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Sample records for bursting pacemaker neurons

  1. Network bursts in cortical neuronal cultures: 'noise - versus pacemaker'- driven neural network simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsun, T.; Stegenga, J.; le Feber, Jakob; Rutten, Wim

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we address the issue of spontaneous bursting activity in cortical neuronal cultures and explain what might cause this collective behavior using computer simulations of two different neural network models. While the common approach to acivate a passive network is done by introducing

  2. Intrinsically active and pacemaker neurons in pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal populations.

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    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-03-11

    Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks.

  3. Intrinsically Active and Pacemaker Neurons in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks. PMID:24672755

  4. Pacemaker potentials for the periodic burst discharge in the heart ganglion of a stomatopod, Squilla oratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, A; Obara, S; Akiyama, T

    1967-03-01

    From somata of the pacemaker neurons in the Squilla heart ganglion, pacemaker potentials for the spontaneous periodic burst discharge are recorded with intracellular electrodes. The electrical activity is composed of slow potentials and superimposed spikes, and is divided into four types, which are: (a) "mammalian heart" type, (b) "slow generator" type, (c) "slow grower" type, and (d) "slow deficient" type. Since axons which are far from the somata do not produce slow potentials, the soma and dendrites must be where the slow potentials are generated. Hyperpolarization impedes generation of the slow potential, showing that it is an electrically excitable response. Membrane impedance increases on depolarization. Brief hyperpolarizing current can abolish the plateau but brief tetanic inhibitory fiber stimulation is more effective for the abolition. A single stimulus to the axon evokes the slow potential when the stimulus is applied some time after a previous burst. Repetitive stimuli to the axon are more effective in eliciting the slow potential, but the depolarization is not maintained on continuous stimulation. Synchronization of the slow potential among neurons is achieved by: (a) the electrotonic connections, with periodic change in resistance of the soma membrane, (b) active spread of the slow potential, and (c) synchronization through spikes.

  5. The Role of the Electrogenic Sodium Pump in Modulation of Pacemaker Discharge of ’Aplysia’ Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    pump contributes to resting membrane potential. Endogenous pacemaker activity is characteristic of many invertebrate neurons including the majority...neurons upon a relatively abrupt temperature change. The warm sensitive cell in Figure 2B has the bursting discharge characteristic of some identi...molluscan neurone. J. Physiol. 210:919-931, 1970. 14. Hodgkin, A. L. and Keynes, R. D. Active transport of cations in giant axons from Sepia and

  6. A sodium leak current regulates pacemaker activity of adult central pattern generator neurons in Lymnaea stagnalis.

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    Tom Z Lu

    Full Text Available The resting membrane potential of the pacemaker neurons is one of the essential mechanisms underlying rhythm generation. In this study, we described the biophysical properties of an uncharacterized channel (U-type channel and investigated the role of the channel in the rhythmic activity of a respiratory pacemaker neuron and the respiratory behaviour in adult freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Our results show that the channel conducts an inward leak current carried by Na(+ (I(Leak-Na. The I(Leak-Na contributed to the resting membrane potential and was required for maintaining rhythmic action potential bursting activity of the identified pacemaker RPeD1 neurons. Partial knockdown of the U-type channel suppressed the aerial respiratory behaviour of the adult snail in vivo. These findings identified the Na(+ leak conductance via the U-type channel, likely a NALCN-like channel, as one of the fundamental mechanisms regulating rhythm activity of pacemaker neurons and respiratory behaviour in adult animals.

  7. Noise effects on robust synchronization of a small pacemaker neuronal ensemble via nonlinear controller: electronic circuit design.

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    Megam Ngouonkadi, Elie Bertrand; Fotsin, Hilaire Bertrand; Kabong Nono, Martial; Louodop Fotso, Patrick Herve

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report on the synchronization of a pacemaker neuronal ensemble constituted of an AB neuron electrically coupled to two PD neurons. By the virtue of this electrical coupling, they can fire synchronous bursts of action potential. An external master neuron is used to induce to the whole system the desired dynamics, via a nonlinear controller. Such controller is obtained by a combination of sliding mode and feedback control. The proposed controller is able to offset uncertainties in the synchronized systems. We show how noise affects the synchronization of the pacemaker neuronal ensemble, and briefly discuss its potential benefits in our synchronization scheme. An extended Hindmarsh-Rose neuronal model is used to represent a single cell dynamic of the network. Numerical simulations and Pspice implementation of the synchronization scheme are presented. We found that, the proposed controller reduces the stochastic resonance of the network when its gain increases.

  8. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

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    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  9. Bursting deep dorsal horn neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Eva Meier; Rasmussen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    In a recent publication, Thaweerattanasinp et al. (J Neurophysiol 116: 1644–1653, 2016) investigated spinal cord injury and firing properties of deep dorsal horn neurons during NMDA or zolmitriptan application by employing electrophysiology in an in vitro spinal cord preparation. Deep dorsal horn...

  10. Circadian pacemaker neurons change synaptic contacts across the day

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    Gorostiza, E. Axel; Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Frenkel, Lia; Pírez, Nicolás; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Daily cycles of rest and activity are a common example of circadian control of physiology. In Drosophila rhythmic locomotor cycles rely on the activity of 150-200 neurons grouped in seven clusters [1, 2]. Work from many laboratories points to the small Lateral Neurons ventral (sLNvs) as essential for circadian control of locomotor rhythmicity [3-7]. sLNv neurons undergo circadian remodeling of their axonal projections opening the possibility for a circadian control of connectivity of these relevant circadian pacemakers [8]. Here we show that circadian plasticity of the sLNv axonal projections has further implications than mere structural changes. First, we found that the degree of daily structural plasticity exceeds that originally described [8] underscoring that changes in the degree of fasciculation as well as extension or pruning of axonal terminals could be involved. Interestingly, the quantity of active zones changes along the day, lending support to the attractive hypothesis that new synapses are formed while others are dismantled between late night and the following morning. More remarkably, taking full advantage of the GFP Reconstitution Across Synaptic Partners (GRASP) technique [9] we showed that, in addition to new synapses being added or removed, sLNv neurons contact different synaptic partners at different times along the day. These results lead us to propose that the circadian network, and in particular the sLNv neurons, orchestrates some of the physiological and behavioral differences between day and night by changing the path through which information travels. PMID:25155512

  11. Pacemaker

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    ... with a pacemaker include: Cell phones and MP3 players (for example, iPods) Household appliances, such as microwave ovens High-tension wires Metal ... pacemaker is implanted. If you strap your MP3 player to your arm while listening ... use household appliances, but avoid close and prolonged exposure, as it ...

  12. Coexistence of tonic firing and bursting in cortical neurons

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    Fröhlich, Flavio; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2006-09-01

    Sustained neuronal activity can be broadly classified as either tonic firing or bursting. These two major patterns of neuronal oscillations are state dependent and may coexist. The dynamics and intracellular mechanisms of transitions between tonic firing and bursting in cortical networks remain poorly understood. Here we describe a detailed two-compartment conductance-based cortical neuron model which exhibits bistability with hysteresis between tonic firing and bursting for elevated extracellular potassium concentration. The study explains the ionic and dynamical mechanisms of burst generation and reveals the conditions underlying coexistence of two different oscillatory modes as a function of neuronal excitability.

  13. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

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    Enrico Rossoni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  14. Neuronal networks and energy bursts in epilepsy.

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    Wu, Y; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-02-26

    Epilepsy can be defined as the abnormal activities of neurons. The occurrence, propagation and termination of epileptic seizures rely on the networks of neuronal cells that are connected through both synaptic- and non-synaptic interactions. These complicated interactions contain the modified functions of normal neurons and glias as well as the mediation of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms with feedback homeostasis. Numerous spread patterns are detected in disparate networks of ictal activities. The cortical-thalamic-cortical loop is present during a general spike wave seizure. The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) is the major inhibitory input traversing the region, and the dentate gyrus (DG) controls CA3 excitability. The imbalance between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is the main disorder in epilepsy. Adjustable negative feedback that mediates both inhibitory and excitatory components affects neuronal networks through neurotransmission fluctuation, receptor and transmitter signaling, and through concomitant influences on ion concentrations and field effects. Within a limited dynamic range, neurons slowly adapt to input levels and have a high sensitivity to synaptic changes. The stability of the adapting network depends on the ratio of the adaptation rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory populations. Thus, therapeutic strategies with multiple effects on seizures are required for the treatment of epilepsy, and the therapeutic functions on networks are reviewed here. Based on the high-energy burst theory of epileptic activity, we propose a potential antiepileptic therapeutic strategy to transfer the high energy and extra electricity out of the foci. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth dynamics explain the development of spatiotemporal burst activity of young cultured neuronal networks in detail.

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    Gritsun, Taras A; le Feber, Joost; Rutten, Wim L C

    2012-01-01

    A typical property of isolated cultured neuronal networks of dissociated rat cortical cells is synchronized spiking, called bursting, starting about one week after plating, when the dissociated cells have sufficiently sent out their neurites and formed enough synaptic connections. This paper is the third in a series of three on simulation models of cultured networks. Our two previous studies [26], [27] have shown that random recurrent network activity models generate intra- and inter-bursting patterns similar to experimental data. The networks were noise or pacemaker-driven and had Izhikevich-neuronal elements with only short-term plastic (STP) synapses (so, no long-term potentiation, LTP, or depression, LTD, was included). However, elevated pre-phases (burst leaders) and after-phases of burst main shapes, that usually arise during the development of the network, were not yet simulated in sufficient detail. This lack of detail may be due to the fact that the random models completely missed network topology .and a growth model. Therefore, the present paper adds, for the first time, a growth model to the activity model, to give the network a time dependent topology and to explain burst shapes in more detail. Again, without LTP or LTD mechanisms. The integrated growth-activity model yielded realistic bursting patterns. The automatic adjustment of various mutually interdependent network parameters is one of the major advantages of our current approach. Spatio-temporal bursting activity was validated against experiment. Depending on network size, wave reverberation mechanisms were seen along the network boundaries, which may explain the generation of phases of elevated firing before and after the main phase of the burst shape.In summary, the results show that adding topology and growth explain burst shapes in great detail and suggest that young networks still lack/do not need LTP or LTD mechanisms.

  16. Growth Dynamics Explain the Development of Spatiotemporal Burst Activity of Young Cultured Neuronal Networks in Detail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsun, Taras A.; le Feber, Joost; Rutten, Wim L. C.

    2012-01-01

    A typical property of isolated cultured neuronal networks of dissociated rat cortical cells is synchronized spiking, called bursting, starting about one week after plating, when the dissociated cells have sufficiently sent out their neurites and formed enough synaptic connections. This paper is the third in a series of three on simulation models of cultured networks. Our two previous studies [26], [27] have shown that random recurrent network activity models generate intra- and inter-bursting patterns similar to experimental data. The networks were noise or pacemaker-driven and had Izhikevich-neuronal elements with only short-term plastic (STP) synapses (so, no long-term potentiation, LTP, or depression, LTD, was included). However, elevated pre-phases (burst leaders) and after-phases of burst main shapes, that usually arise during the development of the network, were not yet simulated in sufficient detail. This lack of detail may be due to the fact that the random models completely missed network topology .and a growth model. Therefore, the present paper adds, for the first time, a growth model to the activity model, to give the network a time dependent topology and to explain burst shapes in more detail. Again, without LTP or LTD mechanisms. The integrated growth-activity model yielded realistic bursting patterns. The automatic adjustment of various mutually interdependent network parameters is one of the major advantages of our current approach. Spatio-temporal bursting activity was validated against experiment. Depending on network size, wave reverberation mechanisms were seen along the network boundaries, which may explain the generation of phases of elevated firing before and after the main phase of the burst shape.In summary, the results show that adding topology and growth explain burst shapes in great detail and suggest that young networks still lack/do not need LTP or LTD mechanisms. PMID:23028450

  17. Growth dynamics explain the development of spatiotemporal burst activity of young cultured neuronal networks in detail.

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    Taras A Gritsun

    Full Text Available A typical property of isolated cultured neuronal networks of dissociated rat cortical cells is synchronized spiking, called bursting, starting about one week after plating, when the dissociated cells have sufficiently sent out their neurites and formed enough synaptic connections. This paper is the third in a series of three on simulation models of cultured networks. Our two previous studies [26], [27] have shown that random recurrent network activity models generate intra- and inter-bursting patterns similar to experimental data. The networks were noise or pacemaker-driven and had Izhikevich-neuronal elements with only short-term plastic (STP synapses (so, no long-term potentiation, LTP, or depression, LTD, was included. However, elevated pre-phases (burst leaders and after-phases of burst main shapes, that usually arise during the development of the network, were not yet simulated in sufficient detail. This lack of detail may be due to the fact that the random models completely missed network topology .and a growth model. Therefore, the present paper adds, for the first time, a growth model to the activity model, to give the network a time dependent topology and to explain burst shapes in more detail. Again, without LTP or LTD mechanisms. The integrated growth-activity model yielded realistic bursting patterns. The automatic adjustment of various mutually interdependent network parameters is one of the major advantages of our current approach. Spatio-temporal bursting activity was validated against experiment. Depending on network size, wave reverberation mechanisms were seen along the network boundaries, which may explain the generation of phases of elevated firing before and after the main phase of the burst shape.In summary, the results show that adding topology and growth explain burst shapes in great detail and suggest that young networks still lack/do not need LTP or LTD mechanisms.

  18. Understanding the Generation of Network Bursts by Adaptive Oscillatory Neurons

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    Tanguy Fardet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies have revealed that isolated populations of oscillatory neurons can spontaneously synchronize and generate periodic bursts involving the whole network. Such a behavior has notably been observed for cultured neurons in rodent's cortex or hippocampus. We show here that a sufficient condition for this network bursting is the presence of an excitatory population of oscillatory neurons which displays spike-driven adaptation. We provide an analytic model to analyze network bursts generated by coupled adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that, for strong synaptic coupling, intrinsically tonic spiking neurons evolve to reach a synchronized intermittent bursting state. The presence of inhibitory neurons or plastic synapses can then modulate this dynamics in many ways but is not necessary for its appearance. Thanks to a simple self-consistent equation, our model gives an intuitive and semi-quantitative tool to understand the bursting behavior. Furthermore, it suggests that after-hyperpolarization currents are sufficient to explain bursting termination. Through a thorough mapping between the theoretical parameters and ion-channel properties, we discuss the biological mechanisms that could be involved and the relevance of the explored parameter-space. Such an insight enables us to propose experimentally-testable predictions regarding how blocking fast, medium or slow after-hyperpolarization channels would affect the firing rate and burst duration, as well as the interburst interval.

  19. Stochastic bursting synchronization in a population of subthreshold Izhikevich neurons

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    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Youngnam; Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Jean; Lim, Woochang

    2012-05-01

    We consider a population of subthreshold Izhikevich neurons that cannot fire spontaneously without noise. As the coupling strength passes a threshold, individual neurons exhibit noise-induced burstings ( i.e., discrete groups or bursts of noise-induced spikes). We investigate stochastic bursting synchronization by varying the noise intensity. Through competition between the constructive and the destructive roles of noise, collective coherence between noise-induced burstings is found to occur over a large range of intermediate noise intensities. This kind of stochastic bursting synchronization is well characterized by using the techniques of statistical mechanics and nonlinear dynamics, such as the order parameter, the raster plot of neural spikes, the time series of the ensemble-averaged global potential, and the phase portraits of limit cycles. In contrast to spiking neurons showing only spike synchronization (characterizing a temporal relationship between spikes), bursting neurons are found to exhibit both spike synchronization and burst synchronization (characterizing a temporal relationship between the onset times of the active phases of repetitive spikings). The degree of stochastic bursting synchronization is also measured in terms of a synchronization measure that reflects the resemblance of the global potential to the individual potential.

  20. Modification of bursting in a Helix neuron by drugs influencing intracellular regulation of calcium level.

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    Salánki, J; Budai, D; Véró, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium red, caffein and EGTA (ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid) influencing intracellular Ca2+ level as well as that of pH-lowering was investigated on identified RPal neuron of Helix pomatia characterized by bimodal pacemaker (bursting) activity. Drugs were applied both extracellularly and intracellularly. Intracellular injection was performed from micropipettes by pressure. It was found that intracellular injection of ruthenium red, caffein, EGTA and pH-lowering caused immediate short hyperpolarization and suspension of bursting. The effect of caffein and lowering of pH was biphasic, hyperpolarization was followed by an increase of spiking. Following EGTA injection the amplitudes of interburst hyperpolarizing waves decreased, and prolongation of spikes occurred. Extracellular application of ruthenium red caused slight depolarization, while caffein produced mainly effects that were similar to those of the intracellular injection. Adding EGTA into the bath resulted in cessation of bursting, and later on also spike generation was blocked. All these effects could be eliminated by washing. It is concluded that Ca-influx during spiking cannot be considered as a single factor in maintaining bursting activity, nevertheless, intracellular binding and liberation of Ca depending on the cell metabolism should also be taken into consideration as a possible mechanism of burst regulation.

  1. E and M circadian pacemaker neurons use different PDF receptor signalosome components in drosophila.

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    Duvall, Laura B; Taghert, Paul H

    2013-08-01

    We used real-time imaging to detect cAMP levels in neurons of intact fly brains to study the mechanisms of circadian pacemaker synchronization by the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF) in Drosophila. PDF receptor (PDF-R) is expressed by both M (sLNv) and E (LNd) pacemaker subclasses and is coupled to G(sα) in both cases. We previously reported that PDF-R in M pacemakers elevates cAMP levels by activating the ortholog of mammalian adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) but that AC3 disruptions had no effect on E pacemaker sensitivity to PDF. Here, we show that PDF-R in E pacemakers activates a different AC isoform, AC78C, an ortholog of mammalian AC8. Knockdown of AC78C by transgenic RNAi substantially reduces, but does not completely abrogate, PDF responses in these E pacemakers. The knockdown effect is intact when restricted to mature stages, suggesting a physiological and not a development role for AC78C in E pacemakers. The AC78C phenotype is rescued by the overexpression of AC78C but not by overexpression of the rutabaga AC. AC78C overexpression does not disrupt PDF responses in these E pacemakers, and neither AC78C knockdown nor its overexpression disrupted locomotor rhythms. Finally, knockdown of 2 AKAPs, nervy and AKAP200, partially reduces LNd PDF responses. These findings begin to identify the components of E pacemaker PDF-R signalosomes and indicate that they are distinct from PDF-R signalosomes in M pacemakers: we propose they contain AC78C and at least 1 other AC.

  2. Pacemaker neuron and network oscillations depend on a neuromodulator-regulated linear current

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    Shunbing Zhao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Linear leak currents have been implicated in the regulation of neuronal excitability, generation of neuronal and network oscillations, and network state transitions. Yet, few studies have directly tested the dependence of network oscillations on leak currents or explored the role of leak currents on network activity. In the oscillatory pyloric network of decapod crustaceans neuromodulatory inputs are necessary for pacemaker activity. A large subset of neuromodulators is known to activate a single voltage-gated inward current IMI, which has been shown to regulate the rhythmic activity of the network and its pacemaker neurons. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we show that the crucial component of IMI for the generation of oscillatory activity is only a close-to-linear portion of the current-voltage relationship. The nature of this conductance is such that the presence or the absence of neuromodulators effectively regulates the amount of leak current and the input resistance in the pacemaker neurons. When deprived of neuromodulatory inputs, pyloric oscillations are disrupted; yet, a linear reduction of the total conductance in a single neuron within the pacemaker group recovers not only the pacemaker activity in that neuron, but also leads to a recovery of oscillations in the entire pyloric network. The recovered activity produces proper frequency and phasing that is similar to that induced by neuromodulators. These results show that the passive properties of pacemaker neurons can significantly affect their capacity to generate and regulate the oscillatory activity of an entire network, and that this feature is exploited by neuromodulatory inputs.

  3. Possible mechanism of bursting suppression in nociceptive neurons.

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    Dick, O E; Krylov, B V; Nozdrachev, A D

    2017-03-01

    The use of the mathematical model of rat nociceptive neuron membrane allowed us to predict a new mechanism of suppression of ectopic bursting discharges, which arise in neurons of dorsal root ganglia and are one of the causes of neuropathic pain. The treatment with comenic acid leads to switching off the ectopic bursting discharges due to a decrease in the effective charge transferring via the activation gating structure of the slow sodium channels (Na V1.8a). Comenic acid is a drug substance of a new non-opioid analgesic [1] Thus, this analgesic not only reduces the frequency of rhythmic discharges of nociceptive neuron membrane [2] but also it suppresses its ectopic bursting discharges.

  4. Bursting and synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks

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    Stegenga, J.

    2010-01-01

    Networks of neonatal cortical neurons, cultured on multi electrode arrays (MEAs) exhibit spontaneous action potential firings. The electrodes embedded in the glass surface of a MEA can be used to record and stimulate activity at 60 sites in a network of ~50.000 neurons. Such in-vitro networks enable

  5. Bifurcations of emergent bursting in a neuronal network.

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    Yu Wu

    Full Text Available Complex neuronal networks are an important tool to help explain paradoxical phenomena observed in biological recordings. Here we present a general approach to mathematically tackle a complex neuronal network so that we can fully understand the underlying mechanisms. Using a previously developed network model of the milk-ejection reflex in oxytocin cells, we show how we can reduce a complex model with many variables and complex network topologies to a tractable model with two variables, while retaining all key qualitative features of the original model. The approach enables us to uncover how emergent synchronous bursting can arise from a neuronal network which embodies known biological features. Surprisingly, the bursting mechanisms are similar to those found in other systems reported in the literature, and illustrate a generic way to exhibit emergent and multiple time scale oscillations at the membrane potential level and the firing rate level.

  6. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity.

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    Hull, Michael J; Soffe, Stephen R; Willshaw, David J; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition.

  7. Functional analysis of circadian pacemaker neurons in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Rieger, Dirk; Shafer, Orie Thomas; Tomioka, Kenji; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2006-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms are well known, but how multiple clocks within one organism generate a structured rhythmic output remains a mystery. Many animals show bimodal activity rhythms with morning (M) and evening (E) activity bouts. One long-standing model assumes that two mutually coupled oscillators underlie these bouts and show different sensitivities to light. Three groups of lateral neurons (LN) and three groups of dorsal neurons govern behavioral rhythmicity of Drosophila. Recent data suggest that two groups of the LN (the ventral subset of the small LN cells and the dorsal subset of LN cells) are plausible candidates for the M and E oscillator, respectively. We provide evidence that these neuronal groups respond differently to light and can be completely desynchronized from one another by constant light, leading to two activity components that free-run with different periods. As expected, a long-period component started from the E activity bout. However, a short-period component originated not exclusively from the morning peak but more prominently from the evening peak. This reveals an interesting deviation from the original Pittendrigh and Daan (1976) model and suggests that a subgroup of the ventral subset of the small LN acts as "main" oscillator controlling M and E activity bouts in Drosophila.

  8. The neuropeptide PDF acts directly on evening pacemaker neurons to regulate multiple features of circadian behavior.

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    Lear, Bridget C; Zhang, Luoying; Allada, Ravi

    2009-07-01

    Discrete clusters of circadian clock neurons temporally organize daily behaviors such as sleep and wake. In Drosophila, a network of just 150 neurons drives two peaks of timed activity in the morning and evening. A subset of these neurons expresses the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF), which is important for promoting morning behavior as well as maintaining robust free-running rhythmicity in constant conditions. Yet, how PDF acts on downstream circuits to mediate rhythmic behavior is unknown. Using circuit-directed rescue of PDF receptor mutants, we show that PDF targeting of just approximately 30 non-PDF evening circadian neurons is sufficient to drive morning behavior. This function is not accompanied by large changes in core molecular oscillators in light-dark, indicating that PDF RECEPTOR likely regulates the output of these cells under these conditions. We find that PDF also acts on this focused set of non-PDF neurons to regulate both evening activity phase and period length, consistent with modest resetting effects on core oscillators. PDF likely acts on more distributed pacemaker neuron targets, including the PDF neurons themselves, to regulate rhythmic strength. Here we reveal defining features of the circuit-diagram for PDF peptide function in circadian behavior, revealing the direct neuronal targets of PDF as well as its behavioral functions at those sites. These studies define a key direct output circuit sufficient for multiple PDF dependent behaviors.

  9. Contribution of synchronized GABAergic neurons to dopaminergic neuron firing and bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Zakharov, Denis; di Volo, Matteo; Gutkin, Boris; Lapish, Christopher C.; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), interactions between dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons are critical for regulating DA neuron activity and thus DA efflux. To provide a mechanistic explanation of how GABA neurons influence DA neuron firing, we developed a circuit model of the VTA. The model is based on feed-forward inhibition and recreates canonical features of the VTA neurons. Simulations revealed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABAR) stimulation can differentially influence the firing pattern of the DA neuron, depending on the level of synchronization among GABA neurons. Asynchronous activity of GABA neurons provides a constant level of inhibition to the DA neuron and, when removed, produces a classical disinhibition burst. In contrast, when GABA neurons are synchronized by common synaptic input, their influence evokes additional spikes in the DA neuron, resulting in increased measures of firing and bursting. Distinct from previous mechanisms, the increases were not based on lowered firing rate of the GABA neurons or weaker hyperpolarization by the GABAR synaptic current. This phenomenon was induced by GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the DA neuron that leads to decreases in intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration, thus reducing the Ca2+-dependent potassium (K+) current. In this way, the GABA-mediated hyperpolarization replaces Ca2+-dependent K+ current; however, this inhibition is pulsatile, which allows the DA neuron to fire during the rhythmic pauses in inhibition. Our results emphasize the importance of inhibition in the VTA, which has been discussed in many studies, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby computations can occur locally. PMID:27440240

  10. Lmo mutants reveal a novel role for circadian pacemaker neurons in cocaine-induced behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus T-Y Tsai

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila has been developed recently as a model system to investigate the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying responses to drugs of abuse. Genetic screens for mutants with altered drug-induced behaviors thus provide an unbiased approach to define novel molecules involved in the process. We identified mutations in the Drosophila LIM-only (LMO gene, encoding a regulator of LIM-homeodomain proteins, in a genetic screen for mutants with altered cocaine sensitivity. Reduced Lmo function increases behavioral responses to cocaine, while Lmo overexpression causes the opposite effect, reduced cocaine responsiveness. Expression of Lmo in the principal Drosophila circadian pacemaker cells, the PDF-expressing ventral lateral neurons (LN(vs, is sufficient to confer normal cocaine sensitivity. Consistent with a role for Lmo in LN(vfunction,Lmomutants also show defects in circadian rhythms of behavior. However, the role for LN(vs in modulating cocaine responses is separable from their role as pacemaker neurons: ablation or functional silencing of the LN(vs reduces cocaine sensitivity, while loss of the principal circadian neurotransmitter PDF has no effect. Together, these results reveal a novel role for Lmo in modulating acute cocaine sensitivity and circadian locomotor rhythmicity, and add to growing evidence that these behaviors are regulated by shared molecular mechanisms. The finding that the degree of cocaine responsiveness is controlled by the Drosophila pacemaker neurons provides a neuroanatomical basis for this overlap. We propose that Lmo controls the responsiveness of LN(vs to cocaine, which in turn regulate the flies' behavioral sensitivity to the drug.

  11. Emergence of bursting activity in connected neuronal sub-populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bisio

    Full Text Available Uniform and modular primary hippocampal cultures from embryonic rats were grown on commercially available micro-electrode arrays to investigate network activity with respect to development and integration of different neuronal populations. Modular networks consisting of two confined active and inter-connected sub-populations of neurons were realized by means of bi-compartmental polydimethylsiloxane structures. Spontaneous activity in both uniform and modular cultures was periodically monitored, from three up to eight weeks after plating. Compared to uniform cultures and despite lower cellular density, modular networks interestingly showed higher firing rates at earlier developmental stages, and network-wide firing and bursting statistics were less variable over time. Although globally less correlated than uniform cultures, modular networks exhibited also higher intra-cluster than inter-cluster correlations, thus demonstrating that segregation and integration of activity coexisted in this simple yet powerful in vitro model. Finally, the peculiar synchronized bursting activity shown by confined modular networks preferentially propagated within one of the two compartments ('dominant', even in cases of perfect balance of firing rate between the two sub-populations. This dominance was generally maintained during the entire monitored developmental frame, thus suggesting that the implementation of this hierarchy arose from early network development.

  12. Firing pattern of bursting neurons under sinusoidal drive in mean-field modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Kim, J W; Robinson, P A; Drysdale, P M

    2009-07-07

    Bursting has been observed in many sensory neurons, and is thought to be important in neural signaling, sleep, and some disorders of the brain. Bursting neurons have been studied via various types of conductance-based models at the single-neuron level. Important features of bursting have been reproduced by this type of model, but it is not certain how well the behavior of populations of bursting neurons can be represented solely by that of individual neurons. To study bursting neurons at the population level, a conductance-based model is incorporated into a mean-field model to yield a mean-field bursting model. The responses of the model to sinusoidal inputs are studied, showing that neurons with various different initial states are capable of phase-locked or intermittent firing, depending on their baseline voltage. Furthermore, depending on this voltage, the bursting frequency either slaves to the original unperturbed bursting frequency or approaches a steady value when the external driving frequency increases. Finally, use of white noise perturbations shows that the bursting frequency of the neurons remains the same even under a more general external stimulus.

  13. Phase-locked cluster oscillations in periodically forced integrate-and-fire-or-burst neuronal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Angela J.; Breakspear, Michael; Coombes, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    The minimal integrate-and-fire-or-burst neuron model succinctly describes both tonic firing and postinhibitory rebound bursting of thalamocortical cells in the sensory relay. Networks of integrate-and-fire-or-burst (IFB) neurons with slow inhibitory synaptic interactions have been shown to support stable rhythmic states, including globally synchronous and cluster oscillations, in which network-mediated inhibition cyclically generates bursting in coherent subgroups of neurons. In this paper, we introduce a reduced IFB neuronal population model to study synchronization of inhibition-mediated oscillatory bursting states to periodic excitatory input. Using numeric methods, we demonstrate the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked bursting oscillations in the sinusoidally forced IFB neuronal population model. Phase locking is shown to arise when periodic excitation is sufficient to pace the onset of bursting in an IFB cluster without counteracting the inhibitory interactions necessary for burst generation. Phase-locked bursting states are thus found to destabilize when periodic excitation increases in strength or frequency. Further study of the IFB neuronal population model with pulse-like periodic excitatory input illustrates that this synchronization mechanism generalizes to a broad range of n:m phase-locked bursting states across both globally synchronous and clustered oscillatory regimes.

  14. Phase resetting of the mammalian circadian clock relies on a rapid shift of a small population of pacemaker neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos H T Rohling

    Full Text Available The circadian pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN contains a major pacemaker for 24 h rhythms that is synchronized to the external light-dark cycle. In response to a shift in the external cycle, neurons of the SCN resynchronize with different pace. We performed electrical activity recordings of the SCN of rats in vitro following a 6 hour delay of the light-dark cycle and observed a bimodal electrical activity pattern with a shifted and an unshifted component. The shifted component was relatively narrow as compared to the unshifted component (2.2 h and 5.7 h, respectively. Curve fitting and simulations predicted that less than 30% of the neurons contribute to the shifted component and that their phase distribution is small. This prediction was confirmed by electrophysiological recordings of neuronal subpopulations. Only 25% of the neurons exhibited an immediate shift in the phase of the electrical activity rhythms, and the phases of the shifted subpopulations appeared significantly more synchronized as compared to the phases of the unshifted subpopulations (p<0.05. We also performed electrical activity recordings of the SCN following a 9 hour advance of the light-dark cycle. The phase advances induced a large desynchrony among the neurons, but consistent with the delays, only 19% of the neurons peaked at the mid of the new light phase. The data suggest that resetting of the central circadian pacemaker to both delays and advances is brought about by an initial shift of a relatively small group of neurons that becomes highly synchronized following a shift in the external cycle. The high degree of synchronization of the shifted neurons may add to the ability of this group to reset the pacemaker. The large desynchronization observed following advances may contribute to the relative difficulty of the circadian system to respond to advanced light cycles.

  15. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation

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    Daniel Henry Elijah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of

  16. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elijah, Daniel H; Samengo, Inés; Montemurro, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here, we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of thalamic neurons.

  17. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Emre eKapucu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates interspike interval thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  18. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Fikret E; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI) histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates ISI thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average (CMA) and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA) data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  19. Leader neurons in population bursts of 2D living neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckmann, J-P; Zbinden, Cyrille [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Jacobi, Shimshon; Moses, Elisha [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Marom, Shimon [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa 31096 (Israel)], E-mail: elisha.moses@weizmann.ac.il

    2008-01-15

    Eytan and Marom (2006 J. Neurosci. 26 8465-76) recently showed that the spontaneous bursting activity of rat neuron cultures includes 'first-to-fire' cells that consistently fire earlier than others. Here, we analyze the behavior of these neurons in long-term recordings of spontaneous activity of rat hippocampal and rat cortical neuron cultures from three different laboratories. We identify precursor events that may either subside ('aborted bursts') or can lead to a full-blown burst ('pre-bursts'). We find that the activation in the pre-burst typically has a first neuron ('leader'), followed by a localized response in its neighborhood. Locality is diminished in the bursts themselves. The long-term dynamics of the leaders is relatively robust, evolving with a half-life of 23-34 h. Stimulation of the culture alters the leader distribution, but the distribution stabilizes within about 1 h. We show that the leaders carry information about the identity of the burst, as measured by the signature of the number of spikes per neuron in a burst. The number of spikes from leaders in the first few spikes of a precursor event is furthermore shown to be predictive with regard to the transition into a burst (pre-burst versus aborted burst). We conclude that the leaders play a role in the development of the bursts and conjecture that they are part of an underlying sub-network that is excited first and then acts as a nucleation center for the burst.

  20. Presumptive insect circadian pacemakers in vitro: immunocytochemical characterization of cultured pigment-dispersing hormone-immunoreactive neurons of Leucophaea maderae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, B; Stengl, M

    1999-06-01

    The accessory medulla with its associated pigment-dispersing hormone-immunoreactive neurons appears to be the pacemaker that controls the circadian locomotor activity rhythm of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. To permit studies at the level of individual, identified, pacemaker neurons, we developed specific long-term primary cell cultures of fully differentiated adult neurons of the accessory medulla. As judged from soma diameter distribution, the cultures contain an unbiased representation of apparently all neuronal types of the accessory medulla. The cultured cells survive and grow processes for more than 2 months with or without additional hemocyte coculturing. However, a strong positive effect on initial outgrowth was observed with hemocyte coculturing. At least six different morphological cell types of the accessory medulla could be distinguished in vitro. Among these only one cell type, the monopolar type C cell, was recognized in vitro with an antiserum against the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing hormone. Thus, the identifiable monopolar type C cells are candidates for circadian pacemaker neurons and will be the focus of further physiological characterizations.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of the membrane potential of a bursting pacemaker cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2012-03-01

    This article presents the results of an exploration of one two-parameter space of the Chay model of a cell excitable membrane. There are two main regions: a peripheral one, where the system dynamics will relax to an equilibrium point, and a central one where the expected dynamics is oscillatory. In the second region, we observe a variety of self-sustained oscillations including periodic oscillation, as well as bursting dynamics of different types. These oscillatory dynamics can be observed as periodic oscillations with different periodicities, and in some cases, as chaotic dynamics. These results, when displayed in bifurcation diagrams, result in complex bifurcation structures, which have been suggested as relevant to understand biological cell signaling.

  2. A critical firing rate associated with tonic-to-bursting transitions in synchronized gap-junction coupled neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Annabelle; Follmann, Rosangela; Harris, Allison L.; Postnova, Svetlana; Braun, Hans; Rosa, Epaminondas

    2017-06-01

    A transition between tonic and bursting neuronal behaviors is studied using a linear chain of three electrically coupled model neurons. Numerical simulations show that, depending on their individual dynamical states, the neurons first synchronize either in a tonic or in a bursting regime. Additionally, a characteristic firing rate, mediating tonic-to-bursting transitions in networked neurons, is found to be associated with a firing rate encountered in the single neuron's equivalent transition. A few cases describing this peculiar phenomenon are presented.

  3. Electrical properties of the pacemaker neurons in the heart ganglion of a stomatopod, Squilla oratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, A; Obara, S; Akiyama, T; Yumoto, K

    1967-03-01

    In the Squilla heart ganglion, the pacemaker is located in the rostral group of cells. After spontaneous firing ceased, the electrophysiological properties of these cells were examined with intracellular electrodes. Cells respond to electrical stimuli with all-or-none action potentials. Direct stimulation by strong currents decreases the size of action potentials. Comparison with action potentials caused by axonal stimulation and analysis of time relations indicate that with stronger currents the soma membrane is directly stimulated whereas with weaker currents the impulse first arises in the axon and then invades the soma. Spikes evoked in a neuron spread into all other neurons. Adjacent cells are interconnected by electrotonic connections. Histologically axons are tied with the side-junction. B spikes of adjacent cells are blocked simultaneously by hyperpolarization or by repetitive stimulation. Experiments show that under such circumstances the B spike is not directly elicited from the A spike but is evoked by invasion of an impulse or electrotonic potential from adjacent cells. On rostral stimulation a small prepotential precedes the main spike. It is interpreted as an action potential from dendrites.

  4. Intermittent synchronization in a network of bursting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L

    2011-09-01

    Synchronized oscillations in networks of inhibitory and excitatory coupled bursting neurons are common in a variety of neural systems from central pattern generators to human brain circuits. One example of the latter is the subcortical network of the basal ganglia, formed by excitatory and inhibitory bursters of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus, involved in motor control and affected in Parkinson's disease. Recent experiments have demonstrated the intermittent nature of the phase-locking of neural activity in this network. Here, we explore one potential mechanism to explain the intermittent phase-locking in a network. We simplify the network to obtain a model of two inhibitory coupled elements and explore its dynamics. We used geometric analysis and singular perturbation methods for dynamical systems to reduce the full model to a simpler set of equations. Mathematical analysis was completed using three slow variables with two different time scales. Intermittently, synchronous oscillations are generated by overlapped spiking which crucially depends on the geometry of the slow phase plane and the interplay between slow variables as well as the strength of synapses. Two slow variables are responsible for the generation of activity patterns with overlapped spiking, and the other slower variable enhances the robustness of an irregular and intermittent activity pattern. While the analyzed network and the explored mechanism of intermittent synchrony appear to be quite generic, the results of this analysis can be used to trace particular values of biophysical parameters (synaptic strength and parameters of calcium dynamics), which are known to be impacted in Parkinson's disease.

  5. PreBötzinger complex and pacemaker neurons: hypothesized site and kernel for respiratory rhythm generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Feldman, J L

    1998-01-01

    Identification of the sites and mechanisms underlying the generation of respiratory rhythm is of longstanding interest to physiologists and neurobiologists. Recently, with the development of novel experimental preparations, especially in vitro en bloc and slice preparations of rodent brainstem......, progress has been made In particular, a site in the ventrolateral medulla, the preBötzinger Complex, is hypothesized to contain neuronal circuits generating respiratory rhythm. Lesions or disruption of synaptic transmission within the preBötzinger Complex, either in vivo or in vitro, can abolish...... respiratory activity. Furthermore, the persistence of respiratory rhythm following interference with postsynaptic inhibition and the subsequent discovery of neurons with endogenous bursting properties within the preBötzinger Complex have led to the hypothesis that rhythmogenesis results from synchronized...

  6. Food Restriction Increases Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Burst Firing of Dopamine Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Branch, Sarah Y.; Goertz, R. Brandon; Sharpe, Amanda L.; Pierce, Janie; Roy, Sudip; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A.; Beckstead, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Restriction of food intake increases the acquisition of drug abuse behavior and enhances the reinforcing efficacy of those drugs. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms responsible for the interactions between feeding state and drug use are largely unknown. Here we show that chronic mild food restriction increases the burst firing of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. Dopamine neurons from food-restricted mice exhibited increased burst firing in vivo, an effect that was enhanced by...

  7. Effects of glial release and somatic receptors on bursting in synchronized neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xuan; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, C. K.

    2011-07-01

    A model is constructed to study the phenomenon of bursting in cultured neuronal networks by considering the effects of glial release and the extrasynaptic receptors on neurons. In the frequently observed situations of synchronized bursting, the whole neuronal network can be described by a mean-field model. In this model, the dynamics of the synchronized network in the presence of glia is represented by an effective two-compartment neuron with stimulations on both the dendrite and soma. Numerical simulations of this model show that most of the experimental observations in bursting, in particular the high plateau and the slow repolarization, can be reproduced. Our findings suggest that the effects of glia release and extrasynaptic receptors, which are usually neglected in neuronal models, can become important in intense network activities. Furthermore, simulations of the model are also performed for the case of glia-suppressed cultures to compare with recent experimental results.

  8. A multiscale model to investigate circadian rhythmicity of pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Vasalou

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus is a multicellular system that drives daily rhythms in mammalian behavior and physiology. Although the gene regulatory network that produces daily oscillations within individual neurons is well characterized, less is known about the electrophysiology of the SCN cells and how firing rate correlates with circadian gene expression. We developed a firing rate code model to incorporate known electrophysiological properties of SCN pacemaker cells, including circadian dependent changes in membrane voltage and ion conductances. Calcium dynamics were included in the model as the putative link between electrical firing and gene expression. Individual ion currents exhibited oscillatory patterns matching experimental data both in current levels and phase relationships. VIP and GABA neurotransmitters, which encode synaptic signals across the SCN, were found to play critical roles in daily oscillations of membrane excitability and gene expression. Blocking various mechanisms of intracellular calcium accumulation by simulated pharmacological agents (nimodipine, IP3- and ryanodine-blockers reproduced experimentally observed trends in firing rate dynamics and core-clock gene transcription. The intracellular calcium concentration was shown to regulate diverse circadian processes such as firing frequency, gene expression and system periodicity. The model predicted a direct relationship between firing frequency and gene expression amplitudes, demonstrated the importance of intracellular pathways for single cell behavior and provided a novel multiscale framework which captured characteristics of the SCN at both the electrophysiological and gene regulatory levels.

  9. KAYAK-α modulates circadian transcriptional feedback loops in Drosophila pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jinli; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2012-11-21

    Circadian rhythms are generated by well-conserved interlocked transcriptional feedback loops in animals. In Drosophila, the dimeric transcription factor CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) promotes period (per), timeless (tim), vrille (vri), and PAR-domain protein 1 (Pdp1) transcription. PER and TIM negatively feed back on CLK/CYC transcriptional activity, whereas VRI and PDP1 negatively and positively regulate Clk transcription, respectively. Here, we show that the α isoform of the Drosophila FOS homolog KAYAK (KAY) is required for normal circadian behavior. KAY-α downregulation in circadian pacemaker neurons increases period length by 1.5 h. This behavioral phenotype is correlated with decreased expression of several circadian proteins. The strongest effects are on CLK and the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR, which are both under VRI and PDP1 control. Consistently, KAY-α can bind to VRI and inhibit its interaction with the Clk promoter. Interestingly, KAY-α can also repress CLK activity. Hence, in flies with low KAY-α levels, CLK derepression would partially compensate for increased VRI repression, thus attenuating the consequences of KAY-α downregulation on CLK targets. We propose that the double role of KAY-α in the two transcriptional loops controlling Drosophila circadian behavior brings precision and stability to their oscillations.

  10. A Generalized PWC Spiking Neuron Model and Its Neuron-Like Activities and Burst-Related Bifurcations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yutaro; Torikai, Hiroyuki

    A generalized version of a piece-wise constant (ab. PWC) spiking neuron model is presented. It is shown that the generalization enables the model to reproduce 20 activities in the Izhikevich model. Among the activities, we analyze tonic bursting. Using an analytical one-dimensional iterative map, it is shown that the model can reproduce a burst-related bifurcation scenario, which is qualitatively similar to that of the Izhikevich model. The bifurcation scenario can be observed in an actual hardware.

  11. Bursting as a source of non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of nigral dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jaeseung; Shi, Wei-Xing; Hoffman, Ralph; Oh, Jihoon; Gore, John C; Bunney, Benjamin S; Peterson, Bradley S

    2012-11-01

    Nigral dopamine (DA) neurons in vivo exhibit complex firing patterns consisting of tonic single-spikes and phasic bursts that encode information for certain types of reward-related learning and behavior. Non-linear dynamical analysis has previously demonstrated the presence of a non-linear deterministic structure in complex firing patterns of DA neurons, yet the origin of this non-linear determinism remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that bursting activity is the primary source of non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of DA neurons. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the dimension complexity of inter-spike interval data recorded in vivo from bursting and non-bursting DA neurons in the chloral hydrate-anesthetized rat substantia nigra. We found that bursting DA neurons exhibited non-linear determinism in their firing patterns, whereas non-bursting DA neurons showed truly stochastic firing patterns. Determinism was also detected in the isolated burst and inter-burst interval data extracted from firing patterns of bursting neurons. Moreover, less bursting DA neurons in halothane-anesthetized rats exhibited higher dimensional spiking dynamics than do more bursting DA neurons in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats. These results strongly indicate that bursting activity is the main source of low-dimensional, non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of DA neurons. This finding furthermore suggests that bursts are the likely carriers of meaningful information in the firing activities of DA neurons. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Resonance and selective communication via bursts in neurons having subthreshold oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, Eugene M

    2002-01-01

    Revealing the role of bursts of action potentials is an important step toward understanding how the neurons communicate. The dominant point of view is that bursts are needed to increase the reliability of communication between neurons [Trends Neurosci. 20 (1997) 38]. In this paper we present an alternative but complementary hypothesis. We consider the effect of a short burst on a model postsynaptic cell having damped oscillation of its membrane potential. The oscillation frequency (eigenfrequency) plays a crucial role. Due to the subthreshold membrane resonance and frequency preference, the responses (i.e. voltage oscillations) of such a cell are amplified when the intra-burst frequency equals the cell's eigenfrequency. Responses are negligible, however, if the intra-burst frequency is twice the eigenfrequency. Thus, the same burst could be effective for one cell and ineffective for another depending on their eigenfrequencies. This theoretical observation suggests that, in addition to coping with unreliable synapses, bursts of action potentials may provide effective mechanisms for selective communication between neurons.

  13. Action potential bursts in central snail neurons elicited by procaine: roles of ionic currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Lin, Pei-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Cheng; Hsu, Hui-Yu; Yang, Han-Yin; Chuang, Chieh-Min; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2010-10-31

    The role of ionic currents on procaine-elicited action potential bursts was studied in an identifiable RP1 neuron of the African snail, Achatina fulica Ferussac, using the two-electrode voltage clamp method. The RP1 neuron generated spontaneous action potentials and bath application of procaine at 10 mM reversibly elicited action potential bursts in a concentration-dependent manner. Voltage clamp studies revealed that procaine at 10 mM decreased [1] the Ca2+ current, [2] the Na+ current, [3] the delayed rectifying K+ current I(KD), and [4] the fast-inactivating K+ current (I(A)). Action potential bursts were not elicited by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), an inhibitor of I(A), whereas they were seen after application of tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a blocker of the I(K)(Ca) and I(KD) currents, and tacrine, an inhibitor of I(KD). Pretreatment with U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, blocked the action potential bursts elicited by procaine. U73122 did not affect the I(KD) of the RP1 neuron; however, U73122 decreased the inhibitory effect of procaine on the I(KD). Tacrine decreased the TEA-sensitive I(KD) of RP1 neuron but did not significantly affect the I(A). Tacrine also successfully induced action potential bursts in the RP1 neuron. It is concluded that the inhibition on the I(KD) is responsible for the generation of action potential bursts in the central snail RP1 neuron. Further, phospholipase C activity is involved in the procaine-elicited I(KD) inhibition and action potential bursts.

  14. Ionic mechanisms of endogenous bursting in CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons: a model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A critical property of some neurons is burst firing, which in the hippocampus plays a primary role in reliable transmission of electrical signals. However, bursting may also contribute to synchronization of electrical activity in networks of neurons, a hallmark of epilepsy. Understanding the ionic mechanisms of bursting in a single neuron, and how mutations associated with epilepsy modify these mechanisms, is an important building block for understanding the emergent network behaviors. We present a single-compartment model of a CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neuron based on recent experimental data. We then use the model to determine the roles of primary depolarizing currents in burst generation. The single compartment model incorporates accurate representations of sodium (Na(+ channels (Na(V1.1 and T-type calcium (Ca(2+ channel subtypes (Ca(V3.1, Ca(V3.2, and Ca(V3.3. Our simulations predict the importance of Na(+ and T-type Ca(2+ channels in hippocampal pyramidal cell bursting and reveal the distinct contribution of each subtype to burst morphology. We also performed fast-slow analysis in a reduced comparable model, which shows that our model burst is generated as a result of the interaction of two slow variables, the T-type Ca(2+ channel activation gate and the Ca(2+-dependent potassium (K(+ channel activation gate. The model reproduces a range of experimentally observed phenomena including afterdepolarizing potentials, spike widening at the end of the burst, and rebound. Finally, we use the model to simulate the effects of two epilepsy-linked mutations: R1648H in Na(V1.1 and C456S in Ca(V3.2, both of which result in increased cellular excitability.

  15. Conditional bursting enhances resonant firing in neocortical layer 2-3 pyramidal neurons.

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    Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J

    2009-02-04

    The frequency response properties of neurons are critical for signal transmission and control of network oscillations. At subthreshold membrane potential, some neurons show resonance caused by voltage-gated channels. During action potential firing, resonance of the spike output may arise from subthreshold mechanisms and/or spike-dependent currents that cause afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and afterdepolarizations (ADPs). Layer 2-3 pyramidal neurons (L2-3 PNs) have a fast ADP that can trigger bursts. The present study investigated what stimuli elicit bursting in these cells and whether bursts transmit specific frequency components of the synaptic input, leading to resonance at particular frequencies. We found that two-spike bursts are triggered by step onsets, sine waves in two frequency bands, and noise. Using noise adjusted to elicit firing at approximately 10 Hz, we measured the gain for modulation of the time-varying firing rate as a function of stimulus frequency, finding a primary peak (7-16 Hz) and a high-frequency resonance (250-450 Hz). Gain was also measured separately for single and burst spikes. For a given spike rate, bursts provided higher gain at the primary peak and lower gain at intermediate frequencies, sharpening the high-frequency resonance. Suppression of bursting using automated current feedback weakened the primary and high-frequency resonances. The primary resonance was also influenced by the SK channel-mediated medium AHP (mAHP), because the SK blocker apamin reduced the sharpness of the primary peak. Our results suggest that resonance in L2-3 PNs depends on burst firing and the mAHP. Bursting enhances resonance in two distinct frequency bands.

  16. Fractal-like correlations of the fluctuating inter-spike membrane potential of a Helix aspersa pacemaker neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seseña-Rubfiaro, Alberto; Echeverría, Juan Carlos; Godínez-Fernández, Jose Rafael

    2014-10-01

    We analyzed the voltage fluctuations of the membrane potential manifested along the inter-spike segment of a pacemaker neuron. Time series of intracellular inter-spike voltage fluctuations were obtained in the current-clamp configuration from the F1 neuron of 12 Helix aspersa specimens. To assess the dynamic or stochastic nature of the voltage fluctuations these series were analyzed by Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), providing the scaling exponent α. The median α result obtained for the inter-spike segments was 0.971 ([0.963, 0.995] lower and upper quartiles). Our results indicate a critical-like dynamic behavior in the inter-spike membrane potential that, far from being random, shows long-term correlations probably linked to the dynamics of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the membrane potential, thereby endorsing the occurrence of critical-like phenomena at a single-neuron level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling of synchronization behavior of bursting neurons at nonlinearly coupled dynamical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Yüksel

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization behaviors of bursting neurons coupled through electrical and dynamic chemical synapses are investigated. The Izhikevich model is used with random and small world network of bursting neurons. Various currents which consist of diffusive electrical and time-delayed dynamic chemical synapses are used in the simulations to investigate the influences of synaptic currents and couplings on synchronization behavior of bursting neurons. The effects of parameters, such as time delay, inhibitory synaptic strengths, and decay time on synchronization behavior are investigated. It is observed that in random networks with no delay, bursting synchrony is established with the electrical synapse alone, single spiking synchrony is observed with hybrid coupling. In small world network with no delay, periodic bursting behavior with multiple spikes is observed when only chemical and only electrical synapse exist. Single-spike and multiple-spike bursting are established with hybrid couplings. A decrease in the synchronization measure is observed with zero time delay, as the decay time is increased in random network. For synaptic delays which are above active phase period, synchronization measure increases with an increase in synaptic strength and time delay in small world network. However, in random network, it increases with only an increase in synaptic strength.

