uranium. PWR fuel accounts for approximately two-thirds of the average spent-fuel mass but only 50 kg of the SFD and NFB waste, with most of that being spent fuel disassembly hardware. BWR fuel accounts for one-third of the average spent-fuel mass and the remaining 100 kg of the waste. The relatively large contribution of waste hardware in BWR fuel, will be non-fuel-bearing components, primarily consisting of the fuel channels. Chapters are devoted to a description of spent fuel disassembly hardware and non-fuel assembly components, characterization of activated components, disposal considerations (regulatory requirements, economic analysis, and projected annual waste quantities), and proposed acceptance requirements for spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel assembly components at a geologic repository. The economic analysis indicates that there is a large incentive for volume reduction.

  7. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Motoo; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Kaneto, Kunikazu; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Uchikawa, Sadao [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Izutsu, Sadayuki; Fujita, Satoshi

    1998-03-10

    MOX fuel assemblies containing fuel rods of mixed oxide (MOX) of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a reactor core of a BWR type reactor. The fuel assembly comprises lattice like arranged fuel rods, one large diameter water rod disposed at the central portion and a channel box surrounding them. An average enrichment degree A of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the outermost layer region and an average enrichment degree B of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the inner layer region satisfy the relation of B/A {>=} 2.2. It is preferable that the average enrichment degree C of fission plutonium of fuel rods arranged at the outermost corner portions and the enrichment degree A satisfy the relation: C/A {<=} 0.5. With such a constitution, even in a case where the MOX fuel assemblies and uranium fuel assemblies are disposed together, thermal margin can be improved. (I.N.)

  8. VENUS: cold prototype installation of the head-end of the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements. Activity report, 1 July 1976--31 December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnert, R.; Walter, C.

    1977-02-15

    The purpose of the VENUS Project is advance planning for the construction of a cold prototype system to incinerate HTR fuel element graphite. The Venus Project is organized into four phases between advance planning and experimental operation, corresponding to the maturity of the work. It is in the advance planning phase. Status of individual studies is given. (LK)

  9. Welding procedures used in the fabrication of fuel elements for the DON Reactor exponential experiment; La soldadura en la fabricacion de elementos combustibles destinados a una experiencia exponencial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Beltran, A.; Jaraiz Franco, E.; Rivas Diaz, M. de las

    1965-07-01

    This exponential experiment required 74 units (37 loaded with UO{sub 2} and 37 with UC) to simulate the Reactor fuel channels. Each unit was enclosed in a tube similar to the calandria ones. It contained the pressure tube, the shroud and the 19 rods cluster. Within the pressure tube, in touch with the elements, was the organic liquid. (Author)

  10. Thermophysical and Corrosion Characteristics of the Actual and Potential Fuel-Element Jackets of Light-Water Reactors in the Case of an Accident with Coolant Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyuk, S. S.; Kiselev, D. S.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.; Mokrushin, A. A.; Parshin, N. Ya.; Popov, E. B.; Soldatkin, D. M.; Fedik, I. I.

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion tests were carried out and experimental data are presented on the characteristics of steam-phase oxidation of fuel-element jackets made from an É110G zirconium alloy and vacuum-melted molybdenum in a temperature range of up to 1400°C at atmospheric pressure. The shut-down cooling characteristics on repeated flooding of model fuel assemblies of large-scale stands with fuel elements simulators having jackets made from various standard materials and those from a promising molybdenum one are compared. It is shown that interaction of steam with zirconium alloy is more intense than with molybdenum. At the present time the data on molybdenum are limited.

  11. Release and Transformation of Inorganic Elements in Combustion of a High-Phosphorus Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Castro, Maria; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The release and transformation of inorganic elements during grate-firing of bran was studied via experiments in a laboratory-scale reactor, analysis of fly ash from a grate-fired plant, and equilibrium modeling. It was found that K, P, S, and to a lesser extent Cl and Na were released to the gas...... phase during bran combustion. Laboratory-scale experiments showed that S was almost fully vaporized during pyrolysis below 700 °C. Sixty to seventy percent of the K and P in bran was released during combustion, in the temperature range 900–1100 °C. The release of K and P was presumably attributed...... of the released K/P, whereas kaolinite showed an opposite effect. Thermodynamic modeling indicated that the fly ash chemistry was sensitive to the molar ratio of the released K/P. When the molar ratio of the released K/P was below 1, KPO3 and P4O10(g) were the main stable K and P species at temperatures higher...

  12. Characterization of a Neutron Beam Following Reconfiguration of the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD Core and Addition of New Fuel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E. Craft

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The neutron radiography reactor (NRAD is a 250 kW Mark-II Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics (TRIGA reactor at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, USA. The East Radiography Station (ERS is one of two neutron beams at the NRAD used for neutron radiography, which sits beneath a large hot cell and is primarily used for neutron radiography of highly radioactive objects. Additional fuel elements were added to the NRAD core in 2013 to increase the excess reactivity of the reactor, and may have changed some characteristics of the neutron beamline. This report discusses characterization of the neutron beamline following the addition of fuel to the NRAD. This work includes determination of the facility category according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards, and also uses an array of gold foils to determine the neutron beam flux and evaluate the neutron beam profile. The NRAD ERS neutron beam is a Category I neutron radiography facility, the highest possible quality level according to the ASTM. Gold foil activation experiments show that the average neutron flux with length-to-diameter ratio (L/D = 125 is 5.96 × 106 n/cm2/s with a 2σ standard error of 2.90 × 105 n/cm2/s. The neutron beam profile can be considered flat for qualitative neutron radiographic evaluation purposes. However, the neutron beam profile should be taken into account for quantitative evaluation.

  13. Improving the reliability of fuel Enusa; Mejora de la fiabilidad del combustible en Enusa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choithramani, S.; Quecedo, M.

    2015-07-01

    ENUSA is committed to providing our customers with fuel designs that meet their needs for operational efficiency, power, energy, performance and reliability. ENUSAs current fuel designs, covering BWR and PWR technologies, incorporate highest performance with proven reliability features developed along nuclear power operation history. As of January 2015, ENUSA has manufactured more than 20.000 fuel assemblies (around half BWR and half PWR), with operating conditions reflecting varying reactor power densities, cycle lengths, operating strategies and water chemistry environments. This experience brings the knowledge to model our fuel behavior and acts as the principal instrument to identify and characterize the failure mechanisms of our fuel. Based on the information obtained from all this years of operation, ENUSA has progressively developed and implemented numerous mitigating actions identified upon the knowledge on failure mechanisms, which are the bases for the fuel reliability improvement program. Contemporaneously to this implementation, a positive trend on ENUSA fuel reliability has been observed. (Author)

  14. Simulation in 3 dimensions of a cycle 18 months for an BWR type reactor using the Nod3D program; Simulacion en 3 dimensiones de un ciclo de 18 meses para un reactor BWR usando el programa Nod3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, N.; Alonso, G. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: nhm@nuclear.inin.mx; Valle, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The development of own codes that you/they allow the simulation in 3 dimensions of the nucleus of a reactor and be of easy maintenance, without the consequent payment of expensive use licenses, it can be a factor that propitiates the technological independence. In the Department of Nuclear Engineering (DIN) of the Superior School of Physics and Mathematics (ESFM) of the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) a denominated program Nod3D has been developed with the one that one can simulate the operation of a reactor BWR in 3 dimensions calculating the effective multiplication factor (kJJ3, as well as the distribution of the flow neutronic and of the axial and radial profiles of the power, inside a means of well-known characteristics solving the equations of diffusion of neutrons numerically in stationary state and geometry XYZ using the mathematical nodal method RTN0 (Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec of index zero). One of the limitations of the program Nod3D is that it doesn't allow to consider the burnt of the fuel in an independent way considering feedback, this makes it in an implicit way considering the effective sections in each step of burnt and these sections are obtained of the code Core Master LEND. However even given this limitation, the results obtained in the simulation of a cycle of typical operation of a reactor of the type BWR are similar to those reported by the code Core Master LENDS. The results of the keJ - that were obtained with the program Nod3D they were compared with the results of the code Core Master LEND, presenting a difference smaller than 0.2% (200 pcm), and in the case of the axial profile of power, the maxim differs it was of 2.5%. (Author)

  15. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines, (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour.

  16. Oxide evolution on Alloy X-750 in simulated BWR environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzi, Silvia; Göransson, Kenneth; Rahman, Seikh M. H.; Eriksson, Sten G.; Liu, Fang; Thuvander, Mattias; Stiller, Krystyna

    2016-12-01

    In order to simulate the environment experienced by spacer grids in a boiling water reactor (BWR), specimens of the Ni-based Alloy X-750 were exposed to a water jet in an autoclave at a temperature of 286 °C and a pressure of 80 bar. The oxide microstructure of specimens exposed for 2 h, 24 h, 168 h and 840 h has been investigated mainly using electron microscopy. The specimens suffer mass loss due to dissolution during exposure. At the same time a complex layered oxide develops. After the longest exposure the oxide consists of two outer spinel layers consisting of blocky crystals, one intermediate layer of nickel oxide interspersed with Ti-rich oxide needles, and an inner layer of oxidized base metal. The evolution of the oxide leading up to this structure is discussed and a model is presented.

  17. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements; Procedimentos de fabricacao de elementos combustiveis a base de dispersoes com alta concentracao de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, J.A.B.; Durazzo, M., E-mail: jasouza@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    IPEN developed and made available for routine production the technology for manufacturing dispersion type fuel elements for use in research reactors. However, the fuel produced at IPEN is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 gU/cm{sup 3} by using the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion. Increasing the uranium concentration of the fuel is interesting by the possibility of increasing the reactor core reactivity and lifetime of the fuel. It is possible to increase the concentration of uranium in the fuel up to the technological limit of 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} for the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion, which is well placed around the world. This new fuel will be applicable in the new Brazilian-Multipurpose Reactor RMB. This study aimed to develop the manufacturing process of high uranium concentration fuel, redefining the procedures currently used in the manufacture of IPEN. This paper describes the main procedures adjustments that will be necessary. (author)

  18. Feasibility study of boiling water reactor core based on thorium-uranium fuel concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois Lacouture, Juan Luis; Martin del Campo, Cecilia [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ingenieria, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Mor. (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-534, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico)], E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx

    2008-01-15

    The design of a boiling water reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using the thorium-uranium (blanket-seed) concept in the same integrated fuel assembly is presented in this paper. The lattice design uses the thorium conversion capability to {sup 233}U in a BWR spectrum. A core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of one effective full power year in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main core operating parameters were obtained. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The economic analysis shows that the fuel cycle cost of the proposed core design can be competitive with a standard uranium core design. Finally, a comparison of the toxicity of the spent fuel showed that the toxicity is lower in the thorium cycle than in other fuel cycles (UO{sub 2} and MOX uranium and plutonium) in the case of the once through cycle for light water reactors (LWR)

  19. Contamination transfers during fuel transport cask loading. A concrete situation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournel, B.; Turchet, J.P.; Faure, S.; Allinei, P.G. [DEN/DED Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Briquet, L. [EDF GENV, 93 - Saint Denis (France); Baubet, D. [SGS Qualitest Industrie, 30 - Pont Saint Esprit (France)

    2002-07-01

    In 1998, a number of contamination cases detected during fuel shipments have been pointed out by the french nuclear safety authority. Wagon and casks external surfaces were partly contaminated upon arrival in Valognes railway terminal. Since then, measures taken by nuclear power plants operators in France and abroad solved the problem. In Germany, a report analyzing the situation in depth has been published in which correctives actions have been listed. In France, EDF launched a large cleanliness program (projet proprete radiologique) in order to better understand contamination transfers mechanisms during power plants exploitation and to list remediation actions to avoid further problems. In this context, CEA Department for Wastes Studies at Cadarache (CEA/DEN/DED) was in charge of a study about contamination transfers during fuel elements loading operations. It was decided to lead experiments for a concrete case. The loading of a transport cask at Tricastin-PWR-1 was followed in november 2000 and different analysis comprising water analysis and smear tests analysis were carried out and are detailed in this paper. Results are discussed and qualitatively compared to those obtained in Philippsburg-BWR, Germany for a similar set of tests. (authors)

  20. Optimal estimate of the coolant flow in the assemblies of a BWR of natural circulation in real time; Estimacion optima del flujo de refrigerante en los ensambles de un BWR de circulacion natural en tiempo real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present work exposes the design and the implementation of an advanced controller that allows estimating the coolant flow in the fuel assemblies of a BWR reactor of natural circulation in real time. To be able to reduce the penalizations that are established in the calculations of the operation limits due to the magnitude of the uncertainties in the coolant flows of a natural circulation reactor, is the objective of this research. In this work the construction of the optimal controller that allows estimating the coolant flows in a fuel channels group of the reactor is shown, as well as the operation of this applied to a reduced order model that simulates the dynamics of a natural circulation reactor. The controller design required of an estimator of the valuation variables not directly of the plant and of the estimates use of the local distributions of the coolant flow. The controller construction of the estimator was based mathematically in the filter Kalman whose algorithm allows to be carried out an advanced control of the system. To prove the estimator operation was development a simplified model that reproduces the basic dynamics of the flowing coolant in the reactor, which works as observer of the system, this model is coupled by means of the estimator controller to a detail model of the plant. The results are presented by means of graphics of the interest variables and the estimate flow, and they are documented in the chart that is presented at the end of this article. (Author)

  1. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  2. The Manufacture of W-UO2 Fuel Elements for NTP Using the Hot Isostatic Pressing Consolidation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert; Mireles, Omar

    2012-01-01

    NTP is attractive for space exploration because: (1) Higher Isp than traditional chemical rockets (2)Shorter trip times (3) Reduced propellant mass (4) Increased payload. Lack of qualified fuel material is a key risk (cost, schedule, and performance). Development of stable fuel form is a critical path, long lead activity. Goals of this project are: Mature CERMET and Graphite based fuel materials and Develop and demonstrate critical technologies and capabilities.

  3. BE (fuel element)/ZL (interim storage facility) module. Constituents of the fuel BE data base for BE documentation with respect to the disposal planning and the support of the BE container storage administration; BE/ZL-Modul. Bestandteile der BE-Datenbank zur BE-Dokumentation fuer die Entsorgungsplanung sowie zur Unterstuetzung der BE-Behaelterlagerverwaltung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, V.; Deutsch, S.; Busch, V. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany); Braun, A. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The securing of spent fuel element disposal from German nuclear power plants is the main task of GNS. This includes the container supply and the disposal analysis and planning. Therefore GNS operates a data base comprising all in Germany implemented fuel elements and all fuel element containers in interim storage facilities. With specific program modules the data base serves an optimized repository planning for all spent fuel elements from German NPPS and the supply of required data for future final disposal. The data base has two functional models: the BE (fuel element) and the ZL (interim storage) module. The contribution presents the data structure of the modules and details of the data base operation.

  4. Fuel safety research 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is in charge of research activity which covers almost research items related to fuel safety of water reactor in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are being conducted by using some unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of JAERI. The research to confirm the safety of high burn-up fuel and MOX fuel under accident conditions is the most important item among them. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). Research group of radionuclides release and transport behavior from irradiated fuel under severe accident conditions (VEGA group). The research conducted in the year 2001 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, the fuel behavior data under BWR power oscillation conditions in the NSRR, the data on failure-bearing capability of hydrided cladding under LOCA conditions and the FP release data at very high temperature in steam which simulate the reactor core condition during severe accidents. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2001 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  5. Simulation of the BWR experiments CORA-17 and CORA-28 using ATHLET-CD and assessment of BWR modelling. 1{sup st} Technical report. Validation and interpretation of the ATHLET-CD model basis; Simulation der SWR-Versuche CORA-17 und CORA-28 mit dem Programmsystem ATHLET-CD und Bewertung der SWR-Modellbasis. 1. Technischer Fachbericht. Validierung und Interpretation der ATHLET-CD Modellbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, M.; Gremme, F.; Koch, M.K.

    2013-08-15

    The 1st Technical Report was prepared for the research project ''Validation and Interpretation of the ATHLET-CD Model Basis'' funded by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi1501385) and carried out at the Chair of Energy Systems and Energy Economics at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB). This report provides results of the simulation of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) experiments CORA-17 and -28 with ATHLET-CD Mod. 2.2A. The system code ATHLET-CD (Analysis of Thermal-hydraulics of Leaks and Transients - Core Degradation) is developed by the German Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH. Code results are compared to measurements in order to assess and to analyze the capabilities of the current code version with regard to the modeling of BWR components. The CORA test series was carried out between the years 1987 and 1993 at the former Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), now Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The investigations provided experimental data regarding the material behavior during the early phase of core degradation in Light Water Reactors (LWR). The tests CORA17 and -28 represented a typical BWR arrangement of the fuel rod bundle and provided insights about the bundle behavior during the quenching process (CORA-17) and regarding the influence of a preoxidized bundle (CORA-28), respectively. The simulation results are analyzed and discussed in terms of the thermal bundle behavior, the zirconium oxidation in steam and the resulting hydrogen generation as well as the material relocation. In particular, the recently extended modeling capabilities of the code in terms of the relocation of BWR components like the absorber blade and the canister wall are assessed. The analysis shows that the code captures the thermal behavior in good agreement in both experiments. An even enhanced reproduction of the test CORA-28 is obtained in comparison to a calculation using the previous code version ATHLET-CD Mod

  6. Development of controllers with high reliability for BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asami, K.; Iida, H.; Eki, Y.; Hirose, M.; Ito, T. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1980-09-01

    Owing to the problems in system operation due to recent energy situation and the increase of nuclear power generation, high reliability and high rate of operation are required for nuclear power stations. In Hitachi Ltd., in order to meet these needs, efforts were exerted positively to make the controllers for BWR plants reliable. In this paper, three representative examples among them are described. The digital type flow rate control system for feed water recirculation ''D-FRC'' and the digital, electronic hydraulic type turbine control system ''D-EHC'' were developed by applying digital control technology and multiplication techniques, aiming at the high reliability of the most important control systems for nuclear power stations. The analog trip module enabled to attain high reliability and to reduce radiation exposure by improving preventive maintainability. Owing to the recent energy situation, the needs of safety and the high rate of operation in nuclear power stations have increased, but the attainment of high reliability in hardwares only has its limit, and the high reliability of systems is required. The measures for improving the reliability, the constitution of the D-FRC and its watching and diagnosing functions, the achievement of high quality control and the outline of the D-EHC and the analog trip module are described.

  7. A New Methodology for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, K. N.

    2005-11-27

    The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

  8. Reactor core stability monitoring method for BWR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemoto, Shigeru; Ebata, Shigeo.

