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Sample records for bursting pacemaker neurons

  1. Pacemaking Kisspeptin Neurons

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    Kelly, Martin J.; Zhang, Chunguang; Qiu, Jian; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons are vital for reproduction. GnRH neurons express the kisspeptin receptor, GPR 54, and kisspeptins potently stimulate the release of GnRH by depolarising and inducing sustained action potential firing in GnRH neurons. As such Kiss1 neurons may be the pre-synaptic pacemaker neurons in the hypothalamic circuitry that controls reproduction. There are at least two different populations of Kiss1 neurons: one in the rostral periventricular area (RP3V) that is stimulated by oestrogens and the other in the arcuate nucleus that is inhibited by oestrogens. How each of these Kiss1 neuronal populations participate in the regulation of the reproductive cycle is currently under intense investigation. Based on electrophysiological studies in the guinea pig and mouse, Kiss1 neurons in general are capable of generating burst firing behavior. Essentially all Kiss1 neurons, which have been studied thus far in the arcuate nucleus, express the ion channels necessary for burst firing, which include hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated cation (HCN) channels and the T-type calcium (Cav3.1) channels. Under voltage clamp conditions, these channels produce distinct currents that under current clamp conditions can generate burst firing behavior. The future challenge is to identify other key channels and synaptic inputs involved in the regulation of the firing properties of Kiss1 neurons and the physiological regulation of the expression of these channels and receptors by oestrogens and other hormones. The ultimate goal is to understand how Kiss1 neurons control the different phases of GnRH neurosecretion and hence reproduction. PMID:23884368

  2. Synchronization of Coupled Neurons Controlled by a Pacemaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei-Sheng; ZHANG Hong-Hui; ZHAO Yong; SHI Xia

    2011-01-01

    We investigate synchronization of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with gap junctions under the control of a pacemaker. In a ring Hindmarsh-Rose neuronal network, the coupled neurons with the pacemaker can occur in synchronization more easily than those without the pacemaker. Furthermore, the pacemaker can induce phase synchronization or nearly-complete synchronization of nonidentical neurons. This synchronization can occur more easily when time delay is considered. Theses results can be helpful to understand the activities of the real neuronal system.

  3. Experimental observation of transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking in a neural pacemaker.

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    Gu, Huaguang

    2013-06-01

    The transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking has been simulated and analyzed in theoretical neuronal models. In the present study, we report experimental observations in a neural pacemaker of a transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking within a bifurcation scenario from period-1 bursting to period-1 spiking. This was induced by adjusting extracellular calcium or potassium concentrations. The bifurcation scenario began from period-doubling bifurcations or period-adding sequences of bursting pattern. This chaotic bursting is characterized by alternations between multiple continuous spikes and a long duration of quiescence, whereas chaotic spiking is comprised of fast, continuous spikes without periods of quiescence. Chaotic bursting changed to chaotic spiking as long interspike intervals (ISIs) of quiescence disappeared within bursting patterns, drastically decreasing both ISIs and the magnitude of the chaotic attractors. Deterministic structures of the chaotic bursting and spiking patterns are also identified by a short-term prediction. The experimental observations, which agree with published findings in theoretical neuronal models, demonstrate the existence and reveal the dynamics of a neuronal transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking in the nervous system.

  4. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

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    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  5. Pacemaker potentials for the periodic burst discharge in the heart ganglion of a stomatopod, Squilla oratoria.

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    Watanabe, A; Obara, S; Akiyama, T

    1967-03-01

    From somata of the pacemaker neurons in the Squilla heart ganglion, pacemaker potentials for the spontaneous periodic burst discharge are recorded with intracellular electrodes. The electrical activity is composed of slow potentials and superimposed spikes, and is divided into four types, which are: (a) "mammalian heart" type, (b) "slow generator" type, (c) "slow grower" type, and (d) "slow deficient" type. Since axons which are far from the somata do not produce slow potentials, the soma and dendrites must be where the slow potentials are generated. Hyperpolarization impedes generation of the slow potential, showing that it is an electrically excitable response. Membrane impedance increases on depolarization. Brief hyperpolarizing current can abolish the plateau but brief tetanic inhibitory fiber stimulation is more effective for the abolition. A single stimulus to the axon evokes the slow potential when the stimulus is applied some time after a previous burst. Repetitive stimuli to the axon are more effective in eliciting the slow potential, but the depolarization is not maintained on continuous stimulation. Synchronization of the slow potential among neurons is achieved by: (a) the electrotonic connections, with periodic change in resistance of the soma membrane, (b) active spread of the slow potential, and (c) synchronization through spikes.

  6. Firing Patterns and Transitions in Coupled Neurons Controlled by a Pacemaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei-Sheng; LU Qi-Shao; DUAN Li-Xia; WANG Qing-Yun

    2008-01-01

    @@ To reveal the dynamics of neuronal networks with pacemakers, the firing patterns and their transitions are investigated in a ring HR neuronal network with gap junctions under the control of a pacemaker. Compared with the situation without pacemaker, the neurons in the network can exhibit various firing patterns as the external current is applied or the coupling strength of pacemaker varies. The results are beneficial for understanding the complex cooperative behaviour of large neural assemblies with pacemaker control.

  7. Persistently active, pacemaker-like neurons in neocortex

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    Morgane Le Bon-Jego

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The neocortex is spontaneously active, however, the origin of this self-generated, patterned activity remains unknown. To detect potential pacemaker cells, we use calcium imaging to directly identify neurons that discharge action potentials in the absence of synaptic transmissionin slices from juvenile mouse visual cortex. We characterize 60 of these neurons electrophysiologically and morphologically, finding that they belong to two classes of cells: one class composed of pyramidal neurons with a thin apical dendritic tree and a second class composed of ascending axon interneurons (Martinotti cells located in layer 5. In both types of neurons, persistent sodium currents are necessary for the generation of the spontaneous activity. Our data demonstrate that subtypes of neocortical neurons have intrinsic mechanisms to generate persistent activity. Like in central pattern generators (CPGs, these neurons may act as pacemakers to initiate or pattern spontaneous activity in the neocortex.

  8. Differentially timed extracellular signals synchronize pacemaker neuron clocks.

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    Ben Collins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized neuronal activity is vital for complex processes like behavior. Circadian pacemaker neurons offer an unusual opportunity to study synchrony as their molecular clocks oscillate in phase over an extended timeframe (24 h. To identify where, when, and how synchronizing signals are perceived, we first studied the minimal clock neural circuit in Drosophila larvae, manipulating either the four master pacemaker neurons (LNvs or two dorsal clock neurons (DN1s. Unexpectedly, we found that the PDF Receptor (PdfR is required in both LNvs and DN1s to maintain synchronized LNv clocks. We also found that glutamate is a second synchronizing signal that is released from DN1s and perceived in LNvs via the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluRA. Because simultaneously reducing Pdfr and mGluRA expression in LNvs severely dampened Timeless clock protein oscillations, we conclude that the master pacemaker LNvs require extracellular signals to function normally. These two synchronizing signals are released at opposite times of day and drive cAMP oscillations in LNvs. Finally we found that PdfR and mGluRA also help synchronize Timeless oscillations in adult s-LNvs. We propose that differentially timed signals that drive cAMP oscillations and synchronize pacemaker neurons in circadian neural circuits will be conserved across species.

  9. SYNCHRONIZATION OF TWO COUPLED HINDMARSH-ROSE NEURONS BY A PACEMAKER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the synchronization of two coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neurons by a pacemaker.Based on the stability theory of differential equations,the complete synchronization of this pacemaker neuron model is reached.Moreover,we also show that pacemaker can enhance or induce synchronization.Numerical simulations are given to illustrate the main results.

  10. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

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    Lü Yong-Bing; Shi Xia; Zheng Yan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper.A quantitative characteristic,the width factor,is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron,and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network.An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network.Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network.The critical value of r is derived,and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value.

  11. Bursting synchronization in clustered neuronal networks

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    Yu Hai-Tao; Wang Jiang; Deng Bin; Wei Xi-Le

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in the brain exhibit the modular (clustered) property,i.e.,they are composed of certain subnetworks with differential internal and external connectivity.We investigate bursting synchronization in a clustered neuronal network.A transition to mutual-phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled neurons,while on the spiking time scale,they behave asynchronously.This synchronization transition can be induced by the variations of inter-and intracoupling strengths,as well as the probability of random links between different subnetworks.Considering that some pathological conditions are related with the synchronization of bursting neurons in the brain,we analyze the control of bursting synchronization by using a time-periodic external signal in the clustered neuronal network.Simulation results show a frequency locking tongue in the driving parameter plane,where bursting synchronization is maintained,even in the presence of external driving.Hence,effective synchronization suppression can be realized with the driving parameters outside the frequency locking region.

  12. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets.

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    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2012-01-01

    Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes - bursts - that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing - the auditory receptor - already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2's sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  13. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

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    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  14. Reexposure to nicotine during withdrawal increases the pacemaking activity of cholinergic habenular neurons

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    Görlich, Andreas; Antolin-Fontes, Beatriz; Ables, Jessica L.; Frahm, Silke; Ślimak, Marta A.; Dougherty, Joseph D.; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of genetic variants in the cholinergic receptor nicotinic CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster associated with heavy smoking and higher relapse risk has led to the identification of the midbrain habenula–interpeduncular axis as a critical relay circuit in the control of nicotine dependence. Although clear roles for α3, β4, and α5 receptors in nicotine aversion and withdrawal have been established, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that participate in signaling nicotine use and contribute to relapse have not been identified. Here, using translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) profiling, electrophysiology, and behavior, we demonstrate that cholinergic neurons, but not peptidergic neurons, of the medial habenula (MHb) display spontaneous tonic firing of 2–10 Hz generated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) pacemaker channels and that infusion of the HCN pacemaker antagonist ZD7288 in the habenula precipitates somatic and affective signs of withdrawal. Further, we show that a strong, α3β4-dependent increase in firing frequency is observed in these pacemaker neurons upon acute exposure to nicotine. No change in the basal or nicotine-induced firing was observed in cholinergic MHb neurons from mice chronically treated with nicotine. We observe, however, that, during withdrawal, reexposure to nicotine doubles the frequency of pacemaking activity in these neurons. These findings demonstrate that the pacemaking mechanism of cholinergic MHb neurons controls withdrawal, suggesting that the heightened nicotine sensitivity of these neurons during withdrawal may contribute to smoking relapse. PMID:24082085

  15. Pacemaker neuron and network oscillations depend on a neuromodulator-regulated linear current

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    Shunbing Zhao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Linear leak currents have been implicated in the regulation of neuronal excitability, generation of neuronal and network oscillations, and network state transitions. Yet, few studies have directly tested the dependence of network oscillations on leak currents or explored the role of leak currents on network activity. In the oscillatory pyloric network of decapod crustaceans neuromodulatory inputs are necessary for pacemaker activity. A large subset of neuromodulators is known to activate a single voltage-gated inward current IMI, which has been shown to regulate the rhythmic activity of the network and its pacemaker neurons. Using the dynamic clamp technique, we show that the crucial component of IMI for the generation of oscillatory activity is only a close-to-linear portion of the current-voltage relationship. The nature of this conductance is such that the presence or the absence of neuromodulators effectively regulates the amount of leak current and the input resistance in the pacemaker neurons. When deprived of neuromodulatory inputs, pyloric oscillations are disrupted; yet, a linear reduction of the total conductance in a single neuron within the pacemaker group recovers not only the pacemaker activity in that neuron, but also leads to a recovery of oscillations in the entire pyloric network. The recovered activity produces proper frequency and phasing that is similar to that induced by neuromodulators. These results show that the passive properties of pacemaker neurons can significantly affect their capacity to generate and regulate the oscillatory activity of an entire network, and that this feature is exploited by neuromodulatory inputs.

  16. Neuronal networks and energy bursts in epilepsy.

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    Wu, Y; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-02-26

    Epilepsy can be defined as the abnormal activities of neurons. The occurrence, propagation and termination of epileptic seizures rely on the networks of neuronal cells that are connected through both synaptic- and non-synaptic interactions. These complicated interactions contain the modified functions of normal neurons and glias as well as the mediation of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms with feedback homeostasis. Numerous spread patterns are detected in disparate networks of ictal activities. The cortical-thalamic-cortical loop is present during a general spike wave seizure. The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) is the major inhibitory input traversing the region, and the dentate gyrus (DG) controls CA3 excitability. The imbalance between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is the main disorder in epilepsy. Adjustable negative feedback that mediates both inhibitory and excitatory components affects neuronal networks through neurotransmission fluctuation, receptor and transmitter signaling, and through concomitant influences on ion concentrations and field effects. Within a limited dynamic range, neurons slowly adapt to input levels and have a high sensitivity to synaptic changes. The stability of the adapting network depends on the ratio of the adaptation rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory populations. Thus, therapeutic strategies with multiple effects on seizures are required for the treatment of epilepsy, and the therapeutic functions on networks are reviewed here. Based on the high-energy burst theory of epileptic activity, we propose a potential antiepileptic therapeutic strategy to transfer the high energy and extra electricity out of the foci.

  17. Autaptic pacemaker mediated propagation of weak rhythmic activity across small-world neuronal networks

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    Yilmaz, Ergin; Baysal, Veli; Ozer, Mahmut; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-02-01

    We study the effects of an autapse, which is mathematically described as a self-feedback loop, on the propagation of weak, localized pacemaker activity across a Newman-Watts small-world network consisting of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We consider that only the pacemaker neuron, which is stimulated by a subthreshold periodic signal, has an electrical autapse that is characterized by a coupling strength and a delay time. We focus on the impact of the coupling strength, the network structure, the properties of the weak periodic stimulus, and the properties of the autapse on the transmission of localized pacemaker activity. Obtained results indicate the existence of optimal channel noise intensity for the propagation of the localized rhythm. Under optimal conditions, the autapse can significantly improve the propagation of pacemaker activity, but only for a specific range of the autaptic coupling strength. Moreover, the autaptic delay time has to be equal to the intrinsic oscillation period of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron or its integer multiples. We analyze the inter-spike interval histogram and show that the autapse enhances or suppresses the propagation of the localized rhythm by increasing or decreasing the phase locking between the spiking of the pacemaker neuron and the weak periodic signal. In particular, when the autaptic delay time is equal to the intrinsic period of oscillations an optimal phase locking takes place, resulting in a dominant time scale of the spiking activity. We also investigate the effects of the network structure and the coupling strength on the propagation of pacemaker activity. We find that there exist an optimal coupling strength and an optimal network structure that together warrant an optimal propagation of the localized rhythm.

  18. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

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    Enrico Rossoni

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  19. Bursting and Synchrony in Networks of Model Neurons

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    Geier, Christian; Elger, Christian E; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Bursting neurons are considered to be a potential cause of over-excitability and seizure susceptibility. The functional influence of these neurons in extended epileptic networks is still poorly understood. There is mounting evidence that the dynamics of neuronal networks is influenced not only by neuronal and synaptic properties but also by network topology. We investigate numerically the influence of different neuron dynamics on global synchrony in neuronal networks with complex connection topologies.

  20. Behaviorally relevant burst coding in primary sensory neurons.

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    Sabourin, Patrick; Pollack, Gerald S

    2009-08-01

    Bursts of action potentials in sensory interneurons are believed to signal the occurrence of particularly salient stimulus features. Previous work showed that bursts in an identified, ultrasound-tuned interneuron (AN2) of the cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus code for conspicuous increases in amplitude of an ultrasound stimulus, resulting in behavioral responses that are interpreted as avoidance of echolocating bats. We show that the primary sensory neurons that inform AN2 about high-frequency acoustic stimuli also produce bursts. As is the case for AN2, bursts in sensory neurons perform better as feature detectors than isolated, nonburst, spikes. Bursting is temporally correlated between sensory neurons, suggesting that on occurrence of a salient stimulus feature, AN2 will receive strong synaptic input in the form of coincident bursts, from several sensory neurons, and that this might result in bursting in AN2. Our results show that an important feature of the temporal structure of interneuron spike trains can be established at the earliest possible level of sensory processing, i.e., that of the primary sensory neuron.

  1. Dissecting the Phase Response of a Model Bursting Neuron

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    Sherwood, William Erik

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the phase response properties of the Hindmarsh-Rose model of neuronal bursting using burst phase response curves (BPRCs) computed with an infinitesimal perturbation approximation and by direct simulation of synaptic input. The resulting BPRCs have a significantly more complicated structure than the usual Type I and Type II PRCs of spiking neuronal models, and they exhibit highly timing-sensitive changes in the number of spikes per burst that lead to large magnitude phase responses. We use fast-slow dissection and isochron calculations to analyze the phase response dynamics in both weak and strong perturbation regimes.

  2. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

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    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  3. Bursting and synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Networks of neonatal cortical neurons, cultured on multi electrode arrays (MEAs) exhibit spontaneous action potential firings. The electrodes embedded in the glass surface of a MEA can be used to record and stimulate activity at 60 sites in a network of ~50.000 neurons. Such in-vitro networks enable

  4. Persistent sodium current drives conditional pacemaking in CA1 pyramidal neurons under muscarinic stimulation.

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    Yamada-Hanff, Jason; Bean, Bruce P

    2013-09-18

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are normally quiescent but can fire spontaneously when stimulated by muscarinic agonists. In brain slice recordings from mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, we examined the ionic basis of this activity using interleaved current-clamp and voltage-clamp experiments. Both in control and after muscarinic stimulation, the steady-state current-voltage curve was dominated by inward TTX-sensitive persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) that activated near -75 mV and increased steeply with depolarization. In control, total membrane current was net outward (hyperpolarizing) near -70 mV so that cells had a stable resting potential. Muscarinic stimulation activated a small nonselective cation current so that total membrane current near -70 mV shifted to become barely net inward (depolarizing). The small depolarization triggers regenerative activation of I(NaP), which then depolarizes the cell from -70 mV to spike threshold. We quantified the relative contributions of I(NaP), hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I(h)), and calcium current to pacemaking by using the cell's own firing as a voltage command along with specific blockers. TTX-sensitive sodium current was substantial throughout the entire interspike interval, increasing as the membrane potential approached threshold, while both Ih and calcium current were minimal. Thus, spontaneous activity is driven primarily by activation of I(NaP) in a positive feedback loop starting near -70 mV and providing increasing inward current to threshold. These results show that the pacemaking "engine" from I(NaP) is an inherent property of CA1 pyramidal neurons that can be engaged or disengaged by small shifts in net membrane current near -70 mV, as by muscarinic stimulation.

  5. Bifurcations of emergent bursting in a neuronal network.

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    Yu Wu

    Full Text Available Complex neuronal networks are an important tool to help explain paradoxical phenomena observed in biological recordings. Here we present a general approach to mathematically tackle a complex neuronal network so that we can fully understand the underlying mechanisms. Using a previously developed network model of the milk-ejection reflex in oxytocin cells, we show how we can reduce a complex model with many variables and complex network topologies to a tractable model with two variables, while retaining all key qualitative features of the original model. The approach enables us to uncover how emergent synchronous bursting can arise from a neuronal network which embodies known biological features. Surprisingly, the bursting mechanisms are similar to those found in other systems reported in the literature, and illustrate a generic way to exhibit emergent and multiple time scale oscillations at the membrane potential level and the firing rate level.

  6. Respiratory-like rhythmic activity can be produced by an excitatory network of non-pacemaker neuron models.

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    Kosmidis, Efstratios K; Pierrefiche, Olivier; Vibert, Jean-François

    2004-08-01

    It is still unclear whether the respiratory-like rhythm observed in slice preparations containing the pre-Bötzinger complex is of pacemaker or network origin. The rhythm persists in the absence of inhibition, but blocking pacemaker activity did not always result in rhythm abolition. We developed a computational model of the slice to show that respiratory-like rhythm can emerge as a network property without pacemakers or synaptic inhibition. The key currents of our model cell are the low- and high-threshold calcium currents and the calcium-dependent potassium current. Depolarization of a single unit by current steps or by raising the external potassium concentration can induce periodic bursting activity. Gaussian stimulation increased the excitability of the model without evoking oscillatory activity, as indicated by autocorrelation analysis. In response to hyperpolarizing pulses, the model produces prolonged relative refractory periods. At the network level, an increase of external potassium concentration triggers rhythmic activity that can be attributed to cellular periodic bursting, network properties, or both, depending on different parameters. Gaussian stimulation also induces rhythmic activity that depends solely on network properties. In all cases, the calcium-dependent potassium current has a central role in burst termination and interburst duration. However, when periodic inhibition is considered, the activation of this current is responsible for the characteristic amplification ramp of the emerged rhythm. Our results may explain controversial results from studies blocking pacemakers in vitro and show a shift in the role of the calcium-dependent potassium current in the presence of network inhibition.

  7. Ionic mechanisms of burst firing in dissociated Purkinje neurons.

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    Swensen, Andrew M; Bean, Bruce P

    2003-10-22

    Cerebellar Purkinje neurons have intrinsic membrane properties that favor burst firing, seen not only during complex spikes elicited by climbing fiber input but also with direct electrical stimulation of cell bodies. We examined the ionic conductances that underlie all-or-none burst firing elicited in acutely dissociated mouse Purkinje neurons by short depolarizing current injections. Blocking voltage-dependent calcium entry by cadmium or replacement of external calcium by magnesium enhanced burst firing, but it was blocked by cobalt replacement of calcium, probably reflecting block of sodium channels. In voltage-clamp experiments, we used the burst waveform of each cell as a voltage command and used ionic substitutions and pharmacological manipulations to isolate tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium current, P-type and T-type calcium current, hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), voltage-activated potassium current, large-conductance calcium-activated potassium current, and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) current. Measured near the middle of the first interspike interval, TTX-sensitive sodium current carried the largest inward current, and T-type calcium current was also substantial. Current through P-type channels was large immediately after a spike but decayed rapidly. These inward currents were opposed by substantial components of voltage-dependent and calcium-dependent potassium current. Termination of the burst is caused partly by decay of sodium current, together with a progressive buildup of SK current after the first interspike interval. Although burst firing depends on the net balance between multiple large currents flowing after a spike, it is surprisingly robust, probably reflecting complex interactions between the exact voltage waveform and voltage and calcium dependence of the various currents.

  8. Bursting and spiking due to additional direct and stochastic currents in neuron models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhuo-Qin; Lu Qi-Shao

    2006-01-01

    Neurons at rest can exhibit diverse firing activities patterns in response to various external deterministic and random stimuli, especially additional currents. In this paper, neuronal firing patterns from bursting to spiking, induced by additional direct and stochastic currents, are explored in rest states Corresponding to two values of the parameter VK in the Chay neuron system. Three cases are considered by numerical simulation and fast/slow dynamic analysis, in which only the direct current or the stochastic current exists, or the direct and stochastic currents coexist. Meanwhile, several important bursting patterns in neuronal experiments, such as the period-1 "circle/homoclinic" bursting and the integer multiple "fold/homoclinic" bursting with one spike per burst, as well as the transition from integer multiple bursting to period-1 "circle/homoclinic" bursting and that from stochastic "Hopf/homoclinic" bursting to "Hopf/homoclinic" bursting, are investigated in detail.

  9. Electrical properties of the pacemaker neurons in the heart ganglion of a stomatopod, Squilla oratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, A; Obara, S; Akiyama, T; Yumoto, K

    1967-03-01

    In the Squilla heart ganglion, the pacemaker is located in the rostral group of cells. After spontaneous firing ceased, the electrophysiological properties of these cells were examined with intracellular electrodes. Cells respond to electrical stimuli with all-or-none action potentials. Direct stimulation by strong currents decreases the size of action potentials. Comparison with action potentials caused by axonal stimulation and analysis of time relations indicate that with stronger currents the soma membrane is directly stimulated whereas with weaker currents the impulse first arises in the axon and then invades the soma. Spikes evoked in a neuron spread into all other neurons. Adjacent cells are interconnected by electrotonic connections. Histologically axons are tied with the side-junction. B spikes of adjacent cells are blocked simultaneously by hyperpolarization or by repetitive stimulation. Experiments show that under such circumstances the B spike is not directly elicited from the A spike but is evoked by invasion of an impulse or electrotonic potential from adjacent cells. On rostral stimulation a small prepotential precedes the main spike. It is interpreted as an action potential from dendrites.

  10. Adaptation to visual stimulation modifies the burst firing property of V1 neurons%Adaptation to visual stimulation modifies the burst firing property of V1neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Long LIU; Ke WANG; Jian-Jun MENG; Tian-Miao HUA; Zhen LIANG; Min-Min XI

    2013-01-01

    The mean firing rate of visual cortical neurons is reduced after prolonged visual stimulation,but the underlying process by which this occurs as well as the biological significance of this phenomenon remains unknown.Computational neuroscience studies indicate that high-frequency bursts in stimulus-driven responses can be transmitted across synapses more reliably than isolated spikes,and thus may carry accurate stimulus-related information.Our research examined whether or not adaptation affects the burst firing property of visual cortical neurons by examining changes in the burst firing changes of V1 neurons during adaptation to the preferred visual stimulus.The results show that adaptation to prolonged visual stimulation significantly decreased burst frequency (bursts/s) and burst length (spikes/burst),but increased burst duration and the interspike interval within bursts.These results suggest that the adaptation of V1 neurons to visual stimulation may result in a decrease of feedforward response gain but an increase of functional activities from lateral and/or feedback connections,which could lead to a reduction in the effectiveness of adapted neurons in transmitting information to its driven neurons.

  11. Characteristics of Period-Adding Bursting Bifurcation Without Chaos in the Chay Neuron Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhuo-Qin; LU Qi-Shao

    2004-01-01

    @@ A period-adding bursting sequence without bursting-chaos in the Chay neuron model is studied by bifurcation analysis. The genesis of each periodic bursting is separately evoked by the corresponding periodic spiking patterns through two period-doubling bifurcations, except for the period-1 bursting occurring via Hopf bifurcation. Hence,it is concluded that this period-adding bursting bifurcation without chaos has a compound bifurcation structure closely related to period-doubling bifurcations of periodic spiking in essence.

  12. KAYAK-α modulates circadian transcriptional feedback loops in Drosophila pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jinli; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2012-11-21

    Circadian rhythms are generated by well-conserved interlocked transcriptional feedback loops in animals. In Drosophila, the dimeric transcription factor CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) promotes period (per), timeless (tim), vrille (vri), and PAR-domain protein 1 (Pdp1) transcription. PER and TIM negatively feed back on CLK/CYC transcriptional activity, whereas VRI and PDP1 negatively and positively regulate Clk transcription, respectively. Here, we show that the α isoform of the Drosophila FOS homolog KAYAK (KAY) is required for normal circadian behavior. KAY-α downregulation in circadian pacemaker neurons increases period length by 1.5 h. This behavioral phenotype is correlated with decreased expression of several circadian proteins. The strongest effects are on CLK and the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR, which are both under VRI and PDP1 control. Consistently, KAY-α can bind to VRI and inhibit its interaction with the Clk promoter. Interestingly, KAY-α can also repress CLK activity. Hence, in flies with low KAY-α levels, CLK derepression would partially compensate for increased VRI repression, thus attenuating the consequences of KAY-α downregulation on CLK targets. We propose that the double role of KAY-α in the two transcriptional loops controlling Drosophila circadian behavior brings precision and stability to their oscillations.

  13. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elijah, Daniel H; Samengo, Inés; Montemurro, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here, we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of thalamic neurons.

  14. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Emre eKapucu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates interspike interval thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  15. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Fikret E; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI) histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates ISI thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average (CMA) and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA) data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  16. Phase-locking of bursting neuronal firing to dominant LFP frequency components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Maria; Elijah, Daniel H; Squirrell, Daniel; Gigg, John; Montemurro, Marcelo A

    2015-10-01

    Neuronal firing in the hippocampal formation relative to the phase of local field potentials (LFP) has a key role in memory processing and spatial navigation. Firing can be in either tonic or burst mode. Although bursting neurons are common in the hippocampal formation, the characteristics of their locking to LFP phase are not completely understood. We investigated phase-locking properties of bursting neurons using simulations generated by a dual compartmental model of a pyramidal neuron adapted to match the bursting activity in the subiculum of a rat. The model was driven with stochastic input signals containing a power spectral profile consistent with physiologically relevant frequencies observed in LFP. The single spikes and spike bursts fired by the model were locked to a preferred phase of the predominant frequency band where there was a peak in the power of the driving signal. Moreover, the preferred phase of locking shifted with increasing burst size, providing evidence that LFP phase can be encoded by burst size. We also provide initial support for the model results by analysing example data of spontaneous LFP and spiking activity recorded from the subiculum of a single urethane-anaesthetised rat. Subicular neurons fired single spikes, two-spike bursts and larger bursts that locked to a preferred phase of either dominant slow oscillations or theta rhythms within the LFP, according to the model prediction. Both power-modulated phase-locking and gradual shift in the preferred phase of locking as a function of burst size suggest that neurons can use bursts to encode timing information contained in LFP phase into a spike-count code.

  17. Detection of bursts in neuronal spike trains by the mean inter-spike interval method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Chen; Yong Deng; Weihua Luo; Zhen Wang; Shaoqun Zeng

    2009-01-01

    Bursts are electrical spikes firing with a high frequency, which are the most important property in synaptic plasticity and information processing in the central nervous system. However, bursts are difficult to identify because bursting activities or patterns vary with phys-iological conditions or external stimuli. In this paper, a simple method automatically to detect bursts in spike trains is described. This method auto-adaptively sets a parameter (mean inter-spike interval) according to intrinsic properties of the detected burst spike trains, without any arbitrary choices or any operator judgrnent. When the mean value of several successive inter-spike intervals is not larger than the parameter, a burst is identified. By this method, bursts can be automatically extracted from different bursting patterns of cultured neurons on multi-electrode arrays, as accurately as by visual inspection. Furthermore, significant changes of burst variables caused by electrical stimulus have been found in spontaneous activity of neuronal network. These suggest that the mean inter-spike interval method is robust for detecting changes in burst patterns and characteristics induced by environmental alterations.

  18. Symmetry of oculomotor burst neuron coordinates about Listing's plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, J D; Vilis, T

    1992-08-01

    1. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the axes of eye rotation generated by oculomotor burst neuron populations and the coordinate system that they collectively define. In particular, we asked if such coordinates might be related to constraints in the emergent behavior, i.e., Listing's law for saccades. 2. The mesencephalic rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (riMLF) was identified in four monkeys with the use of single-unit recording, and then explored with the use of electrical microstimulation and pharmacological inactivation with the inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist muscimol. Three-dimensional (3-D) eye positions and velocities were recorded in one or both eyes while alert animals made eye movements in response to visual stimuli and head rotation. 3. Unilateral stimulation of the riMLF (20 microA, 200 Hz, 300-600 ms) produced conjugate, constant velocity eye rotations, which then stopped abruptly and held their final positions. This is expected if the riMLF produces phasic signals upstream from the oculomotor integrator. 4. Units that burst before upward or downward saccades were recorded intermingled in each side of the riMLF. Unilateral stimulation of the same riMLF sites produced eye rotations about primarily torsional axes, clockwise (CW) during right riMLF stimulation and counterclockwise (CCW) during left stimulation. Only small and inconsistent vertical components were observed, supporting the view that the riMLF carries intermingled up and down signals. 5. The torsional axes of eye rotation produced by riMLF stimulation did not correlate to external anatomic landmarks. Instead, stimulation axes from both riMLF sides aligned with the primary gaze direction orthogonal to Listing's plane of eye positions recorded during saccades. 6. Injection of muscimol into one side of the riMLF produced a conjugate deficit in saccades and quick phases, including a 50% reduction in all vertical velocities

  19. Circadian- and Light-Dependent Regulation of Resting Membrane Potential and Spontaneous Action Potential Firing of Drosophila Circadian Pacemaker Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeba, Vasu; Gu, Huaiyu; Sharma, Vijay K.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Holmes, Todd C

    2007-01-01

    The ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) of adult Drosophila brain express oscillating clock proteins and regulate circadian behavior. Whole cell current-clamp recordings of large LNvs in freshly dissected Drosophila whole brain preparations reveal two spontaneous activity patterns that correlate with two underlying patterns of oscillating membrane potential: tonic and burst firing of sodium-dependent action potentials. Resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing are rapidly ...

  20. Extracellular calcium modulates persistent sodium current-dependent burst-firing in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H; Alroy, G; Kirson, E D; Yaari, Y

    2001-06-15

    The generation of high-frequency spike bursts ("complex spikes"), either spontaneously or in response to depolarizing stimuli applied to the soma, is a notable feature in intracellular recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells (PCs) in vivo. There is compelling evidence that the bursts are intrinsically generated by summation of large spike afterdepolarizations (ADPs). Using intracellular recordings in adult rat hippocampal slices, we show that intrinsic burst-firing in CA1 PCs is strongly dependent on the extracellular concentration of Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](o)). Thus, lowering [Ca(2+)](o) (by equimolar substitution with Mn(2+) or Mg(2+)) induced intrinsic bursting in nonbursters, whereas raising [Ca(2+)](o) suppressed intrinsic bursting in native bursters. The induction of intrinsic bursting by low [Ca(2+)](o) was associated with enlargement of the spike ADP. Low [Ca(2+)](o)-induced intrinsic bursts and their underlying ADPs were suppressed by drugs that reduce the persistent Na(+) current (I(NaP)), indicating that this current mediates the slow burst depolarization. Blocking Ca(2+)-activated K(+) currents with extracellular Ni(2+) or intracellular chelation of Ca(2+) did not induce intrinsic bursting. This and other evidence suggest that lowering [Ca(2+)](o) may induce intrinsic bursting by augmenting I(NaP). Because repetitive neuronal activity in the hippocampus is associated with marked decreases in [Ca(2+)](o), the regulation of intrinsic bursting by extracellular Ca(2+) may provide a mechanism for preferential recruitment of this firing mode during certain forms of hippocampal activation.

  1. Drosophila Clock Is Required in Brain Pacemaker Neurons to Prevent Premature Locomotor Aging Independently of Its Circadian Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Abdul-Raouf; Seugnet, Laurent; Klarsfeld, André

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks control many self-sustained rhythms in physiology and behavior with approximately 24-hour periodicity. In many organisms, oxidative stress and aging negatively impact the circadian system and sleep. Conversely, loss of the clock decreases resistance to oxidative stress, and may reduce lifespan and speed up brain aging and neurodegeneration. Here we examined the effects of clock disruptions on locomotor aging and longevity in Drosophila. We found that lifespan was similarly reduced in three arrhythmic mutants (ClkAR, cyc0 and tim0) and in wild-type flies under constant light, which stops the clock. In contrast, ClkAR mutants showed significantly faster age-related locomotor deficits (as monitored by startle-induced climbing) than cyc0 and tim0, or than control flies under constant light. Reactive oxygen species accumulated more with age in ClkAR mutant brains, but this did not appear to contribute to the accelerated locomotor decline of the mutant. Clk, but not Cyc, inactivation by RNA interference in the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF)-expressing central pacemaker neurons led to similar loss of climbing performance as ClkAR. Conversely, restoring Clk function in these cells was sufficient to rescue the ClkAR locomotor phenotype, independently of behavioral rhythmicity. Accelerated locomotor decline of the ClkAR mutant required expression of the PDF receptor and correlated to an apparent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the posterior protocerebral lateral 1 (PPL1) clusters. This neuronal loss was rescued when the ClkAR mutation was placed in an apoptosis-deficient background. Impairing dopamine synthesis in a single pair of PPL1 neurons that innervate the mushroom bodies accelerated locomotor decline in otherwise wild-type flies. Our results therefore reveal a novel circadian-independent requirement for Clk in brain circadian neurons to maintain a subset of dopaminergic cells and avoid premature locomotor aging in Drosophila. PMID:28072817

  2. Minimum neuron density for synchronized bursts in a rat cortical culture on multi-electrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, D; Tamate, H; Nagayama, M; Uchida, T; Kudoh, S N; Gohara, K

    2010-11-24

    To investigate the minimum neuron and neurite densities required for synchronized bursts, we cultured rat cortical neurons on planar multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) at five plating densities (2500, 1000, 500, 250, and 100 cells/mm(2)) using two culture media: Neuron Culture Medium and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium supplemented with serum (DMEM/serum). Long-term recording of spontaneous electrical activity clarified that the cultures exhibiting synchronized bursts required an initial plating density of at least 250 cells/mm(2) for Neuron Culture Medium and 500 cells/mm(2) for DMEM/serum. Immediately after electrical recording, immunocytochemistry of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and Neurofilament 200 kD (NF200) was performed directly on MEAs to investigate the actual densities of neurons and neurites forming the networks. Immunofluorescence observation revealed that the construction of complicated neuronal networks required the same initial plating density as for synchronized bursts, and that overly sparse cultures showed significant decreases of neurons and neurites. We also found that the final densities of surviving neurons at 1 month decreased greatly compared with the initial plating densities and became saturated in denser cultures. In addition, the area of neurites and the number of nuclei were saturated in denser cultures. By comparing both the results of electrophysiological recording and immunocytochemical observation, we revealed that there is a minimum threshold of neuron densities that must be met for the exhibition of synchronized bursts. Interestingly, these minimum densities of MAP2-positive final neurons did not differ between the two culture media; the density was approximately 50 neurons/mm(2). This value was obtained in the cultures with the initial plating densities of 250 cells/mm(2) for Neuron Culture Medium and 500 cells/mm(2) for DMEM/serum.

  3. Diversity of neural signals mediated by multiple, burst-firing mechanisms in rat olfactory tubercle neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Strowbridge, Ben W

    2007-11-01

    Olfactory information is processed by a diverse group of interconnected forebrain regions. Most efforts to define the cellular mechanisms involved in processing olfactory information have been focused on understanding the function of the olfactory bulb, the primary second-order olfactory region, and its principal target, the piriform cortex. However, the olfactory bulb also projects to other targets, including the rarely studied olfactory tubercle, a ventral brain region recently implicated in regulating cocaine-related reward behavior. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from rat tubercle slices to define the intrinsic properties of neurons in the dense and multiform cell layers. We find three common firing modes of tubercle neurons: regular-spiking, intermittent-discharging, and bursting. Regular-spiking neurons are typically spiny-dense-cell-layer cells with pyramidal-shaped, dendritic arborizations. Intermittently discharging and bursting neurons comprise the majority of the deeper multiform layer and share a common morphology: multipolar, sparsely spiny cells. Rather than generating all-or-none stereotyped discharges, as observed in many brain areas, bursting cells in the tubercle generate depolarizing plateau potentials that trigger graded but time-limited discharges. We find two distinct subclasses of bursting cells that respond similarly to step stimuli but differ in the role transmembrane Ca currents play in their intrinsic behavior. Calcium currents amplify depolarizing inputs and enhance excitability in regenerative bursting cells, whereas the primary action of Ca in nonregenerative bursting tubercle neurons appears to be to decrease excitability by triggering Ca-activated K currents. Nonregenerative bursting cells exhibit a prolonged refractory period after even short discharges suggesting that they may function to detect transient events.

  4. Bursts and isolated spikes code for opposite movement directions in midbrain electrosensory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Khosravi-Hashemi

    Full Text Available Directional selectivity, in which neurons respond strongly to an object moving in a given direction but weakly or not at all to the same object moving in the opposite direction, is a crucial computation that is thought to provide a neural correlate of motion perception. However, directional selectivity has been traditionally quantified by using the full spike train, which does not take into account particular action potential patterns. We investigated how different action potential patterns, namely bursts (i.e. packets of action potentials followed by quiescence and isolated spikes, contribute to movement direction coding in a mathematical model of midbrain electrosensory neurons. We found that bursts and isolated spikes could be selectively elicited when the same object moved in opposite directions. In particular, it was possible to find parameter values for which our model neuron did not display directional selectivity when the full spike train was considered but displayed strong directional selectivity when bursts or isolated spikes were instead considered. Further analysis of our model revealed that an intrinsic burst mechanism based on subthreshold T-type calcium channels was not required to observe parameter regimes for which bursts and isolated spikes code for opposite movement directions. However, this burst mechanism enhanced the range of parameter values for which such regimes were observed. Experimental recordings from midbrain neurons confirmed our modeling prediction that bursts and isolated spikes can indeed code for opposite movement directions. Finally, we quantified the performance of a plausible neural circuit and found that it could respond more or less selectively to isolated spikes for a wide range of parameter values when compared with an interspike interval threshold. Our results thus show for the first time that different action potential patterns can differentially encode movement and that traditional measures of

  5. Interaction of NMDA receptor and pacemaking mechanisms in the midbrain dopaminergic neuron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Ha

    Full Text Available Dopamine neurotransmission has been found to play a role in addictive behavior and is altered in psychiatric disorders. Dopaminergic (DA neurons display two functionally distinct modes of electrophysiological activity: low- and high-frequency firing. A puzzling feature of the DA neuron is the following combination of its responses: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR activation evokes high-frequency firing, whereas other tonic excitatory stimuli (α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR activation or applied depolarization block firing instead. We suggest a new computational model that reproduces this combination of responses and explains recent experimental data. Namely, somatic NMDAR stimulation evokes high-frequency firing and is more effective than distal dendritic stimulation. We further reduce the model to a single compartment and analyze the mechanism of the distinct high-frequency response to NMDAR activation vs. other stimuli. Standard nullcline analysis shows that the mechanism is based on a decrease in the amplitude of calcium oscillations. The analysis confirms that the nonlinear voltage dependence provided by the magnesium block of the NMDAR determine its capacity to elevate the firing frequency. We further predict that the moderate slope of the voltage dependence plays the central role in the frequency elevation. Additionally, we suggest a repolarizing current that sustains calcium-independent firing or firing in the absence of calcium-dependent repolarizing currents. We predict that the ether-a-go-go current (ERG, which has been observed in the DA neuron, is the best fit for this critical role. We show that a calcium-dependent and a calcium-independent oscillatory mechanisms form a structure of interlocked negative feedback loops in the DA neuron. The structure connects research of DA neuron firing with circadian biology and determines common minimal models for investigation of robustness of oscillations

  6. Dynamics of synaptically coupled integrate-and-fire-or-burst neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, S.

    2003-04-01

    The minimal integrate-and-fire-or-burst (IFB) neuron model reproduces the salient features of experimentally observed thalamocortical (TC) relay neuron response properties, including the temporal tuning of both tonic spiking (i.e., conventional action potentials) and postinhibitory rebound bursting mediated by a low-threshold calcium current. In this paper we consider networks of IFB neurons with slow synaptic interactions and show how the dynamics may be described with a smooth firing-rate model. When the firing rate of the IFB model is dominated by a refractory process the equations of motion simplify and may be solved exactly. Numerical simulations are used to show that a pair of reciprocally interacting inhibitory spiking IFB TC neurons supports an alternating rhythm of the type predicted from the firing-rate theory. A change in a single parameter of the IFB neuron allows it to fire a burst of spikes in response to a depolarizing signal, so that it mimics the behavior of a reticular (RE) cell. Within a continuum model we show that a network of RE cells with on-center excitation can support a fast traveling pulse. In contrast, a network of inhibitory TC cells is found to support a slowly propagating lurching pulse.

  7. Identification and dynamics of spontaneous burst initiation zones in unidimensional neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinerman, Ofer; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2007-04-01

    Spontaneous activity is typical of in vitro neural networks, often in the form of large population bursts. The origins of this activity are attributed to intrinsically bursting neurons and to noisy backgrounds as well as to recurrent network connections. Spontaneous activity is often observed to emanate from localized sources or initiation zones, propagating from there to excite large populations of neurons. In this study, we use unidimensional cultures to overcome experimental difficulties in identifying initiation zones in vivo and in dissociated two-dimensional cultures. We found that spontaneous activity in these cultures is initiated exclusively in localized zones that are characterized by high neuronal density but also by recurrent and inhibitory network connections. We demonstrate that initiation zones compete in driving network activity in a winner-takes-most scenario.

  8. A comparison of computational methods for detecting bursts in neuronal spike trains and their application to human stem cell-derived neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, Ellese; Charlesworth, Paul; Thomas, Christopher W; Paulsen, Ole; Eglen, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Accurate identification of bursting activity is an essential element in the characterization of neuronal network activity. Despite this, no one technique for identifying bursts in spike trains has been widely adopted. Instead, many methods have been developed for the analysis of bursting activity, often on an ad hoc basis. Here we provide an unbiased assessment of the effectiveness of eight of these methods at detecting bursts in a range of spike trains. We suggest a list of features that an ideal burst detection technique should possess and use synthetic data to assess each method in regard to these properties. We further employ each of the methods to reanalyze microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from mouse retinal ganglion cells and examine their coherence with bursts detected by a human observer. We show that several common burst detection techniques perform poorly at analyzing spike trains with a variety of properties. We identify four promising burst detection techniques, which are then applied to MEA recordings of networks of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and used to describe the ontogeny of bursting activity in these networks over several months of development. We conclude that no current method can provide "perfect" burst detection results across a range of spike trains; however, two burst detection techniques, the MaxInterval and logISI methods, outperform compared with others. We provide recommendations for the robust analysis of bursting activity in experimental recordings using current techniques.

  9. Spike Timing Rigidity Is Maintained in Bursting Neurons under Pentobarbital-Induced Anesthetic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Risako; Yamanaka, Masanori; Yokota, Eiko; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Pentobarbital potentiates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission by prolonging the open time of GABAA receptors. However, it is unknown how pentobarbital regulates cortical neuronal activities via local circuits in vivo. To examine this question, we performed extracellular unit recording in rat insular cortex under awake and anesthetic conditions. Not a few studies apply time-rescaling theorem to detect the features of repetitive spike firing. Similar to these methods, we define an average spike interval locally in time using random matrix theory (RMT), which enables us to compare different activity states on a universal scale. Neurons with high spontaneous firing frequency (>5 Hz) and bursting were classified as HFB neurons (n = 10), and those with low spontaneous firing frequency (<10 Hz) and without bursting were classified as non-HFB neurons (n = 48). Pentobarbital injection (30 mg/kg) reduced firing frequency in all HFB neurons and in 78% of non-HFB neurons. RMT analysis demonstrated that pentobarbital increased in the number of neurons with repulsion in both HFB and non-HFB neurons, suggesting that there is a correlation between spikes within a short interspike interval (ISI). Under awake conditions, in 50% of HFB and 40% of non-HFB neurons, the decay phase of normalized histograms of spontaneous firing were fitted to an exponential function, which indicated that the first spike had no correlation with subsequent spikes. In contrast, under pentobarbital-induced anesthesia conditions, the number of non-HFB neurons that were fitted to an exponential function increased to 80%, but almost no change in HFB neurons was observed. These results suggest that under both awake and pentobarbital-induced anesthetized conditions, spike firing in HFB neurons is more robustly regulated by preceding spikes than by non-HFB neurons, which may reflect the GABAA receptor-mediated regulation of cortical activities. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording in

  10. Spike timing rigidity is maintained in bursting neurons under pentobarbital-induced anesthetic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Kato

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pentobarbital potentiates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission by prolonging the open time of GABAA receptors. However, it is unknown how pentobarbital regulates cortical neuronal activities via local circuits in vivo. To examine this question, we performed extracellular unit recording in rat insular cortex under awake and anesthetic conditions. Not a few studies apply time-rescaling theorem to detect the features of repetitive spike firing. Similar to these methods, we define an average spike interval locally in time using random matrix theory (RMT, which enables us to compare different activity states on a universal scale. Neurons with high spontaneous firing frequency (> 5 Hz and bursting were classified as HFB neurons (n = 10, and those with low spontaneous firing frequency (< 10 Hz and without bursting were classified as non-HFB neurons (n = 48. Pentobarbital injection (30 mg/kg reduced firing frequency in all HFB neurons and in 78% of non-HFB neurons. RMT analysis demonstrated that pentobarbital increased in the number of neurons with repulsion in both HFB and non-HFB neurons, suggesting that there is a correlation between spikes within a short interspike interval. Under awake conditions, in 50% of HFB and 40% of non-HFB neurons, the decay phase of normalized histograms of spontaneous firing were fitted to an exponential function, which indicated that the first spike had no correlation with subsequent spikes. In contrast, under pentobarbital-induced anesthesia conditions, the number of non-HFB neurons that were fitted to an exponential function increased to 80%, but almost no change in HFB neurons was observed. These results suggest that under both awake and pentobarbital-induced anesthetized conditions, spike firing in HFB neurons is more robustly regulated by preceding spikes than by non-HFB neurons, which may reflect the GABAA receptor-mediated regulation of cortical activities. Whole-cell patch

  11. Dendritic calcium activity precedes inspiratory bursts in preBotzinger complex neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Negro, Christopher A; Hayes, John A; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-01-01

    Medullary interneurons of the preBötzinger complex assemble excitatory networks that produce inspiratory-related neural rhythms, but the importance of somatodendritic conductances in rhythm generation is still incompletely understood. Synaptic input may cause Ca(2+) accumulation postsynaptically...... to evoke a Ca(2+)-activated inward current that contributes to inspiratory burst generation. We measured Ca(2+) transients by two-photon imaging dendrites while recording neuronal somata electrophysiologically. Dendritic Ca(2+) accumulation frequently precedes inspiratory bursts, particularly at recording...... suggest that dendritic Ca(2+) activates an inward current to electrotonically depolarize the soma, rather than propagate as a regenerative Ca(2+) wave. These data provide new evidence that respiratory rhythmogenesis may depend on dendritic burst-generating conductances activated in the context of network...