  18. Minocycline inhibits D-amphetamine-elicited action potential bursts in a central snail neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-H; Lin, P-L; Wong, R-W; Wu, Y-T; Hsu, H-Y; Tsai, M-C; Lin, M-J; Hsu, Y-C; Lin, C-H

    2012-10-25

    Minocycline is a second-generation tetracycline that has been reported to have powerful neuroprotective properties. In our previous studies, we found that d-amphetamine (AMPH) elicited action potential bursts in an identifiable RP4 neuron of the African snail, Achatina fulica Ferussac. This study sought to determine the effects of minocycline on the AMPH-elicited action potential pattern changes in the central snail neuron, using the two-electrode voltage clamping method. Extracellular application of AMPH at 300 μM elicited action potential bursts in the RP4 neuron. Minocycline dose-dependently (300-900 μM) inhibited the action potential bursts elicited by AMPH. The inhibitory effects of minocycline on AMPH-elicited action potential bursts were restored by forskolin (50 μM), an adenylate cyclase activator, and by dibutyryl cAMP (N(6),2'-O-Dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate; 1mM), a membrane-permeable cAMP analog. Co-administration of forskolin (50 μM) plus tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA; 5mM) or co-administration of TEA (5mM) plus dibutyryl cAMP (1mM) also elicited action potential bursts, which were prevented and inhibited by minocycline. In addition, minocycline prevented and inhibited forskolin (100 μM)-elicited action potential bursts. Notably, TEA (50mM)-elicited action potential bursts in the RP4 neuron were not affected by minocycline. Minocycline did not affect steady-state outward currents of the RP4 neuron. However, minocycline did decrease the AMPH-elicited steady-state current changes. Similarly, minocycline decreased the effects of forskolin-elicited steady-state current changes. Pretreatment with H89 (N-[2-(p-Bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride; 10 μM), a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited AMPH-elicited action potential bursts and decreased AMPH-elicited steady-state current changes. These results suggest that the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway and the steady-state current are involved in

  19. Noisy activation kinetics induces bursting in the Huber-Braun neuron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, C.; Postnova, S.; Rosa, E.; Freund, J. A.; Huber, M. T.; Voigt, K.; Moss, F. E.; Braun, H. A.; Feudel, U.

    2010-09-01

    We study a physiologically realistic implementation of internal stochasticity in a four-dimensional Hodgkin-Huxley type model of mammalian cold receptors. We show that in a deterministically tonic firing regime, this stochasticity can drive the neuron into a state of complex bursting behaviour. An explanation of the mechanism behind this effect is given in terms of phase space dynamics.

  20. Bursting reverberation as a multiscale neuronal network process driven by synaptic depression-facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao Duc, Khanh; Dao Duc, K; Lee, Chun-Yao; Lee, C Y; Parutto, Pierre; Cohen, Dror; Segal, Menahem; Rouach, Nathalie; Holcman, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal networks can generate complex patterns of activity that depend on membrane properties of individual neurons as well as on functional synapses. To decipher the impact of synaptic properties and connectivity on neuronal network behavior, we investigate the responses of neuronal ensembles from small (5-30 cells in a restricted sphere) and large (acute hippocampal slice) networks to single electrical stimulation: in both cases, a single stimulus generated a synchronous long-lasting bursting activity. While an initial spike triggered a reverberating network activity that lasted 2-5 seconds for small networks, we found here that it lasted only up to 300 milliseconds in slices. To explain this phenomena present at different scales, we generalize the depression-facilitation model and extracted the network time constants. The model predicts that the reverberation time has a bell shaped relation with the synaptic density, revealing that the bursting time cannot exceed a maximum value. Furthermore, before reaching its maximum, the reverberation time increases sub-linearly with the synaptic density of the network. We conclude that synaptic dynamics and connectivity shape the mean burst duration, a property present at various scales of the networks. Thus bursting reverberation is a property of sufficiently connected neural networks, and can be generated by collective depression and facilitation of underlying functional synapses.

  1. Bursting reverberation as a multiscale neuronal network process driven by synaptic depression-facilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Dao Duc

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks can generate complex patterns of activity that depend on membrane properties of individual neurons as well as on functional synapses. To decipher the impact of synaptic properties and connectivity on neuronal network behavior, we investigate the responses of neuronal ensembles from small (5-30 cells in a restricted sphere and large (acute hippocampal slice networks to single electrical stimulation: in both cases, a single stimulus generated a synchronous long-lasting bursting activity. While an initial spike triggered a reverberating network activity that lasted 2-5 seconds for small networks, we found here that it lasted only up to 300 milliseconds in slices. To explain this phenomena present at different scales, we generalize the depression-facilitation model and extracted the network time constants. The model predicts that the reverberation time has a bell shaped relation with the synaptic density, revealing that the bursting time cannot exceed a maximum value. Furthermore, before reaching its maximum, the reverberation time increases sub-linearly with the synaptic density of the network. We conclude that synaptic dynamics and connectivity shape the mean burst duration, a property present at various scales of the networks. Thus bursting reverberation is a property of sufficiently connected neural networks, and can be generated by collective depression and facilitation of underlying functional synapses.

  2. Growth Dynamics Explain the Development of Spatiotemporal Burst Activity of Young Cultured Neuronal Networks in Detail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wennekers, T.; Gritsun, T.; le Feber, Jakob; Rutten, Wim

    2012-01-01

    A typical property of isolated cultured neuronal networks of dissociated rat cortical cells is synchronized spiking, called bursting, starting about one week after plating, when the dissociated cells have sufficiently sent out their neurites and formed enough synaptic connections. This paper is the

  3. Spiking, Bursting, and Population Dynamics in a Network of Growth Transform Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Ahana; Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2017-04-27

    This paper investigates the dynamical properties of a network of neurons, each of which implements an asynchronous mapping based on polynomial growth transforms. In the first part of this paper, we present a geometric approach for visualizing the dynamics of the network where each of the neurons traverses a trajectory in a dual optimization space, whereas the network itself traverses a trajectory in an equivalent primal optimization space. We show that as the network learns to solve basic classification tasks, different choices of primal-dual mapping produce unique but interpretable neural dynamics like noise shaping, spiking, and bursting. While the proposed framework is general enough, in this paper, we demonstrate its use for designing support vector machines (SVMs) that exhibit noise-shaping properties similar to those of ΣΔ modulators, and for designing SVMs that learn to encode information using spikes and bursts. It is demonstrated that the emergent switching, spiking, and burst dynamics produced by each neuron encodes its respective margin of separation from a classification hyperplane whose parameters are encoded by the network population dynamics. We believe that the proposed growth transform neuron model and the underlying geometric framework could serve as an important tool to connect well-established machine learning algorithms like SVMs to neuromorphic principles like spiking, bursting, population encoding, and noise shaping.

  4. Bursting activity of substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons in mouse parkinsonism in awake and anesthetized states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobb, C J; Jaeger, D

    2015-03-01

    Electrophysiological changes in basal ganglia neurons are hypothesized to underlie motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous results in head-restrained MPTP-treated non-human primates have suggested that increased bursting within the basal ganglia and related thalamic and cortical areas may be a hallmark of pathophysiological activity. In this study, we investigated whether there is increased bursting in substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) output neurons in anesthetized and awake, head-restrained unilaterally lesioned 6-OHDA mice when compared to control mice. Confirming previous studies, we show that there are significant changes in the firing rate and pattern in SNpr neuron activity under urethane anesthesia. The regular firing pattern of control urethane-anesthetized SNpr neurons was not present in the 6-OHDA-lesioned group, as the latter neurons instead became phase locked with cortical slow wave activity (SWA). Next, we examined whether such robust electrophysiological changes between groups carried over to the awake state. SNpr neurons from both groups fired at much higher frequencies in the awake state than in the anesthetized state and surprisingly showed only modest changes between awake control and 6-OHDA groups. While there were no differences in firing rate between groups in the awake state, an increase in the coefficient of variation (CV) was observed in the 6-OHDA group. Contrary to the bursting hypothesis, this increased CV was not due to changes in bursting but was instead due to a mild increase in pausing. Together, these results suggest that differences in SNpr activity between control and 6-OHDA lesioned mice may be strongly influenced by changes in network activity during different arousal and behavioral states. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Polyrhythmic synchronization in bursting networking motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilnikov, Andrey; Gordon, René; Belykh, Igor

    2008-09-01

    We study the emergence of polyrhythmic dynamics of motifs which are the building block for small inhibitory-excitatory networks, such as central pattern generators controlling various locomotive behaviors of animals. We discover that the pacemaker determining the specific rhythm of such a network composed of realistic Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons is identified through the order parameter, which is the ratio of the neurons' burst durations or of duty cycles. We analyze different configurations of the motifs and describe the universal mechanisms for synergetics of the bursting patterns. We discuss also the multistability of inhibitory networks that results in polyrhythmicity of its emergent synchronous behaviors. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Spike timing rigidity is maintained in bursting neurons under pentobarbital-induced anesthetic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Kato

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pentobarbital potentiates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission by prolonging the open time of GABAA receptors. However, it is unknown how pentobarbital regulates cortical neuronal activities via local circuits in vivo. To examine this question, we performed extracellular unit recording in rat insular cortex under awake and anesthetic conditions. Not a few studies apply time-rescaling theorem to detect the features of repetitive spike firing. Similar to these methods, we define an average spike interval locally in time using random matrix theory (RMT, which enables us to compare different activity states on a universal scale. Neurons with high spontaneous firing frequency (> 5 Hz and bursting were classified as HFB neurons (n = 10, and those with low spontaneous firing frequency (< 10 Hz and without bursting were classified as non-HFB neurons (n = 48. Pentobarbital injection (30 mg/kg reduced firing frequency in all HFB neurons and in 78% of non-HFB neurons. RMT analysis demonstrated that pentobarbital increased in the number of neurons with repulsion in both HFB and non-HFB neurons, suggesting that there is a correlation between spikes within a short interspike interval. Under awake conditions, in 50% of HFB and 40% of non-HFB neurons, the decay phase of normalized histograms of spontaneous firing were fitted to an exponential function, which indicated that the first spike had no correlation with subsequent spikes. In contrast, under pentobarbital-induced anesthesia conditions, the number of non-HFB neurons that were fitted to an exponential function increased to 80%, but almost no change in HFB neurons was observed. These results suggest that under both awake and pentobarbital-induced anesthetized conditions, spike firing in HFB neurons is more robustly regulated by preceding spikes than by non-HFB neurons, which may reflect the GABAA receptor-mediated regulation of cortical activities. Whole-cell patch

  7. Ecstasy and methamphetamine elicit action potential bursts via different mechanisms in a central snail neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Cheng; Lu, Guan-Ling; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Chuang, Chieh-Min; Yang, Han-Yin; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of (+) methamphetamine (METH) and its ring-substituted analog (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) on electrophysiological behavior and their relationships to second messenger systems in an identifiable RP4 neuron of the African snail, Achatina fulica Ferussac. Extracellular application of MDMA at 1mM and METH at 3mM elicited action potential bursts that were not blocked after immersing the neurons in Ca(2+)-free solution. Notably, MDMA- (1mM) elicited action potential bursts were blocked by pretreatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors chelerythrine (20 microM) and Ro 31-8220 (20 microM), but not by the PKA inhibitors KT-5720 (10 microM) and H89 (10 microM). The PKC activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu; 3 microM), but not the PKA activator forskolin (50 microM), facilitated the induction of bursts elicited by MDMA at a lower concentration (0.3mM). In contrast, METH- (3mM) elicited action potential bursts were blocked by pretreatment with KT-5720 (10 microM) and H89 (10 microM), but not by chelerythrine (20 microM) and Ro 31-8220 (20 microM). Forskolin (50 microM), but not PDBu (3 microM) facilitated the induction of bursts elicited by METH at a lower concentration (1mM). Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a blocker of the delayed rectifying K(+) current (I(KD)), did not elicit bursts at a concentration of 5mM but did facilitate the induction of action potential bursts elicited by both METH and MDMA. Voltage clamp studies revealed that both METH and MDMA decreased the TEA-sensitive I(KD) of the RP4 neuron. Forskolin (50 microM) or dibutyryl cAMP (1mM), a membrane-permeable cAMP analog, alone did not elicit action potential bursts. However, co-administration with forskolin (50 microM) and TEA (5mM) or co-administration with dibutyryl cAMP (1mM) and TEA (50mM) elicited action potential bursts in the presence of the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine (20 microM). Similarly, PDBu (10 microM) or phorbol

  8. State-dependent propagation of neuronal sub-population in spontaneous synchronized bursts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro eYada

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Repeating stable spatiotemporal patterns emerge in synchronized spontaneous activity in neuronal networks. The repertoire of such patterns can serve as memory, or a reservoir of information, in a neuronal network; moreover, the variety of patterns may represent the network memory capacity. However, a neuronal substrate for producing a repertoire of patterns in synchronization remains elusive. We herein hypothesize that state-dependent propagation of a neuronal sub-population is the key mechanism. By combining high-resolution measurement with a 4,096-channel complementary metal-oxide semiconductor microelectrode array and dimensionality reduction with non-negative matrix factorization, we investigated synchronized bursts of dissociated rat cortical neurons at approximately three weeks in vitro. We found that bursts had a repertoire of repeating spatiotemporal patterns, and different patterns shared a partially similar sequence of sub-population, supporting the idea of sequential structure of neuronal sub-populations during synchronized activity. We additionally found that similar spatiotemporal patterns tended to appear successively and periodically, suggesting a state-dependent fluctuation of propagation, which has been overlooked in existing literature. Thus, such a state-dependent property within the sequential sub-population structure is a plausible neural substrate for performing a repertoire of stable patterns during synchronized activity.

  9. Noise-induced torus bursting in the stochastic Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryashko, Lev; Slepukhina, Evdokia

    2017-09-01

    We study the phenomenon of noise-induced torus bursting on the base of the three-dimensional Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model forced by additive noise. We show that in the parametric zone close to the Neimark-Sacker bifurcation, where the deterministic system exhibits rapid tonic spiking oscillations, random disturbances can turn tonic spiking into bursting, which is characterized by the formation of a peculiar dynamical structure resembling that of a torus. This phenomenon is confirmed by the changes in dispersion of random trajectories as well as the power spectral density and interspike intervals statistics. In particular, we show that as noise increases, the system undergoes P and D bifurcations, transitioning from order to chaos. We ultimately characterize the transition from stochastic (tonic) spiking to bursting by stochastic sensitivity functions.

  10. Dendritic calcium activity precedes inspiratory bursts in preBotzinger complex neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Negro, Christopher A; Hayes, John A; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-01-01

    Medullary interneurons of the preBötzinger complex assemble excitatory networks that produce inspiratory-related neural rhythms, but the importance of somatodendritic conductances in rhythm generation is still incompletely understood. Synaptic input may cause Ca(2+) accumulation postsynaptically...... to evoke a Ca(2+)-activated inward current that contributes to inspiratory burst generation. We measured Ca(2+) transients by two-photon imaging dendrites while recording neuronal somata electrophysiologically. Dendritic Ca(2+) accumulation frequently precedes inspiratory bursts, particularly at recording...... suggest that dendritic Ca(2+) activates an inward current to electrotonically depolarize the soma, rather than propagate as a regenerative Ca(2+) wave. These data provide new evidence that respiratory rhythmogenesis may depend on dendritic burst-generating conductances activated in the context of network...

  11. Predictive features of persistent activity emergence in regular spiking and intrinsic bursting model neurons.

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    Kyriaki Sidiropoulou

    Full Text Available Proper functioning of working memory involves the expression of stimulus-selective persistent activity in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC, which refers to neural activity that persists for seconds beyond the end of the stimulus. The mechanisms which PFC pyramidal neurons use to discriminate between preferred vs. neutral inputs at the cellular level are largely unknown. Moreover, the presence of pyramidal cell subtypes with different firing patterns, such as regular spiking and intrinsic bursting, raises the question as to what their distinct role might be in persistent firing in the PFC. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS and an intrinsic bursting (IB model neuron. We identify synaptic location within the basal dendrites as a feature of stimulus selectivity. Specifically, persistent activity-inducing stimuli consist of activated synapses that are located more distally from the soma compared to non-inducing stimuli, in both model cells. In addition, the action potential (AP latency and the first few inter-spike-intervals of the neuronal response can be used to reliably detect inducing vs. non-inducing inputs, suggesting a potential mechanism by which downstream neurons can rapidly decode the upcoming emergence of persistent activity. While the two model neurons did not differ in the coding features of persistent activity emergence, the properties of persistent activity, such as the firing pattern and the duration of temporally-restricted persistent activity were distinct. Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given

  12. Drosophila Clock Is Required in Brain Pacemaker Neurons to Prevent Premature Locomotor Aging Independently of Its Circadian Function.

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    Alexandra Vaccaro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks control many self-sustained rhythms in physiology and behavior with approximately 24-hour periodicity. In many organisms, oxidative stress and aging negatively impact the circadian system and sleep. Conversely, loss of the clock decreases resistance to oxidative stress, and may reduce lifespan and speed up brain aging and neurodegeneration. Here we examined the effects of clock disruptions on locomotor aging and longevity in Drosophila. We found that lifespan was similarly reduced in three arrhythmic mutants (ClkAR, cyc0 and tim0 and in wild-type flies under constant light, which stops the clock. In contrast, ClkAR mutants showed significantly faster age-related locomotor deficits (as monitored by startle-induced climbing than cyc0 and tim0, or than control flies under constant light. Reactive oxygen species accumulated more with age in ClkAR mutant brains, but this did not appear to contribute to the accelerated locomotor decline of the mutant. Clk, but not Cyc, inactivation by RNA interference in the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF-expressing central pacemaker neurons led to similar loss of climbing performance as ClkAR. Conversely, restoring Clk function in these cells was sufficient to rescue the ClkAR locomotor phenotype, independently of behavioral rhythmicity. Accelerated locomotor decline of the ClkAR mutant required expression of the PDF receptor and correlated to an apparent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the posterior protocerebral lateral 1 (PPL1 clusters. This neuronal loss was rescued when the ClkAR mutation was placed in an apoptosis-deficient background. Impairing dopamine synthesis in a single pair of PPL1 neurons that innervate the mushroom bodies accelerated locomotor decline in otherwise wild-type flies. Our results therefore reveal a novel circadian-independent requirement for Clk in brain circadian neurons to maintain a subset of dopaminergic cells and avoid premature locomotor aging in Drosophila.

  13. Drosophila Clock Is Required in Brain Pacemaker Neurons to Prevent Premature Locomotor Aging Independently of Its Circadian Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Alexandra; Issa, Abdul-Raouf; Seugnet, Laurent; Birman, Serge; Klarsfeld, André

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks control many self-sustained rhythms in physiology and behavior with approximately 24-hour periodicity. In many organisms, oxidative stress and aging negatively impact the circadian system and sleep. Conversely, loss of the clock decreases resistance to oxidative stress, and may reduce lifespan and speed up brain aging and neurodegeneration. Here we examined the effects of clock disruptions on locomotor aging and longevity in Drosophila. We found that lifespan was similarly reduced in three arrhythmic mutants (ClkAR, cyc0 and tim0) and in wild-type flies under constant light, which stops the clock. In contrast, ClkAR mutants showed significantly faster age-related locomotor deficits (as monitored by startle-induced climbing) than cyc0 and tim0, or than control flies under constant light. Reactive oxygen species accumulated more with age in ClkAR mutant brains, but this did not appear to contribute to the accelerated locomotor decline of the mutant. Clk, but not Cyc, inactivation by RNA interference in the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF)-expressing central pacemaker neurons led to similar loss of climbing performance as ClkAR. Conversely, restoring Clk function in these cells was sufficient to rescue the ClkAR locomotor phenotype, independently of behavioral rhythmicity. Accelerated locomotor decline of the ClkAR mutant required expression of the PDF receptor and correlated to an apparent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the posterior protocerebral lateral 1 (PPL1) clusters. This neuronal loss was rescued when the ClkAR mutation was placed in an apoptosis-deficient background. Impairing dopamine synthesis in a single pair of PPL1 neurons that innervate the mushroom bodies accelerated locomotor decline in otherwise wild-type flies. Our results therefore reveal a novel circadian-independent requirement for Clk in brain circadian neurons to maintain a subset of dopaminergic cells and avoid premature locomotor aging in Drosophila.

  14. Structure-Dynamics Relationships in Bursting Neuronal Networks Revealed Using a Prediction Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Ruohonen, Keijo; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2013-01-01

    The question of how the structure of a neuronal network affects its functionality has gained a lot of attention in neuroscience. However, the vast majority of the studies on structure-dynamics relationships consider few types of network structures and assess limited numbers of structural measures. In this in silico study, we employ a wide diversity of network topologies and search among many possibilities the aspects of structure that have the greatest effect on the network excitability. The network activity is simulated using two point-neuron models, where the neurons are activated by noisy fluctuation of the membrane potential and their connections are described by chemical synapse models, and statistics on the number and quality of the emergent network bursts are collected for each network type. We apply a prediction framework to the obtained data in order to find out the most relevant aspects of network structure. In this framework, predictors that use different sets of graph-theoretic measures are trained to estimate the activity properties, such as burst count or burst length, of the networks. The performances of these predictors are compared with each other. We show that the best performance in prediction of activity properties for networks with sharp in-degree distribution is obtained when the prediction is based on clustering coefficient. By contrast, for networks with broad in-degree distribution, the maximum eigenvalue of the connectivity graph gives the most accurate prediction. The results shown for small () networks hold with few exceptions when different neuron models, different choices of neuron population and different average degrees are applied. We confirm our conclusions using larger () networks as well. Our findings reveal the relevance of different aspects of network structure from the viewpoint of network excitability, and our integrative method could serve as a general framework for structure-dynamics studies in biosciences. PMID:23935998

  15. Morphology and electrophysiological properties of reticularis thalami neurons in cat: in vivo study of a thalamic pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulle, C; Madariaga, A; Deschênes, M

    1986-08-01

    Reticularis thalami neurons (RE neurons) were identified morphologically, and their electrophysiological properties were studied in cat under barbiturate anesthesia. Intracellular HRP injections showed that RE neurons possessed very long dendrites bearing numerous filopodia-like appendages and that their axons were directed toward main thalamic nuclei. As a rule, small axonal branches were also emitted within the RE nucleus itself. At rest, the membrane potential of RE neurons displayed 2 types of oscillations: a slow 0.1-0.2 Hz oscillation and fast 7-12 Hz oscillations occurring on the positive phase of the former. Episodes of spindle (7-12 Hz) waves lasted for 2-3 sec and were characterized by rhythmic depolarizations and burst discharges. Intracellular injections of QX314 and current pulse analyses revealed the presence in RE cells of 2 distinct inward currents: a persistent current that promoted tonic firing and a low-threshold current deinactivated by hyperpolarization that generated burst discharges. The low-threshold current deinactivated with large somatic hyperpolarizations (up to 30 mV) and produced depolarizing responses that lasted for about 70 msec. In addition, low-threshold responses appeared rhythmically at intervals of about 150 msec after recovery of the membrane potential from hyperpolarization. Because of their duration, voltage dependence, and persistence after intracellular injections of QX314, it is suggested that these responses resulted from activation of a low-threshold Ca2+ current at the dendritic level. In QX314-injected cells, selective components of spontaneous oscillations were abolished, among them the positive phase of the slow oscillation and late depolarizing humps that followed burst discharges within spindle sequences. However, the rhythmic occurrence of spindle episodes at 0.1-0.2 Hz was never affected by DC currents or by QX314 or Cl- injections, suggesting that oscillations within a particular RE neuron partly reflected the

  16. Excitatory effects induced by carbachol on bursting neurons of the rat subiculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, H; Avoli, M

    1996-11-15

    Conventional intracellular recordings were made from neurons of the rat subiculum in an in vitro slice preparation. Intracellular pulses of depolarizing current (duration, 10-120 ms) delivered at a resting membrane potential of -62.2 +/- 7.7 mV (mean +/- SD, n = 14) induced bursts of 3-5 fast, action potentials riding on a slow depolarization. The burst was terminated by an afterhyperpolarization (burst AHP) that lasted 117 +/- 26 ms and reached peak amplitude of 5.1 +/- 1.8 mV (n = 8). Bath application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh; 30-100 microM; n = 20) in the presence of ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists induced a steady depolarization (4.6 +/- 2.7 mV) of the membrane potential, and a small increase in input resistance. Action potential bursts continued to occur in response to intracellular depolarizing pulses during CCh application. However, this cholinergic agonist reduced and eventually blocked the burst AHP, which was replaced by action potentials firing. In the presence of CCh (> 70 microM; n = 9) the burst response, was followed by a depolarizing plateau potential (PP) that outlasted the intracellular depolarizing pulse by 731 +/- 386 ms (range 160-1900 ms), and could trigger repetitive action potential firing at 35-116 Hz. The effects induced by CCh were reversed by bath application of the muscarinic antagonist atropine (0.5-1 microM; n = 4). Our findings demonstrate that CCh exerts in the rat subiculum an excitatory action that is dependent upon muscarinic receptor stimulation. This cholinergic mechanism may play a physiological role in the subicular processing of signals arising from the hippocampus proper, and may also contribute to the generation of sustained epileptiform discharges induced in the limbic system by cholinergic agents.

  17. Persistent sodium currents in mesencephalic v neurons participate in burst generation and control of membrane excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nanping; Enomoto, Akifumi; Tanaka, Susumu; Hsiao, Chie-Fang; Nykamp, Duane Q; Izhikevich, Eugene; Chandler, Scott H

    2005-05-01

    The functional and biophysical properties of a persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) previously proposed to participate in the generation of subthreshold oscillations and burst discharge in mesencephalic trigeminal sensory neurons (Mes V) were investigated in brain stem slices (rats, p7-p12) using whole cell patch-clamp methods. I(NaP) activated around -76 mV and peaked at -48 mV, with V1/2 of -58.7 mV. Ramp voltage-clamp protocols showed that I(NaP) undergoes time- as well as voltage-dependent inactivation and recovery from inactivation in the range of several seconds (tau(onset) = 2.04 s, tau(recov) = 2.21 s). Riluzole (model was constructed using Hodgkin-Huxley parameters obtained experimentally for Na+ and K+ currents that simulated the experimentally observed membrane resonance, subthreshold oscillations, bursting, and PIR. Alterations in the model g(NaP) parameters indicate that I(NaP) is critical for control of subthreshold and suprathreshold Mes V neuron membrane excitability and burst generation.

  18. Emergence of population bursts from simultaneous activation of small subsets of preBötzinger complex inspiratory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Kaiwen; Worrell, Jason W; Ventalon, Cathie; Emiliani, Valentina; Feldman, Jack L

    2013-02-20

    During rhythmic movements, central pattern generators (CPGs) trigger bursts of motor activity with precise timing. However, the number of neurons that must be activated within CPGs to generate motor output is unknown. In the mammalian breathing rhythm, a fundamentally important motor behavior, the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) produces synchronous population-wide bursts of activity to control inspiratory movements. We probed mechanisms underlying inspiratory burst generation in the preBötC using holographic photolysis of caged glutamate in medullary slices from neonatal mice. With stimulation parameters determined to confine photoactivation to targeted neurons, simultaneous excitation of 4-9 targeted neurons could initiate ectopic, endogenous-like bursts with delays averaging 255 ms, placing a critical and novel boundary condition on the microcircuit underlying respiratory rhythmogenesis.

  19. The neuropeptide PDF acts directly on evening pacemaker neurons to regulate multiple features of circadian behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lear, Bridget C; Zhang, Luoying; Allada, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    .... A subset of these neurons expresses the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF), which is important for promoting morning behavior as well as maintaining robust free-running rhythmicity in constant conditions...

  20. Noise-induced precursors of tonic-to-bursting transitions in hypothalamic neurons and in a conductance-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans A.; Schwabedal, Justus; Dewald, Mathias; Finke, Christian; Postnova, Svetlana; Huber, Martin T.; Wollweber, Bastian; Schneider, Horst; Hirsch, Martin C.; Voigt, Karlheinz; Feudel, Ulrike; Moss, Frank

    2011-12-01

    The dynamics of neurons is characterized by a variety of different spiking patterns in response to external stimuli. One of the most important transitions in neuronal response patterns is the transition from tonic firing to burst discharges, i.e., when the neuronal activity changes from single spikes to the grouping of spikes. An increased number of interspike-interval sequences of specific temporal correlations was detected in anticipation of temperature induced tonic-to-bursting transitions in both, experimental impulse recordings from hypothalamic brain slices and numerical simulations of a stochastic model. Analysis of the modelling data elucidates that the appearance of such patterns can be related to particular system dynamics in the vicinity of the period-doubling bifurcation. It leads to a nonlinear response on de- and hyperpolarizing perturbations introduced by noise. This explains why such particular patterns can be found as reliable precursors of the neurons' transition to burst discharges.

  1. Modulation of spike and burst rate in a minimal neuronal circuit with feed-forward inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldenrust, Fleur; Wadman, Wytse J

    2013-04-01

    Pyramidal cells perform computations on their inputs within the context of the local network. The present computational study investigates the consequences of feed-forward inhibition for the firing rate and reliability of a typical hippocampal pyramidal neuron that can respond with single spikes as well as bursts. A simple generic inhibitory interneuron is connected in a feed-forward mode to a pyramidal cell and this minimal circuit is activated with frozen noise. The properties (reversal potential, projection site, propagation delay, fast or slow kinetics) of the connecting synapse and the coupling strength between the interneuron and the pyramidal cell are varied. All forms of inhibition considered here decrease the burst rate, but the effects on the single spike (spikes that are not part of a burst) rate are more ambiguous. Slow dendritic shunting inhibition increases the single spike rate, but fast somatic inhibition does not. When a propagation delay is included in the slow dendritic synapse, the increase of the single spike rate is smaller, an effect that could also be obtained by lowering the reversal potential of the synaptic current. Cross-correlations, reverse correlation analysis and decorrelating the interneuron and pyramidal cell activity are used to demonstrate that these effects depend critically on the exact timing of inhibition, emphasizing the relevance of spatiotemporal organization. The reliability of the firing of the pyramidal cell is quantified with the Victor-Purpura measure. When burst and spikes together or spikes alone are taken into account, feed-forward inhibition makes firing more reliable. This is not the case when the analysis is restricted to bursts. A hyperpolarization-activated, non-specific cation current (Ih) is inserted into the dendritic membrane of the pyramidal cell, where it slightly depolarizes the membrane and reduces its time constant. This dendritic h-current increases the output frequency, makes inhibition less

  2. Prominent burst firing of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area during paradoxical sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Lionel; Astier, Bernadette; Vautrelle, Nicolas; Urbain, Nadia; Kocsis, Bernat; Chouvet, Guy

    2007-06-01

    Dopamine is involved in motivation, memory, and reward processing. However, it is not clear whether the activity of dopamine neurons is related or not to vigilance states. Using unit recordings in unanesthetized head restrained rats we measured the firing pattern of dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area across the sleep-wake cycle. We found these cells were activated during paradoxical sleep (PS) via a clear switch to a prominent bursting pattern, which is known to induce large synaptic dopamine release. This activation during PS was similar to the activity measured during the consumption of palatable food. Thus, as it does during waking in response to novelty and reward, dopamine could modulate brain plasticity and thus participate in memory consolidation during PS. By challenging the traditional view that dopamine is the only aminergic group not involved in sleep physiology, this study provides an alternative perspective that may be crucial for understanding the physiological function of PS and dream mentation.

  3. Interaction of NMDA receptor and pacemaking mechanisms in the midbrain dopaminergic neuron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Ha

    Full Text Available Dopamine neurotransmission has been found to play a role in addictive behavior and is altered in psychiatric disorders. Dopaminergic (DA neurons display two functionally distinct modes of electrophysiological activity: low- and high-frequency firing. A puzzling feature of the DA neuron is the following combination of its responses: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR activation evokes high-frequency firing, whereas other tonic excitatory stimuli (α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR activation or applied depolarization block firing instead. We suggest a new computational model that reproduces this combination of responses and explains recent experimental data. Namely, somatic NMDAR stimulation evokes high-frequency firing and is more effective than distal dendritic stimulation. We further reduce the model to a single compartment and analyze the mechanism of the distinct high-frequency response to NMDAR activation vs. other stimuli. Standard nullcline analysis shows that the mechanism is based on a decrease in the amplitude of calcium oscillations. The analysis confirms that the nonlinear voltage dependence provided by the magnesium block of the NMDAR determine its capacity to elevate the firing frequency. We further predict that the moderate slope of the voltage dependence plays the central role in the frequency elevation. Additionally, we suggest a repolarizing current that sustains calcium-independent firing or firing in the absence of calcium-dependent repolarizing currents. We predict that the ether-a-go-go current (ERG, which has been observed in the DA neuron, is the best fit for this critical role. We show that a calcium-dependent and a calcium-independent oscillatory mechanisms form a structure of interlocked negative feedback loops in the DA neuron. The structure connects research of DA neuron firing with circadian biology and determines common minimal models for investigation of robustness of oscillations

  4. The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin modulates the firing 1 properties of the reticular thalamic nucleus bursting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albéri, Lavinia; Lintas, Alessandra; Kretz, Robert; Schwaller, Beat; Villa, Alessandro E P

    2013-06-01

    The reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) of the mouse is characterized by an overwhelming majority of GABAergic neurons receiving afferences from both the thalamus and the cerebral cortex and sending projections mainly on thalamocortical neurons. The RTN neurons express high levels of the "slow Ca(2+) buffer" parvalbumin (PV) and are characterized by low-threshold Ca(2+) currents, I(T). We performed extracellular recordings in ketamine/xylazine anesthetized mice in the rostromedial portion of the RTN. In the RTN of wild-type and PV knockout (PVKO) mice we distinguished four types of neurons characterized on the basis of their firing pattern: irregular firing (type I), medium bursting (type II), long bursting (type III), and tonically firing (type IV). Compared with wild-type mice, we observed in the PVKOs the medium bursting (type II) more frequently than the long bursting type and longer interspike intervals within the burst without affecting the number of spikes. This suggests that PV may affect the firing properties of RTN neurons via a mechanism associated with the kinetics of burst discharges. Ca(v)3.2 channels, which mediate the I(T) currents, were more localized to the somatic plasma membrane of RTN neurons in PVKO mice, whereas Ca(v)3.3 expression was similar in both genotypes. The immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed that Ca(v)3.2 channels were localized at active axosomatic synapses, thus suggesting that the differential localization of Ca(v)3.2 in the PVKOs may affect bursting dynamics. Cross-correlation analysis of simultaneously recorded neurons from the same electrode tip showed that about one-third of the cell pairs tended to fire synchronously in both genotypes, independent of PV expression. In summary, PV deficiency does not affect the functional connectivity between RTN neurons but affects the distribution of Ca(v)3.2 channels and the dynamics of burst discharges of RTN cells, which in turn regulate the activity in the thalamocortical circuit.

  5. Mmp1 processing of the PDF neuropeptide regulates circadian structural plasticity of pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Fernández-Gamba, Agata; Gorostiza, E Axel; Herrero, Anastasia; Castaño, Eduardo M; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2014-10-01

    In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs) and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2) are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior.

  6. Phase transition approach to bursting in neuronal cultures: quorum percolation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monceau, P.; Renault, R.; Métens, S.; Bottani, S.; Fardet, T.

    2017-10-01

    The Quorum Percolation model has been designed in the context of neurobiology to describe bursts of activity occurring in neuronal cultures from the point of view of statistical physics rather than from a dynamical synchronization approach. It is based upon information propagation on a directed graph with a threshold activation rule; this leads to a phase diagram which exhibits a giant percolation cluster below some critical value mC of the excitability. We describe the main characteristics of the original model and derive extensions according to additional relevant biological features. Firstly, we investigate the effects of an excitability variability on the phase diagram and show that the percolation transition can be destroyed by a sufficient amount of such a disorder; we stress the weakly averaging character of the order parameter and show that connectivity and excitability can be seen as two overlapping aspects of the same reality. Secondly, we elaborate a discrete time stochastic model taking into account the decay originating from ionic leakage through the membrane of neurons and synaptic depression; we give evidence that the decay softens and shifts the transition, and conjecture than decay destroys the transition in the thermodynamical limit. We were able to develop mean-field theories associated with each of the two effects; we discuss the framework of their agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It turns out that the the critical point mC from which information on the connectivity of the network can be inferred is affected by each of these additional effects. Lastly, we show how dynamical simulations of bursts with an adaptive exponential integrateand- fire model can be interpreted in terms of Quorum Percolation. Moreover, the usefulness of the percolation model including the set of sophistication we investigated can be extended to many scientific fields involving information propagation, such as the spread of rumors in sociology, ethology, ecology.

  7. Responses of neurons in the rat's ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to monaural and binaural tone bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiming; Kelly, Jack B

    2006-04-01

    Responses to monaural and binaural tone bursts were recorded from neurons in the rat's ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL). Most of the neurons (55%) had V- or U-shaped frequency-tuning curves with a single clearly defined characteristic frequency (CF). However, many neurons had more complex, multipeaked tuning curves (37%), or other patterns (8%). Temporal firing patterns included both onset and sustained responses to contralateral tone bursts. Onset and sustained responses were distributed along the dorsoventral length of VNLL with no indication of segregation into different regions. Onset neurons had shorter average first-spike latencies than neurons with sustained responses (means, 8.3 vs. 14.8 ms). They also had less jitter, as reflected in the SD of first-spike latencies, than neurons with sustained responses (means, 0.59 and 4.2 ms, respectively). The extent of jitter decreased with an increase in stimulus intensity for neurons with sustained responses, but remained unchanged for onset neurons tested over the same range. Many neurons had binaural responses, primarily of the excitatory/inhibitory (EI) type, widely distributed along the dorsoventral extent of VNLL. Local application of the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX reduced excitatory responses, indicating that responses were dependent on synaptic activity and not recorded from passing fibers. The results show that many neurons in VNLL have a precision of timing that is well suited for processing auditory temporal information. In the rat, these neurons are intermingled among cells with less precise temporal response features and include cells with binaural as well as monaural responses.

  8. Timescales and Mechanisms of Sigh-Like Bursting and Spiking in Models of Rhythmic Respiratory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyang; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2017-12-01

    Neural networks generate a variety of rhythmic activity patterns, often involving different timescales. One example arises in the respiratory network in the pre-Bötzinger complex of the mammalian brainstem, which can generate the eupneic rhythm associated with normal respiration as well as recurrent low-frequency, large-amplitude bursts associated with sighing. Two competing hypotheses have been proposed to explain sigh generation: the recruitment of a neuronal population distinct from the eupneic rhythm-generating subpopulation or the reconfiguration of activity within a single population. Here, we consider two recent computational models, one of which represents each of the hypotheses. We use methods of dynamical systems theory, such as fast-slow decomposition, averaging, and bifurcation analysis, to understand the multiple-timescale mechanisms underlying sigh generation in each model. In the course of our analysis, we discover that a third timescale is required to generate sighs in both models. Furthermore, we identify the similarities of the underlying mechanisms in the two models and the aspects in which they differ.

  9. Blocking endocytosis in Drosophila's circadian pacemaker neurons interferes with the endogenous clock in a PDF-dependent way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wülbeck, Corinna; Grieshaber, Eva; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2009-10-01

    The neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) plays an essential role in the circadian clock of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, but many details of PDF signaling in the clock network are still unknown. We tried to interfere with PDF signaling by blocking the GTPase Shibire in PDF neurons. Shibire is an ortholog of the mammalian Dynamins and is essential for endocytosis of clathrin-coated vesicles at the plasma membrane. Such endocytosis is used for neurotransmitter reuptake by presynaptic neurons, which is a prerequisite of synaptic vesicle recycling, and receptor-mediated endocytosis in the postsynaptic neuron, which leads to signal termination. By blocking Shibire function via overexpression of a dominant negative mutant form of Shibire in PDF neurons, we slowed down the behavioral rhythm by 3 h. This effect was absent in PDF receptor null mutants, indicating that we interfered with PDF receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because we obtained similar behavioral phenotypes by increasing the PDF level in regions close to PDF neurons, we conclude that blocking Shibire did prolong PDF signaling in the neurons that respond to PDF. Obviously, terminating the PDF signaling via receptor-mediated endocytosis is a crucial step in determining the period of behavioral rhythms.

  10. Network bursting using experimentally constrained single compartment CA3 hippocampal neuron models with adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dur-e-Ahmad, Muhammad; Nicola, Wilten; Campbell, Sue Ann; Skinner, Frances K

    2012-08-01

    The hippocampus is a brain structure critical for memory functioning. Its network dynamics include several patterns such as sharp waves that are generated in the CA3 region. To understand how population outputs are generated, models need to consider aspects of network size, cellular and synaptic characteristics and context, which are necessarily 'balanced' in appropriate ways to produce particular outputs. Thick slice hippocampal preparations spontaneously produce sharp waves that are initiated in CA3 regions and depend on the right balance of glutamatergic activities. As a step toward developing network models that can explain important balances in the generation of hippocampal output, we develop models of CA3 pyramidal cells. Our models are single compartment in nature, use an Izhikevich-type structure and involve parameter values that are specifically designed to encompass CA3 intrinsic properties. Importantly, they incorporate spike frequency adaptation characteristics that are directly comparable to those measured experimentally. Excitatory networks using these model cells are able to produce bursting suggesting that the amount of spike frequency adaptation expressed in the biological cells is an essential contributor to network bursting, and as such, may be important for sharp wave generation. The network bursting mechanism is numerically dissected showing the critical balance between adaptation and excitatory drive. The compact nature of our models allows large network simulations to be efficiently computed. This, together with the linkage of our models to cellular characteristics, will allow us to develop an understanding of population output of CA3 hippocampus with direct biological comparisons.

  11. Na+/K+ pump interacts with the h-current to control bursting activity in central pattern generator neurons of leeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueh, Daniel; Barnett, William H; Cymbalyuk, Gennady S; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of different ionic currents shape the bursting activity of neurons and networks that control motor output. Despite being ubiquitous in all animal cells, the contribution of the Na+/K+ pump current to such bursting activity has not been well studied. We used monensin, a Na+/H+ antiporter, to examine the role of the pump on the bursting activity of oscillator heart interneurons in leeches. When we stimulated the pump with monensin, the period of these neurons decreased significantly, an effect that was prevented or reversed when the h-current was blocked by Cs+. The decreased period could also occur if the pump was inhibited with strophanthidin or K+-free saline. Our monensin results were reproduced in model, which explains the pump’s contributions to bursting activity based on Na+ dynamics. Our results indicate that a dynamically oscillating pump current that interacts with the h-current can regulate the bursting activity of neurons and networks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19322.001 PMID:27588351

  12. Electrophysiological Evidence for Intrinsic Pacemaker Currents in Crayfish Parasol Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeForest Mellon

    Full Text Available I used sharp intracellular electrodes to record from parasol cells in the semi-isolated crayfish brain to investigate pacemaker currents. Evidence for the presence of the hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier potassium current was obtained in about half of the parasol cells examined, where strong, prolonged hyperpolarizing currents generated a slowly-rising voltage sag, and a post-hyperpolarization rebound. The amplitudes of both the sag voltage and the depolarizing rebound were dependent upon the strength of the hyperpolarizing current. The voltage sag showed a definite threshold and was non-inactivating. The voltage sag and rebound depolarization evoked by hyperpolarization were blocked by the presence of 5-10 mM Cs2+ ions, 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium chloride, and 10 mM cobalt chloride in the bathing medium, but not by the drug ZD 7288. Cs+ ions in normal saline in some cells caused a slight increase in mean resting potential and a reduction in spontaneous burst frequency. Many of the neurons expressing the hyperpolarization-activated inward potassium current also provided evidence for the presence of the transient potassium current IA, which was inferred from experimental observations of an increased latency of post-hyperpolarization response to a depolarizing step, compared to the response latency to the depolarization alone. The latency increase was reduced in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, a specific blocker of IA. The presence of 4-AP in normal saline also induced spontaneous bursting in parasol cells. It is conjectured that, under normal physiological conditions, these two potassium currents help to regulate burst generation in parasol cells, respectively, by helping to maintain the resting membrane potential near a threshold level for burst generation, and by regulating the rate of rise of membrane depolarizing events leading to burst generation. The presence of post-burst hyperpolarization may depend upon IA channels in

  13. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors depress synaptic transmission onto subicular burst firing neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kintscher, M.; Breustedt, J.; Miceli, S.M.; Schmitz, D.; Wozny, C.

    2012-01-01

    The subiculum (SUB) is a pivotal structure positioned between the hippocampus proper and various cortical and subcortical areas. Despite the growing body of anatomical and intrinsic electrophysiological data of subicular neurons, modulation of synaptic transmission in the SUB is not well understood.

  14. Multirhythmic bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Robert J.

    1998-03-01

    A complex modeled bursting neuron [C. C. Canavier, J. W. Clark, and J. H. Byrne, J. Neurophysiol. 66, 2107-2124 (1991)] has been shown to possess seven coexisting limit cycle solutions at a given parameter set [Canavier et al., J. Neurophysiol 69, 2252-2259 (1993); 72, 872-882 (1994)]. These solutions are unique in that the limit cycles are concentric in the space of the slow variables. We examine the origin of these solutions using a minimal 4-variable bursting cell model. Poincaré maps are constructed using a saddle-node bifurcation of a fast subsystem such as our Poincaré section. This bifurcation defines a threshold between the active and silent phases of the burst cycle in the space of the slow variables. The maps identify parameter spaces with single limit cycles, multiple limit cycles, and two types of chaotic bursting. To investigate the dynamical features which underlie the unique shape of the maps, the maps are further decomposed into two submaps which describe the solution trajectories during the active and silent phases of a single burst. From these findings we postulate several necessary criteria for a bursting model to possess multiple stable concentric limit cycles. These criteria are demonstrated in a generalized 3-variable model. Finally, using a less direct numerical procedure, similar return maps are calculated for the original complex model [C. C. Canavier, J. W. Clark, and J. H. Byrne, J. Neurophysiol. 66, 2107-2124 (1991)], with the resulting mappings appearing qualitatively similar to those of our 4-variable model. These multistable concentric bursting solutions cannot occur in a bursting model with one slow variable. This type of multistability arises when a bursting system has two or more slow variables and is viewed as an essentially second-order system which receives discrete perturbations in a state-dependent manner.

  15. Network bursting dynamics in excitatory cortical neuron cultures results from the combination of different adaptive mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée Masquelier

    Full Text Available In the brain, synchronization among cells of an assembly is a common phenomenon, and thought to be functionally relevant. Here we used an in vitro experimental model of cell assemblies, cortical cultures, combined with numerical simulations of a spiking neural network (SNN to investigate how and why spontaneous synchronization occurs. In order to deal with excitation only, we pharmacologically blocked GABAAergic transmission using bicuculline. Synchronous events in cortical cultures tend to involve almost every cell and to display relatively constant durations. We have thus named these "network spikes" (NS. The inter-NS-intervals (INSIs proved to be a more interesting phenomenon. In most cortical cultures NSs typically come in series or bursts ("bursts of NSs", BNS, with short (~1 s INSIs and separated by long silent intervals (tens of s, which leads to bimodal INSI distributions. This suggests that a facilitating mechanism is at work, presumably short-term synaptic facilitation, as well as two fatigue mechanisms: one with a short timescale, presumably short-term synaptic depression, and another one with a longer timescale, presumably cellular adaptation. We thus incorporated these three mechanisms into the SNN, which, indeed, produced realistic BNSs. Next, we systematically varied the recurrent excitation for various adaptation timescales. Strong excitability led to frequent, quasi-periodic BNSs (CV~0, and weak excitability led to rare BNSs, approaching a Poisson process (CV~1. Experimental cultures appear to operate within an intermediate weakly-synchronized regime (CV~0.5, with an adaptation timescale in the 2-8 s range, and well described by a Poisson-with-refractory-period model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the INSI statistics are indeed informative: they allowed us to infer the mechanisms at work, and many parameters that we cannot access experimentally.

  16. Oscillating PDF in termini of circadian pacemaker neurons and synchronous molecular clocks in downstream neurons are not sufficient for sustenance of activity rhythms in constant darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Pavitra; Nambiar, Aishwarya; Sheeba, Vasu

    2017-01-01

    In Drosophila, neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF) is expressed in small and large ventral Lateral Neurons (sLNv and lLNv), among which sLNv are critical for activity rhythms in constant darkness. Studies show that this is mediated by rhythmic accumulation and likely secretion of PDF from sLNv dorsal projections, which in turn synchronises molecular oscillations in downstream circadian neurons. Using targeted expression of a neurodegenerative protein Huntingtin in LNv, we evoke a selective loss of neuropeptide PDF and clock protein PERIOD from sLNv soma. However, PDF is not lost from sLNv dorsal projections and lLNv. These flies are behaviourally arrhythmic in constant darkness despite persistence of PDF oscillations in sLNv dorsal projections and synchronous PERIOD oscillations in downstream circadian neurons. We find that PDF oscillations in sLNv dorsal projections are not sufficient for sustenance of activity rhythms in constant darkness and this is suggestive of an additional component that is possibly dependent on sLNv molecular clock and PDF in sLNv soma. Additionally, despite loss of PERIOD in sLNv, their activity rhythms entrain to light/dark cycles indicating that sLNv molecular clocks are not necessary for entrainment. Under constant light, these flies lack PDF from both soma and dorsal projections of sLNv, and when subjected to light/dark cycles, show morning and evening anticipation and accurately phased morning and evening peaks. Thus, under light/dark cycles, PDF in sLNv is not necessary for morning anticipation.

  17. Synchronous Infra-Slow Bursting in the Mouse Accessory Olfactory Bulb Emerge from Interplay between Intrinsic Neuronal Dynamics and Network Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2017-03-08

    Rhythmic neuronal activity of multiple frequency bands has been described in many brain areas and attributed to numerous brain functions. Among these, little is known about the mechanism and role of infra-slow oscillations, which have been demonstrated recently in the mouse accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). Along with prolonged responses to stimuli and distinct network connectivity, they inexplicably affect the AOB processing of social relevant stimuli. Here, we show that assemblies of AOB mitral cells are synchronized by lateral interactions through chemical and electrical synapses. Using a network model, we demonstrate that the synchronous oscillations in these assemblies emerge from interplay between intrinsic membrane properties and network connectivity. As a consequence, the AOB network topology, in which each mitral cell receives input from multiple glomeruli, enables integration of chemosensory stimuli over extended time scales by interglomerular synchrony of infra-slow bursting. These results provide a possible functional significance for the distinct AOB physiology and topology. Beyond the AOB, this study presents a general model for synchronous infra-slow bursting in neuronal networks.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Infra-slow rhythmic neuronal activity with a very long (>10 s) duration has been described in many brain areas, but little is known about the role of this activity and the mechanisms that produce it. Here, we combine experimental and computational methods to show that synchronous infra-slow bursting activity in mitral cells of the mouse accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) emerges from interplay between intracellular dynamics and network connectivity. In this novel mechanism, slow intracellular Na+ dynamics endow AOB mitral cells with a weak tendency to burst, which is further enhanced and stabilized by chemical and electrical synapses between them. Combined with the unique topology of the AOB network, infra-slow bursting enables integration and binding of

  18. Macro- and micro-chaotic structures in the Hindmarsh-Rose model of bursting neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, Roberto, E-mail: rbarrio@unizar.es; Serrano, Sergio [Computational Dynamics Group, Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, GME and IUMA, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Angeles Martínez, M. [Computational Dynamics Group, GME, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Shilnikov, Andrey [Neuroscience Institute and Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30078 (United States); Department of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, 603950 Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    We study a plethora of chaotic phenomena in the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model with the use of several computational techniques including the bifurcation parameter continuation, spike-quantification, and evaluation of Lyapunov exponents in bi-parameter diagrams. Such an aggregated approach allows for detecting regions of simple and chaotic dynamics, and demarcating borderlines—exact bifurcation curves. We demonstrate how the organizing centers—points corresponding to codimension-two homoclinic bifurcations—along with fold and period-doubling bifurcation curves structure the biparametric plane, thus forming macro-chaotic regions of onion bulb shapes and revealing spike-adding cascades that generate micro-chaotic structures due to the hysteresis.

  19. Differential Somatic Ca2+ Channel Profile in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, Fabian; Destreel, Geoffrey; Merino-Sepúlveda, Paulina; Henny, Pablo; Engel, Dominique; Seutin, Vincent

    2016-07-06

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons located in the ventral midbrain continuously generate a slow endogenous pacemaker activity, the mechanism of which is still debated. It has been suggested that, in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), the pacemaking relies more on Ca(2+) channels and that the density of L-type Ca(2+) channels is higher in these DA neurons than in those located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). This might lead to a higher Ca(2+) load in SNc DA neurons and explain their higher susceptibility to degeneration. However, direct evidence for this hypothesis is lacking. We found that the L-type current and channel density are indeed higher in the somata of rat SNc DA neurons and that this current undergoes less inactivation in this region. Nonstationary fluctuation analysis measurements showed a much higher number of L-type channels in the soma of SNc DA neurons, as well as a smaller single-channel conductance, pointing to a possible different molecular identity of L-type channels in DA neurons from the two areas. A major consequence of this is that pacemaking and, even more so, bursting are associated with a larger Ca(2+) entry through L-type channels in SNc DA neurons than in their VTA counterparts. Our results establish a molecular and functional difference between two populations of midbrain DA neurons that may contribute to their differential sensitivity to neurodegeneration. Dopamine neurons from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) are involved in various brain functions, such as movement initiation and goal directed behavior, respectively. This work shows that, although both neurons fire in a similar regular and slow pacemaker mode, this firing activity is supported by different calcium channel landscapes. Indeed, the L-type calcium current is larger in the soma of dopamine neurons of the SNc, leading to a higher charge transfer through L-type channels during pacemaking and bursting. Therefore, these neurons may

  20. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leave the hospital. When You're in the Hospital You had a pacemaker placed in your chest ... interfere with your pacemaker. But some with strong magnetic fields may. Always ask your provider about any ...