    1992-09-01

    In an operation for a BWR type reactor, reactor power is usually increased or decreased by controlling both of control rods and reactor core flow rate. Under a certain condition, the reactor core is made unstable by the coupling of nuclear and thermohydrodynamic characteristics in the reactor. Therefore, the reactor power and the reactor core flow rate are changed within a range predetermined by a design calculation. However, if reactor core stability can be always measured and monitored, it is useful for safe operation, as well as an existent operation range can be extended to enable more effective operation. That is, autoregressive a coefficient is determined successively on real time based on fluctuation components of neutron flux signals. Based on the result, an amplification ratio, as a typical measure of the reactor core stability, is determined on a real time. A time constant of the successive calculation for the autoregressive coefficient can be made variable by the amplification ratio. Then, the amplification ratio is estimated at a constant accuracy. With such procedures, the reactor core stability can be monitored successively in an ON-line manner at a high accuracy, thereby enabling to improve the operation performance. (I.S.).

  9. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 /times/ 10/sup 8/ rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 /times/ 10/sup 8/ rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  11. CIRFT Data Update and Data Analyses for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Reliability Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this research is to collect experimental data on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs), including the H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station (HBR), Catawba Nuclear Station, North Anna Nuclear Power Station (NA), and the Limerick Nuclear Power Station (LMK) boiling water reactor (BWR).

  12. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, L.R. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming {open_quotes}World Class{close_quotes} performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance.

  13. Application of the FFTBM method and the power relative contribution to the discharge transitory of the recirculation pumps of a BWR; Aplicacion del metodo FFTBM y de la contribucion relativa de potencia al transitorio de disparo de las bombas de recirculacion de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo D, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Fuentes M, L., E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In this work was realized the simulation of the discharge transitory of both recirculation pumps of a BWR with the Simulate-3K code. This type of transitory is used in the stability analyses for the licensing of the fuel reload. An analysis of the precision of the simulation is also presented, using the FFTBM method jointly with the power relative contribution. This way, instead of determining the total precision of the calculation, a weighed precision is obtained by the contribution of each relevant parameter of the transitory. The results show that the precision of the simulation is acceptable due to the small magnitude of the merit figure of the width total average. The error in the merit figure comes mainly from the parameters total flow in the core and temperature of the fuel in the core. (Author)

  14. Design of a redundant meteorological station for a BWR reactor; Diseno de una estacion meteorologica redundante para un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, R.; Celis del Angel, L.; Bucio, F.; Rivero, T.; Palacios, J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: ramses@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    In this work the design of a meteorological station for a reactor type BWR is proposed. Two independent channels of data acquisition that allow him to have a bigger readiness is exposed. It is incorporate sensors without mobile parts to measure speed, wind direction and pluvial precipitation. It also counts, with sensors of global solar radiation, net radiation, barometric pressure, relative humidity and ambient temperature; with them they are possible to be calculated, moreover, other variables as temperature differential, dew point and atmospheric stability. The sensors are placed on a tower to different heights and send their information (each second) to a local registration system, the one which in turn, it remits the data to the monitoring office so that a computer is linked with the system, display and management the information in real time and automatic way. The redundant structure allows that in the event of maintenance the data acquisition is not interrupted, even if the information is transferred to another place. In all the station sections it is used protocols of standard communication to allow that a great quantity of devices can be connected without major problem. The above-mentioned would allow to the operators in the control room to have reliable information during the whole time of the reactor operation. (Author)

  15. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor; Identificacion de modelos de orden reducido de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: augusto@correo.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  16. Overview of New Tools to Perform Safety Analysis: BWR Station Black Out Test Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Mandelli; C. Smith; T. Riley; J. Nielsen; J. Schroeder; C. Rabiti; A. Alfonsi; Cogliati; R. Kinoshita; V. Pasucci; B. Wang; D. Maljovec

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA) methodologies couple system simulator codes (e.g., RELAP, MELCOR) with simulation controller codes (e.g., RAVEN, ADAPT). While system simulator codes accurately model system dynamics deterministically, simulation controller codes introduce both deterministic (e.g., system control logic, operating procedures) and stochastic (e.g., component failures, parameter uncertainties) elements into the simulation. Typically, a DPRA is performed by: 1) sampling values of a set of parameters from the uncertainty space of interest (using the simulation controller codes), and 2) simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values (using the system simulator codes). For complex systems, one of the major challenges in using DPRA methodologies is to analyze the large amount of information (i.e., large number of scenarios ) generated, where clustering techniques are typically employed to allow users to better organize and interpret the data. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of a nuclear simulation dataset that is part of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) case study. We apply a software tool that provides the domain experts with an interactive analysis and visualization environment for understanding the structures of such high-dimensional nuclear simulation datasets. Our tool encodes traditional and topology-based clustering techniques, where the latter partitions the data points into clusters based on their uniform gradient flow behavior. We demonstrate through our case study that both types of clustering techniques complement each other in bringing enhanced structural understanding of the data.

  17. Development of an Input Model to MELCOR 1.8.5 for the Oskarshamn 3 BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Lars [Lentek, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    An input model has been prepared to the code MELCOR 1.8.5 for the Swedish Oskarshamn 3 Boiling Water Reactor (O3). This report describes the modelling work and the various files which comprise the input deck. Input data are mainly based on original drawings and system descriptions made available by courtesy of OKG AB. Comparison and check of some primary system data were made against an O3 input file to the SCDAP/RELAP5 code that was used in the SARA project. Useful information was also obtained from the FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report) for O3 and the SKI report '2003 Stoerningshandboken BWR'. The input models the O3 reactor at its current state with the operating power of 3300 MW{sub th}. One aim with this work is that the MELCOR input could also be used for power upgrading studies. All fuel assemblies are thus assumed to consist of the new Westinghouse-Atom's SVEA-96 Optima2 fuel. MELCOR is a severe accident code developed by Sandia National Laboratory under contract from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). MELCOR is a successor to STCP (Source Term Code Package) and has thus a long evolutionary history. The input described here is adapted to the latest version 1.8.5 available when the work began. It was released the year 2000, but a new version 1.8.6 was distributed recently. Conversion to the new version is recommended. (During the writing of this report still another code version, MELCOR 2.0, has been announced to be released within short.) In version 1.8.5 there is an option to describe the accident progression in the lower plenum and the melt-through of the reactor vessel bottom in more detail by use of the Bottom Head (BH) package developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory especially for BWRs. This is in addition to the ordinary MELCOR COR package. Since problems arose running with the BH input two versions of the O3 input deck were produced, a NONBH and a BH deck. The BH package is no longer a separate package in the new 1

  18. Assessment of PCMI Simulation Using the Multidimensional Multiphysics BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen R. Novascone; Jason D. Hales; Benjamin W. Spencer; Richard L. Williamson

    2012-09-01

    Since 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a next-generation nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. BISON is built using INL’s Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment, or MOOSE. MOOSE is a massively parallel, finite element-based framework to solve systems of coupled non-linear partial differential equations using the Jacobian-FreeNewton Krylov (JFNK) method. MOOSE supports the use of complex two- and three-dimensional meshes and uses implicit time integration, which is important for the widely varied time scales in nuclear fuel simulation. MOOSE’s object-oriented architecture minimizes the programming required to add new physics models. BISON has been applied to various nuclear fuel problems to assess the accuracy of its 2D and 3D capabilities. The benchmark results used in this assessment range from simulation results from other fuel performance codes to measurements from well-known and documented reactor experiments. An example of a well-documented experiment used in this assessment is the Third Risø Fission Gas Project, referred to as “Bump Test GE7”, which was performed on rod ZX115. This experiment was chosen because it allows for an evaluation of several aspects of the code, including fully coupled thermo-mechanics, contact, and several nonlinear material models. Bump Test GE7 consists of a base-irradiation period of a full-length rod in the Quad-Cities-1 BWR for nearly 7 years to a burnup of 4.17% FIMA. The base irradiation test is followed by a “bump test” of a sub-section of the original rod. The bump test takes place in the test reactor DR3 at Risø in a water-cooled HP1 rig under BWR conditions where the power level is increased by about 50% over base irradiation levels in the span of several hours. During base irradiation, the axial power profile is flat. During the bump test, the axial power profile changes so that the bottom half of the rod is at approximately 50% higher power than at the base

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN U-MO DISPERSED FUEL OF FULL-SIZE FUEL ELEMENTS AND MINI-RODS IRRADIATED IN THE MIR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSEY. L. IZHUTOV

    2013-12-01

    The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%235U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85%235U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%.

  20. Combining octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid extractants for recovering transuranic elements from irradiated nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Gelis, Artem V.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2009-10-14

    Advanced concepts for closing the nuclear fuel cycle include separating Am and Cm from other fuel components. Separating these elements from the lanthanide elements at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge. We describe here a chemical system in which a neutral extractant--octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO)--is combined with an acidic extractant--bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP)--to form a single process solvent (with dodecane as the diluent) for separating Am and Cm from the other components of irradiated nuclear fuel. Continuous variation experiments in which the relative CMPO and HDEHP concentrations are varied indicate a synergistic relationship between the two extractants in the extraction of Am from buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solutions. A solvent mixture consisting or 0.1 M CMPO + 1 M HDEHP in dodecane offers acceptable extraction efficiency for the trivalent lanthanides and actinides from 1 M HNO3 while maintaining good lanthanide/actinide separation factors in the stripping regime (buffered DTPA solutions with pH 3.5 to 4). Using citrate buffer instead of lactate buffer results in improved lanthanide/actinide separation factors.

  1. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors; Metodos aplicados para la mitigacion del dano por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  2. Parametric and experimentally informed BWR Severe Accident Analysis Utilizing FeCrAl - M3FT-17OR020205041

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Larry J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are being considered as advanced fuel cladding concepts with enhanced accident tolerance. At high temperatures, FeCrAl alloys have slower oxidation kinetics and higher strength compared with zirconium-based alloys. FeCrAl could be used for fuel cladding and spacer or mixing vane grids in light water reactors and/or as channel box material in boiling water reactors (BWRs). There is a need to assess the potential gains afforded by the FeCrAl accident-tolerant-fuel (ATF) concept over the existing zirconium-based materials employed today. To accurately assess the response of FeCrAl alloys under severe accident conditions, a number of FeCrAl properties and characteristics are required. These include thermophysical properties as well as burst characteristics, oxidation kinetics, possible eutectic interactions, and failure temperatures. These properties can vary among different FeCrAl alloys. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has pursued refined values for the oxidation kinetics of the B136Y FeCrAl alloy (Fe-13Cr-6Al wt %). This investigation included oxidation tests with varying heating rates and end-point temperatures in a steam environment. The rate constant for the low-temperature oxidation kinetics was found to be higher than that for the commercial APMT FeCrAl alloy (Fe-21Cr-5Al-3Mo wt %). Compared with APMT, a 5 times higher rate constant best predicted the entire dataset (root mean square deviation). Based on tests following heating rates comparable with those the cladding would experience during a station blackout, the transition to higher oxidation kinetics occurs at approximately 1,500°C. A parametric study varying the low-temperature FeCrAl oxidation kinetics was conducted for a BWR plant using FeCrAl fuel cladding and channel boxes using the MELCOR code. A range of station blackout severe accident scenarios were simulated for a BWR/4 reactor with Mark I containment. Increasing the FeCrAl low-temperature oxidation rate

  3. Calculations for a BWR Lattice with Adjacent Gadolinium Pins Using the Monte Carlo Cell Code Serpent v.1.1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ferraro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are usually used to perform criticality calculations and to solve shielding problems due to their capability to model complex systems without major approximations. However, these codes demand high computational resources. The improvement in computer capabilities leads to several new applications of Monte Carlo neutron transport codes. An interesting one is to use this method to perform cell-level fuel assembly calculations in order to obtain few group constants to be used on core calculations. In the present work the VTT recently developed Serpent v.1.1.7 cell-oriented neutronic calculation code is used to perform cell calculations of a theoretical BWR lattice benchmark with burnable poisons, and the main results are compared to reported ones and with calculations performed with Condor v.2.61, the INVAP's neutronic collision probability cell code.

  4. Comprehensive assessment of the Ispra BWR and PWR subchannel experiments and code analysis with different two-phase models and solution schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, L.; Fischer, K.; Herkenrath, H.; Hufschmidt, W.

    1987-02-01

    This paper presents subchannel code results for a selection of the subchannel experiments performed at the Joint Research Centre of the CEC at Ispra with 16-rod BWR and PWR bundles at prototypical conditions. Three different well-known subchannel codes (COBRA-IIIC, CANAL, THERMIT) have been applied, each of which is representative of widely used two-phase flow methodologies (homogeneous, drift-flux, 2-fluid modelling) and numerical solution schemes. Their degrees of agreement with the measured subchannel exit mass flow and enthalpy distributions are reported as well as their limitations due to the lack of details in modelling two-phase flow rod bundle transport phenomena and/or numerical solution schemes both in transverse and axial directions. It is conclusively demonstrated that the extra expenditures of using advanced codes such as THERMIT effectively pay off when stringent requirements for optimizing LWR fuel rod bundles should be met.

  5. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor; Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, F.J. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fuentes C, P. [ITT, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fjmc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  6. Solution to the transport equation with anisotropic dispersion in a BWR type assembly using the AZTRAN code; Solucion de la ecuacion de transporte con dispersion anisotropica en un ensamble tipo BWR usando el codigo AZTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chepe P, M. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V.; Gomez T, A. M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: liaison.web@gmail.com [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07730 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Due to the current computing power, the deterministic codes for analyzing nuclear reactors that have been used for several years are becoming more relevant, since much more precise solution techniques can be used; the last century would have been very difficult, since memory and processor capacities were very limited or had high prices on the components. In this work we analyze the effect of the anisotropic dispersion of the effective dispersion section, compared to the isotropic dispersion. The anisotropy implementation was carried out in the AZTRAN transport code, which is part of the AZTLAN platform for nuclear reactors analysis (in development). The AZTRAN code solves the Boltzmann transport equation in one, two and three dimensions at steady state, using the multi-group technique for energy discretization, the RTN-0 nodal method in spatial discretization and for angular discretization the discrete ordinates without considering anisotropy originally. The effect of the anisotropy dispersion on the effective multiplication factor and the axial and radial power on a fuel assembly BWR type are analyzed. (Author)

  7. Comparison of results for burning with BWR reactors CASMO and SCALE 6.2 (TRITON / NEWT); Comparacion de los resultados de quemado para reactores BWR con CASMO y SCALE 6.2 (TRITON/NEWT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesado, C.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we compare the results from two codes burned, CASMO and SCALE 6.2 (TRITON). To do this, is simulated all segments corresponding to a boiling water reactor (BWR) using both codes. In addition, to account for different working points, simulations changing the instantaneous variables, these are repeated: void fractions (6 points), fuel temperature (6 points) and control rods (two points), with a total of 72 possible combinations of different instantaneous variables for each segment. After all simulations are completed for each segment, we can reorder the obtained cross sections, as SCALE CASMO both, to create a library of compositions nemtab format. This format is accepted by the neutronic code of nodal diffusion, PARCS v2.7. Finally compares the results obtained with PARCS and with the SIMULATE3 -SIMTAB methodology to level of full reactor. Also, we have made use of the KENO-VI and MCDANCOFF modules belonging to SCALE. The first is a Monte Carlo transport code with which you can validate the value of the multiplier, the second has been used to obtain values of Dancoff factor and increase the accuracy of model SCALE. (Author)

  8. Analysis CFD for the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR; Analisis CFD para el transporte de hidrogeno en la contencion primaria de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez P, D. A.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: guerreroazteca_69@hotmail.com [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    This study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison among the CFD GASFLOW and OpenFOAM codes which are related with the phenomenon of hydrogen transport and other gases in the primary containment of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). GASFLOW is a commercial license code that is well validated and that was developed in Germany for the analysis of the gases transport in containments of nuclear reactors. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source code that offers several evaluation solvers for different types of phenomena; in this case, the solver reacting-Foam is used to analyze the hydrogen transport inside the primary containment of the BWR. The results that offer the solver reacting-Foam of OpenFOAM are evaluated in the hydrogen transport calculation and the results are compared with those of the program of commercial license GASFLOW to see if is viable the use of the open source code in the case of the hydrogen transport in the primary containment of a BWR. Of the obtained results so much quantitative as qualitative some differences were identified between both codes, the differences (with a percentage of maximum error of 4%) in the quantitative results are small and they are considered acceptable for this analysis type, also, these differences are attributed mainly to the used transport models, considering that OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous model and GASFLOW uses a heterogeneous model. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of Erosion of the Dummy “EE” Plate 19 in YA Type ATR Fuel Element During Reactor PALM Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jeffrey O. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Test Reactor; Glazoff, Michael V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Test Reactor; Eiden, Thomas J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Test Reactor; Rezvoi, Aleksey V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Test Reactor

    2016-08-01

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 153B-1 was a 14-day, high-power, powered axial locator mechanism (PALM) operating cycle that completed on April 12, 2013. Cycle 153B-1 was a typical operating cycle for the ATR, and did not result in any unusual plant transients. ATR was started up and shut down as scheduled. The PALM drive physically moves the selected experiments into and out of the core to simulate reactor startup and heat up, and shutdown and cooldown transients, while the reactor remains in steady-state conditions. However, after the cycle was over, when the fuel elements were removed from the core and inspected, several thousand flow-assisted erosion pits and “horseshoeing” defects were readily observed on the surface of the several YA-type fuel elements (these are aluminum “dummy” plates that contain no fuel). In order to understand these erosion phenomena, a thermal-hydraulic model of coolant channel 20 on a YA-M fuel element was generated. The boundaries of the model were the aluminum EE plate of a YA-M fuel element and a beryllium reflector block with 13 horizontal saw cuts which represented regions of zero flow. The heat generated in fuel plates 1 through 18 was modeled to be passing through the aluminum EE plate. The coolant channel 20 width was set at 0.058 in. (58 mils). It was established that the horizontal saw cuts had a significant effect on the temperature of the coolant. The flow, which was expected to vary linearly with gradual heating of the coolant as it passed through the channel, was extremely turbulent. The temperature rise, which was expected to be a smooth “S” curve, was represented by a series temperature rise “humps,” which occurred at each horizontal saw cut in the beryllium reflector block. Each of the 13 saw cuts had a chamfered edge which resulted in the coolant flow being re-directed as a jet across the coolant channel into the surface of the EE plate, which explained the temperature rise and the observed

  10. Signal analysis of acoustic and flow-induced vibrations of BWR main steam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Prieto-Guerrero, A. [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Núñez-Carrera, A. [Comisión Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Doctor Barragán 779, Col. Narvarte, México, D.F. 03020 (Mexico); Vázquez-Rodríguez, A. [División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Centeno-Pérez, J. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas Unidad Profesional “Adolfo López Mateos”, Av. IPN, s/n, México, D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Espinosa-Martínez, E.-G. [Departamento de Sistemas Energéticos, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); and others

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Acoustic and flow-induced vibrations of BWR are analyzed. • BWR performance after extended power uprate is considered. • Effect of acoustic side branches (ASB) is analyzed. • The ASB represents a reduction in the acoustic loads to the steam dryer. • Methodology developed for simultaneous analyzing the signals in the MSL. - Abstract: The aim of this work is the signal analysis of acoustic waves due to phenomenon known as singing in Safety Relief Valves (SRV) of the main steam lines (MSL) in a typical BWR5. The acoustic resonance in SRV standpipes and fluctuating pressure is propagated from SRV to the dryer through the MSL. The signals are analyzed with a novel method based on the Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition (M-EMD). The M-EMD algorithm has the potential to find common oscillatory modes (IMF) within multivariate data. Based on this fact, we implement the M-EMD technique to find the oscillatory mode in BWR considering the measurements obtained collected by the strain gauges located around the MSL. These IMF, analyzed simultaneously in time, allow obtaining an estimation of the effects of the multiple-SRV in the MSL. Two scenarios are analyzed: the first is the signal obtained before the installation of the acoustic dampers (ASB), and the second, the signal obtained after installation. The results show the effectiveness of the ASB to damp the strong resonances when the steam flow increases, which represents an important reduction in the acoustic loads to the steam dryer.