  12. Predictive features of persistent activity emergence in regular spiking and intrinsic bursting model neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2012-01-01

    Proper functioning of working memory involves the expression of stimulus-selective persistent activity in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which refers to neural activity that persists for seconds beyond the end of the stimulus. The mechanisms which PFC pyramidal neurons use to discriminate between preferred vs. neutral inputs at the cellular level are largely unknown. Moreover, the presence of pyramidal cell subtypes with different firing patterns, such as regular spiking and intrinsic bursting, raises the question as to what their distinct role might be in persistent firing in the PFC. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS) and an intrinsic bursting (IB) model neuron. We identify synaptic location within the basal dendrites as a feature of stimulus selectivity. Specifically, persistent activity-inducing stimuli consist of activated synapses that are located more distally from the soma compared to non-inducing stimuli, in both model cells. In addition, the action potential (AP) latency and the first few inter-spike-intervals of the neuronal response can be used to reliably detect inducing vs. non-inducing inputs, suggesting a potential mechanism by which downstream neurons can rapidly decode the upcoming emergence of persistent activity. While the two model neurons did not differ in the coding features of persistent activity emergence, the properties of persistent activity, such as the firing pattern and the duration of temporally-restricted persistent activity were distinct. Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given stimulus that code

  13. Predictive features of persistent activity emergence in regular spiking and intrinsic bursting model neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriaki Sidiropoulou

    Full Text Available Proper functioning of working memory involves the expression of stimulus-selective persistent activity in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC, which refers to neural activity that persists for seconds beyond the end of the stimulus. The mechanisms which PFC pyramidal neurons use to discriminate between preferred vs. neutral inputs at the cellular level are largely unknown. Moreover, the presence of pyramidal cell subtypes with different firing patterns, such as regular spiking and intrinsic bursting, raises the question as to what their distinct role might be in persistent firing in the PFC. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS and an intrinsic bursting (IB model neuron. We identify synaptic location within the basal dendrites as a feature of stimulus selectivity. Specifically, persistent activity-inducing stimuli consist of activated synapses that are located more distally from the soma compared to non-inducing stimuli, in both model cells. In addition, the action potential (AP latency and the first few inter-spike-intervals of the neuronal response can be used to reliably detect inducing vs. non-inducing inputs, suggesting a potential mechanism by which downstream neurons can rapidly decode the upcoming emergence of persistent activity. While the two model neurons did not differ in the coding features of persistent activity emergence, the properties of persistent activity, such as the firing pattern and the duration of temporally-restricted persistent activity were distinct. Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given

  14. [Electrical activities of bursting-firing neurons in epileptic network reestablishment of rat hippocampus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Ting; Qin, Xing-Kui; Yin, Shi-Jin; Han, Dan

    2003-12-25

    The purpose of our present work was to study the discharge of bursting-firing neurons (BFNs) in ipsilateral or contralateral hippocampus (HPC), and its relations to the reestablishment of local epileptic networks. The experiments were performed on 140 Sprague Dawley male rats (150-250 g). Acute tetanization (60 Hz, 2 s, 0.4 -0.6 mA) of the right posterior dorsal hippocampus (ATPDH) was administered to establish rat epilepsy model. The single unit discharges and the depth electrographs were simultaneously recorded from ipsilateral or contralateral HPC. In other experimental rats, acute tetanization of the right anterior dorsal HPC (ATADH) was used. Extracellular unit discharges in the CA1 region were simultaneously recorded from bilateral anterior dorsal hippocampi. Analysis of hippocampal BFN firing patterns before or after administration of the tetanization was focused on according to their location in the HPC epileptic networks in vivo. Single unit discharges of 138 hippocampal neurons were recorded from ipsilateral and/or contralateral anterior dorsal HPC. Of the 138 neurons recorded, 19 were BFNs. 13 BFNs were tetanus-evoked and the remaining 6 were spontaneous ones. The evoked reactions of the single hippocampal neuron induced by the tetanization mainly included: (1) the firing patterns of the BFNs in ipsilateral anterior dorsal HPC were obviously modulated by the ATPDH from tonic firing into rhythmic bursting. The bursting interspike intervals (BISI) decreased. (2) There were mild modulations of the firing patterns of the BFNs in contralateral anterior dorsal HPC following post-inhibition of the firing rate of single neuron induced by the ATPDH. The interspike intervals (ISI) increased obviously. (3) Post-facilitation of rhythmic bursting-firing of the BFNs in contralateral anterior dorsal HPC was induced by ATADH; both the ISI and the IBI increased. (4) Synchronous or asynchronous rhythmic bursting-firing of the BFNs and the network epileptiform events

  15. Desynchronization in an ensemble of globally coupled chaotic bursting neuronal oscillators by dynamic delayed feedback control

    CERN Document Server

    Che, Yanqiu; Li, Ruixue; Li, Huiyan; Han, Chunxiao; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xile

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic delayed feedback control approach for desynchronization of chaotic-bursting synchronous activities in an ensemble of globally coupled neuronal oscillators. We demonstrate that the difference signal between an ensemble's mean field and its time delayed state, filtered and fed back to the ensemble, can suppress the self-synchronization in the ensemble. These individual units are decoupled and stabilized at the desired desynchronized states while the stimulation signal reduces to the noise level. The effectiveness of the method is illustrated by examples of two different populations of globally coupled chaotic-bursting neurons. The proposed method has potential for mild, effective and demand-controlled therapy of neurological diseases characterized by pathological synchronization.

  16. Spikes and bursts in two types of thalamic projection neurons differentially shape sleep patterns and auditory responses in a songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnloser, Richard H R; Wang, Claude Z-H; Nager, Aymeric; Naie, Katja

    2008-05-07

    In mammals, the thalamus plays important roles for cortical processing, such as relay of sensory information and induction of rhythmical firing during sleep. In neurons of the avian cerebrum, in analogy with cortical up and down states, complex patterns of regular-spiking and dense-bursting modes are frequently observed during sleep. However, the roles of thalamic inputs for shaping these firing modes are largely unknown. A suspected key player is the avian thalamic nucleus uvaeformis (Uva). Uva is innervated by polysensory input, receives indirect cerebral feedback via the midbrain, and projects to the cerebrum via two distinct pathways. Using pharmacological manipulation, electrical stimulation, and extracellular recordings of Uva projection neurons, we study the involvement of Uva in zebra finches for the generation of spontaneous activity and auditory responses in premotor area HVC (used as a proper name) and the downstream robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). In awake and sleeping birds, we find that single Uva spikes suppress and spike bursts enhance spontaneous and auditory-evoked bursts in HVC and RA neurons. Strong burst suppression is mediated mainly via tonically firing HVC-projecting Uva neurons, whereas a fast burst drive is mediated indirectly via Uva neurons projecting to the nucleus interface of the nidopallium. Our results reveal that cerebral sleep-burst epochs and arousal-related burst suppression are both shaped by sophisticated polysynaptic thalamic mechanisms.

  17. A codimension-2 bifurcation controlling endogenous bursting activity and pulse-triggered responses of a neuron model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Barnett

    Full Text Available The dynamics of individual neurons are crucial for producing functional activity in neuronal networks. An open question is how temporal characteristics can be controlled in bursting activity and in transient neuronal responses to synaptic input. Bifurcation theory provides a framework to discover generic mechanisms addressing this question. We present a family of mechanisms organized around a global codimension-2 bifurcation. The cornerstone bifurcation is located at the intersection of the border between bursting and spiking and the border between bursting and silence. These borders correspond to the blue sky catastrophe bifurcation and the saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle (SNIC curves, respectively. The cornerstone bifurcation satisfies the conditions for both the blue sky catastrophe and SNIC. The burst duration and interburst interval increase as the inverse of the square root of the difference between the corresponding bifurcation parameter and its bifurcation value. For a given set of burst duration and interburst interval, one can find the parameter values supporting these temporal characteristics. The cornerstone bifurcation also determines the responses of silent and spiking neurons. In a silent neuron with parameters close to the SNIC, a pulse of current triggers a single burst. In a spiking neuron with parameters close to the blue sky catastrophe, a pulse of current temporarily silences the neuron. These responses are stereotypical: the durations of the transient intervals-the duration of the burst and the duration of latency to spiking-are governed by the inverse-square-root laws. The mechanisms described here could be used to coordinate neuromuscular control in central pattern generators. As proof of principle, we construct small networks that control metachronal-wave motor pattern exhibited in locomotion. This pattern is determined by the phase relations of bursting neurons in a simple central pattern generator

  18. Slow Bursting Neurons of Mouse Cortical Layer 6b Are Depolarized by Hypocretin/Orexin and Major Transmitters of Arousal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger Combremont, Anne-Laure; Bayer, Laurence; Dupré, Anouk; Mühlethaler, Michel; Serafin, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons firing spontaneously in bursts in the absence of synaptic transmission have been previously recorded in different layers of cortical brain slices. It has been suggested that such neurons could contribute to the generation of alternating UP and DOWN states, a pattern of activity seen during slow-wave sleep. Here, we show that in layer 6b (L6b), known from our previous studies to contain neurons highly responsive to the wake-promoting transmitter hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx), there is a set of neurons, endowed with distinct intrinsic properties, which displayed a strong propensity to fire spontaneously in rhythmic bursts. In response to small depolarizing steps, they responded with a delayed firing of action potentials which, upon higher depolarizing steps, invariably inactivated and were followed by a depolarized plateau potential and a depolarizing afterpotential. These cells also displayed a strong hyperpolarization-activated rectification compatible with the presence of an Ih current. Most L6b neurons with such properties were able to fire spontaneously in bursts. Their bursting activity was of intrinsic origin as it persisted not only in presence of blockers of ionotropic glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors but also in a condition of complete synaptic blockade. However, a small number of these neurons displayed a mix of intrinsic bursting and synaptically driven recurrent UP and DOWN states. Most of the bursting L6b neurons were depolarized and excited by hcrt/orx through a direct postsynaptic mechanism that led to tonic firing and eventually inactivation. Similarly, they were directly excited by noradrenaline, histamine, dopamine, and neurotensin. Finally, the intracellular injection of these cells with dye and their subsequent Neurolucida reconstruction indicated that they were spiny non-pyramidal neurons. These results lead us to suggest that the propensity for slow rhythmic bursting of this set of L6b neurons could be directly impeded by hcrt

  19. Intrinsic and synaptic dynamics interact to generate emergent patterns of rhythmic bursting in thalamocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, Vikaas S; Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Rudolph, Uwe; Huguenard, John R

    2006-04-19

    Rhythmic inhibition entrains the firing of excitatory neurons during oscillations throughout the brain. Previous work has suggested that the strength and duration of inhibitory input determines the synchrony and period, respectively, of these oscillations. In particular, sleep spindles result from a cycle of events including rhythmic inhibition and rebound bursts in thalamocortical (TC) neurons, and slowing and strengthening this inhibitory input may transform spindles into spike-wave discharges characteristic of absence epilepsy. Here, we used dynamic clamp to inject TC neurons with spindle-like trains of IPSCs and studied how modest changes in the amplitude and/or duration of these IPSCs affected the responses of the TC neurons. Contrary to our expectations, we found that prolonging IPSCs accelerates postinhibitory rebound (PIR) in TC neurons, and that increasing either the amplitude or duration of IPSCs desynchronizes PIR activity in a population of TC cells. Tonic injection of hyperpolarizing or depolarizing current dramatically alters the timing and synchrony of PIR. These results demonstrate that rhythmic PIR activity is an emergent property of interactions between intrinsic and synaptic currents, not just a passive reflection of incoming synaptic inhibition.

  20. Synchronous bursts on scale-free neuronal networks with attractive and repulsive coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyun Wang

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dependence of synchronization transitions of bursting oscillations on the information transmission delay over scale-free neuronal networks with attractive and repulsive coupling. It is shown that for both types of coupling, the delay always plays a subtle role in either promoting or impairing synchronization. In particular, depending on the inherent oscillation period of individual neurons, regions of irregular and regular propagating excitatory fronts appear intermittently as the delay increases. These delay-induced synchronization transitions are manifested as well-expressed minima in the measure for spatiotemporal synchrony. For attractive coupling, the minima appear at every integer multiple of the average oscillation period, while for the repulsive coupling, they appear at every odd multiple of the half of the average oscillation period. The obtained results are robust to the variations of the dynamics of individual neurons, the system size, and the neuronal firing type. Hence, they can be used to characterize attractively or repulsively coupled scale-free neuronal networks with delays.

  1. The persistent sodium current generates pacemaker activities in the central pattern generator for locomotion and regulates the locomotor rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazerart, Sabrina; Vinay, Laurent; Brocard, Frédéric

    2008-08-20

    Rhythm generation in neuronal networks relies on synaptic interactions and pacemaker properties. Little is known about the contribution of the latter mechanisms to the integrated network activity underlying locomotion in mammals. We tested the hypothesis that the persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) is critical in generating locomotion in neonatal rodents using both slice and isolated spinal cord preparations. After removing extracellular calcium, 75% of interneurons in the area of the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion exhibited bursting properties and I(NaP) was concomitantly upregulated. Putative CPG interneurons such as commissural and Hb9 interneurons also expressed I(NaP)-dependent (riluzole-sensitive) bursting properties. Most bursting cells exhibited a pacemaker-like behavior (i.e., burst frequency increased with depolarizing currents). Veratridine upregulated I(NaP), induced riluzole-sensitive bursting properties, and slowed down the locomotor rhythm. This study provides evidence that I(NaP) generates pacemaker activities in CPG interneurons and contributes to the regulation of the locomotor activity.

  2. Dopamine-deprived striatal GABAergic interneurons burst and generate repetitive gigantic IPSCs in medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehorter, Nathalie; Guigoni, Celine; Lopez, Catherine; Hirsch, June; Eusebio, Alexandre; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Hammond, Constance

    2009-06-17

    Striatal GABAergic microcircuits modulate cortical responses and movement execution in part by controlling the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). How this is altered by chronic dopamine depletion, such as in Parkinson's disease, is not presently understood. We now report that, in dopamine-depleted slices of the striatum, MSNs generate giant spontaneous postsynaptic GABAergic currents (single or in bursts at 60 Hz) interspersed with silent episodes, rather than the continuous, low-frequency GABAergic drive (5 Hz) observed in control MSNs. This shift was observed in one-half of the MSN population, including both "D(1)-negative" and "D(1)-positive" MSNs. Single GABA and NMDA channel recordings revealed that the resting membrane potential and reversal potential of GABA were similar in control and dopamine-depleted MSNs, and depolarizing, but not excitatory, actions of GABA were observed. Glutamatergic and cholinergic antagonists did not block the GABAergic oscillations, suggesting that they were generated by GABAergic neurons. In support of this, cell-attached recordings revealed that a subpopulation of intrastriatal GABAergic interneurons generated bursts of spikes in dopamine-deprived conditions. This subpopulation included low-threshold spike interneurons but not fast-spiking interneurons, cholinergic interneurons, or MSNs. Therefore, a population of local GABAergic interneurons shifts from tonic to oscillatory mode when dopamine deprived and gives rise to spontaneous repetitive giant GABAergic currents in one-half the MSNs. We suggest that this may in turn alter integration of cortical signals by MSNs.

  3. The Role of the Electrogenic Sodium Pump in Modulation of Pacemaker Discharge of ’Aplysia’ Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    functionally change the intracellular ionic 12 concentrations. Gorman and Marmor , in a closely related preparation, have shown that membrane...Gorman, A. L. F. and Marmor , M. F. Contributions of the sodium pump and ionic gradients to the membrane potential of a molluscan neurone. J...Physiol. 210:897-917, 1970. 18 13. Gorman, A. L. F. and Marmor , M. F. Temperature dependence of the sodium- potassium permeability ratio of a

  4. Abnormal burst patterns of single neurons recorded in the substantia nigra reticulata of behaving 140 CAG Huntington's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy-Nakhnikian, Alexander; Dorner, Jenelle L; Fischer, Benjamin I; Bower-Bir, Nathan D; Rebec, George V

    2012-03-14

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that causes neurological pathology in the basal ganglia and related circuitry. A key site of HD pathology is striatum, the principal basal ganglia input structure; striatal pathology likely changes basal ganglia output but no existing studies address this issue. In this report, we characterize single-neuron activity in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) of awake, freely behaving 140 CAG knock-in (KI) mice at 16-40 weeks. KI mice are a well characterized model of adult HD and are mildly symptomatic in this age range. As the primary basal ganglia output nucleus in rodents, the SNr receives direct innervation from striatum, as well as indirect influence via polysynaptic inputs. We analyzed 32 single neurons recorded from KI animals and 44 from wild-type (WT) controls. We found increased burst rates, without a concordant change in spike discharge rate, in KI animals relative to WTs. Furthermore, although metrics of burst structure, such as the inter-spike interval in bursts, do not differ between groups, burst rate increases with age in KI, but not WT, animals. Our findings suggest that altered basal ganglia output is a physiological feature of early HD pathology.

  5. Who Needs a Pacemaker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs a Pacemaker? Doctors recommend pacemakers for many reasons. ... help regulate your heartbeat after the procedure. You need to take certain heart medicines, such as beta ...

  6. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pacemaker can be used for patients with heart failure. It has three leads to help the heart beat in a more coordinated manner. Some pacemakers also can deliver electric shocks to the heart that can stop life-threatening ...

  7. Potassium current kinetics in bursting secretory neurons: effects of intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J J; Onetti, C G; García, E; Hernández, S

    1991-11-01

    1. The kinetics of delayed rectifier (IK) and transient potassium (IA) currents and their modification by intracellular calcium ions in bursting X-organ neurons of the crayfish were studied with whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Activation and inactivation kinetics were analyzed according to Hodgkin and Huxley-type equations. 2. IK activates with sigmoidal time course at membrane potentials more positive than -38.4 +/- 3.5 (SD) mV (n = 5), and does not inactivate. The conductance through delayed rectifier channels (gK) is described by the equation gK = GKn2. 3. IA activates at membrane potentials close to the resting potential (-52.2 +/- 4.3 mV, n = 5) and, after a peak, inactivates completely. The conductance through A-channels (gA) can be described by the product of independent activation and inactivation parameters: gA = GAa4b. Both activation and inactivation processes are voltage and time dependent. 4. Steady-state activation of IK and IA as well as inactivation of IA can be described by Boltzmann distributions for single particles with valencies of 2.55 +/- 0.01 (n = 5), 1.60 +/- 0.25 (n = 5), and 3.87 +/- 0.39 (n = 3), respectively. 5. Increasing [Ca2+]i, we observed the following: 1) a considerable inactivation of IK during test pulses, 2) an increase of maximal conductance for IA, 3) a reduction of the valency of IA inactivation gating particle (from 3.87 to 2.27), 4) a reduction of the inactivation time constants of IA, and 5) a shift of the inactivation steady-state curve to more positive membrane potentials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Fast-reset of pacemaking and theta-frequency resonance patterns in cerebellar golgi cells: Simulations of their impact in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Solinas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi cells are inhibitory interneurons of the cerebellar granular layer, which respond to afferent stimulation in vivo with a burst-pause sequence interrupting their irregular background low-frequency firing (Vos et al., 1999a. Eur. J. Neurosci. 11, 2621–2634. However, Golgi cells in vitro are regular pacemakers (Forti et al., 2006. J. Physiol. 574, 711–729, raising the question how their ionic mechanisms could impact on responses during physiological activity. Using patch-clamp recordings in cerebellar slices we show that the pacemaker cycle can be suddenly reset by spikes, making the cell highly sensitive to input variations. Moreover, the neuron resonates around the pacemaker frequency, making it specifically sensitive to patterned stimulation in the theta-frequency band. Computational analysis based on a model developed to reproduce Golgi cell pacemaking (Solinas et al., 2008 Front. Neurosci., 1:2 predicted that phase-reset required spike-triggered activation of SK channels and that resonance was sustained by a slow voltage-dependent potassium current and amplified by a persistent sodium current. Adding balanced synaptic noise to mimic the irregular discharge observed in vivo, we found that pacemaking converts into spontaneous irregular discharge, that phase-reset plays an important role in generating the burst-pause pattern evoked by sensory stimulation, and that repetitive stimulation at theta-frequency enhances the time-precision of spike coding in the burst. These results suggest that Golgi cell intrinsic properties exert a profound impact on time-dependent signal processing in the cerebellar granular layer.

  9. Fast-reset of pacemaking and theta-frequency resonance patterns in cerebellar golgi cells: simulations of their impact in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas, Sergio; Forti, Lia; Cesana, Elisabetta; Mapelli, Jonathan; De Schutter, Erik; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2007-01-01

    The Golgi cells are inhibitory interneurons of the cerebellar granular layer, which respond to afferent stimulation in vivo with a burst-pause sequence interrupting their irregular background low-frequency firing (Vos et al., 1999a. Eur. J. Neurosci. 11, 2621-2634). However, Golgi cells in vitro are regular pacemakers (Forti et al., 2006. J. Physiol. 574, 711-729), raising the question how their ionic mechanisms could impact on responses during physiological activity. Using patch-clamp recordings in cerebellar slices we show that the pacemaker cycle can be suddenly reset by spikes, making the cell highly sensitive to input variations. Moreover, the neuron resonates around the pacemaker frequency, making it specifically sensitive to patterned stimulation in the theta-frequency band. Computational analysis based on a model developed to reproduce Golgi cell pacemaking (Solinas et al., 2008Front. Neurosci., 2:2) predicted that phase-reset required spike-triggered activation of SK channels and that resonance was sustained by a slow voltage-dependent potassium current and amplified by a persistent sodium current. Adding balanced synaptic noise to mimic the irregular discharge observed in vivo, we found that pacemaking converts into spontaneous irregular discharge, that phase-reset plays an important role in generating the burst-pause pattern evoked by sensory stimulation, and that repetitive stimulation at theta-frequency enhances the time-precision of spike coding in the burst. These results suggest that Golgi cell intrinsic properties exert a profound impact on time-dependent signal processing in the cerebellar granular layer.

  10. Effects of penicillin on procaine-elicited bursts of potential in central neuron of snail, Achatina fulica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hung; Lu, Kuan-Ling; Hsiao, Ru-Wan; Lee, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lin, Chia Hsien; Tsai, Ming-Cheng

    2008-08-01

    Effects of penicillin on changes in procaine-elicited bursts of potential (BoP) were studied in a central neuron (RP4) of snail, Achatina fulica Ferussac. Procaine elicited BoP in the RP4 neuron while penicillin elicited depolarization of the neuron. Penicillin decreased the BoP elicited by procaine in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of penicillin on the procaine-elicited BoP was not altered in the preparations treated with ascorbate or L-NAME (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). However, the inhibitory effect of penicillin on the procaine-elicited BoP was enhanced with a decrease in extracellular sodium ion. Sodium ion was one of the important ions contributing to the action potential of the neuron. Two-electrode voltage-clamp studies revealed that penicillin decreased the fast sodium inward current of the neuron. It is concluded that penicillin inhibited the BoP elicited by procaine and sodium ion altered the effect of penicillin on procaine-elicited BoP.

  11. Bursting deep dorsal horn neurons: The pharmacological target for the anti-spastic effects of Zolmitriptan?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Carlsen, Eva Maria Meier

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication, Thaweerattanasinp and colleagues investigated spinal cord injury and firing properties of deep dorsal horn neurons during NMDA or Zolmitriptan application by employing electrophysiology in an in vitro spinal cord preparation. Deep dorsal horn neurons were classified...

  12. Periodically-modulated inhibition of living pacemaker neurons--III. The heterogeneity of the postsynaptic spike trains, and how control parameters affect it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segundo, J P; Vibert, J F; Stiber, M

    1998-11-01

    Codings involving spike trains at synapses with inhibitory postsynaptic potentials on pacemakers were examined in crayfish stretch receptor organs by modulating presynaptic instantaneous rates periodically (triangles or sines; frequencies, slopes and depths under, respectively, 5.0 Hz, 40.0/s/s and 25.0/s). Timings were described by interspike and cross-intervals ("phases"); patterns (dispersions, sequences) and forms (timing classes) were identified using pooled graphs (instant along the cycle when a spike occurs vs preceding interval) and return maps (plots of successive intervals). A remarkable heterogeneity of postsynaptic intervals and phases characterizes each modulation. All cycles separate into the same portions: each contains a particular form and switches abruptly to the next. Forms differ in irregularity and predictability: they are (see text) "p:q alternations", "intermittent", "phase walk-throughs", "messy erratic" and "messy stammering". Postsynaptic cycles are asymmetric (hysteresis). This contrasts with the presynaptic homogeneity, smoothness and symmetry. All control parameters are, individually and jointly, strongly influential. Presynaptic slopes, say, act through a postsynaptic sensitivity to their magnitude and sign; when increasing, hysteresis augments and forms change or disappear. Appropriate noise attenuates between-train contrasts, providing modulations are under 0.5 Hz. Postsynaptic natural intervals impose critical time bases, separating presynaptic intervals (around, above or below them) with dissimilar consequences. Coding rules are numerous and have restricted domains; generalizations are misleading. Modulation-driven forms are trendy pacemaker-driven forms. However, dissimilarities, slight when patterns are almost pacemaker, increase as inhibition departs from pacemaker and incorporate unpredictable features. Physiological significance-(1) Pacemaker-driven forms, simple and ubiquitous, appear to be elementary building blocks of

  13. What Is a Pacemaker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it work? •A pacemaker uses batteries to send electric signals to your heart to help it pump the right way. • The pacemaker is connected to your heart by one or more wires. Tiny electric charges that you can’t feel move through ...

  14. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasu Sheeba

    2008-12-01

    As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools at our disposal over the past four decades has enabled discovery of the genetic and molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity. More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit presents a relatively simple and attractive model for the study of neuronal circuits and their functions.

  15. 钙离子激活钾通道对起搏神经元活性的作用%Role of calcium-activated potassium channels in neuronal pacemaker activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nancy DONG; 冯中平

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous rhythmic activity of pacemaker neurons in the central nervous system underlies fundamental neurological processes such as locomotion, cognition and circadian rhythm. Among the wide range of ion channels required for its generation, the Ca2+-activated K+(KCa) channels play a prominent role in maintaining physiologically-relevant frequency and pattern of pacemaker activity. Much of our understanding of the functions of KCa channels in pacemaker neurons have been derived from pharmacological studies using channel modulators, such as iberiotoxin and apamin. Despite the significant advances made, recent studies have painted an increasingly complex picture of the effects of widely used KCa channel modulators on unintended targets that may confound our under⁃standing of their functions. In this review, we discussed the utility and shortcomings of the KCa channel modulators, and highlighted the significance of these findings, because the KCa channel modulators have been used in early clinical trials to treat disorders ranging from Parkinson disease to alcoholism.%中枢起搏神经元的自发节律活动是神经功能的基础,这些神经功能例如体位移动,昼夜节律和认识知觉。神经元的自发节律活动的生成涉及多种离子通道,钙离子激活钾通道(KCa通道)在维持生理性起博频率和规律中起着的突出的作用。根据对iberiotoxin和蜂毒明肽类的KCa通道调节药物的药理研究,我们对KCa通道在起搏神经元功能中的作用的认识获得很大的提高。尽管近年的研究取得了显著的进步,钙激活钾通道调节剂的广泛使用增加了非特异性药物作用意想不到的复杂性。由于KCa通道调节剂已经用于帕金森病和乙醇中毒等多种疾病的早期临床试验治疗,本文强调了这些药物作用和不足在使用中的重要性。

  16. Disruption of neocortical lamina V neuronal bursts by serotonin in urethane anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, M J; Mridha, K A

    1989-03-01

    Time-shared high speed cyclic voltametry using carbon fibre multibarrelled microelectrodes was used to monitor the concentration of 5-Hydroxytryptamine administered by iontophoresis to locations in lamina V of Sm l neocortex and to record spontaneous neuronal spike activity. In the absence of 5-Hydroxytryptamine at any one recording location the firing of two or more individual units was seen to be synchronized so that the pattern of multi-unit activity consisted of synchronized clusters of spike activity interspersed with period of neuronal silence. The repetition rate of such clusters of neuronal activity was seen to be between 0.5 and 4Hz. Maximum concentrations of 2.7 x 10(-7) M 5-Hydroxytryptamine produced by iontophoresis disrupted synchronized neuronal cluster activity. 5-Hydroxytryptamine at a concentration of 6.2 x 10(-8) M resulted in a greater than 50% inhibition of activity for 47 single units but a change in firing pattern from cluster restricted high frequency activity to a continuous mode of firing for a separate population of 11 units. Intraperitoneal administration of P-Chloroamphetamine produced similar changes of neuronal firing and hence loss of synchrony.

  17. Analgesic and sedative concentrations of lignocaine shunt tonic and burst firing in thalamocortical neurones

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Stephan K.W.; Puil, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    The effects of lignocaine [lidocaine] HCl (0.6 μM–1 mM) on the membrane electrical properties and action potential firing of neurones of the ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus were investigated using whole cell recording techniques in rat brain slices in vitro.Bath application of lignocaine reversibly decreased the input resistance (Ri) of VPL neurones. This effect was observed at low, clinically sedative and analgesic concentrations (i.e., maximal amplitude at 10 μM) wherea...

  18. Dependence of synchronized bursting activity on medium stirring and the perfusion rate in a cultured network of neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Ryoun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-05-01

    A cultured network of neurons coupled with a multi-electrode-array (MEA) recording system has been a useful platform for investigating various issues in neuroscience and engineering. The neural activity supported by the system can be sensitive to environmental fluctuations, for example, in the medium's nutrient composition, ph, and temperature, and to mechanical disturbances, yet this issue has not been the subject. Especially, a normal practice in maintaining neuronal cell cultures involves an intermittent sequence of medium exchanges, typically at a time interval of a few days, and one such sudden medium exchange is unavoidably accompanied by many unintended disturbances. Here, based on a quantitative time-series analysis of synchronized bursting events, we explicitly demonstrate that such a medium exchange can, indeed, bring a huge change in the existing neural activity. Subsequently, we develop a medium perfusion-stirring system and an ideal protocol that can be used in conjunction with a MEA recording system, providing long-term stability. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the effects of medium stirring and perfusion rates. Unexpectedly, even some vigorous mechanical agitations do not have any impacts on neural activity. On the other hand, too much replenishment ( e.g., 1.8 ml/day for a 1.8-ml dish) of neurobasal medium results in an excitotoxicity.

  19. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors depress synaptic transmission onto subicular burst firing neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kintscher, M.; Breustedt, J.; Miceli, S.M.; Schmitz, D.; Wozny, C.

    2012-01-01

    The subiculum (SUB) is a pivotal structure positioned between the hippocampus proper and various cortical and subcortical areas. Despite the growing body of anatomical and intrinsic electrophysiological data of subicular neurons, modulation of synaptic transmission in the SUB is not well understood.

  20. How Does a Pacemaker Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a battery, a computerized generator, and wires with sensors at their tips. (The sensors are called electrodes.) The battery powers the generator, ... or single-chamber, pacemaker in the upper chest. Types of Pacemaker Programming The two main types of ...

  1. Computer simulations of stimulus dependent state switching in basic circuits of bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail; Huerta, Ramón; Bazhenov, Maxim; Kozlov, Alexander K.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    1998-11-01

    We investigate the ability of oscillating neural circuits to switch between different states of oscillation in two basic neural circuits. We model two quite distinct small neural circuits. The first circuit is based on invertebrate central pattern generator (CPG) studies [A. I. Selverston and M. Moulins, The Crustacean Stomatogastric System (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1987)] and is composed of two neurons coupled via both gap junction and inhibitory synapses. The second consists of coupled pairs of interconnected thalamocortical relay and thalamic reticular neurons with both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic coupling. The latter is an elementary unit of the thalamic networks passing sensory information to the cerebral cortex [M. Steriade, D. A. McCormick, and T. J. Sejnowski, Science 262, 679 (1993)]. Both circuits have contradictory coupling between symmetric parts. The thalamocortical model has excitatory and inhibitory connections and the CPG has reciprocal inhibitory and electrical coupling. We describe the dynamics of the individual neurons in these circuits by conductance based ordinary differential equations of Hodgkin-Huxley type [J. Physiol. (London) 117, 500 (1952)]. Both model circuits exhibit bistability and hysteresis in a wide region of coupling strengths. The two main modes of behavior are in-phase and out-of-phase oscillations of the symmetric parts of the network. We investigate the response of these circuits, while they are operating in bistable regimes, to externally imposed excitatory spike trains with varying interspike timing and small amplitude pulses. These are meant to represent spike trains received by the basic circuits from sensory neurons. Circuits operating in a bistable region are sensitive to the frequency of these excitatory inputs. Frequency variations lead to changes from in-phase to out-of-phase coordination or vice versa. The signaling information contained in a spike train driving the network can place the circuit into one or

  2. Macro- and micro-chaotic structures in the Hindmarsh-Rose model of bursting neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, Roberto, E-mail: rbarrio@unizar.es; Serrano, Sergio [Computational Dynamics Group, Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, GME and IUMA, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Angeles Martínez, M. [Computational Dynamics Group, GME, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Shilnikov, Andrey [Neuroscience Institute and Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30078 (United States); Department of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, 603950 Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    We study a plethora of chaotic phenomena in the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model with the use of several computational techniques including the bifurcation parameter continuation, spike-quantification, and evaluation of Lyapunov exponents in bi-parameter diagrams. Such an aggregated approach allows for detecting regions of simple and chaotic dynamics, and demarcating borderlines—exact bifurcation curves. We demonstrate how the organizing centers—points corresponding to codimension-two homoclinic bifurcations—along with fold and period-doubling bifurcation curves structure the biparametric plane, thus forming macro-chaotic regions of onion bulb shapes and revealing spike-adding cascades that generate micro-chaotic structures due to the hysteresis.

  3. Macro- and micro-chaotic structures in the Hindmarsh-Rose model of bursting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Roberto; Martínez, M Angeles; Serrano, Sergio; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2014-06-01

    We study a plethora of chaotic phenomena in the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model with the use of several computational techniques including the bifurcation parameter continuation, spike-quantification, and evaluation of Lyapunov exponents in bi-parameter diagrams. Such an aggregated approach allows for detecting regions of simple and chaotic dynamics, and demarcating borderlines-exact bifurcation curves. We demonstrate how the organizing centers-points corresponding to codimension-two homoclinic bifurcations-along with fold and period-doubling bifurcation curves structure the biparametric plane, thus forming macro-chaotic regions of onion bulb shapes and revealing spike-adding cascades that generate micro-chaotic structures due to the hysteresis.

  4. Identification and continuity of the distributions of burst-length and interspike intervals in the stochastic Morris-Lecar neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, Peter F; Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2011-12-01

    Using the Morris-Lecar model neuron with a type II parameter set and K(+)-channel noise, we investigate the interspike interval distribution as increasing levels of applied current drive the model through a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. Our goal is to provide a quantitative description of the distributions associated with spiking as a function of applied current. The model generates bursty spiking behavior with sequences of random numbers of spikes (bursts) separated by interburst intervals of random length. This kind of spiking behavior is found in many places in the nervous system, most notably, perhaps, in stuttering inhibitory interneurons in cortex. Here we show several practical and inviting aspects of this model, combining analysis of the stochastic dynamics of the model with estimation based on simulations. We show that the parameter of the exponential tail of the interspike interval distribution is in fact continuous over the entire range of plausible applied current, regardless of the bifurcations in the phase portrait of the model. Further, we show that the spike sequence length, apparently studied for the first time here, has a geometric distribution whose associated parameter is continuous as a function of applied current over the entire input range. Hence, this model is applicable over a much wider range of applied current than has been thought.

  5. Burst-generating neurones in the dorsal horn in an in vitro preparation of the turtle spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1996-01-01

    horn, was distinguished by the ability to generate a burst response following a hyperpolarization from rest or during a depolarization from a hyperpolarized holding potential. The burst response was inactivated at the resting membrane potential. 3. The burst response was mediated by a low threshold Ca2......+ spike assumed to be mediated by T-type Ca2+ channels since it resisted tetrodotoxin and was blocked by 3 mM Co2+ or 100-300 microM Ni2+ and resembled the low threshold spike (LTS) described elsewhere. 4. Some burst-generating cells also displayed plateau potentials mediated by L-type Ca2+ channels....... In these cells the burst following a hyperpolarizing current pulse, applied from the resting membrane potential, facilitated the activation of the plateau potential. Wind-up of the plateau potential was produced when the hyperpolarizing pulse generating the burst was repeated at 0.1-0.3 Hz or faster. 5...

  6. Pacemaker Use Following Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Hari R.; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation after orthotopic heart transplantation has been reported to be 2%-24%. Transplanted hearts usually exhibit sinus rhythm in the operating room following reperfusion, and most patients do not exhibit significant arrhythmias during the postoperative period. However, among the patients who do exhibit abnormalities, pacemakers may be implanted for early sinus node dysfunction but are rarely used after 6 months. Permanent pacing is often required for atrioventricular block. A different cohort of transplant patients presents later with bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, reported to occur in approximately 1.5% of patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the indications for pacemaker implantation, compare the need for pacemakers following bicaval vs biatrial anastomosis, and examine the long-term outcomes of heart transplant patients who received pacemakers. Methods: For this retrospective, case-cohort, single-institution study, patients were identified from clinical research and administrative transplant databases. Information was supplemented with review of the medical records. Standard statistical techniques were used, with chi-square testing for categorical variables and the 2-tailed t test for continuous variables. Survival was compared with the use of log-rank methods. Results: Between January 1968 and February 2008, 1,450 heart transplants were performed at Stanford University. Eighty-four patients (5.8%) were identified as having had a pacemaker implanted. Of these patients, 65.5% (55) had the device implanted within 30 days of transplantation, and 34.5% (29) had late implantation. The mean survival of patients who had an early pacemaker implant was 6.4 years compared to 7.7 years for those with a late pacemaker implant (Ptransplantation had a pretransplant diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathy. In our cohort, the need for a permanent pacemaker was also associated with older

  7. Glutamatergic synaptic currents of nigral dopaminergic neurons follow a postnatal developmental sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard ePearlstein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous activity pattern of adult dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc results from interactions between intrinsic membrane conductances and afferent inputs. In adult SNc DA neurons, low-frequency tonic background activity is generated by intrinsic pacemaker mechanisms, whereas burst generation depends on intact synaptic inputs in particular the glutamatergic ones. Tonic DA release in the striatum during pacemaking is required to maintain motor activity, and burst firing evokes phasic DA release, necessary for cue-dependent learning tasks. However, it is still unknown how the firing properties of SNc DA neurons mature during postnatal development before reaching the adult state. We studied the postnatal developmental profile of spontaneous and evoked AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in SNc DA neurons in brain slices from immature (postnatal days P4-10 and young adult (P30-50 tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-GFP mice. We found that somato-dendritic fields of SNc DA neurons are already mature at P4-10. In contrast, spontaneous glutamatergic EPSCs show a developmental sequence. Spontaneous NMDA EPSCs in particular are larger and more frequent in immature SNc DA neurons than in young adult ones and have a bursty pattern. They are mediated by GluN2B and GluN2D subunit-containing NMDA receptors. The latter generate long-lasting, DQP1105-sensitive, spontaneous EPSCs, which are transiently recorded during this early period. Due to high NMDA activity, immature SNc DA neurons generate large and long lasting NMDA receptor-dependent (APV-sensitive bursts in response to the stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We conclude that the transient high NMDA activity allows calcium influx into the dendrites of developing SNc DA neurons.

  8. Modern pacemaker therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijatov Milan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pacemakers are devices that modern medicine and cardiology cannot be imagined without. The technique of implantation comes to surgical procedure where all principles of asepsis and antisepsis have to be respected. Although some complications do happen, they are rather rare. Results. After the implantation of the device, the patient is not handicapped (unless the heart was additionally damaged. On the contrary, the patient returns to his work and functions normally within his family in most of the cases. The first medical appointment is scheduled a month after the implantation and the following are three and six months after. Types of devices. Today there are „new types of electrostimulation”- implantable cardioverter defibrillators and multisite electrostimulators. The former is implanted in patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death and the latter in patients with heart failure and left bundle branch block. Owing to these devices, the sudden cardiac death can be prevented successfully and the quality of a patient’s life is improved.

  9. mRNA Expression of Ion Channels in GnRH Neurons: Subtype-Specific Regulation by 17β-Estradiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Martha A.; Tonsfeldt, Karen J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Burst firing of neurons optimizes neurotransmitter release. GnRH neurons exhibit burst firing activity and T-type calcium channels, which are vital for burst firing activity, are regulated by 17β-estradiol (E2) in GnRH neurons. To further elucidate ion channel expression and E2 regulation during positive and negative feedback on GnRH neurosecretion, we used single cell RT-PCR and real-time qPCR to quantify channel mRNA expression in GnRH neurons. GFP-GnRH neurons expressed numerous ion channels important for burst firing activity. E2-treatment sufficient to induce an LH surge increased mRNA expression of HCN1 channels, which underlie the pacemaker current, the calcium-permeable CaV1.3, CaV2.2, CaV2.3 channels, and TRPC4 channels, which mediate the kisspeptin excitatory response. E2 also decreased mRNA expression of SK3 channels underlying the medium AHP current. Therefore, E2 exerts fundamental changes in ion channel expression in GnRH neurons, to prime them to respond to incoming stimuli with increased excitability at the time of the surge. PMID:23305677

  10. Cocaine increases dopaminergic neuron and motor activity via midbrain α1 adrenergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Richard Brandon; Wanat, Matthew J; Gomez, Jorge A; Brown, Zeliene J; Phillips, Paul E M; Paladini, Carlos A

    2015-03-13

    Cocaine reinforcement is mediated by increased extracellular dopamine levels in the forebrain. This neurochemical effect was thought to require inhibition of dopamine reuptake, but cocaine is still reinforcing even in the absence of the dopamine transporter. Here, we demonstrate that the rapid elevation in dopamine levels and motor activity elicited by cocaine involves α1 receptor activation within the ventral midbrain. Activation of α1 receptors increases dopaminergic neuron burst firing by decreasing the calcium-activated potassium channel current (SK), as well as elevates dopaminergic neuron pacemaker firing through modulation of both SK and the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih). Furthermore, we found that cocaine increases both the pacemaker and burst-firing frequency of rat ventral-midbrain dopaminergic neurons through an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent mechanism within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. These results demonstrate the mechanism underlying the critical role of α1 adrenergic receptors in the regulation of dopamine neurotransmission and behavior by cocaine.

  11. Pacemaker-associated Bacillus cereus endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraud, Olivier; Hidri, Nadia; Ly, Kim; Pichon, Nicolas; Manea, Petrus; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Garnier, Fabien

    2012-11-01

    We report the case of a pacemaker-associated Bacillus cereus endocarditis in a nonimmunocompromised patient. Antibiotic treatment was ineffective, and the pacemaker had to be removed. B. cereus was cultured from several blood samples and from the pacemaker electrodes. This case underlines the contribution of the rpoB gene for Bacillus species determination.

  12. Pacemaker patients’ perspective and experiences in a pacemaker outpatient clinic in relation to test intervals of the pacemaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauberg, Astrid; Hansen, Tina; Pedersen, Trine Pernille Dahl

    the pacemaker and psychological reactions. Patients with pacemakers older than 3 months lacked communication with fellowmen. Conclusion The patients express receiving competent and professional treatment when visiting the outpatient clinic, there seems to be a discrepancy between the long test intervals......In and out in 15 minutes! Shorttime nursing in an outpatient clinic Pacemaker patients’ perspective and experiences in a pacemaker outpatient clinic in relation to test intervals of the pacemaker. Background Pacemaker implantation is a highly documented treatment for patients with bradycardia...... an evident decline in quality of life regarding psychological and social aspects 6 month after the implantation in terms of cognitive function, work ability, and sexual activity. Mlynarski et al (2009) have found correlations between pacemaker implantation and anxiety and depression. Aim The aim...

  13. Circadian Pacemaker – Temperature Compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerkema, Menno P.; Binder, Marc D.; Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Windhorst, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    One of the defining characteristics of circadian pacemakers and indicates the independence of the speed of circadian clock processes of environmental temperature. Mechanisms involved, so far not elucidated in full detail, entail at least two processes that are similarly affected by temperature chang

  14. First Degree Pacemaker Exit Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Usually atrial and ventricular depolarizations follow soon after the pacemaker stimulus (spike on the ECG. But there can be an exit block due to fibrosis at the electrode - tissue interface at the lead tip. This can increase the delay between the spike and atrial or ventricular depolarization.

  15. Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  16. Interruption of pacemaker signals by a diencephalic nucleus in the African electric fish, Gymnarchus niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Kawasaki, Masashi

    2006-05-01

    The African electric fish Gymnarchus niloticus rhythmically emits electric organ discharges (EODs) for communication and navigation. The EODs are generated by the electric organ in the tail in response to the command signals from the medullary pacemaker complex, which consists of a pacemaker nucleus (PN), two lateral relay nuclei (LRN) and a medial relay nucleus (MRN). The premotor structure and its modulatory influences on the pacemaker complex have been investigated in this paper. A bilateral prepacemaker nucleus (PPn) was found in the area of the dorsal posterior nucleus (DP) of the thalamus by retrograde labeling from the PN. No retrogradely labeled neurons outside the pacemaker complex were found after tracer injection into the LRN or MRN. Accordingly, anterogradely labeled terminal fibers from PPn neurons were found only in the PN. Iontophoresis of L-glutamate into the region of the PPn induced EOD interruptions. Despite the exclusive projection of the PPn neurons to the PN, extracellular and intracellular recordings showed that PN neurons continue their firing while MRN neurons ceased their firing during EOD interruption. This mode of EOD interruption differs from those found in any other weakly electric fishes in which EOD cessation mechanisms have been known.

  17. Pacemaker interactions induce reentrant wave dynamics in engineered cardiac culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Bartłomiej; Shajahan, T. K.; Gabriels, James; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Pacemaker interactions can lead to complex wave dynamics seen in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias. We use experimental and mathematical models of pacemakers in heterogeneous excitable media to investigate how pacemaker interactions can be a mechanism for wave break and reentrant wave dynamics. Embryonic chick ventricular cells are cultured invitro so as to create a dominant central pacemaker site that entrains other pacemakers in the medium. Exposure of those cultures to a potassium channel blocker, E-4031, leads to emergence of peripheral pacemakers that compete with each other and with the central pacemaker. Waves emitted by faster pacemakers break up over the slower pacemaker to form reentrant waves. Similar dynamics are observed in a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model of heterogeneous excitable media with two distinct sites of pacemaking. These findings elucidate a mechanism of pacemaker-induced reentry in excitable media.

  18. Validation of the Netherlands pacemaker patient registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, WA; Kingma, T; Hooijschuur, CAM; Dassen, WRM; Hoorntje, JCA; van Gelder, LM

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the validation of the information stored in the Netherlands central pacemaker patient database. At this moment the registry database contains information on more than 70500 patients, 85000 pacemakers and 90000 leads. The validation procedures consisted of an internal consistenc

  19. The dynamics of GABA signaling: Revelations from the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, H Elliott; Walton, James C; Gamble, Karen L; McNeill, John K; Hummer, Daniel L

    2017-01-01

    Virtually every neuron within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) communicates via GABAergic signaling. The extracellular levels of GABA within the SCN are determined by a complex interaction of synthesis and transport, as well as synaptic and non-synaptic release. The response to GABA is mediated by GABAA receptors that respond to both phasic and tonic GABA release and that can produce excitatory as well as inhibitory cellular responses. GABA also influences circadian control through the exclusively inhibitory effects of GABAB receptors. Both GABA and neuropeptide signaling occur within the SCN, although the functional consequences of the interactions of these signals are not well understood. This review considers the role of GABA in the circadian pacemaker, in the mechanisms responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms, in the ability of non-photic stimuli to reset the phase of the pacemaker, and in the ability of the day-night cycle to entrain the pacemaker.

  20. Pacemakers charging using body energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bairagi, Sweeti; Goel, Sanat; Jangra, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient's heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat). Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists - typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery.

  1. Pacemakers charging using body energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Life-saving medical implants like pacemakers and defibrillators face a big drawback that their batteries eventually run out and patients require frequent surgery to have these batteries replaced. With the advent of technology, alternatives can be provided for such surgeries. To power these devices, body energy harvesting techniques may be employed. Some of the power sources are patient′s heartbeat, blood flow inside the vessels, movement of the body parts, and the body temperature (heat. Different types of sensors are employed, such as for sensing the energy from the heartbeat the piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled nanowires are used that convert the mechanical energy into electricity. Similarly, for sensing the blood flow energy, nanogenerators driven by ultrasonic waves are used that have the ability to directly convert the hydraulic energy in human body to electrical energy. Another consideration is to use body heat employing biothermal battery to generate electricity using multiple arrays of thermoelectric generators built into an implantable chip. These generators exploit the well-known thermocouple effect. For the biothermal device to work, it needs a 2°C temperature difference across it. But there are many parts of the body where a temperature difference of 5°C exists - typically in the few millimeters just below the skin, where it is planned to place this device. This study focuses on using body heat as an alternative energy source to recharge pacemaker batteries and other medical devices and prevent the possibility of life-risk during repeated surgery.

  2. Molecular Properties of Kiss1 Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsch, Michelle L.; Popa, Simina M.; Lawhorn, Janessa K.; Qiu, Jian; Tonsfeldt, Karen J.; Bosch, Martha A.; Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Sanz, Elisenda; McKnight, G. Stanley; Clifton, Donald K.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Neurons that produce kisspeptin play a critical role in reproduction. However, understanding the molecular physiology of kisspeptin neurons has been limited by the lack of an in vivo marker for those cells. Here, we report the development of a Kiss1-CreGFP knockin mouse, wherein the endogenous Kiss1 promoter directs the expression of a Cre recombinase-enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein. The pattern of GFP expression in the brain of the knockin recapitulates what has been described earlier for Kiss1 in the male and female mouse, with prominent expression in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) (in both sexes) and the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (in females). Single-cell RT-PCR showed that the Kiss1 transcript is expressed in 100% of GFP-labeled cells, and the CreGFP transcript was regulated by estradiol in the same manner as the Kiss1 gene (i.e. inhibited in the ARC and induced in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus). We used this mouse to evaluate the biophysical properties of kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons in the ARC of the female mouse. GFP-expressing Kiss1 neurons were identified in hypothalamic slice preparations of the ARC and patch clamped. Whole-cell (and loose attached) recordings revealed that Kiss1 neurons exhibit spontaneous activity and expressed both h- (pacemaker) and T-type calcium currents, and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated 1–4 and CaV3.1 channel subtypes (measured by single cell RT-PCR), respectively. N-methyl-D-aspartate induced bursting activity, characterized by depolarizing/hyperpolarizing oscillations. Therefore, Kiss1 neurons in the ARC share molecular and electrophysiological properties of other CNS pacemaker neurons. PMID:21933870

  3. [Management of pacemaker patients by bathtub ECG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, H; Togawa, T; Toyoshima, T; Ishijima, M

    1989-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a new method for recording electrocardiogram (ECG) of pacemaker patients in bathtub (bathtub ECG). ECG from the pacemaker implanted patients in the bathtub with tap water was recorded through three silver/silver chloride electrodes (4 x 4 cm) fitted on the inside wall of bathtub. Electric signal was connected to the isolated amplifier and recorded on the strip chart recorder. Contrast to the conventional method for recording standard ECG, bathtub ECG does not require body surface electrodes and is recorded at patients home. Although the amplitude of bathtub ECG was reduced approximately to a quarter of standard ECG, cardiac arrhythmia can be easily interpreted by bathtub ECG. In patients with pacemaker system, the amplitude of the pacing pulse recorded by bathtub ECG was much larger than that of QRS complex recorded by standard ECG. Therefore, we conclude that bathtub ECG would be a suitable method to follow up patients with pacemaker system.

  4. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  5. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  6. Caffeine increases light responsiveness of the mouse circadian pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Hester C; Lucassen, Eliane A; Yasenkov, Roman; Groenen, Inske; Ijzerman, Adriaan P; Meijer, Johanna H; Deboer, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive stimulant worldwide. It reduces sleep and sleepiness by blocking access to the adenosine receptor. The level of adenosine increases during sleep deprivation, and is thought to induce sleepiness and initiate sleep. Light-induced phase shifts of the rest-activity circadian rhythms are mediated by light-responsive neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, where the circadian clock of mammals resides. Previous studies have shown that sleep deprivation reduces circadian clock phase-shifting capacity and decreases SCN neuronal activity. In addition, application of adenosine agonists and antagonists mimics and blocks, respectively, the effect of sleep deprivation on light-induced phase shifts in behaviour, suggesting a role for adenosine. In the present study, we examined the role of sleep deprivation in and the effect of caffeine on light responsiveness of the SCN. We performed in vivo electrical activity recordings of the SCN in freely moving mice, and showed that the sustained response to light of SCN neuronal activity was attenuated after 6 h of sleep deprivation prior to light exposure. Subsequent intraperitoneal application of caffeine was able to restore the response to light. Finally, we performed behavioural recordings in constant conditions, and found enhanced period lengthening during chronic treatment with caffeine in drinking water in constant light conditions. The data suggest that increased homeostatic sleep pressure changes circadian pacemaker functioning by reducing SCN neuronal responsiveness to light. The electrophysiological and behavioural data together provide evidence that caffeine enhances clock sensitivity to light.

  7. Phase analysis method for burst onset prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellino, Flavio; Mazzoni, Alberto; Storace, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The response of bursting neurons to fluctuating inputs is usually hard to predict, due to their strong nonlinearity. For the same reason, decoding the injected stimulus from the activity of a bursting neuron is generally difficult. In this paper we propose a method describing (for neuron models) a mechanism of phase coding relating the burst onsets with the phase profile of the input current. This relation suggests that burst onset may provide a way for postsynaptic neurons to track the input phase. Moreover, we define a method of phase decoding to solve the inverse problem and estimate the likelihood of burst onset given the input state. Both methods are presented here in a unified framework, describing a complete coding-decoding procedure. This procedure is tested by using different neuron models, stimulated with different inputs (stochastic, sinusoidal, up, and down states). The results obtained show the efficacy and broad range of application of the proposed methods. Possible applications range from the study of sensory information processing, in which phase-of-firing codes are known to play a crucial role, to clinical applications such as deep brain stimulation, helping to design stimuli in order to trigger or prevent neural bursting.