  1. T-type calcium channels cause bursts of spikes in motor but not sensory thalamic neurons during mimicry of natural patterns of synaptic input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haram R.; Hong, Su Z.; Fiorillo, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Although neurons within intact nervous systems can be classified as ‘sensory’ or ‘motor,’ it is not known whether there is any general distinction between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular or molecular levels. Here, we extend and test a theory according to which activation of certain subtypes of voltage-gated ion channel (VGC) generate patterns of spikes in neurons of motor systems, whereas VGC are proposed to counteract patterns in sensory neurons. We previously reported experimental evidence for the theory from visual thalamus, where we found that T-type calcium channels (TtCCs) did not cause bursts of spikes but instead served the function of ‘predictive homeostasis’ to maximize the causal and informational link between retinogeniculate excitation and spike output. Here, we have recorded neurons in brain slices from eight sensory and motor regions of rat thalamus while mimicking key features of natural excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials. As predicted by theory, TtCC did cause bursts of spikes in motor thalamus. TtCC-mediated responses in motor thalamus were activated at more hyperpolarized potentials and caused larger depolarizations with more spikes than in visual and auditory thalamus. Somatosensory thalamus is known to be more closely connected to motor regions relative to auditory and visual thalamus, and likewise the strength of its TtCC responses was intermediate between these regions and motor thalamus. We also observed lower input resistance, as well as limited evidence of stronger hyperpolarization-induced (‘H-type’) depolarization, in nuclei closer to motor output. These findings support our theory of a specific difference between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular level. PMID:26582654

  2. T-type calcium channels cause bursts of spikes in motor but not sensory thalamic neurons during mimicry of natural patterns of synaptic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haram R; Hong, Su Z; Fiorillo, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Although neurons within intact nervous systems can be classified as 'sensory' or 'motor,' it is not known whether there is any general distinction between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular or molecular levels. Here, we extend and test a theory according to which activation of certain subtypes of voltage-gated ion channel (VGC) generate patterns of spikes in neurons of motor systems, whereas VGC are proposed to counteract patterns in sensory neurons. We previously reported experimental evidence for the theory from visual thalamus, where we found that T-type calcium channels (TtCCs) did not cause bursts of spikes but instead served the function of 'predictive homeostasis' to maximize the causal and informational link between retinogeniculate excitation and spike output. Here, we have recorded neurons in brain slices from eight sensory and motor regions of rat thalamus while mimicking key features of natural excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials. As predicted by theory, TtCC did cause bursts of spikes in motor thalamus. TtCC-mediated responses in motor thalamus were activated at more hyperpolarized potentials and caused larger depolarizations with more spikes than in visual and auditory thalamus. Somatosensory thalamus is known to be more closely connected to motor regions relative to auditory and visual thalamus, and likewise the strength of its TtCC responses was intermediate between these regions and motor thalamus. We also observed lower input resistance, as well as limited evidence of stronger hyperpolarization-induced ('H-type') depolarization, in nuclei closer to motor output. These findings support our theory of a specific difference between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular level.

  3. MRI Conditional Pacemakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, magnetic resonance [MR] imaging is an absolute contraindication for those with an implanted pacemaker.This represents a significant clinical problem as several studies have shown approximately 75% of patients with pacemakers will have an indication for an MRI scan. Patients over the age of 65 are twice as likely to require an MRI and 80% of pacemaker patients are over the age of 65. MR imaging is an important source of information for neurological disorders and several soft tissue abnormalities. Hence denying this important diagnostic modality for those with an implanted pacemaker and other cardiac implantable electronic devices [CIED] is a tremendous clinical problem both because of concerns about MRI signals interfering with the function of the pacemaker and the pacemaker in turn interfering with the MR images.

  4. How Does a Pacemaker Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does a Pacemaker Work? A pacemaker consists of a battery, a computerized ... these recordings to adjust your pacemaker so it works better for you. Your doctor can program the ...

  5. What Is a Pacemaker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your pacemaker. • If you work around industrial microwaves, electricity, cars or other large motors, ask your doctor about possible effects. Can I use a cell phone or microwave oven if I have a pacemaker? Microwave ovens, electric blankets, remote controls for TV and other common ...

  6. Burst-generating neurones in the dorsal horn in an in vitro preparation of the turtle spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1996-01-01

    1. In transverse slices of the spinal cord of the turtle, intracellular recordings were used to characterize and analyse the responses to injected current and activation of primary afferents in dorsal horn neurones. 2. A subpopulation of neurones, with cell bodies located centrally in the dorsal...

  7. Glutamatergic synaptic currents of nigral dopaminergic neurons follow a postnatal developmental sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard ePearlstein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous activity pattern of adult dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc results from interactions between intrinsic membrane conductances and afferent inputs. In adult SNc DA neurons, low-frequency tonic background activity is generated by intrinsic pacemaker mechanisms, whereas burst generation depends on intact synaptic inputs in particular the glutamatergic ones. Tonic DA release in the striatum during pacemaking is required to maintain motor activity, and burst firing evokes phasic DA release, necessary for cue-dependent learning tasks. However, it is still unknown how the firing properties of SNc DA neurons mature during postnatal development before reaching the adult state. We studied the postnatal developmental profile of spontaneous and evoked AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in SNc DA neurons in brain slices from immature (postnatal days P4-10 and young adult (P30-50 tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-GFP mice. We found that somato-dendritic fields of SNc DA neurons are already mature at P4-10. In contrast, spontaneous glutamatergic EPSCs show a developmental sequence. Spontaneous NMDA EPSCs in particular are larger and more frequent in immature SNc DA neurons than in young adult ones and have a bursty pattern. They are mediated by GluN2B and GluN2D subunit-containing NMDA receptors. The latter generate long-lasting, DQP1105-sensitive, spontaneous EPSCs, which are transiently recorded during this early period. Due to high NMDA activity, immature SNc DA neurons generate large and long lasting NMDA receptor-dependent (APV-sensitive bursts in response to the stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We conclude that the transient high NMDA activity allows calcium influx into the dendrites of developing SNc DA neurons.

  8. Swim pacemakers in box jellyfish are modulated by the visual input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Bielecki, Jan

    2008-01-01

    A major part of the cubozoan central nervous system is situated in the eye-bearing rhopalia. One of the neuronal output channels from the rhopalia carries a swim pacemaker signal, which has a one-to-one relation with the swim contractions of the bell shaped body. Given the advanced visual system...... of box jellyfish and that the pacemaker signal originates in the vicinity of these eyes, it seems logical to assume that the pacemakers are modified by the visual input. Here, the firing frequency and distribution of inter-signal intervals (ISIs) of single pacemakers are examined in the Caribbean box...

  9. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-12-16

    channel types participate in action potential repolarization about equally, they have contrasting and partially opposite effects in regulating neuronal firing at frequencies typical of bursting. Our analysis shows that this results from their different kinetic properties, with fast-activating BK channels serving to short-circuit activation of Kv2 channels, which tend to slow firing by producing a deep afterhyperpolarization. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3516404-14$15.00/0.

  10. How Will a Pacemaker Affect My Lifestyle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has abnormal heart rhythms resume a more active lifestyle. Understanding the Heart's Electrical System Your heart has ... pacemaker surgery. How Will a Pacemaker Affect My Lifestyle? Once you have a pacemaker, you have to ...

  11. [Sport for pacemaker patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, C W

    2012-06-01

    Sport activity is an important issue in many patients with a pacemaker either because they performed sport activities before pacemaker implantation to reduce the cardiovascular risk or to improve the course of an underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. coronary artery disease, heart failure) by sports. Compared to patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) the risks from underlying cardiovascular disease (e.g. ischemia, heart failure), arrhythmia, lead dysfunction or inappropriate therapy are less important or absent. Sport is contraindicated in dyspnea at rest, acute heart failure, new complex arrhythmia, acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction, valvular disease with indications for intervention and surgery and comorbidities which prevent physical activity. Patients with underlying cardiovascular disease (including hypertension) should preferably perform types and levels of physical activity that are aerobic (with dynamic exercise) such as running, swimming, cycling instead of sport with high anaerobic demands and high muscular workload. In heart failure, studies demonstrated advantages of isometric sport that increases the amount of muscle, thereby preventing cardiac cachexia. Sport with a risk of blows to the chest or physical contact (e.g. boxing, rugby, martial arts) should be avoided. Implantation, programming and follow-up should respect specific precautions to allow optimal physical activity with a pacemaker including implantation of bipolar leads on the side contralateral to the dominant hand, individual programming of the upper sensor and tracking rate and regular exercise testing.

  12. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Sarma Mallela

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future.

  13. New Concepts in Pacemaker Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Michael Farmer

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available After implantation of a permanent pacemaker, patients may experience severe symptoms of dyspnea, palpitations, malaise, and syncope resulting from pacemaker syndrome. Although pacemaker syndrome is most often ascribed to the loss of atrioventricular (A-V synchrony, more recent data may also implicate left ventricular dysynchrony caused by right ventricular pacing. Previous studies have not shown reductions in mortality or stroke with rate-modulated dual-chamber (DDDR pacing as compared to ventricular-based (VVI pacing. The benefits in A-V sequential pacing with the DDDR mode are likely mitigated by the interventricular (V-V dysynchrony imposed by the high percentage of ventricular pacing commonly seen in the DDDR mode. Programming DDDR pacemakers to encourage intrinsic A-V conduction and reduce right ventricular pacing will likely decrease heart failure and pacemaker syndrome. Studies are currently ongoing to address these questions.

  14. Waiting for a pacemaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, B.; Elming, H.; Jensen, G.V.

    2012-01-01

    to implantation. A lack of implantation capacity was responsible for 4.5 of the waiting days. Twenty-nine patients (11.2) developed infection while waiting, primarily urinary tract infections. Thirteen patients (5.0) suffered non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and eight patients (3.1) suffered clinical...... event during the waiting period. The present study indicates that a waiting period is dangerous as it is associated with an increased risk of adverse events. Acute PPMs should be implanted with a 24-h pacemaker implantation service capacity. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All...

  15. Pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1996-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described a century ago as primitive neurons in the intestines. Through the years, ICC have been mistaken for neurons, glial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. We identified ICC in the musculature of mouse small intestine...... by their characteristic morphology and topography, and we analysed the relation between ICC, autonomic nerves, and smooth muscle. Subsequent morphological and electrophysiological evidence has strongly supported our hypotheses that some ICC populations are gut pacemakers and may hold other fundamental regulatory...... functions (coordinative, mechanoreceptive, mediating nervous input). Recognition of common principles of ICC organization (confinement to specific locations in relation to smooth muscle layers; formation of extensive cellular networks through tight coupling of overlapping thin processes; innervation...

  16. Dual oscillator model of the respiratory neuronal network generating quantal slowing of respiratory rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Amit; Oku, Yoshitaka; Hülsmann, Swen; Okada, Yasumasa; Miwakeichi, Fumikazu; Kawai, Shigeharu; Tamura, Yoshiyasu; Ishiguro, Makio

    2011-04-01

    We developed a dual oscillator model to facilitate the understanding of dynamic interactions between the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG) and the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) neurons in the respiratory rhythm generation. Both neuronal groups were modeled as groups of 81 interconnected pacemaker neurons; the bursting cell model described by Butera and others [model 1 in Butera et al. (J Neurophysiol 81:382-397, 1999a)] were used to model the pacemaker neurons. We assumed (1) both pFRG and preBötC networks are rhythm generators, (2) preBötC receives excitatory inputs from pFRG, and pFRG receives inhibitory inputs from preBötC, and (3) persistent Na(+) current conductance and synaptic current conductances are randomly distributed within each population. Our model could reproduce 1:1 coupling of bursting rhythms between pFRG and preBötC with the characteristic biphasic firing pattern of pFRG neurons, i.e., firings during pre-inspiratory and post-inspiratory phases. Compatible with experimental results, the model predicted the changes in firing pattern of pFRG neurons from biphasic expiratory to monophasic inspiratory, synchronous with preBötC neurons. Quantal slowing, a phenomena of prolonged respiratory period that jumps non-deterministically to integer multiples of the control period, was observed when the excitability of preBötC network decreased while strengths of synaptic connections between the two groups remained unchanged, suggesting that, in contrast to the earlier suggestions (Mellen et al., Neuron 37:821-826, 2003; Wittmeier et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105(46):18000-18005, 2008), quantal slowing could occur without suppressed or stochastic excitatory synaptic transmission. With a reduced excitability of preBötC network, the breakdown of synchronous bursting of preBötC neurons was predicted by simulation. We suggest that quantal slowing could result from a breakdown of synchronized bursting within the preBötC.

  17. Inhibition of NMDARs in the nucleus reticularis of the thalamus produces delta frequency bursting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Zhang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Injection of NMDAR antagonist into the thalamus can produce delta frequency EEG oscillations in the thalamocortical system. It is surprising that an antagonist of an excitatory neurotransmitter should trigger such activity, and the mechanism is unknown. One hypothesis is that the antagonist blocks excitation of GABAergic cells, thus producing disinhibition. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of NMDAR antagonist (APV on cells of the nucleus reticularis (nRT in rat brain slices, a thalamic nucleus that can serve as a pacemaker for thalamocortical delta oscillations and that is composed entirely of GABAergic neurons. We found, unexpectedly, that nRT cells are hyperpolarized by APV. This occurs because these cells have an unusual form of NMDAR (probably NR2C that contributes inward current at resting potential in response to ambient glutamate. The hyperpolarization produced by APV is sufficient to deinactivate T-type calcium channels, and these trigger rhythmic bursting at delta frequency. The APV-induced delta frequency bursting is abolished by dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, indicating that dopamine and NMDAR antagonist work synergistically to stimulate delta frequency bursting. Our results have significant implications concerning the electrophysiological basis of schizophrenia and bring together the NMDAR hypofunction, dopamine, and GABA theories of the disease. Our results suggest that NMDAR hypofunction and dopamine work synergistically on the GABAergic cells of the nRT to generate the delta frequency EEG oscillations, a thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD in the awake state that is an established abnormality in schizophrenia.

  18. Transistor analogs of emergent iono-neuronal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmuth, Guy; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2008-01-01

    Neuromorphic analog metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) transistor circuits promise compact, low-power, and high-speed emulations of iono-neuronal dynamics orders-of-magnitude faster than digital simulation. However, their inherently limited input voltage dynamic range vs power consumption and silicon die area tradeoffs makes them highly sensitive to transistor mismatch due to fabrication inaccuracy, device noise, and other nonidealities. This limitation precludes robust analog very-large-scale-integration (aVLSI) circuits implementation of emergent iono-neuronal dynamics computations beyond simple spiking with limited ion channel dynamics. Here we present versatile neuromorphic analog building-block circuits that afford near-maximum voltage dynamic range operating within the low-power MOS transistor weak-inversion regime which is ideal for aVLSI implementation or implantable biomimetic device applications. The fabricated microchip allowed robust realization of dynamic iono-neuronal computations such as coincidence detection of presynaptic spikes or pre- and postsynaptic activities. As a critical performance benchmark, the high-speed and highly interactive iono-neuronal simulation capability on-chip enabled our prompt discovery of a minimal model of chaotic pacemaker bursting, an emergent iono-neuronal behavior of fundamental biological significance which has hitherto defied experimental testing or computational exploration via conventional digital or analog simulations. These compact and power-efficient transistor analogs of emergent iono-neuronal dynamics open new avenues for next-generation neuromorphic, neuroprosthetic, and brain-machine interface applications. PMID:19404469

  19. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Visser Sid; van Gils Stephan A

    2014-01-01

    We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behaviour intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting Izhikevich neurons. In both cases, the lumped model is compared with the spiking network. There is excellent agreement in terms of duration and number of action potentials within the bursts, but there is ...

  20. Wireless power transfer for a pacemaker application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfin, Vladimir; Sayfan-Altman, Shai; Ianconescu, Reuven

    2017-05-01

    An artificial pacemaker is a small medical device that uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contracting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. The pacemaker is implanted under the skin, and uses for many years regular non-rechargeable batteries. However, the demand for rechargeable batteries in pacemakers increased, and the aim of this work is to design an efficient charging system for pacemakers.

  1. Phase analysis method for burst onset prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellino, Flavio; Mazzoni, Alberto; Storace, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The response of bursting neurons to fluctuating inputs is usually hard to predict, due to their strong nonlinearity. For the same reason, decoding the injected stimulus from the activity of a bursting neuron is generally difficult. In this paper we propose a method describing (for neuron models) a mechanism of phase coding relating the burst onsets with the phase profile of the input current. This relation suggests that burst onset may provide a way for postsynaptic neurons to track the input phase. Moreover, we define a method of phase decoding to solve the inverse problem and estimate the likelihood of burst onset given the input state. Both methods are presented here in a unified framework, describing a complete coding-decoding procedure. This procedure is tested by using different neuron models, stimulated with different inputs (stochastic, sinusoidal, up, and down states). The results obtained show the efficacy and broad range of application of the proposed methods. Possible applications range from the study of sensory information processing, in which phase-of-firing codes are known to play a crucial role, to clinical applications such as deep brain stimulation, helping to design stimuli in order to trigger or prevent neural bursting.

  2. Inadvertent transarterial pacemaker lead placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi R. Bajaj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 73-year-old patient with acute left-sided hemiparesis four months after right ventricular pacemaker insertion. Post-procedural electrocardiogram revealed a paced RBBB complex and an abnormal lead path on chest X-ray. Subsequent echocardiography and computed tomography showed left ventricular pacemaker malposition with retrograde passage to the punctured subclavian artery. We also discuss the utility of routine cardiac investigations post-insertion to identify signal lead malposition as well as management strategies once identified.

  3. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  4. [Wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spikes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, M; Aranda, A; Gómez, F J; Jurado, A

    2014-04-01

    The differential diagnosis and therapeutic management of wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spike is presented. The pacemaker-mediated tachycardia, tachycardia fibrillo-flutter in patients with pacemakers, and runaway pacemakers, have a similar surface electrocardiogram, but respond to different therapeutic measures. The tachycardia response to the application of a magnet over the pacemaker could help in the differential diagnosis, and in some cases will be therapeutic, as in the case of a tachycardia-mediated pacemaker. Although these conditions are diagnosed and treated in hospitals with catheterization laboratories using the application programmer over the pacemaker, patients presenting in primary care clinic and emergency forced us to make a diagnosis and treat the haemodynamically unstable patient prior to referral. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. First Degree Pacemaker Exit Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Usually atrial and ventricular depolarizations follow soon after the pacemaker stimulus (spike on the ECG. But there can be an exit block due to fibrosis at the electrode - tissue interface at the lead tip. This can increase the delay between the spike and atrial or ventricular depolarization.

  6. Pyoderma gangrenosum complicating pacemaker implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosío, Francisco G; Herrada, Carlos González; Monereo, Alfonso; Pastor, Agustín; Núñez, Ambrosio

    2006-12-01

    A 70-year-old lady with diabetes and monoclonal gammopathy underwent pacemaker implant for 2:1 atrioventricular block. Within 7 days, a painful, infiltrating, necrotic lesion involved the implant area. Biopsy was compatible with pyoderma gangrenosum and corticosteroid treatment led to healing in 3 weeks.

  7. Bursting in Cellular Automata and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bub, Gil; Shrier, Alvin; Glass, Leon

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the initiation and continuation of abnormal cardiac arrhythmias are incompletely understood. In this chapter, we summarize work that shows how simple cellular automata models of excitable media can display a range of interesting dynamical behavior including spontaneous bursts of reentrant spiral activity. Since the model incorporates basic physiological properties of excitability, heterogeneity, localized pacemakers, and fatigue in a schematic way, the model captures generic physiological dynamics that should be broadly observed in experimental and clinical settings as well as in more realistic mathematical models.

  8. Runaway pacemaker: a still existing complication and therapeutic guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H; Andersen, C; Nielsen, L H

    1989-01-01

    Runaway pacemaker is a rare, but still existing potential lethal complication in permanent pacemakers. Within 4 1/2 years, we saw two cases of runaway pacemaker in patients with multiprogrammable, VVI pacemakers (Siemens-Elema, Model 668). In both cases a pacemaker-induced ventricular tachycardia...

  9. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Sid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behavior intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting Izhikevich neurons. In both cases, the lumped model is compared with the spiking network. There is excellent agreement in terms of duration and number of action potentials within the bursts, but there is a slight mismatch of the burst frequency. The lumped model accurately accounts for both intrinsic bursting and post inhibitory rebound potentials in the neuron model, features which are absent in prevalent neural mass models.

  10. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.; van Gils, Stephanus A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behaviour intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting

  11. Electromagnetic field interference and cardiac pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S L

    1976-09-01

    The physical and physiological effects of electromagnetic field interference on 440 patients with cardiac pacemakers were determined by reviewing the literature from 1949 to 1973. The sources, mechanisms, and findings of physiological dysfunction and ventricular fibrillation in patients with pacemakers are presented. Shortwave and microwave diathermy and electrical stimulators have been found to have a definite adverse influence on some cardiac pacemakers. The effect of interference may be an increase or decrease in pacemaker rate or rhythm, ventricular fibrillation, a total loss of pacing, or cessation of impulses. Because all pacemaker units are not resistant to interference, no ungrounded electrical equipment and no equipment such as microwave diathermy, short wave diathermy, and electrical stimulators should be placed on, or near, a patient with a cardiac pacemaker.

  12. Pacemaker Lead Endocarditis Due to Trichosporon Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Pratap Chandra; Purohit, Bharat Vijay; Agrawal, Binod; Reddy, Krupal; Nutankavala, Lavanya; Narreddy, Suneetha; Reddy, Mallikkarjun; Abu Salim, Md

    2015-04-01

    Pacemaker-related fungal endocarditis is an uncommon and unexpected complication. It is associated with high mortality rates. Due to nonspecific clinical symptoms, negative blood culture and delays in obtaining appropriate imaging studies; late diagnosis is common with fungal endocarditis. Hereby we are reporting a rare case of pacemaker lead endocarditis due to Trichosporon species. In literature we did not find any case of pacemaker-related endocarditis due to Trichosporon species.

  13. Acute hyperkalemia and failure of pacemaker stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Guetta, Roland; Mansencal, Nicolas; Digne, Franck; Dubourg, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    Acute hyperkalemia may induce well-known serious cardiac arrhythmia. However, ventricular aberration including concealed conduction may also occur. We report the case of a 35-year-old woman who had a previous history of late-operated ventricular septal defect communication and DDD pacemaker was admitted for dyspnea. During hospitalization, an acute hyperkalemia induced sinoatrial block despite correct pacemaker programming. Sodium bicarbonate allowed to restore sinus rhythm. Our report highlights that acute hyperkalemia may increase thresholds of pacemaker stimulus and physicians should be aware that complete block of conduction may occur despite correct pacemaker programming. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic Elimination of GABAergic Neurotransmission Reveals Two Distinct Pacemakers for Spontaneous Waves of Activity in the Developing Mouse Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Curtis R.; Weir, Keiko; Scott, Adina; Moen, Samantha P.; Barger, Zeke; Folch, Albert; Hevner, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Many structures of the mammalian CNS generate propagating waves of electrical activity early in development. These waves are essential to CNS development, mediating a variety of developmental processes, such as axonal outgrowth and pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and the maturation of ion channel and receptor properties. In the mouse cerebral cortex, waves of activity occur between embryonic day 18 and postnatal day 8 and originate in pacemaker circuits in the septal nucleus and the piriform cortex. Here we show that genetic knock-out of the major synthetic enzyme for GABA, GAD67, selectively eliminates the picrotoxin-sensitive fraction of these waves. The waves that remain in the GAD67 knock-out have a much higher probability of propagating into the dorsal neocortex, as do the picrotoxin-resistant fraction of waves in controls. Field potential recordings at the point of wave initiation reveal different electrical signatures for GABAergic and glutamatergic waves. These data indicate that: (1) there are separate GABAergic and glutamatergic pacemaker circuits within the piriform cortex, each of which can initiate waves of activity; (2) the glutamatergic pacemaker initiates waves that preferentially propagate into the neocortex; and (3) the initial appearance of the glutamatergic pacemaker does not require preceding GABAergic waves. In the absence of GAD67, the electrical activity underlying glutamatergic waves shows greatly increased tendency to burst, indicating that GABAergic inputs inhibit the glutamatergic pacemaker, even at stages when GABAergic pacemaker circuitry can itself initiate waves. PMID:24623764

  15. Noise-induced bursting in Rulkov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryashko, L.; Slepukhina, E.; Nasyrova, V.

    2016-10-01

    A problem of mathematical modeling and analysis of the stochastic phenomena in neuronal activity is considered. As a basic example, we use the nonlinear Rulkov map-based neuron model with random disturbances. In deterministic case, this one-dimensional model demonstrates quiescence, tonic and chaotic spiking regimes. We show that due to presence of random disturbances, a new regime of noise-induced bursting is generated not only in bistability zones, but also in monostability zones. To estimate noise intensity corresponding to the onset of bursting, the stochastic sensitivity technique and confidence domains method are applied. An effciency of our approach is confirmed by the statistics of interspike intervals.

  16. What Are the Risks of Pacemaker Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a pacemaker include: Cell phones and MP3 players (for example, iPods) Household appliances, such as microwave ovens High-tension wires Metal ... pacemaker is implanted. If you strap your MP3 player to your arm while listening ... use household appliances, but avoid close and prolonged exposure, as it ...

  17. Computer simulation for studying calcium dependent abnormalities in firing mechanism of molluscan neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongrácz, F; Szente, M

    1982-01-01

    Computer modelling technique is proposed to assist in physiological research on invertebrate neuronal membranes. The firing mechanism of a single patch of invertebrate neuronal membrane has been studied in dependence on maximum Ca++ conductance. The calculations are based on modification of Hodgkin-Huxley's data completed by a straight line approximation between experimental points of the kinetic parameters of Ca++ current and early transient potassium current. The time course of conductance changes is assumed to be proportional to m2h for Ca++ current. Three distinct potassium currents are involved into the model, viz. transient potassium current, delayed potassium current and Ca++-dependent potassium current. The modified Euler method run on a digital computer has been used for numerical integration of kinetic equations. Significant effects of Ca++ conductance on spike broadening, plateau development and spike afterhyperpolarization are represented. In the range of small Ca++ conductance an infinite spontaneous activity can be triggered by a short (suprathreshold) current pulse which may be considered a model of pacemaker activity. Plateau development resulting from potassium blocking or decreasing potassium equilibrium is facilitated by Ca++ conductance in the range of greater Ca++ conductance. The effects of voltage sensitivity of the coupling coefficient describing the current of Ca++-dependent K+ channels were studied and compared to the voltage independent case. The coupling coefficient seems to be a crucial factor in broadening the range of Ca++ conductance responsible for pacemaker activity. For greater values of Ca++ conductance, a decrease of the coupling coefficient leads to a transition from prolonged bursting to interruption of burst activity by burst-afterhyperpolarization. The blocking effect of 4-aminopyridine on fast outward current has been studied by the model which has a practical significance considering that aminopyridine is known as a

  18. Simple model of spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, E M

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented that reproduces spiking and bursting behavior of known types of cortical neurons. The model combines the biologically plausibility of Hodgkin-Huxley-type dynamics and the computational efficiency of integrate-and-fire neurons. Using this model, one can simulate tens of thousands of spiking cortical neurons in real time (1 ms resolution) using a desktop PC.

  19. Pacemaker patients’ perspective and experiences in a pacemaker outpatient clinic in relation to test intervals of the pacemaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauberg, Astrid; Hansen, Tina; Pedersen, Trine Pernille Dahl

    . In Aalborg University Hospital pacemakers are tested when implanted, 3 months later and then two years after the implantation. It is tested by a nurse specialist who also is interested in the patient’s general health status and well being. Patient expectations are unknown. Cheng et al (2002) have found...... an evident decline in quality of life regarding psychological and social aspects 6 month after the implantation in terms of cognitive function, work ability, and sexual activity. Mlynarski et al (2009) have found correlations between pacemaker implantation and anxiety and depression. Aim The aim...... the patients expect the nurses to check the technicalities of the pacemaker and talk about precautions. Long test intervals led to worry that the pacemaker was still working. The patients did not expect specialists to pay attention to psychological reactions as they did not find a correlation between...

  20. [Pacemaker ECG quiz no. 21: Strange ECG after DDDR pacemaker implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, C W

    2010-03-01

    In a patient with sinus node disease (intermittent sinus arrest with symptomatic pauses >4 s), a DDDR pacemaker with a dedicated algorithm to avoid unnecessary ventricular pacing (mode switch between AAIR and DDDR) was implanted. The pacemaker ECG after implantation shows an unexpected tachycardia.

  1. Processing of sub- and supra-second intervals in the primate brain results from the calibration of neuronal oscillators via sensory, motor and feedback processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daya Shankar Gupta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The processing of time intervals in the sub- to supra-second range by the brain is critical for the interaction of primates with their surroundings in activities, such as foraging and hunting. For an accurate processing of time intervals by the brain, representation of the physical time within neuronal circuits is necessary. I propose that time-dimension of the physical surrounding is represented in the brain by different types of neuronal oscillators, generating spikes or spike bursts at regular intervals. The proposed oscillators include the pacemaker neurons, tonic inputs and synchronized excitation and inhibition of inter-connected neurons. Oscillators, which are built inside various circuits of brain, help to form modular clocks, processing time intervals or other temporal characteristics specific to functions of a circuit. Relative or absolute duration is represented within neuronal oscillators by ‘neural temporal unit’, defined as the interval between regularly occurring spikes or spike bursts. Oscillator output is processed to produce changes in activities of neurons, named frequency modulator neuron, wired within a separate module, represented by the rate of change in frequency, and frequency of activities, proposed to encode time intervals. Inbuilt oscillators are calibrated by (a feedback processes (b input of time intervals resulting from rhythmic external sensory stimulation and (c synchronous effects of feedback processes and evoked sensory activity. A single active clock is proposed per circuit, which is calibrated by one or more mechanisms. Multiple calibration mechanisms, inbuilt oscillators and the presence of modular connections prevent a complete loss of interval timing functions of the brain.

  2. Mutant α-Synuclein Overexpression Induces Stressless Pacemaking in Vagal Motoneurons at Risk in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Simchovitz, Alon; Chiu, Wei-Hua; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Sharon, Ronit; Soreq, Hermona; Roeper, Jochen; Goldberg, Joshua A

    2017-01-04

    α-Synuclein overexpression (ASOX) drives the formation of toxic aggregates in neurons vulnerable in Parkinson's disease (PD), including dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). Just as these populations differ in when they exhibit α-synucleinopathies during PD pathogenesis, they could also differ in their physiological responses to ASOX. An ASOX-mediated hyperactivity of SN dopamine neurons, which was caused by oxidative dysfunction of Kv4.3 potassium channels, was recently identified in transgenic (A53T-SNCA) mice overexpressing mutated human α-synuclein. Noting that DMV neurons display extensive α-synucleinopathies earlier than SN dopamine neurons while exhibiting milder cell loss in PD, we aimed to define the electrophysiological properties of DMV neurons in A53T-SNCA mice. We found that DMV neurons maintain normal firing rates in response to ASOX. Moreover, Kv4.3 channels in DMV neurons exhibit no oxidative dysfunction in the A53T-SNCA mice, which could only be recapitulated in wild-type mice by glutathione dialysis. Two-photon imaging of redox-sensitive GFP corroborated the finding that mitochondrial oxidative stress was diminished in DMV neurons in the A53T-SNCA mice. This reduction in oxidative stress resulted from a transcriptional downregulation of voltage-activated (Cav) calcium channels in DMV neurons, which led to a reduction in activity-dependent calcium influx via Cav channels. Thus, ASOX induces a homeostatic remodeling with improved redox signaling in DMV neurons, which could explain the differential vulnerability of SN dopamine and DMV neurons in PD and could promote neuroprotective strategies that emulate endogenous homeostatic responses to ASOX (e.g., stressless pacemaking) in DMV neurons. Overexpression of mutant α-synuclein causes Parkinson's disease, presumably by driving neurodegeneration in vulnerable neuronal target populations. However, the extent of

  3. Swim pacemakers in box jellyfish are modulated by the visual input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garm, A; Bielecki, J

    2008-07-01

    A major part of the cubozoan central nervous system is situated in the eye-bearing rhopalia. One of the neuronal output channels from the rhopalia carries a swim pacemaker signal, which has a one-to-one relation with the swim contractions of the bell shaped body. Given the advanced visual system of box jellyfish and that the pacemaker signal originates in the vicinity of these eyes, it seems logical to assume that the pacemakers are modified by the visual input. Here, the firing frequency and distribution of inter-signal intervals (ISIs) of single pacemakers are examined in the Caribbean box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora. It is shown that the absolute ambient light intensity, if kept constant, has no influence on the signal, but if the intensity changes, it has a major impact on both frequency and ISIs. If the intensity suddenly drops there is an increase in firing frequency, and the ISIs become more homogeneously distributed. A rise in intensity, on the other hand, produces a steep decline in the frequency and makes the ISIs highly variable. These electrophysiological data are correlated with behavioral observations from the natural habitat of the medusae.

  4. Clinically guided pacemaker choice and setting: pacemaker expert programming study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziacchi, Matteo; Palmisano, Pietro; Ammendola, Ernesto; Dell'era, Gabriele; Guerra, Federico; Aquilani, Stefano; Aspromonte, Vittorio; Boriani, Giuseppe; Accogli, Michele; Del Giorno, Giuseppe; Occhetta, Eraldo; Capucci, Alessandro; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Maglia, Giampiero; Biffi, Mauro

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this multicentre, observational, transversal study was to evaluate pacemaker (PM) choice and setting in a large number of patients, in order to understand their relationship with the patients' clinical characteristics. The study enrolled a total of 1858 patients (71 ± 14 years, 54% male), consecutively evaluated during scheduled PM follow-up visits in 7 Italian cardiac arrhythmia centres. To evaluate the appropriateness of PM choice in relation to the patients' clinical characteristics, we analysed their rhythm disorders at the time of device implantation and the characteristics of the devices implanted. To evaluate the appropriateness of device setting, current rhythm disorders and device setting at the time of enrolment were analysed. In the overall study population, 64.3% of the patients received a PM with all of the features required for their rhythm disorder [80.8% in persistent atrioventricular (AV) block, 76.5% in atrial fibrillation needing pacing, 71.0% in sinus node disease, 58.7% in non-persistent atrioventricular block (AVB), 52.7% in neuro-mediated syncope]. The most frequent cause of inappropriate PM choice was the lack of an algorithm to promote intrinsic AV conduction in non-persistent AVB patients (38.1%). In 76.2% of the patients with an appropriate PM (n = 1301), the PM was optimally set for their rhythm disorder. In the present 'real-world' registry, a large number of patients (35.7%) did not receive an optimal PM for their rhythm disorders. Moreover, one-fourth of appropriate PMs were not programmed according to the patients' clinical characteristics.

  5. Drugs and pacemakers for vasovagal, carotid sinus and situational syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romme, Jacobus J. C. M.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Black, Catherine N.; Colman, Nancy; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Wieling, Wouter; van Dijk, Nynke

    2011-01-01

    Background Neurally mediated reflex syncope is the most common cause of transient loss of consciousness. In patients not responding to nonpharmacological treatment, pharmacological or pacemaker treatment might be considered. Objectives To examine the effects of pharmacological therapy and pacemaker

  6. Adaptive Optical Burst Switching

    OpenAIRE

    Bonald, Thomas; Indre, Raluca-Maria; Oueslati, Sara

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We propose a modified version of Optical Burst Switching (OBS) that adapts the size of switched data units to the network load. Specifically, we propose a two-way reservation OBS scheme in which every active source-destination pair attempts to reserve a lightpath and for every successful reservation, transmits an optical burst whose size is proportional to the number of active data flows. We refer to this technique as Adaptive Optical Burst Switching. We prove that the...

  7. External Type All-purpose Cardiac Pacemaker System

    OpenAIRE

    牧野, 秀夫; 尾嵜, 真浩; 斉藤, 義明; 田村, 康二; 三田村, 好矩; 三上, 智久; Makino, Hideo; Ozaki, Masahiro; Saitoh, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Kohji; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Mikami, Tomohisa

    1985-01-01

    A microcomputer-based pacemaker system for evaluating the pacemaker treatment of arrhythmia is described. This system can function not only as a demand pacemaker but also as a pacemaker for tachycardia control as well as a defibrillator. All stimulations are delivered through a catheter electrode in the right ventricle and a subcutaneous electrode. For the detection of arrhythmia, ECG and blood pressure signals are used. In particular, the blood pressure signal is useful to detect the actual ...

  8. Cesium blockade of delayed outward currents and electrically induced pacemaker activity in mammalian ventricular myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, C F; Katzung, B G

    1981-05-01

    The effects of Cs+, 5-25 mM, were studied in cat and guinea pig papillary muscles using voltage clamp and current clamp techniques. In solutions containing normal K+, the major effects of Cs+ were depolarization of the resting potential and reduction of the delayed outward current (ixl) between -80 and -20 mV. Both inward and outward portions of the isochronal current voltage relation (l-s clamps) were reduced by extracellular Cs+. This resulted in a substantial reduction of inward rectification and, by subtraction from the normal I-V relationship, the definition of a Cs+-sensitive component of current. Under current clamp conditions, 5-10 mM Cs+ produced a dose-dependent slowing of repetitive firing induced by depolarization. At higher concentrations (25 mM) the resting potential was depolarized and repetitive activity could not be induced by further depolarization. However, release of hyperpolarizing pulses was followed by prolonged bursts of repetitive action potentials, suggesting partial reversal of blockade or participation of another pacemaker process. The experimental results and a numerical simulation show that under readily attainable conditions, reduction in an outward pacemaker current may slow pacemaker activity.

  9. Hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih, in inspiratory brainstem neurons and its inhibition by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, S L; Langohr, K; Richter, D W

    2000-02-01

    A hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih, is often implied in pacemaker-like depolarizations during rhythmic oscillatory activity. We describe Ih in the isolated respiratory centre of immature mice (P6-P11). Ih was recorded in 15% (22/146) of all inspiratory neurons examined. The mean half-maximal Ih activation occurred at -78 mV and the reversal potential was -40 mV. Ih was inhibited by Cs+ (1-5 mM) and by organic blockers N-ethyl-1,6-dihydro-1, 2-dimethyl-6-(methylimino)-N-phenyl-4-pyrimidinamine (ZD 7288; 0.3-3 microM) and N,N'-bis-(3,4-dimethylphenylethyl)-N-methylamine (YS 035, 3-30 microM), but not by Ba2+ (0.5 mM). The organic Ih blockers did not change the inspiratory bursts recorded from the XIIth nerve and synaptic drives in inspiratory neurons. Hypoxia reversibly inhibited Ih but, in the presence of organic blockers, the hypoxic reaction remained unchanged. We conclude that although Ih channels are functional in a minority of inspiratory neurons, Ih does not contribute to respiratory rhythm generation or its modulation by hypoxia.

  10. Wandering permanent pacemaker generators in children: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Sabti Hilal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Epicardial permanent pacemaker generators are implanted some times in the abdominal wall in pediatric age groups. Case presentation Three permanent epicardial pacemakers that migrated in an unusual manner producing intraabdominal complications are reported. Conclusion The different clinical presentations of pacemaker migration in the pediatric age groups are highlighted and a few suggestions are made for avoiding such a complication.

  11. Analysis of a five year experience of permanent pacemaker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Permanent pacemaker implantation is available in Nigeria. There is however no national registry or framework for pacemaker data collection. A pacemaker database has been developed in our institution and the results are analyzed in this study. Methods: The study period was between January 2008 and ...

  12. The circadian neuropeptide PDF signals preferentially through a specific adenylate cyclase isoform AC3 in M pacemakers of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Laura B; Taghert, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF) is essential for normal circadian function in Drosophila. It synchronizes the phases of M pacemakers, while in E pacemakers it decelerates their cycling and supports their amplitude. The PDF receptor (PDF-R) is present in both M and subsets of E cells. Activation of PDF-R stimulates cAMP increases in vitro and in M cells in vivo. The present study asks: What is the identity of downstream signaling components that are associated with PDF receptor in specific circadian pacemaker neurons? Using live imaging of intact fly brains and transgenic RNAi, we show that adenylate cyclase AC3 underlies PDF signaling in M cells. Genetic disruptions of AC3 specifically disrupt PDF responses: they do not affect other Gs-coupled GPCR signaling in M cells, they can be rescued, and they do not represent developmental alterations. Knockdown of the Drosophila AKAP-like scaffolding protein Nervy also reduces PDF responses. Flies with AC3 alterations show behavioral syndromes consistent with known roles of M pacemakers as mediated by PDF. Surprisingly, disruption of AC3 does not alter PDF responses in E cells--the PDF-R(+) LNd. Within M pacemakers, PDF-R couples preferentially to a single AC, but PDF-R association with a different AC(s) is needed to explain PDF signaling in the E pacemakers. Thus critical pathways of circadian synchronization are mediated by highly specific second messenger components. These findings support a hypothesis that PDF signaling components within target cells are sequestered into "circadian signalosomes," whose compositions differ between E and M pacemaker cell types.

  13. Does bipolar pacemaker current activate blood platelets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesdal, Grunde; Hansen, Annebirthe Bo; Brandes, Axel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether bipolar pacemaker current lead can activate blood platelets. The null hypothesis was that 1 minute of electrical stimulation of platelets would not influence their subsequent reactivity to adenosine diphosphate (ADP). BACKGROUND: Both...... to the pacemaker can. METHODS: Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from two healthy subjects. Platelet reactivity to the agonist ADP was tested in paired samples in an aggregometer in a case/control setup. RESULTS: Eighteen of 46 tested pairs of platelet-rich plasma showed increased reactivity in the paced sample......; 26 were unchanged while two showed decreased reactivity in the paced sample. Using a two-sided sign test, the null hypothesis was rejected (P = 0.0004). CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates increased reactivity to ADP in platelets exposed in vitro to stimulation by pacemaker current. The clinical...

  14. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude....... We then develop a non-parametric test statistic that allows for the identification of drift bursts from noisy high-frequency data. We apply this methodology to a comprehensive set of tick data and show that drift bursts form an integral part of the price dynamics across equities, fixed income......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  15. Quality assessment of pacemaker implantations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Arnsbo, P; Asklund, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: Quality assessment of therapeutic procedures is essential to insure a cost-effective health care system. Pacemaker implantation is a common procedure with more than 500,000 implantations world-wide per year, but the general complication rate is not well described. We studied procedure related...

  16. Pseudo SVT in the pacemaker patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Simon; Barker, Diane; Cooper, Robert; Patwala, Ash; Hall, Mark

    2012-07-01

    This is an interesting report of a supraventricular tachycardia in a paced patient with intermittent atrioventricular nodal block. Only electrophysiology testing revealed the correct diagnosis. Images explain how pacemaker timing cycles and refractory periods can confuse an otherwise straightforward diagnosis. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Keeping the Rhythm : Cardiac Pacemaker Cell Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkhard, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to form and function in the developing vertebrate embryo. Its proper morphogenesis and function is crucial for survival. Here we focus on the development and characterization of a highly specialized subset of cardiac cells, the pacemaker cells. In the mammalian heart,

  18. [Angina pectoris induced by pacemaker syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Z; Török, T; Rudas, L; Fazekas, T

    1998-05-31

    Pacemaker syndrome is caused primarily by the lack of atrial kick and by neurocardiogenic reflex mechanisms due to simultaneous atrial and ventricular contractions. The most common clinical symptoms are dyspnoe, hypotension, dizziness and syncopal attacks. A case report of a patient with pacemaker syndrome is presented, in which the main clinical manifestation was a recurrent chest pain. A VVI demand pacemaker was implanted because of sick sinus syndrome ten years ago and shortly afterwards anginal attacks of rest developed. Coronary angiography revealed a non-significant (25%) narrowing of the right coronary artery (RCA). Casual and long-term ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM) measurements elucidated that the patient occasionally has extremely low diastolic blood pressure. This later phenomenon was confirmed and refined by a "beat-to-beat" blood pressure measuring technique. The elimination of the pronounced "beat-to-beat" variability of arterial blood pressure and transient coronary hypoperfusion due to implantation of an AV sequential bifocal pacemaker resulted in a full disappearance of angina pectoris.

  19. Astroglial networks promote neuronal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chever, Oana; Dossi, Elena; Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-12

    Astrocytes interact with neurons to regulate network activity. Although the gap junction subunits connexin 30 and connexin 43 mediate the formation of extensive astroglial networks that cover large functional neuronal territories, their role in neuronal synchronization remains unknown. Using connexin 30- and connexin 43-deficient mice, we showed that astroglial networks promoted sustained population bursts in hippocampal slices by setting the basal active state of neurons. Astroglial networks limited excessive neuronal depolarization induced by spontaneous synaptic activity, increased neuronal release probability, and favored the recruitment of neurons during bursting, thus promoting the coordinated activation of neuronal networks. In vivo, this sustained neuronal coordination translated into increased severity of acutely evoked epileptiform events and convulsive behavior. These results revealed that connexin-mediated astroglial networks synchronize bursting of neuronal assemblies, which can exacerbate pathological network activity and associated behavior. Our data thus provide molecular and biophysical evidence predicting selective astroglial gap junction inhibitors as anticonvulsive drugs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  1. Bifurcation transitions in gap-junction-coupled neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Annabelle; Harris, Allison L.; Follmann, Rosangela; Rosa, Epaminondas

    2016-10-01

    Here we investigate transitions occurring in the dynamical states of pairs of distinct neurons electrically coupled, with one neuron tonic and the other bursting. Depending on the dynamics of the individual neurons, and for strong enough coupling, they synchronize either in a tonic or a bursting regime, or initially tonic transitioning to bursting via a period doubling cascade. Certain intrinsic properties of the individual neurons such as minimum firing rates are carried over into the dynamics of the coupled neurons affecting their ultimate synchronous state.

  2. Gamma-ray bursts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe...

  3. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators - general and anesthetic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy G. Rapsang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A pacemaking system consists of an impulse generator and lead or leads to carry the electrical impulse to the patient's heart. Pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator codes were made to describe the type of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implanted. Indications for pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation were given by the American College of Cardiologists. Certain pacemakers have magnet-operated reed switches incorporated; however, magnet application can have serious adverse effects; hence, devices should be considered programmable unless known otherwise. When a device patient undergoes any procedure (with or without anesthesia, special precautions have to be observed including a focused history/physical examination, interrogation of pacemaker before and after the procedure, emergency drugs/temporary pacing and defibrillation, reprogramming of pacemaker and disabling certain pacemaker functions if required, monitoring of electrolyte and metabolic disturbance and avoiding certain drugs and equipments that can interfere with pacemaker function. If unanticipated device interactions are found, consider discontinuation of the procedure until the source of interference can be eliminated or managed and all corrective measures should be taken to ensure proper pacemaker function should be done. Post procedure, the cardiac rate and rhythm should be monitored continuously and emergency drugs and equipments should be kept ready and consultation with a cardiologist or a pacemaker-implantable cardioverter defibrillator service may be necessary.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Nondependent Pacemaker Patients with Pacemakers and Defibrillators with a Nearly Depleted Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Hideo; Padmanabhan, Deepak; Watson, Robert E; Dalzell, Connie; Acker, Nancy; Jondal, Mary; Romme, Abby L; Cha, Yong-Mei; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Felmlee, Joel P; Friedman, Paul A

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with non-MRI-conditional cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) has been shown to be safe when performed under closely monitored protocols. However, the safety of MRI in patients with devices with a nearly depleted battery has not been reported. Prospective data were collected between January 2008 and May 2015 in patients with non-MRI-conditional CIEDs undergoing clinically indicated MRI under institutional protocol. Patients who were pacemaker dependent were excluded. Patients whose devices were at elective replacement indicator (ERI) at the time of MRI or close to ERI (ERI or replacement for battery depletion within 3 months of scan) were identified through database review and analyzed for clinical events. MRI scans (n = 569) were performed in 442 patients. Of these, we identified 13 scans performed with a nearly depleted battery in nine patients. All scans with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs, n = 9) were uneventful. However, two scans with pacemakers close to ERI resulted in a power-on-reset (PoR) event. One scan with a pacemaker close to ERI that was programmed to DOO mode reached ERI during MRI and automatically changed to VVI mode. Additionally, one scan with a pacemaker at ERI did not allow programming. All pacemakers with events were implanted before 2005. Patients with pacemakers and ICDs with a nearly depleted battery can safely undergo MRI when patients are not pacemaker dependent. Attention should be paid because old devices can result in PoR or ERI during MRI, which may lead to oversensing and inhibition of pacing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Bursts as a unit of neural information: selective communication via resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, Eugene M; Desai, Niraj S; Walcott, Elisabeth C; Hoppensteadt, Frank C

    2003-03-01

    What is the functional significance of generating a burst of spikes, as opposed to a single spike? A dominant point of view is that bursts are needed to increase the reliability of communication between neurons. Here, we discuss the alternative, but complementary, hypothesis: bursts with specific resonant interspike frequencies are more likely to cause a postsynaptic cell to fire than are bursts with higher or lower frequencies. Such a frequency preference might occur at the level of individual synapses because of the interplay between short-term synaptic depression and facilitation, or at the postsynaptic cell level because of subthreshold membrane potential oscillations and resonance. As a result, the same burst could resonate for some synapses or cells and not resonate for others, depending on their natural resonance frequencies. This observation suggests that, in addition to increasing reliability of synaptic transmission, bursts of action potentials might provide effective mechanisms for selective communication between neurons.

  6. A pdf Neuropeptide Gene Mutation and Ablation of PDF Neurons Each Cause Severe Abnormalities of Behavioral Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renn, Susan C.P; Park, Jae H; Rosbash, Michael; Hall, Jeffrey C; Taghert, Paul H

    1999-01-01

    .... Here, we define two critical features of that mechanism in Drosophila. We first describe animals mutant for the pdf neuropeptide gene, which is expressed by most of the candidate pacemakers (LNv neurons...

  7. [Exceptional pacemaker complication in Still's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj Kheder, Salma; Hummel, Thomas; Majewski, Heike; Jimènez, Rafael; Wutzler, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    A 49-year-old man with Still's disease presented with a rash above his pacemaker scar. In 2012, there was a replacement of the generator in which the position was changed from subpectoral to subcutaneous. A revision operation was performed after the local finding became worse, turning from a granuloma to a macula. During surgery, a superficial position of the leads was revealed. Both leads and generator were removed with great effort from the granulation tissue. The new material was again implanted into a subpectoral position. The postoperative examination of the wound showed unremarkable signs of healing. After repositioning of the generator to a subcutaneous location, the skin was exposed to greater mechanical stress, which caused erythema and hypergranulation in a patient with Still's disease. A superficial position of a pacemaker should be avoided in patients affected by Still's disease.

  8. Pacemakers in the upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Antonina; Arena, Salvatore; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Mucciardi, Giuseppe; Galì, Alessandro; Magno, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    Pacemakers in upper urinary tract (UUT) are still under study. We reviewed the role of some cells that seem to be involved in the propulsion of urinary bolus from UUT to the bladder. We focuses on evaluating studies on the mechanisms by which the UUT propels urine to the bladder via pacemaker cells. Electric active pacemaker cells generate pyeloureteric autorhythmicity driving adjacent smooth muscle cells (SMCs); it emphasizes the role of the interstitial cells of Cajal-like cells (ICC-LCs) localized in the UUT. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are now thought to cooperate in conducting and amplifying pacemaker activity in the UUT. These cells produce electrical slow-wave potentials and determine the propagation of peristaltic activity. Identification of ICC-LCs is facilitated by use of c-kit antibodies. Contraction waves arising from the UUT and the propagation of these waves may require the direct involvement of ICC-LCs, as c-kit immunoreactivity appears developmentally at the same time as coordinated unidirectional peristaltic contraction. ICC-LCs observed in the UUT have morphological features similar to those of c-kitpositive ICCs in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition to gastrointestinal motility, ICCs may also play a significant role in the propagation, coordination, and modulation of ureteropelvic peristalsis. Alterations in ICC-LCs are closely associated with a variety of motility disorders and many congenital urological diseases of the UUT such as primary obstructive megaureter, congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction, and vesicoureteral reflux. These observations open the way for further investigations of this cell type. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Pacemaker lead erosion simulating "Loch Ness Monster": conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Naveen; Moorthy, Nagaraja

    2012-12-01

    The majority of pacemaker pocket or lead erosions are due to either mechanical erosion by the bulky pulse generator or secondary to pacemaker pocket infection. We describe an unusual case of delayed pacemaker lead erosion causing extrusion of a portion of the pacing lead, with separate entry and exit points, with the gap filled with new skin formation, simulating the "Loch Ness Monster", which was successfully managed conservatively by surgical reinsertion.

  10. A Rare Case of Recurrent Pacemaker Allergic Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shittu, Muhammed; Shah, Pooja; Elkhalili, Walid; Suleiman, Addi; Shaaban, Hamid; Shah, Pradip A; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reactions to pacemaker device components are uncommon. However, when they occur, they usually mimic pacemaker infection, which results in multiple device replacements and increased morbidity burden. Here we present a 40-year-old female with pacemaker insertion due to complete heart block and who had multiple device replacements because of allergic sensitivity to various pacemaker component-encasing materials, confirmed by allergic testing to these materials. She had complete resolution of her symptoms after replacement with gold-plated device, to which she was not allergic.