  11. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  12. Assessment of the Prony's method for BWR stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.m [Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Edo. Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Castillo-Duran, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.m [Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Edo. Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C., E-mail: javier.palacios@inin.gob.m [Gerencia de Ciencias Aplicadas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carr. Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Edo. Mexico 52750 (Mexico)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: This paper describes a method to determine the degree of stability of a BWR. Performance comparison between Prony's and common AR techniques is presented. Benchmark data and actual BWR transient data are used for comparison. DR and f results are presented and discussed. The Prony's method is shown to be a robust technique for BWR stability. - Abstract: It is known that Boiling Water Reactors are susceptible to present power oscillations in regions of high power and low coolant flow, in the power-flow operational map. It is possible to fall in one of such instability regions during reactor startup, since both power and coolant flow are being increased but not proportionally. One other possibility for falling into those areas is the occurrence of a trip of recirculation pumps. Stability monitoring in such cases can be difficult, because the amount or quality of power signal data required for calculation of the stability key parameters may not be enough to provide reliable results in an adequate time range. In this work, the Prony's Method is presented as one complementary alternative to determine the degree of stability of a BWR, through time series data. This analysis method can provide information about decay ratio and oscillation frequency from power signals obtained during transient events. However, so far not many applications in Boiling Water Reactors operation have been reported and supported to establish the scope of using such analysis for actual transient events. This work presents first a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results obtained by Prony's method and those results obtained by the participants of the Forsmark 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactor Stability Benchmark using diverse techniques. Then, a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results is performed for four real BWR transient event data, using Prony's method and two other techniques based on an autoregressive modeling. The four

  13. Results of the monitoring program at the factory site of fuel elements Juzbado; Resultados del programa vigilancia del emplazamiento en la fabrica de elementos combustibles de Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz Trujillo, D.; Perez Fonseca, A.; Sierra Gil, S.

    2011-07-01

    The factory fuel elements Juzbado has a number of unique features different from other nuclear facilities, given that the inventory of isotopes present in Juzbado limited to uranium enriched to 5% and their descendants, all these isotopes are normally in the nature in various amounts depending on the hydrogeological area. For this reason, it should be noted that quantification of contamination provided can be complicated to be able to find the same isotopes in the natural background radiation, having to have clear criteria and appropriate methodology for distinguishing background values ??due to the factory values . In this paper we will explain the results of the inspection plan.

  14. Fuel elements assembling for the DON project exponential experience; Montaje de los elementos combustibles para la experiencia exponencial del proyecto DON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anca Abati, R. de

    1966-07-01

    It is described the fuel unit used in the DON exponential experience, the manufacturing installments and tools as well as the stages in the fabrication.These 74 elements contain each 19 cartridges loaded with synterized urania, uranium carbide and indium, gold, and manganese probes. They were arranged in calandria-like tubes and the process-tube. This last one containing a cooling liquid simulating the reactor organic. Besides being used in the DON reactor exponential experience they were used in critic essays by the substitution method in the French reactor AQUILON II. (Author) 6 refs.

  15. ATRIUM™ 11 – Validation of performanceand value for BWR operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colet, S.; Garner, N.L.; Graebert, R.; Koch, R.; Mollard, P.

    2015-07-01

    AREVA’s ATRIUM™ 11 advanced fuel design for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is the result of a product development program designed to realize a strict set of performance and reliability objectives complying with the industry market demand. The validation of ATRIUM™ 11 performance is given by the now completed out of pile thermal hydraulic and mechanical tests, the results of poolside examinations of initiated lead fuel assembly programs as well as the results of fuel cycle analyses taking benefit of enhanced fuel reliability and operational flexibility. The coming three years will complete the in-service qualification program leading to the anticipated reload deliveries in Europe in 2018 and leading to reload readiness in the US in 2019. The ATRIUM™ 11 Lead Fuel Assembly program is running in Europe since 2012 and in the USA since 2015 and the first irradiation experience data give as-expected results in term of mechanical and thermal-mechanical behavior as well as levels of corrosion. The large gains in term of fuel cycle economy by switching from 10x10 fuel to ATRIUM™ 11 fuel are illustrated specifically for a 1300 MWe US type reactor featuring a symmetric lattice and operated on a 24 month basis. The analytical tools necessary to support cycle design and licensing were initiated in parallel with the product development and, where required by regulatory authorities, submitted for review in time to allow for approval in parallel with the completion of the in-service qualification program. (Author)

  16. Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossela, Harry J.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

  17. Estimation of the activity and isotopic composition of the fuel elements of the reactor in decaying; Estimacion de la actividad y composicion isotopica de los elementos combustibles del reactor en decaimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-03-15

    At the present time its are had 59 fuel elements, 3 control bars with follower and 2 instrumented irradiated fuels that its are decaying in the pool of the reactor. The burnt one that its have these fuels is not uniform, the quantity of U-235 that contain at the moment it varies between 33.5 g up to 35.2 and its have a decay of at least 12 years. The burnt of the fuels was obtained with the CREMAT code, this burnt was takes like base to estimate the current isotopic inventory and the activity of the same ones using the ORIGEN2 code. (Author)

  18. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  19. Thermohydraulic study of a MTR fuel element aimed at the construction of an irradiation facility; Estudo termohidraulico de um elemento combustivel tipo MTR visando a construcao de um dispositivo de irradiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coragem, Helio Boemer de Oliveira

    1980-07-01

    A thermohydraulic study of MTR fuel element is presented as a basic requirement for the development of an irradiation facility for testing fuel elements. A computer code named 'Thermo' has been developed for this purpose, which can stimulate different working conditions, such as, cooling, power elements and neutron flux, performing all pertinent thermohydraulic calculations. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature gradients of the cooling fluid throughout the IEAR-1 reactor core. All experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical model applied in this work. Finally, a draft of the proposed facility and its safety system is presented. (author)

  20. Evaluation of Corrosion of the Dummy “EE” Plate 19 in YA Type ATR Fuel Element During Reactor PALM Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jeffrey Owen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Glazoff, Michael Vasily [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Eiden, Thomas John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rezvoi, Aleksey Victor [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 153B-1 was a 14-day, high-power, powered axial locator mechanism (PALM) operating cycle that completed on April 12, 2013. Cycle 153B-1 was a typical operating cycle for the ATR and did not result in any unusual plant transients. ATR was started up and shut down as scheduled. The PALM drive physically moves the selected experiments into and out of the core to simulate reactor startup and heat up, and shutdown and cooldown transients, while the reactor remains in steady state conditions. However, after the cycle was over, several thousand of the flow-assisted corrosion pits and “horseshoeing” defects were readily observable on the surface of the several YA-type fuel elements (these are “dummy” plates that contain no fuel). In order understand these corrosion phenomena a thermal-hydraulic model of coolant channel 20 on a YA-M fuel element was generated. The boundaries of the model were the aluminum EE plate of a YA-M fuel element and a beryllium reflector block with 13 horizontal saw cuts which represented regions of zero flow. The heat generated in fuel plates 1 through 18 was modeled to be passing through the aluminum EE plate. The coolant channel 20 width was set at 0.058 in. (58 mils). It was established that the horizontal saw cuts had a significant effect on the temperature of the coolant. The flow, which was expected to vary linearly with gradual heating of the coolant as it passed through the channel, was extremely turbulent. The temperature rise, which was expected to be a smooth “S” curve, was represented by a series temperature rise “humps,” which occurred at each horizontal saw cut in the beryllium reflector block. Each of the 13 saw cuts had a chamfered edge which resulted in the coolant flow being re-directed as a jet across the coolant channel into the surface of the EE plate, which explained the temperature rise and the observed sscalloping and possibly pitting degradation on the YA-M fuel elements. In

  1. FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF ROCK FALL ON UNCANISTERED FUEL WASTE PACKAGE DESIGNS (SCPB: N/A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Ceylan

    1996-10-18

    The objective of this analysis is to explore the Uncanistered Fuel (UCF) Tube Design waste package (WP) resistance to rock falls. This analysis will also be used to determine the size of rock that can strike the WP without causing failure in the containment barriers from a height based on the starter tunnel dimensions. The purpose of this analysis is to document the models and methods used in the calculations.

  2. Current and anticipated use of thermal-hydraulic codes for BWR transient and accident analyses in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Kenji; Ebata, Shigeo [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    This paper summarizes the current and anticipated use of the thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes for the BWR transient and accident analyses in Japan. The codes may be categorized into the licensing codes and the best estimate codes for the BWR transient and accident analyses. Most of the licensing codes have been originally developed by General Electric. Some codes have been updated based on the technical knowledge obtained in the thermal hydraulic study in Japan, and according to the BWR design changes. The best estimates codes have been used to support the licensing calculations and to obtain the phenomenological understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena during a BWR transient or accident. The best estimate codes can be also applied to a design study for a next generation BWR to which the current licensing model may not be directly applied. In order to rationalize the margin included in the current BWR design and develop a next generation reactor with appropriate design margin, it will be required to improve the accuracy of the thermal-hydraulic and neutronic model. In addition, regarding the current best estimate codes, the improvement in the user interface and the numerics will be needed.

  3. Simulation of the automatic depressurization system (Ads) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) based on RELAP; Simulacion del sistema de despresurizacion automatica (ADS) para un reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR) basado en RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez G, C.; Chavez M, C., E-mail: ces.raga@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The automatic depressurization system (Ads) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) like part of the emergency cooling systems is designed to liberate the vapor pressure of the reactor vessel, as well as the main vapor lines. At the present time in the Engineering Faculty, UNAM personnel works in the simulation of the Laguna Verde reactor based on the nuclear code RELAP/SCADAP and in the incorporation to the same of the emergency cooling systems. The simulation of the emergency cooling systems began with the inclusion of two hydrodynamic volumes, one source and another drain, and the incorporation of the initiation logic for each emergency system. In this work is defined and designed a simplified model of Ads of the reactor, considering a detail level based on the main elements that compose it. As tool to implement the proposed model, the RELAP code was used. The simulated main functions of Ads are centered in the quick depressurization of the reactor by means of the vapor discharge through the relief/safety valves to the suppression pool, and, in the event of break of the main vapor line, the reduction of the vessel pressure operates for that the cooling systems of the core to low pressure (Lpcs and Lpci) they can begin their operation. (Author)

  4. Analysis of results of AZTRAN and AZKIND codes for a BWR; Analisis de resultados de los codigos AZTRAN y AZKIND para un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida O, G. E.; Vallejo Q, J. A.; Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Xolocostli M, J. V.; Rodriguez H, A.; Gomez T, A. M., E-mail: gbo729@yahoo.com.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents an analysis of results obtained from simulations performed with the neutron transport code AZTRAN and the kinetic code of neutron diffusion AZKIND, based on comparisons with models corresponding to a typical BWR, in order to verify the behavior and reliability of the values obtained with said code for its current development. For this, simulations of different geometries were made using validated nuclear codes, such as CASMO, MCNP5 and Serpent. The results obtained are considered adequate since they are comparable with those obtained and reported with other codes, based mainly on the neutron multiplication factor and the power distribution of the same. (Author)

  5. Multivariate analysis of gamma spectra to characterize used nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, Jamie; Orton, Christopher; Schwantes, Jon

    2017-04-01

    The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor provides an efficient means to monitor the process conditions in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities to support process verification and validation. The MIP Monitor applies multivariate analysis to gamma spectroscopy of key stages in the reprocessing stream in order to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. This research extends the MIP Monitor by characterizing a used fuel sample after initial dissolution according to the type of reactor of origin (pressurized or boiling water reactor; PWR and BWR, respectively), initial enrichment, burn up, and cooling time. Simulated gamma spectra were used to develop and test three fuel characterization algorithms. The classification and estimation models employed are based on the partial least squares regression (PLS) algorithm. A PLS discriminate analysis model was developed which perfectly classified reactor type for the three PWR and three BWR reactor designs studied. Locally weighted PLS models were fitted on-the-fly to estimate the remaining fuel characteristics. For the simulated gamma spectra considered, burn up was predicted with 0.1% root mean squared percent error (RMSPE) and both cooling time and initial enrichment with approximately 2% RMSPE. This approach to automated fuel characterization can be used to independently verify operator declarations of used fuel characteristics and to inform the MIP Monitor anomaly detection routines at later stages of the fuel reprocessing stream to improve sensitivity to changes in operational parameters that may indicate issues with operational control or malicious activities.

  6. Decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Status report Task 2: process evaluation. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divine, J.R.; Woodruff, E.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Zima, G.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to reduce occupational exposure and waste volumes, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Eleven processes or solvents were examined for their behavior in decontaminating BWR carbon steel samples. The solvents included NS-1, a proprietary solvent of Dow Chemical Corporation, designed for BWR use, and AP-Citrox, a well-known, two-step process designed for PWR stainless steel; it was used to provide a reference for later comparison to other systems and processes. The decontamination factors observed in the tests performed in a small laboratory scale recirculating loop ranged from about 1 (no effect) to 222 (about 99.6% of the initial activity removed. Coordinated corrosion measurements were made using twelve chemical solvents and eight metal alloys found in a range of reactor types.

  7. Passive BWR integral LOCA testing at the Karlstein test facility INKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Robert [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Wagner, Thomas [AREVA GmbH, Karlstein am Main (Germany); Leyer, Stephan [TH Univ. of Applied Sciences, Deggendorf (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    KERENA is an innovative AREVA GmbH boiling water reactor (BWR) with passive safety systems (Generation III+). In order to verify the functionality of the reactor design an experimental validation programme was executed. Therefore the INKA (Integral Teststand Karlstein) test facility was designed and erected. It is a mockup of the BWR containment with integrated pressure suppression system. In March 2013 the first integral test - Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) - was executed. The main target was to demonstrate the ability of the passive systems to ensure core coverage, decay heat removal and to maintain the containment within defined limits. The results of the test showed that the passive safety systems are capable to bring the plant to stable conditions meeting all required safety targets with sufficient margins. (orig.)

  8. Development of membrane moisture separator for BWR off-gas system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, H.; Kawamura, S. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kumasaka, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Nishikubo, M. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In BWR plant off-gas treatment systems, dehumidifiers are used to maintain noble gas adsorption efficiency in the first half of the charcoal hold-up units. From the perspective of simplifying and reducing the cost of such a dehumidification system, Japanese BWR utilities and plant fabricators have been developing a dehumidification system employing moisture separation membrane of the type already proven in fields such as medical instrumentation and precision measuring apparatus. The first part of this development involved laboratory testing to simulate the conditions found in an actual off-gas system, the results of which demonstrated satisfactory results in terms of moisture separation capability and membrane durability, and suggested favorable prospects for application in actual off-gas systems. Further, in-plant testing to verify moisture separation capability and membrane durability in the presence of actual gases is currently underway, with results so far suggesting that the system is capable of obtaining good moisture separation capability. (author)

  9. Study on reactor vessel replacement (RVR) for 1100 MW class BWR plants in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, J.; Kawamura, S. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Aoki, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Mori, T. [Toshiba Corp., Yokihama (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Plant Life Management (PLM) is being studied in Japan, and reactor vessel replacement (RVR) is being considered as one option. Since reactor internals, except for reusable parts, and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are replaced, the RVR provides an effective technology for extending the service life of nuclear power plants substantially. At ICONE 7, we reported on the technical viability of the RVR for BWR4-type 800 MWe class plants. This time, we rationalized the RVR method through a study for BWR5-type 1100 MWe class plants to reduce the RVR duration and evaluated the technical viability and the economic efficiency of the method. In addition, we discuss how to dispose of the RPV to complete a scenario of the process from the RVR to its final disposal. (author)

  10. Finite element based stress analysis of BWR internals exposed to accident loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altstadt, E.; Weiss, F.P.; Werner, M.; Willschuetz, H.G.

    1998-10-01

    During a hypothetical accident the reactor pressure vessel internals of boiling water reactors can be exposed to considerable loads resulting from temperature gradients and pressure waves. Three dimensional FE models were developed for the core shroud, the upper and the lower core supporting structure, the steam separator pipes and the feed water distributor. The models of core shroud, upper core structure and lower core structure were coupled by means of the substructure technique. All FE models can be used for thermal and for structural mechanical analyses. As an example the FE analysis for the case of a station black-out scenario (loss of power supply for the main circulating pumps) with subsequent emergency core cooling is demonstrated. The transient temperature distributions within the core shroud and within the steam dryer pipes as well were calculated based on the fluid temperatures and the heat transfer coefficients provided by thermo-hydraulic codes. At the maximum temperature gradients in the core shroud, the mechanical stress distribution was computed in a static analysis with the actual temperature field being the load. (orig.)