  8. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  9. 21 CFR 870.1750 - External programmable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External programmable pacemaker pulse generator... External programmable pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external programmable pacemaker pulse generators is a device that can be programmed to produce one or more pulses at...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3610 - Implantable pacemaker pulse generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implantable pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3610... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An implantable pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has a power supply and electronic circuits that produce a periodic electrical pulse to stimulate...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3600 - External pacemaker pulse generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External pacemaker pulse generator. 870.3600... pacemaker pulse generator. (a) Identification. An external pacemaker pulse generator is a device that has a power supply and electronic circuits that produce a periodic electrical pulse to stimulate the...

  12. The circadian neuropeptide PDF signals preferentially through a specific adenylate cyclase isoform AC3 in M pacemakers of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Duvall

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF is essential for normal circadian function in Drosophila. It synchronizes the phases of M pacemakers, while in E pacemakers it decelerates their cycling and supports their amplitude. The PDF receptor (PDF-R is present in both M and subsets of E cells. Activation of PDF-R stimulates cAMP increases in vitro and in M cells in vivo. The present study asks: What is the identity of downstream signaling components that are associated with PDF receptor in specific circadian pacemaker neurons? Using live imaging of intact fly brains and transgenic RNAi, we show that adenylate cyclase AC3 underlies PDF signaling in M cells. Genetic disruptions of AC3 specifically disrupt PDF responses: they do not affect other Gs-coupled GPCR signaling in M cells, they can be rescued, and they do not represent developmental alterations. Knockdown of the Drosophila AKAP-like scaffolding protein Nervy also reduces PDF responses. Flies with AC3 alterations show behavioral syndromes consistent with known roles of M pacemakers as mediated by PDF. Surprisingly, disruption of AC3 does not alter PDF responses in E cells--the PDF-R(+ LNd. Within M pacemakers, PDF-R couples preferentially to a single AC, but PDF-R association with a different AC(s is needed to explain PDF signaling in the E pacemakers. Thus critical pathways of circadian synchronization are mediated by highly specific second messenger components. These findings support a hypothesis that PDF signaling components within target cells are sequestered into "circadian signalosomes," whose compositions differ between E and M pacemaker cell types.

  13. Cesium blockade of delayed outward currents and electrically induced pacemaker activity in mammalian ventricular myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, C F; Katzung, B G

    1981-05-01

    The effects of Cs+, 5-25 mM, were studied in cat and guinea pig papillary muscles using voltage clamp and current clamp techniques. In solutions containing normal K+, the major effects of Cs+ were depolarization of the resting potential and reduction of the delayed outward current (ixl) between -80 and -20 mV. Both inward and outward portions of the isochronal current voltage relation (l-s clamps) were reduced by extracellular Cs+. This resulted in a substantial reduction of inward rectification and, by subtraction from the normal I-V relationship, the definition of a Cs+-sensitive component of current. Under current clamp conditions, 5-10 mM Cs+ produced a dose-dependent slowing of repetitive firing induced by depolarization. At higher concentrations (25 mM) the resting potential was depolarized and repetitive activity could not be induced by further depolarization. However, release of hyperpolarizing pulses was followed by prolonged bursts of repetitive action potentials, suggesting partial reversal of blockade or participation of another pacemaker process. The experimental results and a numerical simulation show that under readily attainable conditions, reduction in an outward pacemaker current may slow pacemaker activity.

  14. Entirely polytetrafluoroethylene coating for pacemaker system contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamenishi, Akinori; Usui, Akihiko; Oshima, Hideki; Ueda, Yuichi

    2008-04-01

    A 63-year-old man underwent pacemaker implantation for complete atrio-ventricular block. The patient repeated admissions for skin necrosis, and generator or pacemaker system was re-implanted each time. The patient was admitted with skin necrosis of the generator pocket three years after re-implantation. A skin patch test was positive on almost all components of the pacemaker system. The patient underwent pacemaker system removal and re-implantation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheets coating pericardium leads and generator. There has been no recurrence. PTFE sheet coating is effective to treat pacemaker system contact dermatitis.

  15. Runaway pacemaker: a still existing complication and therapeutic guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H; Andersen, C; Nielsen, L H

    1989-01-01

    Runaway pacemaker is a rare, but still existing potential lethal complication in permanent pacemakers. Within 4 1/2 years, we saw two cases of runaway pacemaker in patients with multiprogrammable, VVI pacemakers (Siemens-Elema, Model 668). In both cases a pacemaker-induced ventricular tachycardia...... (rate 240-260 beats/min) was documented. One patient died. Runaway pacemakers must be exchanged as soon as possible. Until this can be accomplished, different emergency maneuvers should be tried. As documented in the cases presented, placing a magnet over the pacemaker may result in a lower, more...... physiological pacing rate. Reprogramming the pulse generator to a lower output or the use of external chest wall overdrive stimulation may also be successful, but these procedures require the presence of an adequate escape rhythm. If this is not the case or the former maneuvers have failed, an external...

  16. Efficient inhibition of bursts by bursts in the auditory system of crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, G; Pollack, G S

    2007-06-01

    In crickets, auditory information about ultrasound is carried bilaterally to the brain by the AN2 neurons. The ON1 neuron provides contralateral inhibitory input to AN2, thereby enhancing bilateral contrast between the left and right AN2s, an important cue for sound localization. We examine how the structures of the spike trains of these neurons affect this inhibitory interaction. As previously shown for AN2, ON1 responds to salient peaks in stimulus amplitude with bursts of spikes. Spike bursts, but not isolated spikes, reliably signal the occurrence of specific features of the stimulus. ON1 and AN2 burst at similar times relative to the amplitude envelope of the stimulus, and bursts are more tightly time-locked to stimulus feature than the isolated spikes. As a consequence, spikes that, in the absence of contralateral inhibition, would occur within AN2 bursts are more likely to be preceded by spikes in ON1 (mainly also in bursts) than are isolated AN2 spikes. This leads to a large decrease in the burst rate of the inhibited AN2. We conclude that the match in coding properties of ON1 and AN2 allows contralateral inhibition to be most efficient for those portions of the response that carry the behaviourally relevant information, i.e. for bursts.

  17. [Cardiac Pacemakers, implantable defibrillators and IRM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, R; Hidden-Lucet, F; Himbert, C; Petitot, J C; Fontaine, G

    2003-04-01

    The IRM is formally contraindicated to the pacemaker and cardiac defibrillator wearers because of the risk of inhibition or inappropriate stimulations during the examination. However if the examination is essential, suitable programming of the apparatus and a constant monitoring of the heartbeat rate by a qualified doctor in cardiac stimulation must make it possible to avoid any accident.

  18. Low atrial septum pacing in pacemaker patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Willem Gijsbert de

    2006-01-01

    In patients with an indication for anti bradycardia pacing, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia (30-50%) even in the absence of atrial tachy arrhythmias before pacemaker implantation. Pace prevention and pace intervention for atrial tachy arrhythmias could be an interesting adjuvant trea

  19. Does bipolar pacemaker current activate blood platelets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesdal, Grunde; Hansen, Annebirthe Bo; Brandes, Axel

    2009-01-01

    to the pacemaker can. METHODS: Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from two healthy subjects. Platelet reactivity to the agonist ADP was tested in paired samples in an aggregometer in a case/control setup. RESULTS: Eighteen of 46 tested pairs of platelet-rich plasma showed increased reactivity in the paced sample...

  20. Intrapericardial pacemaker in a 2-kilogram newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Castillo, Rafael; Rubio, Lorena

    2012-08-01

    A 2-kilogram child had a pacemaker implanted by a subxyphoid approach with the generator located under the rectus sheath. Days later, the battery eroded the abdominal wall and the peritoneum. The whole system was removed and a new one was implanted inside the pericardium on an emergent basis.

  1. Prevention of pacemaker-associated contact dermatitis by polytetrafluoroethylene sheet and conduit coating of the pacemaker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Takahiro; Maeba, Satoru; Sueda, Taijiro

    2014-09-01

    A 73-year-old female with sick sinus syndrome and atrial fibrillation was implanted with a ventricular demand inhibit pacemaker. She subsequently developed multiple episodes of skin irritation and necrosis. Skin patch testing revealed sensitivity to almost every component of the pacemaker system. The pacemaker was removed and replaced with a new pacemaker in which the generator was covered with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet and the lead was covered with PTFE conduit. The patient suffered no further episodes of pacemaker-associated contact dermatitis.

  2. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  3. MRI-conditional pacemakers: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available António M Ferreira,1,2 Francisco Costa,2 António Tralhão,2 Hugo Marques,3 Nuno Cardim,1 Pedro Adragão1,2 1Cardiology Department, Hospital da Luz, 2Cardiology Department, Hospital Santa Cruz- CHLO, 3Radiology Department, Hospital da Luz, Lisbon, Portugal Abstract: Use of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and pacing devices has undergone remarkable growth in recent years, and it is estimated that the majority of patients with pacemakers will need an MRI during their lifetime. These investigations will generally be denied due to the potentially dangerous interactions between cardiac devices and the magnetic fields and radiofrequency energy used in MRI. Despite the increasing reports of uneventful scanning in selected patients with conventional pacemakers under close surveillance, MRI is still contraindicated in those circumstances and cannot be considered a routine procedure. These limitations prompted a series of modifications in generator and lead engineering, designed to minimize interactions that could compromise device function and patient safety. The resulting MRI-conditional pacemakers were first introduced in 2008 and the clinical experience gathered so far supports their safety in the MRI environment if certain conditions are fulfilled. With this technology, new questions and controversies arise regarding patient selection, clinical impact, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, we discuss the potential risks of MRI in patients with electronic cardiac devices and present updated information regarding the features of MRI-conditional pacemakers and the clinical experience with currently available models. Finally, we provide some guidance on how to scan patients who have these devices and discuss future directions in the field. Keywords: pacemakers, magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, MRI-conditional devices, safety

  4. Leader neurons in leaky integrate and fire neural network simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Zbinden, Cyrille

    2010-01-01

    Several experimental studies show the existence of leader neurons in population bursts of 2D living neural networks. A leader neuron is, basically, a neuron which fires at the beginning of a burst (respectively network spike) more often that we expect by looking at its whole mean neural activity. This means that leader neurons have some burst triggering power beyond a simple statistical effect. In this study, we characterize these leader neuron properties. This naturally leads us to simulate ...

  5. Delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances on scale-free neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matjaz; Duan, Zhisheng; Chen, Guanrong

    2009-06-01

    We study the effects of periodic subthreshold pacemaker activity and time-delayed coupling on stochastic resonance over scale-free neuronal networks. As the two extreme options, we introduce the pacemaker, respectively, to the neuron with the highest degree and to one of the neurons with the lowest degree within the network, but we also consider the case when all neurons are exposed to the periodic forcing. In the absence of delay, we show that an intermediate intensity of noise is able to optimally assist the pacemaker in imposing its rhythm on the whole ensemble, irrespective to its placing, thus providing evidences for stochastic resonance on the scale-free neuronal networks. Interestingly thereby, if the forcing in form of a periodic pulse train is introduced to all neurons forming the network, the stochastic resonance decreases as compared to the case when only a single neuron is paced. Moreover, we show that finite delays in coupling can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances independently of the placing of the pacemaker, but they can also altogether destroy stochastic resonance. Delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances manifest as well-expressed maxima of the correlation measure, appearing at every multiple of the pacemaker period. We argue that fine-tuned delays and locally active pacemakers are vital for assuring optimal conditions for stochastic resonance on complex neuronal networks.

  6. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators - general and anesthetic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy G. Rapsang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A pacemaking system consists of an impulse generator and lead or leads to carry the electrical impulse to the patient's heart. Pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator codes were made to describe the type of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implanted. Indications for pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation were given by the American College of Cardiologists. Certain pacemakers have magnet-operated reed switches incorporated; however, magnet application can have serious adverse effects; hence, devices should be considered programmable unless known otherwise. When a device patient undergoes any procedure (with or without anesthesia, special precautions have to be observed including a focused history/physical examination, interrogation of pacemaker before and after the procedure, emergency drugs/temporary pacing and defibrillation, reprogramming of pacemaker and disabling certain pacemaker functions if required, monitoring of electrolyte and metabolic disturbance and avoiding certain drugs and equipments that can interfere with pacemaker function. If unanticipated device interactions are found, consider discontinuation of the procedure until the source of interference can be eliminated or managed and all corrective measures should be taken to ensure proper pacemaker function should be done. Post procedure, the cardiac rate and rhythm should be monitored continuously and emergency drugs and equipments should be kept ready and consultation with a cardiologist or a pacemaker-implantable cardioverter defibrillator service may be necessary.

  7. Calcium-dependent potassium channels play a critical role for burst termination in the locomotor network in lamprey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Manira, A; Tegnér, J; Grillner, S

    1994-10-01

    1. The possible involvement of calcium-dependent potassium channels (KCa) in the termination of locomotor bursts was investigated by administration of a specific blocker, apamin, in the lamprey spinal cord in vitro. The effects were examined by recording the efferent activity in ventral roots and by intracellular recording from interneurons and motoneurons. During fictive locomotion induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), apamin was found to affect both the frequency of bursting and the regularity of the locomotor pattern. 2. At the single cell level, NMDA can induce pacemaker-like membrane potential oscillations in individual neurons after administration of tetrodotoxin. Apamin (2.5 microM) produced a marked increase of the duration of the depolarizing plateau phase occurring during these NMDA-induced oscillations; this shows that the repolarization of the plateau is initiated by a progressive activation of apamin-sensitive KCa-channels. 3. The action potential is followed by an afterhyperpolarization (AHP) with a fast and a slow phase (sAHP). The latter is known to be caused by apamin-sensitive KCa-channels. During repetitive firing, the interspike interval is dependent on the amplitude and the duration of the sAHP. Apamin caused a reduction of the spike frequency adaptation with a concomitant increase in the firing frequency. In some cells, apamin in addition reduced the threshold for the action potential. Apamin-sensitive KCa-channels thus will be involved in controlling both the onset and the duration of neuronal firing in the lamprey spinal cord. 4. During fictive locomotion induced by NMDA (40-200 microM), a blockade of KCa-channels by apamin produced an increase of the coefficient of variation (mean = 167%, n = 26), which was statistically significant in 21 out of 26 experiments. At 40-150 microM NMDA, an average increase in cycle duration was 77% and statistically significant in 15 out of 20 preparations. At 200 microM NMDA (corresponding to higher burst

  8. Influence of D-net (European GSM-Standard) cellular phones on pacemaker function in 50 patients with permanent pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, A; Grimm, W; Funck, R; Maisch, B

    1996-10-01

    The widespread use of cellular phones in the last years has prompted some recent studies to suggest an interference of pacemaker function by cellular phone usage. To determine the risk of pacemaker patients using D-net cellular phones, we tested 50 patients with permanent pacemakers after routine pacemaker check by short phone calls using a cellular phone (Ericsson, D-net, frequency 890-915 MHz, digital information coding, equivalent to the European Groupe Systemes Mobiles standard). A six-channel surface ECG was continuously recorded from each patient to detect any interactions between pacemakers and cellular phones. Phone calls were repeated during the following pacemaker settings: (1) preexisting setting; (2) minimum ventricular rate of 90 beats/min and preexisting sensitivity; and (3) minimum ventricular rate of 90 beats/min and maximum sensitivity without T wave oversensing. Only 2 (4%) of 50 patients repeatedly showed intermittent pacemaker inhibition during calls with the cellular phone. Both pacemakers had unipolar sensing. Therefore, although interactions between cellular phone use and pacemaker function appear to be rare in our study, pacemaker dependent patients in particular should avoid the use of cellular phones.

  9. Choosing the pacemaker; a rational approach to the use of modern pacemaker technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J M; Joseph, S P; Bahri, A K; Ramdial, J; Crowther, A

    1990-08-01

    Sophisticated pacemakers now afford greater benefit than only relief of syncope for patients with symptomatic bradyarrhythmia. For clinical reasons it is inappropriate to implant ventricular demand (VVI) pacemakers in every patient, but for both clinical and economic reasons it is also undesirable to use dual-lead or rate-responsive systems indiscriminately. However, the published guidelines for pacemaker choice and investigation are inadequate. We have analysed the clinical assessment and the investigations required in a series of 150 patients with various electrophysiological disorders, considered consecutively for pacemaker implantation using an algorithm to assist decisions. Holter electrocardiography in 77.3%, exercise testing--formal (in 9.3%) or informal (during Holter electrocardiography), electrophysiology study (EPS)--full in 15.3% and partial in 29.3%, and trial of pacing (10.7%) were all used to characterize dysfunction and to define appropriate pacing mode. 142 patients were paced--57.0% with single lead modes (12.7%) AAI, 44.3% VVI) and 43.0% dual-lead (2.8% DVI, 23.9% VDD or VAT, 16.2% DDD). Three patients received rate-responsive systems (VVIR) which, if available, would have been used in nine; four would have been suitable for AAIR and four for dual-lead responsive pacing (DVIR, DDIR or DDDR). We offer a rational approach based on published data for investigation and pacemaker choice in the management of patients with bradyarrhythmia.

  10. [Magnets, pacemaker and defibrillator: fatal attraction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, C; Graf, D

    2015-05-27

    This article aims at clarifying the effects of a clinical magnet on pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators. The effects of electromagnetic interferences on such devices, including interferences linked to electrosurgery and magnetic resonance imaging are also discussed. In general, a magnet provokes a distinctive effect on a pacemaker by converting it into an asynchronous mode of pacing, and on an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator by suspending its own antitachyarythmia therapies without affecting the pacing. In the operating room, the magnet has to be used cautiously with precisely defined protocols which respect the type of the device used, the type of intervention planned, the presence or absence of EMI and the pacing-dependency of the patient.

  11. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes an oncology patient that must be treated in a linear accelerator. Pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. Above 7 MV therapeutic beam is contaminated with photoneutrons that could damage the CMOS. Here, the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a CMOS cell was calculated, also the spectra were calculated in two point-like detectors in the room. Neutron spectrum in the CMOS cell shows a small peak between 0.1 to 1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, joined by epithermal neutrons, same features were observed in the point-like detectors. The absorbed dose in the CMOS was 1.522 x 10{sup -17} Gy per neutron emitted by the source. (Author)

  12. Abnormal musical pacemaker in a patient with musical hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biran, I; Steiner, I

    2006-12-01

    Music creation requires a highly orchestrated temporal pattern. The study of a patient with repetitive musical hallucinations enabled us to examine temporal pacemakers in music production. Here, we show that the pattern of faster silent production of a chosen tune compared with its production aloud was reversed when the patient produced the hallucinatory tune. This observation might suggest the utilization of a pacemaker(s), which functions differentially during the disease.

  13. The effect of metal detector gates on implanted permanent pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copperman, Y; Zarfati, D; Laniado, S

    1988-10-01

    The effect of metal detector security gates, such as are used in airports, was tested in 103 nonselected pacemaker patients. Various types of single and dual chamber units were examined, using telemetry during the test. Pulse rate and duration were measured immediately before and after the procedure. No ill effect was seen on any of the units tested, pacemaker inhibition was not observed, and programmability was not affected. Metal detector security gates have no effect on implanted permanent pacemakers.

  14. A rare case of recurrent pacemaker allergic reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Shittu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic reactions to pacemaker device components are uncommon. However, when they occur, they usually mimic pacemaker infection, which results in multiple device replacements and increased morbidity burden. Here we present a 40-year-old female with pacemaker insertion due to complete heart block and who had multiple device replacements because of allergic sensitivity to various pacemaker component-encasing materials, confirmed by allergic testing to these materials. She had complete resolution of her symptoms after replacement with gold-plated device, to which she was not allergic.

  15. Processing of sub- and supra-second intervals in the primate brain results from the calibration of neuronal oscillators via sensory, motor and feedback processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daya Shankar Gupta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The processing of time intervals in the sub- to supra-second range by the brain is critical for the interaction of primates with their surroundings in activities, such as foraging and hunting. For an accurate processing of time intervals by the brain, representation of the physical time within neuronal circuits is necessary. I propose that time-dimension of the physical surrounding is represented in the brain by different types of neuronal oscillators, generating spikes or spike bursts at regular intervals. The proposed oscillators include the pacemaker neurons, tonic inputs and synchronized excitation and inhibition of inter-connected neurons. Oscillators, which are built inside various circuits of brain, help to form modular clocks, processing time intervals or other temporal characteristics specific to functions of a circuit. Relative or absolute duration is represented within neuronal oscillators by ‘neural temporal unit’, defined as the interval between regularly occurring spikes or spike bursts. Oscillator output is processed to produce changes in activities of neurons, named frequency modulator neuron, wired within a separate module, represented by the rate of change in frequency, and frequency of activities, proposed to encode time intervals. Inbuilt oscillators are calibrated by (a feedback processes (b input of time intervals resulting from rhythmic external sensory stimulation and (c synchronous effects of feedback processes and evoked sensory activity. A single active clock is proposed per circuit, which is calibrated by one or more mechanisms. Multiple calibration mechanisms, inbuilt oscillators and the presence of modular connections prevent a complete loss of interval timing functions of the brain.

  16. Swim pacemakers in box jellyfish are modulated by the visual input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Bielecki, Jan

    2008-01-01

    A major part of the cubozoan central nervous system is situated in the eye-bearing rhopalia. One of the neuronal output channels from the rhopalia carries a swim pacemaker signal, which has a one-to-one relation with the swim contractions of the bell shaped body. Given the advanced visual system ...... become more homogeneously distributed. A rise in intensity, on the other hand, produces a steep decline in the frequency and makes the ISIs highly variable. These electrophysiological data are correlated with behavioral observations from the natural habitat of the medusae....

  17. Activity-dependent changes in extracellular Ca2+ and K+ reveal pacemakers in the spinal locomotor-related network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocard, Frédéric; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Bouhadfane, Mouloud; Tazerart, Sabrina; Heinemann, Uwe; Rybak, Ilya A; Vinay, Laurent

    2013-03-20

    Changes in the extracellular ionic concentrations occur as a natural consequence of firing activity in large populations of neurons. The extent to which these changes alter the properties of individual neurons and the operation of neuronal networks remains unknown. Here, we show that the locomotor-like activity in the isolated neonatal rodent spinal cord reduces the extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) to 0.9 mM and increases the extracellular potassium ([K(+)]o) to 6 mM. Such changes in [Ca(2+)]o and [K(+)]o trigger pacemaker activities in interneurons considered to be part of the locomotor network. Experimental data and a modeling study show that the emergence of pacemaker properties critically involves a [Ca(2+)]o-dependent activation of the persistent sodium current (INaP). These results support a concept for locomotor rhythm generation in which INaP-dependent pacemaker properties in spinal interneurons are switched on and tuned by activity-dependent changes in [Ca(2+)]o and [K(+)]o.

  18. Dislocation of an infected and abandoned pacemaker lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulou, Anna G; Kyrzopoulos, Stamatios D; Livanis, Efthimios G

    2012-11-01

    We present a case of pacemaker lead dislodgment in an 83-year-old patient with a pacemaker infection. Initially, the generator and the proximal part of the leads were removed, and the remaining leads were severed and abandoned. Twenty-five days later, dislodgment of both abandoned leads and systemic infection were documented. The leads were then surgically removed without further complications.

  19. A NEW METHOD FOR DIAGRAMMING PACEMAKER/HEART INTERACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Advancements in technology have enhanced the performance of pacemakers but made the interaction between the pacemaker and the heart becoming increasingly complex, and its is difficult to interpret the paced ECGs (PGCGs). This paper introduces a brief method to interpret PECGs, which illustrate the timing intervals graphically and avoid using symbols and strings.

  20. A Formal Verification Methodology for DDD Mode Pacemaker Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Shuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pacemakers are safety-critical devices whose faulty behaviors can cause harm or even death. Often these faulty behaviors are caused due to bugs in programs used for digital control of pacemakers. We present a formal verification methodology that can be used to check the correctness of object code programs that implement the safety-critical control functions of DDD mode pacemakers. Our methodology is based on the theory of Well-Founded Equivalence Bisimulation (WEB refinement, where both formal specifications and implementation are treated as transition systems. We develop a simple and general formal specification for DDD mode pacemakers. We also develop correctness proof obligations that can be applied to validate object code programs used for pacemaker control. Using our methodology, we were able to verify a control program with millions of transitions against the simple specification with only 10 transitions. Our method also found several bugs during the verification process.

  1. Pacemaker implantation complication rates in elderly and young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan KS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kazim Serhan Özcan, Damirbek Osmonov, Servet Altay, Cevdet Dönmez, Ersin Yildirim, Ceyhan Türkkan, Baris Güngör, Ahmet Ekmekçi, Ahmet Taha Alper, Kadir Gürkan, İzzet ErdinlerDepartment of Cardiology, Siyami Ersek Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Center, Istanbul, TurkeyAims: To evaluate the complication rate differences between elderly and younger patients who receive a permanent pacemaker implantation.Methods: We reviewed all cases admitted to our institution between January 2008 and June 2009 with symptomatic bradyarrhythmia for whom a permanent pacemaker was implanted. Beginning in June 2009, we prospectively collected data from all patients with the same diagnosis and procedure. The frequency of complications due to the pacemaker implantation procedure was evaluated and compared between young (<70 years old and elderly (≥70 years old patients.Results: Among 574 patients with a permanent pacemaker, 259 patients (45.1% were below and 315 patients (54.9% were above or at 70 years of age. There were 240 (92.7% and 19 (7.3% dual-chamber pacemaker (DDD and single-chamber pacemaker (VVI implanted patients in the younger group, and 291 (76.8% and 73 (23.2% DDD and VVI pacemaker implanted patients in the elderly group, respectively. The complication rate was 39 (15.1% out of 259 young patients and 24 (7.6% out of 315 elderly patients. Postprocedural complications were statistically lower in the elderly patients than in younger patients (P = 0.005.Conclusion: A pacemaker implantation performed by an experienced operator is a safe procedure for patients of advanced age. The patients who are above 70 years old may have less complication rates than the younger patients.Keywords: complications of pacemaker implantation, elderly patients, permanent pacemaker

  2. A behavioral role for feature detection by sensory bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2006-10-11

    Brief episodes of high-frequency firing of sensory neurons, or bursts, occur in many systems, including mammalian auditory and visual systems, and are believed to signal the occurrence of particularly important stimulus features, i.e., to function as feature detectors. However, the behavioral relevance of sensory bursts has not been established in any system. Here, we show that bursts in an identified auditory interneuron of crickets reliably signal salient stimulus features and reliably predict behavioral responses. Our results thus demonstrate the close link between sensory bursts and behavior.

  3. Permanent cardiac pacemaker in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmahapatra, H K; Jamieson, M P; Brewster, G M; Doig, B; Pollock, J C

    1986-08-01

    Between October 1970 and November 1984, 26 infants and children aged 11 days to 18 years (mean 5.7 years) received 42 permanent cardiac pacemakers (26 primary implants, 16 re-implants) for congenital or surgically acquired heart block, bradycardia and sinus node dysfunction. Twenty-two patients had unipolar pacing and 4 bipolar pacing. Of 26 primary implantations, 2 had fixed rate epicardial pacing, 16 ventricular demand pacing (13 epicardial, 3 endocardial), 3 epicardial VAT (P-synchronous) pacing and 5 DDD (universal) pacing (4 epicardial, one endocardial). Fourteen patients required a further 19 operations for change of generators (16), ventricular lead (1), generator site (1) and generator encasing (1). Thirty-day hospital mortality was 11.5% (3/26), of which one death was possibly related to pacing failure. Four patients died during the follow-up period (3 months to 10 years; mean 3.4 years). Sixteen of the 19 survivors achieved complete symptomatic relief, without any medical therapy. Our results indicate that modern cardiac pacemaker systems are safe and reliable, and are associated with major relief of symptoms in this age group.

  4. Taming desynchronized bursting with delays in the Macaque cortical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qing-Yun; Murks Aleksandra; Perc Matja(z); Lu Qi-Shao

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory coupled bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons are considered as constitutive units of the Macaque cortical network. In the absence of information transmission delay the bursting activity is desynchronized, giving rise to spatiotemporally disordered dynamics. This paper shows that the introduction of finite delays can lead to the synchroization of bursting and thus to the emergence of coherent propagating fronts of excitation in the space-time domain.Moreover, it shows that the type of synchronous bursting is uniquely determined by the delay length, with the transitions from one type to the other occurring in a step-like manner depending on the delay. Interestingly, as the delay is tuned close to the transition points, the synchronization deteriorates, which implies the coexistence of different bursting attractors. These phenomena can be observed be different but fixed coupling strengths, thus indicating a new role for information transmission delays in realistic neuronal networks.

  5. [Blood supply as a factor regulating pacemaker activity of the rat uterine horn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, K V; Unanian, N G; Melkonian, N N

    2013-01-01

    Effect of ischemia of the uterine artery supplying with blood the main rhythmogenic zone (the ovarian region) of the uterine horn on parameters of activity both of this locus and of all subsequent pacemaker areas up to the uterine cervix was studied in non-pregnant rats. The most pronounced changes in characteristics of the activity (amplitude, frequency, and burst genesis duration) were revealed in the ovarian horn end. The uterine corpus and the horn cervical end were less affected by ischemia. Meanwhile, under these conditions, amplitude of the slow-wave oscillations rose more than 1.5 times. The obtained data allow us to conclude about the presence of a certain connection between the horn ovarian end and the uterine cervix. Morphological studies have revealed strong vascularization of the upper part of uterine horn.

  6. Modern perspectives on numerical modeling of cardiac pacemaker cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V; Stern, Michael D; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent "coupled-clock" theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age.

  7. Design and Implementation of programmable Cardiac Pacemaker Using VHDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omkar Dwivedi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pacemaker design has evolved very rapidly over the last several years. There has been a great deal of work in enhancing the programmability of pacemakers, to enable them to be programmed to work with different selected operating parameters, and indeed to work in different modes. In Taiwan, about 70%of cardiac pacemakerpatients are paced only from the ventricle with some pacing parameter programmability. This paper goal is to design a cardiac pacemaker with various NBG modes. A state machine approach has been followed to achieve the desired purpose. The pacemaker system is divide into three main sections i.e. controlling unit, sensing unit and pulse generator. In this paper we mainly concentrate on controlling unit and pulse generator. It has been developed using VHDL coding and implemented in hardware using FPGA. In a simple pacemaker process i.e. single chamber or dual chamber pacemaker, first an input signal or an event is detected in heart through leads. When the input signal is detected a timer generates a delay for approximately 0.8 sec. It is the time between two consecutive heartbeats, thus giving us 72 heartbeats per minute. Once the generated delay expires, sensing unit again start detecting a new event. If any event is detected we repeat the process of detection and waiting. If no event is detected we need to provide an electrical pulse to the heart and then repeat the whole process of detection and waiting. The code has been optimized and modified for different pacemaker modes.

  8. The National Survey of Cardiac Pacemakers and Cardioverter Defibrillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamrerza Shafieian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Permanent pacemakers provide effective relief of symptoms and are life-saving in patients with symptomatic heart block. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD are also increasingly recognized as life-saving tools in various groups of patients with malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Methods: As part of the “world survey on pacemaker and ICD implantations”, a survey of all device implantations in Iran during the year 2001 was performed. Data was collected and cross-checked through three sources i.e. direct contact with implanting physicians, pacemaker companies and the governmental pacemaker distributing body.Results: During the year studied, 1635 patients received permanent pacemakers. 88% were new implants at an estimated rate of 24 per million population. The mean age of patients was 65 years and 56.2% were male. 40 cardiologists and 19 surgeons implanted the pacemakers at 27 centers throughout the country. Complete heart block was consistently the most common indication at all centers (mean 56.1%, sick sinus syndrome being the next most common one (mean 20.8%. 69% of the pacemakers were single chamber pacemakers. Transvenous insertion of bipolar steroid-eluting passive fixation leads was the predominant practice at most centers. A total of 60 ICDs were implanted at 7 centers by 9 cardiologists. 45% of ICD implants were dual chamber devices.Conclusion: The survey is the only one available right now and provides useful information about the prevailing pacemaker and defibrillator implantation practice in Iran. Future surveys would be facilitated if a standardized implant registry such as that used in Europe were established in this country.

  9. Routine chest radiography after permanent pacemaker implantation: Is it necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Chest radiographs (CXRs are performed routinely after permanent pacemaker implantation to identify pacemaker lead position and exclude pneumothorax. We assessed the clinical value and need for this procedure. Design: Retrospective analysis of pacemaker data and CXRs following permanent pacemaker insertion between December 2002 and February 2004. Materials and Methods: Post-procedural CXRs were available in 125/126 consecutive patients after either first endocardial pacemaker implantation or insertion of at least one new lead. Subclavian vein puncture was used for venous access in all cases. CXRs were examined to establish the incidence of pneumothorax and assess pacing lead positions. The clinical records were examined in all patients who had subsequent CXRs or a further pacemaker procedure to identify the indication for these and to establish whether CXR had influenced patient management. Results: In total, 192 post-procedural CXRs were performed, either postero-anterior (PA and/or lateral views. Ventricular and/or atrial pacing lead contour and electrode position was considered radiographically appropriate in 86% CXRs. Fourteen per cent of post-procedural radiographs were considered to have radiologically sub-optimal pacemaker lead positioning. None of the patients with these "abnormal" radiographs experienced subsequent pacemaker complications or had further radiographs recorded at a later date. Later repeat CXRs were performed in 16 patients (13% but only 3 patients (2% had pacing abnormalities as the primary indication. All three had satisfactory pacing lead position on initial post-implantation and later radiographs, but required further procedures for lead re-positioning. Iatrogenic pneumothorax occurred in one patient (incidence 0.8% in our series. CXR confirmed the clinical diagnosis and allowed an assessment of size to guide treatment. Conclusion: Routine CXR after permanent pacemaker insertion is not necessary in

  10. Acute pericarditis with cardiac tamponade induced by pacemaker implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingaki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-11-01

    An 87-year-old woman was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular block and underwent pacemaker implantation. On postoperative day 12, she experienced cardiac tamponade that was suspected on computed tomography to be caused by lead perforation; therefore, we performed open-heart surgery. However, we could not identify a perforation site on the heart, and drained a 400-mL exudative pericardial effusion. Subsequently, we diagnosed the pericardial effusion as due to pericarditis induced by pacemaker implantation. It is sometimes difficult to distinguish pericarditis from pacemaker lead perforation, so both should be included in the differential diagnosis.

  11. [Pacemaker implantation in dogs: results of the last 30 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, L; Chetboul, V; Nicolle, A; Carlos, C; Borenstein, N; Pouchelon, J L

    2004-07-01

    Pacemaker implantation in veterinary practice is still not well known and remains uncommon. However, this technique is the only possible way to cure animals suffering from symptomatic bradycardia whose state does not improve with a medical treatment. In most cases, the use of pacemakers in veterinary medicine leads to the disappearance of the clinical and electrocardiographic signs. This retrospective study concerning the last 30 years draws up an evaluation of the improvements, advantages and drawbacks of this method. Moreover, this study allows the understanding of the evolution of pacemakers' use in veterinary cardiology.

  12. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C. Y.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The absorbed dose due to neutrons by a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes a patient that must be treated by radiotherapy with a linear accelerator; the pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. When the Linac is working in Bremsstrahlung mode an undesirable neutron field is produced due to photoneutron reactions; these neutrons could damage the CMOS putting the patient at risk during the radiotherapy treatment. In order to estimate the neutron dose in the CMOS a Monte Carlo calculation was carried out where a full radiotherapy vault room was modeled with a W-made spherical shell in whose center was located the source term of photoneutrons produced by a Linac head operating in Bremsstrahlung mode at 18 MV. In the calculations a phantom made of tissue equivalent was modeled while a beam of photoneutrons was applied on the phantom prostatic region using a field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}. During simulation neutrons were isotropically transported from the Linac head to the phantom chest, here a 1 {theta} x 1 cm{sup 2} cylinder made of polystyrene was modeled as the CMOS, where the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose were estimated. Main damages to CMOS are by protons produced during neutron collisions protective cover made of H-rich materials, here the neutron spectrum that reach the CMOS was calculated showing a small peak around 0.1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, both connected through epithermal neutrons. (Author)

  13. Burst Mechanisms in Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Knobloch, E

    1999-01-01

    Different mechanisms believed to be responsible for the generation of bursts in hydrodynamical systems are reviewed and a new mechanism capable of generating regular or irregular bursts of large dynamic range near threshold is described. The new mechanism is present in the interaction between oscillatory modes of odd and even parity in systems of large but finite aspect ratio, and provides an explanation for the bursting behavior observed in binary fluid convection. Additional applications of the new mechanism are proposed.

  14. Propeller tone bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succi, G. P.; Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1983-01-01

    Intense high frequency (25-38 kHz) tone bursts have been observed in acoustic tests of a scale model of a general aviation propeller. The amplitude of the tone burst is approximately equal to the amplitude of the propeller noise signature. The conditions necessary for the production of these tone bursts are described. The experiments indicate that the origin of these bursts is a periodic flow oscillation on the suction surface of the propeller blade tips which may be due to the interaction between an oscillating shock wave and a laminar boundary layer.

  15. The structure and size of sensory bursts encode stimulus information but only size affects behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2010-04-01

    Cricket ultrasound avoidance is a classic model system for neuroethology. Avoidance steering is triggered by high-firing-rate bursts of spikes in the auditory command neuron AN2. Although bursting is common among sensory neurons, and although the detailed structure of bursts may encode information about the stimulus, it is as yet unclear whether this information is decoded. We address this question in two ways: from an information coding point of view, by showing the relationship between stimulus and burst structure; and also from a functional point of view by showing the relationship between burst structure and behavior. We conclude that the burst structure carries detailed temporal information about the stimulus but that this has little impact on the behavioral response, which is affected mainly by burst size.

  16. Impact of Pacemaker Lead Characteristics on Pacemaker Related Infection and Heart Perforation: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Lin

    Full Text Available Several risk factors for pacemaker (PM related complications have been reported. However, no study has investigated the impact of lead characteristics on pacemaker-related complications.Patients who received a new pacemaker implant from January 1997 to December 2011 were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. This population was grouped according to the pacemaker lead characteristics in terms of fixation and insulation. The impact of the characteristics of leads on early heart perforation was analyzed by multivariable logistic regression analysis, while the impact of the lead characteristics on early and late infection and late heart perforation over a three-year period were analyzed using Cox regression. This study included 36,104 patients with a mean age of 73.4±12.5 years. In terms of both early and late heart perforations, there were no significant differences between groups across the different types of fixation and insulations. In the multivariable Cox regression analysis, the pacemaker-related infection rate was significantly lower in the active fixation only group compared to either the both fixation (OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07-0.80; P = 0.020 or the passive fixation group (OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.83; P = 0.023.There was no difference in heart perforation between active and passive fixation leads. Active fixation leads were associated with reduced risk of pacemaker-related infection.

  17. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  18. Rhythm Synchronization of Coupled Neurons with Temporal Coding Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xia; LU Qi-Shao

    2007-01-01

    Encoding information by firing patterns is one of the basic neural functions, and synchronization is important collective behaviour of a group of coupled neurons. Taking account of two schemes for encoding information (that is, rate coding and temporal coding), rhythm synchronization of coupled neurons is studied. There are two types of rhythm synchronization of neurons: spike and burst synchronizations. Firstly, it is shown that the spike synchronization is equivalent to the phase synchronization for coupled neurons. Secondly, the similarity function of the slow variables of neurons, which have relevant to the bursting process, is proposed to judge the burst synchronization. It is also found that the burst synchronization can be achieved more easily than the spike synchronization, whatever the firing patterns of the neurons are. Hence the temporal encoding scheme, which is closely related to both the spike and burst synchronizations, is more comprehensive than the rate coding scheme in essence.

  19. Bifurcation transitions in gap-junction-coupled neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Annabelle; Harris, Allison L.; Follmann, Rosangela; Rosa, Epaminondas

    2016-10-01

    Here we investigate transitions occurring in the dynamical states of pairs of distinct neurons electrically coupled, with one neuron tonic and the other bursting. Depending on the dynamics of the individual neurons, and for strong enough coupling, they synchronize either in a tonic or a bursting regime, or initially tonic transitioning to bursting via a period doubling cascade. Certain intrinsic properties of the individual neurons such as minimum firing rates are carried over into the dynamics of the coupled neurons affecting their ultimate synchronous state.

  20. Pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1996-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described a century ago as primitive neurons in the intestines. Through the years, ICC have been mistaken for neurons, glial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. We identified ICC in the musculature of mouse small intestine by their char......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described a century ago as primitive neurons in the intestines. Through the years, ICC have been mistaken for neurons, glial cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. We identified ICC in the musculature of mouse small intestine...... patterns; characteristic patterns of contact with smooth muscle cells) and ultrastructure (myoid features: basal lamina, caveolae, rich in sER and mitochondria, often prominent filament bundles and dense bands/bodies) has allowed the identification of ICC in the GI musculature of all species investigated...

  1. Dual chamber pacemaker in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađen Goran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent cardiac dysrhythmia. The aim of this study was to show the role and the efficacy of a dual chamber pacemaker with the algorithm of atrial dynamic overdrive, in the suppression of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Case report. A woman with a classical bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome, and frequent attacks of atrial fibrillation, underwent the implantation of a single chamber permanent pacemaker (VVI. Pacemaker successfully treated the episodes of symptomatic bradycardia, but the patient had frequent attacks of atrial fibrillation, despite the use of different antiarrhythmic drugs, which she did not tolerate well. The decision was made to reimplant a permanent dual chamber pacemaker with the algorithm of atrial dynamic overdrive. The pacemaker was programmed to the basic rate of 75/min, while rate at rest was 55/min. In addition, sotalol was administered. After three months, the patient became asymptomatic with only 4 short − term episodes of atrial fibrillation, and a high level of atrial pacing (99%. Conclusion. In selected patients with bradycardia−tachycardia syndrome, atrial-based pacing seemed to be very effective in reducing the incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

  2. Patients exposure from fluoroscopic guided pacemaker implantation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkhorayef, M.; Babikir, E. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O. Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Daar, E. [University of Jordan, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Amman 11942 (Jordan); Alnaaimi, M.; Alduaij, M. [Kuwait Cancer Control Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shwiekh (Kuwait); Bradley, D., E-mail: malkhorayef@ksu.edu.sa [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    A pacemaker, which is used for heart re synchronization with electrical impulses, is used to manage many clinical conditions. Recently, the frequency of the pacemaker implantation procedures increased 50% worldwide. During this procedure, patients and staff can be exposed to excessive radiation exposure. Wide range of doses was reported in previous studies, suggesting that optimization of this procedure is not fulfilled yet. This study aims to evaluate the patient and staff radiation doses during cardiac pacemaker procedure and quantify the patient effective dose. A total of 145 procedures were performed for five pacemakers procedures (VVI, VVIR, VVD, VVDR and DDDR) two hospitals were evaluated. Patients doses were measured using the kerma-area product meter. Effective doses were estimated using software based on Monte Carlo simulation from National Radiological Protection Board. The effective dose values were used to estimate the cancer risk from pacemaker procedure. Patients demographic data, exposure parameters for both fluoroscopy and radiography were quantified. The mean patients doses (Gy. cm{sup 2}) for VVI, VVIR, VVD, VVDR and DDDR was 1.52±0.13 (1.43-1.61), 3.28±2.34 (0.29-8.73), 3.04±1.67 (1.57-4.86), 6.04±2.326 and 19.2±3.6 (5.43-30.2), respectively, per procedure. The overall patients effective dose is 1.1 mSv per procedure. (Author)

  3. Effects of irradiation on the components of implantable pacemakers

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamura, S; Kuga, N; Shiba, T; Hirose, T; Fujimoto, H; Toyoshima, T; Hyodo, K; Matoba, M

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of irradiation on implantable pacemaker components. The pacemaker was divided into three components: lead wire and electrode, battery, and electrical circuit, and each component was irradiated by X-ray and electron beams, respectively. The pacemaker parameters were measured by both telemetry data of the programmer and directly measured data from the output terminal. The following results were obtained. For the lead wire and electrode, there was no effect on the pacemaker function due to irradiation by X-ray and electron beams. In the case of battery irradiation, there was no change in battery voltage or current up to 236 Gy X-ray dose. In the electrical circuit, the pacemaker reverted to the regular beating rate (fixed-rate mode) immediately after the start of X-ray irradiation, and it continued in this mode during irradiation. In patients with their own heartbeat rhythm, changing to the fixed-rate mode may cause dangerous conditions such as ventricular fib...

  4. The interaction of intrinsic dynamics and network topology in determining network burst synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiteri, Chris; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), within the mammalian respiratory brainstem, represents an ideal system for investigating the synchronization properties of complex neuronal circuits via the interaction of cell-type heterogeneity and network connectivity. In isolation, individual respiratory neurons from the pre-BötC may be tonically active, rhythmically bursting, or quiescent. Despite this intrinsic heterogeneity, coupled networks of pre-BötC neurons en bloc engage in synchronized bursting that can drive inspiratory motor neuron activation. The region's connection topology has been recently characterized and features dense clusters of cells with occasional connections between clusters. We investigate how the dynamics of individual neurons (quiescent/bursting/tonic) and the betweenness centrality of neurons' positions within the network connectivity graph interact to govern network burst synchrony, by simulating heterogeneous networks of computational model pre-BötC neurons. Furthermore, we compare the prevalence and synchrony of bursting across networks constructed with a variety of connection topologies, analyzing the same collection of heterogeneous neurons in small-world, scale-free, random, and regularly structured networks. We find that several measures of network burst synchronization are determined by interactions of network topology with the intrinsic dynamics of neurons at central network positions and by the strengths of synaptic connections between neurons. Surprisingly, despite the functional role of synchronized bursting within the pre-BötC, we find that synchronized network bursting is generally weakest when we use its specific connection topology, which leads to synchrony within clusters but poor coordination across clusters. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of interactions between topology and intrinsic dynamics in shaping the activity of networks and the concerted effects of connectivity patterns and dynamic heterogeneities.

  5. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  6. Surgical Removal of a Giant Vegetation on Permanent Endocavitary Pacemaker Wire and Lead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-tao Ma; Qi Miao; Chao-ji Zhang; Li-hua Cao

    2011-01-01

    PACEMAKER lead infections are rare.There are only about 0.4%-1.1% of the patients who have been implanted permanent pacemakers suffering from serious infections which lead to endocarditis.1 Generally,removal of the infected pacemaker wire and lead,long-term anti-infection therapy,and implantation of a new pacemaker to another anatomic site are accepted approaches for these patients.

  7. 77 FR 37573 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for an Implantable Pacemaker Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Approval for an Implantable Pacemaker Pulse Generator AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... protocol (PDP) for implantable pacemaker pulse generators. The Agency has summarized its findings regarding... PMA or notice of completion of a PDP for the implantable pacemaker pulse generator. In accordance...

  8. Pacemaker patients' perception of unsafe activities: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafquat Azam

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac pacing is a recognized and widely used treatment for patients presenting with bradycardia. Physicians expect patients to return to normal activities almost immediately post implantation. However, patients themselves may perceive interference to pacemaker function by various routine activities and devices, and hence continue to lead restricted, disabled lives. The aim of this study is to determine if routine activities are perceived by pacemaker patients to interfere with their device function. Methods A descriptive cross sectional survey was carried out on consecutive patients at the pacemaker clinic at a public hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. A 47-question tool was developed and tested. Patients' perceptions of safety of performing various routine activities, along with socio-demographic data were recorded. Results The final sample included 93 adult patients (45% males. 41% were illiterate. 77.4% recalled receiving counselling at implantation, predominantly from the implanting physician and house staff. A considerable proportion of patients considered many routine activities unsafe including driving automobiles (28%, passing through metal detectors (31%, bending over (37%, and sleeping on the side of the pacemaker (30%. Also considered unsafe were operation of household appliances- TV/VCR (television/video cassette recorders (53%, irons (55% and electrical wall switches (56%. For nearly all variables neither literacy nor history of counselling improved incorrect perceptions. Conclusion This study shows that our pacemaker patients perceive many routine activities as unsafe, potentially leading to disabling life style modifications. The tremendous investment in pacemaker technology to improve patient performance is not going to pay dividends if patients continue to remain disabled due to incorrect perceptions. Further studies are required to determine the reasons for these misperceptions, and to determine if these

  9. Understanding Synchrony and Stochasticity in Coupled Neuronal and Genetic Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    seminars at the University of Chicago, University of Alabama at Birmingham, the World Congress of Chronobiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Our...SCN),  the  central  circadian  pacemakers  in   mammals ,   comprise  a  multiscale  neuronal  system  that  times

  10. Successful management of late right ventricular perforation after pacemaker implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir K Bigdeli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amir K Bigdeli1, Andres Beiras-Fernandez1, Ingo Kaczmarek1, Christian Kowalski2, Michael Schmoeckel1, Bruno Reichart11Department of Cardiac Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Complications of pacemaker implantation include myocardial perforation, venous thrombosis, vegetations of the tricuspid valve or pacing lead, and tricuspid regurgitation. We report a patient presenting with a case of delayed ventricular lead perforation through the right ventricle. The lead was uneventfully extracted under transesophageal echocardiographic observation in the operating room with cardiac surgery backup.Keywords: pacemaker, lead perforation, complication

  11. L-calcium channel involving the generation and maintenance of bursting firing in rat substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons%L-钙离子通道参与大鼠黑质致密部多巴胺能神经元暴发式放电模式产生和维持的机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛伟宁; 王元; 李志方; 孙彬彬; 刘力学; 张乐石; 樊双义

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of calcium channel in the mechanism of the generation and maintenance of bursting firing of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) dopaminergic neurons in rats.Methods Using the patch clamp technique,we observed the firing pattern switching features after adding 10 μmol/L N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA),compared the changes of whole-calcium current and L-type calcium current with or without NMDA,and analyzed the correlation between the generation of burst firing and L-type calcium channel activation.Results After NMDA treatment,the firing pattern of SNc dopaminergic neurons changed to burst firing,which was compromised by a charastistic high plateau potential and series of action potential on it.The current density of L-type calcium current increased significantly after adding NMDA,which,from (2.86 ±0.26) pA/pF (n =28),significantly increased to (3.75 ± 0.18) pA/pF (n =34 ; t =7.52,P =0.002 8).The high plateau potential was almost abolished with the application of verapamil,a specific antagonist of L-type calcium channel.Consiusion NMDA could induce the firing pattern changed to burst firing in SNc dopaminergic neurons,while L-type calcium channel contributes to the process of generation and maintenance of burst firing.%目的 研究钙离子通道对大鼠黑质致密部(SNc)多巴胺能神经元暴发式放电模式产生和维持的机制.方法 应用全细胞膜片钳的方法,施加N-甲基-D-天冬氨酸(NMDA)诱导神经元放电模式转变,观察并记录其相应放电模式的特点,记录并比较加入10 μmol/L NMDA前后全钙离子流和L-钙电流的变化情况,通过外液加入河豚毒素、维拉帕米、氯化镍后,分析暴发式放电产生和维持与L-钙通道激活之间的联系.结果 加入NMDA后神经元放电模式转变为暴发式放电,该暴发式放电为平台电位及其上的动作电位构成;L-钙通道电流密度峰值在加入NMDA后明显增加,从(2.86±0.26) pA/pF(n =28)增加到(3

  12. Detection of bursts and pauses in spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, D; Wilson, C J; Lobb, C J; Paladini, C A

    2012-10-15

    Midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vivo exhibit a wide range of firing patterns. They normally fire constantly at a low rate, and speed up, firing a phasic burst when reward exceeds prediction, or pause when an expected reward does not occur. Therefore, the detection of bursts and pauses from spike train data is a critical problem when studying the role of phasic dopamine (DA) in reward related learning, and other DA dependent behaviors. However, few statistical methods have been developed that can identify bursts and pauses simultaneously. We propose a new statistical method, the Robust Gaussian Surprise (RGS) method, which performs an exhaustive search of bursts and pauses in spike trains simultaneously. We found that the RGS method is adaptable to various patterns of spike trains recorded in vivo, and is not influenced by baseline firing rate, making it applicable to all in vivo spike trains where baseline firing rates vary over time. We compare the performance of the RGS method to other methods of detecting bursts, such as the Poisson Surprise (PS), Rank Surprise (RS), and Template methods. Analysis of data using the RGS method reveals potential mechanisms underlying how bursts and pauses are controlled in DA neurons.