  11. [Pacemaking in Cracow in years 1966-1980].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machejek, Jakub; Lelakowski, Jacek; Bednarek, Jacek; Majewski, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    Permanent pacemaking, a new and effective bradycardia--treatment method, has appeared in the sixties. In Cracow the first emergency temporary stimulation by means of transvenously inserted intracardiac electrode was performed in 1966. Permanent technique of artificial pacing was introduced soon after. The number of pacemaker implantations grew successfully, obtaining 750 of the end of the seventies when the Institute of Cardiology of Nicolaus Copernicus Medical Academy was established. Assortment of implantable devices also became wider, including such rare constructions like nuclear pacemakers and an inductive coupled pacemaker.

  12. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  13. Differential Responses of Thalamic Reticular Neurons to Nociception in Freely Behaving Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2016-01-01

    Pain serves an important protective role. However, it can also have debilitating adverse effects if dysfunctional, such as in pathological pain conditions. As part of the thalamocortical circuit, the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) has been implicated to have important roles in controlling nociceptive signal transmission. However studies on how TRN neurons, especially how TRN neuronal subtypes categorized by temporal bursting firing patterns—typical bursting, atypical bursting and non-bursting TRN neurons—contribute to nociceptive signal modulation is not known. To reveal the relationship between TRN neuronal subtypes and modulation of nociception, we simultaneously recorded behavioral responses and TRN neuronal activity to formalin induced nociception in freely moving mice. We found that typical bursting TRN neurons had the most robust response to nociception; changes in tonic firing rate of typical TRN neurons exactly matched changes in behavioral nociceptive responses, and burst firing rate of these neurons increased significantly when behavioral nociceptive responses were reduced. This implies that typical TRN neurons could critically modulate ascending nociceptive signals. The role of other TRN neuronal subtypes was less clear; atypical bursting TRN neurons decreased tonic firing rate after the second peak of behavioral nociception and the firing rate of non-bursting TRN neurons mostly remained at baseline level. Overall, our results suggest that different TRN neuronal subtypes contribute differentially to processing formalin induced sustained nociception in freely moving mice. PMID:27917114

  14. Synchronization transition in gap-junction-coupled leech neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Duan, Zhisheng; Feng, Zhaosheng; Chen, Guanrong; Lu, Qishao

    2008-07-01

    Real neurons can exhibit various types of firings including tonic spiking, bursting as well as silent state, which are frequently observed in neuronal electrophysiological experiments. More interestingly, it is found that neurons can demonstrate the co-existing mode of stable tonic spiking and bursting, which depends on initial conditions. In this paper, synchronization in gap-junction-coupled neurons with co-existing attractors of spiking and bursting firings is investigated as the coupling strength gets increased. Synchronization transitions can be identified by means of the bifurcation diagram and the correlation coefficient. It is illustrated that the coupled neurons can exhibit different types of synchronization transitions between spiking and bursting when the coupling strength increases. In the course of synchronization transitions, an intermittent synchronization can be observed. These results may be instructive to understand synchronization transitions in neuronal systems.

  15. [A new program-controlled telemetry technology for pacemakers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Huang, Xin-ming; Fang, Zu-xinag

    2002-09-01

    This thesis is about a new technology of program-controlled telemetry for pacemakers. The system utilizes digital logic circuit design, and the program-controlled part uses single chip to control for display and debug. PWM and reflectance telemetry may improve the preciseness and correctness of signal transmission, and reduce the power consumption of pacemakers and prolong the lifetime.

  16. Two hearts synchronized each other with a DDD pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunacci, Michele; Valbusa, Alberto; Brunelli, Claudio; Bertero, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    : We describe the case of a patient with dyspnea and heterotopic cardiac transplant, ventricular fibrillation from the native heart and sinus rhythm from the transplanted one. The two hearts were synchronized with a pacemaker. Electric external cardioversion and a different type of pacemaker stimulation were successfully performed, with improving symptoms.

  17. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which is...

  18. SK channels participate in the formation of after burst hyperpolarization and partly inhibit the burst strength of epileptic ictal discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yian; Liu, Xu; Wang, Guoxiang; Wang, Yun

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common disease of the central nervous system. Tetanic spasms and convulsions are the key symptoms exhibited during epileptic seizures. However, the majority of patients have a significant post‑seizure silence following a serious seizure; the underlying molecular neural mechanisms in this burst interval are unclear. The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect and role of calcium‑activated potassium channels during this seizure interval silence period. Cyclothiazide (CTZ) was used to establish the seizure model in rat hippocampal cultured neurons, then the after‑burst hyperpolarization (ABH) activities were recorded using the patch clamp technique. By comparing the amplitude and duration of hyperpolarizations, the present study analyzed the association between epileptiform bursts and ABHs when treated with different concentrations of CTZ. In addition, apamin and iberiotoxin were used for pharmacological tests. An intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recording was also performed when the CTZ experiments were repeated on animals. The experimental results revealed that treatment with high levels of CTZ induced larger ABHs and was associated with stronger burst activities, which suggested a positive correlation between ABH and epileptiform burst. Apamin, an antagonist of small conductance calcium‑activated potassium (SK) channels, decreased the amplitude of ABH; however, reduced ABH was associated with enhanced burst activity, in burst probability and burst strength. These results revealed an important role of SK channels in the formation of ABH and in the inhibition of burst activity. Iberiotoxin, an antagonist of big conductance calcium‑activated potassium (BK) channels, had no significant effect on ABH and burst activity. In addition, a positive correlation was identified between burst duration and ABH parameters. An intracellular calcium chelator impaired the amplitude of ABH; however, it did not affect the burst parameters. The

  19. A Formal Verification Methodology for DDD Mode Pacemaker Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Shuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pacemakers are safety-critical devices whose faulty behaviors can cause harm or even death. Often these faulty behaviors are caused due to bugs in programs used for digital control of pacemakers. We present a formal verification methodology that can be used to check the correctness of object code programs that implement the safety-critical control functions of DDD mode pacemakers. Our methodology is based on the theory of Well-Founded Equivalence Bisimulation (WEB refinement, where both formal specifications and implementation are treated as transition systems. We develop a simple and general formal specification for DDD mode pacemakers. We also develop correctness proof obligations that can be applied to validate object code programs used for pacemaker control. Using our methodology, we were able to verify a control program with millions of transitions against the simple specification with only 10 transitions. Our method also found several bugs during the verification process.

  20. Use of pacemaker programmers for disaster victim identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinae, Haruka; Numata, Norio; Kitaoka, Hirofumi; Daimon, Masao; Yamamoto, Taira; Amano, Atsushi

    2013-12-01

    Disaster victim identification (DVI) presents a number of physical and legal challenges, involving the degeneration of human remains and legal obstacles to forensic examinations. One non-invasive method for positive identification may be the use of a pacemaker programmer to detect and obtain data from pacemakers recovered from unidentified remains. To test the usefulness of this method, this investigation examined the efficiency and utility of 5 different pacemaker programmers in the positive identification of victims of the March 2011 tsunami in Japan at 8 disaster sites in May 2011. On scanning 148 sets of remains, data were successfully obtained from 1 implant in 1 set of remains, allowing for the rapid positive identification of the individual. Scanning pacemakers with pacemaker programmers can be a non-invasive method of positive identification that meets Japanese legal and institutional requirements, but this method is ineffective without a preceding whole-body X-ray scan.

  1. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster ...

  2. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  3. Pacemaker implantation complication rates in elderly and young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan KS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kazim Serhan Özcan, Damirbek Osmonov, Servet Altay, Cevdet Dönmez, Ersin Yildirim, Ceyhan Türkkan, Baris Güngör, Ahmet Ekmekçi, Ahmet Taha Alper, Kadir Gürkan, İzzet ErdinlerDepartment of Cardiology, Siyami Ersek Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Center, Istanbul, TurkeyAims: To evaluate the complication rate differences between elderly and younger patients who receive a permanent pacemaker implantation.Methods: We reviewed all cases admitted to our institution between January 2008 and June 2009 with symptomatic bradyarrhythmia for whom a permanent pacemaker was implanted. Beginning in June 2009, we prospectively collected data from all patients with the same diagnosis and procedure. The frequency of complications due to the pacemaker implantation procedure was evaluated and compared between young (<70 years old and elderly (≥70 years old patients.Results: Among 574 patients with a permanent pacemaker, 259 patients (45.1% were below and 315 patients (54.9% were above or at 70 years of age. There were 240 (92.7% and 19 (7.3% dual-chamber pacemaker (DDD and single-chamber pacemaker (VVI implanted patients in the younger group, and 291 (76.8% and 73 (23.2% DDD and VVI pacemaker implanted patients in the elderly group, respectively. The complication rate was 39 (15.1% out of 259 young patients and 24 (7.6% out of 315 elderly patients. Postprocedural complications were statistically lower in the elderly patients than in younger patients (P = 0.005.Conclusion: A pacemaker implantation performed by an experienced operator is a safe procedure for patients of advanced age. The patients who are above 70 years old may have less complication rates than the younger patients.Keywords: complications of pacemaker implantation, elderly patients, permanent pacemaker

  4. Discrete Pattern of Burst Stimulation in the Ventrobasal Thalamus for Anti-Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus has been proposed to play a role in sensory modulation via switching between tonic and burst dual firing of individual neurons. Of the two firing modes, altered burst firing has been repeatedly implicated with pathological pain conditions, which suggests that maintaining a certain form of thalamic burst could be crucial for controlling pain. However, specific elements of burst firing that may contribute to pain control have not yet been actively investigated. Utilizing the deep brain stimulation (DBS) technique, we explored the effects of bursting properties in pain control by electrically stimulating the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus in forms of burst patterned to test different aspects of bursts during the formalin induced nociception in mice. Our results demonstrated that electrical stimulations mimicking specific burst firing properties are important in producing an anti-nociceptive effect and found that the ≤3 ms interval between burst pluses (intra-burst-interval: IntraBI) and ≥3 pulses per burst were required to reliably reduce formalin induced nociceptive responses in mice. Periodicity of IntraBI was also suggested to contribute to anti-nociception to a limited extent. PMID:23950787

  5. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  6. Electromagnetic interference with pacemakers caused by portable media players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaker, Jay P; Patel, Mehul B; Jongnarangsin, Krit; Liepa, Valdis V; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2008-04-01

    Electromagnetic fields generated by electrical devices may cause interference with permanent pacemakers. Media players are becoming a common mode of portable entertainment. The most common media players used worldwide are iPods. These devices are often carried in a shirt chest pocket, which may place the devices close to an implanted pacemaker. The purpose of this study was to determine if iPods cause interference with pacemakers. In this prospective, single-blinded study, 100 patients who had cardiac pacemakers were tested with four types of iPods to assess for interference. Patients were monitored by a single-channel ECG monitor as well as the respective pacemaker programmer via the telemetry wand. iPods were tested by placing them 2 inches anterior to the pacemaker and wand for up to 10 seconds. To simulate actual use, standard-issue headphones were plugged into the iPods. To maintain consistency, the volume was turned up maximally, and the equalizer was turned off. A subset of 25 patients underwent testing on 2 separate days to assess for reproducibility of interference. Pacemaker interference was categorized as type I or type II telemetry interference. Type I interference was associated with atrial and/or ventricular high rates on rate histograms. Type II interference did not affect pacemaker rate counters. Electromagnetic emissions from the four iPods also were evaluated in a Faraday cage to determine the mechanism of the observed interference. One hundred patients (63 men and 37 women; mean age 77.1 +/- 7.6 years) with 11 single-chamber pacemakers and 89 dual-chamber pacemakers underwent 800 tests. The incidence of any type of interference was 51% of patients and 20% of tests. Type I interference was seen in 19% of patients and type II in 32% of patients. Reproducibility testing confirmed that interference occurred regardless of pacing configuration (unipolar or bipolar), pacing mode (AAI, VVI, or DDD), and from one day to the next. Electromagnetic emissions

  7. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  8. Pacemaker-Mediated Programmable Hypertension Control Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, Petr; Merkely, Béla; Erglis, Andrejs; Marinskis, Germanas; de Groot, Joris R; Schmidinger, Herwig; Rodriguez Venegas, Manuel; Voskuil, Michiel; Sturmberger, Thomas; Petru, Jan; Jongejan, Niels; Aichinger, Josef; Kamzola, Ginta; Aidietis, Audrius; Gellér, Laszlo; Mraz, Tomas; Osztheimer, Istvan; Mika, Yuval; Evans, Steven; Burkhoff, Daniel; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2017-12-23

    Many patients requiring a pacemaker have persistent hypertension with systolic blood pressures above recommended levels. We evaluated a pacemaker-based Programmable Hypertension Control (PHC) therapy that uses a sequence of variably timed shorter and longer atrioventricular intervals. Patients indicated for dual-chamber pacing with office systolic blood pressure (oSBP) >150 mm Hg despite stable medical therapy were implanted with a Moderato™ pulse generator that delivers PHC therapy. Patients were followed for 1 month (Run-In period) with conventional pacing; those with persistent oSBP >140 mm Hg were included in the study and had PHC therapy activated. The co-primary efficacy end points were changes in 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure and oSBP between baseline and 3 months. Safety was assessed by tracking adverse events. Thirty-five patients met the initial inclusion criteria and underwent Moderato implantation. At 1 month, oSBP was URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02282033. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. The National Survey of Cardiac Pacemakers and Cardioverter Defibrillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamrerza Shafieian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Permanent pacemakers provide effective relief of symptoms and are life-saving in patients with symptomatic heart block. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD are also increasingly recognized as life-saving tools in various groups of patients with malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Methods: As part of the “world survey on pacemaker and ICD implantations”, a survey of all device implantations in Iran during the year 2001 was performed. Data was collected and cross-checked through three sources i.e. direct contact with implanting physicians, pacemaker companies and the governmental pacemaker distributing body.Results: During the year studied, 1635 patients received permanent pacemakers. 88% were new implants at an estimated rate of 24 per million population. The mean age of patients was 65 years and 56.2% were male. 40 cardiologists and 19 surgeons implanted the pacemakers at 27 centers throughout the country. Complete heart block was consistently the most common indication at all centers (mean 56.1%, sick sinus syndrome being the next most common one (mean 20.8%. 69% of the pacemakers were single chamber pacemakers. Transvenous insertion of bipolar steroid-eluting passive fixation leads was the predominant practice at most centers. A total of 60 ICDs were implanted at 7 centers by 9 cardiologists. 45% of ICD implants were dual chamber devices.Conclusion: The survey is the only one available right now and provides useful information about the prevailing pacemaker and defibrillator implantation practice in Iran. Future surveys would be facilitated if a standardized implant registry such as that used in Europe were established in this country.

  10. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics.

  11. Cardiac pacemaker: when to indicate and how to use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Camilo Pellegrino dos Santos

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Among the major technological advances in medicine we can cite the heart pacemaker as one of the most important. The indication may be for the insertion of either a temporary pacemaker or a final one. Its insertion as well as the patient follow up must be carried out by a cardiologist specialized in cardiac pacemakers or in heart surgery. The disturbances of the excito-conductor system, especially bradyarrhythmias, advanced and total blocks are the illnesses that better react to the use of artificial cardiac stimulation.

  12. Of pacemakers and statistics: the actuarial method extended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussel, J; Wolbarst, A B; Scott-Millar, R N; Obel, I W

    1980-01-01

    Pacemakers cease functioning because of either natural battery exhaustion (nbe) or component failure (cf). A study of four series of pacemakers shows that a simple extension of the actuarial method, so as to incorporate Normal statistics, makes possible a quantitative differentiation between the two modes of failure. This involves the separation of the overall failure probability density function PDF(t) into constituent parts pdfnbe(t) and pdfcf(t). The approach should allow a meaningful comparison of the characteristics of different pacemaker types.

  13. Acute pericarditis with cardiac tamponade induced by pacemaker implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingaki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-11-01

    An 87-year-old woman was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular block and underwent pacemaker implantation. On postoperative day 12, she experienced cardiac tamponade that was suspected on computed tomography to be caused by lead perforation; therefore, we performed open-heart surgery. However, we could not identify a perforation site on the heart, and drained a 400-mL exudative pericardial effusion. Subsequently, we diagnosed the pericardial effusion as due to pericarditis induced by pacemaker implantation. It is sometimes difficult to distinguish pericarditis from pacemaker lead perforation, so both should be included in the differential diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders; Marie, Rodolphe

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the optothermal actuation of individual capillary burst valves in an all-polymer microfluidic device. The capillary burst valves are realised in a planar design by introducing a fluidic constriction in a microfluidic channel of constant depth. We show that a capillary burst valve can be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett. 10, 826-832 (2010)]. An individual valve is burst by focusing the laser in its vicinity. We demonstrate the capture of single polystyrene 7 μm beads in the constriction triggered by the bursting of the valve.

  15. An unusual pacemaker malposition and delayed diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bircan Alan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transvenous right ventricular pacing usually shows a left bundle branch block (LBBB pattern. When right bundle branch block (RBBB pattern appears after the insertion of an electrode, perforation or malposition of the pacing lead usually occurs. However, when the pacing lead that is inserted into the coronary sinus or right ventricle extends to right ventricle septum, RBBB pattern may appear. Echocardiography, due to inadequate echo images or reflections, may result in early clinical misdiagnosis since it cannot be evaluated well. Another reason for the errors in diagnosis is that cardiologists generally relegate telegraphy evaluations to a second plan. Here, we present a case of pacemaker malposition, which was diagnosed using X-ray radiography after multiple failed evaluations with echocardiography.

  16. Endocardial Pacemaker Implantation in Neonates and Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Ayabakan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Transvenous pacemaker lead implantation is the preferred method of pacing in adult patients. Lead performance and longevity are superior and the implantation approach can be performed under local anaesthetic with a very low morbidity. In children, and especially in neonates and infants, the epicardial route was traditionally chosen until the advent of smaller generators and lead implantation techniques that allowed growth of the child without lead displacement. Endocardial implantation is not universally accepted, however, as there is an incidence of venous occlusion of the smaller veins of neonates and infants with concerns for loss of venous access in the future. Growing experience with lower profile leads, however, reveals that endocardial pacing too can be performed with low morbidity and good long-term results in neonates and infants.

  17. Introduction to Optical Burst Switching

    OpenAIRE

    KERNÁCS János; Szilágyi, Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) isconsidered a popular switching paradigm for therealization of all-optical networks due to the balance itoffers between the coarse-grained Optical CircuitSwitching (OSC) and fine-grained Optical PacketSwitching (OPS). Given that the data are switched allopticallyat the burst level, Optical Burst Switchingcombines the transparency of Optical CircuitSwitching with the benefits of statistical multiplexingin Optical Packet Switching.

  18. Gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  19. Materials aspects of implantable cardiac pacemaker leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, S D; Mueller, E P

    1988-01-01

    The reliability of the leads of the entire pacemaker system is vital as the risks of failure include: (1) loss of pacing due to the deterioration of the polymeric insulator in the physiological environment; (2) thromboembolism due to inadequate blood compatibility of the insulator; (3) tissue reactions at the electrode/tissue interface; (4) general foreign body rejection phenomena; (5) perforation of the leads; and (6) excessive stress applied by sutures causing abrasion and stress cracking. Although silicone has been used widely, some years ago Pellethane (a segmented polyetherurethane-urea) has been introduced as an alternate lead insulator, chiefly because it can be extruded using additives into smooth and thin tubes. The additives (antioxidants), extrusion aids, and low molecular weight polymer chains (oligomers) together represent up to approximately 8% by weight of leachables, depending on the extraction medium. The in vivo degradation of Pellethane is biologic in nature and is most likely associated with the absorption and premeation of body fluids from the surrounding physiologic environment leading to stress cracking via the formation of microvoids. Thermally and biologically unstable biuret and allophonate groups in this polyurethane, exposure of the polymer to high extrusion temperatures, and stresses created within the polymer also play key roles in the degradation process. In the case of electrodes, some corrosion can occur even with noble metals and ions formed with the involvement of penetrating body fluids which may combine with the urethane and/or urea groups of the polyurethane, leading to its further degradation in vivo. The totality of the situation indicates a need for the development of a standard guideline for the uniform and consistent pre-clinical testing and evaluation of new materials and fabrication processes of implantable pacemaker leads. Such guidelines should take into consideration, among others, the physiological environment

  20. Identification and Functional Characterization of Cardiac Pacemaker Cells in Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tessadori, Federico; van Weerd, Jan Hendrik; Burkhard, Silja B.; Verkerk, Arie O.; de Pater, Emma; Boukens, Bastiaan J.; Vink, Aryan; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Bakkers, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    In the mammalian heart a conduction system of nodes and conducting cells generates and transduces the electrical signals evoking myocardial contractions. Specialized pacemaker cells initiating and controlling cardiac contraction rhythmicity are localized in an anatomically identifiable structure of

  1. Intra-cardiac pacemaker infection: Surgical management and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Elameen

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Explantation of the complete pacemaker system has proved a reliable method to eradicate infection. Complications were rare, except in patients who present lately in a critically ill condition and septic shock.

  2. Interference with the pacemakers of two workers at electricity substations.

    OpenAIRE

    BUTROUS, G. S.; Bexton, R. S.; Barton, D G; Male, J C; Camm, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Pacemaker function was tested in two electricity substation workers exposed to high tension electric fields. High intensity electric fields induced reversion to the interference mode, producing in one case competitive rhythm and in the other inappropriately slow pacing which resulted in asymptomatic pauses of up to 2.5 s. A suit designed to shield the body from the effects of high intensity electric fields was tried and proved to be effective in protecting the pacemaker, allowing it to functi...

  3. ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND MEDICAL SUPPORT OF PATIENTS WITH PERMANENT PACEMAKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Derienko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to clinical problems of arterial hypertension (AH in patients with implanted pacemakers (EKS and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT. Indications for pacemaker implantation and CRT are considered, especially the purpose and effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA, sartans, beta-blockers (BAB, diuretics, calcium channel blockers. We prove that the CRT and cardiac pacing and do not cancel, bur modify drug therapy of AH.

  4. NEW BURST ASSEMBLY AND SCHEDULING TECHNIQUE FOR OPTICAL BURST SWITCHING NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Kavitha, V.; V.Palanisamy

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Burst Switching is a new switching technology that efficiently utilizes the bandwidth in the optical layer. The key areas to be concentrated in Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks are the burst assembly and burst scheduling i.e., assignment of wavelengths to the incoming bursts. This study presents a New Burst Assembly and Scheduling (NBAS) technique in a simultaneous multipath transmission for burst loss recovery in OBS networks. A Redundant Burst Segmentation (RBS) is used fo...

  5. Synchronization of action potentials during low-magnesium-induced bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah E.; Hudson, John L.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between mono- and polysynaptic strength and action potential synchronization was explored using a reduced external Mg2+ model. Single and dual whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in hippocampal cultures in three concentrations of external Mg2+. In decreased Mg2+ medium, the individual cells transitioned to spontaneous bursting behavior. In lowered Mg2+ media the larger excitatory synaptic events were observed more frequently and fewer transmission failures occurred, suggesting strengthened synaptic transmission. The event synchronization was calculated for the neural action potentials of the cell pairs, and it increased in media where Mg2+ concentration was lowered. Analysis of surrogate data where bursting was present, but no direct or indirect connections existed between the neurons, showed minimal action potential synchronization. This suggests the synchronization of action potentials is a product of the strengthening synaptic connections within neuronal networks. PMID:25609103

  6. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  7. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are transient extragalactic events appearing randomly in the sky as localized flashes of electromagnetic radiation, consisting predominantly of photons with energy in the range of ~0.1–1 MeV. These sporadic bursts, occurring at the rate of ~600 per year, are isotropically distributed in the sky, ...

  8. Impact of Pacemaker Lead Characteristics on Pacemaker Related Infection and Heart Perforation: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Lin

    Full Text Available Several risk factors for pacemaker (PM related complications have been reported. However, no study has investigated the impact of lead characteristics on pacemaker-related complications.Patients who received a new pacemaker implant from January 1997 to December 2011 were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. This population was grouped according to the pacemaker lead characteristics in terms of fixation and insulation. The impact of the characteristics of leads on early heart perforation was analyzed by multivariable logistic regression analysis, while the impact of the lead characteristics on early and late infection and late heart perforation over a three-year period were analyzed using Cox regression. This study included 36,104 patients with a mean age of 73.4±12.5 years. In terms of both early and late heart perforations, there were no significant differences between groups across the different types of fixation and insulations. In the multivariable Cox regression analysis, the pacemaker-related infection rate was significantly lower in the active fixation only group compared to either the both fixation (OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07-0.80; P = 0.020 or the passive fixation group (OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.83; P = 0.023.There was no difference in heart perforation between active and passive fixation leads. Active fixation leads were associated with reduced risk of pacemaker-related infection.

  9. Which model to use for cortical spiking neurons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, Eugene M

    2004-09-01

    We discuss the biological plausibility and computational efficiency of some of the most useful models of spiking and bursting neurons. We compare their applicability to large-scale simulations of cortical neural networks.

  10. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  11. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  12. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Balamurugan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS. This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  13. Simulation of developing human neuronal cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kerstin; Priwitzer, Barbara; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tietz, Lukas H B; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2016-08-30

    Microelectrode array (MEA) is a widely used technique to study for example the functional properties of neuronal networks derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-NN). With hESC-NN, we can investigate the earliest developmental stages of neuronal network formation in the human brain. In this paper, we propose an in silico model of maturating hESC-NNs based on a phenomenological model called INEX. We focus on simulations of the development of bursts in hESC-NNs, which are the main feature of neuronal activation patterns. The model was developed with data from developing hESC-NN recordings on MEAs which showed increase in the neuronal activity during the investigated six measurement time points in the experimental and simulated data. Our simulations suggest that the maturation process of hESC-NN, resulting in the formation of bursts, can be explained by the development of synapses. Moreover, spike and burst rate both decreased at the last measurement time point suggesting a pruning of synapses as the weak ones are removed. To conclude, our model reflects the assumption that the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory neurons during the maturation of a neuronal network and the spontaneous emergence of bursts are due to increased connectivity caused by the forming of new synapses.

  14. [Pacemaker catheter induced systolic murmurs in two patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H; Inagaki, M; Shukuya, M; Doba, N; Shimizu, N

    1989-05-01

    Although extracardiac sounds secondary to cardiac pacing have been well known, the murmurs originating in the heart after permanent pacemaker implantation and then disappearance after exchanging a temporary to permanent lead have rarely been reported. In this paper, two patients revealing a musical systolic murmur after placement of a transvenous endocardial pacemaker in the absence of any complications were documented. Case 1: A 43-year-old man with episodes of dizziness and brady-tachycardiac atrial fibrillation. Immediately after the implantation of a temporary transvenous right ventricular pacemaker, a high-pitched systolic musical murmur was heard at the lower left sternal border. No murmur was however gullible after a permanent pacemaker implantation in this case. Case 2 was a 83-year-old female with coronary heart disease associated with sick sinus syndrome to whom a permanent transvenous right ventricular pacemaker was inserted. A musical systolic murmur occurring immediately after the procedure was best audible at the apex. Although numerous papers concerning the mechanisms of these cardiac murmurs have been reported without reaching conclusive explanations, our data based on two cases examined with Doppler echocardiography did not support the idea of tricuspid regurgitation as one of causative factors. In the first case, this murmur appeared only a temporary pacing was performed and disappeared after implantation of a permanent pacemaker lead. On the contrary, however, the 2nd case revealed after the implantation of the permanent pacemaker with a relatively rigid bipolar lead. It is concluded that these murmurs might be produced by vibrations caused by the pacing catheters and physical properties could be related the mechanism of this phenomenon.

  15. Burst Oscillation Studies with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2017-08-01

    Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes observed from the surfaces of accreting neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries. Oscillations have been observed during the rise and/or decay of some of these X-ray bursts. Those seen during the rise can be well explained by a spreading hot spot model, but large amplitude oscillations in the decay phase remain mysterious because of the absence of a clear-cut source of asymmetry. Here we present the results of our computations of the light curves and amplitudes of oscillations in X-ray burst models that realistically account for both flame spreading and subsequent cooling. For the cooling phase of the burst we use two simple phenomenological models. The first considers asymmetric cooling that can achieve high amplitudes in the tail. The second considers a sustained temperature pattern on the stellar surface that is produced by r-modes propagating in the surface fluid ocean of the star. We will present some simulated burst light curves/spectra using these models and NICER response files, and will show the capabilities of NICER to detect and study burst oscillations. NICER will enable us to study burst oscillations in the energy band below ~3 keV, where there has been no previous measurements of these phenomena.

  16. Roles of subthreshold calcium current and sodium current in spontaneous firing of mouse midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, Michelino; Raviola, Elio; Bean, Bruce P

    2007-01-17

    We used a preparation of acutely dissociated neurons to quantify the ionic currents driving the spontaneous firing of substantia nigra pars compacta neurons, isolated from transgenic mice in which the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter drives expression of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) on the outer surface of the cell membrane. Dissociated neurons identified by fluorescent antibodies to PLAP showed firing properties similar to those of dopaminergic neurons in brain slice, including rhythmic spontaneous firing of broad action potentials and, in some cells, rhythmic oscillatory activity in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Spontaneous activity in TTX had broader, smaller spikes than normal pacemaking and was stopped by removal of external calcium. Normal pacemaking was also consistently silenced by replacement of external calcium by cobalt and was slowed by more specific calcium channel blockers. Nimodipine produced a slowing of pacemaking frequency. Pacemaking was also slowed by the P/Q-channel blocker omega-Aga-IVA, but the N-type channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA had no effect. In voltage-clamp experiments, using records of pacemaking as command voltage, cobalt-sensitive current and TTX-sensitive current were both sizeable at subthreshold voltages between spikes. Cobalt-sensitive current was consistently larger than TTX-sensitive current at interspike voltages from -70 to -50 mV, with TTX-sensitive current larger at voltages positive to -45 mV. These results support previous evidence for a major role of voltage-dependent calcium channels in driving pacemaking of midbrain dopamine neurons and suggest that multiple calcium channel types contribute to this function. The results also show a significant contribution of subthreshold TTX-sensitive sodium current.

  17. Patients exposure from fluoroscopic guided pacemaker implantation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O. Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Daar, E. [University of Jordan, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Amman 11942 (Jordan); Alnaaimi, M.; Alduaij, M. [Kuwait Cancer Control Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shwiekh (Kuwait); Bradley, D., E-mail: malkhorayef@ksu.edu.sa [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    A pacemaker, which is used for heart re synchronization with electrical impulses, is used to manage many clinical conditions. Recently, the frequency of the pacemaker implantation procedures increased 50% worldwide. During this procedure, patients and staff can be exposed to excessive radiation exposure. Wide range of doses was reported in previous studies, suggesting that optimization of this procedure is not fulfilled yet. This study aims to evaluate the patient and staff radiation doses during cardiac pacemaker procedure and quantify the patient effective dose. A total of 145 procedures were performed for five pacemakers procedures (VVI, VVIR, VVD, VVDR and DDDR) two hospitals were evaluated. Patients doses were measured using the kerma-area product meter. Effective doses were estimated using software based on Monte Carlo simulation from National Radiological Protection Board. The effective dose values were used to estimate the cancer risk from pacemaker procedure. Patients demographic data, exposure parameters for both fluoroscopy and radiography were quantified. The mean patients doses (Gy. cm{sup 2}) for VVI, VVIR, VVD, VVDR and DDDR was 1.52±0.13 (1.43-1.61), 3.28±2.34 (0.29-8.73), 3.04±1.67 (1.57-4.86), 6.04±2.326 and 19.2±3.6 (5.43-30.2), respectively, per procedure. The overall patients effective dose is 1.1 mSv per procedure. (Author)

  18. Effects of irradiation on the components of implantable pacemakers

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamura, S; Kuga, N; Shiba, T; Hirose, T; Fujimoto, H; Toyoshima, T; Hyodo, K; Matoba, M

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of irradiation on implantable pacemaker components. The pacemaker was divided into three components: lead wire and electrode, battery, and electrical circuit, and each component was irradiated by X-ray and electron beams, respectively. The pacemaker parameters were measured by both telemetry data of the programmer and directly measured data from the output terminal. The following results were obtained. For the lead wire and electrode, there was no effect on the pacemaker function due to irradiation by X-ray and electron beams. In the case of battery irradiation, there was no change in battery voltage or current up to 236 Gy X-ray dose. In the electrical circuit, the pacemaker reverted to the regular beating rate (fixed-rate mode) immediately after the start of X-ray irradiation, and it continued in this mode during irradiation. In patients with their own heartbeat rhythm, changing to the fixed-rate mode may cause dangerous conditions such as ventricular fib...

  19. Implantable Cardiac Pacemakers – 50 Years from the First Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratko Magjarević

    2010-01-01

    Overview: Development of implantable cardiac pacemaker was enabled by another important invention, the silicon transistor. h ough the invention of suitable lithium cells as appropriate power supply was essential for prolongation of battery life cycle and for increased reliability of pacemakers, main milestones in the development were associated with technological breakthroughs in electronics: from transistors, which introduced such features as small size and low power consumption, to hybrid and integrated circuits, which enabled programmability, microprocessors, which added more options in programming (multiprogrammability, diagnostics and telemetry, and the ICT (information communication technology that enabled physicians remote access to patients and interrogation of their implantable devices. Conclusions: Implantable pacemakers are reliable devices indicated for a wide range of dif erent therapies of cardiac rhythm disorders and heart failure. h ere is still a lot to learn about the physiology of a normal heart and even more about the failing heart. Modern pacemakers provide physicians valuable information from pacemakers’ memory via the built-in telemetry system. h ese information help physicians to better understand pathologic processes within the heart, thus contributing to the development of new ideas for treatment of diseases and for precise tailoring of the therapy to the patient’s needs. Although implantable pacemakers have reached the level of mature technology, they will continue to develop with therapies and diagnostics to facilitate a higher quality of life.

  20. Experimental study on malfunction of pacemakers due to exposure to different external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiikkaja, Maria; Alanko, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Hietanen, Maila; Hartikainen, Juha; Toivonen, Lauri

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac pacemaker malfunction due to exposure to magnetic fields may cause serious problems in some work environments for workers having cardiac pacemakers. The aim of this study was to find the magnetic field interference thresholds for several commonly used pacemaker models. We investigated 16 pacemakers from three different manufacturers with the frequency range of 2 to 1,000 Hz, using sinusoidal, pulse, ramp, and square waveforms. The magnetic fields were produced by a computer-controlled Helmholtz coil system. Pacemaker malfunction occurred in six of 16 pacemakers. Interaction developed almost immediately after high-intensity magnetic field exposure started. With each waveform, at least two pacemakers exhibited interference. In most exposure settings, there was no interference at magnetic field levels below the international occupational safety limits. Nevertheless, some frequencies using ramp or square waveforms interfered with pacemakers even at levels below public exposure limits. The occurrence of interference depended greatly on the waveform, frequency, magnetic field intensity, and the sensing configuration of the pacemaker. Unipolar configurations were more susceptible for interference than the bipolar ones. In addition, magnetic fields perpendicular to the pacemaker loops were more likely to cause interference than parallel fields. There is a need for further investigations on pacemaker interference caused by different external magnetic fields to ensure safe working environment to workers with a pacemaker.

  1. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  2. [Cardiac magnetic resonance with a MRI compatible pacemaker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenti-Rossi, D; Alonso, C; Baron, N; Allouch, P; Convers, R; Belliard, O; Galuscan, G; Gibault-Genty, G; Aubert, S

    2013-11-01

    Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices are usually excluded from MRI examinations due to contraindication for MRI. The MRI-conditional pacemaker system may allow the benefits of MRI (system 1.5T) to be more accessible to pacemaker patients. A 62-year-old man was admitted with acute coronary syndrome and atrial fibrillation. A conventional angiography showed normal coronaries. A cardiac cardioversion revealed a significant sinus node dysfunction and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible dual chamber system was implanted. At 6-week follow-up, a cardiac MRI revealed a typical anterior myocardial infarction with diagnostic quality images despite pacemaker. This is one of the first reports of cardiovascular MRI in a patient with MRI-conditional pacing system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Automatic Capture Verification in Pacemakers (Autocapture – Utility and Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Kam

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a closed – loop feedback system, that would automatically assess pacing threshold and self -adjust pacing output to ensure consistent myocardial capture, has many appeals. Enhancing patient safety in cases of an unexpected rise in threshold, reduced current drain, hence prolonging battery longevity and reducing the amount of physician intervention required are just some of the advantages. Autocapture (AC is a proprietary algorithm developed by St Jude Medical CRMD, Sylmar, CA, USA, (SJM that was the first to commercially provide these automatic functions in a single chamber pacemaker (Microny and Regency, and subsequently in a dual chamber pacemaker (Affinity, Entity and Identity family of pacemakers. This article reviews the conditions necessary for AC verification and performance and the problems encountered in clinical practice.

  4. Dual PDF signaling pathways reset clocks via TIMELESS and acutely excite target neurons to control circadian behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seluzicki, Adam; Flourakis, Matthieu; Kula-Eversole, Elzbieta; Zhang, Luoying; Kilman, Valerie; Allada, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Molecular circadian clocks are interconnected via neural networks. In Drosophila, PIGMENT-DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) acts as a master network regulator with dual functions in synchronizing molecular oscillations between disparate PDF(+) and PDF(-) circadian pacemaker neurons and controlling pacemaker neuron output. Yet the mechanisms by which PDF functions are not clear. We demonstrate that genetic inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) in PDF(-) clock neurons can phenocopy PDF mutants while activated PKA can partially rescue PDF receptor mutants. PKA subunit transcripts are also under clock control in non-PDF DN1p neurons. To address the core clock target of PDF, we rescued per in PDF neurons of arrhythmic per⁰¹ mutants. PDF neuron rescue induced high amplitude rhythms in the clock component TIMELESS (TIM) in per-less DN1p neurons. Complete loss of PDF or PKA inhibition also results in reduced TIM levels in non-PDF neurons of per⁰¹ flies. To address how PDF impacts pacemaker neuron output, we focally applied PDF to DN1p neurons and found that it acutely depolarizes and increases firing rates of DN1p neurons. Surprisingly, these effects are reduced in the presence of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, yet persist in the presence of PKA inhibition. We have provided evidence for a signaling mechanism (PKA) and a molecular target (TIM) by which PDF resets and synchronizes clocks and demonstrates an acute direct excitatory effect of PDF on target neurons to control neuronal output. The identification of TIM as a target of PDF signaling suggests it is a multimodal integrator of cell autonomous clock, environmental light, and neural network signaling. Moreover, these data reveal a bifurcation of PKA-dependent clock effects and PKA-independent output effects. Taken together, our results provide a molecular and cellular basis for the dual functions of PDF in clock resetting and pacemaker output.

  5. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-07

    Dec 7, 2008 ... communication between the two brain hemispheres (Kaneko and Hall 2000; Helfrich-Förster et al. 2007). ... that PDF is essential for communication among and between the LNv and other circadian neurons ..... treat circadian rhythm disorders in more complex circuits. Acknowledgements. I thank Todd ...

  6. Pacemaker patients' perception of unsafe activities: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Masooma; Shafquat, Azam; Salahuddin, Nawal

    2008-11-14

    Cardiac pacing is a recognized and widely used treatment for patients presenting with bradycardia. Physicians expect patients to return to normal activities almost immediately post implantation. However, patients themselves may perceive interference to pacemaker function by various routine activities and devices, and hence continue to lead restricted, disabled lives. The aim of this study is to determine if routine activities are perceived by pacemaker patients to interfere with their device function. A descriptive cross sectional survey was carried out on consecutive patients at the pacemaker clinic at a public hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. A 47-question tool was developed and tested. Patients' perceptions of safety of performing various routine activities, along with socio-demographic data were recorded. The final sample included 93 adult patients (45% males). 41% were illiterate. 77.4% recalled receiving counselling at implantation, predominantly from the implanting physician and house staff. A considerable proportion of patients considered many routine activities unsafe including driving automobiles (28%), passing through metal detectors (31%), bending over (37%), and sleeping on the side of the pacemaker (30%). Also considered unsafe were operation of household appliances--TV/VCR (television/video cassette recorders) (53%), irons (55%)) and electrical wall switches (56%). For nearly all variables neither literacy nor history of counselling improved incorrect perceptions. This study shows that our pacemaker patients perceive many routine activities as unsafe, potentially leading to disabling life style modifications. The tremendous investment in pacemaker technology to improve patient performance is not going to pay dividends if patients continue to remain disabled due to incorrect perceptions. Further studies are required to determine the reasons for these misperceptions, and to determine if these problems also exist in, and hinder, other patient populations.

  7. Pacemaker patients' perception of unsafe activities: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafquat Azam

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac pacing is a recognized and widely used treatment for patients presenting with bradycardia. Physicians expect patients to return to normal activities almost immediately post implantation. However, patients themselves may perceive interference to pacemaker function by various routine activities and devices, and hence continue to lead restricted, disabled lives. The aim of this study is to determine if routine activities are perceived by pacemaker patients to interfere with their device function. Methods A descriptive cross sectional survey was carried out on consecutive patients at the pacemaker clinic at a public hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. A 47-question tool was developed and tested. Patients' perceptions of safety of performing various routine activities, along with socio-demographic data were recorded. Results The final sample included 93 adult patients (45% males. 41% were illiterate. 77.4% recalled receiving counselling at implantation, predominantly from the implanting physician and house staff. A considerable proportion of patients considered many routine activities unsafe including driving automobiles (28%, passing through metal detectors (31%, bending over (37%, and sleeping on the side of the pacemaker (30%. Also considered unsafe were operation of household appliances- TV/VCR (television/video cassette recorders (53%, irons (55% and electrical wall switches (56%. For nearly all variables neither literacy nor history of counselling improved incorrect perceptions. Conclusion This study shows that our pacemaker patients perceive many routine activities as unsafe, potentially leading to disabling life style modifications. The tremendous investment in pacemaker technology to improve patient performance is not going to pay dividends if patients continue to remain disabled due to incorrect perceptions. Further studies are required to determine the reasons for these misperceptions, and to determine if these

  8. Interference with the pacemakers of two workers at electricity substations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrous, G S; Bexton, R S; Barton, D G; Male, J C; Camm, A J

    1983-11-01

    Pacemaker function was tested in two electricity substation workers exposed to high tension electric fields. High intensity electric fields induced reversion to the interference mode, producing in one case competitive rhythm and in the other inappropriately slow pacing which resulted in asymptomatic pauses of up to 2.5 s. A suit designed to shield the body from the effects of high intensity electric fields was tried and proved to be effective in protecting the pacemaker, allowing it to function normally in the substations.

  9. [Development and research of temporary demand pacemaker with electrocardiosignal display].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shounian; Jiang, Chenxi; Cai, Yunchang; Pan, Yangzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Wu, Qiang; Zheng, Yaxi; Liu, Xiaoqiao; Li, Shiying

    2004-08-01

    A temporary demand pacemaker with electrocardiosignal display is introduced in this paper. Double way low-noise electrocardiosignal preamplifier, amplitude limiter, high and low pass filter, 50 Hz notch filter, TTL level generator and stimulating pulse formation circuit are components of the hardware electrocircuit. The demand pacing and the electrocardiosignal display are separately controlled by the software in which the double microcontrollers communications technique is used. In this study, liquid crystal display is firstly used in body surface electrocardiosignal display or intracardial electrophysiologic signal display when the temporary demand pacemaker is installed and put into use. The machine has proven clinically useful and can be of wide appliation.

  10. Putative pacemakers in the eyestalk and brain of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii show circadian oscillations in levels of mRNA for crustacean hyperglycemic hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janikua Nelson-Mora

    Full Text Available Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH synthesizing cells in the optic lobe, one of the pacemakers of the circadian system, have been shown to be present in crayfish. However, the presence of CHH in the central brain, another putative pacemaker of the multi-oscillatory circadian system, of this decapod and its circadian transcription in the optic lobe and brain have yet to be explored. Therefore, using qualitative and quantitative PCR, we isolated and cloned a CHH mRNA fragment from two putative pacemakers of the multi-oscillatory circadian system of Procambarus clarkii, the optic lobe and the central brain. This CHH transcript synchronized to daily light-dark cycles and oscillated under dark, constant conditions demonstrating statistically significant daily and circadian rhythms in both structures. Furthermore, to investigate the presence of the peptide in the central brain of this decapod, we used immunohistochemical methods. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of CHH-IR in fibers and cells of the protocerebral and tritocerebal clusters and neuropiles, particularly in some neurons located in clusters 6, 14, 15 and 17. The presence of CHH positive neurons in structures of P. clarkii where clock proteins have been reported suggests a relationship between the circadian clockwork and CHH. This work provides new insights into the circadian regulation of CHH, a pleiotropic hormone that regulates many physiological processes such as glucose metabolism and osmoregulatory responses to stress.

  11. Decameter Type III-Like Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Rucker, H. O.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2007-12-01

    Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

  12. Leader neurons in leaky integrate and fire neural network simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Cyrille

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we highlight the topological properties of leader neurons whose existence is an experimental fact. Several experimental studies show the existence of leader neurons in population bursts of activity in 2D living neural networks (Eytan and Marom, J Neurosci 26(33):8465-8476, 2006; Eckmann et al., New J Phys 10(015011), 2008). A leader neuron is defined as a neuron which fires at the beginning of a burst (respectively network spike) more often than we expect by chance considering its mean firing rate. This means that leader neurons have some burst triggering power beyond a chance-level statistical effect. In this study, we characterize these leader neuron properties. This naturally leads us to simulate neural 2D networks. To build our simulations, we choose the leaky integrate and fire (lIF) neuron model (Gerstner and Kistler 2002; Cessac, J Math Biol 56(3):311-345, 2008), which allows fast simulations (Izhikevich, IEEE Trans Neural Netw 15(5):1063-1070, 2004; Gerstner and Naud, Science 326:379-380, 2009). The dynamics of our lIF model has got stable leader neurons in the burst population that we simulate. These leader neurons are excitatory neurons and have a low membrane potential firing threshold. Except for these two first properties, the conditions required for a neuron to be a leader neuron are difficult to identify and seem to depend on several parameters involved in the simulations themselves. However, a detailed linear analysis shows a trend of the properties required for a neuron to be a leader neuron. Our main finding is: A leader neuron sends signals to many excitatory neurons as well as to few inhibitory neurons and a leader neuron receives only signals from few other excitatory neurons. Our linear analysis exhibits five essential properties of leader neurons each with different relative importance. This means that considering a given neural network with a fixed mean number of connections per neuron, our analysis gives us a way of

  13. Shaping bursting by electrical coupling and noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Georgi S; Zhuravytska, Svitlana

    2012-02-01

    Gap-junctional coupling is an important way of communication between neurons and other excitable cells. Strong electrical coupling synchronizes activity across cell ensembles. Surprisingly, in the presence of noise synchronous oscillations generated by an electrically coupled network may differ qualitatively from the oscillations produced by uncoupled individual cells forming the network. A prominent example of such behavior is the synchronized bursting in islets of Langerhans formed by pancreatic β-cells, which in isolation are known to exhibit irregular spiking (Sherman and Rinzel, Biophys J 54:411-425, 1988; Sherman and Rinzel, Biophys J 59:547-559, 1991). At the heart of this intriguing phenomenon lies denoising, a remarkable ability of electrical coupling to diminish the effects of noise acting on individual cells. In this paper, building on an earlier analysis of denoising in networks of integrate-and-fire neurons (Medvedev, Neural Comput 21 (11):3057-3078, 2009) and our recent study of spontaneous activity in a closely related model of the Locus Coeruleus network (Medvedev and Zhuravytska, The geometry of spontaneous spiking in neuronal networks, submitted, 2012), we derive quantitative estimates characterizing denoising in electrically coupled networks of conductance-based models of square wave bursting cells. Our analysis reveals the interplay of the intrinsic properties of the individual cells and network topology and their respective contributions to this important effect. In particular, we show that networks on graphs with large algebraic connectivity (Fiedler, Czech Math J 23(98):298-305, 1973) or small total effective resistance (Bollobas, Modern graph theory, Graduate Texts in Mathematics, vol. 184, Springer, New York, 1998) are better equipped for implementing denoising. As a by-product of the analysis of denoising, we analytically estimate the rate with which trajectories converge to the synchronization subspace and the stability of the latter to

  14. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  15. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  16. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashery, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level. PMID:26372048

  17. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  18. Pacemaker dislocation - Truly ectopic activation necessitating surgical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kroon, TL; Witsenburg, M; Bogerts, AJJC

    Intra-abdominal migration of a generator from an epicardial pacemaker system is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We report on a case of a 2-year-old child in whom the generator silently migrated from the sheath of the rectus abdominis muscle in the upper abdominal wall down into

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome type I following pacemaker implantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamath, Sangita; Rao, Ballamudi Srinivas

    ... of the fingers with inability to bend the fingers since 2 months. The symptoms were progressively increasing in intensity for the past 1 month. There was no history of fever or trauma to the hand that she could recall. Two months prior to the development of her symptoms, she had permanent pacemaker (VVl) inserted for complete heart block with syncope....

  20. [Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis in a patient with a biventricular pacemaker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, José M; Fariñas, María C; Rodilla, Irene G; Salesa, Ricardo; de Berrazueta, José R

    2005-05-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis is one of the rarest and severest complications in cardiological patients. We describe a patient with an intracardial pacemaker who was diagnosed as having Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis. Postmortem examination showed a large, Aspergillus-infected thrombus encased in the right ventricle, pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary branches.

  1. Pacemaker Related Infective Endocarditis from Staphylococcus Lugdunensis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ward

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a common skin flora not typically associated with infection. There are, however, several cases reported in the literature of Staphylococcus lugdunensis as a causative bacterium of various infections. This paper reports an additional case of pacemaker associated endocarditis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis as the causative bacterium.

  2. A pacemaker for asystole in breath-holding spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, Leah M; Kantoch, Michal J; Seshia, Shashi S; Soni, Reeni

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of young children with frequent severe breath-holding spells complicated by prolonged asystole and seizures are reported. A ventricular pacemaker was implanted in each child, and both have subsequently remained free of syncope, although they continue to exhibit breath-holding behaviour. PMID:20046299

  3. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610 Section 870.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... intermittent and continuous cardiac rhythm disorders. This device includes triggered, inhibited, and...

  4. Cost Issues in Pacemaker Surgery in Nigeria | Thomas | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Permanent pacemakers are being implanted worldwide for prolongation and improvement of lives of patients who have conduction defects. Even though the average cost of pacing has reduced significantly over the years, procurement of the all important treatment modality remains a major financial drain especially in a ...

  5. Circadian organization is governed by extra-SCN pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezuk, Pinar; Mohawk, Jennifer A; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael

    2010-12-01

    In mammals, a pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is thought to be required for behavioral, physiological, and molecular circadian rhythms. However, there is considerable evidence that temporal food restriction (restricted feedisng [RF]) and chronic methamphetamine (MA) can drive circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature, and endocrine function in the absence of SCN. This indicates the existence of extra-SCN pacemakers: the Food Entrainable Oscillator (FEO) and Methamphetamine Sensitive Circadian Oscillator (MASCO). Here, we show that these extra-SCN pacemakers control the phases of peripheral oscillators in intact as well as in SCN-ablated PER2::LUC mice. MA administration shifted the phases of SCN, cornea, pineal, pituitary, kidney, and salivary glands in intact animals. When the SCN was ablated, disrupted phase relationships among peripheral oscillators were reinstated by MA treatment. When intact animals were subjected to restricted feeding, the phases of cornea, pineal, kidney, salivary gland, lung, and liver were shifted. In SCN-lesioned restricted-fed mice, phases of all of the tissues shifted such that they aligned with the time of the meal. Taken together, these data show that FEO and MASCO are strong circadian pacemakers able to regulate the phases of peripheral oscillators.

  6. Rhythmic activities of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons: autocontrol mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, P; Moos, F; Dayanithi, G; Gouzènes, L; Sabatier, N

    1997-12-01

    Electrophysiological recordings in lactating rats show that oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) neurons exhibit specific patterns of activities in relation to peripheral stimuli: periodic bursting firing for OT neurons during suckling, phasic firing for AVP neurons during hyperosmolarity (systemic injection of hypertonic saline). These activities are autocontrolled by OT and AVP released somato-dentritically within the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei. In vivo, OT enhances the amplitude and frequency of bursts, an effect accompanied with an increase in basal firing rate. However, the characteristics of firing change as facilitation proceeds: the spike patterns become very irregular with clusters of spikes spaced by long silences; the firing rate is highly variable and clearly oscillates before facilitated bursts. This unstable behaviour dramatically decreases during intense tonic activation which temporarily interrupts bursting, and could therefore be a prerequisite for bursting. In vivo, the effects of AVP depend on the initial firing pattern of AVP neurons: AVP excites weakly active neurons (increasing duration of active periods and decreasing silences), inhibits highly active neurons, and does not affect neurons with intermediate phasic activity. AVP brings the entire population of AVP neurons to discharge with a medium phasic activity characterised by periods of firing and silence lasting 20-40 s, a pattern shown to optimise the release of AVP from the neurohypophysis. Each of the peptides (OT or AVP) induces an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, specifically in the neurons containing either OT or AVP respectively. OT evokes the release of Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores. AVP induces an influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels of T-, L- and N-types. We postulate that the facilitatory autocontrol of OT and AVP neurons could be mediated by Ca2+ known to play a key role in the control of the patterns of phasic neurons.