  11. Current understanding on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of BWR reactor pressure vessel steels in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, K.; Nishiyama, T. [TEPCO (Japan); Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A. [CRIEPI (Japan); Ohta, T. [Japan Atomic Power Co. (Japan); Ishimaru, Y. [Chugoku EPCO (Japan); Yoneda, H. [Hokuriku EPCO (Japan); Lida, J. [Tohoku EPCO (Japan); Yuya, H. [Chubu EPCO (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels has been of concern primarily for the pressurized water reactors (PWRs). After long operation experiences, we are now becoming aware of the situation that the neutron irradiation embrittlement is also of concern for some of the boiling water reactors (BWRs) particularly with Cu-containing RPV steels. The surveillance data of Cu-containing BWR RPV steels show relatively larger shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of fracture toughness than predicted by the embrittlement correlation method developed in late eighties and early nineties. Accurate evaluation of the amount of embrittlement is now very important for long-term operation of BWRs. In this paper, we will describe the neutron irradiation embrittlement of BWR RPVs in Japan. Some of the materials that show relatively large transition temperature shifts are investigated to understand the causes of embrittlement using state-of-the-art microstructural characterization techniques. Furthermore, some archive materials of such RPVs are irradiated in a material testing reactor with high neutron flux to understand the effect of flux on transition temperature shifts and corresponding microstructural changes. Microstructural evolution under irradiation, solute clustering in particular could explain the differences in transition temperature shift of the analyzed specimens. Larger BWR RPVs, which have larger water gaps, receive less neutron irradiation and harmful impurities in steels such as copper are well controlled since 1980 so irradiation embrittlement in BWR vessels can now be considered a concern only in old and small plants. All the new information obtained through these activities was considered in the development of new embrittlement correlation that is now adopted in JEAC 4201- 2007 of Japan Electric Association

  12. Analysis of BWR/Mark III drywell failure during degraded core accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for a hydrogen detonation due to the accumulation of a large amount of hydrogen in the drywell region of a BWR Mark III containment is analyzed. Loss of integrity of the drywell wall causes a complete bypass of the suppression pool and leads to pressurization of the containment building. However, the predicted peak containment pressure does not exceed the estimates of containment failure pressure.

  13. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  14. Performance of iron–chromium–aluminum alloy surface coatings on Zircaloy 2 under high-temperature steam and normal BWR operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Weicheng; Mouche, Peter A.; Han, Xiaochun [University of Illinois, Department of Nuclear, Radiological, and Plasma Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Heuser, Brent J., E-mail: bheuser@illinois.edu [University of Illinois, Department of Nuclear, Radiological, and Plasma Engineering, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Was, Gary S. [University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) coatings deposited on Zircaloy 2 (Zy2) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by magnetron sputtering have been tested with respect to oxidation weight gain in high-temperature steam. In addition, autoclave testing of FeCrAl-coated Zy2 coupons under pressure-temperature-dissolved oxygen coolant conditions representative of a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment has been performed. Four different FeCrAl compositions have been tested in 700 °C steam; compositions that promote alumina formation inhibited oxidation of the underlying Zy2. Parabolic growth kinetics of alumina on FeCrAl-coated Zy2 is quantified via elemental depth profiling. Autoclave testing under normal BWR operating conditions (288 °C, 9.5 MPa with normal water chemistry) up to 20 days demonstrates observable weight gain over uncoated Zy2 simultaneously exposed to the same environment. However, no FeCrAl film degradation was observed. The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe–Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system. - Graphical abstract: Weight gain normalized to total sample surface area versus time during 700 °C steam exposure for FeCrAl samples with different composition (A) and Fe/Cr/Al:62/4/34 (B). In both cases, the responses of uncoated Zry2 (Zry2-13A and Zry2-19A) are shown for comparison. This uncoated Zry2 response shows the expected pre-transition quasi-cubic kinetic behavior and eventual breakaway (linear) kinetics. Highlights: • FeCrAl coatings deposited on Zy2 have been tested with respect to oxidation in high-temperature steam. • FeCrAl compositions promoting alumina formation inhibited oxidation of Zy2 and delay weight gain. • Autoclave testing to 20 days of coated Zy2 in a simulated BWR environment demonstrates minimal weight gain and no film degradation. • The 900 °C eutectic in binary Fe-Zr is addressed with the FeCrAl-YSZ system.

  15. Identification and assessment of BWR in-vessel severe accident mitigation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cleveland, J.C.; Kress, T.S.; Petek, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This report provides the results of work carried out in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program to develop a technical basis for evaluating the effectiveness and feasibility of current and proposed strategies for boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accident management. First, the findings of an assessment of the current status of accident management strategies for the mitigation of in-vessel events for BWR severe accident sequences are described. This includes a review of the BWR Owners` Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGSs) to determine the extent to which they currently address the characteristic events of an unmitigated severe accident and to provide the basis for recommendations for enhancement of accident management procedures. Second, where considered necessary, new candidate accident management strategies are proposed for mitigation of the late-phase (after core damage has occurred) events. Finally, recommendations are made for consideration of additional strategies where warranted, and two of the four candidate strategies identified by this effort are assessed in detail: (1) preparation of a boron solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and (2) containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if the injection systems cannot be restored.

  16. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  17. Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsue, S.T.; Stewart, J.E.; Kaieda, K.; Halbig, J.K.; Phillips, J.R.; Lee, D.M.; Hatcher, C.R.

    1979-02-01

    Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuel has been investigated by calculations and experiments as a simple, complementary technique to the gamma assay. From the calculations it was found that the neutron emission arises mainly from the curium isotopes, the neutrons exhibit very good penetrability of the assemblies, and the neutron multiplication is not affected by the burnup. From the experiments on BWR and PWR assemblies, the neutron emission rate is proportional to burnup raised to 3.4 power. The investigations indicate that the passive neutron assay is a simple and useful technique to determine the consistency of burnups between assemblies.

  18. Year-round Source Contributions of Fossil Fuel and Biomass Combustion to Elemental Carbon on the North Slope Alaska Utilizing Radiocarbon Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, T. E.; Gustafsson, O.; Winiger, P.; Moffett, C.; Back, J.; Sheesley, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well documented that the Arctic has undergone rapid warming at an alarming rate over the past century. Black carbon (BC) affects the radiative balance of the Arctic directly and indirectly through the absorption of incoming solar radiation and by providing a source of cloud and ice condensation nuclei. Among atmospheric aerosols, BC is the most efficient absorber of light in the visible spectrum. The solar absorbing efficiency of BC is amplified when it is internally mixed with sulfates. Furthermore, BC plumes that are fossil fuel dominated have been shown to be approximately 100% more efficient warming agents than biomass burning dominated plumes. The renewal of offshore oil and gas exploration in the Arctic, specifically in the Chukchi Sea, will introduce new BC sources to the region. This study focuses on the quantification of fossil fuel and biomass combustion sources to atmospheric elemental carbon (EC) during a year-long sampling campaign in the North Slope Alaska. Samples were collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) climate research facility in Barrow, AK, USA. Particulate matter (PM10) samples collected from July 2012 to June 2013 were analyzed for EC and sulfate concentrations combined with radiocarbon (14C) analysis of the EC fraction. Radiocarbon analysis distinguishes fossil fuel and biomass burning contributions based on large differences in end members between fossil and contemporary carbon. To perform isotope analysis on EC, it must be separated from the organic carbon fraction of the sample. Separation was achieved by trapping evolved CO2 produced during EC combustion in a cryo-trap utilizing liquid nitrogen. Radiocarbon results show an average fossil contribution of 85% to atmospheric EC, with individual samples ranging from 47% to 95%. Source apportionment results will be combined with back trajectory (BT) analysis to assess geographic source region impacts on the EC burden in the western Arctic.

  19. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels; Dano por radiacion en materiales estructurales de vasijas de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A{sup 2}). (Author)

  20. Logical model for the control of a BWR turbine;Modelo logico para el control de una turbina de un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas O, Y. [Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Campus Toluca, Av. Las Palmas No. 136, Col. San Jorge Pueblo Nuevo, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Amador G, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Castillo D, R., E-mail: yonaeton@hotmail.co [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    In this work a design of a logical model is presented for the turbine control of a nuclear power plant with a BWR like energy source. The model is sought to implement later on inside the thermal hydraulics code of better estimate RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The logical model is developed for the control and protection of the turbine, and the consequent protection to the BWR, considering that the turbine control will be been able to use for one or several turbines in series. The quality of the present design of the logical model of the turbine control is that it considers the most important parameters in the operation of a turbine, besides that they have incorporated to the logical model the secondary parameters that will be activated originally as true when the turbine model is substituted by a detailed model. The development of the logical model of a turbine will be of utility in the short and medium term to carry out analysis on the turbine operation with different operation conditions, of vapor extraction, specific steps of the turbine to feed other equipment s, in addition to analyze the separate and the integrated effect. (Author)

  1. Decay profiles of {beta} and {gamma} for a radionuclide inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor; Perfiles de decaimiento de radiacion {beta} y {gamma} para un inventario de radionuclidos en ciclo de equilibrio de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaices, M.; Sandoval, S.; Ovando, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas. Gerencia de Energia Nuclear, Av. Reforma 113 Col. Palmira. 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: sal@iie.org.mx

    2007-07-01

    Presently work the {beta} and {gamma} radiation decay profiles for a radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle of a BWR type reactor is presented. The profiles are presented in terms of decay in the activity of the total inventory as well as of the chemical groups that conform the inventory. In the obtaining of the radionuclides inventory in equilibrium cycle the ORIGEN2 code, version 1 was used, which simulates fuel burnup cycles and it calculates the evolution of the isotopic composition as a result of the burnt one, irradiation and decay of the nuclear fuel. It can be observed starting from the results that the decrease in the activity for the initial inventory and the different chemical groups that conform it is approximately proportional to the base 10 logarithm of the time for the first 24 hours of having concluded the burnt one. It can also be observed that the chemical groups that contribute in more proportion to the total activity of the inventory are the lanthanides-actinides and the transition metals, with 39% and 28%, respectively. The groups of alkaline earth metals, halogens, metalloids, noble gases and alkaline metals, contribute with percentages that go from the 8 to 5%. The groups that less they contribute to the total activity of the inventory they are the non metals and semi-metals with smaller proportions that 1%. The chemical groups that more contribute to the energy of {beta} and {gamma} radiation its are the transition metals and the lanthanides-actinides with a change in the order of importance at the end of the 24 hours period. The case of the halogens is of relevance for the case of the {gamma} radiation energy due that occupying the very near third site to the dimensions of the two previous groups. Additionally, the decay in the activity for the total inventory and the groups that conform it can be simulated by means of order 6 polynomials or smaller than describe its behavior appropriately. The results presented in this work, coupled

  2. Spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity. Annual report, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Bradley, E.R.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Langstaff, D.C.

    1981-09-01

    During program FY 1980 staff members of the Spent Fuel and Fuel Pool Component Integrity Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) completed the following major tasks: represented DOE on the international Behavior of Fuel Assemblies in Storage (BEFAST) Committee; the program manager, A.B. Johnson, Jr., participated in an International Survey of Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage Experience, which was conducted jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency (Vienna) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (Paris); provided written testimony and cross statement for the Proposed Rulemaking on Storage and Disposal of Nuclear Waste; acquired and began examination of the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel from the Shippingport reactor, stored approx. 21 years in deionized water; acquired and began examination of stainless-clad spent fuel from the Connecticut Yankee Reactor (PWR); negotiated for specimens from components stored in spent fuel pools at fuel storage facilities from the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina, Zion (PWR) spent fuel pool, Zion, Illinois, and La Crosse (BWR) spent fuel pool, La Crosse, Wisconsin; planned for examinations in FY 81 of specimens from the three spent fuel pools; investigated a low-temperature stress corrosion cracking mechanism that developed in piping at a few PWR spent fuel pools. This report summarizes the results of these activities and investigations. Details are provided in the presentationsand publications generated under this program and summarized in Appendix A.

  3. MOX fuel assembly and reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hidemitsu; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo

    1998-06-26

    The MOX fuel assembly of the present invention is of a c-lattice type loaded to a BWR type reactor. 74 MOX fuel rods filled with mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium and two water rods disposed to a space equal to that for 7 MOX fuel rods are arranged in 9 x 9 matrix. MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are disposed to four corners of the 9 x 9 matrix. The enrichment degree means a ratio of the weight of fission products based on the total weight of fuels. Two MOX fuel rods having the same enrichment degree are arranged in each direction so as to be continuous from the MOX fuel rods at four corners in the direction of the same row and different column and same column and the different row. In addition, among the outermost circumferential portion of the 9 x 9 matrix, MOX fuel rods having a lower enrichment degree next to the MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are arranged, each by three to a portion where MOX fuel rods having the lowest enrichment degree are not disposed. (I.N.)

  4. Validation and Benchmarking of Westinghouse BWR lattice physics methods

    OpenAIRE

    Luszczek, Karol

    2015-01-01

    A lattice physics code is a vital tool, forming a base of reactor coreanalysis. It enables the neutronic properties of the fuel assembly to becalculated and generates a proper set of data to be used by a 3-D full coresimulator. Due to advancement and complexity of modern Boiling WaterReactor assembly designs, a new deterministic lattice physics codeis being developed at Westinghouse Sweden AB, namely PHOENIX5.Each time a new code is written, its methodology of solving the neutrontransport equ...

  5. Reports of the 8th new type nuclear fuel materials studying meeting. Present status of the plutonium mixed oxide fuel application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This was the reports of the 8th New Type Nuclear Fuel Materials Studying Meeting, as a circle of Yayoi Studying Group meeting held on March 17, 1997. This meeting was added to a subtitle of `Present status and problems of plutonium mixed oxide application`, which had 12 lectures. In this meeting, for the MOX fuels putting the most attention in the field of nuclear fuel development at present, many specialists introduced faithfully on present status and problems of its nuclear features, reactor core design, and application to light water reactor and fast reactor. And, following reports were executed: (A) On feature of plutonium and reactor core design; (1) nuclear feature of plutonium, (2) nuclear design of BWR, (3) nuclear design of PWR, (4) nuclear design of FBR, and (5) and (6) properties of the MOX fuel; (B) On application of plutonium to the light water reactor; (1) preparation of the MOX fuel for light water reactor, (2) radiation behavior and using result of the MOX fuel for BWR, and (3) radiation behavior and using result of the MOX fuel for PWR; and (C) On application of plutonium to the fast reactor; (1) fuel preparation, (2) radiation behavior, and (3) reprocessing of the fast reactor fuel. (G.K.)

  6. Thorium utilization program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending February 28, 1977. [Fuel element crushing, burning; particle classification; solvent extraction; dry solids handling; plant management; HET fuel shipping; HTGR recycle demonstration facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-01

    General Atomic Thorium Utilization Program activities progressed on schedule during the quarter, with continuation of the head-end reprocessing equipment testing program. Individual testing of the tertiary, oversize crushers and the screener was completed. Preparation of the equipment for testing as a system is under way. Tests on the tertiary crusher revealed no operating problems. No material holdup areas or bypass of the crushing cavity were detected. The initial issue of a functional level diagram for the Fuel Element Size Reduction System has been prepared for preliminary review. Heat transfer coefficients were calculated from data obtained in six 0.40-m primary burner heatup runs. Six runs were made on the 0.20-m primary burner. Other significant 0.20-m burner work included fabrication and initial testing of an electrical resistance probe bed level sensor and preliminary heat transfer design calculations for determining the cooling requirements to maintain the recycling fines cyclone exit temperature at approximately 500/sup 0/C. The conceptual design of the engineering-scale dissolver-centrifuge for incorporation into the head-end line was completed. Three solvent extraction feed adjustment runs were completed. Two of the runs were representative of the continuous intercycle concentration step. The other run was a continuous operation which utilized leacher product as feed. Progress with dry solids handling component and system testing continues. Efforts were focused on completion of the HET fuel shipping conceptual design report, development of detailed costs, and identification of all system interfaces. The Reprocessing Flowsheet Review and Materials Balance Study of reprocessing head-end and off-gas treatment systems is in technical review.

  7. Water chemistry control and decontamination experience with TEPCO BWR`s and the measures planned for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, N.; Miyamaru, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The new TEPCO BWR`s are capable of having the occupational radiation exposure controlled successfully at a low level by selecting low cobalt steel, using corrosion-resistant steel, employing dual condensate polishing systems, and controlling Ni/Fe ratio during operation. The occupational radiation exposure of the old BWR`s, on the other hand, remains high though reduced substantially through the use of low cobalt replacement steel and the partial addition of a filter in the condensate polishing system. Currently under review is the overall decontamination procedure for the old BWR`s to find out to measures needed to reduce the amount of crud that is and has been carried over into the nuclear reactor. The current status of decontamination is reported below.

  8. Analysis of design practices for snubbers (report 3). [PWR, BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.H.

    1978-01-12

    In an effort to understand the expected performance of snubbers, a survey of current design methods was performed. Questionnaires were sent to the major snubber manufacturers requesting information on important phases of snubber analysis, testing, shipping, and handling. The elements of design considered in the questionnaire were derived from an evaluation of snubber failure histories and the performance requirements of snubber users.

  9. THERMIT2. BWR & PWR Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimi, M.S.; Kao, S.P.; Kelly, J.E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1992-02-27

    THERMIT2, the most recent release of THERMIT, is intended for thermal-hydraulic analysis of both boiling and pressurized water reactor cores. It solves the three-dimensional, two-fluid equations describing the two-phase flow and heat transfer dynamics in rectangular coordinates. The two-fluid model uses separate partial differential equations expressing conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for each fluid. By expressing the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between the fluids with physically-based mathematical models, the relative motion and thermal non-equilibrium between the fluids can exist. THERMIT2 offers the choice of either pressure or velocity boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the core. THERMIT2 includes a two-phase turbulent mixing model which provides subchannel analysis capability. THERMIT2 also solves the radial heat conduction equations for fuel pin temperatures, and calculates the heat flux from fuel pin to coolant with appropriate heat transfer models described by a boiling curve.