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Subthreshold Resonant Properties in Pyloric Dilator Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Vazifehkhah Ghaffari, Babak; Kouhnavard, Mojgan; Aihara, Takeshi; Kitajima, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response) to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD) neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neur...

  14. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimization of cardiac pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Chris; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Mereacre, Alexandru; Paoletti, Nicola; Patane, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Implantable cardiac pacemakers are medical devices that can monitor and correct abnormal heart rhythms. To provide the necessary safety assurance for pacemaker software, both testing and verification of the code, as well as testing the entire pacemaker hardware in the loop, is necessary. In this paper, we present a hardware testbed that enables detailed hardware-in-the-loop simulation and energy optimisation of pacemaker algorithms with respect to a heart model. Both the heart and the pacemaker models are encoded in Simulink/Stateflow™ and translated into executable code, with the pacemaker executed directly on the microcontroller. We evaluate the usefulness of the testbed by developing a parameter synthesis algorithm which optimises the timing parameters based on power measurements acquired in real-time. The experiments performed on real measurements successfully demonstrate that the testbed is capable of energy minimisation in real-time and obtains safe pacemaker timing parameters.

  15. [Telemedicine in pacemaker therapy and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchert, A

    2009-12-01

    Present-day remote systems for cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide, in contrast to previous solutions, a broad range of data about the patient and the implanted device ("remote control"). Telemedicine includes remote monitoring as well as remote follow-up: Remote monitoring is the continual interrogation of the device to detect patient- or device-related adverse events earlier than with standard follow-up visits. Remote follow-up aims to replace scheduled and unscheduled face-to-face follow-up visits due to the interrogation of the automatic pacemaker functions. Currently available remote systems, such as Home Monitoring, CareLink, Merlin.net, and Latitude, have in common that they interrogate the device, send these data to a server, and provide the data to the physician on a secured web site. Automatic wireless interrogation of the device is the preferred solution; however, the devices must have been equipped with a micro-antenna, which is usually restricted to more recent pacemaker models. Knowledge about remote control in pacemaker patients is limited, because most remote applications were evaluated in ICD and CRT patients. While the most frequently reported clinical event in pacemaker patients is atrial fibrillation, the impact in routine clinical follow-up still has to be evaluated in detail. Device-related adverse events are rare. Large, long-term, randomized trials are comparing remote and conventional approaches with the aim of demonstrating the benefits of telemedicine in this patient group.

  16. Pacemaker Related Infective Endocarditis from Staphylococcus Lugdunensis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ward

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a common skin flora not typically associated with infection. There are, however, several cases reported in the literature of Staphylococcus lugdunensis as a causative bacterium of various infections. This paper reports an additional case of pacemaker associated endocarditis with Staphylococcus lugdunensis as the causative bacterium.

  17. [Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis in a patient with a biventricular pacemaker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, José M; Fariñas, María C; Rodilla, Irene G; Salesa, Ricardo; de Berrazueta, José R

    2005-05-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis is one of the rarest and severest complications in cardiological patients. We describe a patient with an intracardial pacemaker who was diagnosed as having Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis. Postmortem examination showed a large, Aspergillus-infected thrombus encased in the right ventricle, pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary branches.

  18. Pacemaker dislocation - Truly ectopic activation necessitating surgical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kroon, TL; Witsenburg, M; Bogerts, AJJC

    2002-01-01

    Intra-abdominal migration of a generator from an epicardial pacemaker system is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We report on a case of a 2-year-old child in whom the generator silently migrated from the sheath of the rectus abdominis muscle in the upper abdominal wall down into

  19. Can Brain 'Pacemaker' Improve Lives of Head Trauma Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 161109.html Can Brain 'Pacemaker' Improve Lives of Head Trauma Patients? Deep brain stimulation appears to boost function and quality of life, small study finds To use the sharing ... that's implanted from the head, under the skin, through the neck and shoulders ...

  20. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  1. Putative pacemakers in the eyestalk and brain of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii show circadian oscillations in levels of mRNA for crustacean hyperglycemic hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janikua Nelson-Mora

    Full Text Available Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH synthesizing cells in the optic lobe, one of the pacemakers of the circadian system, have been shown to be present in crayfish. However, the presence of CHH in the central brain, another putative pacemaker of the multi-oscillatory circadian system, of this decapod and its circadian transcription in the optic lobe and brain have yet to be explored. Therefore, using qualitative and quantitative PCR, we isolated and cloned a CHH mRNA fragment from two putative pacemakers of the multi-oscillatory circadian system of Procambarus clarkii, the optic lobe and the central brain. This CHH transcript synchronized to daily light-dark cycles and oscillated under dark, constant conditions demonstrating statistically significant daily and circadian rhythms in both structures. Furthermore, to investigate the presence of the peptide in the central brain of this decapod, we used immunohistochemical methods. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of CHH-IR in fibers and cells of the protocerebral and tritocerebal clusters and neuropiles, particularly in some neurons located in clusters 6, 14, 15 and 17. The presence of CHH positive neurons in structures of P. clarkii where clock proteins have been reported suggests a relationship between the circadian clockwork and CHH. This work provides new insights into the circadian regulation of CHH, a pleiotropic hormone that regulates many physiological processes such as glucose metabolism and osmoregulatory responses to stress.

  2. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  3. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  4. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  5. The Glast Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBK is a collaboration between Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Huntsville, Alabama, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The purpose of the GBM is to extend energy coverage below the main instrument's lower limit of about 20 MeV, and to provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors. This combination provides energy coverage from a few keV up to about 30 MeV.

  6. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  7. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  8. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination.

  9. Pregnancy in sick sinus syndrome with pacemaker - two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, T; Begum, F; Akhter, N; Sharmin, F

    2013-04-01

    Sick sinus syndrome is a generalized abnormality of cardiac impulse formation that may be caused by extrinsic causes or by intrinsic disease of the sinus node making it unable to perform pace making function. It can be manifested for the first time in pregnancy. First case was diagnosed as sick sinus syndrome at 8 weeks of gestation having Mobitz type I heart block (Wenckebach block), and needed temporary pacemaker during caesarean section. Second case was diagnosed at 24 weeks of gestation having complete heart block and needed permanent pacemaker at 38 weeks of gestation due to exaggeration of the symptoms. Both the cases were dealt successfully by caesarean section under general anesthesia in close collaboration with cardiologists and anesthesiologists.

  10. Transient apical dyskinesia with a pacemaker: Electrocardiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Feltes, Gisela I; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Biagioni, Corina; De Agustín, J Alberto; Vivas, David; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Transient apical dyskinesia syndromes present features similar to acute coronary syndromes, but with normal coronary arteries and rapid complete resolution of wall motion alterations. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of typical chest pain at rest after her brother's death. She had had a pacemaker implanted in 2001. Troponin levels were elevated and apical hypokinesia was shown by ventriculography and echocardiography, with normal coronary arteries. Evolving ECG alterations were observed in spite of the continued pacing rhythm. All these alterations were fully resolved after discharge. This case shows that, even in the presence of a pacemaker, evolving ECG alterations can be observed in Takotsubo syndrome.

  11. [Representations, myths, and behaviors among Chagas disease patients with pacemakers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Claudia; Oliveira, Bruna Guimarães; Gontijo, Eliane Dias

    2007-07-01

    This anthropological study aimed to evaluate the incorporation of pacemakers into the lives of individuals with Chagas disease. An ethnographic methodology was used, based on an open interview focusing on the personal perceptions of 15 patients with chronic Chagas cardiopathy who had required pacemaker implants at the Federal University Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. As part of a broader quality of life analysis, the study investigated the cultural, physical, and psychological resources used by patients to confront, explain, and accept the disease process, including mental representations on the cultural perception of the illness and definition of social relations. The study was intended to contribute to comprehensive patient care by health professionals, including psychosocial aspects. Decoded and integrated orientation in the cultural sphere assumes an important role in order to prevent disinformation from perpetuating the dissemination of popular myths as active elements in patient stigmatization.

  12. Role of persistent sodium current in bursting activity of mouse neocortical networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Wim; Koch, Henner; Elsen, Frank P; Lee, Hyong C; Mrejeru, Ana; Doren, Erin; Marcuccilli, Charles J; Hereld, Mark; Stevens, Rick L; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2006-11-01

    Most types of electrographic epileptiform activity can be characterized by isolated or repetitive bursts in brain electrical activity. This observation is our motivation to determine mechanisms that underlie bursting behavior of neuronal networks. Here we show that the persistent sodium (Na(P)) current in mouse neocortical slices is associated with cellular bursting and our data suggest that these cells are capable of driving networks into a bursting state. This conclusion is supported by the following observations. 1) Both low concentrations of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and riluzole reduce and eventually stop network bursting while they simultaneously abolish intrinsic bursting properties and sensitivity levels to electrical stimulation in individual intrinsically bursting cells. 2) The sensitivity levels of regular spiking neurons are not significantly affected by riluzole or TTX at the termination of network bursting. 3) Propagation of cellular bursting in a neuronal network depended on excitatory connectivity and disappeared on bath application of CNQX (20 microM) + CPP (10 microM). 4) Voltage-clamp measurements show that riluzole (20 microM) and very low concentrations of TTX (50 nM) attenuate Na(P) currents in the neural membrane within a 1-min interval after bath application of the drug. 5) Recordings of synaptic activity demonstrate that riluzole at this concentration does not affect synaptic properties. 6) Simulations with a neocortical network model including different types of pyramidal cells, inhibitory interneurons, neurons with and without Na(P) currents, and recurrent excitation confirm the essence of our experimental observations that Na(P) conductance can be a critical factor sustaining slow population bursting.

  13. Identification and functional characterization of cardiac pacemaker cells in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Tessadori

    Full Text Available In the mammalian heart a conduction system of nodes and conducting cells generates and transduces the electrical signals evoking myocardial contractions. Specialized pacemaker cells initiating and controlling cardiac contraction rhythmicity are localized in an anatomically identifiable structure of myocardial origin, the sinus node. We previously showed that in mammalian embryos sinus node cells originate from cardiac progenitors expressing the transcription factors T-box transcription factor 3 (Tbx3 and Islet-1 (Isl1. Although cardiac development and function are strikingly conserved amongst animal classes, in lower vertebrates neither structural nor molecular distinguishable components of a conduction system have been identified, questioning its evolutionary origin. Here we show that zebrafish embryos lacking the LIM/homeodomain-containing transcription factor Isl1 display heart rate defects related to pacemaker dysfunction. Moreover, 3D reconstructions of gene expression patterns in the embryonic and adult zebrafish heart led us to uncover a previously unidentified, Isl1-positive and Tbx2b-positive region in the myocardium at the junction of the sinus venosus and atrium. Through their long interconnecting cellular protrusions the identified Isl1-positive cells form a ring-shaped structure. In vivo labeling of the Isl1-positive cells by transgenic technology allowed their isolation and electrophysiological characterization, revealing their unique pacemaker activity. In conclusion we demonstrate that Isl1-expressing cells, organized as a ring-shaped structure around the venous pole, hold the pacemaker function in the adult zebrafish heart. We have thereby identified an evolutionary conserved, structural and molecular distinguishable component of the cardiac conduction system in a lower vertebrate.

  14. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics.

  15. Effects of Lubiprostone on Pacemaker Activity of Interstitial Cells of Cajal from the Mouse Colon

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Han-Yi; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ki, Jung Suk; Ryu, Kwon Ho; Choi, Seok; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2014-01-01

    Lubiprostone is a chloride (Cl-) channel activator derived from prostaglandin E1 and used for managing constipation. In addition, lubiprostone affects the activity of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells that generate slow-wave activity in smooth muscles. We studied the effects of lubiprostone on the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to determine the pacemaker activity in cultured colonic ICCs ...

  16. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. (Winthrop-Univ. Hospital, Mineola, NY (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  17. Reuse of pacemakers, defibrillators and cardiac resynchronisation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, R; Satheesh, Santhosh; Ananthakrishna Pillai, Ajith; Sagnol, Pascal; Jouven, Xavier; Dodinot, Bernard; Balachander, Jayaraman

    2017-01-01

    Objective Access to pacemakers remains poor among many patients in low/middle-income countries. Reuse of explanted pacemakers is a possible solution, but is still not widespread because of concerns regarding outcomes, especially infection. Our objective was to study early outcomes with implants using reused devices and compare them with those with implants using new devices. Methods We studied all patients who underwent implantation of a new or reused pacemaker, cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) device or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in the last 5 years at a single institution. We analysed outcomes related to infection, device malfunction and device-related death within 6 months after initial implantation. Results During the study period, 887 patients underwent device implant, including 127 CRT devices or ICDs. Of these, 260 devices (29.3%) were reused and the others were new. At 6 months, there were three device-related infections in implants using a new device. There were no infections among patients receiving a reused device. There were no device malfunctions or device-related deaths in either group. Conclusions We found no difference in rate of infection or device malfunction among patients getting a reused device as compared with those with a new device. This study reinforces the safety of reusing devices for implant including CRT and ICDs. PMID:28176981

  18. Isolating neural correlates of the pacemaker for food anticipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian David Blum

    Full Text Available Mice fed a single daily meal at intervals within the circadian range exhibit food anticipatory activity. Previous investigations strongly suggest that this behaviour is regulated by a circadian pacemaker entrained to the timing of fasting/refeeding. The neural correlate(s of this pacemaker, the food entrainable oscillator (FEO, whether found in a neural network or a single locus, remain unknown. This study used a canonical property of circadian pacemakers, the ability to continue oscillating after removal of the entraining stimulus, to isolate activation within the neural correlates of food entrainable oscillator from all other mechanisms driving food anticipatory activity. It was hypothesized that continued anticipatory activation of central nuclei, after restricted feeding and a return to ad libitum feeding, would elucidate a neural representation of the signaling circuits responsible for the timekeeping component of the food entrainable oscillator. Animals were entrained to a temporally constrained meal then placed back on ad libitum feeding for several days until food anticipatory activity was abolished. Activation of nuclei throughout the brain was quantified using stereological analysis of c-FOS expressing cells and compared against both ad libitum fed and food entrained controls. Several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei remained activated at the previous time of food anticipation, implicating them in the timekeeping mechanism necessary to track previous meal presentation. This study also provides a proof of concept for an experimental paradigm useful to further investigate the anatomical and molecular substrates of the FEO.

  19. Nursing procedure in the temporary transvenous pacemaker implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Teresa Redecillas Peiró

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The temporary transvenous pacemaker (MPTT implantation is a technique that consists in stimulating artificially the heart when the natural pacemaker is unable to maintain the rhythm and the appropiate frequency. This type of electric stimulation is carried out by means of an electrocateter that was implanted in the endocardium through a central vein connected to an external generator, requiring equipment and personal with specific abilities. It is commonly carried out in the intensive care units when a continuous temporary stimulation is suitable and in most cases it is carried out in situations of extreme medical urgency in critical and unstable patients. The nursing professionals play an important role in the whole procedure, becoming essential that they possess knowledge not only about technique and handling of the device but also on the performance in all its phases. This research work intends to be a practical reference that gathers those essential aspects for the development of this assistance practice including, in a detailed way, the nursing performance in the preparation, the implantation and the pursuit of the patients who a temporary transvenous pacemaker was placed in.

  20. Repetitive firing properties of medial pontine reticular formation neurones of the rat recorded in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, U; Greene, R W; McCarley, R W

    1989-03-01

    1. Intracellularly recorded neurones in nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis of the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) in the in vitro slice preparation were analysed for repetitive firing properties in response to intracellularly applied constant-current pulses. 2. Three neuronal classes were defined by this procedure: (1) non-burst neurones, which had only a non-burst firing pattern; (2) low-threshold burst neurones, which had either a low-threshold burst pattern or a non-burst pattern; (3) high-threshold burst neurones, which had either a high-threshold burst pattern or a non-burst pattern. 3. Histological characterization of electrophysiologically identified mPRF neurones with carboxyfluorescein showed no definite morphological difference between the first two classes. There was a trend for low-threshold burst neurones to have larger somata. 4. The low-threshold burst was generated by a slow calcium-dependent low-threshold spike, revealed in the presence of tetrodotoxin. The size of the low-threshold spike and thus the number of fast action potentials in the low-threshold burst was controlled by at least five factors including: activation; inactivation; amplitude of low-threshold conductance available to be activated; delayed outward conductance; and early transient outward conductance. 5. The non-burst pattern examined in both non-burst and low-threshold burst neurones appeared to be controlled primarily by one or more calcium-dependent potassium conductances sensitive to the removal of calcium and tetraethyl-ammonium. In the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), the addition of antagonists to calcium-dependent potassium current revealed a slow high-threshold calcium spike which was distinguished from the low-threshold spike by its threshold, lack of inactivation (at potentials negative to -40 mV) and insensitivity to Mg2+. A long-duration after-hyperpolarization (greater than 0.5 s) was not observed in any of these cells. 6. An early transient outward

  1. Impact of Dendritic Size and Dendritic Topology on Burst Firing in Pyramidal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Ronald A. J.; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    Neurons display a wide range of intrinsic firing patterns. A particularly relevant pattern for neuronal signaling and synaptic plasticity is burst firing, the generation of clusters of action potentials with short interspike intervals. Besides ion-channel composition, dendritic morphology appears to

  2. Permanent pacemaker lead induced severe tricuspid regurgitation in patient undergoing multiple valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Wook Sung

    2015-04-01

    Severe and permanent tricuspid regurgitation induced by pacemaker leads is rarely reported in the literature. The mechanism of pacemaker-induced tricuspid regurgitation has been identified, but its management has not been well established. Furthermore, debate still exists regarding the proper surgical approach. We present the case of a patient with severe tricuspid regurgitation induced by a pacemaker lead, accompanied by triple valve disease. The patient underwent double valve replacement and tricuspid valve repair without removal of the pre-existing pacemaker lead. The operation was successful and the surgical procedure is discussed in detail.

  3. Intra-SA-nodal pacemaker shifts induced by autonomic nerve stimulation in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, J M

    1975-10-01

    Pacemaker shifts in the canine heart were inferred during stimulation of thoracic cardiac nerves and following norepinephrine from changes in the initial site of activation of bipolar electrodes sutured over the rostral, middle, and caudal regions of the sinus node, over the internodal pathways, and His bundle. During control periods, pacemaker activity was localized within the sinoatrial (SA) node 87% of the time, with the middle electrode most frequently showing initial activation. Stimulation of the right-sympathetic nerves enhanced sinus node pacemaker dominance, shifting it rostrally within the node. Right-vagal stimulation shifted the pacemaker caudally within the SA node, to nonnodal sites, and to the lower atrioventricular node and His bundle. Left-sympathetic stimulation shifted the pacemaker caudally within the sinus node and enhanced pacemaker activity in the vicinity of the internodal pathway electrodes and His bundle. Dispersion of pacemaker activity was particularly apparent during stimulation of the ventrolateral cervical cardiac nerve. Stimulation of the left-vagal nerves produced effects similar to those of the left-sympathetic nerves. Norepinephrine enhanced pacemaker activity particularly in the rostral region of the sinus node. Slight shifts in pacemaker activity within the sinus node produced changes in pattern of atrial excitation.

  4. New Canards Bursting and Canards Periodic-Chaotic Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOOER Chi-Feng; XU Jian-Xue; ZHANG Xin-Hua

    2009-01-01

    A trajectory following the repelling branch of an equilibrium or a periodic orbit is called a canards solution. Using a continuation method, we find a new type of canards bursting which manifests itself in an alternation between the oscillation phase following attracting the limit cycle branch and resting phase following a repelling fixed point branch in a reduced leech neuron model. Via periodic-chaotic alternating of infinite times, the number of windings within a canards bursting can approach infinity at a Gavrilov-Shilnikov homoclinic tangency bifurcation of a simple saddle limit cycle.

  5. Dual PDF signaling pathways reset clocks via TIMELESS and acutely excite target neurons to control circadian behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Seluzicki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular circadian clocks are interconnected via neural networks. In Drosophila, PIGMENT-DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF acts as a master network regulator with dual functions in synchronizing molecular oscillations between disparate PDF(+ and PDF(- circadian pacemaker neurons and controlling pacemaker neuron output. Yet the mechanisms by which PDF functions are not clear. We demonstrate that genetic inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA in PDF(- clock neurons can phenocopy PDF mutants while activated PKA can partially rescue PDF receptor mutants. PKA subunit transcripts are also under clock control in non-PDF DN1p neurons. To address the core clock target of PDF, we rescued per in PDF neurons of arrhythmic per⁰¹ mutants. PDF neuron rescue induced high amplitude rhythms in the clock component TIMELESS (TIM in per-less DN1p neurons. Complete loss of PDF or PKA inhibition also results in reduced TIM levels in non-PDF neurons of per⁰¹ flies. To address how PDF impacts pacemaker neuron output, we focally applied PDF to DN1p neurons and found that it acutely depolarizes and increases firing rates of DN1p neurons. Surprisingly, these effects are reduced in the presence of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, yet persist in the presence of PKA inhibition. We have provided evidence for a signaling mechanism (PKA and a molecular target (TIM by which PDF resets and synchronizes clocks and demonstrates an acute direct excitatory effect of PDF on target neurons to control neuronal output. The identification of TIM as a target of PDF signaling suggests it is a multimodal integrator of cell autonomous clock, environmental light, and neural network signaling. Moreover, these data reveal a bifurcation of PKA-dependent clock effects and PKA-independent output effects. Taken together, our results provide a molecular and cellular basis for the dual functions of PDF in clock resetting and pacemaker output.

  6. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  7. Solar Partial N-burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Jun Ning; Yu-Ying Liu; Qi-Jun Fu; Fu-Ying Xu

    2003-01-01

    We present a new sub-class of type III solar radio burst at the highfrequencies around 6.0 GHz. In addition to a descending and an ascending branchon the dynamic spectrum, it has an inverted morphology different from the simpletype U-burst. We call it "partial N-burst" because it is interpreted as the knownN-burst minus its first branch. The partial N-burst presented here was detectedamong a reverse slope type III (RS-III) burst group prior to the type V solar radiocontinuum and was simultaneously recorded by two spectrometers at the NationalAstronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC, 5.20-7.60 GHz)and at Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO, 4.50-7.50 GHz) on 1999 August 25.After the N-burst and M-burst, the partial N-burst is a third piece of evidence for amagnetic mirror effect in solar radio observation, when the same electron is reflectedat a pinched foot of a flare loop.

  8. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  9. A forced desynchrony study of circadian pacemaker characteristics in seasonal affective disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorengevel, Kathelijne M.; Beersma, Domien G.M.; den Boer, Johan; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    2002-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is an endogenous clock that regulates oscillations in most physiological and psychological processes with a near 24-h period. In many species, this pacemaker triggers seasonal changes in behavior. The seasonality of symptoms and the efficacy of light therapy suggest involveme

  10. Subacute Right Ventricle Perforation by Pacemaker Lead Presenting with Left Hemothorax and Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac perforation by pacemaker is a rare but potentially fatal complication. Acute perforations occurring within twenty-four hours of insertion of pacemaker can lead to hemopericardium, cardiac tamponade, and death. Hemothorax occurring as an acute complication of pacemaker insertion is reported but extremely rare. Previously, hemothorax and shock as a subacute complication following pacemaker insertion have not been reported. We report the case of an 85-year-old patient who presented with shock from hemothorax caused by pacemaker perforation, two weeks after insertion. Device interrogation showed normal function. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram missed lead dislocation and the diagnosis was made on computed tomogram (CT of the chest. Following surgical repair, a new ventricular pacemaker was placed transvenously in the right ventricular septum. This case illustrates that CT scan of the chest should be performed in all patients in whom cardiac perforation by pacemaker is suspected but not diagnosed on chest X-ray and echocardiogram. Normal functioning of pacemaker on device interrogation does not exclude perforation.

  11. Twiddler-syndrom er en årsag til pacemaker elektrode displacering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Keea Treu; Hansen, Michael Gilså

    2013-01-01

    Twiddler's syndrome is a rare cause of pacemaker electrode displacement. The displacement is caused by the patient's manipulation with the pacemaker, so the electrode is retracted. We describe a case of a 79-year-old overweight woman with a known psychiatric anamnesis, who was admitted twice...

  12. T-box transcription factor TBX3 reprogrammes mature cardiac myocytes into pacemaker-like cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.L.; Boink, G.J.; Boukens, B.J.; Verkerk, A.O.; Boogaard, M.W. van den; Haan, A.D. den; Hoogaars, W.M.; Buermans, H.P.; Bakker, J.M. de; Seppen, J.; Tan, H.L.; Moorman, A.F.; Hoen, P.A.C. 't; Christoffels, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Treatment of disorders of the sinus node or the atrioventricular node requires insights into the molecular mechanisms of development and homoeostasis of these pacemaker tissues. In the developing heart, transcription factor TBX3 is required for pacemaker and conduction system development. Here,

  13. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p-wave process than for s-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation bu...

  14. Pacemaker Created in Human Ventricle by Depressing Inward-Rectifier K+ Current: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Li, Qince; Zhang, Henggui

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders are common diseases which cause slow heart rate and syncope. The best way to treat these diseases by now is to implant electronic pacemakers, which, yet, have many disadvantages, such as the limited battery life and infection. Biopacemaker has been expected to replace the electronic devices. Automatic ventricular myocytes (VMs) could show pacemaker activity, which was induced by depressing inward-rectifier K+ current (IK1). In this study, a 2D model of human biopacemaker was created from the ventricular endocardial myocytes. We examined the stability of the created biopacemaker and investigated its driving capability by finding the suitable size and spatial distribution of the pacemaker for robust pacing and driving the surrounding quiescent cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that the rhythm of the pacemaker is similar to that of the single cell at final stable state. The driving force of the biopacemaker is closely related to the pattern of spatial distribution of the pacemaker. PMID:26998484

  15. Pacemaker Created in Human Ventricle by Depressing Inward-Rectifier K+ Current: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac conduction disorders are common diseases which cause slow heart rate and syncope. The best way to treat these diseases by now is to implant electronic pacemakers, which, yet, have many disadvantages, such as the limited battery life and infection. Biopacemaker has been expected to replace the electronic devices. Automatic ventricular myocytes (VMs could show pacemaker activity, which was induced by depressing inward-rectifier K+ current (IK1. In this study, a 2D model of human biopacemaker was created from the ventricular endocardial myocytes. We examined the stability of the created biopacemaker and investigated its driving capability by finding the suitable size and spatial distribution of the pacemaker for robust pacing and driving the surrounding quiescent cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that the rhythm of the pacemaker is similar to that of the single cell at final stable state. The driving force of the biopacemaker is closely related to the pattern of spatial distribution of the pacemaker.

  16. Popeye domain-containing proteins and stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simrick, Subreena; Schindler, Roland F; Poon, Kar-Lai; Brand, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    An intricate network of ion channels and pumps are involved in generating a diastolic pacemaker potential, which is transmitted to the working myocardium with the help of the cardiac conduction system. The principles of cardiac pacemaking are reasonably well understood, however, the mechanism by which the heart increases its beating frequency in response to adrenergic stimulation has not been fully worked out. The Popeye domain-containing (Popdc) genes encode plasma membrane-localized proteins that are able to bind cAMP with high affinity; mice with null mutations in Popdc1 or 2 have a stress-induced pacemaker dysfunction. The phenotype in both mutants develops in an age-dependent manner and thus may model pacemaker dysfunction in man, as well as provide novel mechanistic insights into the process of pacemaker adaptation to stress.

  17. Dental treatment in patients with cardiac pacemakers: Is it a risky affair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reet Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac pacemakers are the implanted devices used to treat patients with damaged heart muscles. These electronic devices are sensitive to strong electromagnetic signals. The dental literature also included articles regarding electromagnetic interferences to pacemakers, due to dental devices such as ultrasonic scalers, electrosurgical unit, ultrasonic bath cleaners, and battery driven light cure composite unit. Although pacemakers of new generation have more protective features than those of past, but still precautionary measures should be taken in dental clinics for the safety of cardiac patients with pacemaker. The aim of this paper is to identify the possible sources from dental clinics which can adversely interfere with the pacemaker activity and to provide some guidelines for safe dental practice in this high-risk group.

  18. Computational reconstruction of pacemaking and intrinsic electroresponsiveness in cerebellar golgi cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Solinas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi cells have been recently shown to beat regularly in vitro (Forti et al., 2006. J. Physiol. 574, 711-729. Four main currents were shown to be involved, namely a persistent sodium current (INa-p, an h current (Ih, an SK-type calcium-dependent potassium current (IK-AHP, and a slow M-like potassium current (IK-slow. These ionic currents could take part, together with others, also to different aspects of neuronal excitability like responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing current injection. However, the ionic mechanisms and their interactions remained largely hypothetical. In this work, we have investigated the mechanisms of Golgi cell excitability by developing a computational model. The model predicts that pacemaking is sustained by subthreshold oscillations tightly coupled to spikes. INa-p and IK-slow emerged as the critical determinants of oscillations. Ih also played a role by setting the oscillatory mechanism into the appropriate membrane potential range. IK-AHP, though taking part to the oscillation, appeared primarily involved in regulating the ISI following spikes. The combination with other currents, in particular a resurgent sodium current (INa-r and an A-current (IK-A, allowed a precise regulation of response frequency and delay. These results provide a coherent reconstruction of the ionic mechanisms determining Golgi cell intrinsic electroresponsiveness and suggests important implications for cerebellar signal processing, which will be fully developed in a companion paper (Solinas et al., 2008. Front. Neurosci. 1:4.

  19. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  20. Do tonic and burst TMS modulate the lemniscal and extralemniscal system differentially?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Ridder, Elsa van der Loo, Karolien Van der Kelen, Tomas Menovsky, Paul van de Heyning, Aage Moller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tinnitus is an auditory phantom percept related to tonic and burst hyperactivity of the auditory system. Two parallel pathways supply auditory information to the cerebral cortex: the tonotopically organised lemniscal system, and the non-tonotopic extralemniscal system, firing in tonic mode and burst mode respectively. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a non-invasive method capable of modulating activity of the human cortex, by delivering tonic or burst stimuli. Burst stimulation is shown to be more powerful in activating the cerebral cortex than tonic stimulation and bursts may activate neurons that are not activated by tonic stimulations. Methods: The effect of both tonic and burst TMS in 14 placebo-negative patients presenting narrow band/white noise tinnitus were analysed. Results: Our TMS results show that narrow band/white noise tinnitus is better suppressed with burst TMS in comparison to tonic TMS, t(13=6.4, p=.000. For pure tone tinnitus no difference is found between burst or tonic TMS, t(13=.3, ns. Discussion: Based on the hypothesis that white noise is the result of hyperactivity in the non-tonotopic system and pure tone tinnitus of the tonotopic system, we suggest that burst stimulation modulates the extralemniscal system and lemniscal system and tonic stimulation only the lemniscal system.

  1. Effects of disinhibition on spatiotemporal pattern of neuronal first recruitment in neuronal networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangbin Pan; Xindong Sing; Guangxin Xiang; Jing Zhu; Jing Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of neuronal activities is a key feature to understanding information processing in networks.The analysis based on first-spikes of bursts in turn plays an important role in the research of neuronal activity propagation.Our focus here is to investigate how spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal first-spikes are affected by disinhibition.Multi-electrode arrays were used to record stimulationevoked bursts of multiple neurons in randomly cultured neuronal networks.Both the precise timing of and the rank relationships between first-spikes were analyzed.Compared with evoked bursts in the network's native state,the precise first-spike latencies in its disinhibited state are more consistent and the propagation of its bursting activities is much faster.Additional points of interest are that disinhibited neuronal networks can be evoked to generate stable and distinguishable neuronal first recruitment spatiotemporal patterns specific to the stimulation site,and that the disinhibition may cause the original spatiotemporal patterns to change in a heterogeneous manner with regards to different propagation pathways.(C) 2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences.Published by Elsevier Limited and Science inChina Press.All rights reserved.

  2. Excitation model of pacemaker cardiomyocytes of cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardium includes typical and atypical cardiomyocytes - pacemakers, which form the cardiac conduction system. Excitation from the atrioventricular node in normal conditions is possible only in one direction. Retrograde direction of pulses is impossible. The most important prerequisite for the work of cardiomyocytes is the anatomical integrity of the conduction system. Changes in contractile force of the cardiomyocytes, which appear periodically, are due to two mechanisms of self-regulation - heterometric and homeometric. Graphic course of the excitation pulse propagation along the heart muscle more accurately reveals the understanding of the arrhythmia mechanism. These models have the ability to visualize the essence of excitation dynamics. However, they do not have the proper forecasting function for result estimation. Integrative mathematical model enables further investigation of general laws of the myocardium active behavior, allows for determination of the violation mechanism of electrical and contractile function of cardiomyocytes. Currently, there is no full understanding of the topography of pacemakers and ionic mechanisms. There is a need for the development of direction of mathematical modeling and comparative studies of the electrophysiological arrangement of cells of atrioventricular connection and ventricular conduction system.

  3. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  4. Variety of synchronous regimes in neuronal ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, M. A.; Osipov, G. V.; Suykens, J. A. K.

    2008-09-01

    We consider a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of oscillatory activity in neurons of the snail Helix pomatia. This model has a distinctive feature: It demonstrates multistability in oscillatory and silent modes that is typical for the thalamocortical neurons. A single neuron cell can demonstrate a variety of oscillatory activity: Regular and chaotic spiking and bursting behavior. We study collective phenomena in small and large arrays of nonidentical cells coupled by models of electrical and chemical synapses. Two single elements coupled by electrical coupling show different types of synchronous behavior, in particular in-phase and antiphase synchronous regimes. In an ensemble of three inhibitory synaptically coupled elements, the phenomenon of sequential synchronous dynamics is observed. We study the synchronization phenomena in the chain of nonidentical neurons at different oscillatory behavior coupled with electrical and chemical synapses. Various regimes of phase synchronization are observed: (i) Synchronous regular and chaotic spiking; (ii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting; and (iii) synchronous regular and chaotic bursting with different numbers of spikes inside the bursts. We detect and study the effect of collective synchronous burst generation due to the cluster formation and the oscillatory death.

  5. Bursting dynamics of in vitro neural networks and their stimulation driven learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joon Ho; Hoan Kim, June; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies have indicated that recurring neural ``bursts'' may play an essential role in neural information processing and memory. One key element of this hypothesis involves the translation of temporal patterns of stimuli into spatiotemporally distributed information. One ideal system to investigate this issue is cultured network of neurons grown on multi-electrode array (MEA). Based on such in vitro systems, we have investigated the changes incurred by extrinsic stimuli in the spontaneously recurring bursting activities. We have employed, in particular, two-channel paired, delayed, tetanic stimuli to evoke different patterns of bursting activities. Our preliminary data suggests that the neural network can exhibit some learning behavior.

  6. Bursting thalamic responses in awake monkey contribute to visual detection and are modulated by corticofugal feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Tania; Grieve, Kenneth L; Cao, Ricardo; Cudeiro, Javier; Rivadulla, Casto

    2014-01-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus is the gateway for visual information en route to the visual cortex. Neural activity is characterized by the existence of two firing modes: burst and tonic. Originally associated with sleep, bursts have now been postulated to be a part of the normal visual response, structured to increase the probability of cortical activation, able to act as a "wake-up" call to the cortex. We investigated a potential role for burst in the detection of novel stimuli by recording neuronal activity in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of behaving monkeys during a visual detection task. Our results show that bursts are often the neuron's first response, and are more numerous in the response to attended target stimuli than to unattended distractor stimuli. Bursts are indicators of the task novelty, as repetition decreased bursting. Because the primary visual cortex is the major modulatory input to the LGN, we compared the results obtained in control conditions with those observed when cortical activity was reduced by TMS. This cortical deactivation reduced visual response related bursting by 90%. These results highlight a novel role for the thalamus, able to code higher order image attributes as important as novelty early in the thalamo-cortical conversation.

  7. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  8. Ventricular oversensing of atrial electrical activity that inhibits VVI pacemaker and causes syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elibet Chávez González

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Far-field oversensing of atrial electrical activity caused by a VVI pacemaker is a rare phenomenon; however, it may have serious clinical consequences. It has several causes and its timely identification may avoid a possible ventricular asystole. This article reports the case of a 72-year-old male who had a Biotronik Axios SR pacemaker implanted, in VVIR mode, six years ago, due to blocked atrial fibrillation. He suffered syncope due to pacemaker inhibition caused by ventricular oversensing of atrial electrical activity.

  9. Subjective consequences of permanent pacemaker therapy in patients under the age of retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H; Petersen, J; Nielsen, B L

    1989-01-01

    or a sensation of "impulses"/palpitations. To the majority (49 patients or 68.1%) pacemaker treatment did not influence quality of sexual activity. Six patients (8.3%) perceived an improvement, whereas a corresponding number felt deterioration in sexual activity following pacemaker implantation. Pacemaker...... pronounced in subjects suffering from syncope and/or dizziness. Eight patients (11.1%) perceived anxiety most frequently due to fear of pacing failure. Physical complaints were present in 17 patients (23.6%), and the discomfort was mainly due to the size of generator, pain/tenderness from the scar...

  10. Is the gated blood pool scan useful for optimization of programmable cardiac pacemakers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunkel, H.; Otto, H.J.; Pundrich, R.; Mann, D.

    1986-08-01

    The significance of the ECG-triggered cardiac blood pool scan for optimization of physiological parameters of multiprogrammable cardiac pacemakers was investigated. Six patients were investigated, and two case reports are demonstrated in detail. By use of the quantitative evaluation of the parametric scans and other function parameters it is possible to evaluate cardiac function objectively in relation to the stimulation frequency and AV-delay using demand/delay pacemakers. These first results encourage the further use of this technique for evaluation of cardiac function in patients with programmable pacemakers.

  11. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  12. Percutaneously injectable fetal pacemaker: electronics, pacing thresholds, and power budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Adriana; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Zheng, Kaihui; Loeb, Gerald E

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a cardiac pacemaker that is designed to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. One of the most significant considerations for this device is the technical challenges presented by the battery and charging system. The size of the device is limited to about 3 mm in diameter; batteries on this scale have very small charge capacities. The smaller capacity means that the device needs to be designed so that it uses as little current as possible and so that its battery can be recharged wirelessly. We determined the pacing thresholds for a simple relaxation oscillator that can be assembled from discrete, surface mount components and analyzed the power consumption of the device given different electrode configurations and stimulus parameters. An inductive recharging system will be required for some patients; it is feasible within the package constraints and under development.

  13. Nonlinear oscillations in a muscle pacemaker cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a numerical simulation study of the nonlinear oscillations displayed by the Morris-Lecar model [Biophys. J. 35 (1981) 193] for the oscillations experimentally observed in the transmembrane potential of a muscle fiber subject to an external electrical stimulus. We consider the model in the case when there is no external stimulation, aiming to establish the ability of the model to display biophysically reasonable pacemaker dynamics. We obtain 2D bifurcation diagrams showing that indeed the model presents oscillatory dynamics, displaying the two main types of action potentials that are observed in muscle fibers. The results obtained are shown to be structurally stable; that is, robust against changes in the values of system parameters. Moreover, it is demonstrated how the model is appropriate to analyze the action potentials observed in terms of the transmembrane currents creating them.

  14. Leader neurons in leaky integrate and fire neural network simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Cyrille

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we highlight the topological properties of leader neurons whose existence is an experimental fact. Several experimental studies show the existence of leader neurons in population bursts of activity in 2D living neural networks (Eytan and Marom, J Neurosci 26(33):8465-8476, 2006; Eckmann et al., New J Phys 10(015011), 2008). A leader neuron is defined as a neuron which fires at the beginning of a burst (respectively network spike) more often than we expect by chance considering its mean firing rate. This means that leader neurons have some burst triggering power beyond a chance-level statistical effect. In this study, we characterize these leader neuron properties. This naturally leads us to simulate neural 2D networks. To build our simulations, we choose the leaky integrate and fire (lIF) neuron model (Gerstner and Kistler 2002; Cessac, J Math Biol 56(3):311-345, 2008), which allows fast simulations (Izhikevich, IEEE Trans Neural Netw 15(5):1063-1070, 2004; Gerstner and Naud, Science 326:379-380, 2009). The dynamics of our lIF model has got stable leader neurons in the burst population that we simulate. These leader neurons are excitatory neurons and have a low membrane potential firing threshold. Except for these two first properties, the conditions required for a neuron to be a leader neuron are difficult to identify and seem to depend on several parameters involved in the simulations themselves. However, a detailed linear analysis shows a trend of the properties required for a neuron to be a leader neuron. Our main finding is: A leader neuron sends signals to many excitatory neurons as well as to few inhibitory neurons and a leader neuron receives only signals from few other excitatory neurons. Our linear analysis exhibits five essential properties of leader neurons each with different relative importance. This means that considering a given neural network with a fixed mean number of connections per neuron, our analysis gives us a way of

  15. The Immunoendocrine Thymus as a Pacemaker of Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, György

    2016-06-01

    The thymus develops from an endocrine area of the foregut, and retains the ancient potencies of this region. However, later it is populated by bone marrow originated lymphatic elements and forms a combined organ, which is a central part of the immune system as well as an influential element of the endocrine orchestra. Thymus produces self-hormones (thymulin, thymosin, thymopentin, and thymus humoral factor), which are participating in the regulation of immune cell transformation and selection, and also synthesizes hormones similar to that of the other endocrine glands such as melatonin, neuropeptides, and insulin, which are transported by the immune cells to the sites of requests (packed transport). Thymic (epithelial and immune) cells also have receptors for hormones which regulate them. This combined organ, which is continuously changing from birth to senescence seems to be a pacemaker of life. This function is basically regulated by the selection of self-responsive thymocytes as their complete destruction helps the development (up to puberty) and their gradual release in case of weakened control (after puberty) causes the erosion of cells and intercellular material, named aging. This means that during aging, self-destructive and non-protective immune activities are manifested under the guidance of the involuting thymus, causing the continuous irritation of cells and organs. Possibly the pineal body is the main regulator of the pacemaker, the neonatal removal of which results in atrophy of thymus and wasting disease and its later corrosion causes the insufficiency of thymus. The co-involution of pineal and thymus could determine the aging and the time of death without external intervention; however, external factors can negatively influence both of them.

  16. Burst Suppression: A Review and New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Dillon Kenny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression is a pattern of brain electrical activity characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude bursts and electrical silence. Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ between different general anesthetics.

  17. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  18. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  19. A novel non invasive measurement of hemodynamic parameters: Comparison of single-chamber ventricular and dual-chamber pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M. Pardede

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a cross sectional study to analyze hemodynamic parameters of single-chamber ventricular pacemaker compared with dual-chamber pacemaker by using thoracic electrical bioimpedance monitoring method (Physio Flow™ - a novel simple non-invasive measurement. A total of 48 consecutive outpatients comprised of 27 single chamber pacemaker and 21 dual chamber were analyzed. We measured cardiac parameters: heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac output index, estimated ejection fraction, end diastolic volume, early diastolic function ratio, thoracic fluid index, and systemic parameters: left cardiac work index and systemic vascular resistance index. Baseline characteristic and pacemaker indication were similar in both groups. Cardiac parameters assessment revealed no significant difference between single-chamber pacemaker and dual-chamber pacemaker in heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac index, estimated ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, thoracic fluid index. There was significantly higher early diastolic function ratio in single-chamber pacemaker compared to dual-chamber pacemaker: 92% (10.2-187.7% vs. 100.6% (48.7-403.2%; p=0.006. Systemic parameters assessment revealed significantly higher left cardiac work index in single-chamber group than dual-chamber group 4.9 kg.m/m² (2.8-7.6 kg.m/m² vs. 4.3 kg.m/m² (2.9-7.2 kg.m/m²; p=0.004. There was no significant difference on systemic vascular resistance in single-chamber compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. Single-chamber ventricular pacemaker provides similar stroke volume, cardiac output and left cardiac work, compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. A non-invasive hemodynamic measurement using thoracic electrical bioimpedance is feasible for permanent pacemaker outpatients. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 25-32Keywords: Permanent pacemaker, single chamber, dual chamber, thoracic electrical bioimpedance, hemodynamic parameter

  20. Hyperpolarization-Activated Current, , in Mathematical Models of Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Pacemaker Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie O. Verkerk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A typical feature of sinoatrial (SA node pacemaker cells is the presence of an ionic current that activates upon hyperpolarization. The role of this hyperpolarization-activated current, , which is also known as the “funny current” or “pacemaker current,” in the spontaneous pacemaker activity of SA nodal cells remains a matter of intense debate. Whereas some conclude that plays a fundamental role in the generation of pacemaker activity and its rate control, others conclude that the role of is limited to a modest contribution to rate control. The ongoing debate is often accompanied with arguments from computer simulations, either to support one's personal view or to invalidate that of the antagonist. In the present paper, we review the various mathematical descriptions of that have been used in computer simulations and compare their strikingly different characteristics with our experimental data. We identify caveats and propose a novel model for based on our experimental data.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Patient with a Dual Chamber Pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Martina Millar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Having a pacemaker has been seen an absolute contraindication to having an MRI scan. This has become increasingly difficult in clinical practice as insertion of pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators is at an all time high. Here we outline a case where a 71-year-old male patient with a permanent pacemaker needed to have an MRI scan to ascertain the aetiology of his condition and help guide further management. Given this clinical dilemma, an emergency clinical ethics consultation was arranged. As a result the patient underwent an MRI scan safely under controlled conditions with a consultant cardiologist and radiologist present. The results of the MRI scan were then able to tailor further treatment. This case highlights that in certain conditions an MRI can be performed in patients with permanent pacemakers and outlines the role of clinical ethics committees in complex medical decision making.

  2. Psychosocial aspects and mental health in children after permanent pacemaker implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C; Hørder, K; Kristensen, L

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the psychosocial status and the mental health of children receiving a permanent pacemaker during childhood. Nineteen children under the age of 19 years had a permanent pacemaker implanted. Contact was established to 15 of these patients, 7 girls and 8 boys......, and they were given a child-psychiatric evaluation consisting of a semi-structured and a child-psychiatric interview. The psychological interview used intelligence tests and the Draw-A-Person test as well as the Rorschach test. The patients had had their pacemakers during an average of 6.7 years (range 3......-14). Generally the psychological condition was strained in 7 families, in which psychiatric and social therapy had been necessary. The children's intelligence was within normal ranges, average IQ being 110 (range 80-135). The children had abnormal body image related to the pacemaker. Adults virtually incorporate...

  3. Do Gamma-Ray Burst Sources Repeat?

    OpenAIRE

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and...

  4. Synchronized Firing in Coupled Inhomogeneous Excitable Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhi-Gang; WANG Fu-Zhong

    2002-01-01

    We study the firing synchronization behavior of the inhomogeneous excitable media. Phase synchronizationof neuron firings is observed with increasing the coupling, while the phases of neurons are different (out-of-phase synchronization). We found the synchronization of bursts can be greatly enhanced by applying an external forcing (in-phasesynchronization). The external forcing can be either a periodic or just homogeneous thermal noise. The mechanismresponsible for this enhancement is discussed.PACS numbers: 05.45.-a, 87.10.+e

  5. A fully implantable pacemaker for the mouse: from battery to wireless power.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob I Laughner

    Full Text Available Animal models have become a popular platform for the investigation of the molecular and systemic mechanisms of pathological cardiovascular physiology. Chronic pacing studies with implantable pacemakers in large animals have led to useful models of heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Unfortunately, molecular and genetic studies in these large animal models are often prohibitively expensive or not available. Conversely, the mouse is an excellent species for studying molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease through genetic engineering. However, the large size of available pacemakers does not lend itself to chronic pacing in mice. Here, we present the design for a novel, fully implantable wireless-powered pacemaker for mice capable of long-term (>30 days pacing. This design is compared to a traditional battery-powered pacemaker to demonstrate critical advantages achieved through wireless inductive power transfer and control. Battery-powered and wireless-powered pacemakers were fabricated from standard electronic components in our laboratory. Mice (n = 24 were implanted with endocardial, battery-powered devices (n = 14 and epicardial, wireless-powered devices (n = 10. Wireless-powered devices were associated with reduced implant mortality and more reliable device function compared to battery-powered devices. Eight of 14 (57.1% mice implanted with battery-powered pacemakers died following device implantation compared to 1 of 10 (10% mice implanted with wireless-powered pacemakers. Moreover, device function was achieved for 30 days with the wireless-powered device compared to 6 days with the battery-powered device. The wireless-powered pacemaker system presented herein will allow electrophysiology studies in numerous genetically engineered mouse models as well as rapid pacing-induced heart failure and atrial arrhythmia in mice.

  6. Medicare’s Policies and Prospective Payment Rates for Cardiac Pacemaker Surgeries need Review and Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-26

    pacemaker manufacturers whose sales account for about 80 percent of the pacemaker sales in the United States. The four manufacturers are: -- Cordis ...percentage increase in the hospital market basket (an index designed to measure changes in the prices hospitals pay for goods and services) plus 0.25 percent...For fiscal year 1986, the DRG payment rates cannot be in- creased by more than the estimated change in the hospital market basket plus 0.25 percent

  7. Involvement of mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchange in intestinal pacemaking activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung Joo Kim; Jae Yeoul Jun; Insuk So; Ki Whan Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells that generate slow waves in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We have aimed to investigate the involvement of mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchange in intestinal pacemaking activity in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal.METHODS: Enzymatic digestions were used todissociate ICCs from the small intestine of a mouse. The whole-cell patch-clamp configuration was used to record membrane currents (voltage clamp) and potentials (current clamp) from cultured ICCs.RESULTS: Clonazepam and CGP37157 inhibited the pacemaking activity of ICCs in a dose-dependent manner.Clonazepam from 20 to 60 μmol/L and CGP37157 from 10 to 30 μmol/L effectively inhibited Ca2+ efflux from mitochondria in pacemaking activity of ICCs. The IC50S of clonazepam and CGP37157 were 37.1 and 18.2 μmol/L, respectively. The addition of 20 μmol/L NiCl2 to the internal solution caused a "wax and wane" phenomenon of pacemaking activity of ICCs.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchange has an important role in intestinal pacemaking activity.