  7. Synchronization Dynamics of Two Heterogeneous Chaotic Rulkov Neurons with Electrical Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lifang; Cao, Hongjun

    Two heterogeneous chaotic Rulkov neurons with electrical synapses are investigated in this paper. First, we study the ability of the second neuron to modify the dynamics of the first neuron. It is shown that when the parameters of the first neuron are located at the vicinity of the Neimark-Sacker bifurcation curves the first firing neuron can be controlled into the quiescent state when coupled with the second neuron. While the parameters of the first neuron are near the flip bifurcation curves the first firing neuron cannot be suppressed. Second, we discuss burst synchronization for two bursting neurons and two tonic spiking neurons. It is shown that two heterogeneous chaotic Rulkov neurons with tonic spiking firing cannot reach anti-phase synchronization under the inhibitory coupling, which is different from the property of nonchaotic Rulkov neurons. Finally, we show that for two bursting neurons if the coupling is strong enough then burst synchronization can be converted into spike synchronization. However, complete synchronization cannot be achieved for any strong coupling.

  8. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  9. Phase-dependent stimulation effects on bursting activity in a neural network cortical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William S; Kudela, Pawel; Weinberg, Seth; Bergey, Gregory K; Franaszczuk, Piotr J

    2009-03-01

    A neural network simulation with realistic cortical architecture has been used to study synchronized bursting as a seizure representation. This model has the property that bursting epochs arise and cease spontaneously, and bursting epochs can be induced by external stimulation. We have used this simulation to study the time-frequency properties of the evolving bursting activity, as well as effects due to network stimulation. The model represents a cortical region of 1.6 mm x 1.6mm, and includes seven neuron classes organized by cortical layer, inhibitory or excitatory properties, and electrophysiological characteristics. There are a total of 65,536 modeled single compartment neurons that operate according to a version of Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics. The intercellular wiring is based on histological studies and our previous modeling efforts. The bursting phase is characterized by a flat frequency spectrum. Stimulation pulses are applied to this modeled network, with an electric field provided by a 1mm radius circular electrode represented mathematically in the simulation. A phase dependence to the post-stimulation quiescence is demonstrated, with local relative maxima in efficacy occurring before or during the network depolarization phase in the underlying activity. Brief periods of network insensitivity to stimulation are also demonstrated. The phase dependence was irregular and did not reach statistical significance when averaged over the full 2.5s of simulated bursting investigated. This result provides comparison with previous in vivo studies which have also demonstrated increased efficacy of stimulation when pulses are applied at the peak of the local field potential during cortical after discharges. The network bursting is synchronous when comparing the different neuron classes represented up to an uncertainty of 10 ms. Studies performed with an excitatory chandelier cell component demonstrated increased synchronous bursting in the model, as predicted from

  10. Microgenerators for energy autarkic pacemakers and defibrillators: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görge, G; Kirstein, M; Erbel, R

    2001-02-01

    Implantable devices for medical use like permanent pacemakers, defibrillators, and fluid pumps depend on an energy provided by batteries. Unfortunately, the battery usually determines the duration of life of these devices, while technical problems occur infrequent. Device replacement for battery exhaustion requires surgical procedures and account for up to 1/3 of all pacemakers sold. Attempts to provide unlimited power support using radio transmission, nuclear energy etc. did not gain clinical acceptance. We therefore evaluated the potential role of a microgenerator (designed for use in wrist watches) to recharge pacemaker batteries. We used the Epson-Seiko Caliber 5M22 that uses a "Gold-Cap" for energy storage. The mass of the actuator is 1.6 g and an angle of > 10 degrees is needed to overcome friction. Output at a rotor frequency of 200 Hz is 1.8 mWatt To measure the power provided, various experiments were made with the microgenerator taped to the chest of a normal person working in an office. Range of 11 experiments over 8 hours each was 0.2 to 3.1 microWatt (median 0.5 microWatt). Therefore, the power generated was 10 to 100 times less than the calculated power needed to recharge a typical pacemaker battery. A second type of generator (Mondaine, Zurich, Switzerland) with less mechanical parts, available in a "black box" version only, generated not more power. Thus, commercially available, yet not optimized microgenerators provided only between 1 to 10% of the power requirements of a pacemaker. However, modifications in design and mainly the orientation and weight of the actuator to generate more power from the G-forces during walking, would result in a more meaningful energy output.

  11. Shortest loops are pacemakers in random networks of electrically coupled axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita eVladimirov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency oscillations (HFOs are an important part of brain activity in health and disease. However, their origins remain obscure and controversial. One possible mechanism depends on the presence of sparsely distributed gap junctions that electrically couple the axons of principal cells. A plexus of electrically coupled axons is modeled as a random network with bidirectional connections between its nodes. Under certain conditions the network can demonstrate one of two types of oscillatory activity. Type I oscillations (100-200 Hz are predicted to be caused by spontaneously spiking axons in a network with strong (high-conductance gap junctions. Type II oscillations (200-300 Hz require no spontaneous spiking and relatively weak (low-conductance gap junctions, across which spike propagation failures occur. The type II oscillations are reentrant and self-sustained. Here we examine what determines the frequency of type II oscillations. Using simulations we show that the distribution of loop lengths is the key factor for determining frequency in type II network oscillations. We first analyze spike failure between two electrically coupled cells using a model of anatomically reconstructed CA1 pyramidal neuron. Then network oscillations are studied by a cellular automaton model with random network connectivity, in which we control loop statistics. We show that oscillation periods can be predicted from the network's loop statistics. The shortest loop, around which a spike can travel, is the most likely pacemaker candidate.The principle of one loop as a pacemaker is remarkable, because random networks contain a large number of loops juxtaposed and superimposed, and their number rapidly grows with network size. This principle allows us to predict the frequency of oscillations from network connectivity and visa versa. We finally propose that type I oscillations may correspond to ripples, while type II oscillations correspond to so-called fast ripples.

  12. Epigenetic Regulation of Axonal Growth of Drosophila Pacemaker Cells by Histone Acetyltransferase Tip60 Controls Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirooznia, Sheila K.; Chiu, Kellie; Chan, May T.; Zimmerman, John E.; Elefant, Felice

    2012-01-01

    Tip60 is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzyme that epigenetically regulates genes enriched for neuronal functions through interaction with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular domain. However, whether Tip60-mediated epigenetic dysregulation affects specific neuronal processes in vivo and contributes to neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here, we show that Tip60 HAT activity mediates axonal growth of the Drosophila pacemaker cells, termed “small ventrolateral neurons” (sLNvs), and their production of the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) that functions to stabilize Drosophila sleep–wake cycles. Using genetic approaches, we show that loss of Tip60 HAT activity in the presence of the Alzheimer’s disease-associated APP affects PDF expression and causes retraction of the sLNv synaptic arbor required for presynaptic release of PDF. Functional consequence of these effects is evidenced by disruption of the sleep–wake cycle in these flies. Notably, overexpression of Tip60 in conjunction with APP rescues these sleep–wake disturbances by inducing overelaboration of the sLNv synaptic terminals and increasing PDF levels, supporting a neuroprotective role for dTip60 in sLNv growth and function under APP-induced neurodegenerative conditions. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism for Tip60 mediated sleep–wake regulation via control of axonal growth and PDF levels within the sLNv-encompassing neural network and provide insight into epigenetic-based regulation of sleep disturbances observed in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22982579

  13. A neuron-based time-optimal controller of horizontal saccadic eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Alireza; Enderle, John D

    2014-09-01

    A neural network model of biophysical neurons in the midbrain for controlling oculomotor muscles during horizontal human saccades is presented. Neural circuitry that includes omnipause neuron, premotor excitatory and inhibitory burst neurons, long lead burst neuron, tonic neuron, interneuron, abducens nucleus and oculomotor nucleus is developed to investigate saccade dynamics. The final motoneuronal signals drive a time-optimal controller that stimulates a linear homeomorphic model of the oculomotor plant. To our knowledge, this is the first report on modeling the neural circuits at both premotor and motor stages of neural activity in saccadic systems.

  14. Burst firing in a motion-sensitive neural pathway correlates with expansion properties of looming objects that evoke avoidance behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Allan McMillan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The locust visual system contains a well-defined motion-sensitive pathway that transfers visual input to motor centers involved in predator evasion and collision avoidance. One interneuron in this pathway, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD, is typically described as using rate coding; edge expansion of approaching objects causes an increased rate of neuronal firing that peaks after a certain retinal threshold angle is exceeded. However, evidence of intrinsic DCMD bursting properties combined with observable oscillations in mean firing rates and tight clustering of spikes in raw traces, suggest that bursting may be important for motion detection. Sensory neuron bursting provides important timing information about dynamic stimuli in many model systems, yet no studies have rigorously investigated if bursting occurs in the locust DCMD during object approach. We presented repetitions of 30 looming stimuli known to generate behavioural responses to each of 20 locusts in order to identify and quantify putative bursting activity in the DCMD. Overall, we found a bimodal distribution of inter-spike intervals (ISI with peaks of more frequent and shorter ISIs occurring from 1-8 ms and longer less frequent ISIs occurring from 40-50 ms. Subsequent analysis identified bursts and isolated single spikes from the responses. Bursting frequency increased in the latter phase of an approach and peaked at the time of collision, while isolated spiking was predominant during the beginning of stimulus approach. We also found that the majority of inter-burst intervals occurred at 40-50 ms (or 20-25 bursts/s. Bursting also occurred across varied stimulus parameters and suggests that burst timing may be a key component of looming detection. Our findings suggest that the DCMD uses two modes of coding to transmit information about looming stimuli and that these modes change dynamically with a changing stimulus at a behaviourally-relevant time.

  15. Burst Firing in a Motion-Sensitive Neural Pathway Correlates with Expansion Properties of Looming Objects that Evoke Avoidance Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Glyn A; Gray, John R

    2015-01-01

    The locust visual system contains a well-defined motion-sensitive pathway that transfers visual input to motor centers involved in predator evasion and collision avoidance. One interneuron in this pathway, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), is typically described as using rate coding; edge expansion of approaching objects causes an increased rate of neuronal firing that peaks after a certain retinal threshold angle is exceeded. However, evidence of intrinsic DCMD bursting properties combined with observable oscillations in mean firing rates and tight clustering of spikes in raw traces, suggest that bursting may be important for motion detection. Sensory neuron bursting provides important timing information about dynamic stimuli in many model systems, yet no studies have rigorously investigated if bursting occurs in the locust DCMD during object approach. We presented repetitions of 30 looming stimuli known to generate behavioral responses to each of 20 locusts in order to identify and quantify putative bursting activity in the DCMD. Overall, we found a bimodal distribution of inter-spike intervals (ISI) with peaks of more frequent and shorter ISIs occurring from 1-8 ms and longer less frequent ISIs occurring from 40-50 ms. Subsequent analysis identified bursts and isolated single spikes from the responses. Bursting frequency increased in the latter phase of an approach and peaked at the time of collision, while isolated spiking was predominant during the beginning of stimulus approach. We also found that the majority of inter-burst intervals (IBIs) occurred at 40-50 ms (or 20-25 bursts/s). Bursting also occurred across varied stimulus parameters and suggests that burst timing may be a key component of looming detection. Our findings suggest that the DCMD uses two modes of coding to transmit information about looming stimuli and that these modes change dynamically with a changing stimulus at a behaviorally-relevant time.

  16. Mixed-mode synchronization between two inhibitory neurons with post-inhibitory rebound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornov, Roman; Osipov, Grigory; Komarov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    We study an array of activity rhythms generated by a half-center oscillator (HCO), represented by a pair of reciprocally coupled neurons with post-inhibitory rebounds (PIR). Such coupling-induced bursting possesses two time scales, one for fast spiking and another for slow quiescent periods, is shown to exhibit an array of synchronization properties. We discuss several HCO configurations constituted by two endogenous bursters, by tonic-spiking and quiescent neurons, as well as mixed-mode configurations composed of neurons of different type. We demonstrate that burst synchronization can be accompanied by complex, often chaotic, interactions of fast spikes within synchronized bursts.

  17. Bursting thalamic responses in awake monkey contribute to visual detection and are modulated by corticofugal feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania eOrtuno

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lateral geniculate nucleus is the gateway for visual information en route to the visual cortex. Neural activity is characterized by the existence of 2 firing modes: burst and tonic. Originally associated with sleep, bursts have now been postulated to be a part of the normal visual response, structured to increase the probability of cortical activation, able to act as a wake-up call to the cortex. We investigated a potential role for burst in the detection of novel stimuli by recording neuronal activity in the LGN of behaving monkeys during a visual detection task. Our results show that bursts are often the neuron’s first response, and are more numerous in the response to attended target stimuli than to unattended distractor stimuli. Bursts are indicators of the task novelty, as repetition decreased bursting. Because the primary visual cortex is the major modulatory input to the LGN, we compared the results obtained in control conditions with those observed when cortical activity was reduced by TMS. This cortical deactivation reduced visual response related bursting by 90%. These results highlight a novel role for the thalamus, able to code higher order image attributes as important as novelty early in the thalamo-cortical conversation.

  18. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eOster

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition.

  19. EXIST's Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D. L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Fishman, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Garson, A., III; Krawczynski, H.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.

    2008-02-01

    We use semianalytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field of view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that of Swift's Burst Alert Telescope. Bursts will be localized to better than 40'' at threshold, with a burst position as good as a few arcseconds for strong bursts. EXIST's combination of three different detector systems will provide spectra from 3 keV to more than 10 MeV. Thus, EXIST will enable a major leap in the understanding of bursts, their evolution, environment, and utility as cosmological probes.

  20. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett...

  1. Respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinecke, J W; Shapiro, B M

    1989-02-01

    Partially reduced oxygen species are toxic, yet sea urchin eggs synthesize H2O2 in a "respiratory burst" at fertilization, as an extracellular oxidant to crosslink their protective surface envelopes. To study the biochemical mechanism for H2O2 production, we have isolated an NADPH-specific oxidase fraction from homogenates of unfertilized Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs that produces H2O2 when stimulated with Ca2+ and MgATP2-. Concentrations of free Ca2+ previously implicated in regulation of egg activation modulate the activity of the oxidase. Inhibitors were used to test the relevance of this oxidase to the respiratory burst of fertilization. Procaine, two phenothiazines, and N-ethylmaleimide (but not iodoacetamide) inhibited H2O2 production by the oxidase fraction and oxygen consumption by activated eggs. The ATP requirement suggested that protein kinase activity might regulate the respiratory burst of fertilization; consonant with this hypothesis, H-7 and staurosporine were inhibitory. The respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization is an NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase that appears to be regulated by a protein kinase; although it bears a remarkable resemblance to the neutrophil oxidase, unlike the latter it does not form O2- as its initial product.

  2. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note that...

  3. Effects of eugenol on respiratory burst generation in newborn rat brainstem-spinal cord preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Sayumi; Irie, Saki; Izumizaki, Masahiko; Onimaru, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    Eugenol is contained in several plants including clove and is used as an analgesic drug. In the peripheral and central nervous systems, this compound modulates neuronal activity through action on voltage-gated ionic channels and/or transient receptor potential channels. However, it is unknown whether eugenol exerts any effects on the respiratory center neurons in the medulla. We examined the effects of eugenol on respiratory rhythm generation in the brainstem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rat (P0-P3). The preparations were superfused by artificial cerebrospinal fluid at 25-26 °C, and inspiratory C4 ventral root activity was monitored. Membrane potentials of respiratory neurons were recorded in the parafacial region of the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Bath application of eugenol (0.5-1 mM) decreased respiratory rhythm accompanied by strong inhibition of the burst activity of pre-inspiratory neurons. After washout, respiratory rhythm partly recovered, but the inspiratory burst duration was extremely shortened, and this continued for more than 60 min after washout. The shortening of C4 inspiratory burst by eugenol was not reversed by capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 antagonist), whereas the depression was partially blocked by GABAA antagonist bicuculline and glycine antagonist strychnine or GABAB antagonist phaclofen. A spike train of action potentials in respiratory neurons induced by depolarizing current pulse was depressed by application of eugenol. Eugenol decreased the negative slope conductance of pre-inspiratory neurons, suggesting blockade of persistent Na+ current. These results suggest that changes in both membrane excitability and synaptic connections are involved in the shortening of respiratory neuron bursts by eugenol.

  4. Reliability of spike and burst firing in thalamocortical relay cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldenrust, Fleur; Chameau, Pascal J P; Wadman, Wytse J

    2013-12-01

    The reliability and precision of the timing of spikes in a spike train is an important aspect of neuronal coding. We investigated reliability in thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells in the acute slice and also in a Morris-Lecar model with several extensions. A frozen Gaussian noise current, superimposed on a DC current, was injected into the TCR cell soma. The neuron responded with spike trains that showed trial-to-trial variability, due to amongst others slow changes in its internal state and the experimental setup. The DC current allowed to bring the neuron in different states, characterized by a well defined membrane voltage (between -80 and -50 mV) and by a specific firing regime that on depolarization gradually shifted from a predominantly bursting regime to a tonic spiking regime. The filtered frozen white noise generated a spike pattern output with a broad spike interval distribution. The coincidence factor and the Hunter and Milton measure were used as reliability measures of the output spike train. In the experimental TCR cell as well as the Morris-Lecar model cell the reliability depends on the shape (steepness) of the current input versus spike frequency output curve. The model also allowed to study the contribution of three relevant ionic membrane currents to reliability: a T-type calcium current, a cation selective h-current and a calcium dependent potassium current in order to allow bursting, investigate the consequences of a more complex current-frequency relation and produce realistic firing rates. The reliability of the output of the TCR cell increases with depolarization. In hyperpolarized states bursts are more reliable than single spikes. The analytically derived relations were capable to predict several of the experimentally recorded spike features.

  5. Detecting pipe bursts by monitoring water demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Van der Roer, M.; Sperber, V.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm which compares measured and predicted water demands to detect pipe bursts was developed and tested on three data sets of water demand and reported pipe bursts of three years. The algorithm proved to be able to detect bursts where the water loss exceeds 30% of the average water demand in

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome type I following pacemaker implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Sangita; Rao, Ballamudi Srinivas

    2015-12-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with burning pain and swelling over dorsum of right hand and small joints of the fingers, associated with redness, feeling of warmth, and stiffness of the fingers, with inability to bend the fingers since 2 months. The symptoms were progressively increasing in intensity for the past 1 month. There was no history of fever or trauma to the hand. Two months before her symptoms started, she had permanent pacemaker implanted for complete heart block with syncope. She was hypertensive and was on regular medication. Her X-ray of right hand showed decreased bone density (demineralisation), suggestive of osteopenia. A diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome or complex regional pain syndrome type I induced by pacemaker insertion was made. She was treated with amitriptyline and steroids, after which her symptoms improved dramatically. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Femoral approach: an exceptional alternative for permanent pacemaker implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereno Valente, Bruno; Conceição, José M; Nogueira da Silva, Manuel; M Oliveira, Mário; S Cunha, Pedro; Lousinha, Ana; Galrinho, Ana; C Ferreira, Rui

    2014-05-01

    The classic transvenous implantation of a permanent pacemaker in a pectoral location may be precluded by obstruction of venous access through the superior vena cava or recent infection at the implant site. When these barriers to the procedure are bilateral and there are also contraindications or technical difficulties to performing a thoracotomy for an epicardial approach, the femoral vein, although rarely used, can be a viable alternative. We describe the case of a patient with occlusion of both subclavian veins and a high risk for mini-thoracotomy or videothoracoscopy, who underwent implantation of a permanent single-chamber pacemaker via the right femoral vein. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Ventricular perforation by pacemaker lead repaired with two hemostatic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestipino, Filippo; Nenna, Antonio; Casacalenda, Adele; Chello, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac perforation is a rare, but potentially serious, complication of pacemaker implantation that may develop days or weeks after implantation. In the current case, 92-year-old man underwent permanent pacemaker implantation, but he presented 3 weeks later with severe symptoms. Computed tomography showed protrusion of the tip of the ventricular electrode through the right ventricle and into the chest wall. During an urgent surgical intervention, the lead was disconnected and extracted. A sealing hemostatic device and an hemostatic patch were applied to repair the ventricle; the procedure was uneventfull. This case demonstrates how the correct diagnosis of ventricular perforation is crucial, and should be followed immediately by surgical planning. The hemostatic patch is a valuable alternative to sutures in patients with thin and fragile ventricular wall, unable to undergo stitching. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Transient apical dyskinesia with a pacemaker: Electrocardiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Feltes, Gisela I; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Biagioni, Corina; De Agustín, J Alberto; Vivas, David; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Transient apical dyskinesia syndromes present features similar to acute coronary syndromes, but with normal coronary arteries and rapid complete resolution of wall motion alterations. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of typical chest pain at rest after her brother's death. She had had a pacemaker implanted in 2001. Troponin levels were elevated and apical hypokinesia was shown by ventriculography and echocardiography, with normal coronary arteries. Evolving ECG alterations were observed in spite of the continued pacing rhythm. All these alterations were fully resolved after discharge. This case shows that, even in the presence of a pacemaker, evolving ECG alterations can be observed in Takotsubo syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. New aspects of firing pattern autocontrol in oxytocin and vasopressin neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, F; Gouzènes, L; Brown, D; Dayanithi, G; Sabatier, N; Boissin, L; Rabié, A; Richard, P

    1998-01-01

    In the rat, oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) neurones exhibit specific electrical activities which are controlled by OT and AVP released from soma and dendrites within the magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei. OT enhances amplitude and frequency of suckling-induced bursts, and changes basal firing characteristics: spike patterning becomes very irregular (spike clusters separated by long silences), firing rate is highly variable, oscillating before facilitated bursts. This unstable behaviour which markedly decreases during hyperosmotic stimulation (interrupting bursting) could be a prerequisite for bursting. The effects of AVP depend on the initial phasic pattern of AVP neurones: AVP excites weakly active neurones (increasing burst duration, decreasing silences) and inhibits highly active neurones; neurones with intermediate phasic activity are unaffected. Thus, AVP ensures all AVP neurones discharge with moderate phasic activity (bursts and silences lasting 20-40 s), known to optimise systemic AVP release. V1a-type receptors are involved in AVP actions. In conclusion, OT and AVP control their respective neurones in a complex manner to favour the patterns of activity which are the best suited for an efficient systemic hormone release.

  11. Impact of Fontan conversion with arrhythmia surgery and pacemaker therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Iwata, Yusuke; Matsumura, Goki; Konuma, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    In the long-term period after Fontan operation, atrial arrhythmia was one of the important factors to decide the postoperative quality of life. We reviewed the impact of Fontan conversion with arrhythmia surgery and pacemaker therapy. Thirty-eight patients underwent Fontan conversion using extracardiac conduit from 1992, and 22 patients with atrial arrhythmia underwent maze procedure simultaneously using cryoablation or radiofrequency ablation and epicardial DDD pacemaker implantation and 16 patients had regular 'sinus' rhythm before Fontan conversion. Mean follow-up period was 52 months. Pre- and postoperative clinical course were analyzed. Average weight, age at Fontan conversion, and years after first Fontan operation were 49.0 kg, 25.8 years old, 14.7 years, respectively. Nineteen percent of patients were in New York Heart Association class I (NYHA I), and 74% of patients were in NYHA II, and 7% were in NYHA III, respectively. Except three early deaths, actual survival rate at 1 year and 5 years were 80% and 64%, respectively. In survivors, 80% of the patients obtained regular heart rhythm including artificial pacemaker rhythm, although only 43% of the patients had regular 'sinus' rhythm before the Fontan conversion. Postoperative average cardiothoracic ratio and oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) were 50% and 94%, and 74% of patients were in NYHA I and 26% were in NYHA II, respectively, after Fontan conversion. Mid-term results of Fontan conversion with arrhythmia surgery and pacemaker therapy were acceptable. Restoration of regular rhythm might improve the postoperative NYHA status and the activity of the daily life. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification and functional characterization of cardiac pacemaker cells in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Tessadori

    Full Text Available In the mammalian heart a conduction system of nodes and conducting cells generates and transduces the electrical signals evoking myocardial contractions. Specialized pacemaker cells initiating and controlling cardiac contraction rhythmicity are localized in an anatomically identifiable structure of myocardial origin, the sinus node. We previously showed that in mammalian embryos sinus node cells originate from cardiac progenitors expressing the transcription factors T-box transcription factor 3 (Tbx3 and Islet-1 (Isl1. Although cardiac development and function are strikingly conserved amongst animal classes, in lower vertebrates neither structural nor molecular distinguishable components of a conduction system have been identified, questioning its evolutionary origin. Here we show that zebrafish embryos lacking the LIM/homeodomain-containing transcription factor Isl1 display heart rate defects related to pacemaker dysfunction. Moreover, 3D reconstructions of gene expression patterns in the embryonic and adult zebrafish heart led us to uncover a previously unidentified, Isl1-positive and Tbx2b-positive region in the myocardium at the junction of the sinus venosus and atrium. Through their long interconnecting cellular protrusions the identified Isl1-positive cells form a ring-shaped structure. In vivo labeling of the Isl1-positive cells by transgenic technology allowed their isolation and electrophysiological characterization, revealing their unique pacemaker activity. In conclusion we demonstrate that Isl1-expressing cells, organized as a ring-shaped structure around the venous pole, hold the pacemaker function in the adult zebrafish heart. We have thereby identified an evolutionary conserved, structural and molecular distinguishable component of the cardiac conduction system in a lower vertebrate.

  13. Brain magnetic resonance imaging examination in a patient with non-magnetic resonance conditional pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Nakai, MD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical dilemmas arise when patients with a non-magnetic resonance (MR conditional pacemaker are required to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We encountered a pacemaker patient with debilitating non-motor symptoms of Parkinson׳s disease, who required an MRI prior to deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery. MRI was performed safely without adverse events despite the presence of a conventional pacemaker.

  14. Effects of Lubiprostone on Pacemaker Activity of Interstitial Cells of Cajal from the Mouse Colon

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Han-Yi; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ki, Jung Suk; Ryu, Kwon Ho; Choi, Seok; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2014-01-01

    Lubiprostone is a chloride (Cl-) channel activator derived from prostaglandin E1 and used for managing constipation. In addition, lubiprostone affects the activity of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells that generate slow-wave activity in smooth muscles. We studied the effects of lubiprostone on the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to determine the pacemaker activity in cultured colonic ICCs ...

  15. Nursing procedure in the temporary transvenous pacemaker implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Teresa Redecillas Peiró

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The temporary transvenous pacemaker (MPTT implantation is a technique that consists in stimulating artificially the heart when the natural pacemaker is unable to maintain the rhythm and the appropiate frequency. This type of electric stimulation is carried out by means of an electrocateter that was implanted in the endocardium through a central vein connected to an external generator, requiring equipment and personal with specific abilities. It is commonly carried out in the intensive care units when a continuous temporary stimulation is suitable and in most cases it is carried out in situations of extreme medical urgency in critical and unstable patients. The nursing professionals play an important role in the whole procedure, becoming essential that they possess knowledge not only about technique and handling of the device but also on the performance in all its phases. This research work intends to be a practical reference that gathers those essential aspects for the development of this assistance practice including, in a detailed way, the nursing performance in the preparation, the implantation and the pursuit of the patients who a temporary transvenous pacemaker was placed in.

  16. A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Pacemaker Telemonitoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Villegas, Antonio; Catalán-Matamoros, Daniel; Martín-Saborido, Carlos; Villegas-Tripiana, Irene; Robles-Musso, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, telemedicine applied to pacemaker monitoring has undergone extraordinary growth. It is not known if telemonitoring is more or less efficient than conventional monitoring. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review analyzing the available evidence on resource use and health outcomes in both follow-up modalities. We searched 11 databases and included studies published up until November 2014. The inclusion criteria were: a) experimental or observational design; b) studies based on complete economic evaluations; c) patients with pacemakers, and d) telemonitoring compared with conventional hospital monitoring. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 2852 patients, with a mean age of 81 years. The main indication for device implantation was atrioventricular block. With telemonitoring, cardiovascular events were detected and treated 2 months earlier than with conventional monitoring, thus reducing length of hospital stay by 34% and reducing routine and emergency hospital visits as well. There were no significant intergroup differences in perceived quality of life or number of adverse events. The cost of telemonitoring was 60% lower than that of conventional hospital monitoring. Compared with conventional monitoring, cardiovascular events were detected earlier and the number or hospitalizations and hospital visits was reduced with pacemaker telemonitoring. In addition, the costs associated with follow-up were lower with telemonitoring. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving pacemaker therapy in congenital heart disease: contractility and resynchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpawich, Peter P

    2015-01-01

    Designed as effective therapy for patients with symptomatic bradycardia, implantable cardiac pacemakers initially served to improve symptoms and survival. With initial applications to the elderly and those with severe myocardial disease, extended longevity was not a major concern. However, with design technology advances in leads and generators since the 1980s, pacemaker therapy is now readily applicable to all age patients, including children with congenital heart defects. As a result, emphasis and clinical interests have advanced beyond simply quantity to quality of life. Adverse cardiac effects of pacing from right ventricular apical or epicardial sites with resultant left bundle branch QRS configurations have been recognized. As a result, and with the introduction of newer catheter-delivered pacing leads, more recent studies have focused on alternative or select pacing sites such as septal, outflow tract, and para-bundle of His. This is especially important in dealing with pacemaker therapy among younger patients and those with congenital heart disease, with expected decades of artificial cardiac stimulation, in which adverse myocellular changes secondary to pacing itself have been reported. As a correlate to these alternate or select pacing sites, applications of left ventricular pacing, either via the coronary sinus, intraseptal or epicardial, alone or in combination with right ventricular pacing, have gained interest for patients with heart failure. Although cardiac resynchronization pacing has, to date, had limited clinical applications among patients with congenital heart disease, the few published reports do indicate potential benefits as a bridge to cardiac transplant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  19. Isolating neural correlates of the pacemaker for food anticipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian David Blum

    Full Text Available Mice fed a single daily meal at intervals within the circadian range exhibit food anticipatory activity. Previous investigations strongly suggest that this behaviour is regulated by a circadian pacemaker entrained to the timing of fasting/refeeding. The neural correlate(s of this pacemaker, the food entrainable oscillator (FEO, whether found in a neural network or a single locus, remain unknown. This study used a canonical property of circadian pacemakers, the ability to continue oscillating after removal of the entraining stimulus, to isolate activation within the neural correlates of food entrainable oscillator from all other mechanisms driving food anticipatory activity. It was hypothesized that continued anticipatory activation of central nuclei, after restricted feeding and a return to ad libitum feeding, would elucidate a neural representation of the signaling circuits responsible for the timekeeping component of the food entrainable oscillator. Animals were entrained to a temporally constrained meal then placed back on ad libitum feeding for several days until food anticipatory activity was abolished. Activation of nuclei throughout the brain was quantified using stereological analysis of c-FOS expressing cells and compared against both ad libitum fed and food entrained controls. Several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei remained activated at the previous time of food anticipation, implicating them in the timekeeping mechanism necessary to track previous meal presentation. This study also provides a proof of concept for an experimental paradigm useful to further investigate the anatomical and molecular substrates of the FEO.

  20. Percutaneous Extraction of Transvenous Permanent Pacemaker/Defibrillator Leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Paraskevaidis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Widespread use of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices has inevitably increased the need for lead revision/replacement. We report our experience in percutaneous extraction of transvenous permanent pacemaker/defibrillator leads. Methods. Thirty-six patients admitted to our centre from September 2005 through October 2012 for percutaneous lead extraction were included. Lead removal was attempted using Spectranetics traction-type system (Spectranetics Corp., Colorado, CO, USA and VascoExtor countertraction-type system (Vascomed GmbH, Weil am Rhein, Germany. Results. Lead extraction was attempted in 59 leads from 36 patients (27 men, mean ± SD age 61±5 years, with permanent pacemaker (n=25, defibrillator (n=8, or cardiac resynchronisation therapy (n=3 with a mean ± SD implant duration of 50±23 months. The indications for lead removal included pocket infection (n=23, endocarditis (n=2, and ventricular (n=10 and atrial lead dysfunction (n=1. Traction device was used for 33 leads and countertraction device for 26 leads. Mean ± SD fluoroscopy time was 4±2 minutes/lead for leads implanted 48 months (n=21, P=0.03. Complete procedural success rate was 91.7% and clinical procedural success rate was 100%, while lead procedural success rate was 95%. Conclusions. In conclusion, percutaneous extraction of transvenous permanent pacemaker/defibrillator leads using dedicated removal tools is both feasible and safe.

  1. Permanent and temporary pacemaker implantation after orthotopic heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacal Fernando

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE:To determine the indication for and incidence and evolution of temporary and permanent pacemaker implantation in cardiac transplant recipients. METHODS: A retrospective review of 114 patients who underwent orthotopic heart transplantation InCor (Heart Institute USP BR between March 1985 and May 1993. We studied the incidence of and indication for temporary pacing, the relationship between pacing and rejection, the need for pemanent pacing and the clinical follow-up. RESULTS: Fourteen of 114 (12%heart transplant recipients required temporary pacing and 4 of 114 (3.5% patients required permanent pacing. The indication for temporary pacing was sinus node dysfunction in 11 patients (78.5% and atrioventricular (AV block in 3 patients (21.4%. The indication for permanent pacemaker implantation was sinus node dysfunction in 3 patients (75% and atrioventricular (AV block in 1 patient (25%. We observed rejection in 3 patients (21.4% who required temporary pacing and in 2 patients (50% who required permanent pacing. The previous use of amiodarone was observed in 10 patients (71.4% with temporary pacing. Seven of the 14 patients (50% died during follow-up. CONCLUSION: Sinus node dysfunction was the principal indication for temporary and permanent pacemaker implantation in cardiac transplant recipients. The need for pacing was related to worse prognosis after cardiac transplantation.

  2. Pacemaker interference by magnetic fields at power line frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Trevor W; Caputa, Kris; Stuchly, Maria A; Shepard, Richard B; Kavet, Robert; Sastre, Antonio

    2002-03-01

    Human exposure to external 50/60-Hz electric and magnetic fields induces electric fields within the body. These induced fields can cause interference with implanted pacemakers. In the case of exposure to magnetic fields, the pacemaker leads are subject to induced electromotive forces, with current return paths being provided by the conducting body tissues. Modern computing resources used in conjunction with millimeter-scale human body conductivity models make numerical modeling a viable technique for examining any such interference. In this paper, an existing well-verified scalar-potential finite-difference frequency-domain code is modified to handle thin conducting wires embedded in the body. The effects of each wire can be included numerically by a simple modification to the existing code. Results are computed for two pacemaker lead insertion paths, terminating at either atrial or ventricular electrodes in the heart. Computations are performed for three orthogonal 60-Hz magnetic field orientations. Comparison with simplified estimates from Faraday's law applied directly to extracorporeal loops representing unipolar leads underscores problems associated with this simplified approach. Numerically estimated electromagnetic interference (EMI) levels under the worst case scenarios are about 40 microT for atrial electrodes, and 140 microT for ventricular electrodes. These methods could also be applied to studying EMI with other implanted devices such as cardiac defibrillators.

  3. Percutaneous extraction of transvenous permanent pacemaker/defibrillator leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevaidis, Stylianos; Konstantinou, Dimitrios; Vassilikos, Vassilios; Theofilogiannakos, Efstratios; Mantziari, Lilian; Megarisiotou, Athanasia; Galitsianos, Ioannis; Karvounis, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices has inevitably increased the need for lead revision/replacement. We report our experience in percutaneous extraction of transvenous permanent pacemaker/defibrillator leads. Thirty-six patients admitted to our centre from September 2005 through October 2012 for percutaneous lead extraction were included. Lead removal was attempted using Spectranetics traction-type system (Spectranetics Corp., Colorado, CO, USA) and VascoExtor countertraction-type system (Vascomed GmbH, Weil am Rhein, Germany). Lead extraction was attempted in 59 leads from 36 patients (27 men), mean ± SD age 61 ± 5 years, with permanent pacemaker (n = 25), defibrillator (n = 8), or cardiac resynchronisation therapy (n = 3) with a mean ± SD implant duration of 50 ± 23 months. The indications for lead removal included pocket infection (n = 23), endocarditis (n = 2), and ventricular (n = 10) and atrial lead dysfunction (n = 1). Traction device was used for 33 leads and countertraction device for 26 leads. Mean ± SD fluoroscopy time was 4 ± 2 minutes/lead for leads implanted lead for leads implanted >48 months (n = 21), P = 0.03. Complete procedural success rate was 91.7% and clinical procedural success rate was 100%, while lead procedural success rate was 95%. In conclusion, percutaneous extraction of transvenous permanent pacemaker/defibrillator leads using dedicated removal tools is both feasible and safe.

  4. Successful Interventional Management for Pulmonary Arterial Injury Secondary to Pacemaker Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tokue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subclavian vein puncture is a relatively fast and safe technique to access the right heart for placement of pacemaker leads. Hemothorax related to injury of the pulmonary artery (PA is a rare complication of subclavian vein access but can be life-threatening. We report a case of hemothorax occurring after subclavian vein puncture for pacemaker implantation. No cases of transcatheter arterial embolization for PA injury secondary to pacemaker implantation have been reported. Understanding of this rare complication after pacemaker implantation along with its specific clinical presentation may lead to early diagnosis and intervention.

  5. Interference of implanted cardiac pacemakers with TASER X26 dart mode application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, Norbert; Niedermayr, Florian; Neubauer, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of pacemaker patients among the general population and of conducted energy devices for law enforcement and self-defence is increasing. Consequently, the question on whether cardiac pacemaker patients are at particular risk becomes increasingly important, in particular, as the widespread use of such devices is planned in Europe. The risk of pacemaker patients has been investigated by numerical simulation at detailed anatomical models of patients with cardiac pacemakers implanted in left pectoral, right pectoral, and abdominal positions, with the monopolar electrode placed at the ventricular apex. The induced cardiac pacemaker interference voltages have been assessed for distant application of TASER X26 devices with dart electrodes propelled towards a subject. It could be shown that interference voltages are highest in abdominal pacemaker implantation, while they are about 20% lower in left or right pectoral sites. They remain below the immunity threshold level as defined by safety standards of implanted cardiac pacemakers and of implanted cardioverter defibrillators to prevent persisting malfunction or damage. However, induced voltages are high enough to be sensed by the pacemaker and to capture pacemaker function in case of hits at thorax and abdomen, frontal as well as dorsal.

  6. Respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization.

    OpenAIRE

    Heinecke, J W; Shapiro, B M

    1989-01-01

    Partially reduced oxygen species are toxic, yet sea urchin eggs synthesize H2O2 in a "respiratory burst" at fertilization, as an extracellular oxidant to crosslink their protective surface envelopes. To study the biochemical mechanism for H2O2 production, we have isolated an NADPH-specific oxidase fraction from homogenates of unfertilized Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs that produces H2O2 when stimulated with Ca2+ and MgATP2-. Concentrations of free Ca2+ previously implicated in regulation...

  7. On the neutron bursts origin.

    CERN Document Server

    Stenkin, Yu V

    2002-01-01

    The origin of the neutron bursts in Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is explained using results of the experiments and CORSIKA based Monte-Carlo simulations. It is shown that events with very high neutron multiplicity observed last years in neutron monitors as well as in surrounding detectors, are caused by usual EAS core with primary energies > 1 PeV. No exotic processes were needed for the explanation.

  8. Interactive Responses of a Thalamic Neuron to Formalin Induced Lasting Pain in Behaving Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yeowool; Bhatt, Rushi; Jung, DaeHyun; Shin, Hee-sup; Cho, Jeiwon

    2012-01-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) neurons are known to relay incoming sensory information to the cortex via firing in tonic or burst mode. However, it is still unclear how respective firing modes of a single thalamic relay neuron contribute to pain perception under consciousness. Some studies report that bursting could increase pain in hyperalgesic conditions while others suggest the contrary. However, since previous studies were done under either neuropathic pain conditions or often under anesthesia, the mechanism of thalamic pain modulation under awake conditions is not well understood. We therefore characterized the thalamic firing patterns of behaving mice in response to nociceptive pain induced by inflammation. Our results demonstrated that nociceptive pain responses were positively correlated with tonic firing and negatively correlated with burst firing of individual TC neurons. Furthermore, burst properties such as intra-burst-interval (IntraBI) also turned out to be reliably correlated with the changes of nociceptive pain responses. In addition, brain stimulation experiments revealed that only bursts with specific bursting patterns could significantly abolish behavioral nociceptive responses. The results indicate that specific patterns of bursting activity in thalamocortical relay neurons play a critical role in controlling long-lasting inflammatory pain in awake and behaving mice. PMID:22292022

  9. Dynamics of gamma bursts in local field potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Priscilla E; McDonnell, Mark D; Ward, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we provide a stochastic analysis of, and supporting simulation data for, a stochastic model of the generation of gamma bursts in local field potential (LFP) recordings by interacting populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Our interest is in behavior near a fixed point of the stochastic dynamics of the model. We apply a recent limit theorem of stochastic dynamics to probe into details of this local behavior, obtaining several new results. We show that the stochastic model can be written in terms of a rotation multiplied by a two-dimensional standard Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process. Viewing the rewritten process in terms of phase and amplitude processes, we are able to proceed further in analysis. We demonstrate that gamma bursts arise in the model as excursions of the modulus of the OU process. The associated pair of stochastic phase and amplitude processes satisfies their own pair of stochastic differential equations, which indicates that large phase slips occur between gamma bursts. This behavior is mirrored in LFP data simulated from the original model. These results suggest that the rewritten model is a valid representation of the behavior near the fixed point for a wide class of models of oscillatory neural processes.

  10. Electrical silencing of PDF neurons advances the phase of non-PDF clock neurons in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Cao, Guan; Nitabach, Michael N

    2008-04-01

    Drosophila clock neurons exhibit self-sustaining cellular oscillations that rely in part on rhythmic transcriptional feedback loops. We have previously determined that electrical silencing of the pigment dispersing factor (PDF)-expressing lateral-ventral (LN(V)) pacemaker subset of fly clock neurons via expression of an inward-rectifier K(+) channel (Kir2.1) severely disrupts free-running rhythms of locomotor activity-most flies are arrhythmic and those that are not exhibit weak short-period rhythms-and abolishes LN(V) molecular oscillation in constant darkness. PDF is known to be an important LN(V) output signal. Here we examine the effects of electrical silencing of the LN(V) pacemakers on molecular rhythms in other, nonsilenced, subsets of clock neurons. In contrast to previously described cell-autonomous abolition of free-running molecular rhythms, we find that electrical silencing of the LN(V) pacemakers via Kir2.1 expression does not impair molecular rhythms in LN(D), DN1, and DN2 subsets of clock neurons. However, free-running molecular rhythms in these non-LN(V) clock neurons occur with advanced phase. Electrical silencing of LN(V)s phenocopies PDF null mutation (pdf (01) ) at both behavioral and molecular levels except for the complete abolition of free-running cellular oscillation in the LN(V)s themselves. LN(V) electrically silenced or pdf 01 flies exhibit weak free-running behavioral rhythms with short period, and the molecular oscillation in non-LN(V) neurons phase advances in constant darkness. That LN( V) electrical silencing leads to the same behavioral and non-LN( V) molecular phenotypes as pdf 01 suggests that persistence of LN(V) molecular oscillation in pdf 01 flies has no functional effect, either on behavioral rhythms or on non-LN(V) molecular rhythms. We thus conclude that functionally relevant signals from LN(V)s to non-LN(V) clock neurons and other downstream targets rely both on PDF signaling and LN(V) electrical activity, and that LN( V

  11. Cannabinoid receptor activation reverses kainate-induced synchronized population burst firing in rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Mason

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties in whole animal models of epilepsy. The present investigation sought to examine the effects of cannabinoid receptor activation on kainic acid (KA-induced epileptiform neuronal excitability. Under urethane anesthesia, acute KA treatment (10 mg/kg, i.p. entrained the spiking mode of simultaneously recorded neurons from random firing to synchronous bursting (% change in burst rate. Injection of the high-affinity cannabinoid agonist (--11-hydroxy-8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethyl-heptyl (HU210, 100 µg/kg, i.p. following KA markedly reduced the burst frequency (% decrease in burst frequency and reversed synchronized firing patterns back to baseline levels. Pre-treatment with the central cannabinoid receptor (CB1 antagonist N-piperidino-5-(4-clorophenyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl-4-methyl-3-pyrazole-carboxamide (rimonabant, SR141716A 3 mg/kg, i.p. completely prevented the actions of HU210. The present results indicate that cannabinoids exert their antiepileptic effects by impeding pathological synchronization of neuronal networks in the hippocampus.

  12. Long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, synchronous bursting and synaptic remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Kaufman

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neuromodulation plays key roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability, network activity, arousal, and behavior. On longer time scales, cholinergic systems play essential roles in cortical development, maturation, and plasticity. Presumably, these processes are associated with substantial synaptic remodeling, yet to date, long-term relationships between cholinergic tone and synaptic remodeling remain largely unknown. Here we used automated microscopy combined with multielectrode array recordings to study long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, excitatory synapse remodeling, and network activity characteristics in networks of cortical neurons grown on multielectrode array substrates. Experimental elevations of cholinergic tone led to the abrupt suppression of episodic synchronous bursting activity (but not of general activity, followed by a gradual growth of excitatory synapses over hours. Subsequent blockage of cholinergic receptors led to an immediate restoration of synchronous bursting and the gradual reversal of synaptic growth. Neither synaptic growth nor downsizing was governed by multiplicative scaling rules. Instead, these occurred in a subset of synapses, irrespective of initial synaptic size. Synaptic growth seemed to depend on intrinsic network activity, but not on the degree to which bursting was suppressed. Intriguingly, sustained elevations of cholinergic tone were associated with a gradual recovery of synchronous bursting but not with a reversal of synaptic growth. These findings show that cholinergic tone can strongly affect synaptic remodeling and synchronous bursting activity, but do not support a strict coupling between the two. Finally, the reemergence of synchronous bursting in the presence of elevated cholinergic tone indicates that the capacity of cholinergic neuromodulation to indefinitely suppress synchronous bursting might be inherently limited.

  13. α-Calcium calmodulin kinase II modulates the temporal structure of hippocampal bursting patterns.

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    Jeiwon Cho

    Full Text Available The alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (α-CaMKII is known to play a key role in CA1/CA3 synaptic plasticity, hippocampal place cell stability and spatial learning. Additionally, there is evidence from hippocampal electrophysiological slice studies that this kinase has a role in regulating ion channels that control neuronal excitability. Here, we report in vivo single unit studies, with α-CaMKII mutant mice, in which threonine 305 was replaced with an aspartate (α-CaMKII(T305D mutants, that indicate that this kinase modulates spike patterns in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Previous studies showed that α-CaMKII(T305D mutants have abnormalities in both hippocampal LTP and hippocampal-dependent learning. We found that besides decreased place cell stability, which could be caused by their LTP impairments, the hippocampal CA1 spike patterns of α-CaMKII(T305D mutants were profoundly abnormal. Although overall firing rate, and overall burst frequency were not significantly altered in these mutants, inter-burst intervals, mean number of intra-burst spikes, ratio of intra-burst spikes to total spikes, and mean intra-burst intervals were significantly altered. In particular, the intra burst intervals of place cells in α-CaMKII(T305D mutants showed higher variability than controls. These results provide in vivo evidence that besides its well-known function in synaptic plasticity, α-CaMKII, and in particular its inhibitory phosphorylation at threonine 305, also have a role in shaping the temporal structure of hippocampal burst patterns. These results suggest that some of the molecular processes involved in acquiring information may also shape the patterns used to encode this information.

  14. Brief bursts self-inhibit and correlate the pyramidal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K Berger

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory pathways are an essential component in the function of the neocortical microcircuitry. Despite the relatively small fraction of inhibitory neurons in the neocortex, these neurons are strongly activated due to their high connectivity rate and the intricate manner in which they interconnect with pyramidal cells (PCs. One prominent pathway is the frequency-dependent disynaptic inhibition (FDDI formed between layer 5 PCs and mediated by Martinotti cells (MCs. Here, we show that simultaneous short bursts in four PCs are sufficient to exert FDDI in all neighboring PCs within the dimensions of a cortical column. This powerful inhibition is mediated by few interneurons, leading to strongly correlated membrane fluctuations and synchronous spiking between PCs simultaneously receiving FDDI. Somatic integration of such inhibition is independent and electrically isolated from monosynaptic excitation formed between the same PCs. FDDI is strongly shaped by I(h in PC dendrites, which determines the effective integration time window for inhibitory and excitatory inputs. We propose a key disynaptic mechanism by which brief bursts generated by a few PCs can synchronize the activity in the pyramidal network.

  15. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the hybrid and the FAT algorithms in terms of burst end-to-end delay, packet end-to-end delay, and packet loss ratio.

  16. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  17. Subjective consequences of permanent pacemaker therapy in patients under the age of retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H; Petersen, J; Nielsen, B L

    1989-01-01

    During a 5-year period, 81 patients ages 20 to 60 years old had implantation of a permanent cardiac pacemaker at the University Hospital, Odense. At follow-up, during 1985, the 73 survivors received a semi-structured questionnaire regarding subjective consequences of pacemaker therapy, and 72...

  18. Pacemaker Lead Induced Inferior Vena Caval Thrombosis Leading to Portal Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Chandra, MD, DM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inferior vena caval thrombosis is an unusual complication of permanent pacemaker implantation. The clinical presentation due to thrombosis depends on the site of thrombus. We have described here a rare case of pacemaker lead associated thrombosis of inferior vena cava, its diagnostic work up and briefly reviewed the existing literature of this uncommon complication.

  19. [The electromagnetic compatibility test requirements for cardiac pacemaker in international standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Gao, Zhong

    2010-09-01

    Based on the latest international standards about implantable pacemakers, describing the main test requirements, especially for the EMC test requirements in details, and comparing the differences between the different standards, making readers having a clear understanding for the tests on pacemakers, especially for the EMC tests.

  20. Noise-induced effects on multicellular biopacemaker spontaneous activity: Differences between weak and strong pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghighi, Alireza; Comtois, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Self-organization of spontaneous activity of a network of active elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for pacemaking activity to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, consisting of resting and pacemaker cells, exhibit spontaneous activation of their electrical activity. Similarly, one proposed approach to the development of biopacemakers as an alternative to electronic pacemakers for cardiac therapy is based on heterogeneous cardiac cells with resting and spontaneously beating phenotypes. However, the combined effect of pacemaker characteristics, density, and spatial distribution of the pacemaker cells on spontaneous activity is unknown. Using a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm, we previously showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of pacemaker cells. In this study, we show that this behavior is dependent on the pacemaker cell characteristics, with weaker pacemaker cells requiring higher density and larger clusters to sustain multicellular activity. These multicellular structures also demonstrated an increased sensitivity to voltage noise that favored spontaneous activity at lower density while increasing temporal variation in the period of activity. This information will help researchers overcome the current limitations of biopacemakers.

  1. A forced desynchrony study of circadian pacemaker characteristics in seasonal affective disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorengevel, Kathelijne M.; Beersma, Domien G.M.; den Boer, Johan; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    2002-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is an endogenous clock that regulates oscillations in most physiological and psychological processes with a near 24-h period. In many species, this pacemaker triggers seasonal changes in behavior. The seasonality of symptoms and the efficacy of light therapy suggest

  2. Sinus venosus atrial septal defect: a rare cause of misplacement of pacemaker leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodian M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Malick Bodian,1 Fatou Aw,1 Mouhamadou Bamba Ndiaye,1 Adama Kane,1 Modou Jobe,1 Alioune Tabane,1 Alassane Mbaye,2 Simon Antoine Sarr,1 Maboury Diao,1 Moustapha Sarr,1 Serigne Abdou Bâ1 1Department of Cardiology, Aristide Le Dantec Teaching Hospital, 2Grand Yoff General Hospital, Dakar, Senegal Abstract: Routine implantation of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators is not commonly associated with complications. However, in some cases we see misplacement of pacemaker leads which is most often related to the presence of underlying cardiac anomalies. We report the case of misplacement of a pacemaker lead into the left ventricle of a 56-year-old patient paced in VVI/R mode and with a tined type pacemaker lead because of a symptomatic complete atrioventricular block. Electrocardiogram showed a pacemaker-generated rhythm with a right bundle branch block pattern. Chest X-ray showed the pacemaker lead located relatively high in relation to the diaphragm. Echocardiography visualized the pacemaker lead in the left heart chambers (atrium and ventricle, hence confirming its aberrant course. Further, the defect causing its passage to the left heart chambers was a sinus venosus atrial septal defect. The patient reported no complication related to the misplacement of the lead. After a brief period of oral anticoagulation, the lead was inserted into the right ventricle by percutaneous technique. Keywords: pacemaker, lead misplacement, sinus venosus atrial septal defect

  3. Twiddler-syndrom er en årsag til pacemaker elektrode displacering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Keea Treu; Hansen, Michael Gilså

    2013-01-01

    Twiddler's syndrome is a rare cause of pacemaker electrode displacement. The displacement is caused by the patient's manipulation with the pacemaker, so the electrode is retracted. We describe a case of a 79-year-old overweight woman with a known psychiatric anamnesis, who was admitted twice...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3680 - Cardiovascular permanent or temporary pacemaker electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... electrical conductors with one end connected to an external pacemaker pulse generator and the other end applied to the heart. The device is used to transmit a pacing electrical stimulus from the pulse generator... permanent pacemaker electrode is a device consisting of flexible insulated electrical conductors with one...