  10. Cells for the examination of irradiated plutonium fuel elements - two years operation - may 1961/may 1963 (1963); Cellules pour examen d'elements combustibles au plutonium irradies - deux ans d'exploitation - mai 1961/mai 1963 (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentin, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Within the framework of the 'Rapsodie' fast reactor program, prototype plutonium fuel elements are irradiated and then examined in an {alpha} {beta} {gamma} laboratory at Saclay. This laboratory consists of five in line cells and a lead enclosure microscope. Each cell contains an {alpha} sealed removable box 4 ft 3 in. high, 4 ft 11 in. wide and 5 ft 1 in. deep, fitted with one or two magnetic transmission indirect manipulators. The boxes are contained in an {beta} {gamma} shielded enclosure whose front face is constructed of cast iron panels 21-2/3 in. thick. Nitrogen circulating in a closed loop forms the atmosphere of the boxes. This laboratory is essentially intended for metallurgical research. The functions of the various cells are as follows: transferring and packing, cutting, density measurement and cathodic etching, storage and metallography. Work on radioactive materials began in April 1961. Operational incidents have always been of a material nature only. (author) [French] Dans le cadre du projet de reacteur rapide Rapsodie, des elements combustibles prototypes au plutonium sont, apres irradiation, examines a Saclay dans un laboratoire {alpha} {beta} {gamma}. Celui-ci comprend cinq cellules en ligne et une enceinte en plomb contenant un microscope telecommande. Chaque cellule est constituee d'un caisson etanche (1, 3 m x 1, 5 m x 1, 56m) equipee d'un ou deux manipulateurs indirects a transmissions magnetiques. Les caissons sont places, dans une enceinte {beta} {gamma} dont la face avant est formee de blocs en fonte ayant 55 cm d'epaisseur. L'atmosphere des caissons est de l'azote, circulant en circuit ferme. Ce laboratoire est destine essentiellement a des recherches metallurgiques. Les fonctions des differentes cellules sont: conditionnement et transferts, tronconnage, mesure de densite et polissage ionique, stockage, metallographie. Le travail sur materiaux radioactifs a commence en avril 1961. Les incidents d

  11. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  12. Thermal hydraulics characterization of the core and the reactor vessel type BWR; Caracterizacion termohidraulica del nucleo y de la vasija de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata Y, M.; Lopez H, L.E. [CFE, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Municipio Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: marxlenin.zapata@cfe.gob.mx

    2008-07-01

    The thermal hydraulics design of a reactor type BWR 5 as the employees in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde involves the coupling of at least six control volumes: Pumps jet region, Stratification region, Core region, Vapor dryer region, Humidity separator region and Reactor region. Except by the regions of the core and reactor, these control volumes only are used for design considerations and their importance as operative data source is limited. It is for that is fundamental to complement the thermal hydraulics relations to obtain major data that allow to determine the efficiency of internal components, such as pumps jet, humidity separator and vapor dryer. Like example of the previous thing, calculations are realized on the humidity of the principal vapor during starting, comparing it with the values at the moment incorporated in the data banks of the computers of process of both units. (Author)

  13. Study of transient rod extraction failure without RBM in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio error de extraccion de barra sin RBM en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of the operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-term events and the impact that would cause this transient. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could cause an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis results of the transient rod extraction failure in which not taken into operation the RBM is presented. The study was conducted for a BWR of 2027 MWt, in an intermediate cycle of its useful life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a scenario of anomalies was created in the core reactivity which gave a coherent prediction to the type of presented event. (Author)

  14. Study of transient turbine shot without bypass in a BWR; Estudio del transitorio disparo de turbina sin bypass en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo Q, J. A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: amhed_jvq@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The study and analysis of operational transients are important for predicting the behavior of a system to short-terms events and the impact that would cause this transition. For the nuclear industry these studies are indispensable due to economic, environmental and social impacts that could result in an accident during the operation of a nuclear reactor. In this paper the preparation, simulation and analysis of results of a turbine shot transient, which is not taken into operation the bypass is presented. The study is realized for a BWR of 2027 MWt, to an intermediate cycle life and using the computer code Simulate-3K a depressurization stage of the vessel is created which shows the response of other security systems and gives a coherent prediction to the event presented type. (Author)

  15. Crack growth rate in core shroud horizontal welds using two models for a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis Juárez, C.R., E-mail: carlos.arganis@inin.gob.mx; Hernández Callejas, R.; Medina Almazán, A.L.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Two models were used to predict SCC growth rate in a core shroud of a BWR. • A weld residual stress distribution with 30% stress relaxation by neutron was used. • Agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions. • Slip–oxidation model is better at low fluences and empirical model at high fluences. - Abstract: An empirical crack growth rate correlation model and a predictive model based on the slip–oxidation mechanism for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) were used to calculate the crack growth rate in a BWR core shroud. In this study, the crack growth rate was calculated by accounting for the environmental factors related to aqueous environment, neutron irradiation to high fluence and the complex residual stress conditions resulting from welding. In estimating the SCC behavior the crack growth measurements data from a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plant are referred to, and the stress intensity factor vs crack depth throughout thickness is calculated using a generic weld residual stress distribution for a core shroud, with a 30% stress relaxation induced by neutron irradiation. Quantitative agreement is shown between the measurements of SCC growth rate and the predictions of the slip–oxidation mechanism model for relatively low fluences (5 × 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}), and the empirical model predicted better the SCC growth rate than the slip–oxidation model for high fluences (>1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}). The relevance of the models predictions for SCC growth rate behavior depends on knowing the model parameters.

  16. Non-disturbance technique to estimate the core stability of BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, D.J.; Chang, S.I.

    1980-09-01

    The feasibility of estimating the core instability margin of BWR by analyzing the fluctuation of normal operation neutron flux signal is surveyed. It concludes that the instability margin estimated by this technique will be comparable with the small reactivity perturbation test result. The DDS method used to estimate the natural frequency and decay ratio is briefly described and verified by some simulation cases. Then the APRM signal taken from Chin-Shan Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 is analyzed. The result shows that the natural frequency is 0.777 +- 0.039 Hz, and the decay ratio is 0.277 +- 0.045.

  17. An on-line method to monitor BWR core stability based on an autocorrelation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokomizo, Osamu; Masuhara, Yasuhiro (Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Energy Research Lab.); Yoshimoto, Yuichiro (Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works)

    1990-03-01

    A on-line monitoring method is introduced for BWR core stability. The method utilizes only autocorrelation values for two delay time intervals. Its simplicity makes it suitable for an on-line monitor. Accuracy of the core decay ratio calculated by the method improves as the core condition approaches instability. The error in the decay ratio for regional limit cycle oscillations is 0.2% when calculated from local signals in the most unstable region, and 4% when calculated from core averaged signals. (orig.).

  18. TRACE code validation for BWR spray cooling injection based on GOTA facility experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racca, S. [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), Pisa (Italy); Kozlowski, T. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Best estimate codes have been used in the past thirty years for the design, licensing and safety of NPP. Nevertheless, large efforts are necessary for the qualification and the assessment of such codes. The aim of this work is to study the main phenomena involved in the emergency spray cooling injection in a Swedish designed BWR. For this purpose, data from the Swedish separate effect test facility GOTA have been simulated using TRACE version 5.0 Patch 2. Furthermore, uncertainty calculations have been performed with the propagation of input errors method and the identification of the input parameters that mostly influence the peak cladding temperature has been performed. (author)

  19. Utilization of the NFS West Valley Installation for spent fuel storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, R W

    1978-04-01

    Several thousand MT of capacity of AFR storage will be required in the 1980's. The pool at NFS has capacity for an additional 60 MT of BWR fuel or 150 MT of PWR assemblies. Zircaloy-clad LWR fuel can be stored in pools for up to 100 years. Environmental effects are discussed. Expansion of the pool capacity for as much as 1000 MT more, either by using more compact storage racks or constructing a new pool or an independent pool, is considered. Some indication of the environmental impacts of expanded fuel storage capacity at West Valley is offered by experience at Barnwell. (DLC)

  20. Development, Testing and Validation of a Waste Assay System for the Measurement and Characterisation of Active Spent Fuel Element Debris From UK Magnox Reactors - 12533

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, John A.; Burke, Kevin J.; Looman, Marc R.; Towner, Antony C.N. [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Martin E. [Nympsfield Nuclear Ltd, Chapel House, The Cross, Nympsfield, Stonehouse GL10 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the development, testing and validation of a waste measurement instrument for characterising active remote handled radioactive waste arising from the operation of Magnox reactors in the United Kingdom. Following operation in UK Magnox gas cooled reactors and a subsequent period of cooling, parts of the magnesium-aluminium alloy cladding were removed from spent fuel and the uranium fuel rods with the remaining cladding were removed to Sellafield for treatment. The resultant Magnox based spent fuel element debris (FED), which constitutes active intermediate level waste (ILW) has been stored in concrete vaults at the reactor sites. As part of the decommissioning of the FED vaults the FED must be removed, measured and characterised and placed in intermediate storage containers. The present system was developed for use at the Trawsfynydd nuclear power station (NPS), which is in the decommissioning phase, but the approach is potentially applicable to FED characterisation at all of the Magnox reactors. The measurement system consists of a heavily shielded and collimated high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with electromechanical cooling and a high count-rate preamplifier and digital multichannel pulse height analyser. The HPGe based detector system is controlled by a software code, which stores the measurement result and allows a comprehensive analysis of the measured FED data. Fuel element debris is removed from the vault and placed on a tray to a uniform depth of typically 10 cm for measurement. The tray is positioned approximately 1.2 meters above the detector which views the FED through a tungsten collimator with an inverted pyramid shape. At other Magnox sites the positions may be reversed with the shielded and collimated HPGe detector located above the tray on which the FED is measured. A comprehensive Monte Carlo modelling and analysis of the measurement process has been performed in order to optimise the measurement geometry and eliminate

  1. Translational reprocessing of spent fuel elements in the light of European Community law. Grenzueberschreitende atomare Wiederaufarbeitung im Lichte des europaeischen Gemeinschaftsrechts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuing, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    Objections are being raised against the current reprocessing of fuel elements from German nuclear power plants in France and Great Britain on the grounds that, measured by German protection requirements, it cannot be regarded as 'inncuous utilization' of radioactive waste material; this brings a momentous intervention of the German authorities against the operators of German nuclear power plants into consideration. Yet would not such a 'national solo attempt' conflict with European Community law . This question is illuminated in its different aspects. First the issue is examined from the point of view of radiation protection law under the Euratom Treaty and of the aim of the EC to establish the single market. Subsequent focal points are an inquiry into compatibility with the freedom of merchandise traffic and commercial services as provided by European Community law. The outcome is that European Community law does not oppose the German authorities intervencing. Rather such self-discipline practised by member states for the benefit of the European environment is admissible so long as the other EC member states do not establish equally stringent standards on their own accord or European Community law itself does not provide protection on a high level. (orig.).

  2. Models for steady state and transient heat conduction in a nuclear power reactor fuel element; Modelos para conduccion de calor estacionaria y transiente en un elemento combustible de un reactor de potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ventura, Mirta A. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    Two radial conduction models (one for steady state and another for unsteady state) in a nuclear power reactor fuel element have been developed. The objective is to obtain the temperatures in the fuel pellet and the cladding. The lumped-parameter hypothesis have been adopted to represent the system. The steady state model has been verified and both models have been compared. A method to calculate the conductance in the gap between the UO{sub 2} pellet and the clad and its associated uncertainty has been included in the steady state model. (author)

  3. Optimization of the distribution of bars with gadolinium oxide in reactor fuel elements PWR; Optimizacion de la distribucion de barras con oxido de gadolinio en elementos combustibles para reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgar Santa Cecilia, P. A.; Velazquez, J.; Ahnert Iglesias, C.

    2014-07-01

    In the schemes of low leakage, currently used in the majority of PWR reactors, it makes use of absorbent consumables for the effective control of the factors of peak, the critical concentration of initial boron and the moderator temperature coefficient. One of the most used absorbing is the oxide of gadolinium, which is integrated within the fuel pickup. Occurs a process of optimization of fuel elements with oxide of gadolinium, which allows for a smaller number of configurations with a low peak factor for bar. (Author)

  4. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  5. Fuel dissipater for pressurized fuel cell generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Richard A.; King, John E.

    2003-11-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a pressurized fuel cell generator (10) when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated during transient operation, such as a shutdown; where, two electrically resistive elements (two of 28, 53, 54, 55) at least one of which is connected in parallel, in association with contactors (26, 57, 58, 59), a multi-point settable sensor relay (23) and a circuit breaker (24), are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals (21, 22) at two or more contact points, in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel inventory in the generator.

  6. Fuel Pumping System And Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Scott F.; Wang, Lifeng

    2005-12-13

    A fuel pumping system that includes a pump drive is provided. A first pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a first flow of pressurized fuel. A second pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a second flow of pressurized fuel. A first solenoid is operatively connected to the first pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the first flow of pressurized fuel. A second solenoid is operatively connected to the second pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the second flow of pressurized fuel.

  7. Design of an overmoderated fuel and a full MOX core for plutonium consumption in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J.L. E-mail: franmar@prodigy.net.mx; Campo, C.M. del; Hernandez, J

    2002-11-01

    The use of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel (MOX) in light water reactors (LWR) is nowadays a current practice in several countries. Generally 1/3 of the reactor core is loaded with MOX fuel assemblies and the other 2/3 with uranium assemblies. Nevertheless the plutonium utilization could be more effective if the full core could be loaded with MOX fuel. In this paper the design of a boiling water reactor (BWR) core fully loaded with an overmoderated MOX fuel design is investigated. The design of overmoderated BWR MOX fuel assemblies based on a 10x10 lattice are developed, these designs improve the neutron spectrum and the plutonium consumption rate, compared with standard MOX assemblies. In order to increase the moderator to fuel ratio two approaches are followed: in the first approach, 8 or 12 fuel rods are replaced by water rods in the 10x10 lattice; in the second approach, an 11x11 lattice with 24 water rods is designed with an active fuel length very close to the standard MOX assembly. The results of the depletion behavior and the main steady state core parameters are presented. The feasibility of a full core loaded with the 11x11 overmoderated MOX fuel assembly is verified. This design take advantage of the softer spectrum comparable to the 10x10 lattice with 12 water rods but with thermal limits comparable to the standard MOX fuel assembly.

  8. On the Decay Ratio Determination in BWR Stability Analysis by Auto-Correlation Function Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behringer, K.; Hennig, D

    2002-11-01

    A novel auto-correlation function (ACF) method has been investigated for determining the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio in BWR stability analyses. The neutron signals are band-pass filtered to separate the oscillation peak in the power spectral density (PSD) from background. Two linear second-order oscillation models are considered. These models, corrected for signal filtering and including a background term under the peak in the PSD, are then least-squares fitted to the ACF of the previously filtered neutron signal, in order to determine the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio. Our method uses fast Fourier transform techniques with signal segmentation for filtering and ACF estimation. Gliding 'short-term' ACF estimates on a record allow the evaluation of uncertainties. Numerical results are given which have been obtained from neutron data of the recent Forsmark I and Forsmark II NEA benchmark project. Our results are compared with those obtained by other participants in the benchmark project. The present PSI report is an extended version of the publication K. Behringer, D. Hennig 'A novel auto-correlation function method for the determination of the decay ratio in BWR stability studies' (Behringer, Hennig, 2002)

  9. Fracture toughness of irradiated wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels in BWR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Gruber, E.E.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness of wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels (SSs) that were irradiated to a fluence of {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV){sup *} ({approx} 2.3 dpa) at 296-305{sup o}C. To evaluate the possible effects of test environment and crack morphology on the fracture toughness of these steels, all tests were conducted in normal-water-chemistry boiling water reactor (BWR) environments at {approx} 289{sup o}C. Companion tests were also conducted in air on the same material for comparison. The fracture toughness J-R curves for SS weld heat-affected-zone materials in BWR water were found to be comparable to those in air. However, the results of tests on sensitized Type 304 SS and thermally aged cast CF-8M steel suggested a possible effect of water environment. The available fracture toughness data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to assess the potential for radiation embrittlement of reactor-core internal components. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components are also discussed. (author)

  10. Technology assessment of alternative fuels for the transportation sector. Fact sheets on technology elements and system calculations for technology tracks; Teknologivurdering af alternative drivmidler til transportsektoren. Fakta-ark for teknologi-elementer og systemberegninger for teknologi-spor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-05-15

    The report documents an analysis, which aims at evaluating technologies in connection with alternative fuels for the transportation sector. During the analysis process a method has been developed for consistent evaluation of alternative transportation fuels with the largest technological and economic potential. This appendix presents key fact sheets which substantiate the analysis presented in the report 'Technology assessment of alternative fuels for the transportation sector'. (BA)

  11. Impact of uranium concentration reduction in side plates of the fuel elements of IEA-R1 reactor on neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses; Impacto da reducao na concentracao de uranio nas placas laterais dos elementos combustiveis do reator IEA-R1 nas analises neutronica e termo-hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Ilka Antonia

    2013-09-01

    This master thesis presents a study to verify the impact of the uranium concentration reduction in the side plates of the reactor IEA-R1 fuel elements on the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses. To develop such study, a previous IPEN-CNEN/SP research was reproduced by simulating the fuel elements burn-up, with side plate uranium density reduced to 50, 60 and 70% of the standard fuel element plates. This research begins with the neutronic analysis using the computer code HAMMER and the first step consists in the calculation of the cross section of all materials presented at the reactor core, with their initial concentration; the second step consists in the calculation of the fast and thermal neutron group fluxes and power densities for fuel elements using the computer code CITATION. HAMMER output data is used as input data. Once the neutronic analysis is finished and the most critical fuel elements with highest power density have been defined, the thermal-hydraulics analysis begins. This analysis uses MCTR-IEA-R1 thermal-hydraulics model, which equations are solved by commercial code EES. Thermalhydraulics analysis input is the power density data calculated by CITATION: it is considered the highest power density on each fuel element, where there is a higher energy release and, consequently, higher temperatures. This data is used on energy balance equations to calculate temperatures on critical fuel element regions. Reactor operation comparison for three different uranium densities on fuel side plates is presented. Uranium density reduction contributes to the cladding surface temperature to remain below the established limit, as reactor operation safety requirement and it does not affect significantly fuel element final burn-up nor reactor reactivity. The reduction of uranium in the side plates of the fuel elements of the IEA-R1 showed to be a viable option to avoid corrosion problems due to high temperatures. (author)

  12. Corrosion fatigue initiation behaviour of wrought austenitic stainless pipe steels under simulated BWR/HWC and PWR conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leber, H.J.; Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The corrosion fatigue (CF) initiation and short crack growth behavior of different low-carbon and stabilized austenitic stainless steels was characterized under simulated BWR and primary PWR conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with sharply notched fracture mechanics specimens in the temperature range from 70 to 320 C. Environmental reduction of fatigue initiation life was observed in all stainless steels at strain rates {<=} 0.1 %/s in BWR and PWR environment. The stationary short crack CF crack growth rates after crack advances of 50 to 300 {mu}m from the notch-root were in the typical range of corresponding results from tests with long cracks (pre-cracked specimens) and also showed the same system parameter response. The effect of environment on the initiation process ({Delta}a = 10 {mu}m) was relevantly stronger than on the subsequent stationary short crack growth. Both, under BWR/HWC and PWR conditions, a relevant environmental reduction of fatigue initiation life occurred for the combination of temperatures {>=} 100 C, notch strain rates {<=} 0.1 %/s and notch strain amplitudes {>=} 0.3 %. If these conjoint threshold conditions were simultaneously satisfied, the environmental enhancement increased with decreasing strain rate and increasing temperature. Material and water chemistry parameters usually only had a little effect. Sensitization affected the CF behavior under highly oxidizing BWR/NWC conditions only. Preliminary block loading experiments did not reveal significant static load hold period effects on the technical corrosion fatigue initiation life. If the critical requirements were satisfied, the BWR/HWC and PWR environments usually resulted in acceleration of short fatigue crack growth by a factor of 5 to 20 with respect to air. Solution annealed steels showed slightly shorter CF initiation lives, but also lower stationary short CF crack growth rates under BWR/HWC and PWR conditions with low ECPs than under highly oxidizing BWR/NWC conditions. A very

  13. Correlating activity incorporation with properties of oxide films formed on material samples exposed to BWR and PWR coolants in Finnish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Kvarnstroem, R.; Tompuri, K. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Helin, M.; Muttilainen, E.; Reinvall, A. [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The extent of activity incorporation on primary circuit surfaces in nuclear power plants is connected to the chemical composition of the coolant, to the corrosion behaviour of the material surfaces and to the structure and properties of oxide films formed on circuit surfaces due to corrosion. Possible changes in operational conditions may induce changes in the structure of the oxide films and thus in the rate of activity incorporation. To predict these changes, experimental correlations between water chemistry, oxide films and activity incorporation, as well as mechanistic understanding of the related phenomena need to be established. In order to do this, flow-through cells with material samples and facilities for high-temperature water chemistry monitoring have been installed at Olkiluoto unit 1 (BWR) and Loviisa unit 1 (PWR) in spring 2000. The cells are being used for two major purposes: To observe the changes in the structure and activity levels of oxide films formed on material samples exposed to the primary coolant. Correlating these observations with the abundant chemical and radiochemical data on coolant composition, dose rates etc. collected routinely by the plant, as well as with high-temperature water chemistry monitoring data such as the corrosion potentials of relevant material samples, the redox potential and the high-temperature conductivity of the primary coolant. We describe in this paper the scope of the work, give examples of the observations made and summarize the results on oxide films that have been obtained during one full fuel cycle at both plants. (authors)

  14. Concepts for Small-Scale Testing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschman, Steven Craig [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Winston, Philip Lon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report documents a concept for a small-scale test involving between one and three Boiling Water Rector (BWR) high burnup (HBU) fuel assemblies. This test would be similar to the DOE funded High Burn-Up (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project to confirm the behavior of used high burn-up fuel under prototypic conditions, only on a smaller scale. The test concept proposed would collect data from fuel stored under prototypic dry storage conditions to mimic, as closely as possible, the conditions HBU UNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for multi-year storage.