  8. Irregular excitation patterns in reaction-diffusion systems due to perturbation by secondary pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Claudia; Einax, Mario; Maass, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Spatiotemporal excitation patterns in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model are studied, which result from the disturbance of a primary pacemaker by a secondary pacemaker. The primary and secondary pacemakers generate regular waves with frequencies f(pace) and f(pert), respectively. The pacemakers are spatially separated, but waves emanating from them encounter each other via a small bridge. This leads to three different types I-III of irregular excitation patterns in disjunct domains of the f(pace)-f(pert) plane. Types I and II are caused by detachments of waves coming from the two pacemakers at corners of the bridge. Type III irregularities are confined to a boundary region of the system and originate from a partial penetration of the primary waves into a space, where circular wave fronts from the secondary pacemaker prevail. For this type, local frequencies can significantly exceed f(pace) and f(pert). The degree of irregularity found for the three different types is quantified by the entropy of the local frequency distribution and an order parameter for phase coherence.

  9. Computational reconstruction of pacemaking and intrinsic electroresponsiveness in cerebellar Golgi cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas, Sergio; Forti, Lia; Cesana, Elisabetta; Mapelli, Jonathan; De Schutter, Erik; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2007-01-01

    The Golgi cells have been recently shown to beat regularly in vitro (Forti et al., 2006. J. Physiol. 574, 711-729). Four main currents were shown to be involved, namely a persistent sodium current (I(Na-p)), an h current (I(h)), an SK-type calcium-dependent potassium current (I(K-AHP)), and a slow M-like potassium current (I(K-slow)). These ionic currents could take part, together with others, also to different aspects of neuronal excitability like responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing current injection. However, the ionic mechanisms and their interactions remained largely hypothetical. In this work, we have investigated the mechanisms of Golgi cell excitability by developing a computational model. The model predicts that pacemaking is sustained by subthreshold oscillations tightly coupled to spikes. I(Na-p) and I(K-slow) emerged as the critical determinants of oscillations. I(h) also played a role by setting the oscillatory mechanism into the appropriate membrane potential range. I(K-AHP), though taking part to the oscillation, appeared primarily involved in regulating the ISI following spikes. The combination with other currents, in particular a resurgent sodium current (I(Na-r)) and an A-current (I(K-A)), allowed a precise regulation of response frequency and delay. These results provide a coherent reconstruction of the ionic mechanisms determining Golgi cell intrinsic electroresponsiveness and suggests important implications for cerebellar signal processing, which will be fully developed in a companion paper (Solinas et al., 2008. Front. Neurosci. 2:4).

  10. Broadband Spectral Study of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizibayrak, Demet; Gogus, Ersin; Sasmaz Mus, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    Magnetar bursts occur sporadically on random occasions, and every burst-active episode carries unique information about the bursting magnetar. Therefore, in-depth spectral and temporal analyses of each of the magnetar bursts provide new insights into the bursting and radiation mechanisms. There have been a number of studies over the last decade, investigating the spectral and temporal properties of magnetar bursts. The spectra of typical magnetar bursts were generally described with the Comptonized model or the sum of two blackbody functions. However, it was recently shown that the actual spectral nature of these bursts can be conclusively determined if the spectral analysis is performed on a wide energy coverage. We present the results of in-depth systematic broadband (2 - 250 keV) spectral analysis of a large number of bursts originated from three magnetars: SGR 1806-20, SGR 1900+14, and SGR J1550-5418, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer.

  11. A modeling approach on why simple central pattern generators are built of irregular neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bussotti Reyes

    Full Text Available The crustacean pyloric Central Pattern Generator (CPG is a nervous circuit that endogenously provides periodic motor patterns. Even after about 40 years of intensive studies, the rhythm genesis is still not rigorously understood in this CPG, mainly because it is made of neurons with irregular intrinsic activity. Using mathematical models we addressed the question of using a network of irregularly behaving elements to generate periodic oscillations, and we show some advantages of using non-periodic neurons with intrinsic behavior in the transition from bursting to tonic spiking (as found in biological pyloric CPGs as building components. We studied two- and three-neuron model CPGs built either with Hindmarsh-Rose or with conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley-like model neurons. By changing a model's parameter we could span the neuron's intrinsic dynamical behavior from slow periodic bursting to fast tonic spiking, passing through a transition where irregular bursting was observed. Two-neuron CPG, half center oscillator (HCO, was obtained for each intrinsic behavior of the neurons by coupling them with mutual symmetric synaptic inhibition. Most of these HCOs presented regular antiphasic bursting activity and the changes of the bursting frequencies was studied as a function of the inhibitory synaptic strength. Among all HCOs, those made of intrinsic irregular neurons presented a wider burst frequency range while keeping a reliable regular oscillatory (bursting behavior. HCOs of periodic neurons tended to be either hard to change their behavior with synaptic strength variations (slow periodic burster neurons or unable to perform a physiologically meaningful rhythm (fast tonic spiking neurons. Moreover, 3-neuron CPGs with connectivity and output similar to those of the pyloric CPG presented the same results.

  12. A modeling approach on why simple central pattern generators are built of irregular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Marcelo Bussotti; Carelli, Pedro Valadão; Sartorelli, José Carlos; Pinto, Reynaldo Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The crustacean pyloric Central Pattern Generator (CPG) is a nervous circuit that endogenously provides periodic motor patterns. Even after about 40 years of intensive studies, the rhythm genesis is still not rigorously understood in this CPG, mainly because it is made of neurons with irregular intrinsic activity. Using mathematical models we addressed the question of using a network of irregularly behaving elements to generate periodic oscillations, and we show some advantages of using non-periodic neurons with intrinsic behavior in the transition from bursting to tonic spiking (as found in biological pyloric CPGs) as building components. We studied two- and three-neuron model CPGs built either with Hindmarsh-Rose or with conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley-like model neurons. By changing a model's parameter we could span the neuron's intrinsic dynamical behavior from slow periodic bursting to fast tonic spiking, passing through a transition where irregular bursting was observed. Two-neuron CPG, half center oscillator (HCO), was obtained for each intrinsic behavior of the neurons by coupling them with mutual symmetric synaptic inhibition. Most of these HCOs presented regular antiphasic bursting activity and the changes of the bursting frequencies was studied as a function of the inhibitory synaptic strength. Among all HCOs, those made of intrinsic irregular neurons presented a wider burst frequency range while keeping a reliable regular oscillatory (bursting) behavior. HCOs of periodic neurons tended to be either hard to change their behavior with synaptic strength variations (slow periodic burster neurons) or unable to perform a physiologically meaningful rhythm (fast tonic spiking neurons). Moreover, 3-neuron CPGs with connectivity and output similar to those of the pyloric CPG presented the same results.

  13. Amplitude-Modulated Bursting: A Novel Class of Bursting Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Theodore; Kramer, Mark A.; Kaper, Tasso J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the discovery of a novel class of bursting rhythms, called amplitude-modulated bursting (AMB), in a model for intracellular calcium dynamics. We find that these rhythms are robust and exist on open parameter sets. We develop a new mathematical framework with broad applicability to detect, classify, and rigorously analyze AMB. Here we illustrate this framework in the context of AMB in a model of intracellular calcium dynamics. In the process, we discover a novel family of singularities, called toral folded singularities, which are the organizing centers for the amplitude modulation and exist generically in slow-fast systems with two or more slow variables.

  14. Use of an active fixation lead and a subpectoral pacemaker pocket may not avoid Twiddler′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris E A Udink ten Cate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of a pacemaker with consequent malfunction of the device has been called Twiddler′s syndrome. Use of active-fixation leads and subpectoral pacemaker pockets has been considered to help in avoiding this problem. We describe a child in whom twiddling was not prevented despite implantation of a lumenless atrial lead and insertion of the pacemaker generator in a subpectoral pocket.

  15. Dynamics of Time Delay-Induced Multiple Synchronous Behaviors in Inhibitory Coupled Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huaguang; Zhao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory synapse can induce synchronous behaviors different from the anti-phase synchronous behaviors, which have been reported in recent studies. In the present paper, synchronous behaviors are investigated in the motif model composed of reciprocal inhibitory coupled neurons with endogenous bursting and time delay. When coupling strength is weak, synchronous behavior appears at a single interval of time delay within a bursting period. When coupling strength is strong, multiple synchronous behaviors appear at different intervals of time delay within a bursting period. The different bursting patterns of synchronous behaviors, and time delays and coupling strengths that can induce the synchronous bursting patterns can be well interpreted by the dynamics of the endogenous bursting pattern of isolated neuron, which is acquired by the fast-slow dissection method, combined with the inhibitory coupling current. For an isolated neuron, when a negative impulsive current with suitable strength is applied at different phases of the bursting, multiple different bursting patterns can be induced. For a neuron in the motif, the inhibitory coupling current, of which the application time and strength is modulated by time delay and coupling strength, can cause single or multiple synchronous firing patterns like the negative impulsive current when time delay and coupling strength is suitable. The difference compared to the previously reported multiple synchronous behaviors that appear at time delays wider than a period of the endogenous firing is discussed. The results present novel examples of synchronous behaviors in the neuronal network with inhibitory synapses and provide a reasonable explanation. PMID:26394224

  16. Intrinsic bursters increase the robustness of rhythm generation in an excitatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, L K; Smith, J C; Koizumi, H; Butera, R J

    2007-02-01

    The pre-Botzinger complex (pBC) is a vital subcircuit of the respiratory central pattern generator. Although the existence of neurons with pacemaker-like bursting properties in this network is not questioned, their role in network rhythmogenesis is unresolved. Modeling is ideally suited to address this debate because of the ease with which biophysical parameters of individual cells and network architecture can be manipulated. We modeled the parameter variability of experimental data from pBC bursting pacemaker and nonpacemaker neurons using a modified version of our previously developed pBC neuron and network models. To investigate the role of pacemakers in networkwide rhythmogenesis, we simulated networks of these neurons and varied the fraction of the population made up of pacemakers. For each number of pacemaker neurons, we varied the amount of tonic drive to the network and measured the frequency of synchronous networkwide bursting produced. Both excitatory networks with all-to-all coupling and sparsely connected networks were explored for several levels of synaptic coupling strength. Networks containing only nonpacemakers were able to produce networkwide bursting, but with a low probability of bursting and low input and output ranges. Our results indicate that inclusion of pacemakers in an excitatory network increases robustness of the network by more than tripling the input and output ranges compared with networks containing no pacemakers. The largest increase in dynamic range occurs when the number of pacemakers in the network is greater than 20% of the population. Experimental tests of our model predictions are proposed.

  17. Multiple conductances cooperatively regulate spontaneous bursting in mouse olfactory bulb external tufted cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaolin; Shipley, Michael T

    2008-02-13

    External tufted (ET) cells are juxtaglomerular neurons that spontaneously generate bursts of action potentials, which persist when fast synaptic transmission is blocked. The intrinsic mechanism of this autonomous bursting is unknown. We identified a set of voltage-dependent conductances that cooperatively regulate spontaneous bursting: hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)), persistent Na+ current (I(NaP)), low-voltage-activated calcium current (I(L/T)) mediated by T- and/or L-type Ca2+ channels, and large-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ current (I(BK)). I(h) is important in setting membrane potential and depolarizes the cell toward the threshold of I(NaP) and I(T/L), which are essential to generate the depolarizing envelope that is crowned by a burst of action potentials. Action potentials depolarize the membrane and induce Ca2+ influx via high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (I(HVA)). The combined depolarization and increased intracellular Ca2+ activates I(BK), which terminates the burst by hyperpolarizing the membrane. Hyperpolarization activates I(h) and the cycle is regenerated. A novel finding is the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in autonomous ET cells bursting. A second novel feature is the role of BK channels, which regulate burst duration. I(L) and I(BK) may go hand-in-hand, the slow inactivation of I(L) requiring I(BK)-dependent hyperpolarization to deactivate inward conductances and terminate the burst. ET cells receive monosynaptic olfactory nerve input and drive the major inhibitory interneurons of the glomerular circuit. Modulation of the conductances identified here can regulate burst frequency, duration, and spikes per burst in ET cells and thus significantly shape the impact of glomerular circuits on mitral and tufted cells, the output channels of the olfactory bulb.

  18. Propagation of pacemaker activity in the guinea-pig antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, G W; Hirst, G D S; Park, K J; Smith, C B; Sanders, K M; Ward, S M; Smith, T K

    2004-04-15

    Cyclical periods of depolarization (slow waves) underlie peristaltic contractions involved in mixing and emptying of contents in the gastric antrum. Slow waves originate from a myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY). In this study we have visualized the sequence and propagation of Ca(2+) transients associated with pacemaker potentials in the ICC network and longitudinal (LM) and circular muscle (CM) layers of the isolated guinea-pig gastric antrum. Gastric antrum was dissected to reveal the ICC-MY network, loaded with Fluo-4 AM and activity was monitored at 37 degrees C. Ca(2+) waves propagated throughout the ICC-MY network at an average velocity of 3.24 +/- 0.12 mm s(-1) at a frequency of 4.87 +/- 0.16 cycles min(-1) (n= 4). The propagation of the Ca(2+) wave often appeared 'step-like', with separate regions of the network being activated after variable delays. The direction of propagation was highly variable (Delta angle of propagation 44.3 +/- 10.9 deg per cycle) and was not confined to the axes of the longitudinal or circular muscle. Ca(2+) waves appeared to spread out radially from the site of initiation. The initiating Ca(2+) wave in ICC-MY was correlated to secondary Ca(2+) waves in intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal, ICC-IM, and smooth muscle cells, and the local distortion (contraction) in a field of view. TTX (1 microm) had little effect on slow wave or pacemaker potential activity, but 2-APB (50 microm) blocked all Ca(2+) waves, indicating a pivotal role for intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Nicardipine (2 microm) eliminated the Ca(2+) transient generated by smooth muscle, but did not affect the fast upstroke associated with ICC-MY. These results indicate that slow waves follow a sequence of activation, beginning with the ICC-MY and ICC-IM network, followed later by a sustained Ca(2+) transient in the muscle layers that is responsible for contraction.

  19. Network and external perturbation induce burst synchronisation in cat cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Batista, Antonio M.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-05-01

    The brain of mammals are divided into different cortical areas that are anatomically connected forming larger networks which perform cognitive tasks. The cat cerebral cortex is composed of 65 areas organised into the visual, auditory, somatosensory-motor and frontolimbic cognitive regions. We have built a network of networks, in which networks are connected among themselves according to the connections observed in the cat cortical areas aiming to study how inputs drive the synchronous behaviour in this cat brain-like network. We show that without external perturbations it is possible to observe high level of bursting synchronisation between neurons within almost all areas, except for the auditory area. Bursting synchronisation appears between neurons in the auditory region when an external perturbation is applied in another cognitive area. This is a clear evidence that burst synchronisation and collective behaviour in the brain might be a process mediated by other brain areas under stimulation.

  20. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eOster

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition.

  1. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  2. Risk of pacemaker implantation subsequent to radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Videbaek, L.; Brock Johansen, J.

    2015-01-01

    -stage breast cancer in Denmark from 1982 to 2005. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on pacemaker implants subsequent to radiotherapy. Rate ratios (RR) of pacemaker implantation for left versus right sided breast cancer were calculated. Results: Among 18......,308 women treated with radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer, 179 women had a pacemaker implanted subsequent to radiotherapy, 90 in 9,315 left sided and 89 in 8,993 right sided breast cancers. The unadjusted RR was 1.02 (0.76-1.36 95% CI, p=0.91) and the RR adjusted for year, age and time since...

  3. Phentolamine inhibits the pacemaker activity of mouse interstitial cells of Cajal by activating ATP-sensitive K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Seung Whan; Kim, Sang Hun; Kim, Jin Ho; Choi, Seok; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Wie, Hee Wook; Sun, Jae Myeong; So, Insuk; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify if phentolamine has proven effects on the pacemaker activities of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) from the mouse small intestine involving the ATPsensitive K(+) channels and adrenergic receptor. The actions of phentolamine on pacemaker activities were investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp technique and intracellular Ca(2+) analysis at 30 degrees C in cultured mouse intestinal ICC. ICC generated spontaneous pacemaker currents at a holding potential of -70 mV. Treatment with phentolamine reduced the frequency and amplitude of the pacemaker currents and increased the resting outward currents. Moreover, under current clamping (I = 0), phentolamine hyperpolarized the ICC membrane and decreased the amplitude of the pacemaker potentials. We also observed that phentolamine inhibited spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in ICC. The alpha-adrenergic drugs prazosin, yohimbine, methoxamine, and clonidine had no effect on ICC intestinal pacemaker activity and did not block phentolamine-induced effects. Phentolamine-induced effects on the pacemaker currents and the pacemaker potentials were significantly inhibited by ATP sensitive K(+) channel blocker glibenclamide, but not by TEA, apamin, or 4-aminopyridine. In addition, the NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ were incapable of blocking the phentolamine-induced effects. These results demonstrate that phentolamine regulates the pacemaker activity of ICC via ATP-sensitive K(+) channel activation. Phentolamine could act through an adrenergic receptor- and also through NO-independent mechanism that involves intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

  4. Simple hand-held metal detectors are an effective means of detecting cardiac pacemakers in the deceased prior to cremation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jason Lyle; Williams, John; Fearn, Lesley

    2010-05-01

    The hazard of undetected cardiac pacemakers exploding in crematoria is well described. This short report describes the use of an affordable hand-held metal detector to detect cardiac pacemakers. Over the course of a year, the metal detector located 100% of cardiac pacemakers in a district general hospital mortuary. A simple model using pigskin and fat is also used to demonstrate the effectiveness in vitro. Commercially purchased hand-held metal detectors should be used in all mortuaries responsible for detection and removal of cardiac pacemakers prior to cremation.

  5. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  6. Bursting thalamic responses in awake monkey contribute to visual detection and are modulated by corticofugal feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania eOrtuno

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lateral geniculate nucleus is the gateway for visual information en route to the visual cortex. Neural activity is characterized by the existence of 2 firing modes: burst and tonic. Originally associated with sleep, bursts have now been postulated to be a part of the normal visual response, structured to increase the probability of cortical activation, able to act as a wake-up call to the cortex. We investigated a potential role for burst in the detection of novel stimuli by recording neuronal activity in the LGN of behaving monkeys during a visual detection task. Our results show that bursts are often the neuron’s first response, and are more numerous in the response to attended target stimuli than to unattended distractor stimuli. Bursts are indicators of the task novelty, as repetition decreased bursting. Because the primary visual cortex is the major modulatory input to the LGN, we compared the results obtained in control conditions with those observed when cortical activity was reduced by TMS. This cortical deactivation reduced visual response related bursting by 90%. These results highlight a novel role for the thalamus, able to code higher order image attributes as important as novelty early in the thalamo-cortical conversation.

  7. Case study thoracic radiotherapy in an elderly patient with pacemaker: The issue of pacing leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirova, Youlia M., E-mail: youlia.kirova@curie.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Menard, Jean; Chargari, Cyrus; Mazal, Alejandro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Kirov, Krassen [Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-07-01

    To assess clinical outcome of patients with pacemaker treated with thoracic radiation therapy for T8-T9 paravertebral chloroma. A 92-year-old male patient with chloroma presenting as paravertebral painful and compressive (T8-T9) mass was referred for radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie. The patient presented with cardiac dysfunction and a permanent pacemaker that had been implanted prior. The decision of Multidisciplinary Meeting was to deliver 30 Gy in 10 fractions for reducing the symptoms and controlling the tumor growth. The patient received a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 4-field conformal radiotherapy with 20-MV photons. The dose to pacemaker was 0.1 Gy but a part of the pacing leads was in the irradiation fields. The patient was treated the first time in the presence of his radiation oncologist and an intensive care unit doctor. Moreover, the function of his pacemaker was monitored during the entire radiotherapy course. No change in pacemaker function was observed during any of the radiotherapy fractions. The radiotherapy was very well tolerated without any side effects. The function of the pacemaker was checked before and after the radiotherapy treatment by the cardiologist and no pacemaker dysfunction was observed. Although updated guidelines are needed with acceptable dose criteria for implantable cardiac devices, it is possible to treat patients with these devices and parts encroaching on the radiation field. This case report shows we were able to safely treat our patient through a multidisciplinary approach, monitoring the patient during each step of the treatment.

  8. Distribution of pacemaker function through the tunica muscularis of the canine gastric antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, K; Semple, G S; Sanders, K M; Ward, S M

    2001-11-15

    1. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) have been shown to generate pacemaker activity in gastrointestinal (GI) muscles. Experiments were performed to characterize the ICC within the canine gastric antrum and to determine the site(s) of pacemaker activity and whether active propagation pathways exist within the thick-walled tunica muscularis of large mammals. 2. Immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy revealed four populations of ICC within the antral muscularis on the basis of anatomical location. Typical ICC were found in the myenteric region of the small intestine (IC-MY). Intramuscular ICC (IC-IM) were intermingled between muscle fibres of circular and longitudinal muscle layers. ICC were also found within septa (IC-SEP) between muscle bundles and along the submucosal surface of the circular muscle layer (IC-SM). ICC were identified in each location by ultrastructural features. 3. Intracellular electrical recordings demonstrated nifedipine-insensitive slow waves throughout the circular muscle layer. Separation of interior and submucosal circular muscle strips from the dominant (myenteric) pacemaker region dramatically slowed frequency but did not block spontaneous slow waves, suggesting that pacemaker cells populate all regions of the circular muscle. 4. Slow waves could be evoked in interior and submucosal circular muscles at rates above normal antral frequency by electrical pacing or by acetylcholine (0.3 microM). Active slow wave propagation occurred in all regions of the circular muscle, and propagation velocities were similar in each region. 5. In summary, antral muscles of the canine stomach have pacemaker capability throughout the circular muscle. Normally, a dominant pacemaker near the myenteric plexus drives slow waves that actively propagate throughout the circular layer. Pacemaker activity and the active propagation pathway may occur in networks of ICC that are distributed in the region of the myenteric plexus and throughout the circular muscle

  9. Cell type-specific synaptic dynamics of synchronized bursting in the juvenile CA3 rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, Ildiko; Maccaferri, Gianmaria

    2004-10-27

    Spontaneous synchronous bursting of the CA3 hippocampus in vitro is a widely studied model of physiological and pathological network synchronization. The role of inhibitory conductances during network bursting is not understood in detail, despite the fact that several antiepileptic drugs target GABA(A) receptors. Here, we show that the first manifestation of a burst event is a cell type-specific flurry of GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory input to pyramidal cells, but not to stratum oriens horizontal interneurons. Moreover, GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic input is proportionally smaller in these interneurons compared with pyramidal cells. Computational models and dynamic-clamp studies using experimentally derived conductance waveforms indicate that both these factors modulate spike timing during synchronized activity. In particular, the different kinetics and the larger strength of GABAergic input to pyramidal cells defer action potential initiation and contribute to the observed delay of firing, so that the interneuronal activity leads the burst cycle. In contrast, excitatory inputs to both neuronal populations during a burst are kinetically similar, as required to maintain synchronicity. We also show that the natural pattern of activation of inhibitory and excitatory conductances during a synchronized burst cycle is different within the same neuronal population. In particular, GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents activate earlier and outlast the excitatory components driving the bursts. Thus, cell type-specific balance and timing of GABA(A) receptor-mediated input are critical to set the appropriate spike timing in pyramidal cells and interneurons and coordinate additional neurotransmitter release modulating burst strength and network frequency.

  10. Management of radiation therapy patients with cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Francesca; Gomellini, Sara; Caruso, Cristina; Barbara, Raffaele; Musio, Daniela; Coppi, Tamara; Cardinale, Mario; Tombolini, Vincenzo; de Paula, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The increasing growth of population with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as Pacemaker (PM) and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD), requires particular attention in management of patients needing radiation treatment. This paper updates and summarizes some recommendations from different international guidelines. Ionizing radiation and/or electromagnetic interferences could cause device failure. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centres. We refer to the German Society of Radiation Oncology and Cardiology guidelines (ed. 2015); to the Society of Cardiology Australia and New Zealand Statement (ed. 2015); to the guidelines in force in the Netherlands (ed. 2012) and to the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology recommendations (ed. 2013) as reported in the guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with CIED. Although there is not a clear cut-off point, risk of device failure increases with increasing doses. Cumulative dose and pacing dependency have been combined to categorize patients into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Measures to secure patient safety are described for each category. The use of energy ≤6MV is preferable and it's strongly recommended not to exceed a total dose of 2 Gy to the PM and 1 Gy for ICD. Given the dangers of device malfunction, radiation oncology departments should adopt all the measures designed to minimize the risk to patients. For this reason, a close collaboration between cardiologist, radiotherapist and physicist is necessary.

  11. Pacemaker-Mediated Tachycardia: Manufacturer Specifics and Spectrum of Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteil, Benjamin; Ploux, Sylvain; Eschalier, Romain; Ritter, Philippe; Haissaguerre, Michel; Koneru, Jayanthi N; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Bordachar, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Pacemaker-mediated tachycardia (PMT) is the term used to describe a repetitive sequence of sensed retrograde P waves followed by ventricular pacing at or below the maximum tracking rate. The following events can promote atrioventricular (AV) dissociation, retrograde conduction, and the onset of PMT: ventricular or atrial extrasystole, an excessively long programmed AV delay, external interference or myopotentials sensed by the atrial channel, atrial sensing or pacing failure, the absence of postventricular atrial refractory period extension after removal of a magnet, and VDD pacing at a higher rate than sinus rate. In contemporary devices, each manufacturer has a proprietary algorithm to detect and terminate PMT. Because of the increase in the number and complexity of the pacing algorithms and because of manufacturer-driven differences, a basic understanding of these new algorithms is important for patient care. We review here the main elements of the physiopathology of this type of tachycardia, describe the specific characteristics of the different manufacturers, and present representative clinical cases.

  12. A Lognormal Recurrent Network Model for Burst Generation during Hippocampal Sharp Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Yoshiyuki; Carvalho, Milena M; Inokuchi, Kaoru; Fukai, Tomoki

    2015-10-28

    The strength of cortical synapses distributes lognormally, with a long tail of strong synapses. Various properties of neuronal activity, such as the average firing rates of neurons, the rate and magnitude of spike bursts, the magnitude of population synchrony, and the correlations between presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes, also obey lognormal-like distributions reported in the rodent hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Theoretical models have demonstrated how such a firing rate distribution emerges from neural network dynamics. However, how the other properties also display lognormal patterns remain unknown. Because these features are likely to originate from neural dynamics in CA3, we model a recurrent neural network with the weights of recurrent excitatory connections distributed lognormally to explore the underlying mechanisms and their functional implications. Using multi-timescale adaptive threshold neurons, we construct a low-frequency spontaneous firing state of bursty neurons. This state well replicates the observed statistical properties of population synchrony in hippocampal pyramidal cells. Our results show that the lognormal distribution of synaptic weights consistently accounts for the observed long-tailed features of hippocampal activity. Furthermore, our model demonstrates that bursts spread over the lognormal network much more effectively than single spikes, implying an advantage of spike bursts in information transfer. This efficiency in burst propagation is not found in neural network models with Gaussian-weighted recurrent excitatory synapses. Our model proposes a potential network mechanism to generate sharp waves in CA3 and associated ripples in CA1 because bursts occur in CA3 pyramidal neurons most frequently during sharp waves.

  13. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note that...

  14. Millisecond extragalactic radio bursts as magnetar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S B

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the population of millisecond extragalactic radio bursts discovered by Thornton et al. (2013) are in good correspondence with the hypothesis that such events are related to hyperflares of magnetars, as was proposed by us after the first observation of an extragalactic millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al. (2007). We also point that some of multiple millisecond radio bursts from M31 discovered by Rubio-Herrera et al. (2013) also can be related to weaker magnetar bursts.

  15. Pre-ejection period by radial artery tonometry supplements echo doppler findings during biventricular pacemaker optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamruddin Salima

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biventricular (Biv pacemaker echo optimization has been shown to improve cardiac output however is not routinely used due to its complexity. We investigated the role of a simple method involving computerized pre-ejection time (PEP assessment by radial artery tonometry in guiding Biv pacemaker optimization. Methods Blinded echo and radial artery tonometry were performed simultaneously in 37 patients, age 69.1 ± 12.8 years, left ventricular (LV ejection fraction (EF 33 ± 10%, during Biv pacemaker optimization. Effect of optimization on echo derived velocity time integral (VTI, ejection time (ET, myocardial performance index (MPI, radial artery tonometry derived PEP and echo-radial artery tonometry derived PEP/VTI and PEP/ET indices was evaluated. Results Significant improvement post optimization was achieved in LV ET (286.9 ± 37.3 to 299 ± 34.6 ms, p Conclusion An acute shortening of PEP by radial artery tonometry occurs post Biv pacemaker optimization and correlates with improvement in hemodynamics by echo Doppler and may provide a cost-efficient approach to assist with Biv pacemaker echo optimization.

  16. How to test mode switching in pacemakers implanted in patients: the MOST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padeletti, Luigi; Gasparini, Maurizio; Porciani, Maria Cristina; Pieragnoli, Paolo; Colella, Andrea; Michelucci, Antonio; Proclemer, Alessandro; Tognarini, Stefano; Mantica, Massimo; Coltorti, Fernando; Corbucci, Giorgio; Sutton, Richard

    2002-02-01

    Optimal management of atrial arrhythmias with dual chamber pacemakers requires proper performance of automatic mode switching (AMS). The aim of this study was to develop a reliable technique to test the AMS function by using an external electronic device capable of mimicking the occurrence of supraventricular arrhythmias (Supraventricular Arrhythmia Simulator [SAS]). The SAS delivers low voltage pulse trains (200 mV, 20 ms) through two skin electrodes. Each pulse train lasts 15 seconds and starts synchronously with a pacing pulse of the implanted pacemaker to avoid interference from the operator. The pulse train rate is set at 350, 250, and 160 beats/min to simulate AF, atrial flutter, and atrial tachycardia (AT), respectively. Thirty-five patients implanted with Vitatron pacemakers, whose AMS system has been previously validated, were enrolled. Atrial and ventricular sensing were programmed in unipolar mode at 0.5 mV and in bipolar mode at > 2 mV, respectively. All pulses from the SAS were detected by the atrial channel at an amplitude ranging from 1 to 3 mV. The test proved to be safe and reliable at rest and during exercise. AMS occurred immediately at onset or at offset of atrial arrhythmias, and no adverse interference on pacemaker function was seen from the SAS. In conclusion, the described technique and the SAS are safe and reliable for patient and pacemaker function and can be proposed as a useful method to verify proper performance of AMS function irrespective of the type of implanted devices.

  17. Differences in atrial septal activation with an intrasinoatrial nodal pacemaker and epicardial sinoatrial nodal pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, J M

    1979-01-01

    Changes in Intra-SA nodal pacemaker localization were produced through stimulation of the decentralized cervical vagi and stellate ganglia in the anesthetized dog. Shifts in pacemaker to the rostral, middle, or caudal regions of the SA node produced a change in the timing as well as a change in the sequence of activation of recording sites overlying the AV node. Epicardial pacing with a plaque electrode from either the rostral, middle, or caudal regions of the SA node produced the same activation sequence of the AV nodal electrodes irrespective of the epicardial SA nodal pacing site. The inability of epicardial SA nodal pacing to precisely reproduce the activation pattern of the atrial septum overlying the AV node observed with a natural SA nodal pacemaker can be explained by the geographic relationship of the pacemaker cells within the node to the preferential internodal pathways and the area of atrial tissue stimulated by pacing. Pacing activates a large mass of tissue, whereas an intrinsic pacemaker probably acts as a more localized focus. The inability of pacing to reproduce the activation pattern seen with spontaneous rhythm may be a determinant in the varied P wave morphology seen with coronary sinus or AV nodal junctional rhythms, as compared with more consistent morphology seen with pacing.

  18. Permanent transvenous pacemaker implantation in a patient with Cor triatriatum dextrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun; Xiang; George; V; Moukarbel; Blair; Grubb

    2015-01-01

    Cor triatriatum dextrum is an extremely rare congenital heart abnormality in which the right atrium is separatedinto two chambers by a persistent fibrous membrane. A transvenous approach to place a dual-chamber pacemaker in such patients is technically challenging. We report the first case of a transvenous permanent pacemaker placement in a patient with cor triatriatum dextrum. An 87-year-old woman was diagnosed with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. She was accidentally found to have cor triatriatum dextrum during the transesophageal echocardiography(TEE) prior to cardioversion. Later during her hospital stay, it was indicated to place a permanant pacemaker due to high grade atrioventricular block. After thorough reviewing TEE imagings, a transvenous catheter-based approach was decided feasible. Patient successfully received a dual chamber pacemaker through left subclavian venous approach. Furthermore in our case, using specially designed pacemaker leads and cautious intra-procedural maneuvering under fluoroscopic guidance ensured procedural success. In summary, a thorough pre-operative evaluation with transesophageal echocardiography is critical for the planning and eventual success of the transvenous placement of rightsided leads.

  19. Stochastic Phenomena in One-Dimensional Rulkov Model of Neuronal Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Bashkirtseva

    2015-01-01

    transitions in a zone of bistability are considered. It is shown how such random transitions can generate a new neuronal regime of the stochastic bursting and transfer the system from order to chaos. A transient zone of values of noise intensity corresponding to the onset of noise-induced bursting and chaotization is localized by the stochastic sensitivity functions technique.

  20. The dependence of radiofrequency induced pacemaker lead tip heating on the electrical conductivity of the medium at the lead tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langman, Deborah A; Goldberg, Ira B; Judy, Jack; Paul Finn, J; Ennis, Daniel B

    2012-08-01

    Radiofrequency induced pacemaker lead tip heating is one of the main reasons magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is contraindicated for patients with pacemakers. The objective of this work was to evaluate the dependence of pacemaker lead tip heating during MRI scanning on the electrical conductivity of the medium surrounding the pacemaker lead tip. The effect of conductivity was measured using hydroxyethyl cellulose, polyacrylic acid, and saline with conductivities ranging from 0 to 3 S/m which spans the range of human tissue conductivity. The maximum lead tip heating observed in polyacrylic acid was 50.4 °C at 0.28 S/m, in hydroxyethyl cellulose the maximum was 36.8 °C at 0.52 S/m, and in saline the maximum was 12.5 °C at 0.51 S/m. The maximum power transfer theorem was used to calculate the relative power deposited in the solution based on the characteristic impedance of the pacemaker lead and test solution impedance. The results demonstrate a strong correlation between the relative power deposited and pacemaker lead tip heating for hydroxyethyl cellulose and saline solutions. Maximum power deposition occurred when the impedance of the solution matched the pacemaker lead impedance. Pacemaker lead tip heating is dependent upon the electrical conductivity of the solution at the lead tip and should be considered when planning in vitro gel or saline experiments.

  1. Pacemaker activity of the human sinoatrial node: Role of the hyperpolarization-activated current, I-f

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Verkerk; A.C.G. van Ginneken; R. Wilders

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of primary, spontaneous cardiac pacemaker activity of the sinoatrial node (SAN) has extensively been studied in several animal species, but is virtually unexplored in man. Understanding the mechanisms of human SAN pacemaker activity is important for developing new therapeutic approache

  2. Pacemaker optimization guided by echocardiography in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Danijela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT or biventricular pacing is a contemporary treatment in the management of advanced heart failure. Echocardiography plays an evolving and important role in patient selection for CRT, follow-up of acute and chronic CRT effects and optimization of device settings after biventricular pacemaker implantation. In this paper we illustrate usefulness of echocardiography for successful AV and VV timing optimization in patients with CRT. A review of up-to-date literature concerning rationale for AV and VV delay optimization, echocardiographic protocols and current recommendations for AV and VV optimization after CRT are also presented. Outline of Cases. The first case is of successful AV delay optimization guided by echocardiography in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy treated with CRT is presented. Pulsed blood flow Doppler was used to detect mitral inflow while programming different duration of AV delay. The AV delay with optimal transmittal flow was established. The optimal mitral flow was the one with clearly defined E and A waves and maximal velocity time integral (VTI of the mitral flow. Improvement in clinical status and reverse left ventricle remodelling with improvement of ejection fraction was registered in our patient after a month. The second case presents a patient with heart failure caused by dilated cardiomyopathy; six months after CRT implantation the patient was still NYHA class III and with a significantly depressed left ventricular ejection fraction. Optimization of VV interval guided by echocardiography was undertaken measuring VTI of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT during programming of different VV intervals. The optimal VV interval was determined using a maximal LVOT VTI. A month after VV optimization our patient showed improvement in LV ejection fraction. Conclusion. Optimal management of patients treated with CRT integrate both clinical and echocardiographic follow

  3. [New pacemaker functions: which ones represent real progress and which are only gadgets?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodinot, B

    2000-07-01

    Modern pacemakers, and particularly dual chamber models, include a broad array of therapeutic and diagnostic features. Some are designed to increase safety, whereas others are either designed to avoid unnecessary pacing, reduce the current drain and increase the pacemaker longevity, or to improve the hemodynamics. Diagnostic features are more elaborate, more or less automatic, and easier to extract from the pacemaker memory. Some of these new algorithms represent a real advantage, while others appear to be more like gadgets than real advances. Several new algorithms should be improved in order to avoid possibly dangerous side effects. Most of these new features are of little value in the absence of postoperative programming by a well trained physician.

  4. [The computer assisted pacemaker clinic at the regional hospital of Udine (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feruglio, G A; Lestuzzi, L; Carminati, D

    1978-01-01

    For a close follow-up of large groups of pacemaker patients and for evaluation of long term pacing on a reliable statistical basis, many pacemaker centers in the world are now using computer systems. A patient data system with structured display records, designed to give complete, comprehensive and surveyable information and which are immediately retrievable 24 hours a day, on display or printed sets, seems to offer an ideal solution. The pacemaker clinic at the Regional Hospital of Udine has adopted this type of system. The clinic in linked to a live, on-line patient data system (G/3, Informatica Friuli-Venezia Giulia). The input and retrieval of information are made through a conventional keyboard. The input formats have fixed headings with coded alternatives and a limited space for comments in free text. The computer edits the coded information to surveyable reviews. Searches can be made on coded information and data of interest.

  5. Dynamic Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging without Complications in a Patient with Dual-Chamber Demand Pacemaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, F.; Lupo, P.; Esseridou, A.; Fausto, A.; Quarenghi, M. [Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy). Depts. of Radiology, Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Center

    2006-02-15

    Mammography and ultrasound indicated a cancer of the right breast in a 77-year-old woman with a dual-chamber demand pacemaker. The patient was not pacemaker-dependent. She underwent breast 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (dynamic gradient echo sequence with Gd-DOTA 0.1 mmol/kg). Before the patient entered the MR room, the configuration of the device was changed (the response to magnet was switched from asynchronous to off and the rate-responsive algorithm was disabled). No relevant modifications of heart rhythm or rate were observed during the MR examination. No symptom was reported. Immediately after the examination, the pacemaker interrogation showed neither program changes nor alert warnings. MRI detected a bifocal cancer in the right breast which allowed tailored breast-conserving treatment to be initiated. Histopathology confirmed a bifocal invasive ductal carcinoma.

  6. Effects of lubiprostone on pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of cajal from the mouse colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Han-Yi; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ki, Jung Suk; Ryu, Kwon Ho; Choi, Seok; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2014-08-01

    Lubiprostone is a chloride (Cl(-)) channel activator derived from prostaglandin E1 and used for managing constipation. In addition, lubiprostone affects the activity of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells that generate slow-wave activity in smooth muscles. We studied the effects of lubiprostone on the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to determine the pacemaker activity in cultured colonic ICCs obtained from mice. Lubiprostone hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited the generation of pacemaker potentials. Prostanoid EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 antagonists (SC-19220, PF-04418948, 6-methoxypyridine-2-boronc acid N-phenyldiethanolamine ester, and GW627368, respectively) did not block the response to lubiprostone. L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase) did not block the response to lubiprostone. In addition, tetraethylammonium (TEA, a voltage-dependent potassium [K(+)] channel blocker) and apamin (a calcium [Ca(2+)]-dependent K(+) channel blocker) did not block the response to lubiprostone. However, glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker) blocked the response to lubiprostone. Similar to lubiprostone, pinacidil (an opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel) hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited the generation of pacemaker potentials, and these effects were inhibited by glibenclamide. These results suggest that lubiprostone can modulate the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs via activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel through a prostanoid EP receptor-independent mechanism.

  7. Redoing a bioprosthetic tricuspid valve replacement with pacemaker wire through the ruined bioprosthetic valve orifice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-wei; PAN Shi-wei; SONG Yun-hu; HU Sheng-shou

    2011-01-01

    Severe tricuspid regurgitation with permanent pacemaker wire passing through the orifice of bioprosthetic tricuspid valve is extremely rare. We present a case of such kind of patient and redid bioprosthetic tricuspid valve replacement. A hawk mouth forceps for bone surgery was used to cut off the mental ring of ruined bioprosthetic tricuspid valve and the ruined valve was removed. A new bioprosthetic tricuspid valve was implanted and the wire of permanent pacemaker was left outside the ring of bioprosthetic tricuspid valve. This method may be helpful for such kind of patient.

  8. Calcium Transient and Sodium-Calcium Exchange Current in Human versus Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Pacemaker Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Verkerk, Arie O.; Marcel M. G. J. van Borren; Ronald Wilders

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the mechanism underlying the pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, focusing on the relative importance of the “membrane clock” and the “Ca2+ clock” in the generation of the small net membrane current that depolarizes the cell towards the action potential threshold. Specifically, the debate centers around the question whether the membrane clock-driven hyperpolarization-activated current, I f , which is also known as the “funny current” or “pacemaker c...

  9. Electromagnetic interference with a bipolar pacemaker by an induction heating (IH) rice cooker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Toshihisa; Abe, Haruhiko; Kohno, Ritsuko; Toyoshima, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Kondo, Shoichi; Kabashima, Narutoshi; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masahito; Okazaki, Masahiro; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields may interfere with normal pacemaker function. Despite new device designs and bipolar leads, electromagnetic interference (EMI) remains a concern when pacemaker recipients are exposed to various household appliances. We report the observation of EMI by an induction heating (IH) rice cooker in a patient with sick sinus syndrome who was the recipient of a bipolar dual chamber-pacing system. Stored electrograms revealed episodes of inappropriate ventricular pacing, all coinciding with the opening of an IH rice cooker. Recipients of implantable medical devices must be warned to handle IH rice cookers with caution.

  10. Multiple photoreceptor systems control the swim pacemaker activity in box jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Mori, S.

    2009-01-01

    Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each with a s......Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each...

  11. Pacemaker repetitive nonreentrant ventriculoatrial synchrony. Why did automatic mode switching occur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barold, S Serge; Stroobandt, Roland X; Van Heuverswyn, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive nonreentrant ventriculoatrial synchrony during dual-chamber pacing is characterized by long intervals alternating with short intervals. This arrangement activated automatic mode switching in a St Jude dual-chamber pacemaker in which the algorithm requires an atrial sensed event for automatic mode switching initiation. Automatic mode switching activation by an atrial sensed event (retrograde P wave) was puzzling because the programmed postventricular atrial period was longer than the retrograde ventriculoatrial conduction time. The explanation is presented in the form of questions and answers to facilitate the understanding of pacemaker function and complex timing cycles.

  12. Reduction of atrial fibrillation in remotely monitored pacemaker patients: results from a Chinese multicentre registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ke-ping; DAI Yan; HUA Wei; YANG Jie-fu; LI Kang; LIANG Zhao-guang; SHEN Fa-rong

    2013-01-01

    Background Many recipients of implantable cardiac electronic devices have atrial fibrillation (AF) occurrences after device implantation,even if there is no previous history of AF,and some of the episodes are asymptomatic.The purpose of this study was to evaluate trends in AF burden following early AF detection in patients treated with pacemakers equipped with automatic,daily Home Monitoring function.Methods Between February 2009 and December 2010,the registry recruited 701 pacemaker patients (628 dual-chamber,73 biventricular devices) at 97 clinical centers in China.Daily Home Monitoring data transmissions were analyzed to screen for the AF burden.In-office follow-ups were scheduled for 3 and 6 months after implantation.Upon first AF (i.e.,mode-switch) detection in a patient,screening of AF burden by Home Monitoring was extended for the next 180 days.Results At least one episode of AF was observed in 22.9% of patients with dual-chamber pacemakers and in 28.8% of patients with biventricular pacemakers.The first AF detection in a patient occurred,on average,about 2 months before scheduled follow-up visits.In both pacemaker groups,mean AF burden decreased significantly (P<0.05) over 180 days following first AF detection:from 12.0% to 2.5% in dual-chamber and from 12.2% to 0.5% in biventricular pacemaker recipients.The number of patients with an AF burden >10% per month was significantly reduced over 6 months of implantation in both dual chamber (38 patients in the first month vs.21 patients in month 6,P<0.05) and biventricular (7 patients in the first month vs.0 patient in months 4-6,P<0.05) pacemaker recipients.Conclusions Automatic,daily Home Monitoring of patients treated with cardiac pacemakers allows early detection of AF,and there is a gradual and significant decrease in AF burden.

  13. Long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, synchronous bursting and synaptic remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Kaufman

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neuromodulation plays key roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability, network activity, arousal, and behavior. On longer time scales, cholinergic systems play essential roles in cortical development, maturation, and plasticity. Presumably, these processes are associated with substantial synaptic remodeling, yet to date, long-term relationships between cholinergic tone and synaptic remodeling remain largely unknown. Here we used automated microscopy combined with multielectrode array recordings to study long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, excitatory synapse remodeling, and network activity characteristics in networks of cortical neurons grown on multielectrode array substrates. Experimental elevations of cholinergic tone led to the abrupt suppression of episodic synchronous bursting activity (but not of general activity, followed by a gradual growth of excitatory synapses over hours. Subsequent blockage of cholinergic receptors led to an immediate restoration of synchronous bursting and the gradual reversal of synaptic growth. Neither synaptic growth nor downsizing was governed by multiplicative scaling rules. Instead, these occurred in a subset of synapses, irrespective of initial synaptic size. Synaptic growth seemed to depend on intrinsic network activity, but not on the degree to which bursting was suppressed. Intriguingly, sustained elevations of cholinergic tone were associated with a gradual recovery of synchronous bursting but not with a reversal of synaptic growth. These findings show that cholinergic tone can strongly affect synaptic remodeling and synchronous bursting activity, but do not support a strict coupling between the two. Finally, the reemergence of synchronous bursting in the presence of elevated cholinergic tone indicates that the capacity of cholinergic neuromodulation to indefinitely suppress synchronous bursting might be inherently limited.

  14. α-Calcium calmodulin kinase II modulates the temporal structure of hippocampal bursting patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeiwon Cho

    Full Text Available The alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (α-CaMKII is known to play a key role in CA1/CA3 synaptic plasticity, hippocampal place cell stability and spatial learning. Additionally, there is evidence from hippocampal electrophysiological slice studies that this kinase has a role in regulating ion channels that control neuronal excitability. Here, we report in vivo single unit studies, with α-CaMKII mutant mice, in which threonine 305 was replaced with an aspartate (α-CaMKII(T305D mutants, that indicate that this kinase modulates spike patterns in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Previous studies showed that α-CaMKII(T305D mutants have abnormalities in both hippocampal LTP and hippocampal-dependent learning. We found that besides decreased place cell stability, which could be caused by their LTP impairments, the hippocampal CA1 spike patterns of α-CaMKII(T305D mutants were profoundly abnormal. Although overall firing rate, and overall burst frequency were not significantly altered in these mutants, inter-burst intervals, mean number of intra-burst spikes, ratio of intra-burst spikes to total spikes, and mean intra-burst intervals were significantly altered. In particular, the intra burst intervals of place cells in α-CaMKII(T305D mutants showed higher variability than controls. These results provide in vivo evidence that besides its well-known function in synaptic plasticity, α-CaMKII, and in particular its inhibitory phosphorylation at threonine 305, also have a role in shaping the temporal structure of hippocampal burst patterns. These results suggest that some of the molecular processes involved in acquiring information may also shape the patterns used to encode this information.

  15. Learning-induced reduction in post-burst after-hyperpolarization (AHP) is mediated by activation of PKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroussi, Yaron; Brosh, Inbar; Barkai, Edi

    2002-09-01

    We studied the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) in mediating learning-related long lasting reduction of the post-burst after-hyperpolarization (AHP) in cortical pyramidal neurons. We have shown previously that pyramidal neurons in the rat piriform (olfactory) cortex from trained (TR) rats have reduced post-burst AHP for 3 days after odour-discrimination learning, and that this reduction is due to decreased conductance of calcium-dependent potassium current. In the present study, we examined whether this long-lasting reduction in AHP is mediated by second messenger systems. The broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor, H7, increased the AHP in neurons from TR rats, but not in neurons from pseudo-trained (pseudo-TR) and naive rats. Consequently, the difference in AHP amplitude between neurons from TR and control animals was diminished. This effect was also obtained by application of the specific PKC inhibitor, GF-109203x. The PKC activator, 1-Oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), significantly reduced the AHP in neurons from naive and pseudo-TR rats, but not in neurons from TR rats, so that the difference between the groups was abolished. The PKA-specific inhibitor, H-89, increased the AHP in neurons from all groups to a similar extent, and the difference in AHP amplitude between neurons from TR rats and neurons from controls was maintained. We suggest that while the post-burst AHP in piriform cortex pyramidal neurons is modulated by both PKC and PKA, a PKC-dependent process maintains the learning-related reduction of the AHP in these cells.

  16. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  17. Noise-induced phase transitions in neuronal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K -E; Goltsev, A V

    2013-01-01

    Using an exactly solvable cortical model of a neuronal network, we show that, by increasing the intensity of shot noise (flow of random spikes bombarding neurons), the network undergoes first- and second-order non-equilibrium phase transitions. We study the nature of the transitions, bursts and avalanches of neuronal activity. Saddle-node and supercritical Hopf bifurcations are the mechanisms of emergence of sustained network oscillations. We show that the network stimulated by shot noise behaves similar to the Morris-Lecar model of a biological neuron stimulated by an applied current.

  18. Transcription factor ISL1 is essential for pacemaker development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xingqun; Zhang, Qingquan; Cattaneo, Paola; Zhuang, Shaowei; Gong, Xiaohui; Spann, Nathanael J; Jiang, Cizhong; Cao, Xinkai; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Bu, Lei; Wang, Gang; Chen, H S Vincent; Zhuang, Tao; Yan, Jie; Geng, Peng; Luo, Lina; Banerjee, Indroneal; Chen, Yihan; Glass, Christopher K; Zambon, Alexander C; Chen, Ju; Sun, Yunfu; Evans, Sylvia M

    2015-08-01

    The sinoatrial node (SAN) maintains a rhythmic heartbeat; therefore, a better understanding of factors that drive SAN development and function is crucial to generation of potential therapies, such as biological pacemakers, for sinus arrhythmias. Here, we determined that the LIM homeodomain transcription factor ISL1 plays a key role in survival, proliferation, and function of pacemaker cells throughout development. Analysis of several Isl1 mutant mouse lines, including animals harboring an SAN-specific Isl1 deletion, revealed that ISL1 within SAN is a requirement for early embryonic viability. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of FACS-purified cells from ISL1-deficient SANs revealed that a number of genes critical for SAN function, including those encoding transcription factors and ion channels, were downstream of ISL1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays performed with anti-ISL1 antibodies and chromatin extracts from FACS-purified SAN cells demonstrated that ISL1 directly binds genomic regions within several genes required for normal pacemaker function, including subunits of the L-type calcium channel, Ank2, and Tbx3. Other genes implicated in abnormal heart rhythm in humans were also direct ISL1 targets. Together, our results demonstrate that ISL1 regulates approximately one-third of SAN-specific genes, indicate that a combination of ISL1 and other SAN transcription factors could be utilized to generate pacemaker cells, and suggest ISL1 mutations may underlie sick sinus syndrome.