  5. Interference of apex locator, pulp tester and diathermy on pacemaker function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriman, Narayanan; Prabhakar, V; Bhuvaneswaran, J S; Subha, N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three electronic apex locators (EAL), electric pulp tester (EPT) and diathermy on pacemaker function in vitro. Three EALs: Root ZX (J. Morita Co., Tustin, CA, U.S.A.), Propex (Dentsply), Mini Apex locator (SybronEndo, Anaheim, CA, USA), EPT (Parkell pulp vitality tester Farmingdale, NY, USA) and Diathermy (Neomed 250 B) were tested for any interference with one pacemaker (A medtronic kappa KVDD901-serial number: PLE734632S). Directly connecting the pacemaker lead with the EAL/EPT/diathermy operating on a flat bench top, the telemetry wand was held directly over the pacemaker to monitor the pacing pattern for a period of 30 s. Pacemaker activity was continuously recorded on the telemetric programmer and electro gram (EGM) readings examined for pacer inhibition, noise reversion or inappropriate pacemaker pulses. All the three apex locators showed no pacing interference or background noise during its function or at rest. The EGM readings of EPT showed varying levels of background noise in between pacing however, this did not affect the normal pacing pattern and the pacing interval remained constant. EGM readings of diathermy showed an increase in the pacing interval (irregular pacing pattern) followed by complete inhibition of the pacing system. The tested EALs do not interfere with cardiac pacemaker function. The tested EPT showed varying levels of background noise but does not interfere with cardiac pacemaker function. Use of Diathermy interfered with the normal pacing, leading to complete inhibition of the pacing system.

  6. Compatibility of Radiofrequency Surgical Sponge Detection Technology with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices and Temporary Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Jonathan D; Pretorius, Victor G; Hsu, Jonathan C; Lalani, Gautam G; Schricker, Amir A; Hebsur, Shrinivas M; McGARRY, Thomas J; Hunter, Jessica A; Lewis, Kathryn E; Krummen, David E; Feld, Gregory K; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika

    2016-11-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) technology has improved detection of retained surgical sponges with a reported 100% sensitivity and specificity. However, the potential for interactions of the RF signals emitted by the detection system with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) or temporary pacemakers may limit its use in those patients with these devices. This study investigated whether RF detection technology causes interference or clinically significant changes in the programmed settings of implanted pacemakers and defibrillators or temporary epicardial pacemakers. Fifty patients who were scheduled either for CIED removal or placement of a temporary epicardial pacemaker (at the time of open heart surgery) were recruited for this study. Device settings and measurements from separate interrogations before and after scanning with the RF detection system were compared. For the temporary pacemakers, we observed for any changes in hemodynamics or signs of pacing interference. Twenty (40%) pacemakers, 20 (40%) implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and 10 (20%) temporary pacemakers were analyzed in this study. During scanning, no signal interference was detected in any permanent device, and there were no significant changes in programmed settings after scanning with the RF detection system. However, pacing inhibition was detected with temporary pacing systems when programmed to a synchronous mode (DDD). RF detection technology can be safely used to scan for retained surgical sponges in patients with permanent CIEDs and temporary pacemakers set to asynchronous mode. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are now generally believed to originate from cosmological distances and represent the largest known explosions in the Universe. These lectures will describe the temporal and spectral characteristic of gamma-ray bursts, their intensity and sky distribution, and other observed characteristics in the gamma-ray region, primarily from data obtained with the BATSE experiment on the Compton Observatory. A summary of recent discoveries and observations in other wavelength regions will also be presented, along with their implications for models of the burst emission mechanism. Various possibilities and models for the energy source(s) of gamma-ray bursts will be described.

  8. Multiple photoreceptor systems control the swim pacemaker activity in box jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garm, A; Mori, S

    2009-12-01

    Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each with a similar set of six eyes of four morphologically different types. We have examined how each of the four eye types influences the swim pacemaker. Multiple photoreceptor systems, three of the four eye types, plus the rhopalial neuropil, affect the swim pacemaker. The lower lens eye inhibits the pacemaker when stimulated and provokes a strong increase in the pacemaker frequency upon light-off. The upper lens eye, the pit eyes and the rhopalial neuropil all have close to the opposite effect. When these responses are compared with all-eye stimulations it is seen that some advanced integration must take place.

  9. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  10. Development of the Mouse Circadian Pacemaker: Independence from Environmental Cycles*

    OpenAIRE

    Fred C Davis; Menaker, Michael

    1981-01-01

    The freerunning period (τ) of the circadian pacemaker underlying the wheel-running activity rhythm of Mus musculus was found to be unaffected by the periods of environmental cycles (maternal and light/dark) under which the mice are raised. Mice born to mothers entrained to periods (T) of 28 or 20 h (ratio of light to dark of 14/10) and maintained on those cycle until beyond puberty showed only a temporary difference in freerunning period when placed into constant darkness. Such temporary ‘aft...

  11. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Nerves are fibres that conduct electrical signals and hence pass on information from and to the brain. Nerves are made of nerve cells called neurons (Figure 1). Instructions in our body are sent via electrical signals that present themselves as variations in the potential across neuronal membranes. These potential differences ...

  12. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...

  13. [Atrial fibrillation before and after pacemaker implantation (WI and DDD) in patients with complete atrioventricular block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusik, Paweł; Woznica, Natalia; Lelakowsk, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent problem of patients with pacemakers, and depends not only on disease but also on stimulation method. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of AF before and after pacemaker implantation as well as to assess the influence of VVI and DDD cardiac pacing on onset of AF in patients with complete atrioventricularblock (AVB). We included 155 patients controlled between 2000 and 2008 in Pacemaker Clinic because of AVB III degree, treated with VVI or DDD pacemaker implantation. Information about the health status of the patients was gathered from medical documentation and analysis of clinical ambulatory electrocardiograms. The study group comprised of 68 women and 87 men, mean age 68.7 +/- 13.9 years during implantation. 69% of patients had VVI pacemaker. There were 72.3% of patients with sinus rhythm before pacemaker implantation. During follow-up 4 +/- 2.8 years in 19.6% cases onset of atrial fibrillation de novo was diagnosed (in 31.3% in VVI mode vs. 2.2% in DDD mode; p = 0.00014). Mean time to AF since implantation was approximately 2.5 years. In VVI group (21 persons) amounted 32.1 months, while in 1 patient with DDD pacemaker 18 months. Between group with AF after implantation and with sinus rhythm preserved there was no statistically significant difference in age or gender (p = 0.89512 and p = 0.1253, respectively). Prevalence of atrial fibrillation after pacemaker implantation increased to 40%. Atrial fibrillation is frequent in patients before and after pacemaker implantation, especially in patients stimulated in VVI mode. Major possibility of atrial fibrillation onset after pacemaker implantation should result in more attention during routine ECG examination.

  14. Clique of functional hubs orchestrates population bursts in developmentally regulated neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Luccioli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been discovered that single neuron stimulation can impact network dynamics in immature and adult neuronal circuits. Here we report a novel mechanism which can explain in neuronal circuits, at an early stage of development, the peculiar role played by a few specific neurons in promoting/arresting the population activity. For this purpose, we consider a standard neuronal network model, with short-term synaptic plasticity, whose population activity is characterized by bursting behavior. The addition of developmentally inspired constraints and correlations in the distribution of the neuronal connectivities and excitabilities leads to the emergence of functional hub neurons, whose stimulation/deletion is critical for the network activity. Functional hubs form a clique, where a precise sequential activation of the neurons is essential to ignite collective events without any need for a specific topological architecture. Unsupervised time-lagged firings of supra-threshold cells, in connection with coordinated entrainments of near-threshold neurons, are the key ingredients to orchestrate population activity.

  15. Acetylcholine from Visual Circuits Modulates the Activity of Arousal Neurons in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Nara I; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2015-12-16

    Drosophila melanogaster's large lateral ventral neurons (lLNvs) are part of both the circadian and sleep-arousal neuronal circuits. In the past, electrophysiological analysis revealed that lLNvs fire action potentials (APs) in bursting or tonic modes and that the proportion of neurons firing in those specific patterns varies circadianly. Here, we provide evidence that lLNvs fire in bursts both during the day and at night and that the frequency of bursting is what is modulated in a circadian fashion. Moreover, we show that lLNvs AP firing is not only under cell autonomous control, but is also modulated by the network, and in the process we develop a novel preparation to assess this. We demonstrate that lLNv bursting mode relies on a cholinergic input because application of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists impairs this firing pattern. Finally, we found that bursting of lLNvs depends on an input from visual circuits that includes the cholinergic L2 monopolar neurons from the lamina. Our work sheds light on the physiological properties of lLNvs and on a neuronal circuit that may provide visual information to these important arousal neurons. Circadian rhythms are important for organisms to be able to anticipate daily changes in environmental conditions to adjust physiology and behavior accordingly. These rhythms depend on an endogenous mechanism that operates in dedicated neurons. In the fruit fly, the large lateral ventral neurons (lLNvs) are part of both the circadian and sleep-arousal neuronal circuits. Here, we provide new details about the firing properties of these neurons and demonstrate that they depend, not only on cell-autonomous mechanisms, but also on a specific neurotransmitter derived from visual circuits. Our work sheds light on the physiological properties of lLNvs and on a neuronal circuit that may provide visual information to these important arousal neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3516315-13$15.00/0.

  16. A burst-based "Hebbian" learning rule at retinogeniculate synapses links retinal waves to activity-dependent refinement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Butts

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Patterned spontaneous activity in the developing retina is necessary to drive synaptic refinement in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN. Using perforated patch recordings from neurons in LGN slices during the period of eye segregation, we examine how such burst-based activity can instruct this refinement. Retinogeniculate synapses have a novel learning rule that depends on the latencies between pre- and postsynaptic bursts on the order of one second: coincident bursts produce long-lasting synaptic enhancement, whereas non-overlapping bursts produce mild synaptic weakening. It is consistent with "Hebbian" development thought to exist at this synapse, and we demonstrate computationally that such a rule can robustly use retinal waves to drive eye segregation and retinotopic refinement. Thus, by measuring plasticity induced by natural activity patterns, synaptic learning rules can be linked directly to their larger role in instructing the patterning of neural connectivity.

  17. Pacemaker dynamics in the full Morris-Lecar model

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    This article reports the finding of pacemaker dynamics in certain region of the parameter space of the three-dimensional version of the Morris-Lecar model for the voltage oscillations of a muscle cell. This means that the cell membrane potential displays sustained oscillations in the absence of an external electrical stimulation. The development of this dynamic behavior is shown to be tied to the strength of the leak current contained in the model. The approach followed is mostly based on the use of linear stability analysis and numerical continuation techniques. In this way it is shown that the oscillatory dynamics is associated to the existence of two Hopf bifurcations, one subcritical and other supercritical. Moreover, it is explained that in the region of parameter values most commonly studied for this model such pacemaker dynamics is not displayed because of the development of two fold bifurcations, with the increase of the strength of the leak current, whose interaction with the Hopf bifurcations destroys the oscillatory dynamics.

  18. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  19. Coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition in a parabolic bursting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lin; Zhang, Jia; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Xiuhui

    2013-03-01

    The transition from tonic spiking to bursting is an important dynamic process that carry physiologically relevant information. In this work, coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition is investigated in a parabolic bursting model with specific discussion on their cooperation effects. Fast/slow analysis shows that weak coupling may help to induce the bursting by changing the geometric property of the fast subsystem so that the original unstable periodical solution are stabilized. It turned out that noise can play the similar stabilization role and induce bursting at appropriate moderate intensity. However, their cooperation may either strengthen or weaken the overall effect depending on the choice of noise level.

  20. Hyperbolic Plykin attractor can exist in neuron models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V.; Belykh, I.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Strange hyperbolic attractors are hard to find in real physical systems. This paper provides the first example of a realistic system, a canonical three-dimensional (3D) model of bursting neurons, that is likely to have a strange hyperbolic attractor. Using a geometrical approach to the study...... of the neuron model, we derive a flow-defined Poincare map giving ail accurate account of the system's dynamics. In a parameter region where the neuron system undergoes bifurcations causing transitions between tonic spiking and bursting, this two-dimensional map becomes a map of a disk with several periodic...... holes. A particular case is the map of a disk with three holes, matching the Plykin example of a planar hyperbolic attractor. The corresponding attractor of the 3D neuron model appears to be hyperbolic (this property is not verified in the present paper) and arises as a result of a two-loop (secondary...

  1. Photospheric radius expansion during magnetar bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, A.L.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.J.; Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Harding, A.K.; Baring, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    On 2008 August 24 the new magnetar SGR 0501+4516 (discovered by Swift) emitted a bright burst with a pronounced double-peaked structure in hard X-rays, reminiscent of the double-peaked temporal structure seen in some bright thermonuclear bursts on accreting neutron stars. In the latter case this is

  2. A theory of gamma-ray bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, G.E.; Lee, C.-H.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Lee, H.K.; Israelian, G.; Bethe, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent observations and theoretical considerations have linked gamma-ray bursts with ultra-bright type Ibc supernovae (`hypernovae'). We here work out a specific scenario for this connection. Based on earlier work, we argue that especially the longest bursts must be powered by the Blandford-Znajek

  3. Neuron-Type-Specific Utility in a Brain-Machine Interface: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Martha G; Bergquist, Austin J; Vargas-Perez, Hector; Nagai, Mary K; Zariffa, Jose; Marquez-Chin, Cesar; Popovic, Milos R

    2017-11-01

    Firing rates of single cortical neurons can be volitionally modulated through biofeedback (i.e. operant conditioning), and this information can be transformed to control external devices (i.e. brain-machine interfaces; BMIs). However, not all neurons respond to operant conditioning in BMI implementation. Establishing criteria that predict neuron utility will assist translation of BMI research to clinical applications. Single cortical neurons (n=7) were recorded extracellularly from primary motor cortex of a Long-Evans rat. Recordings were incorporated into a BMI involving up-regulation of firing rate to control the brightness of a light-emitting-diode and subsequent reward. Neurons were classified as 'fast-spiking', 'bursting' or 'regular-spiking' according to waveform-width and intrinsic firing patterns. Fast-spiking and bursting neurons were found to up-regulate firing rate by a factor of 2.43±1.16, demonstrating high utility, while regular-spiking neurons decreased firing rates on average by a factor of 0.73±0.23, demonstrating low utility. The ability to select neurons with high utility will be important to minimize training times and maximize information yield in future clinical BMI applications. The highly contrasting utility observed between fast-spiking and bursting neurons versus regular-spiking neurons allows for the hypothesis to be advanced that intrinsic electrophysiological properties may be useful criteria that predict neuron utility in BMI implementation.

  4. Leadless Cardiac Pacemakers: Current status of a modern approach in pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideris, Skevos; Archontakis, Stefanos; Dilaveris, Polychronis; Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A; Trachanas, Konstantinos; Sotiropoulos, Ilias; Arsenos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2017-05-18

    Since the first transvenous pacemaker implantation, which took place 50 years ago, important progress has been achieved in pacing technology. Consequently, at present, more than 700,000 pacemakers are implanted annually worldwide. However, conventional pacemakers' implantation has a non-negligible risk of periprocedural and long-term complications associated with the transvenous leads and pacemaker pocket. Recently, leadless pacing systems have emerged as a therapeutic alternative to conventional pacing systems that provide therapy for patients with bradyarrhythmias, while eliminating potential transvenous lead- and pacemaker pocket-related complications. Initial studies have demonstrated favorable efficacy and safety of currently developed leadless pacing systems, compared to transvenous pacemakers. In the present paper, we review the current evidence and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of this novel technology. New technological advances may allow the next generation of leadless pacemakers to further expand, thereby offering a wireless cardiac pacing in future. Copyright © 2017 Hellenic Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET) - rationale and design: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Peter; Wennström, Leo; Kastberg, Robert; Liv, Per

    2017-01-01

    A pacemaker system consists of one or two leads connected to a device that is implanted into a pocket formed just below the collarbone. This pocket is typically subcutaneous, that is, located just above the pectoral fascia. Even though the size of pacemakers has decreased markedly, complications due to superficial implants do occur. An alternative technique would be intramuscular placement of the pacemaker device, but there are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to support this approach, which is the rationale for the Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET). The aim is to study if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a pacemaker pocket. In October 2016, we started to enroll 200 consecutive patients with an indication for bradycardia pacemaker implantation. Patients are randomized to random block sizes, stratified by age group (cut-off: 65 years) and sex, and then randomized to either subcutaneous or intramuscular implant. A concealed allocation procedure is employed, using sequentially numbered, sealed envelopes. Pocket site is blinded to the patient and in all subsequent care. The primary endpoint is patient overall satisfaction with the pocket location at 24 months as measured using a visual analog scale (VAS) 0-10. Secondary endpoints are: complications, patient-reported satisfaction at 1, 12, and 24 months (overall satisfaction, pain, discomfort, degree of unsightly appearance, movement problems, and sleep problems due to device). POCKET is a prospective interventional RCT designed to evaluate if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a bradycardia pacemaker during a two-year follow-up.

  6. Tricuspid valve repair for severe tricuspid regurgitation due to pacemaker leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Kyokun; Minakata, Kenji; Watanabe, Kentaro; Sakaguchi, Hisashi; Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Tadashi; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2016-07-01

    Tricuspid valve regurgitation due to pacemaker leads is a well-known complication. Although some reports have suggested that pacemaker leads should be surgically explanted, strongly adhered leads cannot always be removed. The aim of this study was to describe our tricuspid valve repair techniques with pacemaker leads left in situ. Our retrospective study investigated 6 consecutive patients who required tricuspid valve surgery for severe regurgitation induced by pacemaker leads. From the operative findings, we identified 3 patterns of tricuspid valve and pacemaker lead involvement. In 3 patients, the leads were caught in the chordae, in 2 patients, tricuspid regurgitation was caused by lead impingement on the septal leaflet, and in 3 patients, tricuspid valve leaflets had been perforated by the pacemaker leads. During surgery, all leads were left in situ after being separated from the leaflet or valvular apparatus. In addition, suture annuloplasty was performed for annular dilatation in all cases. In one patient, the lead was reaffixed to the annulus after the posterior leaflet was cut back towards the annulus, and the leaflet was then closed. There was one hospital death due to sepsis. The degree of tricuspid regurgitation was trivial in all surviving patients at discharge. During a mean follow-up of 21 months, one patient died from pneumonia 20 months after tricuspid valve repair. In patients undergoing tricuspid valve surgery due to severe tricuspid regurgitation caused by pacemaker leads, the leads can be left in situ after proper repair with annuloplasty. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Transvenous permanent pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia: technique, challenges, outcome, and a brief review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenthar, Jayaprakash; Rai, Maneesh K; Walia, Rohit; Ghanta, Somasekhar; Sreekumar, Praveen; Reddy, Satish S

    2014-09-01

    Dextrocardia is a rare congenital anomaly. Pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia can be challenging because of the distorted anatomy and associated anomalies. The literature regarding implantation of pacemaker in dextrocardia is scarce. The study involved retrospective analysis of records of patients with dextrocardia who had undergone pacemaker implantation between January 2006 and July 2013 from a single centre. Six patients with dextrocardia (five males and one female) underwent permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) between January 2006 and July 2013. Of them, three had situs solitus dextrocardia and three situs inversus dextrocardia. All three patients with situs solitus dextrocardia had associated corrected transposition of great arteries. The indication for pacemaker implantation was symptomatic complete atrioventricular (AV) block in four, high-grade AV block in one, and sinus node dysfunction in one patient. A favourable outcome was noted during a mean follow-up of 3.9 years (4 months to 7 years) with one patient needing a pulse generator replacement. Permanent pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia can be challenging because of the distorted anatomy. Use of a technique employing angiography to delineate chamber anatomy and relationship can assist the operator during such difficult PPIs. The medium- and long-term survival after a successful pacemaker implantation in dextrocardia is favourable. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Avalanches in a stochastic model of spiking neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Benayoun

    Full Text Available Neuronal avalanches are a form of spontaneous activity widely observed in cortical slices and other types of nervous tissue, both in vivo and in vitro. They are characterized by irregular, isolated population bursts when many neurons fire together, where the number of spikes per burst obeys a power law distribution. We simulate, using the Gillespie algorithm, a model of neuronal avalanches based on stochastic single neurons. The network consists of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, first with all-to-all connectivity and later with random sparse connectivity. Analyzing our model using the system size expansion, we show that the model obeys the standard Wilson-Cowan equations for large network sizes ( neurons. When excitation and inhibition are closely balanced, networks of thousands of neurons exhibit irregular synchronous activity, including the characteristic power law distribution of avalanche size. We show that these avalanches are due to the balanced network having weakly stable functionally feedforward dynamics, which amplifies some small fluctuations into the large population bursts. Balanced networks are thought to underlie a variety of observed network behaviours and have useful computational properties, such as responding quickly to changes in input. Thus, the appearance of avalanches in such functionally feedforward networks indicates that avalanches may be a simple consequence of a widely present network structure, when neuron dynamics are noisy. An important implication is that a network need not be "critical" for the production of avalanches, so experimentally observed power laws in burst size may be a signature of noisy functionally feedforward structure rather than of, for example, self-organized criticality.

  9. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  10. W/kit gene required for interstitial cells of Cajal and for intestinal pacemaker activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huizinga, J D; Thuneberg, L; Klüppel, M

    1995-01-01

    The pacemaker activity in the mammalian gut is responsible for generating anally propagating phasic contractions. The cellular basis for this intrinsic activity is unknown. The smooth muscle cells of the external muscle layers and the innervated cellular network of interstitial cells of Cajal......, which is closely associated with the external muscle layers of the mammalian gut, have both been proposed to stimulate pacemaker activity. The interstitial cells of Cajal were identified in the last century but their developmental origin and function have remained unclear. Here we show...... of Cajal associated with Auerbach's nerve plexus and intestinal pacemaker activity....

  11. Ventricular oversensing of atrial electrical activity that inhibits VVI pacemaker and causes syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elibet Chávez González

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Far-field oversensing of atrial electrical activity caused by a VVI pacemaker is a rare phenomenon; however, it may have serious clinical consequences. It has several causes and its timely identification may avoid a possible ventricular asystole. This article reports the case of a 72-year-old male who had a Biotronik Axios SR pacemaker implanted, in VVIR mode, six years ago, due to blocked atrial fibrillation. He suffered syncope due to pacemaker inhibition caused by ventricular oversensing of atrial electrical activity.

  12. Intrathoracic implantation of a dual-chamber pacemaker in a preterm infant with congenital AV block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydin, Sertac; Ozturk, Erkut; Ergul, Yakup; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2013-03-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block can be concomitant with congenital heart diseases or maternal connective tissue disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Such patients may require implantation of a permanent pacemaker due to ventricular dysfunction. While many methods of pacemaker implantation have been tested, one that is optimal for low birth weight infants remains to be determined. We present a preterm infant with maternal Sjögren's syndrome with congenital heart block and describe the technique for implantation of an intrathoracic dual-chamber pacemaker. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Signal transfer within a cultured asymmetric cortical neuron circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Takuya; Shimba, Kenta; Takayama, Yuzo; Takeuchi, Akimasa; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Simplified neuronal circuits are required for investigating information representation in nervous systems and for validating theoretical neural network models. Here, we developed patterned neuronal circuits using micro fabricated devices, comprising a micro-well array bonded to a microelectrode-array substrate. Approach. The micro-well array consisted of micrometre-scale wells connected by tunnels, all contained within a silicone slab called a micro-chamber. The design of the micro-chamber confined somata to the wells and allowed axons to grow through the tunnels bidirectionally but with a designed, unidirectional bias. We guided axons into the point of the arrow structure where one of the two tunnel entrances is located, making that the preferred direction. Main results. When rat cortical neurons were cultured in the wells, their axons grew through the tunnels and connected to neurons in adjoining wells. Unidirectional burst transfers and other asymmetric signal-propagation phenomena were observed via the substrate-embedded electrodes. Seventy-nine percent of burst transfers were in the forward direction. We also observed rapid propagation of activity from sites of local electrical stimulation, and significant effects of inhibitory synapse blockade on bursting activity. Significance. These results suggest that this simple, substrate-controlled neuronal circuit can be applied to develop in vitro models of the function of cortical microcircuits or deep neural networks, better to elucidate the laws governing the dynamics of neuronal networks.

  14. Computer algorithms for automated detection and analysis of local Ca2+ releases in spontaneously beating cardiac pacemaker cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Maltsev

    Full Text Available Local Ca2+ Releases (LCRs are crucial events involved in cardiac pacemaker cell function. However, specific algorithms for automatic LCR detection and analysis have not been developed in live, spontaneously beating pacemaker cells. In the present study we measured LCRs using a high-speed 2D-camera in spontaneously contracting sinoatrial (SA node cells isolated from rabbit and guinea pig and developed a new algorithm capable of detecting and analyzing the LCRs spatially in two-dimensions, and in time. Our algorithm tracks points along the midline of the contracting cell. It uses these points as a coordinate system for affine transform, producing a transformed image series where the cell does not contract. Action potential-induced Ca2+ transients and LCRs were thereafter isolated from recording noise by applying a series of spatial filters. The LCR birth and death events were detected by a differential (frame-to-frame sensitivity algorithm applied to each pixel (cell location. An LCR was detected when its signal changes sufficiently quickly within a sufficiently large area. The LCR is considered to have died when its amplitude decays substantially, or when it merges into the rising whole cell Ca2+ transient. Ultimately, our algorithm provides major LCR parameters such as period, signal mass, duration, and propagation path area. As the LCRs propagate within live cells, the algorithm identifies splitting and merging behaviors, indicating the importance of locally propagating Ca2+-induced-Ca2+-release for the fate of LCRs and for generating a powerful ensemble Ca2+ signal. Thus, our new computer algorithms eliminate motion artifacts and detect 2D local spatiotemporal events from recording noise and global signals. While the algorithms were developed to detect LCRs in sinoatrial nodal cells, they have the potential to be used in other applications in biophysics and cell physiology, for example, to detect Ca2+ wavelets (abortive waves, sparks and

  15. Computer algorithms for automated detection and analysis of local Ca2+ releases in spontaneously beating cardiac pacemaker cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander V; Parsons, Sean P; Kim, Mary S; Tsutsui, Kenta; Stern, Michael D; Lakatta, Edward G; Maltsev, Victor A; Monfredi, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Local Ca2+ Releases (LCRs) are crucial events involved in cardiac pacemaker cell function. However, specific algorithms for automatic LCR detection and analysis have not been developed in live, spontaneously beating pacemaker cells. In the present study we measured LCRs using a high-speed 2D-camera in spontaneously contracting sinoatrial (SA) node cells isolated from rabbit and guinea pig and developed a new algorithm capable of detecting and analyzing the LCRs spatially in two-dimensions, and in time. Our algorithm tracks points along the midline of the contracting cell. It uses these points as a coordinate system for affine transform, producing a transformed image series where the cell does not contract. Action potential-induced Ca2+ transients and LCRs were thereafter isolated from recording noise by applying a series of spatial filters. The LCR birth and death events were detected by a differential (frame-to-frame) sensitivity algorithm applied to each pixel (cell location). An LCR was detected when its signal changes sufficiently quickly within a sufficiently large area. The LCR is considered to have died when its amplitude decays substantially, or when it merges into the rising whole cell Ca2+ transient. Ultimately, our algorithm provides major LCR parameters such as period, signal mass, duration, and propagation path area. As the LCRs propagate within live cells, the algorithm identifies splitting and merging behaviors, indicating the importance of locally propagating Ca2+-induced-Ca2+-release for the fate of LCRs and for generating a powerful ensemble Ca2+ signal. Thus, our new computer algorithms eliminate motion artifacts and detect 2D local spatiotemporal events from recording noise and global signals. While the algorithms were developed to detect LCRs in sinoatrial nodal cells, they have the potential to be used in other applications in biophysics and cell physiology, for example, to detect Ca2+ wavelets (abortive waves), sparks and embers in muscle

  16. Muscles innervated by a single motor neuron exhibit divergent synaptic properties on multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Dawn M; Pritchard, Amy E; Latimer, John K; Wakefield, Andrew T

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive changes in the output of neural circuits underlying rhythmic behaviors are relayed to muscles via motor neuron activity. Presynaptic and postsynaptic properties of neuromuscular junctions can impact the transformation from motor neuron activity to muscle response. Further, synaptic plasticity occurring on the time scale of inter-spike intervals can differ between multiple muscles innervated by the same motor neuron. In rhythmic behaviors, motor neuron bursts can elicit additional synaptic plasticity. However, it is unknown whether plasticity regulated by the longer time scale of inter-burst intervals also differs between synapses from the same neuron, and whether any such distinctions occur across a physiological activity range. To address these issues, we measured electrical responses in muscles innervated by a chewing circuit neuron, the lateral gastric (LG) motor neuron, in a well-characterized small motor system, the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the Jonah crab, Cancer borealisIn vitro and in vivo, sensory, hormonal and modulatory inputs elicit LG bursting consisting of inter-spike intervals of 50-250 ms and inter-burst intervals of 2-24 s. Muscles expressed similar facilitation measured with paired stimuli except at the shortest inter-spike interval. However, distinct decay time constants resulted in differences in temporal summation. In response to bursting activity, augmentation occurred to different extents and saturated at different inter-burst intervals. Further, augmentation interacted with facilitation, resulting in distinct intra-burst facilitation between muscles. Thus, responses of multiple target muscles diverge across a physiological activity range as a result of distinct synaptic properties sensitive to multiple time scales. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  18. Noise-modulated-microwave-induced response in snail neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J.C.; Arber, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    Helix aspersa neurons were irradiated with noise-amplitude-modulated microwaves (carrier frequency 2450 MHz, 20% AM, 0-20 kHz, specific absorption rate 6.8 and 14.4 mW/g). It was found that such an exposure caused an appearance of high frequency bursts and a rise in membrane resistance.

  19. Recurrently connected and localized neuronal communities initiate coordinated spontaneous activity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardoni, Davide; Amin, Hayder; Di Marco, Stefano; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Nieus, Thierry

    2017-07-01

    Developing neuronal systems intrinsically generate coordinated spontaneous activity that propagates by involving a large number of synchronously firing neurons. In vivo, waves of spikes transiently characterize the activity of developing brain circuits and are fundamental for activity-dependent circuit formation. In vitro, coordinated spontaneous spiking activity, or network bursts (NBs), interleaved within periods of asynchronous spikes emerge during the development of 2D and 3D neuronal cultures. Several studies have investigated this type of activity and its dynamics, but how a neuronal system generates these coordinated events remains unclear. Here, we investigate at a cellular level the generation of network bursts in spontaneously active neuronal cultures by exploiting high-resolution multielectrode array recordings and computational network modelling. Our analysis reveals that NBs are generated in specialized regions of the network (functional neuronal communities) that feature neuronal links with high cross-correlation peak values, sub-millisecond lags and that share very similar structural connectivity motifs providing recurrent interactions. We show that the particular properties of these local structures enable locally amplifying spontaneous asynchronous spikes and that this mechanism can lead to the initiation of NBs. Through the analysis of simulated and experimental data, we also show that AMPA currents drive the coordinated activity, while NMDA and GABA currents are only involved in shaping the dynamics of NBs. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of functional neuronal communities with recurrent local connections allows a neuronal system to generate spontaneous coordinated spiking activity events. As suggested by the rules used for implementing our computational model, such functional communities might naturally emerge during network development by following simple constraints on distance-based connectivity.

  20. Recurrently connected and localized neuronal communities initiate coordinated spontaneous activity in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lonardoni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing neuronal systems intrinsically generate coordinated spontaneous activity that propagates by involving a large number of synchronously firing neurons. In vivo, waves of spikes transiently characterize the activity of developing brain circuits and are fundamental for activity-dependent circuit formation. In vitro, coordinated spontaneous spiking activity, or network bursts (NBs, interleaved within periods of asynchronous spikes emerge during the development of 2D and 3D neuronal cultures. Several studies have investigated this type of activity and its dynamics, but how a neuronal system generates these coordinated events remains unclear. Here, we investigate at a cellular level the generation of network bursts in spontaneously active neuronal cultures by exploiting high-resolution multielectrode array recordings and computational network modelling. Our analysis reveals that NBs are generated in specialized regions of the network (functional neuronal communities that feature neuronal links with high cross-correlation peak values, sub-millisecond lags and that share very similar structural connectivity motifs providing recurrent interactions. We show that the particular properties of these local structures enable locally amplifying spontaneous asynchronous spikes and that this mechanism can lead to the initiation of NBs. Through the analysis of simulated and experimental data, we also show that AMPA currents drive the coordinated activity, while NMDA and GABA currents are only involved in shaping the dynamics of NBs. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of functional neuronal communities with recurrent local connections allows a neuronal system to generate spontaneous coordinated spiking activity events. As suggested by the rules used for implementing our computational model, such functional communities might naturally emerge during network development by following simple constraints on distance-based connectivity.

  1. Burst Oscillations: Watching Neutron Stars Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2010-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the first detection of rotationally modulated emission from X-ray bursting neutron stars, "burst oscillations," This phenomenon enables us to see neutron stars spin, as the X-ray burst flux asymmetrically lights up the surface. It has enabled a new way to probe the neutron star spin frequency distribution, as well as to elucidate the multidimensional nature of nuclear burning on neutron stars. I will review our current observational understanding of the phenomenon, with an eye toward highlighting some of the interesting remaining puzzles, of which there is no shortage.

  2. Nonlinear oscillations in a muscle pacemaker cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a numerical simulation study of the nonlinear oscillations displayed by the Morris-Lecar model [Biophys. J. 35 (1981) 193] for the oscillations experimentally observed in the transmembrane potential of a muscle fiber subject to an external electrical stimulus. We consider the model in the case when there is no external stimulation, aiming to establish the ability of the model to display biophysically reasonable pacemaker dynamics. We obtain 2D bifurcation diagrams showing that indeed the model presents oscillatory dynamics, displaying the two main types of action potentials that are observed in muscle fibers. The results obtained are shown to be structurally stable; that is, robust against changes in the values of system parameters. Moreover, it is demonstrated how the model is appropriate to analyze the action potentials observed in terms of the transmembrane currents creating them.

  3. A novel non invasive measurement of hemodynamic parameters: Comparison of single-chamber ventricular and dual-chamber pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M. Pardede

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a cross sectional study to analyze hemodynamic parameters of single-chamber ventricular pacemaker compared with dual-chamber pacemaker by using thoracic electrical bioimpedance monitoring method (Physio Flow™ - a novel simple non-invasive measurement. A total of 48 consecutive outpatients comprised of 27 single chamber pacemaker and 21 dual chamber were analyzed. We measured cardiac parameters: heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac output index, estimated ejection fraction, end diastolic volume, early diastolic function ratio, thoracic fluid index, and systemic parameters: left cardiac work index and systemic vascular resistance index. Baseline characteristic and pacemaker indication were similar in both groups. Cardiac parameters assessment revealed no significant difference between single-chamber pacemaker and dual-chamber pacemaker in heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac index, estimated ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, thoracic fluid index. There was significantly higher early diastolic function ratio in single-chamber pacemaker compared to dual-chamber pacemaker: 92% (10.2-187.7% vs. 100.6% (48.7-403.2%; p=0.006. Systemic parameters assessment revealed significantly higher left cardiac work index in single-chamber group than dual-chamber group 4.9 kg.m/m² (2.8-7.6 kg.m/m² vs. 4.3 kg.m/m² (2.9-7.2 kg.m/m²; p=0.004. There was no significant difference on systemic vascular resistance in single-chamber compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. Single-chamber ventricular pacemaker provides similar stroke volume, cardiac output and left cardiac work, compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. A non-invasive hemodynamic measurement using thoracic electrical bioimpedance is feasible for permanent pacemaker outpatients. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 25-32Keywords: Permanent pacemaker, single chamber, dual chamber, thoracic electrical bioimpedance, hemodynamic parameter

  4. An Unusual Cause of Transient Ischemic Attack in a Patient with Pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Kumar Kalavakunta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pacemaker lead malposition in various locations has been described in the literature. Lead malposition in left ventricle is a rare and an underdiagnosed complication. We present a 77-year-old man with history of atrial fibrillation and pacemaker placement who was admitted for transient ischemic attack. He was on aspirin, beta blocker, and warfarin with subtherapeutic international normalized ratio. His paced electrocardiogram showed right bundle-branch block, rather than the typical pattern of left bundle-branch block, suggesting pacemaker lead malposition. Further, his chest X-ray and echocardiogram confirmed the pacemaker lead position in the left ventricle instead of right ventricle. He refused surgical removal of the lead and we increased his warfarin dose. Diagnosis of lead malposition in left ventricle, though easy to identify in echocardiogram, requires high index of clinical suspicion. In asymptomatic patients, surgical removal may be deferred for treatment with lifelong anticoagulation.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Patient with a Dual Chamber Pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Martina Millar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Having a pacemaker has been seen an absolute contraindication to having an MRI scan. This has become increasingly difficult in clinical practice as insertion of pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators is at an all time high. Here we outline a case where a 71-year-old male patient with a permanent pacemaker needed to have an MRI scan to ascertain the aetiology of his condition and help guide further management. Given this clinical dilemma, an emergency clinical ethics consultation was arranged. As a result the patient underwent an MRI scan safely under controlled conditions with a consultant cardiologist and radiologist present. The results of the MRI scan were then able to tailor further treatment. This case highlights that in certain conditions an MRI can be performed in patients with permanent pacemakers and outlines the role of clinical ethics committees in complex medical decision making.

  6. Tilt-table testing of patients with pacemaker and recurrent syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Haarmark

    2015-07-01

    HUT in patients with pacemakers has a high diagnostic yield. Although, the majority of patients had a vasodepressor or orthostatic hypotensive response, cardioinhibitory response leading to syncope was also seen.

  7. Pacemaker lead erosion simulating “Loch Ness Monster”: conservative management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garg, Naveen; Moorthy, Nagaraja

    2012-01-01

    .... We describe an unusual case of delayed pacemaker lead erosion causing extrusion of a portion of the pacing lead, with separate entry and exit points, with the gap filled with new skin formation, simulating the “Loch Ness Monster...

  8. Factors involved in correct analysis of intracardiac electrograms captured by Medtronic Inc. pacemakers during tachycardias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Takagaki, ME

    2013-08-01

    Conclusions: In Medtronic pacemakers with single intracardiac EGM channel recording capability, AEGM is the most useful of the 3 EGM channel settings; PVAB should also be set to a much shorter value to achieve a more accurate automatic diagnosis.

  9. The GABA(A) receptor RDL acts in peptidergic PDF neurons to promote sleep in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Brian Y; Kilman, Valerie L; Keath, J Russel; Pitman, Jena L; Allada, Ravi

    2009-03-10

    Sleep is regulated by a circadian clock that times sleep and wake to specific times of day and a homeostat that drives sleep as a function of prior wakefulness. To analyze the role of the circadian clock, we have used the fruit fly Drosophila. Flies display the core behavioral features of sleep, including relative immobility, elevated arousal thresholds, and homeostatic regulation. We assessed sleep-wake modulation by a core set of circadian pacemaker neurons that express the neuropeptide PDF. We find that disruption of PDF function increases sleep during the late night in light:dark and the first subjective day of constant darkness. Flies deploy genetic and neurotransmitter pathways to regulate sleep that are similar to those of their mammalian counterparts, including GABA. We find that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the GABA(A) receptor gene, Resistant to dieldrin (Rdl), in PDF neurons reduces sleep, consistent with a role for GABA in inhibiting PDF neuron function. Patch-clamp electrophysiology reveals GABA-activated picrotoxin-sensitive chloride currents on PDF+ neurons. In addition, RDL is detectable most strongly on the large subset of PDF+ pacemaker neurons. These results suggest that GABAergic inhibition of arousal-promoting PDF neurons is an important mode of sleep-wake regulation in vivo.

  10. Anemone toxin (ATX II)-induced increase in persistent sodium current: effects on the firing properties of rat neocortical pyramidal neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Franceschetti, Silvana; Avanzini, Giuliano

    1998-01-01

    The experiments were performed on sensorimotor cortex using current-clamp intracellular recordings in layer V pyramidal neurones and whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in dissociated pyramidal neurones. The intracellularly recorded neurones were classified on the basis of their firing characteristics as intrinsically bursting (IB) and regular spiking (RS). The RS neurones were further subdivided into adapting (RSAD) or non-adapting (RSNA), depending on the presence or absence of spike frequency adaptation. Since burst firing in neocortical pyramidal neurones has previously been suggested to depend on the persistent fraction of Na+ current (INa,p), pharmacological manipulations with drugs affecting INa inactivation have been employed. ATX II, a toxin derived from Anemonia sulcata, selectively inhibited INa fast inactivation in dissociated neurones. In current-clamp experiments on neocortical slices, ATX II enhanced the naturally occurring burst firing in IB neurones and revealed the ability of RSNA neurones to discharge in bursts, whereas in RSAD neurones it increased firing frequency, without inducing burst discharges. During the ATX II effect, in all the three neuronal subclasses, episodes of a metastable condition occurred, characterized by long-lasting depolarizing shifts, triggered by action potentials, which were attributed to a peak in the toxin-induced inhibition of INa inactivation. The ATX II effect on IB and RSNA neurones was compared with that induced by veratridine and iodoacetamide. Veratridine induced a small increase in the INa and a large shift to the left in the voltage dependence of INa activation. Accordingly, its major effect on firing characteristics was the induction of prolonged tonic discharges, associated with burst facilitation less pronounced than that induced by ATX II. The alkylating agent iodoacetamide was able to induce a selective small increase in the INa,p, with a similar but less pronounced effect than ATX II on firing behaviour

  11. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  12. A fully implantable pacemaker for the mouse: from battery to wireless power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughner, Jacob I; Marrus, Scott B; Zellmer, Erik R; Weinheimer, Carla J; MacEwan, Matthew R; Cui, Sophia X; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Efimov, Igor R

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have become a popular platform for the investigation of the molecular and systemic mechanisms of pathological cardiovascular physiology. Chronic pacing studies with implantable pacemakers in large animals have led to useful models of heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Unfortunately, molecular and genetic studies in these large animal models are often prohibitively expensive or not available. Conversely, the mouse is an excellent species for studying molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease through genetic engineering. However, the large size of available pacemakers does not lend itself to chronic pacing in mice. Here, we present the design for a novel, fully implantable wireless-powered pacemaker for mice capable of long-term (>30 days) pacing. This design is compared to a traditional battery-powered pacemaker to demonstrate critical advantages achieved through wireless inductive power transfer and control. Battery-powered and wireless-powered pacemakers were fabricated from standard electronic components in our laboratory. Mice (n = 24) were implanted with endocardial, battery-powered devices (n = 14) and epicardial, wireless-powered devices (n = 10). Wireless-powered devices were associated with reduced implant mortality and more reliable device function compared to battery-powered devices. Eight of 14 (57.1%) mice implanted with battery-powered pacemakers died following device implantation compared to 1 of 10 (10%) mice implanted with wireless-powered pacemakers. Moreover, device function was achieved for 30 days with the wireless-powered device compared to 6 days with the battery-powered device. The wireless-powered pacemaker system presented herein will allow electrophysiology studies in numerous genetically engineered mouse models as well as rapid pacing-induced heart failure and atrial arrhythmia in mice.

  13. Influence of He-Ne laser radiation of pacemaker on the frog's heart function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porozov, Yury B.; Brill, Gregory E.; Kiritchuk, Vyacheslav F.

    1997-02-01

    In experiments on isolated amphibian hearts changes in photoreactivity of pacemaker cells under the influence of He-Ne laser radiation in different phases of the heart cycle were studied. The specificity of heart photoreaction, peculiarities of relaxation period after laser light action and laser modification of hypodynamic depression development were revealed. Adaptation of pacemaker cells to the He-Ne laser exposure was observed.

  14. [Stored electrograms in pacemakers and ICD systems from the Sorin Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mletzko, R U; Ocklenburg, R; Prizelius, L

    2010-03-01

    Stored electrograms (EGMs) can improve therapy with pacemakers and ICDs by detecting technical problems (e.g., over- or undersensing) and medical problems (e.g., atrial tachyarrhythmias). Analysis of stored EGMs and their interpretation requires knowledge about EGM recording (e. g., channels, summation EGM) and marker annotations. This review presents stored EGMs in pacemaker and ICD systems from the Sorin Group with tips on the potential and interpretation of memory capabilities.

  15. Is pacemaker therapy the right key to patients with vasovagal syncope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Nikola N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vasovagal syncope is the most common type of reflex syncope. Efficacy of cardiac pacing in this indication has not been the subject of many studies and pacemaker therapy in patients with vasovagal syncope is still controversial. Objective. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of pacing therapy in treatment of patients with vasovagal syncope, to determine contribution of new therapeutic models in increasing its success, and to identify risk factors associated with a higher rate of symptoms after pacemaker implantation. Methods. A retrospective study included 30 patients with pacemaker implanted due to vasovagal syncope in the Pacemaker Center, Clinical Center of Serbia, between November 2003 and June 2014. Head-up tilt test was performed to diagnose vasovagal syncope. Patients with cardioinhibitory and mixed type of disease were enrolled in the study. Results. Mean age was 48.1 ± 11.1 years and 18 (60% patients were men. Mean follow-up period was 5.9 ± 3.0 years. Primarily, implantable loop recorder was implanted in 10 (33.3% patients. Twenty (66.7% patients presented cardioinhibitory and 10 (33.3% mixed type of vasovagal syncope. After pacemaker implantation, 11 (36.7% patients had syncope. In multiple logistic regression analysis we showed that syncope is statistically more likely to occur after pacemaker implantation in patients with mixed type of vasovagal syncope (p = 0.018. There were two (6.7% perioperative surgical complications. Conclusion. Pacemaker therapy is a safe treatment for patients with vasovagal syncope, whose efficacy can be improved by strict selection of patients. We showed that symptoms occur statistically more often in patients with mixed type of disease after pacemaker implantation.

  16. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and commercial...

  17. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  18. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  19. Blockwise Repeated Burst Error Correcting Linear Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Dass

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a lower and an upper bound on the number of parity check digits required for a linear code that corrects a single sub-block containing errors which are in the form of 2-repeated bursts of length b or less. An illustration of such kind of codes has been provided. Further, the codes that correct m-repeated bursts of length b or less have also been studied.

  20. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  1. Pacemaker Implants in Children and Adolescents with Chagas Disease in Brazil: 18-Year Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Christianini Mizzaci

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Chagas disease continues to be a serious public health problem, and accounts for 25-30% of the indications for cardiac stimulation in Brazil. Objective: To assess clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with Chagas disease, younger than 18 years, who had undergone pacemaker implantation in Brazil between 1994 and 2011, and its temporal trend. Methods: This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Brazilian Pacemaker Registry database. The following variables were analyzed: year when pacemaker was implanted, location, age, sex, ethnic group, functional class and the main electrocardiographic findings at baseline. Results: In a total of 183,123 implants performed between 1994 and 2011, 214 implants of cardiac stimulation device in Chagas disease patients aged younger than 18 years were identified. Mean age at implantation was 5.6 ± 6.2 years. Second- and third-degree atrioventricular blocks corresponded to 71% of indications for pacemaker implantation. Fifty-six percent of the procedures were performed in the southeast region. Regarding the total number of pacemaker implants per year, there was a remarkable increase in the implants for all causes. However, time series analysis of the implants in Chagas disease patients younger than 18 years revealed a significant reduction in the annual number of implants. Conclusion: There has been an important reduction in the number of pacemaker implantations among children and adolescents with Chagas disease, suggesting a reduction in the vertical transmission of the parasite.

  2. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Noisy Neurons: Hodgkin-Huxley Model and Stochastic Variants. Shurti Paranjape. General Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 34-43. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Responses of the antennal bimodal hygroreceptor neurons to innocuous and noxious high temperatures in the carabid beetle, Pterostichus oblongopunctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurme, Karin; Merivee, Enno; Must, Anne; Sibul, Ivar; Muzzi, Maurizio; Di Giulio, Andrea; Williams, Ingrid; Tooming, Ene

    2015-10-01

    Electrophysiological responses of thermo- and hygroreceptor neurons from antennal dome-shaped sensilla of the carabid beetle Pterostichus oblongopunctatus to different levels of steady temperature ranging from 20 to 35°C and rapid step-changes in it were measured and analysed at both constant relative and absolute ambient air humidity conditions. It appeared that both hygroreceptor neurons respond to temperature which means that they are bimodal. For the first time in arthropods, the ability of antennal dry and moist neurons to produce high temperature induced spike bursts is documented. Burstiness of the spike trains is temperature dependent and increases with temperature increase. Threshold temperatures at which the two neurons switch from regular spiking to spike bursting are lower compared to that of the cold neuron, differ and approximately coincide with the upper limit of preferred temperatures of the species. We emphasise that, in contrast to various sensory systems studied, the hygroreceptor neurons of P. oblongopunctatus have stable and continuous burst trains, no temporal information is encoded in the timing of the bursts. We hypothesise that temperature dependent spike bursts produced by the antennal thermo- and hygroreceptor neurons may be responsible for detection of noxious high temperatures important in behavioural thermoregulation of carabid beetles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, R.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bianco, C. L.; Caito, L.; Chardonnet, P.; Cherubini, C.; Dainotti, M. G.; Fraschetti, F.; Geralico, A.; Guida, R.; Patricelli, B.; Rotondo, M.; Rueda Hernandez, J. A.; Vereshchagin, G.; Xue, S.-S.

    2008-09-01

    We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the process of gravitational collapse, leading to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma: the basic self-accelerating system explaining both the energetics and the high energy Lorentz factor observed in GRBs. We then turn to recall the two basic interpretational paradigms of our GRB model: 1) the Relative Space-Time Transformation (RSTT) paradigm and 2) the Interpretation of the Burst Structure (IBS) paradigm. These paradigms lead to a "canonical" GRB light curve formed from two different components: a Proper-GRB (P-GRB) and an extended afterglow comprising a raising part, a peak, and a decaying tail. When the P-GRB is energetically predominant we have a "genuine" short GRB, while when the afterglow is energetically predominant we have a so-called long GRB or a "fake" short GRB. We compare and contrast the description of the relativistic expansion of the electron-positron plasma within our approach and within the other ones in the current literature. We then turn

  5. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.J.; Baring, M.G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A.L.; Bhat, P.N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a

  6. Addition of a non-photic component to a light-based mathematical model of the human circadian pacemaker

    OpenAIRE

    St. Hilaire, Melissa A.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Khalsa, Sat Bir; Wright, Kenneth P.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical models have become vital to the study of many biological processes in humans due to the complexity of the physiological mechanisms underlying these processes and systems. While our current mathematical representation of the human circadian pacemaker has proven useful in many experimental situations, it uses as input only a direct effect of light on the circadian pacemaker. Although light (a photic stimulus) has been shown to be the primary synchronizer of the circadian pacemaker ...

  7. Use of an active fixation lead and a subpectoral pacemaker pocket may not avoid Twiddler′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris E A Udink ten Cate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of a pacemaker with consequent malfunction of the device has been called Twiddler′s syndrome. Use of active-fixation leads and subpectoral pacemaker pockets has been considered to help in avoiding this problem. We describe a child in whom twiddling was not prevented despite implantation of a lumenless atrial lead and insertion of the pacemaker generator in a subpectoral pocket.

  8. ASKAP Joins the Hunt for Mysterious Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    A new telescope, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), has joined the search for energetic and elusive fast radio bursts. And in just a few days of looking, its already had success!Elusive TransientsThe Parkes radio telescope, which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date, has a very narrow field of view. [CSIRO]Fast radio bursts are mysterious millisecond-duration radio pulses that were first discovered around a decade ago. Since that time particularly in recent years weve made some progress toward the goal of localizing them. Were now fairly convinced that fast radio bursts come from outside of the galaxy, and yet theyre enormously bright orders of magnitude more luminous than any pulse seen from the Milky Way.Better identification of where these mysterious bursts come from would help us to determine what they are. But so far, weve discovered only around 30 such bursts, despite the fact that theyre estimated to occur at a rate of 3,000 events per day across the whole sky.Why are they so hard to find? Due to their short duration, effective detection would require instantaneous coverage of a very large fraction of the sky. The Parkes radio telescope which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date has a field of view spanning less than a square degree,significantly limiting our ability to rapidly survey for these transients.FRB 170107s band-averaged pulse (top) and dynamic spectrum (bottom). [Bannister et al. 2017]A New Array in TownA new player is now on the scene, however, and its already had huge success. ASKAP is a wide-field radio telescope made up of an array of 12-meter antennas. Using phased-array-feed technology, ASKAP is able to instantaneously observe an effective area of 160 square degrees an enormous field compared to Parkes 0.6 square degrees! This capability significantly increases our chances of being able to detect fast radio bursts.In a new study led by Keith Bannister

  9. Electromagnetic interference with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators from low-frequency electromagnetic fields in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiikkaja, Maria; Aro, Aapo L; Alanko, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Sistonen, Heli; Hartikainen, Juha E K; Toivonen, Lauri; Juutilainen, Jukka; Hietanen, Maila

    2013-03-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) can pose a danger to workers with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). At some workplaces electromagnetic fields are high enough to potentially inflict EMI. The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate the susceptibility of pacemakers and ICDs to external electromagnetic fields. Eleven volunteers with a pacemaker and 13 with an ICD were exposed to sine, pulse, ramp, and square waveform magnetic fields with frequencies of 2-200 Hz using Helmholtz coil. The magnetic field flux densities varied to 300 µT. We also tested the occurrence of EMI from an electronic article surveillance (EAS) gate, an induction cooktop, and a metal inert gas (MIG) welding machine. All pacemakers were tested with bipolar settings and three of them also with unipolar sensing configurations. None of the bipolar pacemakers or ICDs tested experienced interference in any of the exposure situations. The three pacemakers with unipolar settings were affected by the highest fields of the Helmholtz coil, and one of them also by the EAS gate and the welding cable. The induction cooktop did not interfere with any of the unipolarly programmed pacemakers. Magnetic fields with intensities as high as those used in this study are rare even in industrial working environments. In most cases, employees can return to work after implantation of a bipolar pacemaker or an ICD, after an appropriate risk assessment. Pacemakers programmed to unipolar configurations can cause danger to their users in environments with high electromagnetic fields, and should be avoided, if possible.