  15. Implementation of a methodology to perform the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the control rod drop in a BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes F, M. del C.

    2015-07-01

    A methodology to perform uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the cross sections used in a Trace/PARCS coupled model for a control rod drop transient of a BWR-5 reactor was implemented with the neutronics code PARCS. A model of the nuclear reactor detailing all assemblies located in the core was developed. However, the thermohydraulic model designed in Trace was a simple model, where one channel representing all the types of assemblies located in the core, it was located inside a simple vessel model and boundary conditions were established. The thermohydraulic model was coupled with the neutronics model, first for the steady state and then a Control Rod Drop (CRD) transient was performed, in order to carry out the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. To perform the analysis of the cross sections used in the Trace/PARCS coupled model during the transient, Probability Density Functions (PDFs) were generated for the 22 parameters cross sections selected from the neutronics parameters that PARCS requires, thus obtaining 100 different cases for the Trace/PARCS coupled model, each with a database of different cross sections. All these cases were executed with the coupled model, therefore obtaining 100 different outputs for the CRD transient with special emphasis on 4 responses per output: 1) The reactivity, 2) the percentage of rated power, 3) the average fuel temperature and 4) the average coolant density. For each response during the transient an uncertainty analysis was performed in which the corresponding uncertainty bands were generated. With this analysis it is possible to observe the results ranges of the responses chose by varying the uncertainty parameters selected. This is very useful and important for maintaining the safety in the nuclear power plants, also to verify if the uncertainty band is within of safety margins. The sensitivity analysis complements the uncertainty analysis identifying the parameter or parameters with the most influence on the

  16. CFD Simulation of a fall accident of a fuel element in pool This project aims at calculating the speed ratio of impact-fall height for a PWR fuel element falling freely in the fuel pool; Simulacion CFD de un accidente de caida de un elemento combustible en piscina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro Garcia, B.; Corpa Masa, R.; Jimenez-Reja, C.

    2014-07-01

    It is intended to provide a methodology of analysis more realistic this accident.que referred to in calculations of the license that requires fuel catastrophic break regardless of the height of the fall, with the consequent release of inventory analysers. Accidents that occurred in the past indicate that this hypothesis could be too conservative. (Author)

  17. Possibilities with OHWC. Development and application of ECP-simulation in Swedish BWRs; Moejligheter med OHWC. Utveckling och tillaempning av ECP-simulering i svenska BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, K. [ALARA Engineering, Skultuna (Sweden); Wikmark, G. [Advanced Nuclear Technology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-02-01

    Hydrogen injection (HWC) to boiling water reactors has been used for two decades in Sweden, in order to reduce the impact of pipe cracking. The effect of HWC is to establish a sufficiently reducing environment in the systems to protect and hence mitigate the growth of existing stress corrosion cracks. Some disadvantages of HWC have been identified. One is the transitional increase of the dose rate of the main steam lines by up to seven times, another the corrosion release of systems with carbon steel components as a result of the reducing chemistry. In some cases, especially in the USA, an elevated activity build-up has been observed in a few plants in connection to the application of HWC. There is also a fear for increased hydrogen pick-up in fuel cladding and fuel channels by HWC operation. The hydrogen pick-up is already today in many cases limiting for fuel life. The objective of the current work has been to investigate the conditions by application of so called Optimised HWC. This implies a HWC operation with lower hydrogen addition rates than normally used. For this purpose, a computer model in order to simulate the radiolysis chemistry and the ECP (electrochemical corrosion potentials) in BWR systems has been developed. A previously developed radiolysis code, BwrChem, as well as a hydrogen peroxide decomposition code for piping, PEROX, have hence been equipped with ECP calculation modules. The ECP calculation algorithms have been based on fundamental electrochemical theory. The new model has been applied to simulate the radiolysis conditions in a large number of locations in typical BWRs. For the simulation, the external mechanical pump plant Barsebaeck-1 and the internal pump plant Forsmark-1 have been used. A wide range of hydrogen injection rates, down to 0. 1 ppm in the feed water, have been studied. The electrochemical model based on fundamental theory required adequate fundamental parameters. Significant effort has been used to scrutinise and evaluate

  18. Prediction of the stability of BWR reactors during the start-up process; Prediccion de la estabilidad de reactores BWR durante el proceso de arranque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz E, J.A.; Castillo D, R. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Blazquez M, J.B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energetics, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are susceptible of uncertainties of power when they are operated to low flows of coolant (W) and high powers (P), being presented this situation mainly in the start-up process. The start-up process could be made but sure if the operator knew the value of the stability index Decay reason (Dr) before going up power and therefore to guarantee the stability. The power and the flow are constantly measures, the index Dr could also be considered its value in real time. The index Dr depends on the power, flow and many other values, such as, the distribution of the flow axial and radial neutronic, the temperature of the feeding water, the fraction of holes and other thermohydraulic and nuclear parameters. A simple relationship of Dr is derived leaving of the pattern reduced of March-Leuba, where three independent variables are had that are the power, the flow and a parameter that it contains the rest of the phenomenology, that is to say all the other quantities that affect the value of Dr. This relationship developed work presently and verified its prediction with data of start-up of commercial reactors could be used for the design of a practical procedure practice of start-up, what would support to the operator to prevent this type of events of uncertainty. (Author)

  19. SUN-RAH: a nucleoelectric BWR university simulator based in reduced order models; SUN-RAH: simulador universitario de nucleoelectrica BWR basado en modelos de orden reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales S, J.B.; Lopez R, A.; Sanchez B, A.; Sanchez S, R.; Hernandez S, A. [DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jms0620@yahoo.com

    2003-07-01

    The development of a simulator that allows to represent the dynamics of a nucleo electric central, with nuclear reactor of the BWR type, using reduced order models is presented. These models present the characteristics defined by the dominant poles of the system (1) and most of those premature operation transitories in a power station can be reproduced with considerable fidelity if the models are identified with data of plant or references of a code of better estimate like RAMONA, TRAC (2) or RELAP. The models of the simulator are developments or own simplifications starting from the physical laws and retaining the main terms. This work describes the objective of the project and the general specifications of the University student of Nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor type (SUN-RAH) as well as the finished parts that fundamentally are the nuclear reactor, the one of steam supply (NSSS), the plant balance (BOP), the main controllers of the plant and the implemented graphic interfaces. The pendent goals as well as the future developments and applications of SUN-RAH are described. (Author)

  20. Solution of the transport equation in stationary state, in one and two dimensions, for BWR assemblies using nodal methods; Solucion de la ecuacion de transporte en estado estacionario, en 1 y 2 dimensiones, para ensambles tipo BWR usando metodos nodales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xolocostli M, J.V

    2002-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to solve the neutron transport equation in one and two dimensions (slab geometry and X Y geometry, respectively), with no time dependence, for BWR assemblies using nodal methods. In slab geometry, the nodal methods here used are the polynomial continuous (CMPk) and discontinuous (DMPk) families but only the Linear Continuous (also known as Diamond Difference), the Quadratic Continuous (QC), the Cubic Continuous (CC), the Step Discontinuous (also known as Backward Euler), the Linear Discontinuous (LD) and the Quadratic Discontinuous (QD) were considered. In all these schemes the unknown function, the angular neutron flux, is approximated as a sum of basis functions in terms of Legendre polynomials, associated to the values of the neutron flux in the edges (left, right, or both) and the Legendre moments in the cell, depending on the nodal scheme used. All these schemes were implemented in a computer program developed in previous thesis works and known with the name TNX. This program was modified for the purposes of this work. The program discreetizes the domain of concern in one dimension and determines numerically the angular neutron flux for each point of the discretization when the number of energy groups and regions are known starting from an initial approximation for the angular neutron flux being consistent with the boundary condition imposed for a given problem. Although only problems with two-energy groups were studied the computer program does not have limitations regarding the number of energy groups and the number of regions. The two problems analyzed with the program TNX have practically the same characteristics (fuel and water), with the difference that one of them has a control rod. In the part corresponding to two-dimensional problems, the implemented nodal methods were those designated as hybrids that consider not only the edge and cell Legendre moments, but also the values of the neutron flux in the corner points

  1. Experimental study for quantative aging evaluation of epoxy liner in BWR nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, H. S. [KEPRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Y. C.; Kim, N. Y. [Korea Univ. of Educational Technology, Chonnon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study is an experimental approach to quantitatively evaluate the aging status of epoxy coating onto containment structure in BWR nuclear power plant. Based on accelerated aging experiment for 64 days, adhesion test was performed to evaluate an physical bonding. To compare with adhesion data, both impedance data by UT and data by thermal gravimetric analysis were obtained during experiment. At almost 50% of adhesion force decrease, it was identified that aging phenamena of epoxy such as pine hole, blistering was discovered. Coating to establish aging status of epoxy, relations among three kinds of different data were analyze. By compatibility of these data, physical aging situation of as-built epoxy coating was figured out. The possibility to develop new methodology of time-dependent aging status on epoxy coating was identified.

  2. Development of a parametric containment event tree model for a severe BWR accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T. [OTO-Consulting Ay, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-04-01

    A containment event tree (CET) is built for analysis of severe accidents at the TVO boiling water reactor (BWR) units. Parametric models of severe accident progression and fission product behaviour are developed and integrated in order to construct a compact and self-contained Level 2 PSA model. The model can be easily updated to correspond to new research results. The analyses of the study are limited to severe accidents starting from full-power operation and leading to core melting, and are focused mainly on the use and effects of the dedicated severe accident management (SAM) systems. Severe accident progression from eight plant damage states (PDS), involving different pre-core-damage accident evolution, is examined, but the inclusion of their relative or absolute probabilities, by integration with Level 1, is deferred to integral safety assessments. (33 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.).

  3. Non-local two phase flow momentum transport in S BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa P, G.; Salinas M, L.; Vazquez R, A., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Apdo. Postal 55-535, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The non-local momentum transport equations derived in this work contain new terms related with non-local transport effects due to accumulation, convection, diffusion and transport properties for two-phase flow. For instance, they can be applied in the boundary between a two-phase flow and a solid phase, or in the boundary of the transition region of two-phase flows where the local volume averaging equations fail. The S BWR was considered to study the non-local effects on the two-phase flow thermal-hydraulic core performance in steady-state, and the results were compared with the classical local averaging volume conservation equations. (Author)

  4. Modeling of BWR core meltdown accidents - for application in the MELRPI. MOD2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, B R; Kim, S H; Taleyarkhan, R P; Podowski, M Z; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes improvements and modifications made in the MELRPI computer code. A major difference between this new, updated version of the code, called MELRPI.MOD2, and the one reported previously, concerns the inclusion of a model for the BWR emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). This model and its computer implementation, the ECCRPI subroutine, account for various emergency injection modes, for both intact and rubblized geometries. Other changes to MELRPI deal with an improved model for canister wall oxidation, rubble bed modeling, and numerical integration of system equations. A complete documentation of the entire MELRPI.MOD2 code is also given, including an input guide, list of subroutines, sample input/output and program listing.

  5. Application of passive auto catalytic recombiner (PAR) for BWR plants in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, K.; Murano, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Yamanari, S. [Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Y. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The passive auto-catalytic recombiner (PAR), which can recombine flammable gases such as hydrogen and oxygen with each other to avoid an explosion in case of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), installed in the primary containment vessel does not require a power supply or dynamic equipment, while the existing flammability gas control system (FCS) of most BWRs as an outer loop of the primary containment vessel needs them to make flammable gases circulate through blowers and heaters in the system. PAR offers a number of advantages over existing FCS, such as high reliability, low cost due to much smaller amount of materials needed, good maintainability, good operability in case of a LOCA, and smaller space for installation. An experimental study has been carried out for the purpose of solving the problems of applying PAR to Japanese BWR plants instead of existing FCS, in which we grasped the basic characteristics of PAR. (author)

  6. Radial power density distribution of MOX fuel rods in the IFA-651

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun; Joo, Hyung Kook; Cheon, Jin Sik; Oh, Je Yong; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Two MOX fuel rods, which were fabricated in the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland in cooperation with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, have been irradiated in the HBWR from June, 2000 in the framework of OECD-HRP together with a reference MOX fuel rod supplied by the BNFL. Since fuel temperature, which is influenced by radial power distribution, is basic in analyzing fuel behavior, it is required to consider radial power distribution in the HBWR. A subroutine FACTOR{sub H}BWR that calculates radial power density distribution for three MOX fuel rods has been developed based on neutron physics results and DEPRESS program. The developed subroutine FACTOR{sub H}BWR gives good agreement with the physics calculation except slight under-prediction at the outer part of the pellet above the burnup of 20 MWd/kgHM. The subroutine will be incorporated into a computer code COSMOS and used to analyze the in-reactor behavior of the three MOX fuel rods during the Halden irradiation test. 24 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  7. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  8. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  9. Characteristics of debris in the lower head of a BWR in different severe accident scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung, Viet-Anh, E-mail: vaphung@kth.se; Galushin, Sergey, E-mail: galushin@kth.se; Raub, Sebastian, E-mail: raub@kth.se; Goronovski, Andrei, E-mail: andreig@kth.se; Villanueva, Walter, E-mail: walterv@kth.se; Kööp, Kaspar, E-mail: kaspar@safety.sci.kth.se; Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se; Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Station blackout scenario with delayed recovery of safety systems in a Nordic BWR is considered. • Genetic algorithm and random sampling methods are used to explore accident scenario domain. • Main groups of scenarios are identified. • Ranges and distributions of characteristics of debris bed in the lower head are determined. - Abstract: Nordic boiling water reactors (BWRs) adopt ex-vessel debris cooling to terminate severe accident progression. Core melt released from the vessel into a deep pool of water is expected to fragment and form a coolable debris bed. Characteristics of corium melt ejection from the vessel determine conditions for molten fuel–coolant interactions (FCI) and debris bed formation. Non-coolable debris bed or steam explosion can threaten containment integrity. Vessel failure and melt ejection mode are determined by the in-vessel accident progression. Characteristics (such as mass, composition, thermal properties, timing of relocation, and decay heat) of the debris bed formed in the process of core relocation into the vessel lower plenum define conditions for the debris reheating, remelting, melt-vessel structure interactions, vessel failure and melt release. Thus core degradation and relocation are important sources of uncertainty for the success of the ex-vessel accident mitigation strategy. The goal of this work is improve understanding how accident scenario parameters, such as timing of failure and recovery of different safety systems can affect characteristics of the debris in the lower plenum. Station blackout scenario with delayed power recovery in a Nordic BWR is considered using MELCOR code. The recovery timing and capacity of safety systems were varied using genetic algorithm (GA) and random sampling methods to identify two main groups of scenarios: with relatively small (<20 tons) and large (>100 tons) amount of relocated debris. The domains are separated by the transition regions, in which relatively small

  10. Validation of the ultrasonic and Eddy current techniques to inspect the accommodation of the elements of (CRDH) control rod drive; Validacion de las tecnicas de ultrasonidos y corrientes inducidas para inspeccionar los alojamientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.; Gomez, P.; Sanchez, J.; Resa, P.

    2013-07-01

    Tecnatom development in the past with ultrasonic inspection procedures to examine vessels BWR of several Central nuclear (CRDH) control rod drive elements, accommodations. In each case, inspection techniques have relied on both the volume of required test postulated defects. Also, taking into account the possible access to the component, developed mechanical equipments of different characteristics.

  11. The Performance of Hydrocarbon Fuels with H2O2 in a Uni-Element Combustor. An Abstract for the 2003 AIAA/JPC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muss, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    .... The combustor used decomposed hydrogen peroxide at concentrations of 90% as the oxidizer. The water-cooled combustion chamber included significant fuel film cooling with an overall mixture ratio between 4 and 6...

  12. Research reactor fuel element corrosion under repository relevant conditions. Separation, identification, and quantification of secondary alteration phases of UAl{sub x}-Al in MgCl{sub 2}-rich brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumann, A.; Curtius, H.; Kaiser, G.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK-6), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit

    2014-07-01

    The corrosion of the UAl{sub x}-Al research reactor fuel type in synthetic MgCl{sub 2}-rich brine (static batch-type experiments) was investigated with respect to the long-term safety of directly disposed research reactor fuel elements in salt formations. During corrosion, crystalline secondary phases were formed, which may serve as a barrier against radionuclide migration. For an optimized identification and quantification of the secondary phases using X-ray diffraction, a sample treatment to separate and enrich the secondary phases is necessary. A grain size fractionation was carried out in iso-propanol. A chemical composition and phase characterization of the secondary phases was accomplished. The results of the chemical investigations reveal that only traces of Al and U were dissolved. The separation and enrichment of secondary phases were carried out reproducible and successfully. Due to the phase characterization by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction the following secondary phases were unambiguously identified: Mg-Al-Cl layered double hydroxide, lesukite, Fe layered double hydroxide (green rust), lawrencite, Fe (elemental), and traces of uncorroded fuel (UAl{sub 4}). The quantitative analysis showed that LDH compounds and lesukite are the major crystalline phases. All other observed compounds were only present in trace amounts, i.e. constituting accessories. The Rietveld analysis also revealed the high content of amorphous phases of approximately 30%, which are expected to include the uranium as U(OH){sub 4}.