  19. Normal heart rhythm is initiated and regulated by an intracellular calcium clock within pacemaker cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G

    2007-10-01

    For almost half a century it has been thought that the heart rhythm originates on the surface membrane of the cardiac pacemaker cells and is driven by voltage-gated ion channels (membrane clocks). Data from several recent studies, however, conclusively show that the rhythm is initiated, sustained, and regulated by oscillatory Ca(2+) releases (Ca(2+) clock) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, a major Ca(2+) store within sinoatrial node cells, the primary heart's pacemakers. Activation of the local oscillatory Ca(2+) releases is independent of membrane depolarisation and driven by a high level of basal state phosphorylation of Ca(2+) cycling proteins. The releases produce Ca(2+) wavelets under the cell surface membrane during the later phase of diastolic depolarisation and activate the forward mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger resulting in inward membrane current, which ignites an action potential. Phosphorylation-dependent gradation of speed at which Ca(2+) clock cycles is the essential regulatory mechanism of normal pacemaker rate and rhythm. The robust regulation of pacemaker function is insured by tight integration of Ca(2+) and membrane clocks: the action potential shape and ion fluxes are tuned by membrane clocks to sustain operation of the Ca(2+) clock which produces timely and powerful ignition of the membrane clocks to effect action potentials.

  20. Local induction of pacemaking activity in a monolayer of electrically coupled quiescent NRK fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dernison, M.M.; Kusters, J.M.A.M.; Peters, P.H.J.; Meerwijk, W.P. van; Ypey, D.L.; Gielen, C.C.A.M.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Theuvenet, A.P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Cultures of normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts may display spontaneous calcium action potentials which propagate throughout the cellular monolayer. Pacemaking activity of NRK cells was studied by patch clamp electrophysiology and vital calcium imaging, using a new experimental approach in which a r

  1. Potential additional indicators for pacemaker requirement in isolated congenital atrioventricular block.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breur, J.M.; Udink ten Cate, F.E.; Kapusta, L.; Boramanand, N.; Cohen, M.I.; Crosson, J.E.; Lubbers, L.J.; Friedman, A.H.; Brenner, J.I.; Vetter, V.L.; Meijboom, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Low heart rate is the predominantly used indication for pacemaker intervention in patients with isolated congenital atrioventricular block (CAVB). The aim of this study was to compare the difference in heart rates recorded with ECG and Holter monitoring between paced (PM) and nonpaced (NPM) patients

  2. Potential additional indicators for pacemaker requirement in isolated congenital atrioventricular block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P.J. Breur; F.E.A.U. ten Cate; L. Kapusta; N. Boramanand; M.I. Cohen; J.E. Crosson; L.J. Lubbers; A.H. Friedman; J.I. Brenner; V.L. Vetter; E.J. Meijboom

    2006-01-01

    Low heart rate is the predominantly used indication for pacemaker intervention in patients with isolated congenital atrioventricular block (CAVB). The aim of this study was to compare the difference in heart rates recorded with ECG and Holter monitoring between paced (PM) and nonpaced (NPM) patients

  3. Popeye domain containing proteins are essential for stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Alexander; Breher, Stephanie S; Waldeyer, Christoph; Schindler, Roland F R; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Rinné, Susanne; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Schlueter, Jan; Becher, Jan; Simrick, Subreena; Vauti, Franz; Kuhtz, Juliane; Meister, Patrick; Kreissl, Sonja; Torlopp, Angela; Liebig, Sonja K; Laakmann, Sandra; Müller, Thomas D; Neumann, Joachim; Stieber, Juliane; Ludwig, Andreas; Maier, Sebastian K; Decher, Niels; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fabritz, Larissa; Brand, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cells create rhythmic pulses that control heart rate; pacemaker dysfunction is a prevalent disorder in the elderly, but little is known about the underlying molecular causes. Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode membrane proteins with high expression levels in cardiac myocytes and specifically in the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system. Here, we report the phenotypic analysis of mice deficient in Popdc1 or Popdc2. ECG analysis revealed severe sinus node dysfunction when freely roaming mutant animals were subjected to physical or mental stress. In both mutants, bradyarrhythmia developed in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that the conserved Popeye domain functioned as a high-affinity cAMP-binding site. Popdc proteins interacted with the potassium channel TREK-1, which led to increased cell surface expression and enhanced current density, both of which were negatively modulated by cAMP. These data indicate that Popdc proteins have an important regulatory function in heart rate dynamics that is mediated, at least in part, through cAMP binding. Mice with mutant Popdc1 and Popdc2 alleles are therefore useful models for the dissection of the mechanisms causing pacemaker dysfunction and could aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Inadvertent implantation of pacemaker lead in the left ventricle: kill two birds with one stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Ugur Onsel; Tuncer, Esref; Alioglu, Emin; Tengiz, Istemihan; Ercan, Ertugrul

    2014-04-01

    We report an asymptomatic patient in whom the intravenous pacemaker (PM) lead was inadvertently implanted in LV through the perforated interventricular septum. He had no embolic events during the last 9 years after the implantation. Possible explanation of the uncomplicated follow-up period is that the patient had been taking warfarin because of mechanical mitral valve prosthesis.

  5. Effect of permanent pacemaker on mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engborg, Jonathan; Riechel-Sarup, Casper; Gerke, Oke;

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment for high-grade aortic valve stenosis in patients found unfit for open heart surgery. The method may cause cardiac conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation, and the long-term effect...

  6. Survival of 4 dogs with persistent atrial standstill treated by pacemaker implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Justin D; Kraus, Marc S; Fallaw, Tiffany L; Calvert, Clay A

    2016-03-01

    Pacemakers were implanted in 4 client-owned female dogs which had persistent atrial standstill. Three dogs were alive after 14 to 39 months and 1 dog was euthanized after 10.5 years. This report demonstrates that some dogs with persistent atrial standstill can survive for extended time periods.

  7. Sikkerhed af magnetisk resonans-skanning hos patienter med pacemaker og implanterbar defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabagh, Kifah Hekmat; Christensen, Britta Ege; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The presence of a cardiac implantable device is ICD considered an absolute contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of performing MRI in patients with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs that had a compelling clinical need...

  8. Safety of magnetic resonance scanning without monitoring of patients with pacemakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Litten; Petersen, Helen Høgh; Philbert, Berit Thornvig;

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The objective of this study was to investigate whether it is safe to perform 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in pacemaker (PM) patients without pulse oximetry or electrocardiogram monitoring and with no special specific absorption rate (SAR) or time limits, provided...

  9. Influence of Continuous Nursing on the Psychological State and Coping Style of Patients Undergoing Pacemaker Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin LIU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients undergoing pacemaker implantation often experience anxiety and fear. As such, studies have focused on the mechanisms that relieve the negative emotions caused by the intervention. Continuous nursing is a safe and effective nursing mode. In this study, continuous nursing intervention was provided for elderly patients undergo-ing pacemaker implantation and an empirical investigation was performed to determine the effects of their negative emotion and disease-coping ability.Methods: Overall, 114 (68 males and 46 females elderly patients who were undergoing pacemaker implantation from Harbin City (China, were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into two groups, namely, the control group and the intervention group, based on different nursing methods. Routine nursing was applied to the control group; continuous nursing support was provided for the intervention group from January 2014 to January 2015. The nursing results of the two groups were compared. These results were also evaluated using self-rating depression scale, self-rating anxiety scale, and trait coping style questionnaire.Result: The effects of depression and anxiety intervention were significant in the intervention group (P<0.05. Com-pared with the control group, the intervention group did not significantly differ. The coping style of the intervention group elicited significant effects. Compared with the control group, the intervention group was significantly different (P < 0.05.Conclusion: Continuous nursing can relieve the negative emotion and improve the negative coping style of patients undergoing pacemaker implantation.

  10. 76 FR 47085 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for a Pacemaker Programmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... recommendation. C. Risks to Health 1. Cardiac arrhythmias or electrical shock: Excessive electrical leakage... is a device used to change noninvasively one or more of the electrical operating characteristics of a... therapy: Inadequate matching of the programmer to the pacemaker could lead to a situation where...

  11. Reevaluation of the indications for permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre Thygesen, Julie; Loh, Poay Huan; Cholteesupachai, Jiranut

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conduction abnormalities (CA) requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) are a well-known complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to determine the incidence of TAVI-related PPM and reevaluate the indications for PPM after the periprocedural period. METHO...

  12. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  13. Stirling Colgate and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Donald

    2014-10-01

    Even before the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), Stirling Colgate proposed that bursts of x rays and gamma rays might be produced by a relativistic shock created in the supernova explosion of a massive star. We trace the scientific story of GRBs from their detection to the present, highlighting along the way Stirling's interest in them and his efforts to understand them. We summarize our current understanding that short, soft, repeating bursts are produced by magnetic neutron stars; short, hard bursts are produced by the mergers of neutron star-neutron star binaries; and long, hard bursts are produced by the core collapse of massive stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes. We then discuss some important open questions about GRBs and how they might be answered. We conclude by describing the recent serendipitous discovery of an x-ray burst of exactly the kind he proposed, and the insights into core collapse supernovae and GRBs that it provided.

  14. Pulse Phase Dependence of the Magnetar Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chetana Jain; Anjan Dutta; Biswajit Paul

    2007-12-01

    We report here results from a study of X-ray bursts from 3 magnetar candidates (SGR 1806–20, SGR 1900+14 and AXP 1E 2259+586). We have searched for a pulse phase dependence of the X-ray burst rate from these sources. X-ray light curves were obtained with the Proportional Counter Array on-board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the periods of intense burst activity in these sources. On detailed analysis of the three sources, we found a very significant burst rate for all pulsar phases. However, some locations appear to produce bursts slightly more often, rendering the non-isotropic distribution. Only in the case of SGR 1900+14, there is a clear pulse phase dependence of burst rate.

  15. Physics of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the accumulating evidence for the view that gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars, discussing the physical properties of the emission region and the radiation processes expected in strong magnetic fields, and emphasizing that the observed burst spectra require that the emission region be optically thin. This entails that the energy of the emitting plasma and/or the plasma itself be continuously replenished during a burst, and that the cooling time scale of the emitting plasma be much shorter than the observed duration of the bursts. This characteristic of the cooling time scale implies that the burst intensity and spectrum can vary on extremely short time scales, and that the burst duration must have a separate explanation. It is emphasized that synchrotron emission is favored as the gamma-ray production mechanism; it is the only mechanism capable of satisfying the optical thinness constraint while producing the observed luminosity.

  16. Statistics of gamma ray burst temporal asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Link, B; Link, Bennett; Epstein, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We study the temporal asymmetry of over 600 bursts from the BATSE 3B catalog, encompassing a 200-fold range in peak flux. By comparing the rates of rise and fall of the flux near the highest burst peak, we find that about two-thirds of the bursts exhibit a preferred asymmetry in the sense that the flux rises more rapidly than it falls, confirming the conclusions of previous studies employing smaller databases. The statistical significance of the average time asymmetry of the sample is >99.999\\%; therefore, models that predict time symmetry of the burst profile are ruled out. We find no statistically significant correlation between burst temporal asymmetry and peak. This result is consistent with both cosmological and local interpretations of the gamma ray burst phenomenon.

  17. Correlation analysis of the relationship between B-type natriuretic peptide and selected echocardiographic parameters in patients with permanent pacemakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Sielski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the practical value of BNP measurements and echocardiographic left ventricular volume index in patients with permanent pacemakers because there are no such reports in the literature. Aim of the research: The aim of the study was to reveal multiple correlations between BNP levels and selected echocardiographic parameters of the left atrium in patients with permanent pacemakers. In the literature there are reports on the significance of BNP values and left atrial size in patients with permanent pacemakers. The results of the present study appear to be of value in the outpatient assessment of these patients. Material and methods: We analysed a group of 117 patients with permanent pacemakers (AAI/R 21 patients, DDD/R 59 patients, VVI/R 37 patients and 48 healthy volunteers serving as the control group. BNP measurements were performed on venous blood samples using Triage meters. The Simpson method and the ellipse method were used to assess the left atrium on echocardiography. Results: There was a significant correlation between BNP and maximum left atrial volume, minimum left atrial volume, and left atrial volume index in patients with AAI/R, DDD/R, and VVI/R pacemakers at 3 and 6 months after the implantation. Conclusions : In patients after implantation of permanent pacemakers there are correlations between BNP values and echocardiographic left atrial parameters, especially in patients with DDD/R pacemakers. Left atrial function improves in patients with DDD/R pacemakers. Pacemaker check-up should be extended to include BNP measurements and echocardiographic assessment of the left atrium.

  18. United assembly algorithm for optical burst switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhui Yu(于金辉); Yijun Yang(杨教军); Yuehua Chen(陈月华); Ge Fan(范戈)

    2003-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising optical switching technology. The burst assembly algorithm controls burst assembly, which significantly impacts performance of OBS network. This paper provides a new assembly algorithm, united assembly algorithm, which has more practicability than conventional algorithms. In addition, some factors impacting selections of parameters of this algorithm are discussed and the performance of this algorithm is studied by computer simulation.

  19. Environmental Impacts on Spiking Properties in Hodgkin-Huxley Neuron with Direct Current Stimulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Chang-Qing; ZHAO Tong-Jun; ZHAN Yong; ZHANG Su-Hua; LIU Hui; ZHANG Yu-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the well accepted Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model, the neuronal intrinsic excitability is studied when the neuron is subject to varying environmental temperatures, the typical impact for its regulating ways. With computer simulation, it is found that altering environmental temperature can improve or inhibit the neuronal intrinsic excitability so as to influence the neuronal spiking properties. The impacts from environmental factors can be understood that ,the neuronal spiking threshold is essentially influenced by the fluctuations in the environ-ment. With the environmental temperature varying, burst spiking is realized for the neuronal membrane voltage because of the environment-dependent spiking threshold. This burst induced by changes in spiking threshold is different from that excited by input currents or other stimulus.

  20. Bubble burst as jamming phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Saito, Yukiko Umeno; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Recently research on bubble and its burst attract much interest of researchers in various field such as economics and physics. Economists have been regarding bubble as a disorder in prices. However, this research strategy has overlooked an importance of the volume of transactions. In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing the transactions incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation by comparing data taken from US housing market. Our result suggests that the transaction could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon.

  1. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    Data from the 3B Catalogue suggest that short and long GRB are the results of different classes of events, rather than different parameter values within a single class: Short bursts have harder spectra in the BATSE bands, but chiefly long bursts are detected at photon energies over 1 MeV, implying that their hard photons are radiated by a process not found in short bursts. The values of \\langle V/V_{max} \\rangle for short and long bursts differ by 4.3 \\sigma, implying different spatial distributions. Only the soft gamma-ray radiation mechanisms are the same in both classes.

  2. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, F; Herrmann, H J; Plenz, D; de Arcangelis, L

    2016-04-20

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity.

  3. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, F.; Herrmann, H. J.; Plenz, D.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity.

  4. Clique of functional hubs orchestrates population bursts in developmentally regulated neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcini, Alessandro; Luccioli, Stefano; Bonifazi, Paolo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari

    2015-03-01

    It has recently been discovered that single neuron stimulation can impact network dynamics in immature and adult neuronal circuits. Here we report a novel mechanism which can explain in developing neuronal circuits, typically composed of only excitatory cells, the peculiar role played by a few specific neurons in promoting/arresting the population activity. For this purpose, we consider a standard neuronal network model, with short-term synaptic plasticity, whose population activity is characterized by bursting behavior. The addition of developmentally regulated constraints on single neuron excitability and connectivity leads to the emergence of functional hub neurons, whose stimulation/deletion is critical for the network activity. Functional hubs form a clique, where a precise sequential activation of the neurons is essential to ignite collective events without any need for a specific topological architecture. Unsupervised time-lagged firings of supra-threshold cells, in connection with coordinated entrainments of near-threshold neurons, are the key ingredients to orchestrate population activity. This work is part of the activity of the Joint Italian-Israeli Laboratory on Integrative Network Neuroscience supported by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  5. Clique of functional hubs orchestrates population bursts in developmentally regulated neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Luccioli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been discovered that single neuron stimulation can impact network dynamics in immature and adult neuronal circuits. Here we report a novel mechanism which can explain in neuronal circuits, at an early stage of development, the peculiar role played by a few specific neurons in promoting/arresting the population activity. For this purpose, we consider a standard neuronal network model, with short-term synaptic plasticity, whose population activity is characterized by bursting behavior. The addition of developmentally inspired constraints and correlations in the distribution of the neuronal connectivities and excitabilities leads to the emergence of functional hub neurons, whose stimulation/deletion is critical for the network activity. Functional hubs form a clique, where a precise sequential activation of the neurons is essential to ignite collective events without any need for a specific topological architecture. Unsupervised time-lagged firings of supra-threshold cells, in connection with coordinated entrainments of near-threshold neurons, are the key ingredients to orchestrate population activity.

  6. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  7. Hyperbolic Plykin attractor can exist in neuron models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V.; Belykh, I.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Strange hyperbolic attractors are hard to find in real physical systems. This paper provides the first example of a realistic system, a canonical three-dimensional (3D) model of bursting neurons, that is likely to have a strange hyperbolic attractor. Using a geometrical approach to the study...... of the neuron model, we derive a flow-defined Poincare map giving ail accurate account of the system's dynamics. In a parameter region where the neuron system undergoes bifurcations causing transitions between tonic spiking and bursting, this two-dimensional map becomes a map of a disk with several periodic...... holes. A particular case is the map of a disk with three holes, matching the Plykin example of a planar hyperbolic attractor. The corresponding attractor of the 3D neuron model appears to be hyperbolic (this property is not verified in the present paper) and arises as a result of a two-loop (secondary...

  8. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dar, Roy D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Weinberger, Leor S. [University of California, San Diego; Razooky, B [University of California, San Diego; Cox, Chris D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); McCollum, James M. [Miami University; Trimeloni, Tom [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richland; Singh, A [University of California, San Diego

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  9. Analysis of historic bursts and burst detection in water supply areas of different size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Trietsch, E.A.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in water distribution networks lead to water losses and a risk of damaging the urban environment. We studied hydraulic data and customer contact records of 44 real bursts for a better understanding of the phenomena. We found that most bursts were reported to the water company shortly aft

  10. Controlling neuronal noise using chaos control

    CERN Document Server

    Christini, D J; Christini, David J; Collins, James J

    1995-01-01

    Chaos control techniques have been applied to a wide variety of experimental systems, including magneto-elastic ribbons, lasers, chemical reactions, arrhythmic cardiac tissue, and spontaneously bursting neuronal networks. An underlying assumption in all of these studies is that the system being controlled is chaotic. However, the identification of chaos in experimental systems, particularly physiological systems, is a difficult and often misleading task. Here we demonstrate that the chaos criteria used in a recent study can falsely classify a noise-driven, non-chaotic neuronal model as being chaotic. We apply chaos control, periodic pacing, and anticontrol to the non-chaotic model and obtain results which are similar to those reported for apparently chaotic, {\\em in vitro} neuronal networks. We also obtain similar results when we apply chaos control to a simple stochastic system. These novel findings challenge the claim that the aforementioned neuronal networks were chaotic and suggest that chaos control tech...

  11. Magnetars and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bucciantini, N

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, evidences for a long-lived and sustained engine in Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have increased the attention to the so called millisecond-magnetar model, as a competitive alternative to the standard collapsar scenario. I will review here the key aspects of the {\\it millisecond magnetar} model for Long Duration Gamma Ray Bursts (LGRBs). I will briefly describe what constraints, present observations put on any engine model, both in term of energetic, outflow properties, and the relation with the associated Supernova (SN). For each of these I will show how the millisecond magnetar model satisfies the requirements, what are the limits of the model, how can it be further tested, and what observations might be used to discriminate against it. I will also discuss numerical results that show the importance of the confinement by the progenitor star in explaining the formation of a collimated outflow, how a detailed model for the evolution of the central engine can be built, and show that a wide varie...

  12. Avalanches in a stochastic model of spiking neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Benayoun

    Full Text Available Neuronal avalanches are a form of spontaneous activity widely observed in cortical slices and other types of nervous tissue, both in vivo and in vitro. They are characterized by irregular, isolated population bursts when many neurons fire together, where the number of spikes per burst obeys a power law distribution. We simulate, using the Gillespie algorithm, a model of neuronal avalanches based on stochastic single neurons. The network consists of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, first with all-to-all connectivity and later with random sparse connectivity. Analyzing our model using the system size expansion, we show that the model obeys the standard Wilson-Cowan equations for large network sizes ( neurons. When excitation and inhibition are closely balanced, networks of thousands of neurons exhibit irregular synchronous activity, including the characteristic power law distribution of avalanche size. We show that these avalanches are due to the balanced network having weakly stable functionally feedforward dynamics, which amplifies some small fluctuations into the large population bursts. Balanced networks are thought to underlie a variety of observed network behaviours and have useful computational properties, such as responding quickly to changes in input. Thus, the appearance of avalanches in such functionally feedforward networks indicates that avalanches may be a simple consequence of a widely present network structure, when neuron dynamics are noisy. An important implication is that a network need not be "critical" for the production of avalanches, so experimentally observed power laws in burst size may be a signature of noisy functionally feedforward structure rather than of, for example, self-organized criticality.

  13. Avalanches in a stochastic model of spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benayoun, Marc; Cowan, Jack D; van Drongelen, Wim; Wallace, Edward

    2010-07-08

    Neuronal avalanches are a form of spontaneous activity widely observed in cortical slices and other types of nervous tissue, both in vivo and in vitro. They are characterized by irregular, isolated population bursts when many neurons fire together, where the number of spikes per burst obeys a power law distribution. We simulate, using the Gillespie algorithm, a model of neuronal avalanches based on stochastic single neurons. The network consists of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, first with all-to-all connectivity and later with random sparse connectivity. Analyzing our model using the system size expansion, we show that the model obeys the standard Wilson-Cowan equations for large network sizes ( neurons). When excitation and inhibition are closely balanced, networks of thousands of neurons exhibit irregular synchronous activity, including the characteristic power law distribution of avalanche size. We show that these avalanches are due to the balanced network having weakly stable functionally feedforward dynamics, which amplifies some small fluctuations into the large population bursts. Balanced networks are thought to underlie a variety of observed network behaviours and have useful computational properties, such as responding quickly to changes in input. Thus, the appearance of avalanches in such functionally feedforward networks indicates that avalanches may be a simple consequence of a widely present network structure, when neuron dynamics are noisy. An important implication is that a network need not be "critical" for the production of avalanches, so experimentally observed power laws in burst size may be a signature of noisy functionally feedforward structure rather than of, for example, self-organized criticality.

  14. Coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition in a parabolic bursting model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lin; Zhang, Jia; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Xiuhui

    2013-03-01

    The transition from tonic spiking to bursting is an important dynamic process that carry physiologically relevant information. In this work, coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition is investigated in a parabolic bursting model with specific discussion on their cooperation effects. Fast/slow analysis shows that weak coupling may help to induce the bursting by changing the geometric property of the fast subsystem so that the original unstable periodical solution are stabilized. It turned out that noise can play the similar stabilization role and induce bursting at appropriate moderate intensity. However, their cooperation may either strengthen or weaken the overall effect depending on the choice of noise level.

  15. Coding Bounds for Multiple Phased-Burst Correction and Single Burst Correction Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Fong, Wai Han

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, two upper bounds on the achievable code rate of linear block codes for multiple phased-burst correction (MPBC) are presented. One bound is constrained to a maximum correctable cyclic burst length within every subblock, or equivalently a constraint on the minimum error free length or gap within every phased-burst. This bound, when reduced to the special case of a bound for single burst correction (SBC), is shown to be the Abramson bound when the cyclic burst length is less than half the block length. The second MPBC bound is developed without the minimum error free gap constraint and is used as a comparison to the first bound.

  16. Photospheric radius expansion during magnetar bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Watts; C. Kouveliotou; A.J. van der Horst; E. Göğüş; Y. Kaneko; M. van der Klis; R.A.M.J. Wijers; A.K. Harding; M.G. Baring

    2010-01-01

    On 2008 August 24 the new magnetar SGR 0501+4516 (discovered by Swift) emitted a bright burst with a pronounced double-peaked structure in hard X-rays, reminiscent of the double-peaked temporal structure seen in some bright thermonuclear bursts on accreting neutron stars. In the latter case this is

  17. Astronomy: Radio burst caught red-handed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcke, Heino

    2017-01-01

    For almost a decade, astronomers have observed intense bursts of radio waves from the distant cosmos whose origins were unknown. The source of one such burst has now been identified, but this has only deepened the mystery. See Letter p.58

  18. Using temporal bursts for query modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetz, M.H.; Meij, E.; de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach to query modeling that leverages the temporal distribution of documents in an initially retrieved set of documents. In news-related document collections such distributions tend to exhibit bursts. Here, we define a burst to be a time period where unusually many documents are pu

  19. Management of radiation oncology patients with a pacemaker or ICD : A new comprehensive practical guideline in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; Knegjens, Joost L.; Oei, Bing S.; Maas, Ad J. J.; Uiterwaal, G. J.; van der Borden, Arnoud J.; Ploegmakers, Marleen M. J.; van Erven, Lieselot

    2012-01-01

    Current clinical guidelines for the management of radiotherapy patients having either a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (both CIEDs: Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices) do not cover modern radiotherapy techniques and do not take the patient's perspective into account. Availab

  20. Dislocation of a non-functional transvenous ventricular pacemaker lead in a child 6 years following abandonment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Bert; Koestenberger, Martin; Knez, Igor; Gamillscheg, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    This case report describes for the first time a late dislocation of an abandoned transvenous ventricular pacemaker (PM) lead in a child. Further management of this complication and the importance for follow-up of PM leads are discussed.

  1. Recruitment of an inhibitory hippocampal network after bursting in a single granule cell

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, M; Gähwiler, B; Gerber, U.

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampal CA3 area, an associational network implicated in memory function, receives monosynaptic excitatory as well as disynaptic inhibitory input through the mossy-fiber axons of the dentate granule cells. Synapses made by mossy fibers exhibit low release probability, resulting in high failure rates at resting discharge frequencies of 0.1 Hz. In recordings from functionally connected pairs of neurons, burst firing of a granule cell increased the probability of glutamate release onto b...

  2. Cryptochrome is present in the compound eyes and a subset of Drosophila's clock neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Taishi; Todo, Takeshi; Wülbeck, Corinna; Stanewsky, Ralf; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2008-06-20

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is intimately associated with the circadian clock of many organisms. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, CRY seems to be involved in photoreception as well as in the core clockwork. In spite of the critical role of CRY for the clock of Drosophila, it was not quite clear whether CRY is expressed in every clock cell. With the help of a new antibody and a mutant that lacks CRY, we show here that CRY is expressed in specific subsets of Drosophila's pacemaker neurons and in the photoreceptor cells of the compound eyes. In the pacemaker neurons, CRY levels and kinetics under light-dark cycles are quite different from each other. High-amplitude oscillations are observed in only three groups of clock neurons, suggesting that these three groups are strongly receptive to light. The different CRY kinetics may account for phase differences in oscillations of the clock proteins observed in these three groups in earlier studies. The molecular clock of the neurons that contain lower CRY levels or are completely CRY negative can still be synchronized by light, probably via intercellular communication with the CRY-positive neurons as well as via external photoreceptors.

  3. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, E.; Barr, E. D.; Jameson, A.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Kramer, M.; Morello, V.; Tabbara, D.; van Straten, W.

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios, we have re-processed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a Mysql database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the Fast Radio Burst population as it grows.

  4. Bright 30 THz Impulsive Solar Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, P; Marcon, R; Kudaka, A S; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Francile, C; Fernandes, L O T; Ramirez, R F Hidalgo; Luoni, M; Marun, A; Pereyra, P; de Souza, R V

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive 30 THz continuum bursts have been recently observed in solar flares, utilizing small telescopes with a unique and relatively simple optical setup concept. The most intense burst was observed together with a GOES X2 class event on October 27, 2014, also detected at two sub-THz frequencies, RHESSI X-rays and SDO/HMI and EUV. It exhibits strikingly good correlation in time and in space with white light flare emission. It is likely that this association may prove to be very common. All three 30 THz events recently observed exhibited intense fluxes in the range of 104 solar flux units, considerably larger than those measured for the same events at microwave and sub-mm wavelengths. The 30 THz burst emission might be part of the same spectral burst component found at sub-THz frequencies. The 30 THz solar bursts open a promising new window for the study of flares at their origin

  5. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-yang Dai

    2004-01-01

    Objective To review imaging use in the diagnosis ofthoracolumbar burst fractures and to determine the diagnostic value of different imaging methods.Methods One hundred and fourteen patients with 120 thoracolumbar burst fractures were retrospectively reviewed. Plain radiographs were available in all cases; CT scans and MRI were obtained in 96 and 74 cases, respectively.Results A total of 27 burst fractures were misdiagnosed as other types of fractures on radiographs alone, and accounted for 22.5% of all fractures. The results indicated that plain radiographs often fail to delineate the pathological features of thoracolumbar burst fractures, leading to delay in diagnosis.Conclusion In regard to thoracolumbar injury diagnosis, burst fractures should be differentiated from compression fractures. CT should be routinely indicated and MRI examination, when necessary, may be simultaneously considered.

  6. Muscles innervated by a single motor neuron exhibit divergent synaptic properties on multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Dawn M; Pritchard, Amy E; Latimer, John K; Wakefield, Andrew T

    2017-01-19

    Adaptive changes in the output of neural circuits underlying rhythmic behaviors are relayed to muscles via motor neuron activity. Pre- and postsynaptic properties of neuromuscular junctions can impact the transformation from motor neuron activity to muscle response. Further, synaptic plasticity occurring on the time scale of inter-spike intervals can differ between multiple muscles innervated by the same motor neuron. In rhythmic behaviors, motor neuron bursts can elicit additional synaptic plasticity. However, it is unknown if plasticity regulated by the longer time scale of inter-burst intervals also differs between synapses from the same neuron, and whether any such distinctions occur across a physiological activity range. To address these issues, we measured electrical responses in muscles innervated by a chewing circuit neuron, the lateral gastric (LG) motor neuron, in a well-characterized small motor system, the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis In vitro and in vivo, sensory, hormonal and modulatory inputs elicit LG bursting consisting of inter-spike intervals of 50-250 ms and inter-burst intervals of 2-24 s. Muscles expressed similar facilitation measured with paired stimuli except at the shortest inter-spike interval. However distinct decay time constants resulted in differences in temporal summation. In response to bursting activity, augmentation occurred to different extents and saturated at different inter-burst intervals in the three muscles. Further, augmentation interacted with facilitation, resulting in distinct intra-burst facilitation between muscles. Thus, responses of multiple target muscles diverge across a physiological activity range due to distinct synaptic properties sensitive to multiple time scales.

  7. Improved quality of life after treatment of prolonged asystole during breath holding spells with a cardiac pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Kolterer

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Cardiac pacing using appropriate pacemaker settings seems effective in the prevention of LOC and reduction of the frequency of BHS. Our results imply a reduction of subjective stress levels of patients and parents as well as an increased quality of everyday life. After all, randomized controlled trials of the influence of cardiac pacemaker implantation on subjective stress levels in patients with BHS are needed.

  8. Transition to complete synchronization via near-synchronization in two coupled chaotic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qing-Yun; Lu Qi-Shao; Wang Hai-Xia

    2005-01-01

    The synchronization transition in two coupled chaotic Morris-Lecar (ML) neurons with gap junction is studied with the coupling strength increasing. The conditional Lyapunov exponents, along with the synchronization errors are calculated to diagnose synchronization of two coupled chaotic ML neurons. As a result, it is shown that the increase in the coupling strength leads to incoherence, then induces a transition process consisting of three different synchronization states in succession, namely, burst synchronization, near-synchronization and embedded burst synchronization, and achieves complete synchronization of two coupled neurons finally. These sequential transitions to synchronization reveal a new transition route from incoherence to complete synchronization in coupled systems with multi-time scales.

  9. Methods of rock burst prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genkin, V.A.; Minin, Yu.Ya.; Morozov, G.D.; Proskuryakov, V.M.; Cmirnov, V.A.

    1979-07-01

    Some methods of predicting rock bursts in underground coal and iron ore mines are evaluated: using BP-18 indenters and the MGD indenter with automatic recording; seismic method consisting in measuring the speed of shock waves travelling through various layers (apparatus SB-20 is designed for use in coal mines); electrometric method (measuring resistance between two electrodes when electric currents flow through coal and rocks). The design of the AEhSSh-1 measuring instrument, used in the electrometric method in coal mines is also described. Each of the methods is described and mathematical fomulae used as their theoretical basis are presented. The calculating process is explained and brief information on the design and use of the measuring instrument is given. The methods are evaluated from the viewpoint of precision. (In Russian)

  10. Prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing in elderly patients with cardiac pacemaker: a case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyun WU; Shiwen WANG; Jianping JIA; Wenli ZHANG; Qiang XU

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing in elderly patients with permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation due to bradyarrhythmias, and the relationship between pacing mode and patients' sleep apnea-hypopnea index.Methods Forty-four elderly patients (>60 years) with cardiac pacemaker and their 44 controls matched for gender, age, body mass index and cardiovascular morbidity were studied using polysomnography or portable sleep monitoring device. Results Prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing (apnea-hypopnea index ≥5/h) was 44.7% and the mean apnea-hypopnea index was 8.2 ±4.1/h in the cardiac pacemaker group, which were significantly higher than those in control subjects (25% and 4.6±2.4/h, respectively, P<0.01 and P<0.05). The mean apnea-hypopnea index of patients with DDD or AAI pacemaker was significantly lower than that of patients with VVI pacemaker. Conclusions Sleep-disordered breathing was more common in patients who had their cardiac pacemaker implanted due to bradyarrhythmias than in their matched controls. Compared with VVI pacing, DDD or AAI pacing may be more beneficial to patients with bradyarrhythmias and sleep-disordered breathing.

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Subthreshold Resonant Properties in Pyloric Dilator Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Vazifehkhah Ghaffari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neurons without removing the calcium-dependent potassium current. Thus, the effects of calcium ICa and calcium-dependent potassium IKCa currents on resonant properties remain unclear. By taking advantage of Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of neuron and its equivalent RLC circuit, we examine the effects of changing resting membrane potential and those ionic currents on the resonance. Results show that changing the resting membrane potential influences the amplitude and frequency of resonance so that the strength of resonance (Q-value increases by both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. Moreover, hyperpolarization-activated inward current Ih and ICa (in association with IKCa are dominant factors on resonant properties at hyperpolarized and depolarized potentials, respectively. Through mathematical analysis, results indicate that Ih and IKCa affect the resonant properties of PD neurons. However, ICa only has an amplifying effect on the resonance amplitude of these neurons.

  12. Mathematical modeling of subthreshold resonant properties in pyloric dilator neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazifehkhah Ghaffari, Babak; Kouhnavard, Mojgan; Aihara, Takeshi; Kitajima, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response) to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD) neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neurons without removing the calcium-dependent potassium current. Thus, the effects of calcium (I(Ca)) and calcium-dependent potassium (I(KCa)) currents on resonant properties remain unclear. By taking advantage of Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of neuron and its equivalent RLC circuit, we examine the effects of changing resting membrane potential and those ionic currents on the resonance. Results show that changing the resting membrane potential influences the amplitude and frequency of resonance so that the strength of resonance (Q-value) increases by both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. Moreover, hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)) and I(Ca) (in association with I(KCa)) are dominant factors on resonant properties at hyperpolarized and depolarized potentials, respectively. Through mathematical analysis, results indicate that I h and I(KCa) affect the resonant properties of PD neurons. However, I(Ca) only has an amplifying effect on the resonance amplitude of these neurons.

  13. Qualitative-Modeling-Based Silicon Neurons and Their Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Takashi; Sekikawa, Munehisa; Li, Jing; Nanami, Takuya; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The ionic conductance models of neuronal cells can finely reproduce a wide variety of complex neuronal activities. However, the complexity of these models has prompted the development of qualitative neuron models. They are described by differential equations with a reduced number of variables and their low-dimensional polynomials, which retain the core mathematical structures. Such simple models form the foundation of a bottom-up approach in computational and theoretical neuroscience. We proposed a qualitative-modeling-based approach for designing silicon neuron circuits, in which the mathematical structures in the polynomial-based qualitative models are reproduced by differential equations with silicon-native expressions. This approach can realize low-power-consuming circuits that can be configured to realize various classes of neuronal cells. In this article, our qualitative-modeling-based silicon neuron circuits for analog and digital implementations are quickly reviewed. One of our CMOS analog silicon neuron circuits can realize a variety of neuronal activities with a power consumption less than 72 nW. The square-wave bursting mode of this circuit is explained. Another circuit can realize Class I and II neuronal activities with about 3 nW. Our digital silicon neuron circuit can also realize these classes. An auto-associative memory realized on an all-to-all connected network of these silicon neurons is also reviewed, in which the neuron class plays important roles in its performance. PMID:27378842

  14. Reciprocal inhibitory coupling: Measure and control of chaos on a biophysically motivated model of bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2009-06-01

    Bursting activity is an interesting feature of the temporal organization in many cell firing patterns. This complex behavior is characterized by clusters of spikes (action potentials) interspersed with phases of quiescence. As shown in experimental recordings, concerning the electrical activity of real neurons, the analysis of bursting models reveals not only patterned periodic activity but also irregular behavior 1,2]. The interpretation of experimental results, particularly the study of the influence of coupling on chaotic bursting oscillations, is of great interest from physiological and physical perspectives. The inability to predict the behavior of dynamical systems in presence of chaos suggests the application of chaos control methods, when we are more interested in obtaining regular behavior. In the present article, we focus our attention on a specific class of biophysically motivated maps, proposed in the literature to describe the chaotic activity of spiking-bursting cells [Cazelles B, Courbage M, Rabinovich M. Anti-phase regularization of coupled chaotic maps modelling bursting neurons. Europhys Lett 2001;56:504-9]. More precisely, we study a map that reproduces the behavior of a single cell and a map used to examine the role of reciprocal inhibitory coupling, specially on two symmetrically coupled bursting neurons. Firstly, using results of symbolic dynamics, we characterize the topological entropy associated to the maps, which allows us to quantify and to distinguish different chaotic regimes. In particular, we exhibit numerical results about the effect of the coupling strength on the variation of the topological entropy. Finally, we show that complicated behavior arising from the chaotic coupled maps can be controlled, without changing of its original properties, and turned into a desired attracting time periodic motion (a regular cycle). The control is illustrated by an application of a feedback control technique developed by Romeiras et al. [Romeiras

  15. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  16. Swim pacemaker response to bath applied neurotransmitters in the cubozoan Tripedalia cystophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Jan; Nachman, Gösta; Garm, Anders

    2013-09-01

    The four rhopalia of cubomedusae are integrated parts of the central nervous system carrying their many eyes and thought to be the centres of visual information processing. Rhopalial pacemakers control locomotion through a complex neural signal transmitted to the ring nerve and the signal frequency is modulated by the visual input. Since electrical synapses have never been found in the cubozoan nervous system all signals are thought to be transmitted across chemical synapses, and so far information about the neurotransmitters involved are based on immunocytochemical or behavioural data. Here we present the first direct physiological evidence for the types of neurotransmitters involved in sensory information processing in the rhopalial nervous system. FMRFamide, serotonin and dopamine are shown to have inhibitory effect on the pacemaker frequency. There are some indications that the fast acting acetylcholine and glycine have an initial effect and then rapidly desensitise. Other tested neuroactive compounds (GABA, glutamate, and taurine) could not be shown to have a significant effect.

  17. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, unknown to chest radiography: Review, complications and systematic reading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alandete Germán, Salvador Pascual, E-mail: salaiger@gmail.com; Isarria Vidal, Santiago, E-mail: isarria@comv.es; Domingo Montañana, María Luisa, E-mail: domingo.luimon@gmail.com; De la vía Oraá, Esperanza, E-mail: esviao82@gmail.com; Vilar Samper, José, E-mail: vilarsamper@gmail.com

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Radiologists have an important function in the evaluation of these devices. •We revise their radiological appearances and possible complications. •The knowledge in normal aspects and complications is important for radiologist. •To ensure an accurate reading of the chest x-ray, we present a systematic approach. -- Abstract: Chest X-ray is the imaging technique of choice for an initial study of pacemakers and implantable cardio-defibrillators (ICD). Radiologists have an important role in the evaluation of its initial placement and in the assessment during its follow-up. For this reason, it is necessary to know not only the different existing devices and its components but also the reasons of malfunction or possible complications. The purpose of this article is to do a systematic review of the different types of pacemakers and ICD. We review their usual radiological appearances, the possible complications which might take place and its causes of malfunctioning.

  18. Pacemaker activity and inhibitory neurotransmission in the colon of Ws/Ws mutant rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertí, Elena; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Wang, Xuanyu;

    2007-01-01

    and biphasic inhibitory junction potentials both in wild-type and Ws/Ws rats. Apamin-sensitive, likely purinergic, inhibitory innervation was not affected by loss of ICC. Variable presence of nitrergic innervation likely reflects the presence of direct nitrergic innervation to smooth muscle cells as well...... as indirect innervation via ICC. In summary, loss of ICC markedly affects pacemaker and motor activities of the rat colon. Inhibitory innervation is largely maintained but nitrergic innervation is reduced possibly related to the loss of ICC-mediated relaxation.......The aim of this study was to characterize the pacemaker activity and inhibitory neurotransmission in the colon of Ws/Ws mutant rats, which harbor a mutation in the c-kit gene that affects development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). In Ws/Ws rats, the density of KIT-positive cells was markedly...

  19. Exponential synchronization rate of Kuramoto oscillators in the presence of a pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Doyle, Francis J

    2012-08-27

    The exponential synchronization rate is addressed for Kuramoto oscillators in the presence of a pacemaker. When natural frequencies are identical, we prove that synchronization can be ensured even when the phases are not constrained in an open half-circle, which improves the existing results in the literature. We derive a lower bound on the exponential synchronization rate, which is proven to be an increasing function of pacemaker strength, but may be an increasing or decreasing function of local coupling strength. A similar conclusion is obtained for phase locking when the natural frequencies are non-identical. An approach to trapping phase differences in an arbitrary interval is also given, which ensures synchronization in the sense that synchronization error can be reduced to an arbitrary level.

  20. Homoclinic Spike adding in a neuronal model in the presence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuwape, Ibiyinka; Neiman, Alexander; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2008-03-01

    We study the influence of noise on a spike adding transitions within the bursting activity in a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of the leech heart interneuron. Spike adding in this model occur via homoclinic bifurcation of a saddle periodic orbit. Although narrow chaotic regions are observed near bifurcation transition, overall bursting dynamics is regular and is characterized by a constant number of spikes per burst. Experimental studies, however, show variability of bursting patterns whereby number of spikes per burst varies randomly. Thus, introduction of external synaptic noise is a necessary step to account for variability of burst durations observed experimentally. We show that near every such transition the neuron is highly sensitive to random perturbations that lead to and enhance broadly the regions of chaotic dynamics of the cell. For each spike adding transition there is a critical noise level beyond which the dynamics of the neuron becomes chaotic throughout the entire region of the given transition. Noise-induced chaotic dynamics is characterized in terms of the Lyapunov exponents and the Shannon entropy and reflects variability of firing patterns with various numbers of spikes per burst, traversing wide range of the neuron's parameters

  1. Self-powered cardiac pacemaker enabled by flexible single crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Geon-Tae; Park, Hyewon; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Oh, SeKwon; Park, Kwi-Il; Byun, Myunghwan; Park, Hyelim; Ahn, Gun; Jeong, Chang Kyu; No, Kwangsoo; Kwon, HyukSang; Lee, Sang-Goo; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-07-23

    A flexible single-crystalline PMN-PT piezoelectric energy harvester is demonstrated to achieve a self-powered artificial cardiac pacemaker. The energy-harvesting device generates a short-circuit current of 0.223 mA and an open-circuit voltage of 8.2 V, which are enough not only to meet the standard for charging commercial batteries but also for stimulating the heart without an external power source.

  2. [Subclavian vein puncture as a primary approach for pacemaker lead implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronski, D; Haas, H

    2001-12-01

    In the beginning of transvenous pacemaker therapy, the external or alternatively internal jugular vein was commonly used for lead implantation. Due to frequent long-term complications both approaches are nowadays obsolete. In most pacemaker centers implantation via the cephalic vein has become standard. As an alternative, in 1975 Sterz et al. introduced puncture of the subclavian vein in the Seldinger technique as an approach for lead implantation. At this time, the commonly used introducers of pacemaker leads had to be cut for removal. No earlier than 1980 "peel away" introducers were commercially available. Since then, we consequently use this technique for implantation of single or dual chamber pacemaker devices. In the course of the last seven years merely 1.5-2% of implantations were performed via the cephalic vein; no jugular vein approach was performed. Due to a routinely performed subclavian vein puncture, we were able to optimize the procedure, proven by an enormous reduction in implantation time (local anesthesia - skin closure), x-ray time and complication rate. In the year 2000 we performed 52 implantations of a single chamber device with an average fluoroscopy time of 1.5 (0.3-9.3) minutes, radiation dose of 4.5 (0.1-47) Gycm(2) and implantation time of 17.6 (8-40) minutes and 144 implantations of a dual chamber device with an average fluoroscopy time of 2.86 (0.7-6.6) minutes, radiation dose of 8.31 (0.7-28) Gycm(2) and implantation time of 21.25 (10-45) minutes. Complications were rare, clinically irrelevant arterial punctures. Neither nerval damage nor pneumothoraces with the necessity for chest tube placement were seen in the above mentioned time frame. No early or late thrombosis of the subclavian vein was encountered.    The primary subclavian vein approach led to an enormous reduction in overall procedure time without significant morbidity.

  3. Treatment of pacemaker-induced superior vena cava syndrome by balloon angioplasty and stenting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Klop, B

    2011-01-01

    Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome is a rare but serious complication after pacemaker implantation. This report describes three cases of SVC syndrome treated with venoplasty and venous stenting, with an average follow-up of 30.7 (±3.1) months. These cases illustrate that the definitive diagnosis, and the extent and location of venous obstruction, can only be determined by venography.

  4. [Interferences and cardiac pacemakers--defibrillators. Results of in vivo experiments and radio frequencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigano, J A

    2003-04-01

    Interference with cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators by cellular phone and electronic article surveillance systems is shown in experimental studies with disparate findings. Interaction occurrence in real life is a convincing but rare experience. Device model, distance, power output and technology of the source are different and sometimes uncontrollable factors. As a result it remains difficult to quantify the true incidence of interaction and associated health risk. Nevertheless, simple recommendations commonly help the patients to prevent the interference.

  5. High ventricular lead impedance of a DDD pacemaker after cranial magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Kazim; Guray, Umit; Durukan, Mine; Demirkan, Burcu

    2012-09-01

    Management of electromagnetic interference in the form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with pacemakers (PMs) may be challenging. Serious consequences, especially in PM-dependent patients, may be encountered. Changes in device programming, asynchronous pacing, heating of the lead tip(s), and increased thresholds or even device dislocation may be experienced. We report of a patient with a DDD PM who underwent an emergent MRI, after which there was an increase in ventricular impedance as well as increased cardiac biomarkers.

  6. Solar dynamo as host power pacemaker of the Earth global climate

    OpenAIRE

    Rusov, Vitaliy D.; Linnik, Elena P.; Vladimir N. Vaschenko; Mavrodiev, Strachimir Cht.; Margarita E. Beglaryan; Zelentsova, Tatiana N.; Tarasov, Victor A.; Litvinov, Dmitriy A.; Smolyar, Vladimir P.; Vachev, Boyko I.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the so-called problem of solar power pacemaker related to possible existence of some hidden but key mechanism of energy influence of the Sun on fundamental geophysical processes is one of the principal and puzzling problems of modern climatology. The "tracks" of this mechanism have been shown up in different problems of solar-terrestrial physics for a long time and, in particular, in climatology, where the solar-climate variability is stably observed. However, the mechanisms ...

  7. [Behaviour of some serum enzymes after permanent pacemaker implantation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, F; Maiolino, P; Allegri, P; Barbieri, E; de Lio, U; Morlino, T; Ometto, R; Vincenzi, M

    1978-01-01

    The behaviour of some serum enzymes (CPK, LDH, alpha HBDH, SGOT) in 50 patients after permanent pacemaker implantation is outlined. Changes of each enzyme were analyzed statistically by applying Student's t test. Most significant changes are represented by the increase in CPK serum concentrations (19 cases). In 14 of them LDH isoenzymes were evaluated and in 4 patients alteration of LDH1/LDH2 ratio suggestive of cardiac "injury" were observed.

  8. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  9. Cancer patients with cardiac pacemakers needing radiation treatment: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusheel Munshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With improving average life expectancy of individuals in most countries, there has been increase in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Radiation oncologists therefore are likely to encounter an increasing number of cancer patients with in situ cardiac pacemaker devices needing radiation treatments. Pacemaker technology has advanced rapidly in recent years. As a result, the potential interactions of these devices with radiation therapy have changed since American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM issued guidelines in 1994. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centers. Furthermore, the recommendations given by the devices′ manufacturers differ considerably. Common knowledge about pacemaker in radiation oncology community is vital as radiation management needs to be tailored to individual patients in accordance to the information of available for the device. Some general practical guidelines can be gleaned from the literature. It is felt that more robust information is required using web based database sharing to develop total safe practice guidelines in such patients. This article reviews the information available to help create such guidelines and presents recommendations for treatment in this increasingly common clinical situation.

  10. From two competing oscillators to one coupled-clock pacemaker cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Lakatta, Edward G; Maltsev, Victor A

    2015-01-01

    At the beginning of this century, debates regarding "what are the main control mechanisms that ignite the action potential (AP) in heart pacemaker cells" dominated the electrophysiology field. The original theory which prevailed for over 50 years had advocated that the ensemble of surface membrane ion channels (i.e., "M-clock") is sufficient to ignite rhythmic APs. However, more recent experimental evidence in a variety of mammals has shown that the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) acts as a "Ca(2+)-clock" rhythmically discharges diastolic local Ca(2+) releases (LCRs) beneath the cell surface membrane. LCRs activate an inward current (likely that of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger) that prompts the surface membrane "M-clock" to ignite an AP. Theoretical and experimental evidence has mounted to indicate that this clock "crosstalk" operates on a beat-to-beat basis and determines both the AP firing rate and rhythm. Our review is focused on the evolution of experimental definition and numerical modeling of the coupled-clock concept, on how mechanisms intrinsic to pacemaker cell determine both the heart rate and rhythm, and on future directions to develop further the coupled-clock pacemaker cell concept.

  11. From two competing oscillators to one coupled-clock pacemaker cell system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eYaniv

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of this century, debates regarding what are the main control mechanisms that ignite the action potential (AP in heart pacemaker cells dominated the electrophysiology field. The original theory which prevailed for over 50 years had advocated that the ensemble of surface membrane ion channels (i.e., M clock is sufficient to ignite rhythmic APs. However, more recent experimental evidence in a variety of mammals has shown that the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR acts as a Ca2+ clock rhythmically discharges diastolic local Ca2+ releases (LCRs beneath the cell surface membrane. LCRs activate an inward current (likely that of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger that prompts the surface membrane M clock to ignite an AP. Theoretical and experimental evidence has mounted to indicate that this clock crosstalk operates on a beat-to-beat basis and determines both the AP firing rate and rhythm. Our review is focused on the evolution of experimental definition and numerical modeling of the coupled-clock concept, on how mechanisms intrinsic to pacemaker cell determine both the heart rate and rhythm, and on future directions to develop further the coupled-clock pacemaker cell concept.