  10. Test and Evaluation of the Zoll Medical Inc., PD2OOO Cardiac Monitor/Pacemaker/Defibrillator System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hade, Edward

    1997-01-01

    The Zoll PD2000 is a portable cardiac monitor, defibrillator and pacemaker that offers synchronized defibrillation, electrocardiogram monitoring, noninvasive temporary pacing and advisory capability...

  11. Cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: innervation, light responsiveness and entrainment in CCK-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hundahl, Christian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal pacemaker driving circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour. Neurons within the SCN express both classical and neuropeptide transmitters which regulate clock functions. Cholecyctokinin (CCK) is a potent neurotransmitter expressed in neurons......, CCK-containing processes make synaptic contacts with both groups of neurons and some CCK cell bodies were innervated by VIPergic neurons. The CCK neurons received no direct input from the three major pathways to the SCN, and the CCK neurons were not light-responsive as evaluated by induction of c......FOS, and did not express the core clock protein PER1. Accordingly, CCK-deficient mice showed normal entrainment and had similar τ, light-induced phase shift and negative masking behaviour as wild-type animals. In conclusion, CCK signalling seems not to be involved directly in light-induced resetting...

  12. Cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus: innervation, light responsiveness and entrainment in CCK-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hundahl, Christian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the principal pacemaker driving circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour. Neurons within the SCN express both classical and neuropeptide transmitters which regulate clock functions. Cholecyctokinin (CCK) is a potent neurotransmitter expressed in neurons......, CCK-containing processes make synaptic contacts with both groups of neurons and some CCK cell bodies were innervated by VIPergic neurons. The CCK neurons received no direct input from the three major pathways to the SCN, and the CCK neurons were not light-responsive as evaluated by induction of c......FOS, and did not express the core clock protein PER1. Accordingly, CCK-deficient mice showed normal entrainment and had similar t, light-induced phase shift and negative masking behaviour as wild-type animals. In conclusion, CCK signalling seems not to be involved directly in light-induced resetting...

  13. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  14. Information Diversity in Structure and Dynamics of Simulated Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo eMäki-Marttunen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance (NCD. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviours are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses.We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  15. Emergence of Assortative Mixing between Clusters of Cultured Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Sara; Granell, Clara; De Domenico, Manlio; Soriano, Jordi; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the activity of neuronal cultures is considered to be a good proxy of the functional connectivity of in vivo neuronal tissues. Thus, the functional complex network inferred from activity patterns is a promising way to unravel the interplay between structure and functionality of neuronal systems. Here, we monitor the spontaneous self-sustained dynamics in neuronal cultures formed by interconnected aggregates of neurons (clusters). Dynamics is characterized by the fast activation of groups of clusters in sequences termed bursts. The analysis of the time delays between clusters' activations within the bursts allows the reconstruction of the directed functional connectivity of the network. We propose a method to statistically infer this connectivity and analyze the resulting properties of the associated complex networks. Surprisingly enough, in contrast to what has been reported for many biological networks, the clustered neuronal cultures present assortative mixing connectivity values, meaning that there is a preference for clusters to link to other clusters that share similar functional connectivity, as well as a rich-club core, which shapes a ‘connectivity backbone’ in the network. These results point out that the grouping of neurons and the assortative connectivity between clusters are intrinsic survival mechanisms of the culture. PMID:25188377

  16. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

  17. Is metabolic rate a universal 'pacemaker' for biological processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Douglas S

    2015-05-01

    A common, long-held belief is that metabolic rate drives the rates of various biological, ecological and evolutionary processes. Although this metabolic pacemaker view (as assumed by the recent, influential 'metabolic theory of ecology') may be true in at least some situations (e.g. those involving moderate temperature effects or physiological processes closely linked to metabolism, such as heartbeat and breathing rate), it suffers from several major limitations, including: (i) it is supported chiefly by indirect, correlational evidence (e.g. similarities between the body-size and temperature scaling of metabolic rate and that of other biological processes, which are not always observed) - direct, mechanistic or experimental support is scarce and much needed; (ii) it is contradicted by abundant evidence showing that various intrinsic and extrinsic factors (e.g. hormonal action and temperature changes) can dissociate the rates of metabolism, growth, development and other biological processes; (iii) there are many examples where metabolic rate appears to respond to, rather than drive the rates of various other biological processes (e.g. ontogenetic growth, food intake and locomotor activity); (iv) there are additional examples where metabolic rate appears to be unrelated to the rate of a biological process (e.g. ageing, circadian rhythms, and molecular evolution); and (v) the theoretical foundation for the metabolic pacemaker view focuses only on the energetic control of biological processes, while ignoring the importance of informational control, as mediated by various genetic, cellular, and neuroendocrine regulatory systems. I argue that a comprehensive understanding of the pace of life must include how biological activities depend on both energy and information and their environmentally sensitive interaction. This conclusion is supported by extensive evidence showing that hormones and other regulatory factors and signalling systems coordinate the processes of

  18. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M.S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R.M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F.; Bhat, P.N.; Burgess, J.M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M.M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B..B.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the

  19. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  20. Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET – rationale and design: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Magnusson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA pacemaker system consists of one or two leads connected to a device that is implanted into a pocket formed just below the collarbone. This pocket is typically subcutaneous, that is, located just above the pectoral fascia. Even though the size of pacemakers has decreased markedly, complications due to superficial implants do occur. An alternative technique would be intramuscular placement of the pacemaker device, but there are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs to support this approach, which is the rationale for the Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET. The aim is to study if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a pacemaker pocket.MethodsIn October 2016, we started to enroll 200 consecutive patients with an indication for bradycardia pacemaker implantation. Patients are randomized to random block sizes, stratified by age group (cut-off: 65 years and sex, and then randomized to either subcutaneous or intramuscular implant. A concealed allocation procedure is employed, using sequentially numbered, sealed envelopes. Pocket site is blinded to the patient and in all subsequent care. The primary endpoint is patient overall satisfaction with the pocket location at 24 months as measured using a visual analog scale (VAS 0-10. Secondary endpoints are: complications, patient-reported satisfaction at 1, 12, and 24 months (overall satisfaction, pain, discomfort, degree of unsightly appearance, movement problems, and sleep problems due to device.ConclusionsPOCKET is a prospective interventional RCT designed to evaluate if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a bradycardia pacemaker during a two-year follow-up.

  1. Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET – rationale and design: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Magnusson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pacemaker system consists of one or two leads connected to a device that is implanted into a pocket formed just below the collarbone. This pocket is typically subcutaneous, that is, located just above the pectoral fascia. Even though the size of pacemakers has decreased markedly, complications due to superficial implants do occur. An alternative technique would be intramuscular placement of the pacemaker device, but there are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs to support this approach, which is the rationale for the Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET. The aim is to study if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a pacemaker pocket. Methods: In October 2016, we started to enroll 200 consecutive patients with an indication for bradycardia pacemaker implantation. Patients are randomized to random block sizes, stratified by age group (cut-off: 65 years and sex, and then randomized to either subcutaneous or intramuscular implant. A concealed allocation procedure is employed, using sequentially numbered, sealed envelopes. Pocket site is blinded to the patient and in all subsequent care. The primary endpoint is patient overall satisfaction with the pocket location at 24 months as measured using a visual analog scale (VAS 0-10. Secondary endpoints are: complications, patient-reported satisfaction at 1, 12, and 24 months (overall satisfaction, pain, discomfort, degree of unsightly appearance, movement problems, and sleep problems due to device. Conclusions: POCKET is a prospective interventional RCT designed to evaluate if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a bradycardia pacemaker during a two-year follow-up.

  2. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Transcriptional Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    Gene transcription or Gene Expression (GE) is the process which transforms the information encoded in DNA into a functional RNA message. It is known that GE can occur in bursts or pulses. Transcription is irregular, with strong periods of activity, interspersed by long periods of inactivity. If we consider the average behavior over millions of cells, this process appears to be continuous. But at the individual cell level, there is considerable variability, and for most genes, very little activity at any one time. Some have claimed that GE bursting can account for the high variability in gene expression occurring between cells in isogenic populations. This variability has a big impact on cell behavior and thus on phenotypic conditions and disease. In view of these facts, the development of a thermodynamic framework to study gene expression and transcriptional regulation to integrate the vast amount of molecular biophysical GE data is appealing. Application of such thermodynamic formalism is useful to observe various dissipative phenomena in GE regulatory dynamics. In this chapter we will examine at some detail the complex phenomena of transcriptional bursts (specially of a certain class of anomalous bursts) in the context of a non-equilibrium thermodynamics formalism and will make some initial comments on the relevance of some irreversible processes that may be connected to anomalous transcriptional bursts.

  3. Scientific Applications Performance Evaluation on Burst Buffer

    KAUST Repository

    Markomanolis, George S.

    2017-10-19

    Parallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing, especially in storing and processing very large datasets, such as the case of seismic imaging, CFD, combustion and weather modeling. The storage hierarchy includes nowadays additional layers, the latest being the usage of SSD-based storage as a Burst Buffer for I/O acceleration. We present an in-depth analysis on how to use Burst Buffer for specific cases and how the internal MPI I/O aggregators operate according to the options that the user provides during his job submission. We analyze the performance of a range of I/O intensive scientific applications, at various scales on a large installation of Lustre parallel file system compared to an SSD-based Burst Buffer. Our results show a performance improvement over Lustre when using Burst Buffer. Moreover, we show results from a data hierarchy library which indicate that the standard I/O approaches are not enough to get the expected performance from this technology. The performance gain on the total execution time of the studied applications is between 1.16 and 3 times compared to Lustre. One of the test cases achieved an impressive I/O throughput of 900 GB/s on Burst Buffer.

  4. VDD vs DDD pacemakers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurrab, Mohammed; Elitzur, Yair; Healey, Jeff S; Gula, Lorne; Kaoutskaia, Anna; Israel, Carsten; Lau, Ching; Crystal, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Dual-chamber (DDD) and VDD pacing are recognized alternatives for patients with advanced atrioventricular (AV) conduction abnormalities and spared sinus node function. The comparative data between these 2 modes are limited. A literature search was performed using multiple major databases. Outcomes of interest were (1) adverse events including incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and (2) procedural parameters. Odds ratio (OR) was reported for dichotomous variables and standardized mean difference (SMD) for continuous variables. Eight controlled studies (7 cohorts and 1 randomized controlled trial: total 1942 patients) were included. VDD mode was used in 922 patients. Mean follow-up period for the VDD group was 51 ± 24 months. There was a trend toward lower overall adverse events in the VDD group (9.6% vs 11.6%; OR, 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.51-1.05; P = 0.09]). Shorter implantation and fluoroscopy times were noted with VDD pacing (46.2 ± 12 vs 65.9 ± 20 minutes; SMD, -0.96 [95% CI, -1.26 to -0.66; P DDD pacemakers with lower pneumothorax risk and shorter implantation and fluoroscopy times. More high-quality data are required to definitively compare the 2 strategies. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Predictive factors for pacemaker requirement after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akin Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has been established as a treatment option for inoperable patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. However, patients suffer frequently from conduction disturbances after TAVI. Methods Baseline, procedural as well as surface and intracardiac ECG parameters were evaluated for patients treated with TAVI and a comparison between patients requiring pacemaker with those not suffering from relevant conduction disorders were done. Results TAVI was successfully in all patients (n=45. Baseline surface and intracardiac ECG recording revealed longer PQ (197.1±51.2 msec versus 154.1±32.1 msec; p120 msec and a PQ interval >200 msec immediately (within 60 minutes after implantation of the aortic valve were predictors for high-grade (type II second-degree and third-degree AV block. Other clinical parameters as well as baseline electrocardiographic parameters had no impact on critical conduction delay. Conclusion Cardiac conduction disturbances are common after TAVI. The need for pacing after TAVI is predictable by surface ECG evaluation immediately (within 60 minutes after the procedure.

  6. Monocenter feasibility study of the MRI compatibility of the Evia pacemaker in combination with Safio S pacemaker lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollmann Christian G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the magnetic resonance (MR conditional pacemaker (PM system (Evia SR-T and DR-T with Safio S leads under MR conditions. Methods Patients with standard PM indications and Evia PM were eligible for enrollment in this single center prospective non-randomized pilot study. Patients underwent MR of the brain and lower lumbar spine at 1.5 Tesla. Atrial (RA und ventricular (RV lead parameters (sensing, pacing threshold [PTH], pacing impedance were assessed immediately before (baseline follow-up [FU] and immediately after MRI (1st FU, after 1 month (2nd FU and 3 months (3rd FU. The effect of MR on serious adverse device effect (SADE free-rate, on atrial and ventricular sensing (AS/VS; mV and atrial (RA and ventricular (RV pacing thresholds (PTH; V/0.4 ms were investigated between baseline and 2nd FU. Continuous variables are expressed as mean ± SD and were compared using paired Student’s t-test. A p  Results Thirty-one patients were enrolled. One patient had to be excluded because of an enrollment violation. Therefore, data of 30 patients (female 12 [40%], age 73 ± 12 years, dual chamber PM 15 [50%] were included in this analysis. No MR related SADE occurred. Lead measurements were not statistically different between the baseline FU and the 2nd FU (AS/VS at baseline 3.2 ± 2.1/15.0 ± 6.0, at 2nd FU 3.2 ± 2.1/14.9 ± 6.5; p = ns. RA-PTH/RV-PTH at baseline 0.68 ± 0.18/0.78 ± 0.22, at 2nd FU 0.71 ± 0.24/0.78 ± 0.22; p = ns. The presence of the permanent pacemakers led to MR imaging artifacts on diffusion weighted sequences of the brain, but did not affect other sequences (e.g. FLAIR and T2 weighted spin-echo images. Conclusion The use of the MR conditional Evia PM in a MR environment under predefined conditions is feasible. No MR related SADEs nor clinically relevant changes in device functions occurred.

  7. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  8. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin, E-mail: xmli@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Dependable Service Computing in Cyber Physical Society of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  9. A Neuron-Based Model of Sleep-Wake Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Peters, Achim; Braun, Hans

    2008-03-01

    In recent years it was discovered that a neuropeptide orexin/hypocretin plays a main role in sleep processes. This peptide is produced by the neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, which project to almost all brain areas. We present a computational model of sleep-wake cycles, which is based on the Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons and considers reciprocal glutaminergic projections between the lateral hypothalamus and the prefrontal cortex. Orexin is released as a neuromodulator and is required to keep the neurons firing, which corresponds to the wake state. When orexin is depleted the neurons are getting silent as observed in the sleep state. They can be reactivated by the circadian signal from the suprachiasmatic nucleus and/or external stimuli (alarm clock). Orexin projections to the thalamocortical neurons also can account for their transition from tonic firing activity during wakefulness to synchronized burst discharges during sleep.

  10. Image Informatics Strategies for Deciphering Neuronal Network Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrez, Jan R; Verstraelen, Peter; Gebuis, Titia; Verschuuren, Marlies; Kuijlaars, Jacobine; Langlois, Xavier; Nuydens, Rony; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; De Vos, Winnok H

    2016-01-01

    Brain function relies on an intricate network of highly dynamic neuronal connections that rewires dramatically under the impulse of various external cues and pathological conditions. Amongst the neuronal structures that show morphological plasticity are neurites, synapses, dendritic spines and even nuclei. This structural remodelling is directly connected with functional changes such as intercellular communication and the associated calcium bursting behaviour. In vitro cultured neuronal networks are valuable models for studying these morpho-functional changes. Owing to the automation and standardization of both image acquisition and image analysis, it has become possible to extract statistically relevant readouts from such networks. Here, we focus on the current state-of-the-art in image informatics that enables quantitative microscopic interrogation of neuronal networks. We describe the major correlates of neuronal connectivity and present workflows for analysing them. Finally, we provide an outlook on the challenges that remain to be addressed, and discuss how imaging algorithms can be extended beyond in vitro imaging studies.

  11. Bursting activity spreading through asymmetric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2014-01-01

    People communicate with those who have the same background or share a common interest by using a social networking service (SNS). News or messages propagate through inhomogeneous connections in an SNS by sharing or facilitating additional comments. Such human activity is known to lead to endogenous bursting in the rate of message occurrences. We analyze a multi-dimensional self-exciting process to reveal dependence of the bursting activity on the topology of connections and the distribution of interaction strength on the connections. We determine the critical conditions for the cases where interaction strength is regulated at either the point of input or output for each person. In the input regulation condition, the network may exhibit bursting with infinitesimal interaction strength, if the dispersion of the degrees diverges as in the scale-free networks. In contrast, in the output regulation condition, the critical value of interaction strength, represented by the average number of events added by a single ...

  12. Burst Searches for Compact Binary Coalescences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    Compact Binary coalescences (CBC) are the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GW) for the first detection with advanced GW detectors. Being the most efficient GW emitters among anticipated GW sources, they are also well understood theoretically in the framework of General Relativity. In the talk I'll discuss different flavors of CBC sources and two types of search methods employed in the GW data analysis: template and excess power. While template methods are the most optimal for CBC sources, I will concentrate on the excess power methods, which are typical for searches of generic GW transients (bursts). How to use burst searches for CBC sources? Why would we do this? What can we learn about CBC sources from a burst search? - these and other questions will be discussed in the talk. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1205512.

  13. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT FOR THORACOLUMBAR SPINE BURST FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barajas Vanegas Raymundo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the category of evidence and the strength of recommendation for the conservative treatment of thoracolumbar spine burst fractures. Method: A systematic review was conducted from April 2014 to June 2015, selecting articles according to their prospective design, related to thoracolumbar spine burst fractures and their treatment. These studies were published in the electronic bibliographic databases from January 2009 to January 2015. Results: A total of 9,504 articles were found in a free search, of which 7 met the selection criteria and were included for analysis in a study of a total of 435 patients, of whom 72 underwent surgical treatment and 363 received some type of conservative treatment, showing predominantly level of evidence "1b", with strength of recommendation type "A". Conclusions: According to the evidence obtained, the conservative treatment is a choice for patients with stable burst fracture in a single level of thoracolumbar spine and with no neurological injury.

  14. Gamma Ray Bursts Observations and Theoretical Conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Alagoz, E; Carrillo, C; Golup, G T; Grimes, M; Herrera, Mora C; Gallo, Palomino J L; López, Vega A; Wicht, J

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short bursts of very high energy photons which were discovered in the late 1960s. Ever since their discovery, scientists have wondered about their origin. Nowadays it is known that they originate outside the Milky Way because of their high red shift rst measured in the afterglows thanks to the Beppo-SAX satellite and ground-based observations. However, theoreticians still do not agree about the mechanism that generates the bursts, and different competing models are animatedly debated. Current GRB experiments include the Swift satellite and the Pierre Auger Observatory that could detect GRBs with an increase of the background. A forthcoming dedicated experiment is GLAST, a satellite observatory for detecting gamma rays with energies up to 300 GeV, whose launch is scheduled for early 2008.

  15. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  16. Mechanism behind Erosive Bursts In Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, R.; Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-09-01

    Erosion and deposition during flow through porous media can lead to large erosive bursts that manifest as jumps in permeability and pressure loss. Here we reveal that the cause of these bursts is the reopening of clogged pores when the pressure difference between two opposite sites of the pore surpasses a certain threshold. We perform numerical simulations of flow through porous media and compare our predictions to experimental results, recovering with excellent agreement shape and power-law distribution of pressure loss jumps, and the behavior of the permeability jumps as a function of particle concentration. Furthermore, we find that erosive bursts only occur for pressure gradient thresholds within the range of two critical values, independent of how the flow is driven. Our findings provide a better understanding of sudden sand production in oil wells and breakthrough in filtration.

  17. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  18. Coding of saliency by ensemble bursting in the amygdala of primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L Gonzalez Andino

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Salient parts of a visual scene attract longer and earlier fixations of the eyes. Saliency is driven by bottom-up (image dependent factors and top-down factors such as behavioral relevance, goals, and expertise. It is currently assumed that a saliency map defining eye fixation priorities is stored in neural structures that remain to be determined. Lesion studies support a role for the amygdala in detecting saliency. Here we show that neurons in the amygdala of primates fire differentially when the eyes approach to or fixate behaviorally relevant parts of visual scenes. Ensemble bursting in the amygdala accurately predicts main fixations during the free-viewing of natural images. However, fixation prediction is significantly better for faces - where a bottom-up computational saliency model fails - compared to unfamiliar objects and landscapes. On this basis we propose the amygdala as a locus for a saliency map and ensemble bursting as a saliency coding mechanism.

  19. Voltage interval mappings for activity transitions in neuron models for elliptic bursters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2011-07-01

    We performed a thorough bifurcation analysis of a mathematical elliptic bursting model, using a computer-assisted reduction to equationless, one-dimensional Poincaré mappings for a voltage interval. Using the interval mappings, we were able to examine in detail the bifurcations that underlie the complex activity transitions between: tonic spiking and bursting, bursting and mixed-mode oscillations, and finally mixed-mode oscillations and quiescence in the FitzHugh-Nagumo-Rinzel model. We illustrate the wealth of information, qualitative and quantitative, that was derived from the Poincaré mappings, for the neuronal models and for similar (electro)chemical systems.

  20. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2-250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550-5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806-20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  1. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin, E-mail: demetk@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2–250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550−5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806−20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  2. Recovery of Ventriculo-Atrial Conduction after Adrenaline in Patients Implanted with Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismaru, Gabriel; Gusetu, Gabriel; Muresan, Lucian; Rosu, Radu; Andronache, Marius; Matuz, Roxana; Puiu, Mihai; Mester, Petru; Miclaus, Maria; Pop, Dana; Mircea, Petru Adrian; Zdrenghea, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Ventriculo-atrial (VA) conduction can have negative consequences for patients with implanted pacemakers and defibrillators. There is concern whether impaired VA conduction could recover during stressful situations. Although the influence of isoproterenol and atropine are well established, the effect of adrenaline has not been studied systematically. The objective of this study was to determine if adrenaline can facilitate recovery of VA conduction in patients implanted with pacemakers. A prospective study was conducted on 61 consecutive patients during a 4-month period (April-July 2014). The presence of VA conduction was assessed during the pacemaker implantation procedure. In case of an impaired VA conduction, adrenaline infusio was used as a stress surrogate to test conduction recovery. The indications for pacemaker implantation were: sinus node dysfunction in 18 patients, atrioventricular (AV) block in 40 patients, binodal dysfunction (sinus node+ AV node) in two patients and other (carotid sinus syndrome) in one patient. In the basal state, 15/61 (24.6%) presented spontaneous VA conduction and 46/61 (75.4%) had no VA conduction. After administration of adrenaline, there was VA conduction recovery in 5/46 (10.9%) patients. Adrenaline infusion produced recovery of VA conduction in 10.9% of patients with absent VA conduction in a basal state. Recovery of VA conduction during physiological or pathological stresses could be responsible for the pacemaker syndrome, PMT episodes, or certain implantable cardiac defibrillator detection issues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Interference of neodymium magnets with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryf, Salome; Wolber, Thomas; Duru, Firat; Luechinger, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Permanent magnets may interfere with the function of cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become widely available in recent years and are incorporated in various articles of daily life. We conducted an in-vitro study to evaluate the ability of NdFeB magnets for home and office use to cause interference with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs. The magnetic fields of ten NdFeB magnets of different size and shape were measured at increasing distances beginning from the surface until a field-strength (B-field) value of 0.5 mT was reached. Furthermore, for each magnet the distance was determined at which a sample pacemaker switched from magnet mode to normal mode. Depending on the size and remanence of individual magnets, a B-field value of 0.5 mT was found at distances ranging from 1.5 cm to 30 cm and a value of 1 mT at distances from 1 cm to 22 cm. The pacemaker behavior was influenced at distances from 1 cm to 24 cm. NdFeB magnets for home and office use may cause interference with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs at distances up to 24 centimeters. Patient education and product declarations should include information about the risk associated with these magnets.

  4. Pacemaker System Malfunction Resulting from External Electrical Cardioversion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Nishida, MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In May 2005 a 68-year-old woman received a VDD pacemaker implantation in the right pectoral region at our hospital for the treatment of complete atrioventricular block. In July 2008, she was diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy based on histological testing. In November 2008, she developed syncope due to ventricular tachycardia while at another hospital. She underwent external electrical cardioversion with an anterior-lateral paddle position using a single shock of 100 J. This shock led to severe bradycardia resulting in a transfer to our hospital. The physician who provided the shock could not have been aware that the patient had an implanted pacemaker. The skin above the pulse generator was burned. The electrocardiogram showed no pacing spikes or ventricular escape rhythm. Investigation of the pacemaker 3 hours after cardioversion revealed reprogramming of the device and a marked rise in the lead impedance (>3,000 ohm. Removal of the generator and implantation of a biventricular cardioverter defibrillator were required. The emergency situation, the small size of the generator, the small incision made using the buried suture method, and the patient's obesity all probably contributed to the physician's not noticing the implanted pacemaker. It is important to increase awareness of the severe consequences that may follow if the physician administering external defibrillation does not know about the patient's implanted pacemaker.

  5. Pre-ejection period by radial artery tonometry supplements echo doppler findings during biventricular pacemaker optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamruddin Salima

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biventricular (Biv pacemaker echo optimization has been shown to improve cardiac output however is not routinely used due to its complexity. We investigated the role of a simple method involving computerized pre-ejection time (PEP assessment by radial artery tonometry in guiding Biv pacemaker optimization. Methods Blinded echo and radial artery tonometry were performed simultaneously in 37 patients, age 69.1 ± 12.8 years, left ventricular (LV ejection fraction (EF 33 ± 10%, during Biv pacemaker optimization. Effect of optimization on echo derived velocity time integral (VTI, ejection time (ET, myocardial performance index (MPI, radial artery tonometry derived PEP and echo-radial artery tonometry derived PEP/VTI and PEP/ET indices was evaluated. Results Significant improvement post optimization was achieved in LV ET (286.9 ± 37.3 to 299 ± 34.6 ms, p Conclusion An acute shortening of PEP by radial artery tonometry occurs post Biv pacemaker optimization and correlates with improvement in hemodynamics by echo Doppler and may provide a cost-efficient approach to assist with Biv pacemaker echo optimization.

  6. Simmer analysis of prompt burst energetics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, J.T.

    1982-03-01

    The Prompt Burst Energetics experiments are designed to measure the pressure behavior of fuel and coolant as working fluids during a hypothetical prompt burst disassembly in an LMFBR. The work presented in this report consists of a parametric study of PBE-5S, a fresh oxide fuel experiment, using SIMMER-II. The various pressure sources in the experiment are examined, and the dominant source identified as incondensable contaminant gasses in the fuel. The important modeling uncertainties and limitations of SIMMER-II as applied to these experiments are discussed.

  7. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  8. Six types of multistability in a neuronal model based on slow calcium current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Malashchenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multistability of oscillatory and silent regimes is a ubiquitous phenomenon exhibited by excitable systems such as neurons and cardiac cells. Multistability can play functional roles in short-term memory and maintaining posture. It seems to pose an evolutionary advantage for neurons which are part of multifunctional Central Pattern Generators to possess multistability. The mechanisms supporting multistability of bursting regimes are not well understood or classified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our study is focused on determining the bio-physical mechanisms underlying different types of co-existence of the oscillatory and silent regimes observed in a neuronal model. We develop a low-dimensional model typifying the dynamics of a single leech heart interneuron. We carry out a bifurcation analysis of the model and show that it possesses six different types of multistability of dynamical regimes. These types are the co-existence of 1 bursting and silence, 2 tonic spiking and silence, 3 tonic spiking and subthreshold oscillations, 4 bursting and subthreshold oscillations, 5 bursting, subthreshold oscillations and silence, and 6 bursting and tonic spiking. These first five types of multistability occur due to the presence of a separating regime that is either a saddle periodic orbit or a saddle equilibrium. We found that the parameter range wherein multistability is observed is limited by the parameter values at which the separating regimes emerge and terminate. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a neuronal model which exhibits a rich variety of different types of multistability. We described a novel mechanism supporting the bistability of bursting and silence. This neuronal model provides a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of networks with neurons possessing different types of multistability.

  9. Six types of multistability in a neuronal model based on slow calcium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashchenko, Tatiana; Shilnikov, Andrey; Cymbalyuk, Gennady

    2011-01-01

    Multistability of oscillatory and silent regimes is a ubiquitous phenomenon exhibited by excitable systems such as neurons and cardiac cells. Multistability can play functional roles in short-term memory and maintaining posture. It seems to pose an evolutionary advantage for neurons which are part of multifunctional Central Pattern Generators to possess multistability. The mechanisms supporting multistability of bursting regimes are not well understood or classified. Our study is focused on determining the bio-physical mechanisms underlying different types of co-existence of the oscillatory and silent regimes observed in a neuronal model. We develop a low-dimensional model typifying the dynamics of a single leech heart interneuron. We carry out a bifurcation analysis of the model and show that it possesses six different types of multistability of dynamical regimes. These types are the co-existence of 1) bursting and silence, 2) tonic spiking and silence, 3) tonic spiking and subthreshold oscillations, 4) bursting and subthreshold oscillations, 5) bursting, subthreshold oscillations and silence, and 6) bursting and tonic spiking. These first five types of multistability occur due to the presence of a separating regime that is either a saddle periodic orbit or a saddle equilibrium. We found that the parameter range wherein multistability is observed is limited by the parameter values at which the separating regimes emerge and terminate. We developed a neuronal model which exhibits a rich variety of different types of multistability. We described a novel mechanism supporting the bistability of bursting and silence. This neuronal model provides a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of networks with neurons possessing different types of multistability.

  10. The proportion of asymptomatic recurrence after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients with a pacemaker for sick sinus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Osaka

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: One-third of PAF patients with SSS and pacemakers recurred after multiple CA sessions. However, 65% of them were asymptomatic and difficult to be identified with conventional follow-up. Pacemaker interrogation significantly increased the detection rate of AF-recurrence.

  11. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  12. Functions of corazonin and histamine in light entrainment of the circadian pacemaker in the Madeira cockroach, Rhyparobia maderae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Andreas; Baz, El-Sayed; Stengl, Monika

    2017-04-01

    The circadian pacemaker of the Madeira cockroach, Rhyparobia (Leucophaea) maderae, is located in the accessory medulla (AME). Ipsi- and contralateral histaminergic compound eyes are required for photic entrainment. Light pulses delay locomotor activity rhythm during the early night and advance it during the late night. Thus, different neuronal pathways might relay either light-dependent delays or advances to the clock. Injections of neuroactive substances combined with running-wheel assays suggested that GABA, pigment-dispersing factor, myoinhibitory peptides (MIPs), and orcokinins (ORCs) were part of both entrainment pathways, whereas allatotropin (AT) only delayed locomotor rhythms at the early night. To characterize photic entrainment further, histamine and corazonin were injected. Histamine injections resulted in light-like phase delays and advances, indicating that the neurotransmitter of the compound eyes participates in both entrainment pathways. Because injections of corazonin only advanced during the late subjective night, it was hypothesized that corazonin is only part of the advance pathway. Multiple-label immunocytochemistry in combination with neurobiotin backfills demonstrated that a single cell expressed corazonin in the optic lobes that belonged to the group of medial AME interneurons. It colocalized GABA and MIP but not AT or ORC immunoreactivity. Corazonin-immunoreactive (-ir) terminals overlapped with projections of putatively light-sensitive interneurons from the ipsi- and contralateral compound eye. Thus, we hypothesize that the corazonin-ir medial neuron integrates ipsi- and contralateral light information as part of the phase-advancing light entrainment pathway to the circadian clock. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1250-1272, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Electromagnetic and radiation environments: effects on pacemakers; Environnements electromagnetiques et radiatifs: effets sur les stimulateurs cardiaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouton, J.; Trochet, R.; Vicrey, J.; Sauvage, M. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France); Chauvenet, B.; Ostrovski, A.; Leroy, E. [Bureau National de Metrologie, LPRI, CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Haug, R. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. de Physique des Gaz et des Plasma, SUPELEC, 91 - Orsay (France); Dodinot, B. [Centre de Stimulation Cardiaque, CHU de Brabois, 54 - Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Joffre, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Electronique et d' Instrumentation Nucleaire, LETI, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1999-07-01

    Nowadays, medical care development allows many people to share the benefits of implanted pacemakers (PM). PM can be perturbed and even fall in complete breakdowns in an electromagnetic and radiation environment. A stimuli-dependent patient can thus be seriously in danger. This article presents the effect of ionizing radiation from either a cobalt-60 source or from a linear accelerator (Saturne 43) on 12 pacemakers. It seems that technological progress make electronic circuits more sensitive to the cumulated dose of radiation. This survey shows that pacemakers have great difficulties to sustain ionizing radiation doses that are commonly delivered to patients during therapies. Usually perturbed functioning appears suddenly and means a strong shift of stimuli that might lead to heart failure.

  14. [New pacemaker functions: which ones represent real progress and which are only gadgets?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodinot, B

    2000-07-01

    Modern pacemakers, and particularly dual chamber models, include a broad array of therapeutic and diagnostic features. Some are designed to increase safety, whereas others are either designed to avoid unnecessary pacing, reduce the current drain and increase the pacemaker longevity, or to improve the hemodynamics. Diagnostic features are more elaborate, more or less automatic, and easier to extract from the pacemaker memory. Some of these new algorithms represent a real advantage, while others appear to be more like gadgets than real advances. Several new algorithms should be improved in order to avoid possibly dangerous side effects. Most of these new features are of little value in the absence of postoperative programming by a well trained physician.

  15. A Parametric Computational Model of the Action Potential of Pacemaker Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Weiwei; Patel, Nitish D; Roop, Partha S; Malik, Avinash; Andalam, Sidharta; Yip, Eugene; Allen, Nathan; Trew, Mark L

    2018-01-01

    A flexible, efficient, and verifiable pacemaker cell model is essential to the design of real-time virtual hearts that can be used for closed-loop validation of cardiac devices. A new parametric model of pacemaker action potential is developed to address this need. The action potential phases are modeled using hybrid automaton with one piecewise-linear continuous variable. The model can capture rate-dependent dynamics, such as action potential duration restitution, conduction velocity restitution, and overdrive suppression by incorporating nonlinear update functions. Simulated dynamics of the model compared well with previous models and clinical data. The results show that the parametric model can reproduce the electrophysiological dynamics of a variety of pacemaker cells, such as sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node, and the His-Purkinje system, under varying cardiac conditions. This is an important contribution toward closed-loop validation of cardiac devices using real-time heart models.

  16. EFFECTS OF PERMANENT PACEMAKER ON THE PULSE PRESSURE IN PATIENTS IN EARLY POST-IMPLANTATION PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pochinska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of pulse pressure (PP and patients migration between PP classes in 220 patients (110 men and 110 women in average age (70 ± 9 years in the early period after pacemaker implantation (3-5 days in VVI/VVIR, DDD/DDDR, CRT-P/D pacing modes with atrioventricular block, bundle brunch block, sick sinus node syndrome, permanent bradysystolic form of atrial fibrillation and dilated cardiomyopathy were studied. The results showed that the implantation of the pacemaker helps to normalize PP in 79 % of patients with the prevalence in class III due to reducing of PP in II, IV and V classes in the VVI, DDD, DDDR pacing mode, and there is no significant effect of it on the migration of patients in PP classes in VVIR and CRT mode. Saving in 21 % of patients II, IV and V class of PP after pacemaker implantation shows the necessity in complement drug therapy.

  17. [Microwave ablation of a sarcoma lung metastasis in a patient with a pacemaker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A; Guerra, J M; Gallego, O; Franquet, T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a pacemaker and a sarcoma lung metastasis treated with microwave ablation. Although the treatment of tumours with microwave ablation is a successful and minimally invasive approach, there are concerns about the safety of this procedure for patients with implanted cardiac devices, such as a pacemaker. After careful planning between radiology and cardiology, microwave ablation was indicated in the patient since it is safer and shorter than the radiofrequency technique. The lesion was treated without complications. It is important to communicate the procedures performed, as well as any complications in order to formulate guidelines for the use of microwave ablation in patients with pacemakers. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. [The computer assisted pacemaker clinic at the regional hospital of Udine (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feruglio, G A; Lestuzzi, L; Carminati, D

    1978-01-01

    For a close follow-up of large groups of pacemaker patients and for evaluation of long term pacing on a reliable statistical basis, many pacemaker centers in the world are now using computer systems. A patient data system with structured display records, designed to give complete, comprehensive and surveyable information and which are immediately retrievable 24 hours a day, on display or printed sets, seems to offer an ideal solution. The pacemaker clinic at the Regional Hospital of Udine has adopted this type of system. The clinic in linked to a live, on-line patient data system (G/3, Informatica Friuli-Venezia Giulia). The input and retrieval of information are made through a conventional keyboard. The input formats have fixed headings with coded alternatives and a limited space for comments in free text. The computer edits the coded information to surveyable reviews. Searches can be made on coded information and data of interest.

  19. Taser-induced rapid ventricular myocardial capture demonstrated by pacemaker intracardiac electrograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Michael; Shinbane, Jerold S; Gillberg, Jeffrey M; Saxon, Leslie A; Swerdlow, Charles D

    2007-08-01

    A Taser weapon is designed to incapacitate violent individuals by causing temporary neuromuscular paralysis due to current application. We report the first case of a Taser application in a person with a dual-chamber pacemaker demonstrating evidence of Taser-induced myocardial capture. Device interrogation was performed in a 53-year-old man with a dual-chamber pacemaker who had received a Taser shot consisting of two barbs delivered simultaneously. Assessment of pacemaker function after Taser application demonstrated normal sensing, pacing thresholds, and lead impedances. Stored event data revealed two high ventricular rate episodes corresponding to the exact time of the Taser application. This report describes the first human case of ventricular myocardial capture at a rapid rate resulting from a Taser application. This raises the issue as to whether conducted energy devices can cause primary myocardial capture or capture only in association with cardiac devices providing a preferential pathway of conduction to the myocardium.

  20. Anesthetic management of an AAI pacemaker patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation during colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jui-An; Borel, Cecil O; Wang, Wen-Been; Wong, Chih-Shung; Yeh, Chun-Chang; Yang, Chih-Ping; Wu, Ching-Tang

    2006-08-01

    Perioperative management of patients with cardiac pacemakers may be challenging because of the increasing sophistication of these devices. We report a case of a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) and with a permanent AAIR (bipolar atrial-inhibited adaptive rate) pacemaker who suffered life-threatening episodes of arrhythmias during operation. The first episode was vagally induced PAF during bowel manipulation; the second, induced by the increased pacing threshold from the external electric cardioversion and hyperkalemia. Transcutaneous pacing provided cardiac pacing and stabilized the patient during the second episode. Thorough preoperative evaluation and prophylactic placement of temporary pacing or at least transcutaneous pacing are important for the avoidance and minimization of intraoperative complications in patients with sick sinus syndrome and with an AAI (atrial inhibited) pacemaker.

  1. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime. Moreover, a handful of long bursts have shown, before the extended decay phase, an initial spike similar to a normal short X-ray burst. Such twofold bursts might be a sort of link between short and super-bursts, where the premature ignition of a carbon layer could......Thermonuclear bursts on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries have been studied for many years and have in a few cases confirmed theoretical models of nuclear ignition and burning mechanisms. The large majority of X-ray bursts last less than 100s. A good number...... of the known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, in particular in the frame of the Key Programmes. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL instrumentation, an international collaboration led by the JEM-X team at the Danish National Space Institute has been monitoring the occurrence of uncommon burst...

  2. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ai Hong

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of the γ-ray burst phenomena are presented. History of the γ-ray bursts, characteristics, and three radiation mechanisms of thermal bremsstrahlung, thermal synchrotron, and inverse Compton scattering processes are considered.

  3. Unusual Solar Decameter Radio Bursts with High Frequency Cut off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. M.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Panchenko, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar bursts with high frequency cut off were observed by the URAN-2 radio telescope (Poltava, Ukraine) on 18 August, 2012 in the frequency range 8-32 MHz. Durations of these bursts changed from 30 to 70 s. It is much longer than that for standard type III bursts. Drift rates are much smaller than those of type III bursts are, though much larger than those for decameter type II bursts. In some cases, the drift rate sign changes from the negative to positive one. Some of these bursts have fine structures. Stripes of the fine structures have small drift rates of 20-40 kHz/s. Polarizations of these bursts made about 10 % that apparently indicates that they are generated at the second harmonic of the local plasma frequency. The connection of bursts with the high frequency cut off with compact ejections from the behind-limb active regions is confirmed.

  4. [Repetitive syncopale loss of consciousness by properly functioning pacemaker. Ophthalmodynamographic, ophthalmodynamometric, and cerebral-scinitigraphic investigations (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, H; Mebes, W; Kypke, W; Haubold, U; Soulier, W

    1977-10-01

    In spite of an intact pacemaker function, 3.8% of 444 patients with an implanted cardiac pacemaker taking part in a regular follow-up program had repetitive syncopes. The investigation thereafter, whether or not these attacks were symptoms of occlusive vascular disease of the carotid arteries, included a thorough physical and angiological examination, ophthalmodynamometry (ODM), ophthalmodynamography (ODG), and radionuclide angiography. The results were compared to those of a group of 46 cardiac pacemaker patients without syncopes after the implantation of the pacemaker: 29% of the patients with syncopes and 15% of the patients without syncopes showed ODM-, ODG-, and radionuclide angiography results compatible with carotid artery insufficiency; statistically, however, the group differences were insignificant. The reasons are discussed why ODM, ODG, and radionuclide angiography appear to be ineffective for the diagnosis of carotid artery occlusion in patients with an implanted cardiac pacemaker.

  5. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  6. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    The unrivalled, extreme luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make them the favored beacons for sampling the high redshift Universe. To employ GRBs to study the cosmic terrain -- e.g., star and galaxy formation history -- GRB luminosities must be calibrated, and the luminosity function versus redshift must be measured or inferred. Several nascent relationships between gamma-ray temporal or spectral indicators and luminosity or total energy have been reported. These measures promise to further our understanding of GRBs once the connections between the luminosity indicators and GRB jets and emission mechanisms are better elucidated. The current distribution of 33 redshifts determined from host galaxies and afterglows peaks near z $\\sim$ 1, whereas for the full BATSE sample of long bursts, the lag-luminosity relation predicts a broad peak z $\\sim$ 1--4 with a tail to z $\\sim$ 20, in rough agreement with theoretical models based on star formation considerations. For some GRB subclasses and apparently related phenomena -- short bursts, long-lag bursts, and X-ray flashes -- the present information on their redshift distributions is sparse or entirely lacking, and progress is expected in Swift era when prompt alerts become numerous.

  8. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lekshmi Resmi

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) were serendipitously discovered in late 1960s by the Vela military satel- lites. In the following years, dedicated scanning instru- ments on-board high energy missions like BeppoSAX1,. CGRO2, HETE3, Swift4 and Fermi5 have increased the number of GRB detections to several ...

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Cardiomyocytes Provide In Vivo Biological Pacemaker Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Samuel; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P.; Ben-Ari, Meital; Naor, Shulamit; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Danilo, Peter; Rahim, Tania; Burke, Stephanie; Qiu, Xiaoliang; Potapova, Irina A.; Doronin, Sergey V.; Brink, Peter R.; Binah, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    Background— Although multiple approaches have been used to create biological pacemakers in animal models, induced pluripotent stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) have not been investigated for this purpose. We now report pacemaker function of iPSC-CMs in a canine model. Methods and Results— Embryoid bodies were derived from human keratinocytes, their action potential characteristics determined, and their gene expression profiles and markers of differentiation identified. Atrioventricular blocked dogs were immunosuppressed, instrumented with VVI pacemakers, and injected subepicardially into the anterobasal left ventricle with 40 to 75 rhythmically contracting embryoid bodies (totaling 1.3–2×106 cells). ECG and 24-hour Holter monitoring were performed biweekly. After 4 to 13 weeks, epinephrine (1 μg kg−1 min−1) was infused, and the heart removed for histological or electrophysiological study. iPSC-CMs largely lost the markers of pluripotency, became positive for cardiac-specific markers. and manifested If-dependent automaticity. Epicardial pacing of the injection site identified matching beats arising from that site by week 1 after implantation. By week 4, 20% of beats were electronically paced, 60% to 80% of beats were matching, and mean and maximal biological pacemaker rates were 45 and 75 beats per minute. Maximum night and day rates of matching beats were 53±6.9 and 69±10.4 beats per minute, respectively, at 4 weeks. Epinephrine increased rate of matching beats from 35±4.3 to 65±4.0 beats per minute. Incubation of embryoid bodies with the vital dye, Dil, revealed the persistence of injected cells at the site of administration. Conclusions— iPSC-CMs can integrate into host myocardium and create a biological pacemaker. Although this is a promising development, rate and rhythm of the iPSC-CMs pacemakers remain to be optimized. PMID:28500172

  10. Effects of lubiprostone on pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of cajal from the mouse colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Han-Yi; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ki, Jung Suk; Ryu, Kwon Ho; Choi, Seok; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2014-08-01

    Lubiprostone is a chloride (Cl(-)) channel activator derived from prostaglandin E1 and used for managing constipation. In addition, lubiprostone affects the activity of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells that generate slow-wave activity in smooth muscles. We studied the effects of lubiprostone on the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to determine the pacemaker activity in cultured colonic ICCs obtained from mice. Lubiprostone hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited the generation of pacemaker potentials. Prostanoid EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 antagonists (SC-19220, PF-04418948, 6-methoxypyridine-2-boronc acid N-phenyldiethanolamine ester, and GW627368, respectively) did not block the response to lubiprostone. L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase) did not block the response to lubiprostone. In addition, tetraethylammonium (TEA, a voltage-dependent potassium [K(+)] channel blocker) and apamin (a calcium [Ca(2+)]-dependent K(+) channel blocker) did not block the response to lubiprostone. However, glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker) blocked the response to lubiprostone. Similar to lubiprostone, pinacidil (an opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel) hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited the generation of pacemaker potentials, and these effects were inhibited by glibenclamide. These results suggest that lubiprostone can modulate the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs via activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel through a prostanoid EP receptor-independent mechanism.

  11. Runtime Verification of Pacemaker Functionality Using Hierarchical Fuzzy Colored Petri-nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majma, Negar; Babamir, Seyed Morteza; Monadjemi, Amirhassan

    2017-02-01

    Today, implanted medical devices are increasingly used for many patients and in case of diverse health problems. However, several runtime problems and errors are reported by the relevant organizations, even resulting in patient death. One of those devices is the pacemaker. The pacemaker is a device helping the patient to regulate the heartbeat by connecting to the cardiac vessels. This device is directed by its software, so any failure in this software causes a serious malfunction. Therefore, this study aims to a better way to monitor the device's software behavior to decrease the failure risk. Accordingly, we supervise the runtime function and status of the software. The software verification means examining limitations and needs of the system users by the system running software. In this paper, a method to verify the pacemaker software, based on the fuzzy function of the device, is presented. So, the function limitations of the device are identified and presented as fuzzy rules and then the device is verified based on the hierarchical Fuzzy Colored Petri-net (FCPN), which is formed considering the software limits. Regarding the experiences of using: 1) Fuzzy Petri-nets (FPN) to verify insulin pumps, 2) Colored Petri-nets (CPN) to verify the pacemaker and 3) To verify the pacemaker by a software agent with Petri-network based knowledge, which we gained during the previous studies, the runtime behavior of the pacemaker software is examined by HFCPN, in this paper. This is considered a developing step compared to the earlier work. HFCPN in this paper, compared to the FPN and CPN used in our previous studies reduces the complexity. By presenting the Petri-net (PN) in a hierarchical form, the verification runtime, decreased as 90.61% compared to the verification runtime in the earlier work. Since we need an inference engine in the runtime verification, we used the HFCPN to enhance the performance of the inference engine.

  12. Is there cosmological time dilation in gamma-ray bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. report that the temporal structure of faint gamma-ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  13. HOST GALAXIES AS GAMMA-RAY BURST DISTANCE INDICATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. BAND; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the distributions of the total burst energy, the peak luminosity and the X-ray afterglow energy using burst observations and distances to the associated host galaxies. To expand the sample, we include redshift estimates for host galaxies without spectroscopic redshifts. The methodology requires a model of the host galaxy population; we find that in the best model the burst rate is proportional to the host galaxy luminosity at the time of the burst.

  14. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  15. Prototypic and Arkypallidal Neurons in the Dopamine-Intact External Globus Pallidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Azzedine; Mallet, Nicolas; Mohamed, Foad Y.; Sharott, Andrew; Dodson, Paul D.; Nakamura, Kouichi C.; Suri, Sana; Avery, Sophie V.; Larvin, Joseph T.; Garas, Farid N.; Garas, Shady N.; Vinciati, Federica; Morin, Stéphanie; Bezard, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    Studies in dopamine-depleted rats indicate that the external globus pallidus (GPe) contains two main types of GABAergic projection cell; so-called “prototypic” and “arkypallidal” neurons. Here, we used correlative anatomical and electrophysiological approaches in rats to determine whether and how this dichotomous organization applies to the dopamine-intact GPe. Prototypic neurons coexpressed the transcription factors Nkx2-1 and Lhx6, comprised approximately two-thirds of all GPe neurons, and were the major GPe cell type innervating the subthalamic nucleus (STN). In contrast, arkypallidal neurons expressed the transcription factor FoxP2, constituted just over one-fourth of GPe neurons, and innervated the striatum but not STN. In anesthetized dopamine-intact rats, molecularly identified prototypic neurons fired at relatively high rates and with high regularity, regardless of brain state (slow-wave activity or spontaneous activation). On average, arkypallidal neurons fired at lower rates and regularities than prototypic neurons, and the two cell types could be further distinguished by the temporal coupling of their firing to ongoing cortical oscillations. Complementing the activity differences observed in vivo, the autonomous firing of identified arkypallidal neurons in vitro was slower and more variable than that of prototypic neurons, which tallied with arkypallidal neurons displaying lower amplitudes of a “persistent” sodium current important for such pacemaking. Arkypallidal neurons also exhibited weaker driven and rebound firing compared with prototypic neurons. In conclusion, our data support the concept that a dichotomous functional organization, as actioned by arkypallidal and prototypic neurons with specialized molecular, structural, and physiological properties, is fundamental to the operations of the dopamine-intact GPe. PMID:25926446

  16. Exploring neuronal bistability at the depolarization block.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Dovzhenok

    Full Text Available Many neurons display bistability--coexistence of two firing modes such as bursting and tonic spiking or tonic spiking and silence. Bistability has been proposed to endow neurons with richer forms of information processing in general and to be involved in short-term memory in particular by allowing a brief signal to elicit long-lasting changes in firing. In this paper, we focus on bistability that allows for a choice between tonic spiking and depolarization block in a wide range of the depolarization levels. We consider the spike-producing currents in two neurons, models of which differ by the parameter values. Our dopaminergic neuron model displays bistability in a wide range of applied currents at the depolarization block. The Hodgkin-Huxley model of the squid giant axon shows no bistability. We varied parameter values for the model to analyze transitions between the two parameter sets. We show that bistability primarily characterizes the inactivation of the Na(+ current. Our study suggests a connection between the amount of the Na(+ window current and the length of the bistability range. For the dopaminergic neuron we hypothesize that bistability can be linked to a prolonged action of antipsychotic drugs.

  17. Psychosocial aspects and mental health in children after permanent pacemaker implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C; Hørder, K; Kristensen, L

    1994-01-01

    , and they were given a child-psychiatric evaluation consisting of a semi-structured and a child-psychiatric interview. The psychological interview used intelligence tests and the Draw-A-Person test as well as the Rorschach test. The patients had had their pacemakers during an average of 6.7 years (range 3......-14). Generally the psychological condition was strained in 7 families, in which psychiatric and social therapy had been necessary. The children's intelligence was within normal ranges, average IQ being 110 (range 80-135). The children had abnormal body image related to the pacemaker. Adults virtually incorporate...

  18. Multiple photoreceptor systems control the swim pacemaker activity in box jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Mori, S.

    2009-01-01

    Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each with a s......Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each...