  13. Pre-study of dynamic loads on the internals caused by a large pipe break in a BWR; Foerstudie av stroemningsinducerade laster paa interndelar vid brott i huvudcirkulationskretsarna i BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, Jerzy; Lindgren, Anders [Det Norske Veritas Nuclear Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    Det Norske Veritas Nuclear Technology has performed a literature study of dynamic load on a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) internals caused by a large pipe break. The goal of the study was to improve the knowledge about the physics of phenomena occurring in the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) after pipe break in the main circulation system and also to make a review of calculation methods, models and computer programs including their capabilities when calculating the dynamic loads. The report presents description of relevant parts of a BWR, initial and boundary conditions, and phenomena determining the loads - rapid depressurization and propagation of pressure wave (including none-equilibrium). Furthermore, the report generally describes possible methodologies for calculating the dynamic loads on internals after the pipe break and the experiences from calculations the dynamic loads with different methods (computer programs) including comparisons with experimental data. Fluid-Structure Interaction methodology and its importance for calculation of dynamic loads on reactor internals is discussed based on experimental data. A very intensive research program for studying and calculating the dynamic loads on internals after pipe breaks has been performed in USA and Germany during the seventies and the eighties. Several computer programs have been developed and a number of large-scale experiments have been performed to calibrate the calculation methods. In spite of the fact that all experiments were performed for PWR several experiences should be valid also for BWR. These experiences, connected mainly to capabilities of computer programs calculating dynamic loads, are discussed in the report.

  14. Experimental results and analysis of core physics experiments, FUBILA, for high burn-up BWR full MOX cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Kikuchi, S.; Kawashima, K.; Kamimura, K. [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, 3-17-1, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    JNES has been performing MOX core physics experiments, FUBILA, in the EOLE critical facility of the CEA Cadarache center with collaboration of a French Consortium (CEA and COGEMA). The experiments have been designed to obtain the core physics data of operating conditions of full MOX BWR cores consisting of high burn up BWR MOX assemblies. The experiments consisting of seven different core configurations started from January 2005 and will be completed by August 2006. Theoretical analysis of the experimental data has been also carried out using a deterministic code, SRAC, and a continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation code, MVP, with major nuclear data libraries, JENDL-3.3, 3.2, ENDF/B-VI and JEFF-3.1 for the first critical core. (authors)

  15. Study of transient flow in fuel element of tubular plates. Accident: Shaft locking of primary cooling pump without opening the emergency gate; Estudio del regimen transitorio en el elemento combustible de placas tubulares. Accidente: Agarrotamiento de la bomba. No se abre la compuerta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilas, F.; Moneva, M. A.; Garcia Ramirez, L.; Lopez Jimenez, J.; Diaz Diaz, J.

    1971-07-01

    It is analysed the thermal distribution of a fuel element of tubular plates irradiated in the JEN-1 reactor in the case of shaft locking of the primary cooling pump without opening the emergency gate. The fuel element hottest channel is studied in the position of maximum neutronic flux for three reactor power levels: 3 Hw (maximum reactor power), 2 Mw and 1 Hw. (Author) 8 refs.

  16. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR; Evaluacion del agrietamiento por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en ambientes de reactores nucleares tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis J, C. R.

    2010-07-01

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  17. Substitution of chlorinated and fluorinated solvents by biodegradable detergent solution in components cleaning of nuclear fuel elements; Substituicao de solventes organicos clorados e fluorados por solucao detergente biodegradavel na limpeza de componentes do elementos combustivel nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Andre Luiz Pinto da Silva [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica de Elementos Combustiveis]. E-mail: codep@inb.gov.br

    2000-07-01

    As the auxiliary oils used in machining evolved from integral into aqueous emulsion, and later on into aqueous-solution synthetic oils, the components cleaning process with organic solvents, originally adopted at the Fuel Element Factory (FEC), Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB) began to present problems in removing oil residues from machined components, due to the incompatibility between aqueous and organic media. In order to eliminate such incompatibility and adapt the process to the environmental laws restricting production and use of chlorinated or fluorinated solvents as a measure for preserving the atmosphere's ozone layer, in 1995 INB initiated the development of a components cleaning process using biodegradable aqueous detergent. The effort was completed in 2000 with the construction of a machine in keeping with the specific geometry of the fuel-assembly components and the operating conditions required for working with the new process. (author)

  18. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  19. Behavior of spent nuclear fuel and storage system components in dry interim storage. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.; Guenther, R.J.

    1983-02-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been handled under dry conditions since the early days of nuclear reactor operation, and use of dry storage facilities for extended management of irradiated fuel began in 1964. Irradiated fuel is currently being stored dry in four types of facilities: dry wells, vaults, silos, and metal casks. Essentially all types of irradiated nuclear fuel are currently stored under dry conditions. Gas-cooled reactor (GCR) and liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuels are stored in vaults and dry wells. Certain types of fuel are being stored in licensed dry storage facilities: Magnox fuel in vaults in the United Kingdom; organic-cooled reactor (OCR) fuel (clad with a zirconium alloy) in silos in Canada; and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel (clad with Zircaloy) in a metal storage cask in Germany. Dry storage demonstrations are under way for Zircaloy-clad fuel from BWRs, pressurized heavy-water reactors (PHWRs), and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in all four types of dry storage facilities. The demonstrations and related hot cell and laboratory tests are directed toward expanding the data base and establishing a licensing basis for dry storage of water reactor fuel. This report reviews the scope of dry interim storage technology, the performance of fuel and facility materials, the status of programs in several countries to license dry storage of water reactor fuel, and the characteristics of water reactor fuel that relate to dry storage conditions. 110 refs., 22 figs., 28 tabs.

  20. Nuclear fuel pin scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramblett, Richard L.; Preskitt, Charles A.

    1987-03-03

    Systems and methods for inspection of nuclear fuel pins to determine fiss loading and uniformity. The system includes infeed mechanisms which stockpile, identify and install nuclear fuel pins into an irradiator. The irradiator provides extended activation times using an approximately cylindrical arrangement of numerous fuel pins. The fuel pins can be arranged in a magazine which is rotated about a longitudinal axis of rotation. A source of activating radiation is positioned equidistant from the fuel pins along the longitudinal axis of rotation. The source of activating radiation is preferably oscillated along the axis to uniformly activate the fuel pins. A detector is provided downstream of the irradiator. The detector uses a plurality of detector elements arranged in an axial array. Each detector element inspects a segment of the fuel pin. The activated fuel pin being inspected in the detector is oscillated repeatedly over a distance equal to the spacing between adjacent detector elements, thereby multiplying the effective time available for detecting radiation emissions from the activated fuel pin.

  1. Sensitivity analysis for heat diffusion in a fin on a nuclear fuel element; Analise de sensitividade na difusao de calor em uma aleta de um elemento combustivel nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tito, Max Werner de Carvalho

    2001-11-15

    The modern thermal systems generally present a growing complexity, as is in the case of nuclear power plants. It seems that is necessary the use of complex computation and mathematical tools in order to increase the efficiency of the operations, reduce costs and maximize profits while maintaining the integrity of its components. The use of sensitivity calculations plays an important role in this process providing relevant information regarding the resultant influence of variation or perturbation of its parameters as the system works. This technique is better known as sensitivity analysis and through its use makes possible the understanding of the effects of the parameters, which are fundamental for the project preparation, and for the development of preventive and corrective handling measurements of many pieces of equipment of modern engineering. The sensitivity calculation methodology is based generally on the response surface technique (graphic description of the functions of interest based in the results obtained from the system parameter variation). This method presents a lot of disadvantages and sometimes is even impracticable since many parameters can cause alterations or perturbations to the system and the model to analyse it can be very complex as well. The utilization of perturbative methods result appropriate as a practical solution to this problem especially in the presence of complex equations. Also it reduces the resultant computational calculus time considerably. The use of these methods becomes an essential tool to simplify the sensitivity analysis. In this dissertation, the differential perturbative method is applied in a heat conduction problem within a thermal system, made up of a one-dimensional circumferential fin on a nuclear fuel element. The fins are used to extend the thermal surfaces where convection occurs; thus increasing the heat transfer to many thermal pieces of equipment in order to obtain better results. The finned claddings are

  2. Fuel Performance Calculations for FeCrAl Cladding in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Sweet, Ryan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Maldonado, G. Ivan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study expands upon previous neutronics analyses of the reactivity impact of alternate cladding concepts in boiling water reactor (BWR) cores and directs focus toward contrasting fuel performance characteristics of FeCrAl cladding against those of traditional Zircaloy. Using neutronics results from a modern version of the 3D nodal simulator NESTLE, linear power histories were generated and supplied to the BISON-CASL code for fuel performance evaluations. BISON-CASL (formerly Peregrine) expands on material libraries implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and the MOOSE framework by providing proprietary material data. By creating material libraries for Zircaloy and FeCrAl cladding, the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod (e.g., strains, centerline fuel temperature, and time to gap closure) were investigated and contrasted.

  3. Monte Carlo based methodology development for the reactivity measurements of fuel elements in transport or storage casks; Monte-Carlo basierte Methodenentwicklung zur Messung der Reaktivitaet von Brennelementen in Transport- und Lagerbehaeltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indenhuck, A. [Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH (WTI), Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The author studied under which conditions the reactivity of a fuel element loaded transport and storage cask can be determined. From all available measuring methods only the source-jerk method (SJM), which is based on point kinetic reactor equations, is adequate for Monte-Carlo based simulations. The necessary measuring time of several 10 minutes seems to be acceptable in order to reach a sufficient statistical accuracy. For SRJ method validation measurements on known sources should be performed in order to compare the results with the calculated multiplication factor.

  4. Instant release of fission products in leaching experiments with high burn-up nuclear fuels in the framework of the Euratom project FIRST- Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K.; González-Robles, E.; Kienzler, B.; Curti, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Martínez-Torrents, A.; Roth, O.; Slonszki, E.; Mennecart, T.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Hózer, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The instant release of fission products from high burn-up UO2 fuels and one MOX fuel was investigated by means of leach tests. The samples covered PWR and BWR fuels at average rod burn-up in the range of 45-63 GWd/tHM and included clad fuel segments, fuel segments with opened cladding, fuel fragments and fuel powder. The tests were performed with sodium chloride - bicarbonate solutions under oxidizing conditions and, for one test, in reducing Ar/H2 atmosphere. The iodine and cesium release could be partially explained by the differences in sample preparation, leading to different sizes and properties of the exposed surface areas. Iodine and cesium releases tend to correlate with FGR and linear power rating, but the scatter of the data is significant. Although the gap between the fuel and the cladding was closed in some high burn-up samples, fissures still provide possible preferential transport pathways.

  5. Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1987-01-01

    Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

  6. Simulation of the operational monitoring of a BWR with Simulate-3; Simulacion del seguimiento operacional de un reactor BWR con Simulate-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez F, J. O.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ace.jo.cu@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    This work was developed in order to describe the methodology for calculating the fuel burned of nuclear power reactors throughout the duration of their operating cycle and for each fuel reload. In other words, simulate and give monitoring to the main operation parameters of sequential way along its operation cycles. For this particular case, the operational monitoring of five consecutive cycles of a reactor was realized using the information reported by their processes computer. The simulation was performed with the Simulate-3 software and the results were compared with those of the process computer. The goal is to get the fuel burned, cycle after cycle for obtain the state conditions of the reactor needed for the fuel reload analyses, stability studies and transients analysis, and the development of a methodology that allows to manage and resolve similar cases for future fuel cycles of the nuclear power plant and explore the various options offered by the simulator. (Author)

  7. Analyses of Instability Events in the Peach Bottom-2 BWR Using Thermal-Hydraulic and 3D Neutron Kinetic Coupled Codes Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Lombardi Costa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Boiling water reactor (BWR instabilities may occur when, starting from a stable operating condition, changes in system parameters bring the reactor towards an unstable region. In order to design more stable and safer core configurations, experimental and theoretical studies about BWR stability have been performed to characterise the phenomenon and to predict the conditions for its occurrence. In this work, contributions to the study of BWR instability phenomena are presented. The RELAP5/MOD3.3 thermal-hydraulic (TH system code and the PARCS-2.4 3D neutron kinetic (NK code were coupled to simulate BWR transients. Different algorithms were used to calculate the decay ratio (DR and the natural frequency (NF from the power oscillation predicted by the transient calculations as two typical parameters used to provide a quantitative description of instabilities. The validation of the code model set up for the Peach Bottom Unit 2 BWR plant is performed against low-flow stability tests (LFSTs. The four series of LFST have been performed during the first quarter of 1977 at the end of cycle 2 in Pennsylvania. The tests were intended to measure the reactor core stability margins at the limiting conditions used in design and safety analyses.

  8. Experimental investigation of mixing of non-isothermal water streams at BWR operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergagio, Mattia, E-mail: bergagio@kth.se [AlbaNova University Center, Nuclear Reactor Technology Division, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Anglart, Henryk, E-mail: henryk@kth.se [AlbaNova University Center, Nuclear Reactor Technology Division, Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 21/25 Nowowiejska Street, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Temperatures are measured in the presence of mixing at BWR operating conditions. • The thermocouple support is moved along a pattern to extend the measurement region. • Uncertainty of 1.58 K for temperatures acquired at 1000 Hz. • Momenta of the hot streams and thermal stratification affect the data examined. • Unconventional spectral analysis is required to further study the data collected. - Abstract: In this experimental investigation, wall surface temperatures have been measured during mixing of three water streams in the annular gap between two coaxial stainless-steel tubes. The inner tube, with an outer diameter of 35 mm and a thickness of 5 mm, holds six K-type, ungrounded thermocouples with a diameter of 0.5 mm, which measured surface temperatures with a sampling rate of either 100 Hz or 1000 Hz. The tube was rotated from 0 to 360° and moved in a range of 387 mm in the axial direction to allow measurements of surface temperatures in the whole mixing region. The outer tube has an inner diameter of 80 mm and a thickness of 10 mm to withstand a water pressure of 9 MPa. A water stream at a temperature of either 333 K or 423 K and a Reynolds number between 1657 and 8410 rose vertically in the annular gap and mixed with two water streams at a temperature of 549 K and a Reynolds number between 3.56 × 10{sup 5} and 7.11 × 10{sup 5}. These two water streams entered the annulus radially on the same axial level, 180° apart. Water pressure was kept at 7.2 MPa. Temperature recordings were performed at five axial and eight azimuthal locations, for each set of boundary conditions. Each recording lasted 120 s to provide reliable data on the variance, intermittency and frequency of the surface temperature time series at hand. Thorough calculations indicate that the uncertainty in the measured temperature is of 1.58 K. The mixing region extends up to 0.2 m downward of the hot inlets. In most cases, measurements indicate non-uniform mixing in the

  9. Neutron activation analysis and activity in the vessel steel of a BWR reactor for their study without radiological risks in microscopy and spectrometry; Analisis de activacion neutronica y actividad en el acero de la vasija de un reactor nuclear tipo BWR para su estudio sin riesgos radiologicos en microscopia y espectrometria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel, M.; Garcia B, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [IAEA, Department of Technical Cooperation, Division for Latin America, Room B1109 Wagramerstrasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    The vessel material of nuclear reactors is subject to irradiation damage induced by the bombardment of neutrons coming from the reactor core. Neutrons are classified as fast and thermal, which produce different effects. Fast neutrons cause damage to the material by dislocation or displacement of atoms in the crystal structure, while the effect of thermal neutrons is a nuclear transmutation that can significantly change the properties of the material. The type and intensity of damage is based on the characteristics of the material, the flow of neutrons and the modes of neutrons interaction with the atomic structures of the material, among others. This work, alluding to nuclear transmutation, makes an analysis of neutron activation of all isotopes in a steel boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR) vessel. An analytical expression is obtained in order to model activity of steel, on the basis of the weight percentage of its atomic components. Its activity is theoretically estimated in a witness sample of the same material as that of the vessel, placed within the nuclear reactor since the beginning of its commercial operation in April 1995, up to August 2010. It was theoretically determined that the witness sample, with a 0.56 g mass (1 x 1 x 0.07 cm{sup 3} dimensions or equivalent) does not present a radiological risks during the stage of preparation, observation and analysis of it in electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction equipment s. The theoretical results were checked experimentally by measuring the activity of the sample by means of gamma spectrometry, measurement of the exposure levels around the sample, as well as the induced level to whole body and limbs, using thermo-luminescent dosimetry (TLD). As a result of the theoretical analysis, new chemical elements are predicted, as a result of the activation phenomena and radioactive decay, whose presence can be a fundamental factor of change in the properties of the vessel. This work is a preamble to the

  10. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  11. An Electrochemical Study of Lanthanide Elements in LiCl-KCl Eutectic Molten Salt to Convert All The Spent Nuclear Fuel into Low and Intermediate Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Judong; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Gi; Hong, Kwang [Soonchunhyang Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    An additional unit step for the residual actinide recovery, designated as 'Pyro-Reisodex', was proposed to convert all the spent nuclear waste into low and intermediated level water by achieving high decontamination factor for TRH elements. The measurement of basic material properties of lanthanide elements in LiCl-KCl eutectic molten salt is necessary to evaluate the performance of the step. Thus, standard potential, activity coefficient, and diffusion coefficient of lanthanide elements is being tried to determine using conventional electrochemical methods. The cycle voltammetry was measured for LiCl-KCl-SmCl{sub 3} mixture and the standard potential, activity coefficient, and diffusion coefficient of this system was determined from the voltammogram data. The calculated data was well-agreed with reference. Based on this results, another techniques for other lanthanide elements will be applied for better understanding of LiCl-KCl-LnCl{sub n} system.

  12. Project UNESA MAAP5-SFP. Criteria for Selecting Lots of Fuel Elements; Proyecto UNESA MAAP5-SFP. Criterios para la Seleccion de Lotes de elementos CombustibleS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreira Pereira, P.; Sanchez Fernandez, R.

    2013-07-01

    As a result of the events in the global nuclear sector arising from the Fukushima accident and due to the demand for analysis tools that can be used with confidence to the understanding of the phenomenology of accident resulting UNESA conceived a project with the main objective of analyze and evaluate the capabilities of the module behavior of spent fuel pool (SFP) recently incorporated into the simulation code MAAP5 severe accident, Modular accident Analysis Program.