  12. Involvement of ryanodine receptors in pacemaker Ca2+ oscillation in murine gastric ICC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Nian; Ohya, Susumu; Wang, Jing; Imaizumi, Yuji; Nakayama, Shinsuke

    2005-03-11

    Using a cell cluster preparation from the stomach smooth muscle tissue of mice, we measured intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the presence of nifedipine. Pacemaker [Ca(2+)](i) activity in ICCs was significantly suppressed by caffeine application and restored after washout. Application of either ryanodine or FK-506 terminated the pacemaker [Ca(2+)](i) activity irreversibly. Immunostaining of smooth muscle tissue showed that c-Kit-immunopositive cells (that form network-like structure cells in the myenteric plexus, equivalent to ICCs) clearly express ryanodine receptors (RyR). RT-PCR revealed that ICCs (identified with c-Kit-immunoreactivity) predominantly express type 3 RyR (RyR3). Furthermore, the FK-binding proteins 12 and 12.6, both of which would interact with RyR3, were detected. In conclusion, we provide first evidence for the essential contribution of RyR to generating pacemaker activity in gastric motility. Similar mechanisms might account for spontaneous rhythmicity seen in smooth muscle tissues distributed in the autonomic nervous system.

  13. Capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left heart assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandorski, Dirk; Höltgen, Reinhard; Stunder, Dominik; Keuchel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    According to the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration and manufacturers, capsule endoscopy should not be used in patients carrying implanted cardiac devices. For this review we considered studies indexed (until 30.06.2013) in Medline [keywords: capsule endoscopy, small bowel endoscopy, cardiac pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, interference, left heart assist device], technical information from Given Imaging and one own publication (not listed in Medline). Several in vitro and in vivo studies included patients with implanted cardiac devices who underwent capsule endoscopy. No clinically relevant interference was noticed. Initial reports on interference with a simulating device were not reproduced. Furthermore technical data of PillCam (Given Imaging) demonstrate that the maximum transmission power is below the permitted limits for cardiac devices. Hence, impairment of cardiac pacemaker, defibrillator or left ventricular heart assist device function by capsule endoscopy is not expected. However, wireless telemetry can cause dysfunction of capsule endoscopy recording. Application of capsule endoscopy is feasible and safe in patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, and left heart assist devices. Development of new technologies warrants future re-evaluation.

  14. Rechargeable silver-modified mercuric oxide-zinc cell for cardiac pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyers, G F; Hughes, H C; Brownlee, R R; Manley, N J; Gorman, I N

    1976-11-04

    Tests were conducted on rechargeable mercury-zinc pacemaker batteries under simulated and actual biologic conditions, using a variety of discharge rates and charging schedules. In tests on 96 cells at a 6.4 milliampere (ma) discharge, recharging once every 15 months of simulated pacing at a 25 microampere (mua) drain, the earliest cell failure occurred after an equivalent of 50 years of pacing. The mean pacing equivalent for all 96 cells was more than 140 years. In 6.4 ma discharge tests on 24 cells, recharging once every 8 days of simulated pacing, only 1 cell in 24 failed after an equivalent of more than 500 years of pacing (actual time 2 years). In tests on 13 cells pacing at a 200 mua drain without recharging, the simulated mean duration of pacing before total discharge was 4.8 years. Seven other cells at a 200 mua drain with periodic recharging continue to function normally after more than 7 years of actual time, simulating 56 years of pacing at a 25 mua drain. Cardiac pacemakers using the rechargeable mercury-zinc cell have been implanted in animals for more than 2 1/2 years and in patients for more than 1 year with all units continuing to function satisfactorily. It has been demonstrated unequivocally that a rechargeable mercury-zinc pacemaker will function continuously for more than 4 years without recharging and that periodic recharging will extend pacing life far beyond that predicted for lithium and nuclear primary power sources.

  15. Alcaligenes xylosoxidans endocarditis of a prosthetic valve and pacemaker in a 62-year-old woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Abhishek C; Srivatsa, Sanjay S; Castro, Luis J

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Alcaligenes xylosoxidans is known to cause several nosocomial infections; however, it rarely causes endocarditis, which has a very high mortality rate. Early isolation of the infection source and prompt identification of the patient's antibiotic sensitivities are paramount if the infection is to be treated adequately. We present what is apparently only the second documented case of the successful eradication of bioprosthetic valve endocarditis that was caused by pacemaker lead infection with Alcaligenes xylosoxidans. A 62-year-old woman with multiple comorbidities presented with endocarditis of a recently placed bioprosthetic aortic valve. The infection was secondary to pacemaker lead infection. She underwent antibiotic therapy, but an unusual pattern of antibiotic resistance developed. Despite initially adequate therapy, the infection recurred because of virulence induced by antibiotic resistance. Emergent, high-risk surgical treatment involved excising the infected valve and removing the source of the infection (the pacemaker leads). The patient eventually recovered after prolonged antibiotic therapy and close vigilance for recurrent infection. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the features of this bacteremia and the challenges in its diagnosis.

  16. Re-use of explanted DDD pacemakers as VDD- clinical utility and cost effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namboodiri, K K N; Sharma, Y P; Bali, H K; Grover, A

    2004-01-01

    Re-use of DDD pulse generators explanted from patients died of unrelated causes is associated with an additional cost of two transvenous leads if implanted as DDD itself, and high rate of infection according to some studies. We studied the clinical and economical aspects of reutilization of explanted DDD pacemakers programmed to VDD mode. Out of 28 patients who received VDD pacemaker during the period, October 2000- September 2001 in the Department of Cardiology, PGIMER, Chandigarh, 5 poor patients were implanted with explanted DDD pulse generators programmed to VDD mode. Each implantation was planned and carried out according to a standard protocol. The age ranged from 45 to 75 (mean-61) years. The indications for pacing were complete heart block (4) and second degree AV block (1). The clinical profile, costs and complications, if any were noted and followed up at regular intervals. The results were compared with patients who received new DDD pulse generators during this period. The additional cost for the atrial lead was not required in these patients. None of these patients had any local site infection. Compared to the two-lead system, the single lead system provided more rapid implantation and minimized complications associated with placement of an atrial lead. The explanted DDD pacemaker can be safely reused as VDD mode with same efficacy in selected patient population. This is associated with lower cost and complications compared to reimplantation as DDD itself.

  17. [Competitive pacing in a patient with DDD pacemaker and bigeminal ventricular extrasystoles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Candelmo, Fiore; Todaro, Chiara; Oreto, Giuseppe

    2008-11-01

    The ECG recorded from a patient with DDD pacemaker showed variable responses of the pacing system to bigeminal ventricular extrasystoles, dependent on the coupling interval of premature beats. For relatively short coupling intervals, the premature spontaneous event was detected by the pacemaker, inhibiting both atrial and ventricular output, and resulting in a relatively long pacing pause. In slightly less premature end-diastolic extrasystoles, in contrast, the pacing system delivered an atrial spike that was superimposed upon the spontaneous premature QRS complex (pseudo-pseudofusion); under these circumstances, the atrial spike was followed, at the end of the programmed atrioventricular interval, by a ventricular spike falling on the extrasystolic T wave apex (competitive ventricular pacing). This phenomenon, however, did not express a sensing malfunction, but was due to post-atrial ventricular blanking (PAVB), a short period initiated by the atrial spike during which ventricular sensing is temporarily disabled, so that no signal can be detected. Finally, whenever premature end-diastolic impulses occurred after PAVB, during the brief interval defined ventricular safety pacing, the spontaneous event was sensed, being followed by an earlier-than-expected ventricular spike, whose prematurity was aimed at avoiding the occurrence of an artificial impulse upon the T wave of extrasystole. In conclusion, despite several not sensed ventricular extrasystoles and competitive pacing, no sensing malfunction was present. This case demonstrates how complex can be the electrocardiographic analysis of a DDD pacemaker, owing to the many complicating phenomena related to this pacing mechanism.

  18. Spontaneous electrical activity of guinea-pig sinoatrial cells under modulation of two different pacemaker mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cacciani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cellular determinants of cardiac automaticity are the hyperpolarization-activated cationic current If, and the electrogenic Na+/Ca2+ exchanger which generates an inward current after each action potential (AP. Our goal was to evaluate their relative role in pacemaking, by means of application of Ivabradine (IVA (specific If blocker and Ryanodine (RYA (known to abolish calcium transient on enzimatically isolated guinea-pig pacemaker cells. Spontaneous APs were recorded in patch-clamp whole cell configuration at 36°C from 7 cells perfused with the following sequence of solutions: physiological normal tyrode (NT, IVA 3 mM, NT and RYA 3 mM. Cycle length (CL, ms and diastolic depolarization rate (DDR, V/s were also calculated. Both blockers displayed similar effects, increasing CL (by 27 and 30%, respectively, and decreasing DDR (by 34 and 42% with respect to NT exposure. These results suggest that both mechanisms are involved into pacemaking mechanism at a similar degree.

  19. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  20. The Arecibo Fast Radio Burst: Dense Circum-burst Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, S R; Neill, J D

    2015-01-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRB) has been extensively debated. Here we investigate FRB121102, detected at Arecibo telescope and remarkable for its unusually large spectral index. After extensive study we conclude that the spectral index is caused by a nebula with free-free absorption. We find that putative nebula must lie beyond the Milky Way. We conclude that FRBs are of extra-galactic origin and that they arise in dense star-forming regions. The challenge with extra-galactic models is the the high volumetric rate of FRBs. This high rate allows us to eliminate all models of catastrophic stellar deaths. Hyper-giant flares from young magnetars emerge as the most likely progenitors. Some of the consequences are: (i) Intergalactic FRB models can be safely ignored. (ii) The rich ISM environment of young magnetars can result in significant contribution to DM, Rotation Measure (RM) and in some cases to significant free-free optical depth. (iii) The star-forming regions in the host galaxies can contribute signi...

  1. Low frequency magnetic emissions and resulting induced voltages in a pacemaker by iPod portable music players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassen Howard

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, malfunctioning of a cardiac pacemaker electromagnetic, caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI by fields emitted by personal portable music players was highly publicized around the world. A clinical study of one patient was performed and two types of interference were observed when the clinicians placed a pacemaker programming head and an iPod were placed adjacent to the patient's implanted pacemaker. The authors concluded that "Warning labels may be needed to avoid close contact between pacemakers and iPods". We performed an in-vitro study to evaluate these claims of EMI and present our findings of no-effects" in this paper. Methods We performed in-vitro evaluations of the low frequency magnetic field emissions from various models of the Apple Inc. iPod music player. We measured magnetic field emissions with a 3-coil sensor (diameter of 3.5 cm placed within 1 cm of the surface of the player. Highly localized fields were observed (only existing in a one square cm area. We also measured the voltages induced inside an 'instrumented-can' pacemaker with two standard unipolar leads. Each iPod was placed in the air, 2.7 cm above the pacemaker case. The pacemaker case and leads were placed in a saline filled torso simulator per pacemaker electromagnetic compatibility standard ANSI/AAMI PC69:2000. Voltages inside the can were measured. Results Emissions were strongest (≈ 0.2 μT pp near a few localized points on the cases of the two iPods with hard drives. Emissions consisted of 100 kHz sinusoidal signal with lower frequency (20 msec wide pulsed amplitude modulation. Voltages induced in the iPods were below the noise level of our instruments (0.5 mV pp in the 0 – 1 kHz band or 2 mV pp in the 0 – 5 MHz bandwidth. Conclusion Our measurements of the magnitude and the spatial distribution of low frequency magnetic flux density emissions by 4 different models of iPod portable music players. Levels of less than 0.2

  2. Ca2+-Clock-Dependent Pacemaking in the Sinus Node Is Impaired in Mice with a Cardiac Specific Reduction in SERCA2 Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logantha, Sunil Jit R. J.; Stokke, Mathis K.; Atkinson, Andrew J.; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Parveen, Sajida; Saeed, Yawer; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sejersted, Ole M.; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) pump is an important component of the Ca2+-clock pacemaker mechanism that provides robustness and flexibility to sinus node pacemaking. We have developed transgenic mice with reduced cardiac SERCA2 abundance (Serca2 KO) as a model for investigating SERCA2's role in sinus node pacemaking. Methods and Results: In Serca2 KO mice, ventricular SERCA2a protein content measured by Western blotting was 75% (P 70% reduction in SERCA2 activity. Conclusions: Serca2 KO mice show a disrupted Ca2+-clock-dependent pacemaker mechanism contributing to impaired sinus node and atrioventricular node function. PMID:27313537

  3. Cardiac electronic pacemakers and biological Pacemakers%心脏电子起搏器时代与生物起搏替代的前沿话题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周亚峰; 杨向军

    2008-01-01

    植入电子起搏器是目前治疗症状性缓慢心律失常的主要方法,然而它存在许多缺点.能否利用分子生物学原理发展生物起搏器成为大家关注的热点.通过转染编码If电流的超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道基因,过度表达超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道,增加心脏舒张期内向电流,从而在窦房结被抑制时提供起搏作用,这种利用基因治疗和细胞治疗构建的生物起搏在不久的将来可能会成为电子起搏器最为理想的替代方法.目的:总结超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道基因构建生物起搏的研究进展.检索策略:由该论文的研究人员应用计算机检索.Pubmed数据库1979-01/2007-06的相关文献.检索词"hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated nnel;biological pacemaker",并限定文章语言种类为English.共检索到157篇文献,对资料进行初审,纳入标准:①与生物起搏及超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道基因密切相关.②同一领域选择近期发表或在权威杂志上发表的文章.排除标准:重复性研究.文献评价:文献的来源主要是超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道基因的基础实验.所选剧的36篇文献中,10篇为综述,其余均为临床或基础实验研究.资料综合:①在4种异构体中超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道1,2,4是心脏中的主要部分,超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道3只在胚胎起搏细胞中有低水平表达.起搏活性小的区域(如心室肌),超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道2的表达占优势;而起搏活性高的区域超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道4的表达占优势.此外,超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道2在整个发育阶段,是心室的主要异构体,超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道2:超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道4的相当表达量在乳鼠为5:1,成年鼠为13:1.②超极化激活环核苷酸门控通道通道缺陷可导致病窦综合征.③到目前为止.转染编码If

  4. Age-dependent changes in intrinsic neuronal excitability in subiculum after status epilepticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkwon Chung

    Full Text Available Kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (KA-SE in mature rats results in the development of spontaneous recurrent seizures and a pattern of cell death resembling hippocampal sclerosis in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. In contrast, KA-SE in young animals before postnatal day (P 18 is less likely to cause cell death or epilepsy. To investigate whether changes in neuronal excitability occur in the subiculum after KA-SE, we examined the age-dependent effects of SE on the bursting neurons of subiculum, the major output region of the hippocampus. Patch-clamp recordings were used to monitor bursting in pyramidal neurons in the subiculum of rat hippocampal slices. Neurons were studied either one or 2-3 weeks following injection of KA or saline (control in immature (P15 or more mature (P30 rats, which differ in their sensitivity to KA as well as the long-term sequelae of the KA-SE. A significantly greater proportion of subicular pyramidal neurons from P15 rats were strong-bursting neurons and showed increased frequency-dependent bursting compared to P30 animals. Frequency-dependent burst firing was enhanced in P30, but not in P15 rats following KA-SE. The enhancement of bursting induced by KA-SE in more mature rats suggests that the frequency-dependent limitation of repetitive burst firing, which normally occurs in the subiculum, is compromised following SE. These changes could facilitate the initiation of spontaneous recurrent seizures or their spread from the hippocampus to other parts of the brain.

  5. Silicon-Neuron Design: A Dynamical Systems Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, John V; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to design spiking silicon neurons based on dynamical systems theory. Dynamical systems theory aids in choosing the appropriate level of abstraction, prescribing a neuron model with the desired dynamics while maintaining simplicity. Further, we provide a procedure to transform the prescribed equations into subthreshold current-mode circuits. We present a circuit design example, a positive-feedback integrate-and-fire neuron, fabricated in 0.25 μm CMOS. We analyze and characterize the circuit, and demonstrate that it can be configured to exhibit desired behaviors, including spike-frequency adaptation and two forms of bursting.

  6. ESTIMATE OF BURSTING PRESSURE OF MILD STEEL PRESSURE VESSEL AND PRESENTATION OF BURSTING FORMULA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chuanxiang

    2006-01-01

    In order to get more precise bursting pressure formula of mild steel, hundreds of bursting experiments of mild steel pressure vessels such as Q235(Gr.D) and 20R(1020) are done. Based on statistical data of bursting pressure and modification of Faupel formula, a more precise modified formula is given out according to the experimental data. It is proved to be more accurate after examining other bursting pressure value presented in many references. This bursting formula is very accurate in these experiments using pressure vessels with different diameter and shell thickness.Obviously, this modified bursting formula can be used in mild steel pressure vessels with different diameter and thickness of shell.

  7. Characteristics of Gintonin-Mediated Membrane Depolarization of Pacemaker Activity in Cultured Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Joo Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Ginseng regulates gastrointestinal (GI motor activity but the underlying components and molecular mechanisms are unknown. We investigated the effect of gintonin, a novel ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA receptor ligand, on the pacemaker activity of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC in murine small intestine and GI motility. Materials and Methods: Enzymatic digestion was used to dissociate ICC from mouse small intestines. The whole-cell patch-clamp configuration was used to record pacemaker potentials and currents from cultured ICC in the absence or presence of gintonin. In vivo effects of gintonin on gastrointestinal (GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rate (ITR of Evans blue in normal and streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. Results: We investigated the effects of gintonin on pacemaker potentials and currents in cultured ICC from mouse small intestine. Gintonin caused membrane depolarization in current clamp mode but this action was blocked by Ki16425, an LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, and by the addition of GDPβS, a GTP-binding protein inhibitor, into the ICC. To study the gintonin signaling pathway, we examined the effects of U-73122, an active PLC inhibitor, and chelerythrine and calphostin, which inhibit PKC. All inhibitors blocked gintonin actions on pacemaker potentials, but not completely. Gintonin-mediated depolarization was lower in Ca2+-free than in Ca2+-containing external solutions and was blocked by thapsigargin. We found that, in ICC, gintonin also activated Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (TMEM16A, ANO1, but not TRPM7 channels. In vivo, gintonin (10-100 mg/kg, p.o. not only significantly increased the ITR in normal mice but also ameliorated STZ-induced diabetic GI motility retardation in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: Gintonin-mediated membrane depolarization of pacemaker activity and ANO1 activation are coupled to the stimulation of GI

  8. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Edmonson, H [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Felmlee, J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pooley, R [Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  9. SU-E-T-585: Optically-Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters for Monitoring Pacemaker Dose in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apicello, L [Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY (United States); Riegel, A; Jamshidi, A [North Shore LIJ Health System, Lake Success, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A sufficient amount of ionizing radiation can cause failure to components of pacemakers. Studies have shown that permanent damage can occur after a dose of 10 Gy and minor damage to functionality occurs at doses as low as 2 Gy. Optically stimulated thermoluminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) can be used as in vivo dosimeters to predict dose to be deposited throughout the treatment. The purpose of this work is to determine the effectiveness of using OSLDs for in vivo dosimetry of pacemaker dose. Methods: As part of a clinical in vivo dosimetry experience, OSLDs were placed at the site of the pacemaker by the therapist for one fraction of the radiation treatment. OSLD measurements were extrapolated to the total dose to be received by the pacemaker during treatment. A total of 79 measurements were collected from November 2011 to December 2013 on six linacs. Sixty-six (66) patients treated in various anatomical sites had the dose of their pacemakers monitored. Results: Of the 79 measurements recorded, 76 measurements (96 %) were below 2 Gy. The mean and standard deviation were 50.12 ± 76.41 cGy. Of the 3 measurements that exceeded 2 Gy, 2 measurements matched the dose predicted in the treatment plan and 1 was repeated after an unexpectedly high Result. The repeated measurement yielded a total dose less than 2 Gy. Conclusion: This analysis suggests OSLDs may be used for in vivo monitoring of pacemaker dose. Further research should be performed to assess the effect of increased backscatter from the pacemaker device.

  10. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  11. Gamma-ray burst progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Levan, Andrew; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, ii) parameters derived from modeling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous an...

  12. Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, Andrew; Crowther, Paul; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-12-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; (i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, (ii) parameters derived from modelling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and (iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous and super-luminous supernovae to long and short GRBs.

  13. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and commercial...

  14. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Jameson, A; Keane, E F; Bailes, M; Kramer, M; Morello, V; Tabbara, D; van Straten, W

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst (FRB) sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios we have reprocessed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a MySQL database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the FRB population as it grows.

  15. CMEs and frequency cutoff of solar bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, Al.; Konovalenko, Al.; Koval, Ar.; Volvach, Y.; Zarka, P.

    2016-05-01

    Radio observations of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff by the radio telescope UTR-2 (near Kharkiv, Ukraine) at 8-33 MHz on 17-19 August 2012 are presented. Such cutoff may be attributed to the emergence of the burst sources behind limb of the Sun with respect to an observer on the Earth. The events are strongly associated with solar eruptions occurred in a new active region. Ray tracing simulations show that the CMEs play a constructive role for the behind-limb bursts to be detected in ground-based observations. Likely, due to tunnel-like cavities with low density in CMEs, the radio emission of behind-limb solar bursts can be directed towards the Earth.

  16. GLAST Burst Monitor Trigger Classification Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, D. J.; Sidman, E. D.; Meegan, C. A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), currently set for launch in the first quarter of 2007, will consist of two instruments, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and the Large Area Telescope (LAT). One of the goals of the GBM is to identify and locate gamma-ray bursts using on-board software. The GLAST observatory can then be re-oriented to allow observations by the LAT. A Bayesian analysis will be used to distinguish gamma-ray bursts from other triggering events, such as solar flares, magnetospheric particle precipitation, soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), and Cygnus X-1 flaring. The trigger parameters used in the analysis are the burst celestial coordinates, angle from the Earth's horizon, spectral hardness, and the spacecraft geomagnetic latitude. The algorithm will be described and the results of testing will be presented.

  17. Bursts from the very early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Stodolsky, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: les@mppmu.mpg.de

    2006-07-27

    Bursts of weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos or even more weakly interacting particles such as wimps and gravitons from the very early universe would offer a much deeper 'look back time' to early epochs than is possible with photons. We consider some of the issues related to the existence of such bursts and their detectability. Characterizing the burst rate by a probability P per Hubble four-volume we find, for events in the radiation-dominated era, that the natural unit of description is the present intensity of the CMB times P. The existence of such bursts would make the observation of pheno associated with very early times in cosmology at least conceptually possible. One might even hope to probe the transplanckian epoch if complexes more weakly interacting than the graviton can exist. Other conceivable applications include the potential detectability of the formation of 'pocket universes' in a multiverse.

  18. Expected Performance of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; vonKienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Steinle, Helmut; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage from the LAT threshold down to approx. 8 kev, and will provide a trigger for re-orienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from selected bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM consists of twelve NaI scintillation detectors operating in the 8 kev to 1 MeV energy range and two BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 150 keV to 30 MeV energy range. Detector resolution, effective area, and angular response have been determined by calibrations. Analyses indicate that the on-board burst threshold will be approx. 0.7 photon/cm2/s and the on-board burst localization accuracy will typically be better than 8 degrees.

  19. Plasma Bursts in Deep Penetration Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrňa, L.; Šarbort, M.

    We present an experimental study of the deep penetration laser welding process which aims to analyze the plasma plume oscillations on a short time scale. Using the high-speed camera we show that the plasma comes out of the keyhole in the form of short bursts rather than the continuous flow. We detect these bursts as the short-time intensity oscillations of light emissions coming from the plasma plume. We determine the period of bursts using the statistical signal processing methods and the short-time frequency analysis. Finally, we compare the characteristics of plasma bursts and the geometry of resulting welds carried out on a 2 kW Yb:YAG laser welding machine for the steel workpiece and various welding parameters settings.

  20. Research on experiment and calculation of foam bursting device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This research presents experimental data on mechanical foam bursting device, based on the high speed of air fluid impinging insidethe foam bursting device, foam bubbles disrupted as a consequence of pressures changed very quickly as shear force and their impact forces. Experimental data on foam-bursting capacity have been presented. Designed device can provide effective foam bursting on collapse foam.

  1. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Collazzi; C. Kouveliotou; A.J. van der Horst; G.A. Younes; Y. Kaneko; E. Göğüş; L. Lin; J. Granot; M.H. Finger; V.L. Chaplin; D. Huppenkothen; A.L. Watts; A. von Kienlin; M.G. Baring; D. Gruber; P.N. Bhat; M.H. Gibby; N. Gehrels; J. Mcenery; M. van der Klis; R.A.M.J. Wijers

    2015-01-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present

  2. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  3. Syudy of Token Generation for Burst Traffic Shaping in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Wan; So Won-ho; Lu Ji-guang; Kim Young-chon

    2004-01-01

    Traffic shaping is one of important control operation to guarantee the Quality of Service (QoS) in optical burst switching (OBS) networks. The efficiency of traffic shaping is mainly determined by token generation method. In this paper, token generation methods of traffic shaping are evaluated by using three kinds of probability distribution, and are analyzed in terms of burst blocking probability, throughput and correlation by simulation. The simulation results show that the token generation methods decrease the burst correlation of Label Switched Paths (LSPs), and solve traffic congestion as well. The different burst arrival processes have small impact on the blocking probability for OBS networks.

  4. QoS-guaranteed burst transmission for VoIP service over optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Takuji; Kasahara, Shoji

    2007-08-01

    We propose a burst transmission method that guarantees the voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) service. The proposed method consists of three techniques: round-robin burst assembly with slotted scheduling, priority control with void filling, and hop-based preemption. Each technique is utilized so that the burst loss probability and the burst transmission delay satisfy VoIP quality of service (QoS). We evaluate by simulation the performance of the proposed method in NSFNET with 14 nodes. Numerical examples show that our proposed method is effective for guaranteeing the VoIP QoS while accommodating a large number of VoIP users.

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Class Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Roiger, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Guided by the supervised pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 developed by Quinlan in 1986, we examine the three gamma-ray burst classes identified by Mukherjee et al. in 1998. C4.5 provides strong statistical support for this classification. However, with C4.5 and our knowledge of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument, we demonstrate that class 3 (intermediate fluence, intermediate duration, soft) does not have to be a distinct source population: statistical/systematic errors in measuring burst attributes combined with the well-known hardness/intensity correlation can cause low peak flux class 1 (high fluence, long, intermediate hardness) bursts to take on class 3 characteristics naturally. Based on our hypothesis that the third class is not a distinct one, we provide rules so that future events can be placed in either class 1 or class 2 (low fluence, short, hard). We find that the two classes are relatively distinct on the basis of Band's work in 1993 on spectral parameters alpha, beta, and E (sub peak) alone. Although this does not indicate a better basis for classification, it does suggest that different physical conditions exist for class 1 and class 2 bursts. In the process of studying burst class characteristics, we identify a new bias affecting burst fluence and duration measurements. Using a simple model of how burst duration can be underestimated, we show how this fluence duration bias can affect BATSE measurements and demonstrate the type of effect it can have on the BATSE fluence versus peak flux diagram.

  6. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  7. Emergence of assortative mixing between clusters of cultured neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Teller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the activity of neuronal cultures is considered to be a good proxy of the functional connectivity of in vivo neuronal tissues. Thus, the functional complex network inferred from activity patterns is a promising way to unravel the interplay between structure and functionality of neuronal systems. Here, we monitor the spontaneous self-sustained dynamics in neuronal cultures formed by interconnected aggregates of neurons (clusters. Dynamics is characterized by the fast activation of groups of clusters in sequences termed bursts. The analysis of the time delays between clusters' activations within the bursts allows the reconstruction of the directed functional connectivity of the network. We propose a method to statistically infer this connectivity and analyze the resulting properties of the associated complex networks. Surprisingly enough, in contrast to what has been reported for many biological networks, the clustered neuronal cultures present assortative mixing connectivity values, meaning that there is a preference for clusters to link to other clusters that share similar functional connectivity, as well as a rich-club core, which shapes a 'connectivity backbone' in the network. These results point out that the grouping of neurons and the assortative connectivity between clusters are intrinsic survival mechanisms of the culture.

  8. Emergence of Assortative Mixing between Clusters of Cultured Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Sara; Granell, Clara; De Domenico, Manlio; Soriano, Jordi; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the activity of neuronal cultures is considered to be a good proxy of the functional connectivity of in vivo neuronal tissues. Thus, the functional complex network inferred from activity patterns is a promising way to unravel the interplay between structure and functionality of neuronal systems. Here, we monitor the spontaneous self-sustained dynamics in neuronal cultures formed by interconnected aggregates of neurons (clusters). Dynamics is characterized by the fast activation of groups of clusters in sequences termed bursts. The analysis of the time delays between clusters' activations within the bursts allows the reconstruction of the directed functional connectivity of the network. We propose a method to statistically infer this connectivity and analyze the resulting properties of the associated complex networks. Surprisingly enough, in contrast to what has been reported for many biological networks, the clustered neuronal cultures present assortative mixing connectivity values, meaning that there is a preference for clusters to link to other clusters that share similar functional connectivity, as well as a rich-club core, which shapes a ‘connectivity backbone’ in the network. These results point out that the grouping of neurons and the assortative connectivity between clusters are intrinsic survival mechanisms of the culture. PMID:25188377

  9. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.J.; Baring, M.G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A.L.; Bhat, P.N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a

  10. Force and torque effects of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner on cardiac pacemakers and ICDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luechinger, R; Duru, F; Scheidegger, M B; Boesiger, P; Candinas, R

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely accepted tool for the diagnosis of a variety of disease states. However, the presence of an implanted pacemaker is considered to be a strict contraindication to MRI in a vast majority of centers due to safety concerns. In phantom studies, the authors investigated the force and torque effects of the static magnetic field of MRI on pacemakers and ICDs. Thirty-one pacemakers (15 dual chamber and 16 single chamber units) from eight manufacturers and 13 ICDs from four manufacturers were exposed to the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner. Magnetic force and acceleration measurements were obtained quantitatively, and torque measurements were made qualitatively. For pacemakers, the measured magnetic force was in the range of 0.05-3.60 N. Pacemakers released after 1995 had low magnetic force values as compared to the older devices. For these devices, the measured acceleration was even lower than the gravity of the earth (static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner. However, ICD devices, despite considerable reduction in size and weight, may still pose problems due to strong magnetic force and torque.

  11. Role of sinoatrial node architecture in maintaining a balanced source-sink relationship and synchronous cardiac pacemaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathya D Unudurthi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal heart rhythm (sinus rhythm depends on regular activity of the sinoatrial node (SAN, a heterogeneous collection of specialized myocytes in the right atrium. SAN cells, in general, possess a unique electrophysiological profile that promotes spontaneous electrical activity (automaticity. However, while automaticity is required for normal pacemaking, it is not necessarily sufficient. Less appreciated is the importance of the elaborate structure of the SAN complex for proper pacemaker function. Here, we review the important structural features of the SAN with a focus on how these elements help manage a precarious balance between electrical charge generated by the SAN (source and the charge needed to excite the surrounding atrial tissue (sink. We also discuss how compromised source-sink balance due, for example to fibrosis, may promote SAN dysfunction, characterized by slow and/or asynchronous pacemaker activity and even failure, in the setting of cardiovascular disease (e.g. heart failure, atrial fibrillation. Finally, we discuss implications of the source-sink balance in the SAN complex for cell and gene therapies aimed at creating a biological pacemaker as replacement or bridge to conventional electronic pacemakers.

  12. The effectiveness of rigid pericardial endoscopy for minimally invasive minor surgeries: cell transplantation, epicardial pacemaker lead implantation, and epicardial ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Takehiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy and safety of rigid pericardial endoscopy as the promising minimally invasive approach to the pericardial space was evaluated. Techniques for cell transplantation, epicardial pacemaker lead implantation, and epicardial ablation were developed. Methods Two swine and 5 canines were studied to evaluate the safety and efficacy of rigid pericardial endoscopy. After a double pericardiocentesis, a transurethral rigid endoscope was inserted into the pericardial space. The technique to obtain a clear visual field was examined, and acute complications such as hemodynamic changes and the effects on intra-pericardial pressure were evaluated. Using custom-made needles, pacemaker leads, and forceps, the applications for cell transplantation, epicardial pacemaker lead implantation, and epicardial ablation were also evaluated. Results The use of air, the detention of a stiff guide wire in the pericardial space, and the stretching of the pericardium with the rigid endoscope were all useful to obtain a clear visual field. A side-lying position also aided observation of the posterior side of the heart. As a cell transplantation methodology, we developed an ultrasonography-guided needle, which allows for the safe visualization of transplantation without major complications. Pacemaker leads were safely and properly implanted, which provides a better outcome for cardiac resynchronizing therapy. Furthermore, the success of clear visualization of the pulmonary veins enabled us to perform epicardial ablation. Conclusions Rigid pericardial endoscopy holds promise as a safe method for minimally invasive cell transplantation, epicardial pacemaker lead implantation, and epicardial ablation by allowing clear visualization of the pericardial space.

  13. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  14. Cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity are absent in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2013-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) is an hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN type III), expressed at birth, that is associated with reduced pain and temperature sensibilities and absent baroreflexes, causing orthostatic hypotension as well as labile blood pressure that increases markedly during emotional excitement. Given the apparent absence of functional baroreceptor afferents, we tested the hypothesis that the normal cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are absent in patients with familial dysautonomia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into muscle or cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 12 patients with familial dysautonomia. Spontaneous bursts of MSNA were absent in all patients, but in five patients we found evidence of tonically firing sympathetic neurones, with no cardiac rhythmicity, that increased their spontaneous discharge during emotional arousal but not during a manoeuvre that unloads the baroreceptors. Conversely, skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), recorded in four patients, appeared normal. We conclude that the loss of phasic bursts of MSNA and the loss of baroreflex modulation of muscle vasoconstrictor drive contributes to the poor control of blood pressure in familial dysautonomia, and that the increase in tonic firing of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones contributes to the increase in blood pressure during emotional excitement.

  15. Spiking patterns of neocortical L5 pyramidal neurons in vitro change with temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan eHedrick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A subset of pyramidal neurons in layer 5 of the mammalian neocortex can fire action potentials in brief, high-frequency bursts while others fire spikes at regularly-spaced intervals. Here we show that individual layer 5 pyramidal neurons in acute slices from mouse primary motor cortex can adopt both regular and burst spiking patterns. During constant current injection at the soma, neurons displayed a regular firing pattern at 36-37 °C, but switched to burst spiking patterns upon cooling the slice to 24-26 °C. This change in firing pattern was reversible and repeatable and was independent of the somatic resting membrane potential. Hence these spiking patterns are not inherent to discrete populations of pyramidal neurons and are more interchangeable than previously thought. Burst spiking in these neurons is the result of electrical interactions between the soma and distal apical dendritic tree. Presumably the interactions between soma and distal dendrite are temperature-sensitive, suggesting that the manner in which layer 5 pyramidal neurons translate synaptic input into an output spiking pattern is fundamentally altered at sub-physiological temperatures.

  16. Ordering chaos and synchronization transitions by chemical delay and coupling on scale-free neuronal networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Yubing, E-mail: gongyubing09@hotmail.co [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Xie Yanhang; Lin Xiu; Hao Yinghang; Ma Xiaoguang [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: Chemical delay and chemical coupling can tame chaotic bursting. Chemical delay-induced transitions from bursting synchronization to intermittent multiple spiking synchronizations. Chemical coupling-induced different types of delay-dependent firing transitions. - Abstract: Chemical synaptic connections are more common than electric ones in neurons, and information transmission delay is especially significant for the synapses of chemical type. In this paper, we report a phenomenon of ordering spatiotemporal chaos and synchronization transitions by the delays and coupling through chemical synapses of modified Hodgkin-Huxley (MHH) neurons on scale-free networks. As the delay {tau} is increased, the neurons exhibit transitions from bursting synchronization (BS) to intermittent multiple spiking synchronizations (SS). As the coupling g{sub syn} is increased, the neurons exhibit different types of firing transitions, depending on the values of {tau}. For a smaller {tau}, there are transitions from spatiotemporal chaotic bursting (SCB) to BS or SS; while for a larger {tau}, there are transitions from SCB to intermittent multiple SS. These findings show that the delays and coupling through chemical synapses can tame the chaotic firings and repeatedly enhance the firing synchronization of neurons, and hence could play important roles in the firing activity of the neurons on scale-free networks.

  17. Asymmetry Factors Shaping Regular and Irregular Bursting Rhythms in Central Pattern Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elices, Irene; Varona, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Central Pattern Generator (CPG) circuits are neural networks that generate rhythmic motor patterns. These circuits are typically built of half-center oscillator subcircuits with reciprocally inhibitory connections. Another common property in many CPGs is the remarkable rich spiking-bursting dynamics of their constituent cells, which balance robustness and flexibility to generate their joint coordinated rhythms. In this paper, we use conductance-based models and realistic connection topologies inspired by the crustacean pyloric CPG to address the study of asymmetry factors shaping CPG bursting rhythms. In particular, we assess the role of asymmetric maximal synaptic conductances, time constants and gap-junction connectivity to establish the regularity of half-center oscillator based CPGs. We map and characterize the synaptic parameter space that lead to regular and irregular bursting activity in these networks. The analysis indicates that asymmetric configurations display robust regular rhythms and that large regions of both regular and irregular but coordinated rhythms exist as a function of the asymmetry in the circuit. Our results show that asymmetry both in the maximal conductances and in the temporal dynamics of mutually inhibitory neurons can synergistically contribute to shape wide regimes of regular spiking-bursting activity in CPGs. Finally, we discuss how a closed-loop protocol driven by a regularity goal can be used to find and characterize regular regimes when there is not time to perform an exhaustive search, as in most experimental studies. PMID:28261081

  18. Synergism of coupled subsarcolemmal Ca2+ clocks and sarcolemmal voltage clocks confers robust and flexible pacemaker function in a novel pacemaker cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G

    2009-03-01

    Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that sinoatrial node cells (SANC) generate spontaneous, rhythmic, local subsarcolemmal Ca(2+) releases (Ca(2+) clock), which occur during late diastolic depolarization (DD) and interact with the classic sarcolemmal voltage oscillator (membrane clock) by activating Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger current (I(NCX)). This and other interactions between clocks, however, are not captured by existing essentially membrane-delimited cardiac pacemaker cell numerical models. Using wide-scale parametric analysis of classic formulations of membrane clock and Ca(2+) cycling, we have constructed and initially explored a prototype rabbit SANC model featuring both clocks. Our coupled oscillator system exhibits greater robustness and flexibility than membrane clock operating alone. Rhythmic spontaneous Ca(2+) releases of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)-based Ca(2+) clock ignite rhythmic action potentials via late DD I(NCX) over much broader ranges of membrane clock parameters [e.g., L-type Ca(2+) current (I(CaL)) and/or hyperpolarization-activated ("funny") current (I(f)) conductances]. The system Ca(2+) clock includes SR and sarcolemmal Ca(2+) fluxes, which optimize cell Ca(2+) balance to increase amplitudes of both SR Ca(2+) release and late DD I(NCX) as SR Ca(2+) pumping rate increases, resulting in a broad pacemaker rate modulation (1.8-4.6 Hz). In contrast, the rate modulation range via membrane clock parameters is substantially smaller when Ca(2+) clock is unchanged or lacking. When Ca(2+) clock is disabled, the system parametric space for fail-safe SANC operation considerably shrinks: without rhythmic late DD I(NCX) ignition signals membrane clock substantially slows, becomes dysrhythmic, or halts. In conclusion, the Ca(2+) clock is a new critical dimension in SANC function. A synergism of the coupled function of Ca(2+) and membrane clocks confers fail-safe SANC operation at greatly varying rates.

  19. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

    1998-04-28

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time. 12 figs.

  20. A Neuron-Based Model of Sleep-Wake Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Peters, Achim; Braun, Hans

    2008-03-01

    In recent years it was discovered that a neuropeptide orexin/hypocretin plays a main role in sleep processes. This peptide is produced by the neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, which project to almost all brain areas. We present a computational model of sleep-wake cycles, which is based on the Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons and considers reciprocal glutaminergic projections between the lateral hypothalamus and the prefrontal cortex. Orexin is released as a neuromodulator and is required to keep the neurons firing, which corresponds to the wake state. When orexin is depleted the neurons are getting silent as observed in the sleep state. They can be reactivated by the circadian signal from the suprachiasmatic nucleus and/or external stimuli (alarm clock). Orexin projections to the thalamocortical neurons also can account for their transition from tonic firing activity during wakefulness to synchronized burst discharges during sleep.

  1. A microdialysis study on pineal melatonin rhythms in rats after an 8-h phase advance : New characteristics of the underlying pacemaker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, WJ; Brons, HF; Oakley, N; Hagan, RM; Westerink, BHC

    1997-01-01

    This study describes the use of the microdialysis technique to elucidate specific properties of the circadian pacemaking system in the hypothalamus, by measurement of melatonin production in the pineal gland. Melatonin has appeared to be a reliable marker of the pacemaker activity, which is influenc

  2. Analytical characterization of spontaneous firing in networks of developing rat cultured cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Takashi; Kawana, Akio; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2002-05-01

    We have used a multiunit electrode array in extracellular recording to investigate changes in the firing patterns in networks of developing rat cortical neurons. The spontaneous activity of continual asynchronous firing or the alternation of asynchronous spikes and synchronous bursts changed over time so that activity in the later stages consisted exclusively of synchronized bursts. The spontaneous coordinated activity in bursts produced a variability in interburst interval (IBI) sequences that is referred to as ``form.'' The stochastic and nonlinear dynamical analysis of IBI sequences revealed that these sequences reflected a largely random process and that the form for relatively immature neurons was largely oscillatory while the form for the more mature neurons was Poisson-like. The observed IBI sequences thus showed changes in form associated with both the intrinsic properties of the developing cells and the neural response to correlated synaptic inputs due to interaction between the developing neural circuits.

  3. A new burst assembly technique for supporting QoS in optical burst switching networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolong Yang(阳小龙); Mingrui Dang(党明瑞); Youju Mao(毛幼菊); Lemin Li(李乐民)

    2003-01-01

    This letter proposes a new burst assembly technique for supporting QoS in optical burst switching (OBS)networks. It consists of the adaptive-threshold burst assembly mechanism and QoS-based random offset-time scheme. The assembly mechanism, which is fit well to multi-class burst assembly, not only matcheswith IP QoS mechanism based on packet classification, and also utilizes fairly and efficiently assemblycapacity. Based on token-bucket model and burst segment selective discard (BSSD), the offset-time schemecan smooth the traffic to support OBS QoS. The simulation results show that the technique can improvethe performance in terms of packet loss probability (PLP).

  4. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi-Yuan; ZHANG Jian-Guo

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data.

  5. Constrained Synaptic Connectivity in Functional Mammalian Neuronal Networks Grown on Patterned Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, Laurent; Wyart, Claire; Ybert, Christophe; Herr, Catherine; Chatenay, Didier

    2002-03-01

    The use of ordered neuronal networks in vitro is a promising approach to study the development and the activity of neuronal assemblies. However in previous attempts, sufficient growth control and physiological maturation of neurons could not be achieved. We describe an original protocol in which polylysine patterns confine the adhesion of cellular bodies to prescribed spots and the neuritic growth to thin lines. Hippocampal neurons are maintained healthy in serum free medium up to five weeks in vitro. Electrophysiology and immunochemistry show that neurons exhibit mature excitatory and inhibitory synapses and calcium imaging reveals spontaneous bursting activity of neurons in isolated networks. Neurons in these geometrical networks form functional synapses preferentially to their first neighbors. We have therefore established a simple and robust protocol to constrain both the location of neuronal cell bodies and their pattern of connectivity.

  6. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin, E-mail: xmli@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Dependable Service Computing in Cyber Physical Society of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  7. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  8. A Case of Adult-Onset Acute Rheumatic Fever With Long-Lasting Atrioventricular Block Requiring Permanent Pacemaker Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Yusuke; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Yoshioki; Ueno, Shuichi; Nagashima, Takao; Imai, Yasushi; Shimpo, Masahisa; Kario, Kazuomi

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old hypertensive Japanese woman presented with epigastric pain on inspiration, fever, complete atrioventricular block and polyarthritis. Her antistreptolysin O levels were markedly elevated. A diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made according to the modified Jones criteria. She was prescribed loxoprofen sodium, which was partially effective for her extracardiac clinical symptoms. However, she had syncope due to complete atrioventricular block with asystole longer than 10 seconds. Consequently, we implanted a permanent pacemaker. Although we prescribed prednisolone, the efficacy of which was limited for the patient's conduction disturbance, the complete atrioventricular block persisted. In our systematic review of 12 similar cases, the duration of complete heart block was always transient and there was no case requiring a permanent pacemaker. We thus encountered a very rare case of adult-onset acute rheumatic fever with persistent complete atrioventricular block necessitating permanent pacemaker implantation.

  9. Anesthetic management of a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with dual-chamber pacemaker undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Amit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the anesthetic management of a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with dual-chamber pacemaker undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate. Anesthetic challenges included prevention and management of perioperative arrhythmias, maintenance of adequate preload, afterload and heart rate to relieve left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and considerations related to the presence of dual-chamber pacemaker and TURP. We recommend preoperative reprogramming of the DDD pacemaker, avoidance of magnet application during the procedure, application of electrosurgical unit current returning pad to the anterior aspect of the thigh, especially if monopolar cautery is used, use of central venous pressure line for estimation of preload and careful titration of anesthetic drugs to maintain stable hemodynamics.

  10. Global Bifurcation Structure and Variability of Pacemaker Rhythm in a Detailed Model of Cardiac Sinoatrial Node Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenxing; Doi, Shinji

    As a cardiac pacemaker, sinoatrial node spontaneously generates periodic electrical signals (action potentials) in its cells. The action potential generation is deeply related to various ion channels in cell membranes, and the abnormalities of ion channels cause sinus arrhythmia. We use the Zhang model of sinoatrial node cells to investigate the relation between pacemaker rhythm (frequency of action potential generation) and ion channels. The Zhang model is described by the Hodgkin-Huxley-type nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and its parameter values vary between periphery and center cells of sinoatrial node. We analyze the bifurcation structure of the Zhang model, and investigate the variability of pacemaker rhythm and its sensitivity on ion channel conductance changes for both periphery and center cells. Moreover, these results are compared with the previous results of another sinoatrial node cell model: Yanagihara-Noma-Irisawa model.

  11. Membranes as a possible pacemaker of metabolism in cypriniform fish: does phylogeny matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Alex; Pagé, Benoît; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2015-08-01

    The 'membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism' proposes that membranes set metabolic rate by modulating protein activity, and thus purports to explain membrane fatty acid allometry. This relationship has never been tested across species in ectotherms. After accounting for phylogeny, recent analyses have failed to support this theory based on correlations between muscle membrane composition and body mass across mammals. Therefore, the goal of this study was to seek phylogenetically corrected correlations between membrane composition, body mass and calcium-ATPase activity, using 12 species of closely related cypriniform fish (4-5500 g) covering a much narrower genetic scale than in previous tests. The results show that fish membrane unsaturation decreases with mass, but through different mechanisms from those in endotherms: 16:0 replacing 22:6 in muscle and 18:0 replacing 16:1, 18:1 and 18:2 in liver. This shows that allometric patterns differ between endotherms and ectotherms as well as between tissues. After accounting for phylogeny, however, almost all these relationships lose significance except for overall unsaturation. No relationship between calcium-ATPase activity and mass or phospholipid composition was detected. This study shows that membrane unsaturation of cypriniforms decreases with mass, but that genetic cues unrelated to size account for differences in the relative abundance of individual fatty acids. The membrane pacemaker concept accurately predicts general membrane properties such as unsaturation, but fails to explain finer scale allometric patterns. Future examinations of the membrane pacemaker hypothesis will have to take into account that allometric patterns vary between endotherms and ectotherms and between tissues of the same animal class.

  12. Meteor burst in the post 2000 era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, C.; Oduol, V.; Ghosh, A.; Tailor, B.

    In recent years a renewed interest has been shown in the possibility of using meteor burst links in tactical communications, both for networking and covert operations. Some of the applications that recent performance improvements would permit are evaluated. In evaluating the feasibility of a meteor burst implementation, certain technical and physical limitations are addressed. For the success of these applications, interoperability with other communication systems is necessary. The level of interoperability with other media, and the standards necessary to assure this interoperability are examined. Methods of minimizing and combating jamming are proposed. Meteor burst systems can be used in a large number of applications within a tactical environment. The principal disadvantage of the meteor burst medium is the problem of interference to other spectrum users from the probe end, and the interference from other users at the receiver end. The low throughput characteristic of meteor burst compares with some of the channel capacities used in other systems. Interoperability with other networks or communications links is relatively easy if certain straightforward protocols and standards are established.

  13. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  14. Diagnostics From Three Rising Submillimeter Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts occurred sequentially in a super-Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu/GHz (corresponding spectral index $\\alpha$ of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, while it can attain values of 235 sfu/GHz ($\\alpha$=4.8) for 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of high relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV , while it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than that in microwave (MW) one. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20--50$\\%$ during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW one increased by 28$\\%$ for the 2003 Novemb...

  15. GRB Catalog: Bursts from Vela to Swift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, L.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma ray burst (GRB) astronomy started when the first event was recorded on July 2, 1967 by Vela 4a and 4b. Since then many missions have flown experiments capable of detecting GRBs. The events collected by these older experiments are mostly available in paper copy, each containing a few ten to a few hundred bursts. No systematic effort in cataloging of these bursts has been available. In some cases the information is unpublished and in others difficult to retrieve. The first major GRB catalog was obtained by GRO with the BATSE experiment. It contains more than 2000 bursts and includes homogeneous information for each of the bursts. With the launch of Swift, the first Gamma-ray/X-ray mission dedicated to the study of GRBs and their afterglows, a wealth of information is collected by the Swift instrument as well as from ground-based telescopes. This talk will describe the efforts to create a comprehensive GRBCAT and its current status and future prospective.

  16. Apical Ballooning Syndrome (Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy after Permanent Dual-Chamber Pacemaker Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Gardini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Apical ballooning syndrome, also called takotsubo cardiomyopathy, has been recently reported. It may mimic acute myocardial infarction and is typically observed in postmenopausal women after stressful events. A 75-year-old female after permanent dual chamber pacemaker implant complained of chest pain with repolarization alterations suggesting acute myocardial ischemia. Echocardiography showed a left ventricle with akinesia of the apical portions and reduced global systolic function. The patient was treated with antithrombotic agents and intravenous nitrates. No coronary lesions were found at angiography. At ventriculography, a typical takotsubo-like shape of the left ventricle was observed. The clinical and echocardiographic picture normalized at discharge.

  17. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  18. Case report: use caution when applying magnets to pacemakers or defibrillators for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Peter M; Rozner, Marc A

    2013-08-01

    The application of a magnet to a pacemaker (intended to cause asynchronous pacing) or implanted cardioverter defibrillator (intended to prevent shocks) during surgery without a clear understanding of actual magnet function(s) or precautions can have unexpected, untoward, or harmful consequences. In this report, we present 3 cases in which inadequate assessment of cardiac implanted electronic device (CIED) function, coupled with magnet application, contributed to or resulted in inappropriate antitachycardia pacing or shocks, CIED damage, or patient injury. Although these cases might be rare, they reinforce the need for a timely, detailed preoperative review of CIED function and programming as recommended by the American Society of Anesthesiologists and the Heart Rhythm Society.