  19. Atrial demand pacemakers in sick sinus syndrome: an efficient and reliable approach in selected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kae-Woei; Lee, Wen-Lieng; Hsueh, Chung-Whei; Chen, Ying-Tsung; Ting, Chih-Tai

    2003-12-01

    Atrial demand pacemakers offer the advantages of lower cost and less cumbersome implantation in selected sick sinus syndrome patients with acceptable atrioventricular (AV) conduction. However, concerns about their long-term performance and AV conduction degeneration still worry certain implantation physicians. There were still limited long-term follow-up data of atrial demand pacemakers, especially in oriental people. Thus, we reviewed our long-term follow-up results. From January 1996 to December 1998, all symptomatic sick sinus syndrome patients with atrial demand pacemaker (AAI, AAIR) treatment were retrospectively studied. They were all regularly followed up at our pacemaker clinic. The patients' clinical presentations, coronary angiography, electrophysiology results and their initial implantation parameters were collected. All outpatient follow-up histories, electrocardiogram (EKG) rhythm strips, and chronic threshold test data were also retrieved. There were 51 patients enrolled in this study, with a mean age of 68 +/- 7 years. The average follow-up duration was 44 +/- 17 months. The baseline His bundle-ventricular (HV) interval was 40 +/- 6 ms and AV 1:1 conduction cycle lengths were up to 388 +/- 65 ms. Two patients (2/51, 3.9%) had acute lead dislodgement within three days and needed reimplantation. During the long-term follow-up, all patients maintained good pacing function. Five patients (5/51, 9.8%) had occasions of sensing failure, as detected by 12-lead surface EKG or Holter monitor, which all resolved after reprogramming of the sensing threshold. Only 1 patient ( 1/51, 1.9%) developed Wenckebach AV block in the daytime as shown by EKG and was later upgraded to a DDDR pacemaker uneventfully. No patient became victim of chronic atrial fibrillation during the long-term follow-up. Our follow-up study again suggests that atrial demand pacemakers have good initial implantation and long-term results. The chance of developing AV conduction degeneration

  20. Challenging pacemaker implantation in a patient with acquired dextrocardia after pneumonectomy, skoliosis and complete heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Karsten; Haghi, Dariush; Borggrefe, Martin; Kuschyk, Jürgen

    2010-09-01

    Pacemaker implantation after pneumonectomy is rare and there have been no previously reported cases of acquired dextrocardia after implantation. The authors report the case of a pacemaker implantation in a patient with complete heart block, impaired left ventricular function, sclerosis of heart valves and radiation induced vasculopathy resulting in ostial stenosis of the right coronary artery 30 years after radiochemotherapy in childhood. Acquired dextrocardia after right pneumonectomy for mucoepidermoid carcinoma made implantation a challenge due to and poor fluoroscopic visualization of the heart and increased radio-opacity of the right chest when compared to congenital dextrocardia.

  1. Heuristic burst detection method using flow and pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Roer, Van de M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst

  2. Detecting Pipe Bursts Using Heuristic and CUSUM Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Jung, D.; Vreeburg, J.; Van de Roer, M.; Lansey, K.; Rierveld, L.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst

  3. IGR J17254-3257, a new bursting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. The study of the observational properties of uncommonly long bursts from low luminosity sources is important when investigating the transition from a hydrogen - rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning as predicted by current burst theories. On ...

  4. Multi-neuronal recordings in the basal ganglia in normal and dystonic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Baron

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical rate-based pathway models are invaluable for conceptualizing direct/indirect basal ganglia pathways, but cannot account for many aspects of normal and abnormal motor control. To better understand the contribution of patterned basal ganglia signaling to normal and pathological motor control, we simultaneously recorded multi-neuronal and EMG activity in normal and dystonic rats. We used the jaundiced Gunn rat model of kernicterus as our experimental model of dystonia. Stainless steel head fixtures were implanted on the skulls and EMG wires were inserted into antagonistic hip muscles in 7 dystonic and 7 control rats. Under awake, head-restrained conditions, neuronal activity was collected from up to 3 microelectrodes inserted in the principal motor regions of the globus pallidus (GP, subthalamic nucleus (STN, and entopeduncular nucleus (EP. In normal animals, most neurons discharged in regular or irregular patterns, without appreciable bursting. In contrast, in dystonic animals, neurons discharged in slow bursty or irregular, less bursty patterns. In normal rats, a subset of neurons showed brief discharge bursts coinciding with individual agonist or antagonist EMG bursts. In contrast, in dystonics, movement-related discharges were characterized by more prolonged bursts which persist over multiple dystonic co-contraction epics. The pattern of movement related decreases in discharge activity however did not differ in dystonics compared to controls. In severely dystonic rats, exclusively, simultaneously recorded units often showed abnormally synchronized movement related pauses in GP and bursts in EP. In conclusion, our findings support that slow, abnormally patterned neuronal signaling is a fundamental pathophysiological feature of intrinsic basal ganglia nuclei in dystonia. Moreover, from our findings, we suggest that excessive movement related silencing of neuronal signaling in GP profoundly disinhibits EP and in turn contributes to

  5. Astrocytes restrict discharge duration and neuronal sodium loads during recurrent network activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karus, Claudia; Mondragão, Miguel A; Ziemens, Daniel; Rose, Christine R

    2015-06-01

    Influx of sodium ions into active neurons is a highly energy-expensive process which must be strictly limited. Astrocytes could play an important role herein because they take up glutamate and potassium from the extracellular space, thereby dampening neuronal excitation. Here, we performed sodium imaging in mouse hippocampal slices combined with field potential and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and measurement of extracellular potassium ([K(+)]o). Network activity was induced by Mg(2+)-free, bicuculline-containing saline, during which neurons showed recurring epileptiform bursting, accompanied by transient increases in [K(+)]o and astrocyte depolarizations. During bursts, neurons displayed sodium increases by up to 22 mM. Astrocyte sodium concentration increased by up to 8.5 mM, which could be followed by an undershoot below baseline. Network sodium oscillations were dependent on action potentials and activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Inhibition of glutamate uptake caused acceleration, followed by cessation of electrical activity, irreversible sodium increases, and swelling of neurons. The gliotoxin NaFAc (sodium-fluoroacetate) resulted in elevation of astrocyte sodium concentration and reduced glial uptake of glutamate and potassium uptake through Na(+) /K(+)-ATPase. Moreover, NaFAc extended epileptiform bursts, caused elevation of neuronal sodium, and dramatically prolonged accompanying sodium signals, most likely because of the decreased clearance of glutamate and potassium by astrocytes. Our experiments establish that recurrent neuronal bursting evokes sodium transients in neurons and astrocytes and confirm the essential role of glutamate transporters for network activity. They suggest that astrocytes restrict discharge duration and show that an intact astrocyte metabolism is critical for the neurons' capacity to recover from sodium loads during synchronized activity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mechanical stress activates neurites and somata of myenteric neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Kugler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The particular location of myenteric neurons, sandwiched between the 2 muscle layers of the gut, implies that their somata and neurites undergo mechanical stress during gastrointestinal motility. Existence of mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN is undoubted but many of their basic features remain to be studied. In this study, we used ultra-fast neuroimaging to record activity of primary cultured myenteric neurons of guinea pig and human intestine after von Frey hair evoked deformation of neurites and somata. Independent component analysis was applied to reconstruct neuronal morphology and follow neuronal signals. Of the cultured neurons 45% (114 out of 256, 30 guinea pigs responded to neurite probing with a burst spike frequency of 13.4 Hz. Action potentials generated at the stimulation site invaded the soma and other neurites. Mechanosensitive sites were expressed across large areas of neurites. Many mechanosensitive neurites appeared to have afferent and efferent functions as those that responded to deformation also conducted spikes coming from the soma. Mechanosensitive neurites were also activated by nicotine application. This supported the concept of multifunctional MEN. 14% of the neurons (13 out of 96, 18 guinea pigs responded to soma deformation with burst spike discharge of 17.9 Hz. Firing of MEN adapted rapidly (RAMEN, slowly (SAMEN or ultra-slowly (USAMEN. The majority of MEN showed SAMEN behavior although significantly more RAMEN occurred after neurite probing. Cultured myenteric neurons from human intestine had similar properties. Compared to MEN, dorsal root ganglion neurons were activated by neurite but not by soma deformation with slow adaptation of firing. We demonstrated that MEN exhibit specific features very likely reflecting adaptation to their specialized functions in the gut.

  7. Observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows with the AEOS Burst Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Heather Anne

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are variable bursts of gamma-ray radiation, that lasts from milliseconds to hundreds of seconds. These bursts of gamma rays are detected in other wavelengths (optical, IR, radio, X-ray), because the afterglow lasts much longer, and this enables us to learn more about GRBs. The AEOS Burst Camera (ABC) is a 6'x6' field of view camera designed to observe the optical afterglows of GRBs, and is mounted on the 3.67m Advanced Electro- Optical System (AEOS) telescope, located at 10,000ft on Haleakala, Hawaii. There are 45 hours of Target of Opportunity (ToO) time to observe GRBs detected by Swift and other GRB satellites. Observations are started within minutes after a suitable GRB is detected, and continue for an hour or two. During this project, 21 GRBs were observed, and of those, 10 had detected afterglows, and 4 had interesting limits. About half of the bursts fit the fireball model, and half did not, which is similar to what ROTSE has found. Roughly half of the ABC bursts fall in the dark category, with b ox Akerlof Sr, Swan (2007) found, that roughly 70% of all GRBs brighter than 22nd mag at 1000s should be detectable.

  8. Path correlation considered prioritized burst segmentation for quality of service support in optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Rui; Changyue, Jiana; He, Tingting; Yu, Jianwei; Lei, Bo; Mao, Tengyue

    2013-04-01

    Burst segmentation (BS) is a high-efficiency contention resolution scheme in bufferless optical burst switching (OBS) networks. A prioritized BS scheme for quality of service (QoS) support is developed. Unlike the existing work on the BS scheme, the proposed BS model considers path-correlated factors, such as path length, the adjoining paths carrying traffic on a given path, and the multipriority traffic coming from all paths. Byte loss probability for high-priority and low-priority bursts under the time-based assembly approach and the length-based assembly approach to estimate the performance of the proposed BS scheme by comparing the cumulative distribution function of a burst length in an OBS ingress node (source) with that in an egress node (destination) is introduced. A preemptive BS policy for different priority bursts is proposed to support the QoS of the OBS network. Finally, a simulation is given to validate the proposed analytical model in an existing OBS network with two priority bursts. It is shown that the proposed BS scheme can realize the service differentiation for multipriority traffic under the consideration of network topology-dependent parameters.

  9. The Fermi-GBM X-Ray Burst Monitor: Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 0614+09

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; van der Horst, A.J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Chakrabarty, D.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P.N.; Briggs, M.S.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi

  10. Long-lasting modification of intrinsic discharge properties in subicular neurons following status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Jörg; Su, Hailing; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel

    2002-07-01

    A single episode of status epilepticus (SE) induces neuropathological changes in the brain that may lead to the development of a permanent epileptic condition. Most studies of this plasticity have focused on the hippocampus, where both synaptic function and intrinsic neuronal excitability have been shown to be persistently modified by SE. However, many other brain structures are activated during SE and may also be involved in the subsequent epileptogenic process. Here we have investigated whether SE, induced in rats with pilocarpine and terminated after 40 min with diazepam, persistently modifies the intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons in the subiculum. Subicular slices were prepared from control and SE-experienced rats (2-5 weeks after SE). In the control group, only 4% of the neurons fired bursts in response to intrasomatic, threshold-straddling depolarizing current pulses (low-threshold bursters). The remaining neurons either fired bursts in response to strong (3x threshold) depolarizations (35%; high-threshold bursters) or fired in a completely regular mode (61%; nonbursters). In the SE-experienced group, the fractions of low- and high-threshold bursters markedly increased to 29% and 53%, respectively. This change in firing behaviour was associated with a marked increase in the size of the spike after depolarization, particularly in low-threshold bursters. Experimental suppression of Ca2+ currents selectively blocked low-threshold bursting but did not affect high-threshold bursting, suggesting that a dual Ca2+- dependent and Ca2+- independent mechanism controls bursting in these neurons. The persistent up-regulation of intrinsic bursting in the subiculum, in concert with similar changes in the hippocampus, undoubtedly contributes to epileptogenesis following pilocarpine-induced SE.

  11. A Highly Predictive Risk Model for Pacemaker Implantation After TAVR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Yoshio; Abramowitz, Yigal; Kawamori, Hiroyuki; Kazuno, Yoshio; Kubo, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Okuyama, Kazuaki; Kashif, Mohammad; Chakravarty, Tarun; Nakamura, Mamoo; Cheng, Wen; Friedman, John; Berman, Daniel; Makkar, Raj R; Jilaihawi, Hasan

    2017-10-01

    This study sought to develop a robust and definitive risk model for new permanent pacemaker implantation (PPMI) after SAPIEN 3 (third generation balloon expandable valve) (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (third generation balloon expandable valve TAVR), including calcification in the aortic-valvular complex (AVC). The association between calcium in the AVC and need for PPMI is poorly delineated after third generation balloon expandable valve TAVR. At Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, California, a total of 240 patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent third generation balloon expandable valve TAVR and had contrast computed tomography. AVC was characterized precisely by leaflet sector and region. The total new PPMI rate was 14.6%. On multivariate analysis for predictors of PPMI, pre-procedure third generation balloon expandable valve TAVR, right bundle branch block (RBBB), shorter membranous septum (MS) length, and noncoronary cusp device-landing zone calcium volume (NCC-DLZ CA) were included. Predictive probabilities were generated using this logistic regression model. If 3 pre-procedural risk factors were present, the c-statistic of the model for PPMI was area under the curve of 0.88, sensitivity of 77.1%, and specificity of 87.1%; this risk model had high negative predictive value (95.7%). The addition of the procedural factor of device depth to the model, with the parameter of difference between implantation depth and MS length, combined with RBBB and NCC-DLZ CA increased the c-statistic to 0.92, sensitivity to 94.3%, specificity to 83.8%, and negative predictive value to 98.8% CONCLUSIONS: By using a precise characterization of distribution of calcification in the AVC in a single-center, retrospective study, NCC-DLZ CA was found to be an independent predictor of new PPMI post-third generation balloon expandable valve TAVR. The findings also reinforce the importance of short MS length, pre

  12. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  13. Single particle fluorescence burst analysis of epsin induced membrane fission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Brooks

    Full Text Available Vital cellular processes, from cell growth to synaptic transmission, rely on membrane-bounded carriers and vesicles to transport molecular cargo to and from specific intracellular compartments throughout the cell. Compartment-specific proteins are required for the final step, membrane fission, which releases the transport carrier from the intracellular compartment. The role of fission proteins, especially at intracellular locations and in non-neuronal cells, while informed by the dynamin-1 paradigm, remains to be resolved. In this study, we introduce a highly sensitive approach for the identification and analysis of membrane fission machinery, called burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS. BAS is a single particle, free-solution approach, well suited for quantitative measurements of membrane dynamics. Here, we use BAS to analyze membrane fission induced by the potent, fission-active ENTH domain of epsin. Using this method, we obtained temperature-dependent, time-resolved measurements of liposome size and concentration changes, even at sub-micromolar concentration of the epsin ENTH domain. We also uncovered, at 37°C, fission activity for the full-length epsin protein, supporting the argument that the membrane-fission activity observed with the ENTH domain represents a native function of the full-length epsin protein.

  14. Effects of periodic stimulation on an overly activated neuronal circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Okyu; Kim, Kiwoong; Park, Sungwon; Moon, Hie-Tae

    2011-08-01

    Motivated by therapeutic deep brain stimulation, we carried out a model study on the effects of periodic stimulation on an overly activated neuronal circuit. Our neuronal circuit, modeled as a small-world network of noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neurons, is controlled to undergo the mechanism of coherence resonance to exhibit spontaneous synchronization of neuronal firing. This state of energy burst is then directly modulated by a chain of electric pulses. Our study shows that (i) the stimulation blocks the synchronization by generating traveling waves, (ii) only the pulse with proper frequency can block the synchronization, and (iii) the effects of stimulation are completely reversible. It is also found that the stimulation is effective only when the network maintains fairly good structural regularity.

  15. Cardiac pacemaker insertion in the South-South Region of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The disease trends in the region have resulted in increasing demand for invasive cardiac procedures which are largely unavailable in this subregion. This review examines the prospects and possible challenges of interventional cardiology care in South-South Nigeria, using cardiac pacemaker implantation as a surrogate.

  16. Cardiac Pacemaker Insertion in the South-South Region of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    MEMORIA. URT. L. TEACHING. SPECIALI. HOSPITAL. ST. HOSPITAL. (BMSH). The Challenges To Pacemaker Insertion. In South-South Nigeria. The challenges based on the current state are that medical tourism booms to the detriment of capacity and infrastructural development in the sub region. In addition many tertiary.

  17. Calcium transient and sodium-calcium exchange current in human versus rabbit sinoatrial node pacemaker cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, Arie O.; van Borren, Marcel M. G. J.; Wilders, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the mechanism underlying the pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, focusing on the relative importance of the "membrane clock" and the "Ca(2+) clock" in the generation of the small net membrane current that depolarizes the cell towards the action potential

  18. Stable Atrial Sensing on Long-Term Follow Up of VDD Pacemakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Shah

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hemodynamic advantages of maintaining AV synchrony through AV synchronous pacing are widely known as compared to single chamber pacing. DDD pacemaker implantation entails higher cost and is technically more challenging than the VDD pacemaker. Methods: Seventy one patients underwent VDD lead (Biotronik GmbH, St. Jude Medical and Medtronic Inc. implantation at KEM hospital, Mumbai during a period of 3 years through subclavian, axillary and cephalic routes for degenerative, post-surgical or congenital high grade atrioventricular or complete heart block. They were followed up regularly for ventricular threshold and P wave amplitude of the floating atrial dipole. Results: Follow up data of almost 95% of patients is available for a period of 15.8 ± 6.7 months. P wave amplitude at implant was 2.1 ± 0.7mV and at follow up 1.1 ± 0.6mV with mean ventricular threshold of <0.5V at implant and <1V at follow-up. Conclusion: Implantation of a single lead VDD pacemaker is possible in all patients with symptomatic AV block and intact sinus node function without any technical complications. P wave sensing is reliable and consistent with floating atrial lead at an average follow up of 15.8 months, providing an excellent alternative to DDD pacemaker implantation.

  19. Leadless pacemaker implantation in a patient with complex congenital heart disease and limited vascular access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ferrero

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Management of rhythm related issues might be particularly challenging in patients with congenital heart disease due to complex anatomy and restricted vascular access. The leadless technology appears a suitable and attractive alternative for this population. We describe a patient with single ventricle physiology who successfully underwent implantation of a leadless pacemaker.

  20. Dragoljub (Bata Adamov (1927-1996: The first pacemaker implantation in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Siniša U.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been over half a century since the implementation of pacemaker therapy in our country and the region. The first successful implantation of a pacemaker in former Yugoslavia and in Serbia took place on September 16, 1965 in “Dr. Dragiša Mišović” Clinical Hospital Centre, and this operation, with a team of doctors of the institution, was performed by surgeon Dragoljub (Bata Adamov (1927–1996. The first permanent pacemaker implantation was with epicardial leads with thoracotomy approach. The patient was operated on under general anesthesia, administered by anesthesiologist Predrag Lalević (1927–, and Dr. Adamov was assisted by Dr. Miša Albrecht (1933– and Dr. Milan Dragović (1933–2009. Although pacemaker therapy has since been widely proven and confirmed, it is necessary to remember the pioneers who introduced this kind of therapy to the region, as they deserve a distinguished place in the history of medicine in Serbia.

  1. Reevaluation of the indications for permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre Thygesen, Julie; Loh, Poay Huan; Cholteesupachai, Jiranut

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conduction abnormalities (CA) requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) are a well-known complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to determine the incidence of TAVI-related PPM and reevaluate the indications for PPM after the periprocedural period. METHO...

  2. Cardiac pacemaker treatement of heart block in Enugu: a 5 year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Symptomatic heart block is a treatable cardiac cause of death which occurs globally. In Nigeria it is increasingly diagnosed and treated with permanent artificial cardiac pacemaker insertion and pulse generator implantation, sometimes after a period of misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Methods: ...

  3. [Diaphragmatic pacemaker as an alternative to mechanical ventilation in patients with cervical spinal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Ganuza, F J; Gambarrutta-Malfatti, C; Diez de la Lastra-Buigues, E; Marín-Ruiz, M Á; Merlo-González, V E; Sánchez-Aranzueque Pantoja, A M; García-Moreno, F J; Mazaira-Álvarez, J

    2011-01-01

    To verify that the diaphragmatic pacemaker is a form of respiratory support that can be used to replace a volumetric respirator in cervical spinal injury patients with cervical spinal lesion and diaphragmatic paralysis by means of its comparison with the traditional volumetric respirator. Retrospective study of a prospective database and age-matched case-control study. Intensive Care Unit and Intermediate Care Respiratory Unit, Paraplegics National Hospital, Toledo (Spain). We collected data on all patients discharged from the Hospital with permanent respiratory support by volumetric respirator or diaphragmatic pacemaker during a follow-up period of 25 years. Personal interviews were conducted to evaluate health-related quality of life. Comparison and survival tests were used for statistical comparisons. Quality of life questionnaire. The main variables collected were demographic data, hospital stay, mortality, family reintegration and health-related quality of life. We evaluated the clinical records of 101 patients, 37 in the pacemaker-group and 64 in the volumetric respirator-group. Our results show that ICU admission duration and hospitalization as well as family reintegration, without significant differences, with a tendency to greater survival in pacemaker patients (18.18 versus 9.67 years by the Kaplan-Meier method, pventilation is an effective alternative to mechanical ventilation with similar efficacy that improve quality of life in patients with severe respiratory failure due to cervical spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Local induction of pacemaking activity in a monolayer of electrically coupled quiescent NRK fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dernison, M.M.; Kusters, J.M.A.M.; Peters, P.H.J.; Meerwijk, W.P. van; Ypey, D.L.; Gielen, C.C.A.M.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Theuvenet, A.P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Cultures of normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts may display spontaneous calcium action potentials which propagate throughout the cellular monolayer. Pacemaking activity of NRK cells was studied by patch clamp electrophysiology and vital calcium imaging, using a new experimental approach in which a

  5. 76 FR 48058 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Cardiovascular Permanent Pacemaker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... insulated electrical conductors with one end connected to an implantable pacemaker pulse generator and the other end applied to the heart. The device is used to transmit a pacing electrical stimulus from the pulse generator to the heart and/or to transmit the electrical signal of the heart to the pulse...

  6. Syncope during pregnancy in a patient with permanent cardiac pacemaker, due to increased pacing threshold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Akbarzadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old pregnant woman referred with syncope due to pacemaker malfunction. During the second trimester of pregnancy, the right ventricular (RV lead pacing threshold increased and led to early generator depletion. We believe that this might happen due to lead micro-dislodgement or less probably effect of hormonal changes during pregnancy on electrode-myocardium interface.

  7. Effect of permanent pacemaker on mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engborg, Jonathan; Riechel-Sarup, Casper; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment for high-grade aortic valve stenosis in patients found unfit for open heart surgery. The method may cause cardiac conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation, and the long-term effect ...

  8. Improvement of computed tomography scans quality for cancer patients with pacemakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzyukova, Anastasia; Odlozhilikova, Anna; Sepsi, Milan; Pospisil, David

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of patients undergoing radiotherapy have pacemakers. The problem is planning computed tomography scans for the patients having metal artifacts. To improve image quality we have tested metal artifacts deletion technique in Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute (Brno, Czech Republic). The data obtained from this experiment is important for minimizing the dose received by cardiac devices.

  9. Sikkerhed af magnetisk resonans-skanning hos patienter med pacemaker og implanterbar defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabagh, Kifah Hekmat; Christensen, Britta Ege; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The presence of a cardiac implantable device is ICD considered an absolute contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of performing MRI in patients with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs that had a compelling clinical need fo...

  10. Sikkerhed af magnetisk resonans-skanning hos patienter med pacemaker og implanterbar defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabagh, Kifah Hekmat; Christensen, Britta Ege; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a cardiac implantable device is ICD considered an absolute contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of performing MRI in patients with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs that had a compelling clinical need for MRI examinat...

  11. QTC INTERVAL DURATION CLASS AND DRUG THERAPY OF PATIENCE IN A FIRST YEAR AFTER PACEMAKER IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Brynza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 49 patients (28 female, 21 male with implanted DDD/DDDR, VVI/VVIR and CRT pacemakers are investigated. Purpose frequency and dose rate of anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, direct thrombin inhibitors, cardiac glycosides, amiodarone; ivabradine, diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, beta-adrenergic blockers, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs, statins were evaluated before, in acute postoperative period (3–5 days, 6 months and 1 year after pacemaker implantation. Patients were divided into classes 1 (normal QTc (320–440 ms – 24 (49 % patients and 2 (long QTc (> 440 msec – 25 (51 % patients of QTc interval duration. To process the data using standard statistical procedures using Microsoft Excel. It was more often prescriptions of new anticoagulants, beta-adrenergic blockers, ARBs, statins to patients in the first year after pacemaker implantation. QTc interval duration lengthening was associated with a greater purpose frequency and doses of amiodarone, diuretics, beta-adrenergic blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs and statins. Patients with implanted pacemaker need individualized drug therapy according to QTc interval duration, in particular, enhancing antiischemic, antihypertensive, antiarrhythmic therapy and therapy of chronic heart failure in patients with QTc interval duration lengthening.

  12. Safety of magnetic resonance scanning without monitoring of patients with pacemakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Litten; Petersen, Helen Høgh; Philbert, Berit Thornvig

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The objective of this study was to investigate whether it is safe to perform 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in pacemaker (PM) patients without pulse oximetry or electrocardiogram monitoring and with no special specific absorption rate (SAR) or time limits, provided...

  13. No impact of physical activity on the period of the circadian pacemaker in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, DGM; Hiddinga, AE

    1998-01-01

    The intrinsic period tau of the circadian pacemaker in humans was investigated by means of forced desynchrony. In this protocol, during 6 scheduled days, the sleep-wake alternation was forced to a period of 20h (i.e., 13.5h for wakefulness and 6.5h for sleep). Light intensity was kept below 10 lux.

  14. A simple model of burst nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronov, Alexandr; Bufkin, Kevin; Shaw, Dan W; Johnson, Brad L; Patrick, David L

    2015-08-28

    We introduce a comprehensive quantitative treatment for burst nucleation (BN)-a kinetic pathway toward self-assembly or crystallization defined by an extended post-supersaturation induction period, followed by a burst of nucleation, and finally the growth of existing stable assemblages absent the formation of new ones-based on a hybrid mean field rate equation model incorporating thermodynamic treatment of the saturated solvent from classical nucleation theory. A key element is the inclusion of a concentration-dependent critical nucleus size, determined self-consistently along with the subcritical cluster population density. The model is applied to an example experimental study of crystallization in tetracene films prepared by organic vapor-liquid-solid deposition, where good agreement is observed with several aspects of the experiment using a single, physically well-defined adjustable parameter. The model predicts many important features of the experiment, and can be generalized to describe other self-organizing systems exhibiting BN kinetics.

  15. New approach to rock burst forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, V.V.; Fokin, A.N.; Pimonov, A.G. (Kuzbasskii Politekhnicheskii Institut (USSR))

    1990-10-01

    Deals with the problem of rock burst forecasting that departs from the concept of solid body strength and breaking and from equations that relate endurance of a solid body to continuous stress. A formula is derived that permits the lifetime of a rock volume under stress to be calculated. A block diagram of a laboratory automatic system is presented that is capable of monitoring the stress state of a rock sample and of forecasting the time to sample destruction. The system consists of a loading fixture, electromagnetic emission sensor, frequency meter, microprocessor and plotter. An example of a plot of the rate of fissure formation as a function of time is shown and a monitor screen display of a sample life versus time is also presented. It is maintained that the system creates a basis for developing a system that would monitor and forecast rock burst hazards in a continuous manner. 4 refs.

  16. A review of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25 years, are now coming into focus. They involve extraordinary power outputs, and highly relativistic dynamics. The 'trigger' involves stellar-mass compact objects. The most plausible progenitors, ranging from neutron star binary mergers to collapsars (sometimes called 'hypernovae') eventually lead to the formation of a black hole with a torus of hot neutron-density material around it, the extractable energy being up to 10 sup 5 sup 4 ergs. Magnetic fields may exceed 10 sup 1 sup 5 G and particles may be accelerated up to > or approx. 10 sup 2 sup 0 eV. Details of the afterglow may be easier to understand than the initial trigger. Bursts at very high redshift can be astronomically-important as probes of the distant universe.

  17. Coherent combining pulse bursts in time domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvanauskas, Almantas

    2018-01-09

    A beam combining and pulse stacking technique is provided that enhances laser pulse energy by coherent stacking pulse bursts (i.e. non-periodic pulsed signals) in time domain. This energy enhancement is achieved by using various configurations of Fabry-Perot, Gires-Tournois and other types of resonant cavities, so that a multiple-pulse burst incident at either a single input or multiple inputs of the system produces an output with a solitary pulse, which contains the summed energy of the incident multiple pulses from all beams. This disclosure provides a substantial improvement over conventional coherent-combining methods in that it achieves very high pulse energies using a relatively small number of combined laser systems, thus providing with orders of magnitude reduction in system size, complexity, and cost compared to current combining approaches.

  18. Numerical simulations of trailing vortex bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Philip S.

    1987-01-01

    Solutions of the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations for the axisymmetric bursting of a laminar trailing vortex are computed with Newton's method and the pseudo-arc length continuation method for wide ranges of vortex strength and Reynolds number. The results indicate that a trailing vortex can undergo a transition from a state in which the core slowly diffuses to a state marked by large amplitude, spatial oscillations of core radius and core axial velocity. At the transition point the core grows rapidly in size. This event is interpreted as vortex bursting. The results also suggest that when the maximum core swirl velocity is sufficiently large the centerline axial flow downstream of transition will be reversed.

  19. The Chase to Capture Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in the universe, thought to be the birth cries of black holes. It has taken 40 years of international cooperation and competition to begin to unravel the mystery of their origin. The most recent chapter in this field is being written by the SWIFT mission, a fast-response satellite with 3 power telescopes. An international team from countries all over the world participates in the chase to capture the fading light of bursts detected by SWIFT. This talk will discuss the challenges and excitement of building this space observatory. New results will be presented on our growing understanding of exploding stars and fiery mergers of orbiting stars.

  20. Bursting of sensitive polymersomes induced by curling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Elyes; Cuvelier, Damien; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise; Nassoy, Pierre; Li, Min-Hui

    2009-05-05

    Polymersomes, which are stable and robust vesicles made of block copolymer amphiphiles, are good candidates for drug carriers or micro/nanoreactors. Polymer chemistry enables almost unlimited molecular design of responsive polymersomes whose degradation upon environmental changes has been used for the slow release of active species. Here, we propose a strategy to remotely trigger instantaneous polymersome bursting. We have designed asymmetric polymer vesicles, in which only one leaflet is composed of responsive polymers. In particular, this approach has been successfully achieved by using a UV-sensitive liquid-crystalline copolymer. We study experimentally and theoretically this bursting mechanism and show that it results from a spontaneous curvature of the membrane induced by the remote stimulus. The versatility of this mechanism should broaden the range of applications of polymersomes in fields such as drug delivery, cosmetics and material chemistry.

  1. Correlation analysis of the relationship between B-type natriuretic peptide and selected echocardiographic parameters in patients with permanent pacemakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Sielski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the practical value of BNP measurements and echocardiographic left ventricular volume index in patients with permanent pacemakers because there are no such reports in the literature. Aim of the research: The aim of the study was to reveal multiple correlations between BNP levels and selected echocardiographic parameters of the left atrium in patients with permanent pacemakers. In the literature there are reports on the significance of BNP values and left atrial size in patients with permanent pacemakers. The results of the present study appear to be of value in the outpatient assessment of these patients. Material and methods: We analysed a group of 117 patients with permanent pacemakers (AAI/R 21 patients, DDD/R 59 patients, VVI/R 37 patients and 48 healthy volunteers serving as the control group. BNP measurements were performed on venous blood samples using Triage meters. The Simpson method and the ellipse method were used to assess the left atrium on echocardiography. Results: There was a significant correlation between BNP and maximum left atrial volume, minimum left atrial volume, and left atrial volume index in patients with AAI/R, DDD/R, and VVI/R pacemakers at 3 and 6 months after the implantation. Conclusions : In patients after implantation of permanent pacemakers there are correlations between BNP values and echocardiographic left atrial parameters, especially in patients with DDD/R pacemakers. Left atrial function improves in patients with DDD/R pacemakers. Pacemaker check-up should be extended to include BNP measurements and echocardiographic assessment of the left atrium.

  2. The cannonball model of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    2003-01-01

    The cannonball model (CB) of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) is incredibly more successful than the standard blast-wave models (SM) of GRBs, which suffer from profound inadequacies and limited predictive power. The CB model is falsifiable in its hypothesis and results. Its predictions are summarized in simple analytical expressions, derived, in fair approximations, from first principles. It provides a good description on a universal basis of the properties of long-duration GRBs and of their afterglows (AGs).

  3. Control of timing, rate and bursts of hippocampal place cells by dendritic and somatic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Sébastien; Zemelman, Boris V; Losonczy, Attila; Kim, Jinhyun; Chance, Frances; Magee, Jeffrey C; Buzsáki, György

    2012-03-25

    A consortium of inhibitory neurons control the firing patterns of pyramidal cells, but their specific roles in the behaving animal are largely unknown. We performed simultaneous physiological recordings and optogenetic silencing of either perisomatic (parvalbumin (PV) expressing) or dendrite-targeting (somatostatin (SOM) expressing) interneurons in hippocampal area CA1 of head-fixed mice actively moving a treadmill belt rich with visual-tactile stimuli. Silencing of either PV or SOM interneurons increased the firing rates of pyramidal cells selectively in their place fields, with PV and SOM interneurons having their largest effect during the rising and decaying parts of the place field, respectively. SOM interneuron silencing powerfully increased burst firing without altering the theta phase of spikes. In contrast, PV interneuron silencing had no effect on burst firing, but instead shifted the spikes' theta phase toward the trough of theta. These findings indicate that perisomatic and dendritic inhibition have distinct roles in controlling the rate, burst and timing of hippocampal pyramidal cells.

  4. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  5. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  6. Management options in thoracolumbar burst fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchon, P W; Torner, J C; Haddad, S F; Follett, K A

    1998-06-01

    Both surgery and recumbency have been adopted in the treatment of spinal fractures. Herein we present the indications for each, and our experience with thoracolumbar junction (T12, L1 and L2) burst fractures. Sixty-eight patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures were treated operatively in 36 cases, and nonoperatively in 32 with recumbency for 1-6 weeks. Treatment was based on clinical and radiological criteria. Eighty-one percent of the recumbency patients, but only 14% of the surgical patients were intact on admission. Patients were followed for a mean+/-SD of 9+/-10 months in the recumbency group, and 21+/-21 months in the surgical group. Neurological improvement and progressive angular deformity occurred in both groups. The cost of recumbency in our patients was nearly half that of those who required surgery, though the length of hospitalization between the two groups was similar at 1 month +/-2 weeks. The above study emphasizes that the selection of operative versus nonoperative treatment in burst fractures should not be random but based on clinical as well as radiological criteria. Recumbency is favored in patients who are intact, with angular deformity less than 20 degrees , a residual spinal canal greater than 50% of normal, and an anterior body height exceeding 50% of the posterior height. Surgical intervention is generally indicated in patients with partial neurological deficit, and those with severe instability.

  7. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  8. Secured Hash Based Burst Header Authentication Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2017-12-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising technology that could meet the fast growing network demand. They are featured with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of applications that demand intensive bandwidth. OBS proves to be a satisfactory technology to tackle the huge bandwidth constraints, but suffers from security vulnerabilities. The objective of this proposed work is to design a faster and efficient burst header authentication algorithm for core nodes. There are two important key features in this work, viz., header encryption and authentication. Since the burst header is an important in optical burst switched network, it has to be encrypted; otherwise it is be prone to attack. The proposed MD5&RC4-4S based burst header authentication algorithm runs 20.75 ns faster than the conventional algorithms. The modification suggested in the proposed RC4-4S algorithm gives a better security and solves the correlation problems between the publicly known outputs during key generation phase. The modified MD5 recommended in this work provides 7.81 % better avalanche effect than the conventional algorithm. The device utilization result also shows the suitability of the proposed algorithm for header authentication in real time applications.

  9. Content Aware Burst Assembly - Supporting Telesurgery and Telemedicine in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Orosco

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging Telemedicine and Telesurgery technologies allow patients to share medical experts remotely through communication networks. However, network bandwidth, network latency and jitter (variation of latency, are the obstacles to the widespread use of this technology remotely. Optical Burst Switching (OBS networks greatly expand network bandwidth in existing network infrastructure by utilizing multiple DWDM channels within a single fiber, enabling high bandwidth applications. However, the burst assembly process in OBS networks introduces latency and jitter, making it unsuitable for high bandwidth, latency sensitive applications such as telesurgery and telemedicine. In this paper, we propose a content aware burst assembly scheme which dynamically adjusts the burst assembly parameters based on the content being assembled. The proposed content aware burst assembly minimizes the latency and jitter within a video frame, as well as across the left-view and right-view frames for 3D vision generation. Simulation results have shown that the proposed scheme can effectively reduce the latency and jitter experienced by video streams, making OBS a promising candidate for supporting telesurgery and telemedicine applications.

  10. Safety of holmium laser prostatectomy in patients with cardiac pacemaker implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The use of the standard monopolar electrocautery is associated with significant risks of implant malfunction in patients on a cardiac pacemaker. It is also associated with a risk of adverse cardiac events due to blood loss and fluid absorption. The properties of the holmium laser prevent the occurrence of these adverse events. We report the successful use of this technology in resecting the gland in patients on a permanent cardiac pacemaker implant. MATERIALS AND Methods: Six patients with permanent cardiac pacemaker implant were treated with holmium laser resection of prostate over a period of two years. Treated patients had bothersome prostatic symptoms and failed to respond to medical therapy. All patients were operated under spinal anesthesia using a high power VersaPulse ® PowerSuiteTM Holmium laser source. Normal saline was used as irrigant. Intravesical tissue morcellator was also used to remove the larger fragments in two of the patients. Results : Median patient age was 60 years (range 56-73 and median prostate volume was 40cc (range 20-48cc. None of the patient required blood transfusion or had significant hyponatremia or Transurethral resection syndrome. No patients had any pacemaker malfunction or hemodynamic instability during the procedure or in immediate postoperative period. Improvement in maximum urine flow rate was observed from an average of 7 ml/sec in preoperative period to 22 ml/sec postoperatively at 3 month followup. Conclusions: Holmium laser prostatectomy offers the ideal modality of surgery in patients on a cardiac pacemaker. It helps to avoid additional preparation and minimizes the risk of device malfunction and adverse post operative events.

  11. Mechanism underlying impaired cardiac pacemaking rhythm during ischemia: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiangyun; Wang, Kuanquan; Yuan, Yongfeng; Li, Qince; Dobrzynski, Halina; Boyett, Mark R.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2017-09-01

    Ischemia in the heart impairs function of the cardiac pacemaker, the sinoatrial node (SAN). However, the ionic mechanisms underlying the ischemia-induced dysfunction of the SAN remain elusive. In order to investigate the ionic mechanisms by which ischemia causes SAN dysfunction, action potential models of rabbit SAN and atrial cells were modified to incorporate extant experimental data of ischemia-induced changes to membrane ion channels and intracellular ion homeostasis. The cell models were incorporated into an anatomically detailed 2D model of the intact SAN-atrium. Using the multi-scale models, the functional impact of ischemia-induced electrical alterations on cardiac pacemaking action potentials (APs) and their conduction was investigated. The effects of vagal tone activity on the regulation of cardiac pacemaker activity in control and ischemic conditions were also investigated. The simulation results showed that at the cellular level ischemia slowed the SAN pacemaking rate, which was mainly attributable to the altered Na+-Ca2+ exchange current and the ATP-sensitive potassium current. In the 2D SAN-atrium tissue model, ischemia slowed down both the pacemaking rate and the conduction velocity of APs into the surrounding atrial tissue. Simulated vagal nerve activity, including the actions of acetylcholine in the model, amplified the effects of ischemia, leading to possible SAN arrest and/or conduction exit block, which are major features of the sick sinus syndrome. In conclusion, this study provides novel insights into understanding the mechanisms by which ischemia alters SAN function, identifying specific conductances as contributors to bradycardia and conduction block.

  12. Redundant and diverse intranodal pacemakers and conduction pathways protect the human sinoatrial node from failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Hansen, Brian J; Csepe, Thomas A; Zhao, Jichao; Ignozzi, Anthony J; Sul, Lidiya V; Zakharkin, Stanislav O; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Davis, Jonathan P; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Kilic, Ahmet; Janssen, Paul M L; Mohler, Peter J; Weiss, Raul; Hummel, John D; Fedorov, Vadim V

    2017-07-26

    The human sinoatrial node (SAN) efficiently maintains heart rhythm even under adverse conditions. However, the specific mechanisms involved in the human SAN's ability to prevent rhythm failure, also referred to as its robustness, are unknown. Challenges exist because the three-dimensional (3D) intramural structure of the human SAN differs from well-studied animal models, and clinical electrode recordings are limited to only surface atrial activation. Hence, to innovate the translational study of human SAN structural and functional robustness, we integrated intramural optical mapping, 3D histology reconstruction, and molecular mapping of the ex vivo human heart. When challenged with adenosine or atrial pacing, redundant intranodal pacemakers within the human SAN maintained automaticity and delivered electrical impulses to the atria through sinoatrial conduction pathways (SACPs), thereby ensuring a fail-safe mechanism for robust maintenance of sinus rhythm. During adenosine perturbation, the primary central SAN pacemaker was suppressed, whereas previously inactive superior or inferior intranodal pacemakers took over automaticity maintenance. Sinus rhythm was also rescued by activation of another SACP when the preferential SACP was suppressed, suggesting two independent fail-safe mechanisms for automaticity and conduction. The fail-safe mechanism in response to adenosine challenge is orchestrated by heterogeneous differences in adenosine A1 receptors and downstream GIRK4 channel protein expressions across the SAN complex. Only failure of all pacemakers and/or SACPs resulted in SAN arrest or conduction block. Our results unmasked reserve mechanisms that protect the human SAN pacemaker and conduction complex from rhythm failure, which may contribute to treatment of SAN arrhythmias. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Guillain-Barré Syndrome with asystole requiring permanent pacemaker: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Mehul B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Guillain-Barré syndrome is an acute demyelinating disorder of the peripheral nervous system that results from an aberrant immune response directed at peripheral nerves. Autonomic abnormalities in Guillain-Barré syndrome are usually transient and reversible. We present a case of Guillain-Barré syndrome requiring a permanent pacemaker in view of persistent symptomatic bradyarrhythmia. Case Presentation An 18-year-old Caucasian female presented with bilateral lower limb paraesthesias followed by bilateral progressive leg weakness and difficulty in walking. She reported an episode of an upper respiratory tract infection 3 weeks prior to the onset of her neurological symptoms. Diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome was considered and a lumbar puncture was performed. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed albuminocytologic dissociation (increased protein but normal white blood cell count suggestive of Guillain-Barré syndrome and hence an intravenous immunoglobulin G infusion was started. Within 48 hours, she progressed to complete flaccid quadriparesis with involvement of respiratory muscles requiring mechanical ventilatory support. Whist in the intensive care unit, she developed multiple episodes of bradycardia and asystole requiring a temporary pacemaker. In view of the persistent requirement for the temporary pacemaker for more than 5 days, she received a permanent pacemaker. She returned for follow-up three months after discharge with an intermittent need for ventricular pacing. Conclusion Guillain-Barré syndrome can result in permanent damage to the cardiac conduction system. Patients with multiple episodes of bradycardia and asystole in the setting of Guillain-Barré syndrome should be evaluated and considered as potential candidates for permanent pacemaker implantation.

  14. Electrogenesis in the lower Metazoa and implications for neuronal integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Robert W

    2015-02-15

    Electrogenic communication appears to have evolved independently in a variety of animal and plant lineages. Considered here are metazoan cells as disparate as the loose three-dimensional parenchyma of glass sponges, the two-dimensional epithelial sheets of hydrozoan jellyfish and the egg cell membranes of the ctenophore Beroe ovata, all of which are capable of generating electrical impulses. Neuronal electrogenesis may have evolved independently in ctenophores and cnidarians but the dearth of electrophysiological data relating to ctenophore nerves means that our attention is focused on the Cnidaria, whose nervous systems have been the subject of extensive study. The aim here is to show how their active and passive neuronal properties interact to give integrated behaviour. Neuronal electrogenesis, goes beyond simply relaying 'states of excitement' and utilizes the equivalent of a set of basic electrical 'apps' to integrate incoming sensory information with internally generated pacemaker activity. A small number of membrane-based processes make up these analogue applications. Passive components include the decremental spread of current determined by cellular anatomy; active components include ion channels specified by their selectivity and voltage dependence. A recurring theme is the role of inactivating potassium channels in regulating performance. Although different aspects of cnidarian behaviour are controlled by separate neuronal systems, integrated responses and coordinated movements depend on interactions between them. Integrative interactions discussed here include those between feeding and swimming, between tentacle contraction and swimming and between slow and fast swimming in the hydrozoan jellyfish Aglantha digitale. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. INTEGRAL Results on Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kevin C.

    2008-03-01

    Prompt, precise localizations of gamma-ray bursts imaged by IBIS are being disseminated at a rate of about 10 per year (49 to date). The INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS) produces automated alerts within 10's of seconds, giving positions which are accurate to several arcminutes for events as weak as 5.7 x 10-8 erg cm-2. IBIS is also a very sensitive detector of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs). It has detected well over 200 bursts from SGR1806-20, down to a fluence of 7×10-9 erg cm-2. An unexpected discovery is that the quiescent X-ray emission of this source and SGR 1900+14 is considerably harder than previous measurements indicated, and extends to 200 keV, a property which SGRs share with the AXP's. In addition, the SPI anti-coincidence shield (ACS) system is an extremely useful component of the interplanetary network. With its isotropic response, it detects about 66 confirmed bursts/year ( 450 to date) down to a threshold of 4.8×10-8 erg cm-2, many of which can be localized by triangulation. Most of these events are not detected by Swift or IBIS due to their limited fields of view. The triangulation results are currently being used to search for coincident neutrino emission, for gravitational radiation simultaneous with GRBs, and for coincidences between Type Ic supernovae and bursts, among other things. The SPI ACS has recently played a key role in localizing and identifying two events which are believed to be extragalactic giant magnetar flares (EMFs), from M81 and M31. LIGO was operating at the time of one of these events, and their observations support the EMF hypothesis. SPI is also being used as a Compton-scatter polarimeter for GRBs. Kalemci et al. (2007) and McGlynn et al. (2007) studied its response to GRB041219a, and obtained polarizations of 98% +/- 33%, and 63% (+31%,-30%) respectively.

  16. Burst-suppression is reactive to photic stimulation in comatose children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nita, Dragos A.; Moldovan, Mihai; Sharma, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Burst-suppression is an electroencephalographic pattern observed during coma. In individuals without known brain pathologies undergoing deep general anesthesia, somatosensory stimulation transiently increases the occurrence of bursts. We investigated the reactivity of burst-suppression......Objective: Burst-suppression is an electroencephalographic pattern observed during coma. In individuals without known brain pathologies undergoing deep general anesthesia, somatosensory stimulation transiently increases the occurrence of bursts. We investigated the reactivity of burst...... reactivity. We quantified reactivity by measuring the change in the burst ratio (fraction of time in burst) following photic stimulation. Results: Photic stimulation evoked bursts in all patients, resulting in a transient increase in the burst ratio, while the mean heart rate remained unchanged....... The regression slope of the change in burst ratio, referred to as the standardized burst ratio reactivity, correlated with subjects' Glasgow Coma Scale scores. Conclusions: Reactivity of the burst-suppression pattern to photic stimulation occurs across diverse coma etiologies. Standardized burst ratio reactivity...

  17. Dynamic encoding of natural luminance sequences by LGN bursts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Lesica

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN of the thalamus, visual stimulation produces two distinct types of responses known as tonic and burst. Due to the dynamics of the T-type Ca(2+ channels involved in burst generation, the type of response evoked by a particular stimulus depends on the resting membrane potential, which is controlled by a network of modulatory connections from other brain areas. In this study, we use simulated responses to natural scene movies to describe how modulatory and stimulus-driven changes in LGN membrane potential interact to determine the luminance sequences that trigger burst responses. We find that at low resting potentials, when the T channels are de-inactivated and bursts are relatively frequent, an excitatory stimulus transient alone is sufficient to evoke a burst. However, to evoke a burst at high resting potentials, when the T channels are inactivated and bursts are relatively rare, prolonged inhibitory stimulation followed by an excitatory transient is required. We also observe evidence of these effects in vivo, where analysis of experimental recordings demonstrates that the luminance sequences that trigger bursts can vary dramatically with the overall burst percentage of the response. To characterize the functional consequences of the effects of resting potential on burst generation, we simulate LGN responses to different luminance sequences at a range of resting potentials with and without a mechanism for generating bursts. Using analysis based on signal detection theory, we show that bursts enhance detection of specific luminance sequences, ranging from the onset of excitatory sequences at low resting potentials to the offset of inhibitory sequences at high resting potentials. These results suggest a dynamic role for burst responses during visual processing that may change according to behavioral state.

  18. Type III Radio Burst Duration and SEP Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-duration (>15 min), low-frequency (SEP events of solar cycle 23. The Type III durations are distributed symmetrically at 1 MHz yielding a mean value of approximately 33 min (median = 32 min) for the large SEP events. When the SEP events with ground level enhancement (GLE,) are considered, the distribution is essentially unchanged (mean = 32 min, median = 30 min). To test the importance of type III bursts in indicating SEP events, we considered a set of six type III bursts from the same active region (AR 10588) whose durations fit the "long duration" criterion. We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type II radio bursts associated with the type III bursts. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type II burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type II burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 rein) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event, consistent with the statistical study of Cliver and Ling (2009, ApJ ).

  19. Frequency bands and spatiotemporal dynamics of beta burst stimulation induced afterdischarges in hippocampus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, J E; Penttonen, M

    2005-01-01

    Temporal and spatial characteristics of hippocampal neuronal network activation are modified during epileptiform afterdischarges. We developed a beta burst stimulation protocol to investigate subregional variations and substrates of rhythmic population spike discharges in vivo in urethane anesthetized Wistar rat hippocampus with a 14-electrode recording array and extracellular single electrode recordings. Our 64 pulse beta burst stimulation protocol was constructed from electrical pulses delivered at intervals corresponding to beta (14-25 Hz), Delta (2 Hz), and slow (0.5 Hz) frequencies. In each experiment these interleaved pulses were all repeated four times with unchanged intervals. Stimulation of either perforant path or fimbria fornix induced a prolonged afterdischarge pattern peaking at 200 Hz fast, 20 Hz beta, and 2 Hz Delta frequencies. Analysis of variance confirmed that the response pattern of the discharges remained constant regardless of the stimulation beta frequency. Within the afterdischarge the fast frequencies were restricted to independent hippocampal subfields whereas beta and slow frequencies correlated across the subfields. Current source density (CSD) analysis revealed that the original signal propagation through subfields of the hippocampus was compromised during the beta burst stimulation induced afterdischarge. In addition, the CSD profile of the epileptiform afterdischarge was consistently similar across the different experiments. Time-frequency analysis revealed that the beta frequency afterdischarge was initiated and terminated at higher gamma (30-80 Hz) frequencies. However, the alterations in the CSD profile of the hippocampus coincided with the beta frequency dominated discharges. We propose that hippocampal epileptiform activity at fast, beta and Delta frequencies represents coupled oscillators at respectively increasing spatial scales in the hippocampal neuronal network in vivo.

  20. Modeling the emergence of circadian rhythms in a clock neuron network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Diambra

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in pacemaker cells persist for weeks in constant darkness, while in other types of cells the molecular oscillations that underlie circadian rhythms damp rapidly under the same conditions. Although much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical and cellular basis of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms leading to damped or self-sustained oscillations remain largely unknown. There exist many mathematical models that reproduce the circadian rhythms in the case of a single cell of the Drosophila fly. However, not much is known about the mechanisms leading to coherent circadian oscillation in clock neuron networks. In this work we have implemented a model for a network of interacting clock neurons to describe the emergence (or damping of circadian rhythms in Drosophila fly, in the absence of zeitgebers. Our model consists of an array of pacemakers that interact through the modulation of some parameters by a network feedback. The individual pacemakers are described by a well-known biochemical model for circadian oscillation, to which we have added degradation of PER protein by light and multiplicative noise. The network feedback is the PER protein level averaged over the whole network. In particular, we have investigated the effect of modulation of the parameters associated with (i the control of net entrance of PER into the nucleus and (ii the non-photic degradation of PER. Our results indicate that the modulation of PER entrance into the nucleus allows the synchronization of clock neurons, leading to coherent circadian oscillations under constant dark condition. On the other hand, the modulation of non-photic degradation cannot reset the phases of individual clocks subjected to intrinsic biochemical noise.