  13. Effects of axial higher mode on core stability of natural circulation BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, F.; Furuya, M.; Yasuo, A. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    The effect of the chimney on the core stability of natural circulation BWR was investigated using linear stability analysis. The point kinetics model was used for estimating void-reactivity feedback. Drift-flux model was used to evaluate boiling two-phase flow. When chimney was short, the 1st mode was dominant in the case of low power as well as high power. Higher inlet subcooling and higher power could lead to destabilizing effect, and in some case core instability could occur. On the other hand, when chimney was long, it was found that higher harmonics of void fraction perturbation in the chimney could be important. In the case of low power, the 1st mode was less stable, and lower power could lead to the destabilizing effect. In the case of higher power, the higher mode was dominant rather than the 1st mode, and higher inlet subcooling could lead to destabilizing effect, but it was still stable. Sensitivity of stability in the case of long chimney was smaller than that of short chimney, and the instability phenomenon was not generated easily in the case of the long chimney.

  14. Potential for containment leak paths through electrical penetration assemblies under severe accident conditions. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebrell, W.

    1983-07-01

    The leakage behavior of containments beyond design conditions and knowledge of failure modes is required for evaluation of mitigation strategies for severe accidents, risk studies, emergency preparedness planning, and siting. These studies are directed towards assessing the risk and consequences of severe accidents. An accident sequence analysis conducted on a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), Mark I (MK I), indicated very high temperatures in the dry-well region, which is the location of the majority of electrical penetration assemblies. Because of the high temperatures, it was postulated in the ORNL study that the sealants would fail and all the electrical penetration assemblies would leak before structural failure would occur. Since other containments had similar electrical penetration assemblies, it was concluded that all containments would experience the same type of failure. The results of this study, however, show that this conclusion does not hold for PWRs because in the worst accident sequence, the long time containment gases stabilize to 350/sup 0/F. BWRs, on the other hand, do experience high dry-well temperatures and have a higher potential for leakage.

  15. The integrity of NSSS and containment during extended station blackout for Kuosheng BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Keng-Hsien; Yuann, Yng-Ruey; Lin, Ansheng [Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research

    2017-11-15

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident occurring on March 11, 2011, reveals that Station Blackout (SBO) may last longer than 8 h. However, the original design may not have sufficient capacity to cope with a SBO for more than 8 h. In view of this, Taiwan Power Company has initiated several enhancements to mitigate the severity of the extended SBO. Based on the improved plant configuration, a SBO coping analysis is performed in this study to assess whether the Kuosheng BWR plant has sufficient capability to cope with SBO for 24 h with respect to maintaining the integrity of the reactor core and containment. The analyses in the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) and the containment are based on the RETRAN-3D and GOTHIC models, respectively. The flow conditions calculated by RETRAN-3D during the event are retrieved and input to the GOTHIC containment model to determine the containment pressure and temperature response. These boundary conditions include SRV flow rate, SRV flow enthalpy, and total reactor coolant system leakage flow rate.

  16. Standard technical specifications General Electric plants, BWR/6. Volume 1, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/6 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS.

  17. Standard technical specifications: General Electric plants, BWR/4. Volume 1, Revision 1: Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/4 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS.

  18. 3D analysis methods - Study and seminar[BWR safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daaviittila, A. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus (Finland)

    2003-10-01

    The first part of the report results from a study that was performed as a Nordic co-operation activity with active participation from Studsvik Scandpower and Westinghouse Atom in Sweden, and VTT in Finland. The purpose of the study was to identify and investigate the effects rising from using the 3D transient com-puter codes in BWR safety analysis, and their influence on the transient analysis methodology. One of the main questions involves the critical power ratio (CPR) calculation methodology. The present way, where the CPR calculation is per-formed with a separate hot channel calculation, can be artificially conservative. In the investigated cases, no dramatic minimum CPR effect coming from the 3D calculation is apparent. Some cases show some decrease in the transient change of minimum CPR with the 3D calculation, which confirms the general thinking that the 1D calculation is conservative. On the other hand, the observed effect on neutron flux behaviour is quite large. In a slower transient the 3D effect might be stronger. The second part of the report is a summary of a related seminar that was held on the 3D analysis methods. The seminar was sponsored by the Reactor Safety part (NKS-R) of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Programme (NKS). (au)

  19. Identification and assessment of containment and release management strategies for a BWR Mark I containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.C.; Lehner, J.R. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-09-01

    This report identifies and assesses accident management strategies which could be important for preventing containment failure and/or mitigating the release of fission products during a severe accident in a BWR plant with a Mark 1 type of containment. Based on information available from probabilistic risk assessments and other existing severe accident research, and using simplified containment and release event trees, the report identifies the challenges a Mark 1 containment could face during the course of a severe accident, the mechanisms behind these challenges, and the strategies that could be used to mitigate the challenges. A safety objective tree is developed which provides the connection between the safety objectives, the safety functions, the challenges, and the strategies. The strategies were assessed by applying them to certain severe accident sequence categories which have one or more of the following characteristics: have high probability of core damage or high consequences, lead to a number of challenges, and involve the failure of multiple systems. 59 refs., 55 figs., 27 tabs.

  20. Experimental investigation of BWR Suppression Pool stratification during RCIC system operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solom, Matthew, E-mail: msolom@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-0748, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0748 (United States); Vierow Kirkland, Karen [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A& M University, MS 3133, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • An experiment at Texas A&M University explored extended RCIC System operations. • Thermal stratification in Suppression Pools was found to develop and later disappear. • Greater containment pressure led to much greater vertical thermal stratification. - Abstract: In Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants with the Mark I containment, the condition of the Suppression Pool can be a large influence on overall plant safety. When the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (RCIC) System is operating, steam from the reactor drives the RCIC turbine and is then exhausted to the Suppression Pool. When subcooled, the pool can readily condense the steam, warming it up in the process. However, if hot spots or thermal stratification appear, this can limit the Suppression Pool’s ability to perform its safety functions, and can be a limiting factor for RCIC System operation. In order to better understand the RCIC system and its true limits of long-term operation, an experimental model of the system was constructed at the Laboratory for Nuclear Heat Transfer Systems at Texas A&M University (TAMU). These tests provide confirmation of thermal stratification in the Suppression Pool from RCIC System operations, and show a significant degree of dependence on pressure in the airspace above the pool. In the TAMU facility, vertical thermal stratification was limited to 21 °C when fully vented to atmospheric pressure, while pre-pressurization led to stratification well in excess of 60 °C.

  1. Emission factors of fine particulate matter, organic and elemental carbon, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide for four solid fuels commonly used in residential heating by the U.S. Navajo Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Wyatt M; Connors, Lea; Montoya, Lupita D

    2017-09-01

    Most homes in the Navajo Nation use wood as their primary heating fuel, often in combination with locally mined coal. Previous studies observed health effects linked to this solid-fuel use in several Navajo communities. Emission factors (EFs) for common fuels used by the Navajo have not been reported using a relevant stove type. In this study, two softwoods (ponderosa pine and Utah juniper) and two high-volatile bituminous coals (Black Mesa and Fruitland) were tested with an in-use residential conventional wood stove (homestove) using a modified American Society for Testing and Materials/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (ASTM/EPA) protocol. Filter sampling quantified PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm) and organic (OC) and elemental (EC) carbon in the emissions. Real-time monitoring quantified carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and total suspended particles (TSP). EFs for these air pollutants were developed and normalized to both fuel mass and energy consumed. In general, coal had significantly higher mass EFs than wood for all pollutants studied. In particular, coal emitted, on average, 10 times more PM2.5 than wood on a mass basis, and 2.4 times more on an energy basis. The EFs developed here were based on fuel types, stove design, and operating protocols relevant to the Navajo Nation, but they could be useful to other Native Nations with similar practices, such as the nearby Hopi Nation. Indoor wood and coal combustion is an important contributor to public health burdens in the Navajo Nation. Currently, there exist no emission factors representative of Navajo homestoves, fuels, and practices. This study developed emission factors for PM2.5, OC, EC, CO, and CO2 using a representative Navajo homestove. These emission factors may be utilized in regional-, national-, and global-scale health and environmental models. Additionally, the protocols developed and results presented here may inform on-going stove design of the

  2. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  3. Comparison of prediction models for Cherenkov light emissions from nuclear fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branger, E.; Grape, S.; Jacobsson Svärd, S.; Jansson, P.; Andersson Sundén, E.

    2017-06-01

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) [1] is a tool used by nuclear safeguards inspectors to verify irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage based on the Cherenkov light produced by the assembly. Verifying that no rods have been substituted in the fuel, so-called partial-defect verification, is done by comparing the intensity measured with a DCVD with a predicted intensity, based on operator fuel declaration. The prediction model currently used by inspectors is based on simulations of Cherenkov light production in a BWR 8x8 geometry. This work investigates prediction models based on simulated Cherenkov light production in a BWR 8x8 and a PWR 17x17 assembly, as well as a simplified model based on a single rod in water. Cherenkov light caused by both fission product gamma and beta decays was considered. The simulations reveal that there are systematic differences between the model used by safeguards inspectors and the models described in this publication, most noticeably with respect to the fuel assembly cooling time. Consequently, if the intensity predictions are based on another fuel type than the fuel type being measured, a systematic bias in intensity with respect to burnup and cooling time is introduced. While a simplified model may be accurate enough for a set of fuel assemblies with nearly identical cooling times, the prediction models may differ systematically by up to 18 % for fuels with more varied cooling times. Accordingly, these investigations indicate that the currently used model may need to be exchanged with a set of more detailed, fuel-type specific models, in order minimize the model dependent systematic deviations.

  4. Fuel and canister process report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werme, Lars (ed.)

    2006-10-15

    This report documents fuel and canister processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository. It forms an important part of the reporting of the safety assessment SR-Can. The detailed assessment methodology, including the role of the process report in the assessment, is described in the SR-Can Main report. The report is written by, and for, experts in the relevant scientific fields. It should though be possible for a generalist in the area of long-term safety assessments of geologic nuclear waste repositories to comprehend the contents of the report. The report is an important part of the documentation of the SR-Can project and an essential reference within the project, providing a scientifically motivated plan for the handling of geosphere processes. It is, furthermore, foreseen that the report will be essential for reviewers scrutinising the handling of geosphere issues in the SR-Can assessment. Several types of fuel will be emplaced in the repository. For the reference case with 40 years of reactor operation, the fuel quantity from boiling water reactors, BWR fuel, is estimated at 7,000 tonnes, while the quantity from pressurized water reactors, PWR fuel, is estimated at about 2,300 tonnes. In addition, 23 tonnes of mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) fuel of German origin from BWR and PWR reactors and 20 tonnes of fuel from the decommissioned heavy water reactor in Aagesta will be disposed of. To allow for future changes in the Swedish nuclear programme, the safety assessment assumes a total of 6,000 canister corresponding to 12,000 tonnes of fuel.

  5. Fuels Preparation Department monthly report, August 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-09-08

    This report discusses activities from the fuels processing department. Activities described include personnel statistics concerning injuries and accidents; operating plans concerning the N loading activities, 305 test reactor, projection fuel elements; process fuel element testing, and general engineering operations from the department.

  6. CFD Simulation of rigid venting of the containment of a BWR-5 Mark-II reactor; Simulacion CFD de los venteos rigidos de la contencion de un reactor BWR-5 Mark-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo G, I. F.; Vazquez B, A. K.; Velazquez E, L. [Instituto Nacional de Electricidad y Energias Limpias, Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, 62490 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [CFE, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Federal Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, 91476 Municipio Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    In conditions of prolonged loss of external energy or a severe accident, venting to the atmosphere is an alternative to prevent overpressure and release of fission products from the primary containment of a nuclear reactor. Due to the importance of flow determination through rigid vents, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is proposed to verify the capacity of rigid vents in the primary containment of a boiling water reactor (BWR) under different operating conditions (pressure, temperature and compositions of the fluids). The model predicts and provides detailed information on variables such as mass flow and velocity of the venting gases. In the proposed model the primary containment gas is vented to the atmosphere via rigid vents (pipes) from the dry and wet pit. Is assumed that the container is pressurized because is in a defined scenario, and at one point the venting is open and the gas released into the atmosphere. The objective is to characterize the flow and validate the CFD model for the overpressure conditions that occur in an accident such as a LOCA, Sbo, etc. The model is implemented with Ansys-Fluent general-purpose CFD software based on the geometry of the venting ducts of the containment of a BWR. The model is developed three-dimensional and resolves at steady state for compressible flow and includes the effects of the turbulence represented by the Reynolds stress model. The CFD results are compared with the values of a one-dimensional and isentropic model for compressible flow. The relative similarity of results leads to the conclusion that the proposed CFD model can help to predict the rigid venting capacity of the containment of a BWR, however more information is required for full validation of the proposed model. (Author)

  7. Benchmark calculation for radioactivity inventory using MAXS library based on JENDL-4.0 and JEFF-3.0/A for decommissioning BWR plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed benchmark calculation for radioactivity activated in a Primary Containment Vessel (PCV of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR by using MAXS library, which was developed by collapsing with neutron energy spectra in the PCV of the BWR. Radioactivities due to neutron irradiation were measured by using activation foil detector of Gold (Au and Nickel (Ni at thirty locations in the PCV. We performed activation calculations of the foils with SCALE5.1/ORIGEN-S code with irradiation conditions of each foil location as the benchmark calculation. We compared calculations and measurements to estimate an effectiveness of MAXS library.

  8. KE Basin underwater visual fuel survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1995-02-01

    Results of an underwater video fuel survey in KE Basin using a high resolution camera system are presented. Quantitative and qualitative information on fuel degradation are given, and estimates of the total fraction of ruptured fuel elements are provided. Representative photographic illustrations showing the range of fuel conditions observed in the survey are included.

  9. SIMULATION OF THE NUCLEAR-REACTOR ACTIVE-ZONE ELEMENTS WITH THICK ROTATING LAYER OF MICRO-PARTICLE FUEL FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSMUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sorokin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective transmutation of radioactive isotopes into the stable ones with the use of neutrons requires the neutron high-flux and the spectra with significant part of fast and resonance neutrons. It is advisable to alternate a range of specified-duration irradiation sessions with revamping the composition of waste. The depleted fuel of the commercial reactor comprises near 1 % of such isotopes of their individual mass in the batch loading which amounts to several tens of kilograms. The article considers a perspective nuclear reactor for radioactive waste transmutation as regards its design, thermal physics and hydrodynamics. Mobile microparticles of the fuel build up the active zone of the reactor and form a steady dense ringshaped layer. The layer rotates within immovable vortex chamber using the energy of the coolant, i.e. water. The micro particles cool down with the coolant unmediated.The  formulaic  valuation  of  the  device  capacity  with  water  under  pressure  comes to 1–5 MW per 1 liter of the layer. The condition of avoided boiling sets the most restrictive limitations  to  the  capacity.  The  bulk  of  the  layer  constricts  to  tens  of  liters  inasmuch as enlarging the chamber dimensions reduces the rotary acceleration and the force confining the fuel micro-particles on the free surface of the layer. The author offers and substantiates with calculations the active zone composed of several layers or a layer with a large ratio of the volume to the surface area for achieving criticality of nuclear fuel load with limitations on enrichment. The vortex chambers in case of the active zone of several layers can have the joint coolant exscapes along the axis. Implementation of the chambers with reverse vortices in composite active zones with joint escapes allows reducing the flow rotation below the vortex reactor along the coolant course.

  10. Deposition characteristics of iodine from the off-air of the nuclear auxiliaries of a BWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patzelt, A.

    1983-12-01

    Contrary to the present opinion, the penetrating iodine fraction in the off-air from the auxiliaries of a BWR reactor may be higher than the values communicated in the relevant literature. This seems to be a result of internal processes in the systems in which ion exchanger resins are used. In these systems, filters made of a combination of impregnated and activated carbon have proved to be a better solution as experiments have shown. Systems of this type are recommended for general used.

  11. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, J; Abarca, A; Gallardo, S

    2011-08-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experiment data report: Gap Conductance Test Series, Test GC 1-3 postirradiation examination. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdock, B. A.

    1977-09-01

    The results of the postirradiation examination of four boiling water reactor type, zircaloy-clad, UO/sub 2/-fueled rods tested as part of the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program are discussed. These rods were employed in Gap Conductance Test GC 1-3 which was conducted to obtain experimental data from which test rod gap conductance values could be determined by both the steady state integral kdT and the power oscillation methods. The postirradiation examination results provided will aid in interpreting and understanding the experimental data obtained during Test GC 1-3 and in evaluating the effect of fuel behavior on the fuel rod thermal response and interpreted gap conductances. Fuel rod fill gas composition and pressure and rod power profiles are discussed. Evidence is presented showing that significant amounts of water had been present in two of the four fuel rods during testing. For the two fuel rods that remained intact during the test, measurements of fuel pellet-to-cladding gap, as well as the surface area of the fuel cracks at several axial locations are presented. A total effective radial gap is calculated and the fuel structure and porosity are analyzed.

  13. CIRFT Data Update and Data Analyses for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Reliability Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this research is to collect experimental data on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs), including the H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station (HBR), Catawba Nuclear Station, North Anna Nuclear Power Station (NA), and the Limerick Nuclear Power Station (LMK) boiling water reactor (BWR). Data will be collected under simulated transportation environments using the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT), an enabling hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These data will be used to support ongoing SNF modeling activities and to address regulatory issues associated with SNF transport.

  14. Evaluation of the reduction of boron-10 in the control rods in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central, through steady state calculations; Evaluacion de la reduccion del Boro-10 en las barras de control en los BWR de la CLV, mediante calculos en estado estacionario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes T, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Hernandez, J.L.; Ramirez S, J.R. [Departamento de Sistemas Nucleares, ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    One of the more important aspects related with the safety and economy in the operation of a nuclear power reactor, it is without a doubt the control of the reactivity. During the normal operation of a reactor of boiling water (BWR-Boiling Water Reactor), the control of the reactivity in the nucleus it is strongly determined by the efficiency of the control rods. In the case of the Laguna Verde Nuclear power station (CNLV) the nucleus of the reactors has 109 control rods grouped in 4 sets. The CNLV at the moment uses the CCC method (Control Cell Core) in the design of the cycle. With this method only the A2 group is used for the control of the reactivity at full power. With the purpose of quantifying the effect of the decrease of the burnable poison (B{sub 4}C) of the control rods and in particular to the effect due to the postulated lost of 10% of Boron 10, it was carried out a series of calculations of the nucleus in stationary state by means of the system of HELIOS/CM-PRESTO codes. In this work the main derived results of these 3D simulations(three dimensions) of the reactors of the CNLV are presented. It was analyzed the one behavior of the infinite neutron multiplication factor (K{sub infinite}), at fuel assemble cell level used in an equilibrium cycle for the CNLV. It was also analyzed the effect in the shutdown ma