  19. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes-A model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanani, S. [Institut Genomique Fonctionelle, 141 Rue de la Cardonille, 34396 Montpellier (France); Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Pumir, A. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Laboratoire J.A. Dieudonne, CNRS and Universite de Nice, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)], E-mail: alain.pumir@unice.fr; Krinsky, V. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2008-01-07

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler-Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo-Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin-Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I{sub K1} channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I{sub K1} channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I{sub K1} channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I{sub K1} channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler-Reuter and in the dynamic Luo-Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below {approx}1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I{sub K1} has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  20. [Current developments on the physiology of the cardiac atrial pacemaker an excitation conduction of the left atrium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, L; Avanzino, G L

    1979-06-30

    According to recent developments the atrial pacemaker area and the right atrium show a peculiar morpho-functional organization, i.e.: 1) The pacemaker area is formed of clusters of cells containing relatively few myofibrils and showing embryologic characteristics. Such cells are known as nodal cells and between these and the atrial muscles are in general situated transitional cells. Each cluster is separated from the other by collagenous boundaries. The resistance of the membranes to the current flow seems to be relatively low between the cells of the same cluster but the collagenous boundaries are, according to TRAUTWEIN e UCHIZONO (1963), very poor conductors. The pacemaker activity seems to originate inside the various clusters. 2) The functional relationships between the sinoatrial node and the atrioventricular node as well as the interatrial relationship would take place through preferential pathways. These pathways corresponding approximately to the tracts described by JAMES (1966) (anterior, posterior and middle internodal tracts) and to the interatrial or Bachmann bundle, seems to show a higher velocity conduction. In general the fibres of which the tracts are composed are neither morphologically nor functionally isolated from the atrial muscle. The functional consequences of the above mentioned nodal and atrial organization seems to be: a) The possible conditioning of the pacemaker functions by the various clusters activity i.e. the dominance of one cluster over another. b) The shifting of the pacemaker activity from one cluster to anothr due to the arrival of nervous stimuli or chemical substances, etc. According to some Authors as a consequence of the shift the pacemaker area can sometimes move out side the nodal tissue and settle inside an area belonging to the internodal pathways. c) Another consequence of the shift can be the different involvement of the conducting pathways which can lead to a change in the dynamics of the atrial invasion by the

  1. Six types of multistability in a neuronal model based on slow calcium current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Malashchenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multistability of oscillatory and silent regimes is a ubiquitous phenomenon exhibited by excitable systems such as neurons and cardiac cells. Multistability can play functional roles in short-term memory and maintaining posture. It seems to pose an evolutionary advantage for neurons which are part of multifunctional Central Pattern Generators to possess multistability. The mechanisms supporting multistability of bursting regimes are not well understood or classified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our study is focused on determining the bio-physical mechanisms underlying different types of co-existence of the oscillatory and silent regimes observed in a neuronal model. We develop a low-dimensional model typifying the dynamics of a single leech heart interneuron. We carry out a bifurcation analysis of the model and show that it possesses six different types of multistability of dynamical regimes. These types are the co-existence of 1 bursting and silence, 2 tonic spiking and silence, 3 tonic spiking and subthreshold oscillations, 4 bursting and subthreshold oscillations, 5 bursting, subthreshold oscillations and silence, and 6 bursting and tonic spiking. These first five types of multistability occur due to the presence of a separating regime that is either a saddle periodic orbit or a saddle equilibrium. We found that the parameter range wherein multistability is observed is limited by the parameter values at which the separating regimes emerge and terminate. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a neuronal model which exhibits a rich variety of different types of multistability. We described a novel mechanism supporting the bistability of bursting and silence. This neuronal model provides a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of networks with neurons possessing different types of multistability.

  2. [Typical Patterns of Neuronal Activity in Relay and Nonspecific Thalamic Nuclei in Patients with Spasmodic Torticollis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetiarov, D A; Semenova, U N; Butiaeva, L I; Sedov, A S

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity of 50 neurons in nonspecific (Rt, MD) and relay (Voi, Voa) thalamic nuclei was analyzed. Data were obtained by microelectrode technique during 14 stereotactic operations in patients with spasmodic torticollis. Application of Poincare maps and Gap-statistics allowed to reveal 3 main patterns of neuronal activity: irregular single spikes, low-threshold Ca(2+)-dependent rhythmic (3-5 Hz) bursts and combination of bursts and single spikes. In some cases, grouping (in Voi and Rt nuclei) and long burst (in Voa nucleus) patterns were observed. Grouping pattern consist of low-density groups of spikes with tendency to periodicity in range 1-1.5 Hz. Long burst pattern consist of long dense groups of spikes with random length and invariant interburst intervals. Main numerical estimations of 3 most spread patterns of neuronal activity were obtained by parametric analysis. In results, investigated thalamic nuclei significantly distinguished from each other by characteristics of burst activity but average firing rate of these nuclei hadn't significant differences. These data may be useful for functional identification of thalamic nuclei during stereotactic neurosurgery operation in patients with movement disorders.

  3. Symptomatic sick sinus syndrome requiring permanent pacemaker implantation in a patient uwith mirror image dextrocardia with situs inversus and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahali, Dhiman; Mandal, Saroj; Mandal, Debasmita; Ghose, Arijit; Kanjilal, Souvik

    2013-01-01

    Situs inversus with dextrocardia is a congenital condition in which the heart is a mirror image of the anatomically normal heart on the right side. A patient presented with the sick sinus syndrome accompanying mirror image dextrocardia which was associated with double superior vena cava and a left sided inferior vena cava A permanent transvenous demand pacemaker was inserted because of repeated episodes of dizziness and a single episode of syncope with ECG showing bradycardia with junctional escape rhythm. Precise knowledge of the venous system and the location of the apex of the right ventricle were necessary prior to permanent pacemaker implantation. Without such knowledge pacing may be technically challenging.

  4. Pheochromocytoma-induced atrial tachycardia leading to cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest: resolution with atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawa, Hassan; Bajaj, Mandeep; Cunningham, Glenn R

    2014-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma should be considered in young patients who have acute cardiac decompensation, even if they have no history of hypertension. Atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement should be considered for stabilizing pheochromocytoma patients with cardiogenic shock due to atrial tachyarrhythmias. A 38-year-old black woman presented with cardiogenic shock (left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest unresolved by the placement of 2 different ventricular assist devices, but that was completely reversed by radiofrequency ablation of the atrioventricular node and the placement of a temporary pacemaker. We present the patient's clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings, and we review the relevant literature.

  5. Modeling the emergence of circadian rhythms in a clock neuron network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Diambra

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in pacemaker cells persist for weeks in constant darkness, while in other types of cells the molecular oscillations that underlie circadian rhythms damp rapidly under the same conditions. Although much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical and cellular basis of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms leading to damped or self-sustained oscillations remain largely unknown. There exist many mathematical models that reproduce the circadian rhythms in the case of a single cell of the Drosophila fly. However, not much is known about the mechanisms leading to coherent circadian oscillation in clock neuron networks. In this work we have implemented a model for a network of interacting clock neurons to describe the emergence (or damping of circadian rhythms in Drosophila fly, in the absence of zeitgebers. Our model consists of an array of pacemakers that interact through the modulation of some parameters by a network feedback. The individual pacemakers are described by a well-known biochemical model for circadian oscillation, to which we have added degradation of PER protein by light and multiplicative noise. The network feedback is the PER protein level averaged over the whole network. In particular, we have investigated the effect of modulation of the parameters associated with (i the control of net entrance of PER into the nucleus and (ii the non-photic degradation of PER. Our results indicate that the modulation of PER entrance into the nucleus allows the synchronization of clock neurons, leading to coherent circadian oscillations under constant dark condition. On the other hand, the modulation of non-photic degradation cannot reset the phases of individual clocks subjected to intrinsic biochemical noise.

  6. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels;

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  7. On the bursting of gene products

    CERN Document Server

    Yvinec, Romain

    2011-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate that the so-called bursting production of molecular species during gene expression may be an artifact caused by low time resolution in experimental data collection and not an actual burst in production. We reach this conclusion through an analysis of a two-stage and binary model for gene expression, and demonstrate that in the limit when mRNA degradation is much faster than protein degradation they are equivalent. The negative binomial distribution is shown to be a limiting case of the binary model for fast "on to off" state transitions and high values of the ratio between protein synthesis and degradation rates. The gene products population increases by unity but multiple times in a time interval orders of magnitude smaller than protein half-life or the precision of the experimental apparatus employed in its detection. This rare-and-fast one-by-one protein synthesis has been interpreted as bursting.

  8. Study on fault induced rock bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-hua; DOU Lin-ming; LU Cai-ping; MU Zong-long; CAO An-ye

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the rules of rock bursts caused by faults by means of mechanical analysis of a roof rock-mass balanced structure and numerical simulation about fault slip destabilization, the effect of coal mining operation on fault plane stresses and slip displacement were studied. The results indicate that the slip displacement sharply increases due to the decrease of normal stress and the increase of shear stress at the fault plane when the working face advances from the footwall to the fault itself, which may induce a fault rock burst. However, this slip displacement will be very small due to the increase of normal stress and the decrease of shear stress when the working face advances from the hanging wall to the fault itself, which results in a very small risk of a fault rock burst.

  9. A mechanism for fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E; Vieyro, Florencia L

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless Bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarised and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The timescale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of t...

  10. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  11. Bursting activity spreading through asymmetric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2014-01-01

    People communicate with those who have the same background or share a common interest by using a social networking service (SNS). News or messages propagate through inhomogeneous connections in an SNS by sharing or facilitating additional comments. Such human activity is known to lead to endogenous bursting in the rate of message occurrences. We analyze a multi-dimensional self-exciting process to reveal dependence of the bursting activity on the topology of connections and the distribution of interaction strength on the connections. We determine the critical conditions for the cases where interaction strength is regulated at either the point of input or output for each person. In the input regulation condition, the network may exhibit bursting with infinitesimal interaction strength, if the dispersion of the degrees diverges as in the scale-free networks. In contrast, in the output regulation condition, the critical value of interaction strength, represented by the average number of events added by a single ...

  12. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  13. Variable protostellar accretion with episodic bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, Eduard I

    2015-01-01

    We present the latest development of the disk gravitational instability and fragmentation model, originally introduced by us to explain episodic accretion bursts in the early stages of star formation. Using our numerical hydrodynamics model with improved disk thermal balance and star-disk interaction, we computed the evolution of protostellar disks formed from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores. In agreement with our previous studies, we find that cores of higher initial mass and angular momentum produce disks that are more favorable to gravitational instability and fragmentation, while a higher background irradiation and magnetic fields moderate the disk tendency to fragment. The protostellar accretion in our models is time-variable, thanks to the nonlinear interaction between different spiral modes in the gravitationally unstable disk, and can undergo episodic bursts when fragments migrate onto the star owing to the gravitational interaction with other fragments or spiral arms. Most bursts occur...

  14. Origin of the slow afterhyperpolarization and slow rhythmic bursting in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Charles J; Goldberg, Joshua A

    2006-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons recorded in slices exhibit three different firing patterns: rhythmic single spiking, irregular bursting, and rhythmic bursting. The rhythmic single-spiking pattern is governed mainly by a prominent brief afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) that follows single spikes. The mAHP arises from an apamin-sensitive calcium-dependent potassium current. A slower AHP (sAHP), also present in these neurons, becomes prominent during rhythmic bursting or driven firing. Although not apamin sensitive, the sAHP is caused by a calcium-dependent potassium conductance. It is not present after blockade of calcium current with cadmium or after calcium is removed from the media or when intracellular calcium is buffered with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. It reverses at the potassium equilibrium potential. It can be generated by subthreshold depolarizations and persists after blockade of sodium currents by tetrodotoxin. It is slow, being maximal approximately 1 s after depolarization onset, and takes several seconds to decay. It requires >300-ms depolarizations to become maximally activated. Its voltage sensitivity is sigmoidal, with a half activation voltage of -40 mV. We conclude the sAHP is a high-affinity apamin-insensitive calcium-dependent potassium conductance, triggered by calcium currents partly activated at subthreshold levels. In combination with those calcium currents, it accounts for the slow oscillations seen in a subset of cholinergic interneurons exhibiting rhythmic bursting. In all cholinergic interneurons, it contributes to the slowdown or pause in firing that follows driven activity or prolonged subthreshold depolarizations and is therefore a candidate mechanism for the pause response observed in cholinergic neurons in vivo.

  15. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  16. The Integral Burst Alert System (IBAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, S; Borkowski, J J; Walter, R; Pedersen, H

    2003-01-01

    We describe the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS): the automatic software for the rapid distribution of the coordinates of the Gamma-Ray Bursts detected by INTEGRAL. IBAS is implemented as a ground based system, working on the near-real time telemetry stream. During the first six months of operations, six GRB have been detected in the field of view of the INTEGRAL instruments and localized by IBAS. Positions with an accuracy of a few arcminutes are currently distributed by IBAS to the community for follow-up observations within a few tens of seconds of the event.

  17. Gamma-Ray Burst Early Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B

    2005-01-01

    The successful launch and operation of NASA's Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer open a new era for the multi-wavelength study of the very early afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRB early afterglow information is essential to explore the unknown physical composition of GRB jets, the link between the prompt gamma-ray emission and the afterglow emission, the GRB central engine activity, as well as the immediate GRB environment. Here I review some of the recent theoretical efforts to address these problems and describe how the latest Swift data give answers to these outstanding questions.

  18. Distribution of whistler mode bursts at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarf, F. L.; Jordan, K. F.; Russell, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    Several thousand impulsive whistler mode noise bursts were detected by the Pioneer Venus wave instrument during the first 10 seasons with nightside traversals at low altitudes. The altitude distribution for these events shows that essentially all of the bursts were detected when the orbiter was less than 2000 km above the planet, suggesting that the varying plasma conditions could not maintain coherent whistler mode field-aligned guidance over greater distances. Within the 2000-km range, the distribution of the number of events versus altitude shows that there are two distinct subregions. These results are interpreted in terms of two types of whistler mode propagation from sources below the ionosphere.

  19. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the rationale, design, and importance of an X-Ray Polarimeter. There is a brief discussion of Gamma Ray Bursts, followed by a review of the theories of Gamma-Ray Bursts Polarization. This leads to the question of "How do we measure the polarization?" and a discussion of the GRB x-ray emission, the photoelectric effect and photoelectric polarimetry. The requirements for the work, can only be approached using a gas detector. This leads to a discussion of a Micropattern Gas Polarimeter, and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) X-ray Polarimeter.

  20. Compatibility of temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads with magnetic resonance imaging: an ex vivo tissue study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Alexander; Drobnik, Stefanie; Rzanny, Reinhard; Aboud, Anas; Böttcher, Joachim; Schmidt, Peter; Ortmann, Christian; Mall, Gita; Hekmat, Khosro; Brehm, Bernhard; Reichenbach, Juergen; Mayer, Thomas E; Wolf, Gunter; Hansch, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    The presence of temporary myocardial pacing leads is considered a safety contraindication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this ex vivo tissue study was to measure the heating effects at the tip of the leads using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) thermometry. The tissue effects were verified by histological analyses. Pig hearts with implanted temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads were examined by whole-body MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The tests were performed either by a sequence with high specific absorption rate (SAR) or by standard clinical sequences with lower SAR. Temperature changes were detected via (1)HMRS thermometry, by monitoring the frequency difference between water protons and the reference signals of N-methyl protons of creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr) and trimethylamine (TMA). Histology was performed using several staining techniques. Standard low-SAR and high-SAR sequences did not cause significant temperature increases in the myocardial tissue surrounding the implanted leads. There were no histopathological signs of thermal damage around the tips of the leads in any of the hearts or in a control implanted heart not subjected to MRI. The present data suggest that temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads may be compatible with MR scanning at 1.5 Tesla. However, further in vivo studies and carefully monitored patient studies are needed before final safety recommendations can be made.

  1. Influence of Slippery Pacemaker Leads on Lead-Induced Venous Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiguang; Bhatia, Sagar; Obenauf, Dayna; Resse, Max; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Pak, On Shun

    2016-11-01

    The use of medical devices such as pacemakers and implantable cardiac defibrillators have become commonplace to treat arrhythmias. Pacing leads with electrodes are used to send electrical pulses to the heart to treat either abnormally slow heart rates, or abnormal rhythms. Lead induced vessel occlusion, which is commonly seen after placement of pacemaker or ICD leads, may result in lead malfunction and/or SVC syndrome, and makes lead extraction difficult. The association between the anatomic locations at risk for thrombosis and regions of venous stasis have been reported previously. The computational studies reveal obvious flow stasis in the proximity of the leads, due to the no-slip boundary condition imposed on the lead surface. With the advent of recent technologies capable of creating slippery surfaces that can repel complex fluids including blood, we explore computationally how local flow structures may be altered in the regions around the leads when the no-slip boundary condition on the lead surface is relaxed using various slip lengths. The findings evaluate the possibility of mitigating risks of lead-induced thrombosis and occlusion by implementing novel surface conditions (i.e. theoretical coatings) on the leads.

  2. Cardiorespiratory Mechanical Simulator for In Vitro Testing of Impedance Minute Ventilation Sensors in Cardiac Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, Emanuela; Cercenelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cardiorespiratory mechanical simulator (CRMS), a system able to reproduce both the cardiac and respiratory movements, intended to be used for in vitro testing of impedance minute ventilation (iMV) sensors in cardiac pacemakers. The simulator consists of two actuators anchored to a human thorax model and a software interface to control the actuators and to acquire/process impedance signals. The actuators can be driven separately or simultaneously to reproduce the cardiac longitudinal shortening at a programmable heart rate and the diaphragm displacement at a programmable respiratory rate (RR). A standard bipolar pacing lead moving with the actuators and a pacemaker case fixed to the thorax model have been used to measure impedance (Z) variations during the simulated cardiorespiratory movements. The software is able to discriminate the low-frequency component because of respiration (Z(R)) from the high-frequency ripple because of cardiac effect (Z(C)). Impedance minute ventilation is continuously calculated from Z(R) and RR. From preliminary tests, the CRMS proved to be a reliable simulator for in vitro evaluation of iMV sensors. Respiration impedance recordings collected during cardiorespiratory movements reproduced by the CRMS were comparable in morphology and amplitude with in vivo assessments of transthoracic impedance variations.

  3. Quantification of fiber orientation in the canine atrial pacemaker complex using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The atrial pacemaker complex is responsible for the initiation and early propagation of cardiac impulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality with spatial resolutions of ∼1 to 15 μm, can be used to identify unique fiber orientation patterns in this region of the heart. Functionally characterized canine sinoatrial nodes (SAN) (n=7) were imaged using OCT up to ∼1  mm below the endocardial tissue surface. OCT images were directly compared to their corresponding histological sections. Fiber orientation patterns unique to the crista terminalis (CT), SAN, and surrounding atrial myocardium were identified with dominant average fiber angles of 89±12  deg, 110±16  deg, and 95±35  deg, respectively. Both the CT and surrounding atrial myocardium displayed predominantly unidirectionally based fiber orientation patterns within each specimen, whereas the SAN displayed an increased amount of fiber disarray manifested quantitatively as a significantly greater standard deviation in fiber angle distribution within specimens [33±7  deg versus 23±5  deg, atrium (p=0.02); 18±3  deg, CT (p=0.0003)]. We also identified unique, local patterns of fiber orientation specific to the functionally characterized block zone. We demonstrate the ability of OCT in detecting components of the atrial pacemaker complex which are intimately involved in both normal and abnormal cardiac conduction. PMID:22894470

  4. Repetitive nonreentrant ventriculoatrial synchrony: An underrecognized cause of pacemaker-related arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Parikshit S; Kaszala, Karoly; Tan, Alex Y; Koneru, Jayanthi N; Shepard, Richard; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Huizar, Jose F

    2016-08-01

    Similar to endless loop tachycardia (ELT), repetitive nonreentrant ventriculoatrial synchrony (RNRVAS) is a ventriculoatrial (VA) synchrony pacemaker-mediated arrhythmia. RNRVAS was first described in 1990 and can only occur in the presence of retrograde VA conduction and dual-chamber or cardiac resynchronization devices with tracking (P-synchronous ventricular pacing such as DDD, DDDR) or nontracking pacing modes that allow AV-sequential pacing (DDI, DDIR). RNRVAS is promoted by (1) high lower rate limit or any feature that allows rapid pacing, (2) long AV intervals, or (3) long postventricular atrial refractory period (PVARP). In contrast to ELT, RNRVAS is a less well-recognized form of pacemaker-mediated arrhythmia; thus, unlike ELT, there are no specific device algorithms to prevent, recognize, and terminate RNRVAS. However, RNRVAS has been recently shown to occur frequently. We present a series of cases, some of which were found fortuitously. Owing to its clinical implications, we propose that algorithms should be developed to prevent, identify, and terminate RNRVAS.

  5. Coil embolization of internal mammary artery injured during central vein catheter and cardiac pacemaker lead insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemelli, A.P. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: Andreas.Chemelli@i-med.ac.at; Chemelli-Steingruber, I.E. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonaros, N. [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Luckner, G. [Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Millonig, G. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Seppi, K. [Department of Neurology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Lottersberger, C.; Jaschke, W. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: This study describes several cases of endovascular coil embolization of the proximal internal mammary artery injured by blind approach to the subclavian vein for central venous catheter or pacemaker lead insertion. Materials and methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of five patients with iatrogenic arterial lesions of the internal mammary artery (IMA). The lesions occurred in three patients from a puncture of the subclavian vein during insertion of a central venous catheter and in two patients from a puncture of the subclavian vein for insertion of a pacemaker lead. Four patients had acute symptoms of bleeding with mediastinal hematoma and hematothorax and one patient was investigated in a chronic stage. A pseudoaneurysm was detected in all five patients. All four acute and hemodynamic unstable patients required hemodynamic support. Results: In all patients, embolization was performed using a coaxial catheter technique, and a long segment of the IMA adjacent distally and proximally to the source of bleeding was occluded with pushable microcoils. In one patient, additional mechanically detachable microcoils were used at the very proximal part of the IMA. Microcoil embolization of the IMA was successful in all patients, and the source of bleeding was eliminated in all patients. Conclusion: Transarterial coil embolization is a feasible and efficient method in treating acute bleeding and pseudoaneurysm of the IMA and should be considered if mediastinal hematoma or hemathorax occurs after blind puncture of the subclavian vein.

  6. Autaptic regulation of electrical activities in neuron under electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ying, Heping; Jia, Ya; Ma, Jun; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-01-01

    Realistic neurons may hold complex anatomical structure, for example, autapse connection to some internuncial neurons, which this specific synapse can connect to its body via a close loop. Continuous exchanges of charged ions across the membrane can induce complex distribution fluctuation of intracellular and extracellular charged ions of cell, and a time-varying electromagnetic field is set to modulate the membrane potential of neuron. In this paper, an autapse-modulated neuron model is presented and the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux. Bifurcation analysis and sampled time series for membrane potentials are calculated to investigate the mode transition in electrical activities and the biological function of autapse connection is discussed. Furthermore, the Gaussian white noise and electromagnetic radiation are considered on the improved neuron model, it is found appropriate setting and selection for feedback gain and time delay in autapse can suppress the bursting in neuronal behaviors. It indicates the formation of autapse can enhance the self-adaption of neuron so that appropriate response to external forcing can be selected, this biological function is helpful for encoding and signal propagation of neurons. It can be useful for investigation about collective behaviors in neuronal networks exposed to electromagnetic radiation. PMID:28240314

  7. Autaptic regulation of electrical activities in neuron under electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ying, Heping; Jia, Ya; Ma, Jun; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-02-01

    Realistic neurons may hold complex anatomical structure, for example, autapse connection to some internuncial neurons, which this specific synapse can connect to its body via a close loop. Continuous exchanges of charged ions across the membrane can induce complex distribution fluctuation of intracellular and extracellular charged ions of cell, and a time-varying electromagnetic field is set to modulate the membrane potential of neuron. In this paper, an autapse-modulated neuron model is presented and the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux. Bifurcation analysis and sampled time series for membrane potentials are calculated to investigate the mode transition in electrical activities and the biological function of autapse connection is discussed. Furthermore, the Gaussian white noise and electromagnetic radiation are considered on the improved neuron model, it is found appropriate setting and selection for feedback gain and time delay in autapse can suppress the bursting in neuronal behaviors. It indicates the formation of autapse can enhance the self-adaption of neuron so that appropriate response to external forcing can be selected, this biological function is helpful for encoding and signal propagation of neurons. It can be useful for investigation about collective behaviors in neuronal networks exposed to electromagnetic radiation.

  8. Mechanical stress activates neurites and somata of myenteric neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Kugler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The particular location of myenteric neurons, sandwiched between the 2 muscle layers of the gut, implies that their somata and neurites undergo mechanical stress during gastrointestinal motility. Existence of mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN is undoubted but many of their basic features remain to be studied. In this study, we used ultra-fast neuroimaging to record activity of primary cultured myenteric neurons of guinea pig and human intestine after von Frey hair evoked deformation of neurites and somata. Independent component analysis was applied to reconstruct neuronal morphology and follow neuronal signals. Of the cultured neurons 45% (114 out of 256, 30 guinea pigs responded to neurite probing with a burst spike frequency of 13.4 Hz. Action potentials generated at the stimulation site invaded the soma and other neurites. Mechanosensitive sites were expressed across large areas of neurites. Many mechanosensitive neurites appeared to have afferent and efferent functions as those that responded to deformation also conducted spikes coming from the soma. Mechanosensitive neurites were also activated by nicotine application. This supported the concept of multifunctional MEN. 14% of the neurons (13 out of 96, 18 guinea pigs responded to soma deformation with burst spike discharge of 17.9 Hz. Firing of MEN adapted rapidly (RAMEN, slowly (SAMEN or ultra-slowly (USAMEN. The majority of MEN showed SAMEN behavior although significantly more RAMEN occurred after neurite probing. Cultured myenteric neurons from human intestine had similar properties. Compared to MEN, dorsal root ganglion neurons were activated by neurite but not by soma deformation with slow adaptation of firing. We demonstrated that MEN exhibit specific features very likely reflecting adaptation to their specialized functions in the gut.

  9. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  10. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Dranias

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs, which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI.

  11. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranias, Mark R; Westover, M Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI.

  12. THE FIVE YEAR FERMI/GBM MAGNETAR BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazzi, A. C. [SciTec, Inc., 100 Wall Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Horst, A. J. van der; Younes, G. A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Lin, L. [François Arago Centre, APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raanana 43537 (Israel); Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Chaplin, V. L. [School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue S, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Huppenkothen, D. [Center for Data Science, New York University, 726 Broadway, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Watts, A. L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H., E-mail: acollazzi@scitec.com [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550–5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  13. Power Enhancement Cavity for Burst-Mode Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical cavity scheme and locking method that can realize the power enhancement of picosecond UV laser pulses operating at a burst mode with arbitrary burst (macropulse) lengths and repetition rates.

  14. Interaction between cellular voltage-sensitive conductance and network parameters in a model of neocortex can generate epileptiform bursting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Drongelen, W.; Lee, H. C.; Koch, H.; Elsen, F.; Carroll, M. S.; Hereld, M.; Stevens, R. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of both intrinsic neuronal membrane properties and network parameters on oscillatory activity in a model of neocortex. A scalable network model with six different cell types was built with the pGENESIS neural simulator. The neocortical network consisted of two types of pyramidal cells and four types of inhibitory interneurons. All cell types contained both fast sodium and delayed rectifier potassium channels for generation of action potentials. A subset of the pyramidal neurons contained an additional slow inactivating (persistent) sodium current (NaP). The neurons with the NaP current showed spontaneous bursting activity in the absence of external stimulation. The model also included a routine to calculate a simulated electroencephalogram (EEG) trace from the population activity. This revealed emergent network behavior which ranged from desynchronized activity to different types of seizure-like bursting patterns. At settings with weaker excitatory network effects, the propensity to generate seizure-like behavior increased. Strong excitatory network connectivity destroyed oscillatory behavior, whereas weak connectivity enhanced the relative importance of the spontaneously bursting cells. Our findings are in contradiction with the general opinion that strong excitatory synaptic and/or insufficient inhibition effects are associated with seizure initiation, but are in agreement with previously reported behavior in neocortex.

  15. Temporal characteristics of gustatory responses in rat parabrachial neurons vary by stimulus and chemosensitive neuron type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geran, Laura; Travers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN) neurons elicited by multiple applications of "sweet" (sucrose), "salty" (NaCl), "sour" (citric acid), and "bitter" (quinine and cycloheximide) stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500 ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H) afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H) compared to the later response (9.5%). Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H) in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best). Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs.

  16. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  17. Ceruloplasmin decreases respiratory burst reaction during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeeva, Elena Y; Semenova, Elena V; Sokolov, Alexey V; Aplin, Kirill D; Timofeeva, Kseniya E; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Filatov, Michael V

    2016-08-01

    Testing of pregnant women reveals weakening of neutrophil-mediated effector functions, such as reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides data confirming the phenomenon, gained through application of the flow cytometry technique. Key factors influencing neutrophil functional activity in blood plasma of pregnant women have not been detected so far. At the same time, concentration of ceruloplasmin - a copper-containing glycoprotein - is known to increase in blood significantly during pregnancy. We observed the negative correlation between ceruloplasmin concentration in blood plasma of pregnant women and the intensity of respiratory burst of neutrophils. Fractionation of plasma using gel-filtration revealed that ceruloplasmin-containing fraction demonstrated suppression of the respiratory burst reaction. Partial elimination of ceruloplasmin from the blood of pregnant women, performed with the help of specific antibodies and followed by immunoprecipitation, leads to an increased respiratory burst reaction. On the contrary, addition of ceruloplasmin to blood samples of healthy donors noticeably decreases the respiratory burst reaction. The results presented prove that change in ceruloplasmin level in plasma is necessary and sufficient for modulating the ability of neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species during pregnancy.

  18. Fast Radio Bursts: Searches, Sensitivities & Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration transient signals discovered over the past decade. Here we describe the scientific usefulness of FRBs, consider ongoing work at the Parkes telescope, and examine some relevant search sensitivity and completeness considerations. We also look ahead to the results from ongoing and future planned studies in the field.

  19. IPN localizations of Konus short gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V D; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Oleynik, P P; Ulanov, M V; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Trombka, J; McClanahan, T; Starr, R; Goldsten, J; Gold, R; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Savchenko, V; Smith, D M; Hajdas, W; Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Palmer, D; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Briggs, M S; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C; Fishman, G; Connaughton, V; Boer, M; Guidorzi, C; Frontera, F; Montanari, E; Rossi, F; Feroci, M; Amati, L; Nicastro, L; Orlandini, M; Monte, Del; Costa, E; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Pacciani, L; Rapisarda, M; Soffitta, P; Di Cocco, G; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Labanti, C; Marisaldi, M; Atteia, J -L; Vanderspek, R; Ricker, G

    2013-01-01

    Between the launch of the GGS Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 314 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 24 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the IPN consisted of up to eleven spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 276 bursts were obtained. We present the IPN localization data on these events.

  20. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  1. Video-assisted thoracoscopic implantation of a diaphragmatic pacemaker in a child with tetraplegia: indications, technique, and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Ribeiro Pinto Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a child with tetraplegia after cervical trauma, who subsequently underwent diaphragmatic pacemaker implantation. We reviewed the major indications for diaphragmatic pacing and the types of devices employed. We highlight the unequivocal benefit of diaphragmatic pacing in the social and educational reintegration of individuals with tetraplegia.

  2. Pacemaker shift in the gastric antrum of guinea-pigs produced by excitatory vagal stimulation involves intramuscular interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, G D S; Dickens, E J; Edwards, F R

    2002-06-15

    Intracellular recordings were made from isolated bundles of the circular muscle layer of guinea-pig gastric antrum and the responses produced by stimulating intrinsic nerve fibres were examined. After abolishing the effects of stimulating inhibitory nerve terminals with apamin and L-nitroarginine (NOLA), transmural nerve stimulation often evoked a small amplitude excitatory junction potential (EJP) and invariably evoked a regenerative potential. Neurally evoked regenerative potentials had similar properties to those evoked in the same bundle by direct stimulation. EJPs and neurally evoked regenerative potentials were abolished by hyoscine suggesting that both resulted from the release of acetylcholine and activation of muscarinic receptors. Neurally evoked regenerative potentials, but not EJPs, were abolished by membrane hyperpolarization, caffeine and chloride channel blockers. In the intact antrum, excitatory vagal nerve stimulation increased the frequency of slow waves. Simultaneous intracellular recordings of pacemaker potentials from myenteric interstitial cells (ICC(MY)) and slow waves showed that the onset of each pacemaker potential normally preceded the onset of each slow wave but vagal stimulation caused the onset of each slow wave to precede each pacemaker potential. Together the observations suggest that during vagal stimulation there is a change in the origin of pacemaker activity with slow waves being initiated by intramuscular interstitial cells (ICC(IM)) rather than by ICC(MY).

  3. Novel insights on effect of atrioventricular programming of biventricular pacemaker in heart failure – a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafique Asim M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echocardiography plays an integral role in the diagnosis of congestive heart failure including measurement of left heart pressure as well as mechanical dyssynchrony. Methods In this report we describe novel therapeutic uses of echo pulsed wave Doppler in atrioventricular pacemaker optimization in patients who had either not derived significant symptomatic benefit post biventricular pacemaker implantation or deteriorated after deriving initial benefit. In these patients atrioventricular optimization showed novel findings and improved cardiac output and symptoms. Results In 3 patients with Cheyne Stokes pattern of respiration echo Doppler showed worsening of mitral regurgitation during hyperpneac phase in one patient, marked E and A fusion in another patient and exaggerated ventricular interdependence in a third patient thus highlighting mechanisms of adverse effects of Cheyne Stokes respiration in patients with heart failure. All 3 patients required a very short atrioventricular delay programming for best cardiac output. In one patient with recurrent congestive heart failure post cardiac resynchronization, mitral inflow pulse wave Doppler showed no A wave until a sensed atrioventricular delay of 190 ms was reached and showed progressive improvement in mitral inflow pattern until an atrioventricular delay of 290 ms. In 2 patients atrioventricular delay as short as 50 ms was required to allow E and A separation and prevent diastolic mitral regurgitation. All patients developed marked improvement in congestive heart failure symptoms post echo-guided biv pacemaker optimization. Conclusion These findings highlight the value of echo-guided pacemaker optimization in symptomatic patients post cardiac resynchronization treatment.

  4. Subclavian Vein Stenosis/Occlusion Following Transvenous Cardiac Pacemaker and Defibrillator Implantation: Incidence, Pathophysiology and Current Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O'Leary

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Subclavian vein stenosis is a common, but usually asymptomatic, complication following cardiac device placement. In addition to reviewing the literature on incidence, pathogenesis and management options for this important clinical problem, we describe two cases of symptomatic subclavian vein occlusion following pacemaker/defibrillator placement and successful treatment with venoplasty and stenting.

  5. Persistence of left supracardinal vein in an adult patient with heart-hand syndrome and cardiac pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Jan; Heifetz, Steven

    2008-01-01

    A patient with a sporadic heart-hand syndrome, which includes thumb hypoplasia, septum primum atrial septal defect, and cleft mitral valve is described. During attempted placement of a pacemaker lead, persistence of left superior and inferior vena cava was found in addition to the right-sided caval veins. This corresponds to persistence of left-sided supracardinal vein present during fetal development.

  6. Risk of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator after radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Johansen, Jens Brock; Jensen, Maj-Britt;

    2016-01-01

    (RT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All women treated for early-stage BC in Denmark from 1982 to 2005 were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on CIED implants subsequent to RT. Standardized incidence...

  7. Coherence resonance and synchronization of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Xia; Lu Qi-Shao

    2005-01-01

    Noise effects on coherence resonance and synchronization of Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neuron model are studied. The coherence resonance of a single HR neuron with Gaussian white noise added to the membrane potential is investigated in situations before, near and after the Hopf bifurcation, separately, with the external direct current as a bifurcation parameter. It is shown that even though there is no coupling between neurons, uncoupled identical HR neurons driven by a common noise can achieve complete synchronization when the noise intensity is higher than a critical value. Furthermore, noise also enhances complete synchronization of weakly coupled neurons. It is concluded that synchronization in bursting neurons is easier to be induced than in spiking ones, and coupling enhances the sensitivity of synchronization of neurons to noise stimulus.

  8. Leading role of thalamic over cortical neurons during postinhibitory rebound excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, F.; Timofeev, I.; Steriade, M.

    1998-01-01

    The postinhibitory rebound excitation is an intrinsic property of thalamic and cortical neurons that is implicated in a variety of normal and abnormal operations of neuronal networks, such as slow or fast brain rhythms during different states of vigilance as well as seizures. We used dual simultaneous intracellular recordings of thalamocortical neurons from the ventrolateral nucleus and neurons from the motor cortex, together with thalamic and cortical field potentials, to investigate the temporal relations between thalamic and cortical events during the rebound excitation that follows prolonged periods of stimulus-induced inhibition. Invariably, the rebound spike-bursts in thalamocortical cells occurred before the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons and preceded the peak of the depth-negative, rebound field potential in cortical areas. Also, the inhibitory-rebound sequences were more pronounced and prolonged in cortical neurons when elicited by thalamic stimuli, compared with cortical stimuli. The role of thalamocortical loops in the rebound excitation of cortical neurons was shown further by the absence of rebound activity in isolated cortical slabs. However, whereas thalamocortical neurons remained hyperpolarized after rebound excitation, because of the prolonged spike-bursts in inhibitory thalamic reticular neurons, the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons was prolonged, suggesting the role of intracortical excitatory circuits in this sustained activity. The role of intrathalamic events in triggering rebound cortical activity should be taken into consideration when analyzing information processes at the cortical level; at each step, corticothalamic volleys can set into action thalamic inhibitory neurons, leading to rebound spike-bursts that are transferred back to the cortex, thus modifying cortical activities. PMID:9811903

  9. Detecting Pipe Bursts Using Heuristic and CUSUM Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Jung, D.; Vreeburg, J.; Van de Roer, M.; Lansey, K.; Rierveld, L.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst detecti

  10. Characteristics of the Cholecystokinin-Induced Depolarization of Pacemaking Activity in Cultured Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Murine Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hwa Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In this study, we studied the effects of cholecystokinin (CCK on pacemaker potentials in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs from mouse small intestine using the whole cell patch clamp technique. Methods: ICCs are pacemaker cells that exhibit periodic spontaneous depolarization, which is responsible for the production of slow waves in gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and generate periodic pacemaker potentials in current-clamp mode. Results: Exposure to CCK (100 nM-5 µM decreased the amplitudes of pacemaker potentials and depolarized resting membrane potentials. To identify the type of CCK receptors involved in ICCs, we examined the effects of CCK agonists and found that the addition of CCK1 agonist (A-71323, 1 µM depolarized resting membrane potentials, whereas exposure to CCK2 agonist (gastrin , 1 µM had no effect on pacemaker potentials. To confirm these results, we examined the effects of CCK antagonists and found that pretreatment with CCK1 antagonist (SR 27897, 1 µM blocked CCK-induced effects. However, pretreatment with CCK2 antagonist (LY 225910, 1 µM did not. Furthermore, intracellular GDPβS suppressed CCK-induced effects. To investigate the involvements of phospholipase C (PLC, protein kinase C (PKC, and protein kinase A (PKA in the effects of CCK in cultured ICCs, we used U-73122 (an active PLC inhibitor, chelerythrine (a PKC inhibitor, SQ-22536 (an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, or mPKAI (an inhibitor of myristoylated PKA. All inhibitors blocked the CCK-mediated effects on pacemaker potentials. In addition, we found that transient receptor potential classical 5 (TRPC5 channel was involved in CCK-activated currents in cultured ICCs. Conclusion: These results suggest that the CCK induced depolarization of pacemaking activity occurs in a G-protein-, PLC-, PKC-, and PKA-dependent manner via CCK1 receptor and TRPC5 channel is a candidate for CCK-activated currents in cultured ICCs in murine small intestine

  11. Campylobacter fetus infection presenting with bacteremia and cellulitis in a 72-year-old man with an implanted pacemaker: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledina Dragan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Campylobacter is an important causative agent of intestinal infections in humans. Bacteremia is detected in less than 1% of patients, mainly in immunocompromised patients and in extreme age groups. Cellulitis is a relatively common manifestation of Campylobacter infection, but concomitant bacteremia is a rare event. Infections of the pacemaker area are caused primarily by staphylococci, followed by fungi, streptococci and Gram-negative rods. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of pacemaker pocket infection and bacteremia caused by Campylobacter fetus. Case presentation A 72-year-old Croatian Caucasian man with myelodysplasia, impaired fasting glucose levels and a recently implanted permanent pacemaker was admitted to hospital after six days of fever, development of red swelling of the pacemaker pocket area and worsening of his general condition. No antibiotic therapy was introduced in the outpatient setting. He denied any recent gastrointestinal disturbances. With the exception of an elevated leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein and blood glucose levels, other laboratory findings were normal. Treatment with vancomycin plus netilmicin was introduced, and a surgical incision with drainage of the pacemaker pocket was performed. The entire pacemaker system was removed and a new one re-implanted after 14 days of antibiotic therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography showed no pathological findings. Three subsequent blood cultures obtained on admission as well as swab culture of the incised pacemaker area revealed Campylobacter fetus; stool and pacemaker lead cultures were negative. According to the microbiological results, antibiotic therapy was changed to ciprofloxacin plus netilmicin. A clinical examination and the results of a laboratory analysis performed after two weeks of therapy were within normal limits. Conclusion Myelodysplasia, impaired fasting glucose levels

  12. Brief dopaminergic stimulations produce transient physiological changes in prefrontal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Anna R; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Potapenko, Evgeniy S; Kim, Eun-Ji; Antic, Srdjan D

    2011-01-25

    In response to food reward and other pertinent events, midbrain dopaminergic neurons fire short bursts of action potentials causing a phasic release of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex (rapid and transient increases in cortical dopamine concentration). Here we apply short (2s) iontophoretic pulses of glutamate, GABA, dopamine and dopaminergic agonists locally, onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons in brain slices of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Unlike glutamate and GABA, brief dopaminergic pulses had negligible effects on the resting membrane potential. However, dopamine altered action potential firing in an extremely rapid (iontophoresis current artifact. Our present data imply that one population of PFC pyramidal neurons receiving direct synaptic contacts from midbrain dopaminergic neurons would stall during the 0.5s of the phasic dopamine burst. The spillover dopamine, on the other hand, would act as a positive stimulator of cortical excitability (30% increase) to all D2-receptor carrying pyramidal cells, for the next 40s.

  13. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; MacGibbon, J H; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Pal'shin, V D; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Ohmori, N; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Feroci, M; Frontera, F; Guidorzi, C; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; McTiernan, J

    2015-01-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the minimum distance to gamma-ray bursts using detections from widely separated spacecraft. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10^13-10^18 cm (7-10^5 AU) range, consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate for the first time lower limits ...

  14. Selective increase of in vivo firing frequencies in DA SN neurons after proteasome inhibition in the ventral midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mahalakshmi; Kern, Beatrice; Vogel, Simone; Klose, Verena; Schneider, Gaby; Roeper, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    The impairment of protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is present in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), and might play a key role in selective degeneration of vulnerable dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN). Further evidence for a causal role of dysfunctional UPS in familial PD comes from mutations in parkin, which results in a loss of function of an E3-ubiquitin-ligase. In a mouse model, genetic inactivation of an essential component of the 26S proteasome lead to widespread neuronal degeneration including DA midbrain neurons and the formation of alpha-synuclein-positive inclusion bodies, another hallmark of PD. Studies using pharmacological UPS inhibition in vivo had more mixed results, varying from extensive degeneration to no loss of DA SN neurons. However, it is currently unknown whether UPS impairment will affect the neurophysiological functions of DA midbrain neurons. To answer this question, we infused a selective proteasome inhibitor into the ventral midbrain in vivo and recorded single DA midbrain neurons 2 weeks after the proteasome challenge. We found a selective increase in the mean in vivo firing frequencies of identified DA SN neurons in anesthetized mice, while those in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were unaffected. Our results demonstrate that a single-hit UPS inhibition is sufficient to induce a stable and selective hyperexcitability phenotype in surviving DA SN neurons in vivo. This might imply that UPS dysfunction sensitizes DA SN neurons by enhancing 'stressful pacemaking'.

  15. Firing behavior and network activity of single neurons in human epileptic hypothalamic hamartoma

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    Peter N. Steinmetz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Human hypothalamic hamartomas (HH are intrinsically epileptogenic and are associated with treatment-resistant gelastic seizures. The basic cellular mechanisms responsible for seizure onset within HH are unknown. We used intra-operative microwire recordings of single neuron activity to measure the spontaneous firing rate of neurons and the degree of functional connection between neurons within the tumor.Technique: Fourteen patients underwent transventricular endoscopic resection of HH for treatment-resistant epilepsy. Prior to surgical resection, single neuron recordings from bundled microwires (total of 9 contacts were obtained from HH tissue. Spontaneous activity was recorded for two or three 5-minute epochs under steady-state general anesthesia. Off-line analysis included cluster analysis of single unit activity and probability analysis of firing relationships between pairs of neurons.Results: Altogether, 222 neurons were identified (mean 6 neurons per recording epoch. Cluster analysis of single neuron firing utilizing a mixture of Gaussians model identified two distinct populations on the basis of firing rate (median firing frequency 0.6 versus 15.0 spikes per second; p<10-5. Cluster analysis identified three populations determined by levels of burst-firing (median burst indices of 0.015, 0.18, and 0.39; p<10-15. Unbiased analysis of spontaneous single unit behavior showed that 51% of all possible neuron pairs within each recording epoch had a significant level of firing synchrony (p<10-15. The subgroup of neurons with higher median firing frequencies was more likely to demonstrate synchronous firing (p<10-7. Conclusions: HH tissue in-vivo contains neurons which fire spontaneously. The activity of single neurons is diverse but distributes into at least two electrophysiological phenoytpes. Functional linkage between single neurons suggests that HH neurons exist within local networks that may contribute to ictogenesis.

  16. Pacemaker Syndrome. Case report. Síndrome de marcapaso. Presentación de un caso.

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    Brandy Viera Valdés

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pacemaker Syndrome is a clinical entity, most frequently produced by an inadequate AV synchrony, in which the phenomenom of retrograde AV conduction plays a major role, generally in patients with a single-chamber pacemaker with a WI stimulation mode. Main symptoms are: syncope, severe blood hypotension and ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­congestive heart failure. The treatment, both prophylactic and therapeutical, would be related to the appropriate choice of stimulation mode, starting from individual analysis of each patient. We present a case of a patient with pacemaker syndrome, whose primary symptom was syncope on small physical activity, which made him unable to perform ordinary activities. The solution to the problem was substitution of single-chamber stimulation mode by a dual-chamber DDDR system, new surgery and placing of a ­­­electrode being necessary.El síndrome de marcapaso es una entidad clínica, producida de forma más frecuente por una sincronización inadecuada de la contracción auricular y ventricular, en la que juega un papel importante el fenómeno de conducción retrograda, generalmente en pacientes con un marcapaso unicameral con un modo de estimulación VVI. Sus síntomas más importantes son: síncope, hipotensión arterial severa e insuficiencia cardiaca congestiva. El tratamiento, tanto profiláctico como terapéutico, estaría relacionado con la elección adecuada del modo de estimulación, a partir del análisis individualizado de cada paciente. Se presenta el caso de un paciente con síndrome de marcapaso, cuyo síntoma fundamental era el síncope ante pequeños esfuerzos, lo cual lo incapacitaba para realizar actividades ordinarias, la solución del problema fue la sustitución del modo de estimulación monocameral VVI por un sistema bicameral DDDR, fue necesario una nueva intervención quirúrgica y colocación de un cable electrodo auricular.

  17. Brain natriuretic peptide as a predictor of heart failure in patients with permanent pacemaker

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    Jelić Vera

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP has a role in control of cardiovascular and renal functions. Objective The objective was to assess the predictive value of BNP levels for development of heart failure in patients with permanent pacemakers. Method In patients with implanted DDD pacemakers, BNP levels were measured at rest and after exercise testing, on DDD and VVI modes. There were 42 patients (25 males; 59.5%, without symptoms or signs of coronary disease or heart failure, and with normal echocardiograms. According to BNP levels, the patients were divided into three groups: with BNP levels lower than 80 pg/ml, BNP ranging from 81-150 pg/ml, and BNP levels over 151 pg/ml. Results In the first group (27 patients, BNP levels were significantly higher on VVI compared to DDD mode, both at rest and after exercise (p<0.01, with all BNP levels within normal range. In the second group (5 pts, BNP levels at rest were also significantly higher on VVI than on DDD mode, p<0.05. After exercise, these values were also higher on VVI compared to DDD mode, but without statistical significance. The third group (10 pts as a whole had higher BNP values on VVI compared to DDD mode, with no statistical significance. In patients from this group who later developed heart failure, BNP levels were found to be significantly lower on DDD as opposed to VVI mode at rest, p<0.05, and even higher significance was found after exercise, p<0.01. After 6-year follow-up, 2 out of 5 patients from the second group developed dilated cardiomyopathy, and 8/10 patients in the third group experienced heart failure with LV EF 34.1±10%, LV EDD 6.1±0.42 cm, LV ESD 4.8±0.45 cm. Five of these patients died within the follow-up period. Conclusion The increased BNP levels can be valuable for early screening of patients with higher risk of heart failure. In patients with increased BNP at the time of pacemaker implantation, DDD pacing is a modality of choice.

  18. Heart pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ... Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of ...

  19. [Neuronal network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmeier, M; Maresová, D

    2005-01-01

    Function of the central nervous system is based on mutual relations among the nerve cells. Description of nerve cells and their processes, including their contacts was enabled by improvement of optical features of the microscope and by the development of impregnation techniques. It is associated with the name of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), J. Ev. Purkyne (1787-1869), Camillo Golgi (1843-1926), and Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934). Principal units of the neuronal network are the synapses. The term synapse was introduced into neurophysiology by Charles Scott Sherrington (1857-1952). Majority of the interactions between nerve cells is mediated by neurotransmitters acting at the receptors of the postsynaptic membrane or at the autoreceptors of the presynaptic part of the synapse. Attachment of the vesicles to the presynaptic membrane and the release of the neurotransmitter into the synaptic cleft depend on the intracellular calcium concentration and on the presence of several proteins in the presynaptic element.

  20. Development of layer 1 neurons in the mouse neocortex.

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    Ma, Jian; Yao, Xing-Hua; Fu, Yinghui; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2014-10-01

    Layer 1 of the neocortex harbors a unique group of neurons that play crucial roles in synaptic integration and information processing. Although extensive studies have characterized the properties of layer 1 neurons in the mature neocortex, it remains unclear how these neurons progressively acquire their distinct morphological, neurochemical, and physiological traits. In this study, we systematically examined the dynamic development of Cajal-Retzius cells and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons in layer 1 during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Cajal-Retzius cells underwent morphological degeneration after birth and gradually disappeared from layer 1. The majority of GABAergic interneurons showed clear expression of at least 1 of the 6 distinct neurochemical markers, including Reelin, GABA-A receptor subunit delta (GABAARδ), neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calretinin, and somatostatin from postnatal day 8. Furthermore, according to firing pattern, layer 1 interneurons can be divided into 2 groups: late-spiking (LS) and burst-spiking (BS) neurons. LS neurons preferentially expressed GABAARδ, whereas BS neurons preferentially expressed VIP. Interestingly, both LS and BS neurons exhibited a rapid electrophysiological and morphological development during the first postnatal week. Our results provide new insights into the molecular, morphological, and functional developments of the neurons in layer 1 of the neocortex.